WorldWideScience

Sample records for compounds carbon monoxide

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible ...

  3. Reactions of Dicyclopentadienyltitanium(III) Compounds with Carbon Monoxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, E.J.M. de; Cate, L.C. ten; Staring, A.G.J.; Teuben, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions of Cp2TiR (R = Cl, C6F5, C6H5, o-CH3C6H4) with CO give two types of products: terminally coordinated adducts, Cp2Ti(R)CO, and insertion products, Cp2TiCOR, i.e. acyl compounds. The acyl ligand is η2-coordinated at the titanium atom. The preparations and properties of the compounds are

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, ... Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. ...

  6. Production of compound A and carbon monoxide in circle systems: an in vitro comparison of two carbon dioxide absorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struys, M M R F; Bouche, M P L A; Rolly, G; Vandevivere, Y D I; Dyzers, D; Goeteyn, W; Versichelen, L F M; Van Bocxlaer, J F P; Mortier, E P

    2004-06-01

    Two new generation carbon dioxide absorbents, DrägerSorb Free and Amsorb Plus, were studied in vitro for formation of compound A or carbon monoxide, during minimal gas flow (500 ml x min(-1)) with sevoflurane or desflurane. Compound A was assessed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and carbon monoxide with continuous infrared spectrometry. Fresh and dehydrated absorbents were studied. Mean (SD) time till exhaustion (inspiratory carbon dioxide concentration >or= 1 kPa) with fresh absorbents was longer with DrägerSorb Free (1233 (55) min) than with Amsorb Plus (1025 (55) min; p < 0.01). For both absorbents, values of compound A were < 1 ppm and therefore below clinically significant levels, but were up to 0.25 ppm higher with DrägerSorb Free than with Amsorb Plus. Using dehydrated absorbents, values of compound A were about 50% lower than with fresh absorbents and were identical for DrägerSorb Free and Amsorb Plus. With dehydrated absorbents, no detectable carbon monoxide was found with desflurane.

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  8. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Michael C.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a significant cause of illness and death. Its protean symptoms probably lead to a gross underestimation of its true incidence. Low levels of carbon monoxide aggravate chronic cardiopulmonary problems, and high levels are associated with cardiac arrhythmias and cerebral edema. Patients who survive acute poisoning are at risk of delayed neurologic sequelae. The measurement of carboxyhemoglobin levels does not reveal the tissue levels of carbon monoxide but is useful...

  9. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animals can also be poisoned by carbon monoxide. People who have pets at home may notice that their animals become ... or unresponsive from carbon monoxide exposure. Often the pets will ... these conditions. This can lead to a delay in getting help.

  10. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Kent; Smollin, Craig

    2008-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, the elderly or very young, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is conside...

  11. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Smollin, Craig; Olson, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, elderly or very young people, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is cons...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as ...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  15. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Surveillance International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  16. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces. Watch This Video View CO Safety Tips Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest ...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon ... All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center ... Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More ...

  3. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and ...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Website Feedback Connect with Us: Facebook Instagram YouTube Twitter Blog SlideShare GooglePlus Flickr Report an Unsafe Product ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips Recalls and News Questions and Answers Charcoal Portable Heaters & Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non- ... outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and ...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... left anytime CPSC.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal. Message can be left anytime Website ...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with ... Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the ...

  10. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter in buses on highways in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Der-Jen; Huang, Hsiao-Lin

    2009-12-01

    Although airborne pollutants in urban buses have been studied in many cities globally, long-distance buses running mainly on highways have not been addressed in this regard. This study investigates the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and particulate matter (PM) in the long-distance buses in Taiwan. Analytical results indicate that pollutants levels in long-distance buses are generally lower than those in urban buses. This finding is attributable to the driving speed and patterns of long-distance buses, as well as the meteorological and geographical features of the highway surroundings. The levels of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) found in bus cabins exceed the proposed indoor VOC guidelines for aromatic compounds, and are likely attributable to the interior trim in the cabins. The overall average CO level is 2.3 ppm, with higher average level on local streets (2.9 ppm) than on highways (2.2 ppm). The average CO 2 level is 1493 ppm, which is higher than the guideline for non-industrial occupied settings. The average PM level in this study is lower than those in urban buses and IAQ guidelines set by Taiwan EPA. However, the average PM 10 and PM 2.5 is higher than the level set by WHO. Besides the probable causes mentioned above, fewer passenger movements and less particle re-suspension from bus floor might also cause the lower PM levels. Measurements of particle size distribution reveal that more than 75% of particles are in submicron and smaller sizes. These particles may come from the infiltration from the outdoor air. This study concludes that air exchange rates in long-distance buses should be increased in order to reduce CO 2 levels. Future research on long-distance buses should focus on the emission of VOCs from brand new buses, and the sources of submicron particles in bus cabins.

  11. Carbon monoxide: Anticoagulant or procoagulant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2014-03-01

    Within the past decade there have been several investigations attempting to define the impact of exogenous and endogenous carbon monoxide exposure on hemostasis. Critically, two bodies of literature have emerged, with carbon monoxide mediated platelet inhibition cited as a cause of in vitro human and in vitro/in vivo rodent anticoagulation. In contrast, interaction with heme groups associated with fibrinogen, α₂-antiplasmin and plasmin by carbon monoxide has resulted in enhanced coagulation and decreased fibrinolysis in vitro in human and other species, and in vivo in rabbits. Of interest, the ultrastructure of platelet rich plasma thrombi demonstrates an abnormal increase in fine fiber formation and matting that are obtained from humans exposed to carbon monoxide. Further, thrombi obtained from humans and rabbits have very similar ultrastructures, whereas mice and rats have more fine fibers and matting present. In sum, there may be species specific differences with regard to hemostatic response to carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide may be a Janus-faced molecule, with potential to attenuate or exacerbate thrombophilic disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 29 CFR 1917.24 - Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide. 1917.24 Section 1917.24 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.24 Carbon monoxide. (a) Exposure limits. The carbon... employees shall be removed from the enclosed space if the carbon monoxide concentration exceeds a ceiling of...

  13. [Carbon monoxide intoxications in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Márcia Christel; Rodrigues, Rui Paulo; Moura, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of carbon monoxide intoxication in the World shows that this is a common situation. In Portugal, there are no concrete data available in literature and its incidence remains unknown. Currently, the use of hyperbaric oxygen is a valid therapeutic for carbon monoxide poisoning management. However, its effectiveness and its proper handling are still controversial. The first aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of carbon monoxide intoxication in Portugal and to analyze its demographic characteristics. The second objective of this work was to evaluate the possible change in the type of treatment applied in areas near de hyperbaric chamber of Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, since its opening in June 2006. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a survey on admissions data for carbon monoxide intoxication occured between January first, 2000 and December 31, 2007. These data was collected in seven hospitals and in the Administração Central do Sistema de Saúde, I.P. Nationally, 621 hospitalizations were recorded, which represents an incidence of 5,86/100000 in 8 years. In the seven hospitals, there were 93 hospitalizations due to carbon monoxide intoxication during the same period of time. There was a peak of incidence during winter, between November and March and there was a similar distribution in men (47,3%) and women (52,7%). Since June 2006, date of opening of the hyperbaric chamber, the Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, E.P.E. recorded a sharp increase in the number of hospitalization for carbon monoxide intoxication. The number of admissions in the 19 months after the chamber opening was double the number of all cases occurred in that institution in the 65 months prior. We concluded that, in Portugal, carbon monoxide intoxication is an uncommon situation but it´s still an important cause of hospitalization. The referral of cases to the Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, E.P.E. since the opening of hyperbaric chamber

  14. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  15. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  16. Open air carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbelic, M I

    1998-01-01

    An unusual manner of carbon monoxide poisoning claimed the lives of two adults in two separate incidents. In the first case, a young man was four wheeling in a swampy area when his jeep became stuck in the mud as he continued to floor the accelerator. Carbon monoxide fumes entered the vehicle through the rusted floorboards, killing the driver. In the second case, two teens were skinny dipping behind a motor boat when they became affected by the boat exhaust. One of the youths was overcome and submerged into the lake. Both incidents were initially attributed to incorrect causes--a car accident and a drowning--because of the false notion that carbon monoxide is not a hazard in a ventilated area. The carboxyhemoglobin levels in these victims were 78 and 62% respectively. It was only through laboratory testing that carbon monoxide poisoning was identified as the cause of their demise. Physicians as well as the public need to be aware of the potential for this life threatening hazard to occur so that there can be proper emergency treatment and the prevention of fatalities.

  17. Carbon monoxide and the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robkin, M A

    1997-04-01

    Mammals are homeotherms and expend considerable energy maintaining their body temperatures. The temperature of a mammalian embryo on the other hand is maintained by the mother and the embryo can devote its metabolic energy to growth and development. The mammalian embryo is acting as a poikilotherm and its energy needs are thus considerably less than if it were a comparably sized homeotherm. The energy requirements of the preimplantation rat embryo are generated by anaerobic metabolism. As it grows, aerobic metabolism develops. In culture, the addition of carbon monoxide to the perfusing gas for early rat embryos has a much smaller effect than decreasing the oxygen concentration. Carbon monoxide appears to be a relatively mild toxicant until the embryo is much larger, is depending much more on transport of oxygen by red blood cells, and the fraction of required metabolic energy produced by anaerobic metabolism has become quite small. The effect from smoking during gestation may be either by the concomitant reduction in food intake or a more direct toxic effect from some components in the smoke. Carbon monoxide does not seem to be the culprit. The possible mitigating effect of a compensatory increase in fetal hematocrit in response to any hypoxia must also be considered. Humans have no yolk sac placenta as rodents do, but if the switch from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism is correlated with the stage of development, then carbon monoxide exposure should not represent any significant risk to the human embryo until later in gestation.

  18. 40 CFR 52.1581 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52... strategy: Carbon monoxide. (a) Approval—The September 28, 1995 revision to the carbon monoxide state... Quality Standard for carbon monoxide through the year 2007. (b) The base year carbon monoxide emission...

  19. NAMMA CARBON MONOXIDE BY ATTENUATED LASER TRANSMISSION (COBALT) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Carbon mOnoxide By Attenuated Laser Transmission (COBALT) dataset includes measurements of the carbon monoxide mixing ratio and derived carbon monoxide...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Exposure During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Perry; Guo, Xiaoyue M; Stiller, Robert J; Laifer, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the leading cause of poisoning in the United States and is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality rates. Given the nonspecific signs and symptoms of toxicity, cases may go unsuspected or attributed to other etiologies. As CO adversely affects both mother and fetus, it is important for practitioners to recognize and treat poisoning in a timely manner. We seek to assist practitioners with understanding the physiology and recognizing the presentations of both acute and chronic CO poisoning, as well as provide information on diagnosis and treatment options. We also conducted a review of cases described in the literature during the past half century to show varying presentations and treatment methodologies. A qualitative literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published between 1970 and 2014 that assessed cases of CO poisoning during pregnancy. Excluded studies were not in English or contained nonhuman subjects. Nineteen published reports of CO poisoning during pregnancy described in varying levels of detail were found in the literature from 1971 to 2010. Carbon monoxide poisoning requires a high degree of suspicion. Diagnosis is made based on initial history and physical evaluation and assessment of environmental CO levels; presenting carboxyhemoglobin levels may be poor indicators of severity of disease. Oxygen therapy should be initiated promptly in all possible cases with consideration of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in cases of significant maternal exposure. Treatment requires a longer duration for fetal CO elimination than in the nonpregnant patients. Importantly, practitioners should educate pregnant patients on prevention.

  1. Polymer-Based Carbon Monoxide Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, M. L.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Kisor, A. K.; Lara, L. M.; Yen, S.-P. S.; Ryan, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-based sensors have been used primarily to detect volatile organics and inorganics; they are not usually used for smaller, gas phase molecules. We report the development and use of two types of polymer-based sensors for the detection of carbon monoxide. Further understanding of the experimental results is also obtained by performing molecular modeling studies to investigate the polymer-carbon monoxide interactions. The first type is a carbon-black-polymer composite that is comprised of a non-conducting polymer base that has been impregnated with carbon black to make it conducting. These chemiresistor sensors show good response to carbon monoxide but do not have a long lifetime. The second type of sensor has a non-conducting polymer base but includes both a porphyrin-functionalized polypyrrole and carbon black. These sensors show good, repeatable and reversible response to carbon monoxide at room temperature.

  2. 40 CFR 52.376 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... area, the New Haven/Meriden/Waterbury carbon monoxide nonattainment area, and the Connecticut Portion... submitted a request to redesignate the New Haven/Meriden/Waterbury carbon monoxide nonattainment area to... Connecticut carbon monoxide attainment area, the New Haven-Meriden-Waterbury Connecticut carbon monoxide...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1237 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52... strategy: Carbon monoxide. (a) The base year carbon monoxide emission inventory requirement of section 187... Metropolitan Area and Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Area. (b) Approval—The 1993 carbon monoxide periodic...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2353 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52...: Carbon monoxide. Determination. EPA has determined that the Provo carbon monoxide “moderate” nonattainment area attained the carbon monoxide national ambient air quality standard by December 31, 1995. This...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1682 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52...: Carbon monoxide. (a) Approval—The November 13, 1992 revision to the carbon monoxide state implementation... attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for carbon monoxide through the year 2003. (b...

  6. Protect Yourself from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-20

    Learn about carbon monoxide - a colorless, odorless gas - and how to protect yourself and your family.  Created: 11/20/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 12/4/2007.

  7. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  8. Carbon monoxide poisoning in a diver.

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, H

    1992-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a well recognized, but uncommon hazard of sport and inshore diving, which occurs either as a result of a faulty air compressor or from air contamination by the exhaust of nearby petrol engines. The incidence of carbon monoxide poisoning may be under-reported as it may mimic decompression sickness, and respond to the same treatment i.e. hyperbaric oxygen.

  9. Therapeutic Applications of Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauert, Melissa; Vangala, Sandeep; Haslip, Maria; Lee, Patty J.

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a regulated enzyme induced in multiple stress states. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of HO catalysis of heme. In many circumstances, CO appears to functionally replace HO-1, and CO is known to have endogenous anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and antiproliferative effects. CO is well studied in anoxia-reoxygenation and ischemia-reperfusion models and has advanced to phase II trials for treatment of several clinical entities. In alternative injury models, laboratories have used sepsis, acute lung injury, and systemic inflammatory challenges to assess the ability of CO to rescue cells, organs, and organisms. Hopefully, the research supporting the protective effects of CO in animal models will translate into therapeutic benefits for patients. Preclinical studies of CO are now moving towards more complex damage models that reflect polymicrobial sepsis or two-step injuries, such as sepsis complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. Furthermore, co-treatment and post-treatment with CO are being explored in which the insult occurs before there is an opportunity to intervene therapeutically. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential therapeutic implications of CO with a focus on lung injury and sepsis-related models. PMID:24648866

  10. 40 CFR 52.349 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52... monoxide. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, Carbon Monoxide Redesignation Request... of the carbon monoxide (CO) portion of the Colorado State Implementation Plan (SIP). The revision to...

  11. 40 CFR 90.317 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... analyzer to optimize performance on the most sensitive range to be used. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide... monoxide analyzer. (1) Adjust the analyzer to optimize performance. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration...

  12. Determination of carbon monoxide in industrial exhalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepsi, P.; Skalicka, B.

    1976-01-01

    The proposed method for the determination of carbon monoxide can replace infrared spectrometry and gas chromatography provided that discontinual measurements are concerned at the complete elimination of interfering components. The principle of this carbon monoxide determination is based on oxidation with the Schuetz agent. Carbon dioxide formed by oxidation is determined by titration or gravimetrically in accordance with the concentration of carbon monoxide in the original sample. Samples are pumped into rubber bags of at least 51 volume and analyzed within 4 hours after sampling. At a presumed concentration of CO in the range 0.05 to 1 percent vol., after oxidation with the Schuetz agent and after absorption in 0.05 N barium hydroxide, the concentration of CO was determined by titration with 0.05 N HCL. CO in a gas mixture for concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 15.0 percent vol. was determined gravimetrically after oxidation of CO to carbon dioxide.

  13. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  14. Cost effectiveness of residential carbon monoxide alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2017-01-01

    While residential carbon monoxide (CO) alarms are now required in a majority of states, the cost effectiveness of the devices is unknown. This analysis was performed to determine the degree of prevention efficacy necessary from home carbon monoxide alarms for their expense to be cost-effective. Data regarding numbers of individuals affected in the United States annually from accidental, non-fire, residential non-fatal and fatal carbon monoxide poisoning were obtained from published literature. Federal governmental estimates of societal costs associated with medical care, lost wages and earnings, value of pain and suffering, and value of a statistical life were applied. The cost of uniform residential carbon monoxide alarm installation was compared to those societal costs in order to calculate what degree of efficiency makes alarms cost-effective. Societal costs for accidental, non-fire, residential CO poisoning are approximately $3.47 billion annually. With an estimated cost of $348 million annually for alarms, prevention of greater than 10% of residential CO poisoning costs must be achieved in order for alarms to be cost-effective. While the true effectiveness of residential carbon monoxide alarms has yet to be determined, current state legislation requiring residential installation of CO alarms is probably cost-effective. .

  15. 40 CFR 52.1887 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52...: Carbon monoxide. (a) Part D—Approval—The following portions of the Ohio plan are approved: (1) The carbon...) The carbon monoxide attainment and reasonable further progress demonstrations for the following urban...

  16. 40 CFR 89.320 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each used... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.320 Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the NDIR carbon...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Hazards from Small Gasoline Powered Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH CARBON MONOXIDE Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page Recommendations NIOSH Publications Worker Notification Program Carbon Monoxide Hazards from Small Gasoline Powered Engines Many people ...

  18. [Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  19. CPSC Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning with Camping Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hazard with Camping Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warns ... about the carbon monoxide (CO) hazard with camping equipment. CO can kill you! From 2002–2006, CPSC ...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1312 - Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers. 177.1312... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1312 Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers. The ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1185 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52...: Carbon monoxide. (a) Approval—On November 24, 1994, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a revision to the carbon monoxide State Implementation Plan. The submittal pertained to a plan for...

  2. 75 FR 4815 - Integrated Science Assessment for Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... AGENCY Integrated Science Assessment for Carbon Monoxide AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... availability of a final document titled, ``Integrated Science Assessment for Carbon Monoxide'' (EPA/600/R-09... standards (NAAQS) for carbon monoxide. DATES: The document will be available on January 29, 2010. ADDRESSES...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1132 - Control strategy: Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon Monoxide. 52... strategy: Carbon Monoxide. (a) Approval—On November 13, 1992, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection submitted a revision to the carbon monoxide State Implementation Plan for the 1990 base year...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2089 - Control strategy: carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: carbon monoxide. 52... strategy: carbon monoxide. (a) Approval—On September 22, 2008, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental... Island has committed to year round carbon monoxide monitoring at the East Providence Photochemical...

  5. 40 CFR 60.103 - Standard for carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for carbon monoxide. 60.103... Refineries § 60.103 Standard for carbon monoxide. Each owner or operator of any fluid catalytic cracking unit... regenerator any gases that contain carbon monoxide (CO) in excess of 500 ppm by volume (dry basis). ...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1373 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52...: Carbon monoxide. (a) On July 8, 1997, the Governor of Montana submitted revisions to the SIP narrative for the Missoula carbon monoxide control plan. (b) Revisions to the Montana State Implementation Plan...

  7. 40 CFR 60.263 - Standard for carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for carbon monoxide. 60.263... Production Facilities § 60.263 Standard for carbon monoxide. (a) On and after the date on which the... furnace any gases which contain, on a dry basis, 20 or greater volume percent of carbon monoxide...

  8. Carbon Monoxide as Indoor Pollutant in Kano Metropolis | Ayodele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The level of carbon monoxide concentrations in three different residential areas of Kano municipality has been determined. Health effects of carbon monoxide are not only determined by its pollution level, but the time spent breathing polluted air. Samples of carbon monoxide gas in three different residential districts within ...

  9. 40 CFR 52.785 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52... for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for carbon monoxide in the Metropolitan... Environmental Management submitted carbon monoxide maintenance plans for those portions of Lake and Marion...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1528 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52... strategy: Carbon monoxide. (a) Approval—On February 1, 1999, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental... program for carbon monoxide that ceased operating on January 1, 1995. The Nashua Inspection/Maintenance...

  11. 40 CFR 91.317 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to optimize performance on the most sensitive range to be used. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer... optimize performance. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either purified synthetic air or zero... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration...

  12. 40 CFR 86.122-78 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sensitive range to be used. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade... calibrated. (1) Adjust the analyzer to optimize performance. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1322-84 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be used. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3... calibrated. (1) Adjust the analyzer to optimize performance. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration...

  14. 40 CFR 86.522-78 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... performance on the most sensitive range. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero grade air or... carbon monoxide analyzer shall be calibrated. (1) Adjust the analyzer to optimize performance. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero grade air or zero grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each...

  15. Assessment of carbon monoxide values in smokers: a comparison of carbon monoxide in expired air and carboxyhaemoglobin in arterial blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Mette F; Møller, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Smoking increases perioperative complications. Carbon monoxide concentrations can estimate patients' smoking status and might be relevant in preoperative risk assessment. In smokers, we compared measurements of carbon monoxide in expired air (COexp) with measurements of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb...

  16. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker a...

  17. Diffusion of carbon monoxide (1); eicosane (2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) carbon monoxide; (2) eicosane

  18. Carbon Monoxide, A Bibliography With Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anna Grossman

    Included is a review of the carbon monoxide related literature published from 1880 to 1966. The 983 references with abstracts are grouped into these broad categories: Analysis, Biological Effects, Blood Chemistry, Control, Criteria and Standards, Instruments and Techniques, Sampling and Network Operations, and Sources. The Biological Effects group…

  19. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  20. Carbon monoxide contributes to hypotension-induced cerebrovascular vasodilation in piglets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alie Kanu; John Whitfield; Charles W. Leffler

    2006-01-01

    The gaseous compound carbon monoxide (CO) has been identified as an important endogenous biological messenger in brain and is a major component in regulation of cerebrovascular circulation in newborns...

  1. VITREOUS HEMORRHAGE FROM CARBON MONOXIDE RETINOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Moran; Hall, Jason P; Guerami, Amir

    2016-01-01

    To report the observation of a case of carbon monoxide poisoning in a 5-year-old child causing significant vision loss, retinal hemorrhages, and bilateral vitreous hemorrhage. A 5-year-old male patient underwent ophthalmologic examination including indirect ophthalmoscopy with a 20D lens, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and bilateral 25 gauge pars plana vitrectomies. The patient did not fix and follow, but did blink in response to bright light. Pupils were reactive without afferent pupillary defect. Anterior examination was unremarkable and intraocular pressures were normal. Dilated funduscopic examination showed diffuse white, fluffy appearing vitreous haze bilaterally overlying the macula with scattered retinal hemorrhages and Roth spots throughout both retinas. The patient subsequently underwent 25 gauge pars plana vitrectomies in each eye, and findings during surgery were suggestive of vitreous hemorrhage in both eyes. Vitreous biopsy did not reveal any infectious or inflammatory cells. This is the second case of carbon monoxide poisoning causing vitreous changes. Given our findings, along with retinal hemorrhages, disk edema, retinal vein tortuosity, and internal limiting membrane hemorrhages, vitreous hemorrhage can be included as a manifestation of carbon monoxide retinopathy.

  2. 40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide... Test Procedures § 86.316-79 Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers. (b...

  3. The chemistry of subcritical water reactions of a hardwood derived lignin and lignin model compounds with nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Bembenic, Meredith A.

    collected solids from the CO reactions appeared to be the most reacted (i.e., the most changed from the unreacted lignin) according to solid state 13C-NMR analysis, and the widest variety of products (methoxy-substituted phenolic compounds) were obtained when using CO according to GC/MS analysis. Therefore, reactions with CO were completed that varied the initial reaction pressure (300, 500 and 800 psi) in order to elucidate the effects of CO pressure. Similar conversion (≈54--58%) and DCM-soluble liquid product yields (≈53--62%) were obtained for the different pressure reactions, but the reactions with an initial pressure of 500 psi had the greatest change in aromaticity from the unreacted lignin. Additional reactions between Organosolv lignin and H2O with CO (initial pressure of 500 psi) were conducted where the reaction time was varied (15, 30 and 60 min.) to determine the effect of reaction time. Longer reaction time (60 min.) appeared to inhibit conversion to low molecular weight compounds (i.e., conversion and DCM-soluble yields were lower at ≈53% and ≈28%, respectively). Solid state 13C-NMR of collected residues also showed that there are losses in carbons representative of both guaiacyl and syringyl components as reaction time increases, which may indicate that methoxy groups are being cleaved or the products are reacting with each other (i.e., repolymerization) to form high molecular weight compounds as reaction time is increased. The role of H2O and the gases during the baseline reactions and the expanded CO reactions is not intuitive based on the results, so reactions with lignin model compounds (i.e., aromatic aldehydes represented by vanillin and syringaldehyde, aromatic ketones represented by acetovanillone and acetosyringone, and aromatic ethers represented by dibenzyl ether and 2-phenethyl phenyl ether) were completed to study this. From these results, the suggested reaction pathway of Organosolv lignin reactions in subcritical H2O with and without

  4. Spatial variation of volatile organic compounds and carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed variations of ambient volatile organic compounds and carbon monoxide (CO) levels in Blantyre City, Malawi. Volatile organic compounds and carbon monoxide measurement was done using the Multi-Gas Monitor between August and December, 2010. Rapid urbanization and lack of standard ...

  5. 40 CFR 52.729 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52..., Illinois be granted a carbon monoxide (CO) state implementation plan (SIP) revision with specified... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.729 Control strategy: Carbon...

  6. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen for carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Nick A; Juurlink, David N; Isbister, Geoff; Bennett, Michael H; Lavonas, Eric J

    2011-04-13

    Poisoning with carbon monoxide (CO) remains an important cause of accidental and intentional injury worldwide. Several unblinded non-randomized trials have suggested that the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) prevents the development of neurological sequelae. This has led to the widespread use of HBO in the management of patients with carbon monoxide poisoning. To examine randomised trials of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) compared to normobaric oxygen (NBO) for the prevention of neurologic sequelae in patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. We searched the following electronic databases; Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (searched June 2010), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 2), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) 1950 to June 2010, EMBASE (Ovid SP) 1980 to June 2010, ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) 1970 to June 2010, ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S) 1990 to June 2010. All randomised controlled trials of HBO compared to NBO, involving non-pregnant adults who are acutely poisoned with carbon monoxide (regardless of severity). Two authors independently extracted from each trial information on: the number of randomised patients, types of participants, the dose and duration of the intervention, and the prevalence of neurologic symptoms at follow-up. Seven randomised controlled trials of varying quality were identified; one was excluded because it did not evaluate clinical outcomes. Of the six remaining trials involving 1361 participants, two found a beneficial effect of HBO for the reduction of neurologic sequelae at one month, while four others did not. One of these is an incomplete publication (an abstract of an interim analysis). Although pooled random effects meta-analysis does not suggest a significant benefit from HBOT (OR for neurological deficits 0.78, 95%CI 0.54 to 1.12), significant methodologic and statistical heterogeneity was

  8. Carbon Monoxide Exposure in Youth Ice Hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnow, Theodore; Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P

    2017-11-01

    To examine the effect of ice resurfacer type on carboxyhemoglobin levels in youth hockey players. We hypothesized that players in arenas with electric resurfacers would have normal, stable carboxyhemoglobin levels during games, whereas those in arenas with internal combustion engine (IC) resurfacers would have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin levels. Prospective cohort study. Enclosed ice arenas in the northeastern United States. Convenience sample of players aged 8 to 18 years old in 16 games at different arenas. Eight arenas (37 players) used an IC ice resurfacer and 8 arenas (36 players) an electric resurfacer. Carboxyhemoglobin levels (SpCO) were measured using a pulse CO-oximeter before and after the game. Arena air was tested for carbon monoxide (CO) using a metered gas detector. Players completed symptom questionnaires. The change in SpCO from pregame to postgame was compared between players at arenas with electric versus IC resurfacers. Carbon monoxide was present at 6 of 8 arenas using IC resurfacers, levels ranged from 4 to 42 parts per million. Carbon monoxide was not found at arenas with electric resurfacers. Players at arenas with IC resurfacers had higher median pregame SpCO levels compared with those at electric arenas (4.3% vs 1%, P electric group (2.8% vs 1%, P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in symptom scores. Players at arenas operating IC resurfacers had significantly higher SpCO levels. Youth hockey players in arenas with IC resurfacers have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin during games and have elevated baseline carboxyhemoglobin levels compared with players at arenas with electric resurfacers. Electric resurfacers decrease the risk of CO exposure.

  9. [Carbon monoxide poisoning by a heating system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Eric; Gehl, Axel; Friedrich, Peter; Kappus, Stefan; Petter, Franz; Maurer, Klaus; Püschel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    A case of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning in several occupants of two neighboring residential buildings in Hamburg-Harburg (Germany) caused by a defective gas central heating system is described. Because of leaks in one of the residential buildings and the directly adjacent wall of the neighboring house, the gas could spread and accumulated in both residential buildings, which resulted in a highly dangerous situation. Exposure to the toxic gas caused mild to severe intoxication in 15 persons. Three victims died still at the site of the accident. Measures to protect the occupants were taken only with a great delay. As symptoms were unspecific, it was not realized that the various alarms given by persons involved in the accident were related to the same cause. In order to take appropriate measures in time it is indispensible to recognize, assess and check potential risks, which can be done by using carbon monoxide warning devices and performing immediate COHb measurements with special pulse oximeters on site. Moreover, the COHb content in the blood should be routinely determined in all patients admitted to an emergency department with unspecific symptoms.

  10. Fatal carbon monoxide intoxication after acetylene gas welding of pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Christensson, Bengt; Berge, Johan; Sjögren, Bengt

    2013-06-01

    Acetylene gas welding of district heating pipes can result in exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide. A fatal case due to intoxication is described. Measurements of carbon monoxide revealed high levels when gas welding a pipe with closed ends. This fatality and these measurements highlight a new hazard, which must be promptly prevented.

  11. 40 CFR 52.1179 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52.1179 Section 52.1179 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...: Carbon monoxide. (a) Approval—On March 18, 1999, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality...

  12. 40 CFR 52.1340 - Control strategy: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. 52.1340 Section 52.1340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...: Carbon monoxide. Approval—A maintenance plan and redesignation request for the St. Louis, Missouri, area...

  13. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, I. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single breath diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is measure for gas uptake by the lung, and consists of a membrane and a vascular component. Nitric oxide (NO) binds 400 times faster to hemoglobin than carbon monoxide, thus the uptake of NO by the blood is very large.

  14. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  15. Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.; Wiens, R.D. (St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (United States))

    1992-09-01

    The impact of low-level carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency in patients with ischemic heart disease has not been thoroughly studied. The issue is of concern because of the potential proarrhythmic effect of carbon monoxide in patients with ischemic heart disease. We studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. By using appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria, subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study to determine the effects of carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency at rest, during exercise, and during ambulatory activities. The carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. The carbon monoxide exposure protocol produced target levels in 60 minutes, and the levels were maintained for an additional 90 minutes to provide adequate time to assess the impact of carbon monoxide on the frequency of ventricular ectopic beats. The data on total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were analyzed for seven specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide or air exposure; (3) during a two-hour rest period; (4) during an exercise period; (5) during an exercise recovery period; (6) six hours after carbon monoxide or air exposure; and (7) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity.

  16. Inverse modeling of carbon monoxide fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghiemstra, Pim; Krol, Maarten

    2010-05-01

    An inverse modeling framework is used to estimate global emissions of carbon monoxide (CO). In particular, we intend to estimate the magnitude and variability of biomass burning CO emissions because the source strength of these emissions is highly uncertain, and the interannual variability is large. Observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA/CMDL) surface network are assimilated using a four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system with the transport model TM5 and its adjoint for 2 years. The biomass burning emissions in the model are not released in the lowest layer of the model, but a vertical distribution is applied and 40% of the emissions is released above 1000 m. The optimized emissions are validated with a separate set of surface station data and the new version 4 product of the satellite instrument MOPITT. A sensitivity test will be presented in which the biomass burning emissions are released in the surface layer.

  17. Reduction of carbon monoxide. Past research summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrock, R.R.

    1981-10-01

    Research programs for the year on the preparation, characterization, and reactions of binuclear tantalum complexes are described. All evidence to date suggest the following of these dimeric molecules: (1) the dimer does not break into monomers under mild conditions; (2) intermolecular hydride exchange is not negligible, but it is slow; (3) intermolecular non-ionic halide exchange is fast; (4) the ends of the dimers can rotate partially with respect to one another. The binuclear tantalum hydride complexes were found to react with carbon monoxide to give a molecule which is the only example of reduction of CO by a transition metal hydride to give a complex containing a CHO ligand. Isonitrides also reacted in a similar manner with dimeric tantalum hydride. (ATT)

  18. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquid. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  19. Suicidal asphyxiation by carbon monoxide within a polythene bag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Rajanikanta; Behera, C; Kishore, Shyam; Krishna, Karthik; Gupta, S K

    2017-03-01

    Suicide by inhalation of carbon monoxide is not uncommon and usually involves car exhausts or burning charcoal or defective boilers. We report a case of a 25-year-old man, who committed suicide by inhaling carbon monoxide gas inside a polythene bag in a bathroom. The open carbon monoxide cylinder found inside the polythene bag was purchased online by the deceased a few days earlier. He had stated that the gas would be used for his experiment on the environment. A suicide note recovered from his trouser pocket revealed his intention for a painless death.

  20. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H. [Gaziantep University, Gaziantep (Turkey). School of Medicine

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  1. Carbon monoxide poisoning in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaabi, Juma M; Wheatley, Andrew D; Barss, Peter; Al Shamsi, Mariam; Lababidi, Anis; Mushtaq, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is rare in the Arabian Peninsula and occurs almost exclusively during the winter months. Knowledge and perception of the hazards of carbon monoxide is limited. Migrant workers from warm climates appear particularly at risk. We investigated 46 cases of carbon monoxide poisoning presenting at emergency departments from 2007-2009 of the two main hospitals in Al Ain city, United Arab Emirates. Interviews, hospital records, and administered questionnaires were used to collect the data. Among the 46 cases investigated, 24 (52%) were males. Foreign nationals compromised 80% of the cases and the incidence was 3.1 cases per 100,000 residents per year. Burning charcoal in poorly ventilated residences was the predominant source of the carbon monoxide poisoning. Almost all cases (98%) were admitted during the winter months, most in the early morning hours. Carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) was significantly increased in cases with loss of consciousness and depressed consciousness. There were no reported fatalities.

  2. Carbon monoxide inhalation induces headache in a human headache model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced signalling molecule that has a role in nociceptive processing and cerebral vasodilatation. We hypothesized that inhalation of CO would induce headache and vasodilation of cephalic and extracephalic arteries. Methods In a randomized...

  3. Design and Synthesis of 11C-Labelled Compound Libraries for the Molecular Imaging of EGFr, VEGFr-2, AT{sub 1} and AT{sub 2} Receptors: Transition-Metal Mediated Carbonylations Using [11C]Carbon Monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaberg, Ola

    2009-04-15

    This work deals with radiochemistry and new approaches to develop novel PET tracers labelled with the radionuclide 11C. Two methods for the synthesis of 11C-labelled acrylamides have been explored. First, [1-11C]-acrylic acid was obtained from a palladium(0)-mediated 11C-carboxylation of acetylene with [11C]carbon monoxide; this could be converted to the corresponding acyl chloride and then combined with benzylamine to form N-benzyl[carbonyl-11C]acrylamide. In the second method, the palladium(0)-mediated carbonylation of vinyl halides with [11C]carbon monoxide was explored. This latter method, yielded labelled acrylamides in a single step with retention of configuration at the C=C double bond, and required less amine compared to the acetylene method. The vinyl halide method was used to synthesize a library of 11C-labelled EGFr-inhibitors in 7-61% decay corrected radiochemical yield via a combinatorial approach. The compounds were designed to target either the active or the inactive form of EGFr, following computational docking studies. The rhodium(I)-mediated carbonylative cross-coupling of an azide and an amine was shown to be a very general reaction and was used to synthesize a library of dual VEGFr-2/PDGFrbeta inhibitors that were 11C-labelled at the urea position in 38-78% dc rcy. The angiotensin II AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist eprosartan was 11C-labelled at one of the carboxyl groups in one step using a palladium(0)-mediated carboxylation. Autoradiography shows specific binding in rat kidney, lung and adrenal cortex, and organ distribution shows a high accumulation in the intestines, kidneys and liver. Specific binding in frozen sections of human adrenal incidentalomas warrants further investigations of this tracer. Three angiotensin II AT{sub 2} ligands were 11C-labelled at the amide group in a palladium(0)-mediated aminocarbonylation in 16-36% dc rcy. One of the compounds was evaluated using in vitro using autoradiography, and in vivo using organ

  4. Carbon Monoxide | Air Quality Planning Unit | Ground-level ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas that can increase the severity of lung ailments, cause dizziness, fatigue, nausea, and even death. EPA has defined the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) for carbon monoxide as nine parts per million averaged over an eight-hour period, and this threshold cannot be exceeded more than once a year or an area would be violating the standard.

  5. Deaths from unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning and potential for prevention with carbon monoxide detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S S; Macdonald, S C; Parrish, R G

    1998-03-04

    Unintentional carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning causes approximately 2100 deaths in the United States per year, but the use of CO detectors could potentially prevent many of these deaths. To describe the epidemiology of potentially preventable unintentional CO poisoning deaths in New Mexico. Descriptive analysis. A total of 136 deaths from CO poisoning investigated by the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator, 1980 through 1995. Characteristics of deaths from CO poisoning; estimates of the number of deaths potentially preventable with CO detectors. Of 136 people whose deaths were classified as "unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning, not fire related," 49 (36%) most likely were asleep when poisoned. Thirty-nine (49%) of 80 people whose deaths were identified as "residential fatalities" most likely were asleep vs 10 (18%) of 56 of those whose deaths were identified as occurring in or around motor vehicles. A blood-alcohol level greater than 0.01% was present in 56 (42%) of the decedents. Among decedents who had a negative blood-alcohol level (52 in residences and 26 in vehicles), an electronic audible CO detector may have prevented CO poisoning; whereas, among those who had a negative blood-alcohol level and most likely were awake at the time of CO exposure (28 in residences and 23 in vehicles), an electronic detector or a nonaudible, chemical reagent type detector may have prevented CO poisoning. Differences exist between deaths due to unintentional CO poisoning that occur in residences and those that occur in or around motor vehicles. Carbon monoxide detectors, whether the electronic or chemical reagent types, may have prevented approximately half of these deaths. The high proportion of decedents with alcohol in their blood indicates that effective public health campaigns must address the role of alcohol in CO poisoning deaths.

  6. Carbon monoxide. Toxic gas and fuel for anaerobes and aerobes: carbon monoxide dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Fesseler, Jochen; Goetzl, Sebastian; Dobbek, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) pollutes the atmosphere and is toxic for respiring organisms including man. But CO is also an energy and carbon source for phylogenetically diverse microbes living under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Use of CO as metabolic fuel for microbes relies on enzymes like carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) and acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS), which catalyze conversions resembling processes that eventually initiated the dawn of life.CODHs catalyze the (reversible) oxidation of CO with water to CO2 and come in two different flavors with unprecedented active site architectures. Aerobic bacteria employ a Cu- and Mo-containing CODH in which Cu activates CO and Mo activates water and takes up the two electrons generated in the reaction. Anaerobic bacteria and archaea use a Ni- and Fe-containing CODH, where Ni activates CO and Fe provides the nucleophilic water. Ni- and Fe-containing CODHs are frequently associated with ACS, where the CODH component reduces CO2 to CO and ACS condenses CO with a methyl group and CoA to acetyl-CoA.Our current state of knowledge on how the three enzymes catalyze these reactions will be summarized and the different strategies of CODHs to achieve the same task within different active site architectures compared.

  7. Copeptin levels in carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irem, Güler; Çevik, Yunsur; Keskin, Ahmet Turgut; Emektar, Emine; Demirci, Osman Lütfi; Şafak, Tuba; Çikrikçi Işik, Gülşah; Akin, Kadir Okhan

    2017-04-18

    The aim of this study is to identify the copeptin levels in patients presenting with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to the emergency department and to investigate its correlation with the neurological effects. The study group consisted of patients presenting with CO poisoning and carboxyhemoglobin levels >10%. Blood samples for copeptin levels were obtained twice, first at presentation then at the fourth hour of observation. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16 for Windows. The median copeptin levels of the patient group were identified as 0.63 (0.39-1.06) ng/mL at hour 0 and 0.41 (0.31-0.49) at hour 4. The copeptin levels of the control group were 0.34 (0.25-0.42) ng/mL and were significantly lower than those of the patient group (P copeptin level as the best cut-off level may be used with sensitivity of 94.0% and specificity of 60%. The copeptin levels at hour 0 were statistically significantly higher in the neurologically affected patients than those not affected (P copeptin levels increase in patients presenting to the emergency department with CO poisoning.

  8. Myth busting in carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2016-02-01

    The evidence supporting many beliefs in medicine is based upon opinion, personal experience, hearsay, or "common knowledge." When one searches for the data supporting oft-quoted facts in medicine, they are sometimes found to be old, incorrect, or nonexistent. Such unsupported facts or beliefs can be termed myths. This minireview will summarize 4 examples of "myth busting" by the author when he has discovered widely held beliefs regarding carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to be untrue during a 25-year career of research in the field. These include the mistaken beliefs that (1) symptoms correlate with presenting blood carboxyhemoglobin levels, (2) residents are safe from CO poisoning if their home does not contain fuel-burning appliances, (3) carboxyhemoglobin levels must be measured rapidly and on arterial blood, and (4) CO poisoning predisposes to premature long-term death from cardiac disease. In addition to providing the evidence disproving these myths, the importance of going back to the original reference when citing prior work is emphasized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Residential carbon monoxide poisoning from motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2011-01-01

    Although morbidity and mortality from accidental carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning are high in the United States, identification of common but poorly recognized sources should help prevention efforts. The study aimed to describe CO poisoning of home occupants due to a vehicle left running in an attached garage. News stories reporting incidents of US CO poisoning were collected daily from March 2007 to September 2009 via a news.Google.com search and data extracted. Patients were individuals reported in the media to have been poisoned with CO in their home by a vehicle running in the attached garage. Main outcome measures were frequency of occurrence, geographic distribution, patient demographics, and mortality. Of 837 CO poisoning incidents reported in US news media over 2 and a half years, 59 (8%) were the result of a vehicle left running in the garage. The elderly were disproportionately affected, with incidents most common in states with larger elderly populations and 29% of cases with age specified occurring in individuals older than 80 years. Among those older than 80 years, 15 of 17 were found dead at the scene. Residential CO poisoning from a vehicle running in the garage is common, disproportionately affects the elderly, has a high mortality rate, and should be preventable with a residential CO alarm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon monoxide and anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of commonly used anesthetic agents induce widespread neuronal degeneration in the developing mammalian brain. Downstream, the process appears to involve activation of the oxidative stress-associated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Targeting this pathway could result in prevention of anesthetic toxicity in the immature brain. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas that exerts biological activity in the developing brain and low dose exposures have the potential to provide neuroprotection. In recent work, low concentration CO exposures limited isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in newborn mice and modulated oxidative stress within forebrain mitochondria. Because infants and children are routinely exposed to low levels of CO during low-flow general endotracheal anesthesia, such anti-oxidant and pro-survival cellular effects are clinically relevant. Here we provide an overview of anesthesia-related CO exposure, discuss the biological activity of low concentration CO, detail the effects of CO in the brain during development, and provide evidence for CO-mediated inhibition of anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27616667

  11. Chemical Feedback From Decreasing Carbon Monoxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaubert, B.; Worden, H. M.; Arellano, A. F. J.; Emmons, L. K.; Tilmes, S.; Barré, J.; Martinez Alonso, S.; Vitt, F.; Anderson, J. L.; Alkemade, F.; Houweling, S.; Edwards, D. P.

    2017-10-01

    Understanding changes in the burden and growth rate of atmospheric methane (CH4) has been the focus of several recent studies but still lacks scientific consensus. Here we investigate the role of decreasing anthropogenic carbon monoxide (CO) emissions since 2002 on hydroxyl radical (OH) sinks and tropospheric CH4 loss. We quantify this impact by contrasting two model simulations for 2002-2013: (1) a Measurement of the Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO reanalysis and (2) a Control-Run without CO assimilation. These simulations are performed with the Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry of the Community Earth System Model fully coupled chemistry climate model with prescribed CH4 surface concentrations. The assimilation of MOPITT observations constrains the global CO burden, which significantly decreased over this period by 20%. We find that this decrease results to (a) increase in CO chemical production, (b) higher CH4 oxidation by OH, and (c) 8% shorter CH4 lifetime. We elucidate this coupling by a surrogate mechanism for CO-OH-CH4 that is quantified from the full chemistry simulations.

  12. Review: hemodynamic response to carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    Historically, and at present, carbon monoxide is a major gaseous poison responsible for widespread morbidity and mortality. From threshold to maximal nonlethal levels, a variety of cardiovascular changes occur, both immediately and in the long term, whose homeostatic function it is to renormalize tissue oxygen delivery. However, notwithstanding numerous studies over the past century, the literature remains equivocal regarding the hemodynamic responses in animals and humans, although CO hypoxia is clearly different in several respects from hypoxic hypoxia. Factors complicating interpretation of experimental findings include species, CO dose level and rate, route of CO delivery, duration, level of exertion, state of consciousness, and anesthetic agent used. Augmented cardiac output usually observed with moderate COHb may be compromised in more sever poisoning for the same reasons, such that regional or global ischemia result. The hypotension usually seen in most animal studies is thought to be a primary cause of CNS damage resulting from acute CO poisoning, yet the exact mechanism(s) remains unproven in both animals and humans, as does the way in which CO produces hypotension. This review briefly summarizes the literature relevant to the short- and long-term hemodynamic responses reported in animals and humans. It concludes by presenting an overview using data from a single species in which the most complete work has been done to date.

  13. 49 CFR 392.66 - Carbon monoxide; use of commercial motor vehicle when detected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon monoxide; use of commercial motor vehicle... SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Prohibited Practices § 392.66 Carbon monoxide... monoxide; (2) Where carbon monoxide has been detected in the interior of the commercial motor vehicle; (3...

  14. Detection of Carbon Monoxide Using Polymer-Carbon Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon monoxide (CO) sensor was developed that can be incorporated into an existing sensing array architecture. The CO sensor is a low-power chemiresistor that operates at room temperature, and the sensor fabrication techniques are compatible with ceramic substrates. Sensors made from four different polymers were tested: poly (4-vinylpryridine), ethylene-propylene-diene-terpolymer, polyepichlorohydrin, and polyethylene oxide (PEO). The carbon black used for the composite films was Black Pearls 2000, a furnace black made by the Cabot Corporation. Polymers and carbon black were used as received. In fact, only two of these sensors showed a good response to CO. The poly (4-vinylpryridine) sensor is noisy, but it does respond to the CO above 200 ppm. The polyepichlorohydrin sensor is less noisy and shows good response down to 100 ppm.

  15. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning from Portable Electrical Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B; Dunn, Susan L

    2015-08-01

    Portable electrical generators have been responsible for over 800 accidental carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning deaths in the United States from 1999-2012. Because mortality figures are typically the only data reported with regard to the adverse effects of generators, we describe a nonfatal segment of the poisoned population to further emphasize the significance of the problem. Unidentifiable information about patients treated in the United States with hyperbaric oxygen for acute CO poisoning was prospectively reported by participating centers. Those patients poisoned by portable generators were selected for analysis. Of 1604 patients reported from August 1, 2008 to July 31, 2011, there were 264 accidentally poisoned by portable generators. Exposures occurred in 151 incidents in 33 states. In 99 incidents, poisoning occurred in a residence. Average patient age was 37 ± 20 years (range 1 to 90+ years). Of those poisoned, 146 (55%) were non-Hispanic white, 57 (22%) were black, 52 (20%) were Hispanic white, 4 (2%) were Asian, and 4 (2%) were Native American. English was spoken by 96%. The most common symptoms included headache (62%), dizziness (52%), and loss of consciousness (50%). Blood carboxyhemoglobin levels averaged 22.7 ± 9.0% (range 2.3-48.3%). Thirty-six patients demonstrated evidence of cardiac ischemia. Acute, severe CO poisoning from portable electric generators is common in the United States, likely affecting an estimated 4000 individuals annually, occurring predominantly in residential settings, and affecting English language-speaking individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbon monoxide poisoning during camping in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Oh, Bum Jin; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology and characteristics of unintentional carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning during camping in Korea. We performed a retrospective observational study on patients with unintentional camping-related CO poisoning who were admitted to the emergency department (ED) from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014. News reports about incidents of camping-related CO poisoning were collected using news search engines. A total of 72 patients (29 patients involved in 12 incidents, who were admitted to our ED, and 43 victims involved in 17 incidents reported in the media) were identified. Accidental camping-related CO poisoning occurred most frequently in May, late spring in Korea. Gas stove use and the burning of charcoal for tent heating were responsible for camping-related CO exposure. Seventeen victims (39.5%) were found dead when an ambulance arrived at the scene, in the cases reported in the media. In contrast, all the victims at our hospital were alive on hospital discharge. Twelve of the 17 incidents (70.6%) reported in the media were accidental fatalities. The majority of our patients (83.4%) were not aware of the potential danger of charcoal as a source of CO. Accidental camping-related CO poisoning occurred because of an ongoing lack of awareness about the potential danger of charcoal grills and stoves, and this caused prehospital mortality. Such accidents could be prevented by increasing the awareness of the potential danger of using charcoal grills and stoves during camping, as well as by establishing appropriate safety regulations.

  17. Substantially isotactic, linear, alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide and an olefin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Jiang, Z.

    1996-05-28

    The compound, [Pd(Me-DUPHOS)(MeCN){sub 2}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, [Me-DUPHOS: 1,2-bis(2,5-dimethylphospholano)benzene] is an effective catalyst for the highly enantioselective, alternating copolymerization of olefins, such as aliphatic {alpha}-olefins, with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic polymers which can serve as excellent starting materials for the synthesis of other classes of chiral polymers. For example, the complete reduction of a propylene-carbon monoxide copolymer resulted in the formation of a novel, optically active poly(1,4-alcohol). Also, the previously described catalyst is a catalyst for the novel alternating isomerization cooligomerization of 2-butene with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic poly(1,5-ketone).

  18. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  19. [Exposure to carbon monoxide in wildland firefighters during wildfires suppression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo Leyenda, Belén; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José A; López-Satué, Jorge; Avila Ordás, Concepción; Pernía Cubillo, Raúl; Villa Vicente, José Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    Health and occupational performance in wildland firefighters are mainly impaired for the carbon monoxide inhalation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the personal exposure to carbon monoxide in wildland firefighters during wildfires suppression. Carbon monoxide exposure was monitorized in 44 subjects during 58 real wildfires. Moreover, we analyzed the time weighted average exposure for an 8h shift (VA-ED). The wildfires were classified according to the work done (direct attack, indirect attack and mixed attack) and the current fuel (grass, bush, understory and mixed). The mean exposure to carbon monoxide was of 18,4 ± 1,7 ppm, what supposed a VA-ED of 7,0 ± 1,0 ppm. The highest exposures to carbon monoxide were found during the mixed attack (20,4 ± 2,3 ppm) and direct attack (17,5 ± 2,7 ppm). We only obtained significant differences (p INSHT) and international (NIOSH, OSHA) occupational safety and health agencies.

  20. Electrocatalytic studies of osmium-ruthenium carbonyl cluster compounds for their application as methanol-tolerant cathodes for oxygen reduction reaction and carbon monoxide-tolerant anodes for hydrogen oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja-Arco, E.; Uribe-Godinez, J.; Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Escobedo (Mexico); Altamirano-Gutierrez, A.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Querataro (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This paper provided details of an electrokinetic study of novel electrocatalytic materials capable of performing both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). Osmium-ruthenium carbonyl cluster compounds (Os{sub x}Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub n}) were synthesized by chemical condensation in non-polar organic solvents at different boiling points and refluxing temperatures. Three different non-polar organic solvents were used: (1) n-nonane; o-xylene; and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. The electrocatalysts were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A rotating disk electrode technique was used to analyze the materials. Results of the analysis showed that the materials performed ORR in both the presence and absence of carbon monoxide (CO), and that electrocatalysts were not poisoned by the presence of CO. Cyclic voltamperometry for the disk electrodes showed that the electrochemical behaviour of the compounds in the acid electrolyte was similar in the presence or absence of methanol. The Tafel slope, exchange current density and the transfer coefficient were also investigated. The electrokinetic parameters for the ORR indicated that the materials with the highest electrocatalytic activity were synthesized in 1,2-dichlorobenzene. Electrocatalytic activity during HOR were prepared in n-nonane. It was concluded that the new materials are good candidates for use as both a cathode and an anode in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  1. CRISM Observations of Water Vapor and Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, R. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra returned by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM, [1]) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) contain the clear spectral signature of several atmospheric gases including carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor (H2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). Here we describe the seasonal and spatial mapping of water vapor and carbon dioxide for one full Martian year using CRISM spectra.

  2. Carbon monoxide screen for signalized intersections : COSIM, version 4.0 - technical documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Illinois Carbon Monoxide Screen for Intersection Modeling (COSIM) Version 3.0 is a Windows-based computer : program currently used by the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) to estimate worst-case carbon : monoxide (CO) concentrations near s...

  3. The deployment of carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) for ambient air monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Chaichana; Lu, Mingming; Keener, Tim C; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, a carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) was developed to measure carbon monoxide concentrations at a major traffic intersection near the University of Cincinnati main campus...

  4. 75 FR 54773 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Carbon Monoxide (CO...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ...) for carbon monoxide (CO) under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The State has submitted a limited maintenance... Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Carbon monoxide, Incorporation by reference... (e) to read as follows: Sec. 52.1237 Control strategy: Carbon monoxide. * * * * * (e) Approval--On...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1164 - Localized high concentrations-carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Localized high concentrations—carbon monoxide. (a) Not later than October 1, 1975, the Commonwealth shall... quality standards for carbon monoxide. Once such localized areas have been identified, the Commonwealth... implemented strategies will not create carbon monoxide violations elsewhere in the vicinity after the measures...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1627 - Control strategy and regulations: Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Carbon monoxide. 52.1627 Section 52.1627 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1627 Control strategy and regulations: Carbon monoxide. (a) Part D Approval. The Albuquerque/Bernalillo County carbon monoxide maintenance plan as adopted on April 13, 1995, meets the requirements of...

  7. Carbon monoxide reduces near-infrared spectroscopy determined 'total' hemoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Mads J; Sørensen, Henrik; Siebenmann, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) increases middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCAVmean), but the effect of CO on the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) determined cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) is not detailed. In our study, 11 non-smoking subjects breathed 100% O2 through a closed circuit. A CO2 scrubbe...

  8. Optimization of Treatment Policy for Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Akalayev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of combination use of hyperbaric oxygenation, succinate-containing solutions, and anti-edematous agents in patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Subjects and methods. The results of treatment were analyzed in 32 patients admitted in 2009—2011 for severe acute carbon monoxide poisoning and a Glasgow coma score of 6—8. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 patients whose combination therapy involved hyperbaric oxygenation, Succinasol infusions, and L-lysine-aescinate injections; 2 those who received traditional therapy. All the patients underwent complex clinical, laboratory, and neurophysiologic examinations. Results. Just 24 hours after the combination use of Succinasol and L-lysine-aescinate, Group I patients were observed to have substantially reduced lactate, the content of the latter approached the normal value following 48 hours, which was much below the values in the control group. The similar pattern was observed when endogenous intoxication parameters were examined. During the performed therapy, the level of consciousness and that of intellect according to the MMSE and FAB scales were restored more rapidly in the study group patients than in Group 2. Conclusion. The combination use of hyperbaric oxygenation, the succinate-containing solution Succinasol, and the anti-edematous agent L-lysine-aescinate considerably enhances the efficiency of intensive therapy for acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Key words: carbon monoxide, toxic hypoxic encephalopathy, combination therapy, hyperbaric oxygenation, succinic acid, L-lysine-aescinate.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Death on Mount McKinley,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-08

    va liabilitY Coden jAvai 1- and/or/or 11I)ISt Special. ’CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CARBONI MONOX I DE FOIB 0N I NGm DEATH- ON MVOUINT Mvc IN .EY...plateau which contains numerous campsites during %;’no Spring climbing season. The National Park Service/University of Alaska medical/rescue tent is

  10. 21 CFR 862.3220 - Carbon monoxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon monoxide test system. 862.3220 Section 862.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862...

  11. Spatial distribution of atmospheric carbon monoxide over Bay of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During this campaign,carbon monoxide (CO) was continuously monitored using a non-dispersive IR analyser. Quantifying CO in ambient air is vital in determining the air quality of a region.Being toxic,CO is a criteria pollutant,but it is a weak green house gas.Globally,very few measurements exist over marine atmospheres to ...

  12. School Bus Carbon Monoxide Intrusion. NHTSA Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of a voluntary program conducted over a 10-month period during which school buses were tested for carbon monoxide (CO) levels under different climatological conditions. The objective of the test program was to determine whether or not there are any serious CO intrusion problems or indications of potential problems…

  13. Ethylene and Carbon Monoxide Production by Septoria musiva

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Brown-Skrobot; L. R. Brown; T. H. Filer

    1984-01-01

    An investigation into the mechanism by which Septoria musiva causes the premature defoliation of cottonwood trees was undertaken. Gas-chromatograpic analysis of the atmosphere overlying the original culture indicated that this fungus produced significant quantities of ethylene and carbon monoxide. Subcultures failed to produce either gas on a variety...

  14. Air quality assessment of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Air quality in urban areas is a cause of concern because of increased industrial activities that contribute to large quantities of emissions. The study assess levels and variations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in Blantyre, Malawi using a stationary environmental monitoring station ...

  15. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in a Child: A Case Report | Asani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The exact incidence of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in Nigeria is unknown. Globally, CO poisoning is frequently unrecognized and under-reported since the clinical presentation is relatively non-specific. The circumstances usually involve an unsuspected increase of CO in an enclosed environment. We present the ...

  16. Carbon Monoxide as Indoor Pollutant in Kano Metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    carbon monoxide concentrations were measured at about the sitting and breathing zone. Hydrogen sulphide in air was developed and applied by Natush et al., (1972). ... pollution were smokes from cars and motor-cycles as the area is characterized with high traffic flow. The frequency distribution pattern for the gas in GRA.

  17. Modelling of Carbon Monoxide Air Pollution in Larg Cities by Evaluetion of Spectral LANDSAT8 Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzelo, M.; Gharagozlou, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Baikpour, S. H.; Rajabi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS ), spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  18. MODELLING OF CARBON MONOXIDE AIR POLLUTION IN LARG CITIES BY EVALUETION OF SPECTRAL LANDSAT8 IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamzelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS , spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  19. Biological signaling by carbon monoxide and carbon monoxide-releasing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motterlini, Roberto; Foresti, Roberta

    2017-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is continuously produced in mammalian cells during the degradation of heme. It is a stable gaseous molecule that reacts selectively with transition metals in a specific redox state, and these characteristics restrict the interaction of CO with defined biological targets that transduce its signaling activity. Because of the high affinity of CO for ferrous heme, these targets can be grouped into heme-containing proteins, representing a large variety of sensors and enzymes with a series of diverse function in the cell and the organism. Despite this notion, progress in identifying which of these targets are selective for CO has been slow and even the significance of elevated carbonmonoxy hemoglobin, a classical marker used to diagnose CO poisoning, is not well understood. This is also due to the lack of technologies capable of assessing in a comprehensive fashion the distribution and local levels of CO between the blood circulation, the tissue, and the mitochondria, one of the cellular compartments where CO exerts its signaling or detrimental effects. Nevertheless, the use of CO gas and CO-releasing molecules as pharmacological approaches in models of disease has provided new important information about the signaling properties of CO. In this review we will analyze the most salient effects of CO in biology and discuss how the binding of CO with key ferrous hemoproteins serves as a posttranslational modification that regulates important processes as diverse as aerobic metabolism, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial bioenergetics. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Carbon monoxide: present and future indications for a medical gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Gaseous molecules continue to hold new promise in molecular medicine as experimental and clinical therapeutics. The low molecular weight gas carbon monoxide (CO), and similar gaseous molecules (e.g., H2S, nitric oxide) have been implicated as potential inhalation therapies in inflammatory diseases. At high concentration, CO represents a toxic inhalation hazard, and is a common component of air pollution. CO is also produced endogenously as a product of heme degradation catalyzed by heme oxygenase enzymes. CO binds avidly to hemoglobin, causing hypoxemia and decreased oxygen delivery to tissues at high concentrations. At physiological concentrations, CO may have endogenous roles as a signal transduction molecule in the regulation of neural and vascular function and cellular homeostasis. CO has been demonstrated to act as an effective anti-inflammatory agent in preclinical animal models of inflammation, acute lung injury, sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, and organ transplantation. Additional experimental indications for this gas include pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, metabolic diseases, and preeclampsia. The development of chemical CO releasing compounds constitutes a novel pharmaceutical approach to CO delivery with demonstrated effectiveness in sepsis models. Current and pending clinical evaluation will determine the usefulness of this gas as a therapeutic in human disease. PMID:23525151

  1. Selected constituents in the smokes of foreign commercial cigaretts: tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Quincy, R.B.; Guerin, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide contents of the smokes of 220 brands of foreign commercial cigarettes are reported. In some instances, filter cigarettes of certain brands were found to deliver as much or more smoke constituents than their nonfilter counterparts. Also, data indicated that there can be a great variation in the tar, nicotine, or carbon monoxide content of the smoke of samples of a given brand of cigarettes, depending on the nation in which they are purchased. 24 tables.

  2. 77 FR 8252 - Adequacy Status of the Anchorage, Alaska, Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan for Transportation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... AGENCY Adequacy Status of the Anchorage, Alaska, Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan for Transportation... budget (MVEB) in the Anchorage, Alaska, Carbon Monoxide (CO) Maintenance Plan, submitted by the State of... monoxide Maintenance Plan for Anchorage, Alaska. EPA's finding was made pursuant to the adequacy review...

  3. Mechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice analog samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Chris J; Jamieson, Corey S; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2009-06-07

    Binary ice mixtures of two carbon monoxide isotopomers, (13)C(16)O and (12)C(18)O, were subjected at 10 K to energetic electrons to investigate the interaction of ionizing radiation with extraterrestrial, carbon monoxide bearing ices. The chemical modifications were monitored on line and in situ via absorption-reflection-absorption Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as in the gas-phase via a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Detected products include two newly formed carbon monoxide isotopomers ((12)C(16)O and (13)C(18)O), carbon dioxide ((12)C(16)O(2), (12)C(18)O(16)O, (12)C(18)O(2), (13)C(16)O(2), (13)C(18)O(16)O, and (13)C(18)O(2)), and dicarbon monoxide ((12)C(13)C(16)O and (13)C(13)C(16)O). Kinetic profiles of carbon monoxide and of carbon dioxide were extracted and fit to derive reaction mechanisms and information on the decomposition of carbon monoxide and on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial ice analog samples.

  4. Neurological Effects of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Children

    OpenAIRE

    YARAR, Coskun

    2009-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning (COP) is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity due to poisoning in all over the world. Although the incidence of COP has not been known exactly in the childhood, almost one-third of CO exposures occurred in children. The data regarding COP in children are inconclusive. Children may be more vulnerable to CO exposure than adults as a result of their high respiration and metabolic rates, high oxygen metabolism, and immature central nervous system. Rec...

  5. Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Subsequent Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study evaluated the dementia risk after carbon monoxide poisoning (CO poisoning). Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, a total of 9041 adults newly diagnosed with CO poisoning from 2000 to 2011 were identified as the CO poisoning cohort. Four-fold (N?=?36,160) of non-CO poisoning insured people were randomly selected as controls, frequency-matched by age, sex, and hospitalization year. Incidence and hazard ratio (HR) of dementia were measured b...

  6. Mobile Carbon Monoxide Monitoring System Based on Arduino-Matlab for Environmental Monitoring Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azieda Mohd Bakri, Nur; Junid, Syed Abdul Mutalib Al; Razak, Abdul Hadi Abdul; Idros, Mohd Faizul Md; Karimi Halim, Abdul

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, the increasing level of carbon monoxide globally has become a serious environmental issue which has been highlighted in most of the country globally. The monitoring of carbon monoxide content is one of the approaches to identify the level of carbon monoxide pollution towards providing the solution for control the level of carbon monoxide produced. Thus, this paper proposed a mobile carbon monoxide monitoring system for measuring the carbon monoxide content based on Arduino-Matlab General User Interface (GUI). The objective of this project is to design, develop and implement the real-time mobile carbon monoxide sensor system and interfacing for measuring the level of carbon monoxide contamination in real environment. Four phases or stages of work have been carried out for the accomplishment of the project, which classified as sensor development, controlling and integrating sensor, data collection and data analysis. As a result, a complete design and developed system has been verified with the handheld industrial standard carbon monoxide sensor for calibrating the sensor sensitivity and measurement in the laboratory. Moreover, the system has been tested in real environments by measuring the level of carbon monoxide in three different lands used location; industrial area; residential area and main road (commercial area). In this real environment test, the industrial area recorded the highest reading with 71.23 ppm and 82.59 ppm for sensor 1 and sensor 2 respectively. As a conclusion, the mobile realtime carbon monoxide system based on the Arduino-Matlab is the best approach to measure the carbon monoxide concentration in different land-used since it does not require a manual data collection and reduce the complexity of the existing carbon monoxide level concentration measurement practise at the same time with a complete data analysis facilities.

  7. Mechanistic studies of carbon monoxide reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffroy, G.L.

    1990-06-12

    The progress made during the current grant period (1 January 1988--1 April 1990) in three different areas of research is summarized. The research areas are: (1) oxidatively-induced double carbonylation reactions to form {alpha}-ketoacyl complexes and studies of the reactivity of the resulting compounds, (2) mechanistic studies of the carbonylation of nitroaromatics to form isocyanates, carbamates, and ureas, and (3) studies of the formation and reactivity of unusual metallacycles and alkylidene ligands supported on binuclear iron carbonyl fragments. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Dinitrogen cleavage and functionalization by carbon monoxide promoted by a hafnium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Donald J; Lobkovsky, Emil; Chirik, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen (N(2)) and carbon monoxide (CO) have the two strongest bonds in chemistry and present significant challenges in developing new transformations that exploit these two abundant feedstocks. At the core of this objective is the discovery of transition-metal compounds that promote the six-electron reductive cleavage of N(2) at ambient temperature and pressure and also promote new nitrogen-element bond formation. Here we show that an organometallic hafnium compound induces N(2) cleavage on the addition of CO, with a simultaneous assembly of new nitrogen-carbon and carbon-carbon bonds. Subsequent addition of a weak acid liberates oxamide, which demonstrates that an important agrochemical can be synthesized directly from N(2) and CO. These studies introduce an alternative paradigm for N(2) cleavage and functionalization in which the six-electron reductive cleavage is promoted by both the transition metal and the incoming ligand, CO, used for the new bond formations.

  9. Design of a multi-purpose titanium bottle for uncontaminated sampling of carbon monoxide and potentially of other analytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, K. W.; Taylor, C. D.; Zafiriou, O. C.

    2003-03-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a non-contaminating titanium sampler for carbon monoxide (CO) are described. In light of the favorable properties of titanium and the minimal contact of O-rings with samples, this multi-purpose design is expected to excel at a broad range of other uses: sampling gases, organic compounds, some trace metals, and living and dead particles.

  10. Carbon monoxide may be an important molecule in migraine and other headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik W; Hauge, Mette K; Ashina, Messoud; Olesen, Jes

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide was previously considered to just be a toxic gas. A wealth of recent information has, however, shown that it is also an important endogenously produced signalling molecule involved in multiple biological processes. Endogenously produced carbon monoxide may thus play an important role in nociceptive processing and in regulation of cerebral arterial tone. Carbon monoxide-induced headache shares many characteristics with migraine and other headaches. The mechanisms whereby carbon monoxide causes headache may include hypoxia, nitric oxide signalling and activation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathways. Here, we review the literature about carbon monoxide-induced headache and its possible mechanisms. We suggest, for the first time, that carbon monoxide may play an important role in the mechanisms of migraine and other headaches. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Central Diabetes Insipidus and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State Following Accidental Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Abideen, Zain; Mahmud, Syed Nayer; Rasheed, Amna; Farooq Qasim, Yusaf; Ali, Furqan

    2017-06-03

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is common and carries significant morbidity and mortality. The nervous system, particularly the brain, is frequently affected by it, owing to its high metabolic activity and oxygen requirements. Carbon monoxide damages the nervous system by both hypoxic and inflammatory mechanisms. Central diabetes insipidus is an extremely rare complication of carbon monoxide poisoning. Herein, we report the case of a young lady, who developed this complication and severe hypernatremia after accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. She also developed a hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state during the treatment for hypernatremia. To the best of our knowledge, both these entities have not been reported together in association with carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the anticipation and early recognition of central diabetes insipidus in carbon monoxide poisoning. This can prevent severe hypernatremia and complications associated with its presence and treatment.

  12. Nitrogenase reduction of carbon-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefeldt, Lance C; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Duval, Simon; Dean, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an enzyme found in many bacteria and archaea that catalyzes biological dinitrogen fixation, the reduction of N2 to NH3, accounting for the major input of fixed nitrogen into the biogeochemical N cycle. In addition to reducing N2 and protons, nitrogenase can reduce a number of small, non-physiological substrates. Among these alternative substrates are included a wide array of carbon-containing compounds. These compounds have provided unique insights into aspects of the nitrogenase mechanism. Recently, it was shown that carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) can also be reduced by nitrogenase to yield hydrocarbons, opening new insights into the mechanism of small molecule activation and reduction by this complex enzyme as well as providing clues for the design of novel molecular catalysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute wood or coal exposure with carbon monoxide intoxication induces sister chromatid exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, S.; Vatansever, S.; Cefle, K.; Palanduz, S.; Guler, K.; Erten, N.; Erk, O.; Karan, M.A.; Tascioglu, C. [University of Istanbul, Istanbul (Turkey). Istanbul Faculty of Medicine

    2002-07-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the genotoxic effect of acute overexposure to combustion products originating from coal or wood stoves in patients presenting with acute carbon monoxide intoxication. The authors analyzed the frequency of sister chromatid exchange and the carboxyhemoglobin concentration in 20 consecutive patients without a history of smoking or drug use who had been treated in the Emergency Care Unit of Istanbul Medical Faculty due to acute carbon monoxide intoxication. All of these cases were domestic accidents due to dysfunctioning coal or wood stoves. The results were compared with a control group of 20 nonsmoking, nondrug-using healthy individuals matched for age, sex, and absence of other chemical exposure. It was concluded that acute exposure to combustion products of wood or coal is genotoxic to DNA. Potential causes of genotoxicity include known mutagenic compounds present in coal or wood smoke and ash, oxygen radicals formed during combustion, as well as hypoxic and reperfusion injury mechanisms initiated by carbon monoxide intoxication.

  14. Trends in the incidence of carbon monoxide poisoning in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2005-11-01

    Recent data demonstrate that the mortality rate from carbon monoxide poisoning has declined over the past 2 decades. It is not known whether this decrease in mortality is reflective of the total burden of carbon monoxide poisoning. This study sought to examine trends in other potential indicators of the incidence of carbon monoxide poisoning in the United States. Published data from US poison control centers (PCCs) were used to calculate annual rates of calls regarding carbon monoxide exposures. Data on numbers of carbon monoxide-poisoned patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) were used to calculate annual treatment rates. Trends in rates of carbon monoxide-related mortality, calls to PCCs, and HBO treatment were then compared. Contrary to the decline in carbon monoxide-related mortality from 1968 to 1998, rates of calls to PCCs significantly increased over the same period. Neither rates of PCC calls nor HBO treatment changed significantly from 1992 to 2002. The latter 2 measures were strongly correlated. Although deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning have clearly decreased in the United States, other indicators of the incidence of the condition suggest that the total burden (fatal and nonfatal) may not have significantly changed. Efforts to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning should not be relaxed.

  15. Carbon monoxide may be an important molecule in migraine and other headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik W; Hauge, Mette K

    2014-01-01

    an important role in nociceptive processing and in regulation of cerebral arterial tone. DISCUSSION: Carbon monoxide-induced headache shares many characteristics with migraine and other headaches. The mechanisms whereby carbon monoxide causes headache may include hypoxia, nitric oxide signalling and activation......INTRODUCTION: Carbon monoxide was previously considered to just be a toxic gas. A wealth of recent information has, however, shown that it is also an important endogenously produced signalling molecule involved in multiple biological processes. Endogenously produced carbon monoxide may thus play...

  16. 78 FR 48638 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans: Alaska; Fairbanks Carbon Monoxide...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    .... SUMMARY: The EPA is proposing to approve a carbon monoxide Limited Maintenance Plan for the Fairbanks Area... demonstrates that the Fairbanks Area will maintain the carbon monoxide National Ambient Air Quality Standards... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans: Alaska; Fairbanks Carbon...

  17. Suicidal carbon monoxide poisoning using a gas-powered generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blässer, Katharina; Tatschner, Thomas; Bohnert, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The presented case deals with an unusual suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning. In a car parked in a highway rest area, the body of a middle-aged man was found. In the open trunk of the car there was a gas-powered generator which was switched on, but no longer running. The tank was three quarters full. At autopsy, bright-red livores, cherry-pink fingernails, cherry-red blood and salmon-red skeletal musculature were found. According to the toxicological analysis performed during autopsy, the COHb content in the corpse blood was 68%. To reconstruct the event, the emergency generator was started again in the man's car. By means of measuring probes placed in the interior of the car, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen were measured and recorded in a concentration-time curve; the concentration of cyanide was measured at the end of the experiment. The lower explosion limit of 500 ppm CO was reached after 30s already. For technical reasons, no further values could be recorded. After about 14 min the engine started stuttering with approximately 14 vol.% of oxygen in the air, but continued to run at a lower speed until the experiment was stopped after 25 min. The final concentration of cyanide was 7.5 ppm. In view of the rapid CO increase in the interior of the vehicle it is to be assumed that the victim lost consciousness very fast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatial variation of volatile organic compounds and carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREG

    2013-05-12

    May 12, 2013 ... Rapid urbanization in developing countries has led to increased air pollution due to increased vehicular and industrial emissions (Fenger, 1999; Akimoto, 2003). Examples of atmospheric pollutants include volatile orga- nic compounds (VOCs) and carbon monoxide (CO). The use of fossil fuels (for example ...

  19. Interaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen with the (1010) face of ruthenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomcsik, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction was studied at 23.5, 200, and -135/sup 0/C with low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy. (AES). Carbon monoxide adsorbs associatively at 23.5/sup 0/C, but is apparently dissociated by the LEED beam and hydrogen adsorbed from the ambient after a few minutes for less than 10 Langmuirs of carbon monoxide. For large doses of carbon monoxide at 23.5/sup 0/C, 10 Langmuirs or more, the LEED beam does not disociate carbon monoxide, but carbon monoxide and hydrogen adsorbed from the ambient do appear to be removed from the surface by the LEED beam. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen on the surface together will react and form surface complexes with distinctive LEED patterns at 23.5/sup 0/C though some of the interactions appear to be LEED beam induced. If sufficient hydrogen is present, some of these complexes are lost from the surface probably as methane and water. Carbon monoxide will react with itself and hydrogen at 23.5/sup 0/C with carbon being lost from the surface probably as carbon dioxide. At 200/sup 0/C, neither carbon monoxide nor hydrogen will absorb on Ru (1010) in significant amounts at the low dose pressures used. However, if the Ru(1010) crystal is allowed to cool below 70/sup 0/C, ambient carbon monoxide and hydrogen will adsorb on Ru (1010) and form LEED patterns like those formed at 23.5/sup 0/C. At -135/sup 0/C, carbon monoxide will react with itself and hydrogen readily most of the time producing surface complexes with distinctive LEED paterns. If a moderate amount of hydrogen is present, some of these complexes are lost from the surface, probably as methane. If a large amount of hydrogen is present, some of these complexes are lost from the surface probably as carbon dioxdie. 17 figures, 8 tables.

  20. Modulation of growth cone filopodial length by carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is physiologically produced via heme degradation by heme oxygenase enzymes. Whereas CO has been identified as an important physiological signaling molecule, the roles it plays in neuronal development and regeneration are poorly understood. During these events, growth cones guide axons through a rich cellular environment to locate target cells and establish synaptic connections. Previously, we have shown that another gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO), has potent effects on growth cone motility. With NO and CO sharing similar cellular targets, we wanted to determine whether CO affected growth cone motility as well. We assessed how CO affected growth cone filopodial length and determined the signaling pathway by which this effect was mediated. Using two well-characterized neurons from the freshwater snail, Helisoma trivolvis, it was found that the CO donor, carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2), increased filopodial length. CO utilized a signaling pathway that involved the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G, and ryanodine receptors. While increases in filopodial length often occur from robust increases in intracellular calcium levels, the timing in which CO increased filopodial length corresponded with low basal calcium levels in growth cones. Taken together with findings of a heme oxygenase-like protein in the Helisoma nervous system, these results provide evidence for CO as a modulator of growth cone motility and implicate CO as a neuromodulatory signal during neuronal development and/or regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 677-690, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Carbon monoxide poisoning: a new incidence for an old disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, N B; Weaver, L K

    2007-01-01

    While carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is common in the USA, its incidence is uncertain. Fatal poisonings are counted with relative accuracy from death certificate data, but estimates of the more common nonfatal poisonings are either old or limited. This study was performed to estimate the number of emergency department (ED) visits annually in the USA for carbon monoxide poisoning. ED visit rates in five states (Idaho, Maine, Montana, Utah, and Washington) from three prior studies, each using different methodology, were used to extrapolate independent estimates of national ED visits. After correcting for regional differences in CO poisoning incidence, estimates of national ED visits per year ranging from 32,413 to 56,037 were obtained. Excluding the estimate derived from the Maine rate because it did not include intentional and fire-related poisonings, the national average is 50,558 +/- 4,843 visits per year. There are approximately 50,000 ED visits for CO poisoning in the USA annually, 3-5 times the numbers previously estimated. As this disease can result in significant long-term morbidity even when treated, enhanced prevention efforts are warranted.

  2. A carbon monoxide passive sampler: Research and development needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Diamond, R.C.; Woods, A.L.

    1991-11-01

    In rare instances, carbon monoxide (CO) levels in houses can reach dangerously high concentrations, causing adverse health effects ranging from mild headaches to, under extreme conditions, death. Hundreds of fatal accidental carbon monoxide poisonings occur each year primarily due to the indoor operation of motor vehicles, the indoor use of charcoal for cooking, the operation of malfunctioning vented and unvented combustion appliances, and the misuse combustion appliances. Because there is a lack of simple, inexpensive, and accurate field sampling instrumentation, it is difficult for gas utilities and researchers to conduct field research studies designed to quantify the concentrations of CO in residences. Determining the concentration of CO in residences is the first step towards identifying the high risk appliances and high-CO environments which pose health risks. Thus, there exists an urgent need to develop and field-validate a CO-quantifying technique suitable for affordable field research. A CO passive sampler, if developed, could fulfill these requirements. Existing CO monitoring techniques are discussed as well as three potential CO-detection methods for use in a CO passive sampler. Laboratory and field research needed for the development and validation of an effective and cost-efficient CO passive sampler are also discussed.

  3. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen. Carbon monoxide based gaseous fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, J. J.; White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.; Lecren, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating the combuston performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Blue-water gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an 'optimum' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  4. 40 CFR 51.241 - Nonattainment areas for carbon monoxide and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Intergovernmental Consultation Agency Designation § 51.241 Nonattainment areas for carbon monoxide and ozone. (a... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nonattainment areas for carbon monoxide and ozone. 51.241 Section 51.241 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...

  5. 75 FR 54805 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Carbon Monoxide (CO...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ...) for carbon monoxide (CO) under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The State has submitted a limited maintenance... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Carbon Monoxide (CO) Limited Maintenance Plan for the Twin Cities Area AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  6. Iron and carbon monoxide enhance coagulation and attenuate fibrinolysis by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2014-10-01

    Two parallel lines of investigation elucidating novel mechanisms by which iron (scanning electron microscopy-based) and carbon monoxide (viscoelastic-based) enhance coagulation and diminish fibrinolysis have emerged over the past few years. However, a multimodal approach to ascertain the effects of iron and carbon monoxide remained to be performed. Such investigation could be important, as iron and carbon monoxide are two of the products of heme catabolism via heme oxygenase-1, an enzyme upregulated in a variety of disease states associated with thrombophilia. Human plasma was exposed to ferric chloride, carbon monoxide derived from carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2, or their combination. Viscoelastic studies demonstrated ferric chloride and carbon monoxide mediated enhancement of velocity of growth, and final clot strength, with the combination of the two molecules noted to have all the prothrombotic kinetic effects of either separately. Parallel ultrastructural studies demonstrated separate types of fibrin polymer cross-linking and matting in plasma exposed to ferric chloride and carbon monoxide, with the combination sharing features of each molecule. In conclusion, we present the first evidence that iron and carbon monoxide interact with key coagulation and fibrinolytic processes, resulting in thrombi that begin to form more quickly, grow faster, become stronger, and are more resistant to lysis.

  7. Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias. Research report, August 1987-July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.

    1992-09-01

    The authors studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. Subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study; the carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. Total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were measured for four specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide exposure; (3) six hours after carbon monoxide exposure; and (4) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity. During steady-state conditions at rest, the number of ventricular ectopic beats per hour was 115 + or - 153 (SD) for room air exposure (0.7% carboxyhemoglobin), 121 + or - 171 for the lower carbon monoxide exposure (3.2% carboxyhemoglobin), and 94 + or - 129 for the higher carbon monoxide exposure (5.1% carboxyhemoglobin). The frequency of complex ventricular ectopy was not altered at the levels of carbon monoxide studied. Secondary analysis of the impact of carbon monoxide on ventricular ectopic beat frequency stratified by baseline ejection fraction, baseline ventricular ectopic beat frequency, and exercise-induced ST-segment changes did not indicate an effect of carbon monoxide on ventricular arrhythmias. However, patients with symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias and symptomatic myocardial ischemia were excluded from the present study.

  8. Suicide from carbon monoxide poisoning in South Korea: 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Rim; Cha, Eun Shil; Chang, Shu-Sen; Khang, Young-Ho; Lee, Won Jin

    2014-01-01

    Suicide from carbon monoxide poisoning by burning coal briquette or barbecue charcoal increased rapidly in some East Asian countries in the recent decade. The purpose of this study was to examine trends in suicides from carbon monoxide poisoning in South Korea and their epidemiologic characteristics. We presented age-standardized mortality rates of carbon monoxide suicide and compared them with those of suicide by other methods using registered death data from Statistics Korea (South Korea) from 2006 to 2012. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate odds ratios of carbon monoxide suicide by socio-demographic characteristics before and after the marked increase in carbon monoxide suicide in September 2008. The number of carbon monoxide suicides in South Korea was only 34 in 2006 but rapidly increased to 267 in 2008 and was 1125 in 2012, with the age-standardized rates of 0.06 (2006), 0.48 (2008), and 1.97 (2012) per 100,000 population respectively (a striking 3,183% increase in 2006-2012). Suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning showed greater odds ratios among men, younger age groups, single or the divorced, and those with high education and non-manual jobs compared with suicides by other methods. This study only used data for fatal self-poisoning by carbon monoxide (non-fatal cases not included) and had no information on the sources of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide suicides substantially increased in South Korea over the relatively short study period and showed some distinct socio-demographic characteristics compared with suicides by other methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Li; Bian, Miao; Zang, Xiu-Xian; Wu, Yang; Xu, Da-Hai; Dong, Ning; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Yan, Bai-Ling; Wang, Da-Wei; Zhao, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Nan

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of erythropoietin (EPO) for treating patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. We conducted a randomized, prospective study of 103 patients with CO poisoning in two groups: an EPO group (n = 54; patients received EPO) and a placebo group (n = 49; patients received normal saline). The study endpoints were the functional outcome at day 30 (the Barthel index and neurologic sequelae), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, and the levels of S-100β. At 18 days, the NIHSS score improved significantly and S-100β levels significantly decreased in patients in the EPO group. At 30 days, patients in the EPO group had a superior Barthel index and fewer patients had delayed neurologic sequelae (DNS). This study demonstrated that early administration of EPO to patients with CO poisoning improved neurological outcomes and reduced the incidence of DNS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Exploring chainsaw operator occupational exposure to carbon monoxide in forestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Brionny; Parker, Richard; Todoroki, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by chainsaws can negatively impact health in forestry workers. This exploratory study measures CO concentration within the breathing zone of chainsaw operators during motor-manual operations, and discusses the potential influences on CO exposure levels. A CO monitoring instrument was paired with a concurrent video recording of task activities to enable correlation of exact working operations to critical exposure levels. Multiple streams of meteorological data were also collected from sensors worn by the eight professional tree fellers/log makers. Time-weighted averages were applied to investigate levels of CO exposure during a nominal 1-hr monitoring period. The differing task demands and environment were found to influence worker exposure to CO, supporting previous research. Pending further investigation, a number of possible actions are recommended to reduce observed high exposure levels and/or emission concentration.

  11. Effect of carbon monoxide on Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is exposed to multiple host antimicrobial pathways, including toxic gases such as superoxide, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide (CO). To survive, mycobacteria evolved mechanisms to resist the toxic environment, and in this review we focus on a relatively new field, namely, the role of macrophage heme oxygenase and its enzymatic product CO in Mtb pathogenesis. In particular, we focus on (i) the induction of heme oxygenase during Mtb infection and its relevance to Mtb pathogenesis, (ii) the ability of mycobacteria to catabolize CO, (iii) the transcriptional reprogramming of Mtb by exposure to CO, (iv) the general antimicrobial properties of CO and (v) new genetic evidence characterizing the ability of Mtb to resist CO toxicity. Developing a complete molecular and genetic understanding of the pathogenesis of Mtb is essential to its eventual eradication. PMID:23244630

  12. Epidemic carbon monoxide poisoning following a winter storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, P M; Hampson, N B

    1997-01-01

    Hospital emergency departments were surveyed to estimate the number of patients treated for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning after a severe winter storm disrupted electrical service in western Washington State. At least 81 persons were treated. The two main sources of CO were charcoal briquettes (54% of cases) and gasoline-powered electrical generators (40% of cases). Of the 44 persons affected by CO from burning charcoal, 40 (91%) were members of ethnic minority groups; 27 did not speak English. All persons affected by CO from generators were non-Hispanic Whites. This was the largest epidemic of storm-related CO poisoning reported in the United States. This epidemic demonstrated the need to anticipate CO poisoning as a possible consequence of winter storms in cold climates and to make preventive messages understandable to the entire population at risk, including those persons who do not understand written or spoken English.

  13. Carbon monoxide mixing ratio inference from gas filter radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallio, H. A.; Reichle, H. G., Jr.; Casas, J. C.; Saylor, M. S.; Gormsen, B. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new algorithm has been developed which permits, for the first time, real time data reduction of nadir measurements taken with a gas filter correlation radiometer to determine tropospheric carbon monoxide concentrations. The algorithm significantly reduces the complexity of the equations to be solved while providing accuracy comparable to line-by-line calculations. The method is based on a regression analysis technique using a truncated power series representation of the primary instrument output signals to infer directly a weighted average of trace gas concentration. The results produced by a microcomputer-based implementation of this technique are compared with those produced by the more rigorous line-by-line methods. This algorithm has been used in the reduction of Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites, Shuttle, and aircraft data.

  14. UV-induced carbon monoxide emission from living vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of carbon monoxide (CO) is rather uncertain. In this paper we address the potential for UV-induced CO emission by living terrestrial vegetation surfaces. Real-time measurements of CO concentrations were made with a cavity enhanced laser spectrometer connected in closed loop...... to either an ecosystem chamber or a plant-leaf scale chamber. Leaves of all examined plant species exhibited emission of CO in response to artificial UV-radiation as well as the UV-component of natural solar radiation. The UV-induced rate of CO emission exhibited a rather low dependence on temperature......, indicating an abiotic process. The emission of CO in response to the UV-component of natural solar radiation was also evident at the ecosystem scale....

  15. [Parallel investigations of blood and alveolar air in the diagnosis of lethal carbon monoxide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Miroslav; Bauerová, Jiřina; Očko, Peter; Šidlo, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisonings are the most frequent among fatal gas and volatile substances intoxications. The authors present diagnostic options of fatal carbon monoxide poisoning by parallel blood investigations for the content of karbonylhaemoglobin and determining of the concentration of carbon monoxide in the alveolar air. The analysis of 160 cases of lethal poisonings with carbon monoxide over a period of 20 years was carried out. The cases were divided into subgroups according to the place of death to poisonings in flats, garages, bathrooms, in fires, road traffic accidents and mining accidents. Tabular cases were divided into poisonings with a dominant share of carbon monoxide; the lethal concentration (0.075 % volume percentage or more) in the alveolar air was found in 75 % of cases. By pairs of victims different concentrations of carbon monoxide in the alveolar air were found. It confirms the fact that the course of intoxication and time of death also depends on the state of health of an individual. In 25 % of cases composite action with other toxic substances and factors (cyanide ions, ethanol, carbon dioxide, smoke inhalation solids, burns etc.) was detected. The obtained results point to an important and irreplaceable role of the toxicological - chemical analysis of the alveolar air in the context of additional laboratory investigations at autopsy in the diagnosis of fatal carbon monoxide poisoning. Investigation of the alveolar air should be the standard methodological procedure in the diagnosis of fatal poisonings by gases and volatile substances.

  16. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eTechtmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is commonly known as a toxic gas, yet it is used by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and many archaea. In this study, we determined the prevalence of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (anaerobic CODHs, or [Ni,Fe]-CODHs in currently available genomic sequence databases. More than 6% (185 genomes out of 2887 bacterial and archaeal genome sequences in the IMG database possess at least one gene encoding [Ni,Fe]-CODH, the key enzyme for anaerobic CO utilization. The phylogenetic study of this extended protein family revealed nine distinct clades of [Ni,Fe]-CODHs. These clades consisted of [Ni,Fe]-CODHs that, while apparently monophyletic within the clades, were encoded by microorganisms of disparate phylogeny, based on 16S rRNA sequences, and widely ranging physiology. Following this discovery, it was therefore of interest to examine the extent and possible routes of horizontal gene transfer (HGT affecting [Ni,Fe]-CODH genes and gene clusters that include [Ni,Fe]-CODHs.The genome sequence of the extreme thermophile Thermosinus carboxydivorans was used as a case study for HGT. The [Ni,Fe]-CODH operon of T. carboxydivorans differs from its whole genome in its G+C content by 8.2 mol%. Here, we apply statistical methods to establish acquisition by T. carboxydivorans of the gene cluster including [Ni,Fe]-CODH via HGT. Analysis of tetranucleotide frequency and codon usage with application of the Kullback-Leibler divergence metric showed that the [Ni,Fe]-CODH-1 operon of T. carboxidyvorans is quite dissimilar to the whole genome. Using the same metrics, the T. carboxydivorans [Ni,Fe]-CODH-1 operon is highly similar to the genome of the phylogenetically distant anaerobic carboxydotroph Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans. These results allow to assume recent HTG of the gene cluster from a relative of C. hydrogenoformans to T. carboxydivorans or a more ancient transfer from a C. hydrogenoformans ancestor to a T. carboxydivorans

  17. Surveillance and Analysis of Occupational Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in the Paris Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Eric; Villa, Antoine; Garnier, Robert; Dufayet, Laurene; Langrand, Jerome

    2017-10-01

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning is common and often severe. Domestic causes have been extensively documented, while occupational exposures have been reported less frequently. We analyse occupational carbon monoxide poisonings from the available data of the carbon monoxide poisoning surveillance network for Paris and its region, and identify predictive factors of severity for occupational poisoning in order to identify priority prevention actions. We retrospectively reviewed all events of acute accidental carbon monoxide exposures which occurred in the Paris region, at the work place, and notified to the surveillance network from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2011. Over the 7-year study period, 362 exposed workers were identified, representing 8.15% of all cases of carbon monoxide exposures. The largest number of events occurred in the building sector and most commonly affected occupations were craft and related trades workers. The most common sources of exposure were internal combustion engine equipment that was involved in almost half of cases. Minor severity was observed in 86% of cases, and 13% were moderate or more. We identify that the use of internal combustion engine equipment was significantly associated with increased severity. Occupational carbon monoxide poisoning is reported less frequently than domestic poisoning and has different and more numerous causes. It can be potentially severe, especially when it is caused by internal combustion engine equipment. Information about risks, compliance with instructions and cleaning rules, and establishment of collective and individual protective equipment would significantly reduce the frequency and severity of carbon monoxide poisoning.

  18. A comparison of carbon monoxide exposures after snowstorms and power outages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Arbor, Kelly K; Quental, Angela S; Li, Dadong

    2014-05-01

    Unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning occurs frequently after natural disasters. Although the epidemiology of carbon monoxide exposures that occur after power loss storms has been reported, few publications detail the characteristics of carbon monoxide exposures after massive snowstorms. To compare the differences in patient characteristics of carbon monoxide exposures after a snowstorm and power loss storm. In 2013, a retrospective review was conducted of patient characteristics and exposure data from all carbon monoxide cases reported to the Connecticut Poison Control Center in the days following both a major snowstorm in 2013 and a winter storm that caused extensive power outages in 2011. Portable generators were the most common source of carbon monoxide exposure after a storm that resulted in power losses; car exhaust was the most frequent source of exposure after an extensive snowstorm. Most exposures occurred within the first day after the snowstorm, and on the second and third days after the power outage storm. There were no significant differences between the two storms in terms of patient age, gender, or median carboxyhemoglobin concentration. Future public health and medical education regarding the dangers of carbon monoxide in the aftermath of storms should include attention to the differences in the typical exposure sources and timing. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron Catalyst Chemistry in High Pressure Carbon Monoxide Nanotube Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is analyzed using a chemical reaction model coupled with properties calculated along streamlines. Streamline properties for mixing jets are calculated by the FLUENT code using the k-e turbulent model for pure carbon monixide. The HiPco process introduces cold iron pentacarbonyl diluted in CO, or alternatively nitrogen, at high pressure, ca. 30 atmospheres into a conical mixing zone. Hot CO is also introduced via three jets at angles with respect to the axis of the reactor. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Cluster reaction rates are from Krestinin, et aI., based on shock tube measurements. Another model is from classical cluster theory given by Girshick's team. The calculations are performed on streamlines that assume that a cold mixture of Fe(CO)5 in CO is introduced along the reactor axis. Then iron forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs from the Boudouard reaction on Fe-containing clusters by reaction with CO. To simulate the chemical process along streamlines that were calculated by the fluid dynamics code FLUENT, a time history of temperature and dilution are determined along streamlines. Alternative catalyst injection schemes are also evaluated.

  20. Reactions of Vanadocene-Carbyls with Carbon Monoxide, Xylylisocyanide and Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieman, J.; Teuben, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Vanadocene-allyl Cp2V(η1-C3H5) (1a) reacts with strong π-acceptor substrate ligands such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and isonitriles. No reactions are observed with poorer π-acceptor substrates such as alkynes and nitriles. Reaction of 1a with CO gives Cp[η4-C5H5(C3H5)]V(CO)2, showing that

  1. Distribution of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes in deep subseafloor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, T; Inagaki, F

    2017-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the simplest oxocarbon generated by the decomposition of organic compounds, and it is expected to be in marine sediments in substantial amounts. However, the availability of CO in the deep subseafloor sedimentary biosphere is largely unknown even though anaerobic oxidation of CO is a thermodynamically favourable reaction that possibly occurs with sulphate reduction, methanogenesis, acetogenesis and hydrogenesis. In this study, we surveyed for the first time the distribution of the CO dehydrogenase gene (cooS), which encodes the catalytic beta subunit of anaerobic CO dehydrogenase (CODH), in subseafloor sediment-core samples from the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Mars-Ursa Basin, Kumano Basin, and off the Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions 301, 308 and 315 and the D/V Chikyu shakedown cruise CK06-06, respectively. Our results show the occurrence of diverse cooS genes from the seafloor down to about 390 m below the seafloor, suggesting that microbial communities have metabolic functions to utilize CO in anoxic microbial ecosystems beneath the ocean floor, and that the microbial community potentially responsible for anaerobic CO oxidation differs in accordance with possible energy-yielding metabolic reactions in the deep subseafloor sedimentary biosphere. Little is known about the microbial community associated with carbon monoxide (CO) in the deep subseafloor. This study is the first survey of a functional gene encoding anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH). The widespread occurrence of previously undiscovered CO dehydrogenase genes (cooS) suggests that diverse micro-organisms are capable of anaerobic oxidation of CO in the deep subseafloor sedimentary biosphere. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Ambient carbon monoxide and the risk of hospitalization due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Linwei; Ho, Kin-fai; Wang, Tong; Qiu, Hong; Pun, Vivian C; Chan, Chi Sing; Louie, Peter K K; Yu, Ignatius T S

    2014-12-15

    Data from recent experimental and clinical studies have indicated that lower concentrations of inhaled carbon monoxide might have beneficial antiinflammatory effects. Inhaled carbon monoxide has the potential to be a therapeutic agent for chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). However, population-based epidemiologic studies of environmentally relevant carbon monoxide exposure have generated mixed findings. We conducted a time-series study in Hong Kong to estimate the association of short-term exposure to ambient carbon monoxide with emergency hospitalizations for COPD. We collected daily emergency hospital admission data and air pollution data from January 2001 to December 2007. We used log-linear Poisson models to estimate the associations between daily hospital admissions for COPD and the average daily concentrations of carbon monoxide while controlling for the traffic-related co-pollutants nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm. Results showed that ambient carbon monoxide was negatively associated with the risk of hospitalizations for COPD. After adjustment for levels nitrogen dioxide or particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, the negative associations of carbon monoxide with COPD hospitalizations became stronger. The risk estimates were similar for female and male subjects. In conclusion, short-term exposure to ambient carbon monoxide was associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization for COPD, which suggests that carbon monoxide exposure provides some acute protection of against exacerbation of COPD. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The Effect of the Hayward Corridor Improvement Project on Carbon Monoxide Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlfelder, M.; Martinez, E.; Maestas, A.; Peek, A.

    2013-12-01

    In August of 2010, construction began on a stretch of road in Downtown Hayward to address a problem with traffic flow. Known as the Hayward Corridor, the project reshaped the flow of traffic, replacing the two way streets of Foothill, Mission, and A Street with a loop between them. This project began with the initiative of reducing congestion in this area and improving access to businesses for pedestrians. The project was expected to have little environmental impact in most common assessments of degree of effect, including particulate matter, ozone and carbon monoxide levels. This report will discuss the effect of the Hayward Corridor Improvement Project on carbon monoxide emission. Data available to the public in the project's Environmental Impact Report shows that carbon monoxide levels before construction began were at an acceptable level according to federal and state standards. Projections for future concentrations both with and without the project show a decrease in carbon monoxide levels due to technological improvements and the gradual replacement of older, less efficient vehicles. The Environmental Impact Report projected that there would be little difference in carbon monoxide levels whether the project took place or not, at an average of 1.67x102 fewer parts per million per 1 hour period of measurement emitted in the case of the project not taking place. While it is not possible to draw a conclusion on what the current carbon monoxide levels would be if the project had not taken place due to the changes in traffic flow and other surrounding roads as a result of the project, the data gathered in June of 2013 suggested that carbon monoxide levels are higher than the values projected in 2007. This report summarizes both the accuracy of these carbon monoxide level projections and the effect of construction on carbon monoxide levels in the Hayward Corridor and the surrounding area.

  4. Regulation of multiple carbon monoxide consumption pathways in anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Techtmann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO, well known as a toxic gas, is increasingly recognized as a key metabolite and signaling molecule. Microbial utilization of CO is quite common, evidenced by the rapid escalation in description of new species of CO-utilizing bacteria and archaea. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH, the protein complex that enables anaerobic CO utilization has been well-characterized from an increasing number of microorganisms, however the regulation of multiple CO-related gene clusters in single isolates remains unexplored. Many species are extroraordinarily resistant to high CO concentrations, thiriving under pure CO at more than one atmosphere. We hypothesized that, in strains that can grow exclusively on CO, both carbon acquisition via the CODH/Acetyl CoA synthase complex and energy conservation via a CODH-linked hydrogenase must be differentially regulated in response to the availability of CO. The CO-sensing transcriptional activator, CooA is present in most CO-oxidizing bacteria. Here we present a genomic and phylogenetic survey of CODH operons and cooA genes found in CooA-containing bacteria. Two distinct groups of CooA homologs were found: One clade (CooA-1 is found in the majority of CooA containing bacteria, whereas the other clade (CooA-2 is found only in genomes that encode multiple CODH clusters, suggesting that the CooA-2 might be important for cross-regulation of competing CODH operons. Recombinant CooA-1 and CooA-2 regulators from the prototypical CO-utilizing bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans were purified, and promoter binding analyses revealed that CooA-1 specifically regulates the hydrogenase-linked CODH, whereas CooA-2 is able to regulate both the hydrogenase-linked CODH and the CODH/ACS operons. These studies point to the ability of dual CooA homologs to partition CO into divergent CO-utilizing pathways resulting in efficient consumption of a single limiting growth substrate available across a wide range of

  5. Interannual Variations of MLS Carbon Monoxide Induced by Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae N.; Wu, Dong L.; Ruzmaikin, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    More than eight years (2004-2012) of carbon monoxide (CO) measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are analyzed. The mesospheric CO, largely produced by the carbon dioxide (CO2) photolysis in the lower thermosphere, is sensitive to the solar irradiance variability. The long-term variation of observed mesospheric MLS CO concentrations at high latitudes is likely driven by the solar-cycle modulated UV forcing. Despite of different CO abundances in the southern and northern hemispheric winter, the solar-cycle dependence appears to be similar. This solar signal is further carried down to the lower altitudes by the dynamical descent in the winter polar vortex. Aura MLS CO is compared with the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) total solar irradiance (TSI) and also with the spectral irradiance in the far ultraviolet (FUV) region from the SORCE Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). Significant positive correlation (up to 0.6) is found between CO and FUVTSI in a large part of the upper atmosphere. The distribution of this positive correlation in the mesosphere is consistent with the expectation of CO changes induced by the solar irradiance variations.

  6. Triton's Summer Sky of Methane and Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    According to the first ever infrared analysis of the atmosphere of Neptune's moon Triton, summer is in full swing in its southern hemisphere. The European observing team used ESO's Very Large Telescope and discovered carbon monoxide and made the first ground-based detection of methane in Triton's thin atmosphere. These observations revealed that the thin atmosphere varies seasonally, thickening when warmed. "We have found real evidence that the Sun still makes its presence felt on Triton, even from so far away. This icy moon actually has seasons just as we do on Earth, but they change far more slowly," says Emmanuel Lellouch, the lead author of the paper reporting these results in Astronomy & Astrophysics. On Triton, where the average surface temperature is about minus 235 degrees Celsius, it is currently summer in the southern hemisphere and winter in the northern. As Triton's southern hemisphere warms up, a thin layer of frozen nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide on Triton's surface sublimates into gas, thickening the icy atmosphere as the season progresses during Neptune's 165-year orbit around the Sun. A season on Triton lasts a little over 40 years, and Triton passed the southern summer solstice in 2000. Based on the amount of gas measured, Lellouch and his colleagues estimate that Triton's atmospheric pressure may have risen by a factor of four compared to the measurements made by Voyager 2 in 1989, when it was still spring on the giant moon. The atmospheric pressure on Triton is now between 40 and 65 microbars - 20 000 times less than on Earth. Carbon monoxide was known to be present as ice on the surface, but Lellouch and his team discovered that Triton's upper surface layer is enriched with carbon monoxide ice by about a factor of ten compared to the deeper layers, and that it is this upper "film" that feeds the atmosphere. While the majority of Triton's atmosphere is nitrogen (much like on Earth), the methane in the atmosphere, first detected by

  7. Occurrence and production of carbon monoxide in some brown algae. [Pelagophycus porra; Pelagophycus giganteus; Nereocystis luetkeana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, D.J.; Tocher, R.D.

    1966-01-01

    The first report of carbon monoxide in plants was based on studies with the Pacific Coast kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana. This work was extended and later confirmed. In (1916) it was reported that the brown algae Egregia menziesii, Macrocystis pyrifera, and Fucus evanescens did not contain carbon monoxide. Using a more sensitive method, researchers recently showed that the pneumatocysts of Egregia menziesii do indeed contain carbon monoxide, and they also studied its production by tissues of several brown and red algae. Another researcher found that Sargassum linifolium and Fucus virsoides were devoid of this gas, at least in concentrations detectable with a haemoglobin analytical method. By the method to be described, the gas was taken from pneumatocysts of Ascophyllum nodosum (Fucales) collected at Halifax, Nova Scotia. No carbon monoxide could be detected when 10 cm/sup 3/ of pooled samples of gas was analyzed. 10 references, 2 tables.

  8. MLS/Aura Level 2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for carbon monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  9. A nine-atom rhodium-aluminum oxide cluster oxidizes five carbon monoxide molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Hua-Min; Yuan, Zhen; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-01-01

    ... catalysis is elusive. Here we report that a single atom of rhodium, a powerful noble metal catalyst, can promote the transfer of five oxygen atoms to oxidize carbon monoxide from a nine-atom rhodium-aluminum oxide cluster...

  10. MLS/Aura Near-Real-Time L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO_NRT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Near-Real-Time (NRT) product for carbon monoxide (CO). This product contains daily CO profiles taken from the...

  11. Carbon monoxide toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the mechanism and clinical manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, including the effects on the liver, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. Topics include studies of the carbon monoxide binding affinity with hemoglobin, measurement of carboxyhemoglobin in humans and various animal species, carbon monoxide levels resulting from tobacco and marijuana smoke, occupational exposure and the NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) biological exposure index, symptomology and percent of blood CO, and intrauterine exposure. Air pollution, tobacco smoking, and occupational exposure are discussed as primary sources of carbon monoxide exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on fetal development and health are excluded and examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. Carbon monoxide toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the mechanism and clinical manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, including the effects on the liver, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. Topics include studies of the carbon monoxide binding affinity with hemoglobin, measurement of carboxyhemoglobin in humans and various animal species, carbon monoxide levels resulting from tobacco and marijuana smoke, occupational exposure and the NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) biological exposure index, symptomology and percent of blood CO, and intrauterine exposure. Air pollution, tobacco smoking, and occupational exposure are discussed as primary sources of carbon monoxide exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on fetal development and health are excluded and examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Carbon Monoxide NAAQS Designations, Region 9, 2011, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Polygon Feature class of Nonattainment Areas for Carbon Monoxide. Nonattainment areas are geographic areas which have not met National Ambient Air Quality Standards...

  14. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy Christopher [Allentown, PA; Farris, Thomas Stephen [Bethlehem, PA

    2008-11-18

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  15. sup 1 H NMR studies of hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorption on the EUROPt-1 catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Bouyssy, P X

    2001-01-01

    possible carbon monoxide-induced reorganisation of the surface sites available for hydrogen, following a carbon monoxide precoverage above a critical level. It also shows that carbon monoxide blocks hydrogen adsorption but not in the manner expected. No desorption of carbon monoxide was observed with gas phase infrared experiments even at hydrogen coverages approaching saturation. Secondly, to further the understanding of the dynamics of adsorbed hydrogen exchanging between the strongly bound and the weakly bound sites, proton relaxation NMR experiments were undertaken. T sub 1 and T sub 1 subrho measurements were carried out as a function of hydrogen coverage at room temperature and as a function of temperature at fixed hydrogen coverage. These experiments proved to be experimentally challenging and the data obtained do not show a clear enough trend to reach a significant conclusion as was firstly expected. A specially designed sup 1 H NMR probe, capable of holding a large quantity of catalyst sample for in ...

  16. MLS/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for carbon monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  17. Table of Historical Carbon Monoxide (CO) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    See the history of limits to the level of carbon monoxide (CO) in ambient air, set through the NAAQS review and rulemaking process under the Clean Air Act. This includes both primary and secondary standards.

  18. Carbon monoxide toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). NewSearch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the mechanism and clinical manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, including the effects on the liver, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. Topics include studies of the carbon monoxide binding affinity with hemoglobin, measurement of carboxyhemoglobin in humans and various animal species, carbon monoxide levels resulting from tobacco and marijuana smoke, occupational exposure and the NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) biological exposure index, symptomology and percent of blood CO, and intrauterine exposure. Air pollution, tobacco smoking, and occupational exposure are discussed as primary sources of carbon monoxide exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on fetal development and health are excluded and examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 137 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Carbon monoxide toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the mechanism and clinical manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, including the effects on the liver, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. Topics include studies of the carbon monoxide binding affinity with hemoglobin, measurement of carboxyhemoglobin in humans and various animal species, carbon monoxide levels resulting from tobacco and marijuana smoke, occupational exposure and the NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) biological exposure index, symptomology and percent of blood CO, and intrauterine exposure. Air pollution, tobacco smoking, and occupational exposure are discussed as primary sources of carbon monoxide exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on fetal development and health are excluded and examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 172 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. The influence of tobacco blend composition on carbon monoxide formation in mainstream cigarette smoke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Djulančić, Nermina; Radojičić, Vesna; Srbinovska, Marija

    2013-01-01

    ...) in the gas phase of mainstream cigarette smoke. The results showed that the type of tobacco examined had a significant impact on the amount of carbon monoxide production in the gas phase of cigarette smoke...

  1. MLS/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for carbon monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  2. Assimilation of Unusual Carbon Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelhoven, Wouter J.

    Yeast taxa traditionally are distinguished by growth tests on several sugars and organic acids. During the last decades it became apparent that many yeast species assimilate a much greater variety of naturally occurring carbon compounds as sole source of carbon and energy. These abilities are indicative of a greater role of yeasts in the carbon cycle than previously assumed. Especially in acidic soils and other habitats, yeasts may play a role in the degradation of carbon compounds. Such compounds include purines like uric acid and adenine, aliphatic amines, diamines and hydroxyamines, phenolics and other benzene compounds and polysaccharides. Assimilation of purines and amines is a feature of many ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. However, benzene compounds are degraded by only a few ascomycetous yeasts (e.g. the Stephanoascus/ Blastobotrys clade and black yeastlike fungi) but by many basidiomycetes, e.g. Filobasidiales, Trichosporonales, red yeasts producing ballistoconidia and related species, but not by Tremellales. Assimilation of polysaccharides is wide-spread among basidiomycetes

  3. Carbon monoxide production from five volatile anesthetics in dry sodalime in a patient model: halothane and sevoflurane do produce carbon monoxide; temperature is a poor predictor of carbon monoxide production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, Christiaan; Perez, Roberto S. G. M.; de Lange, Jaap J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Desflurane and enflurane have been reported to produce substantial amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) in desiccated sodalime. Isoflurane is said to produce less CO and sevoflurane and halothane should produce no CO at all.The purpose of this study is to measure the maximum amounts of CO

  4. Carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 inhibition of snake venom thrombin-like activity: novel biochemical "brake"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Bazzell, Charles M

    2017-02-01

    A complication of defibrinogenation therapy with snake venom enzymes such as ancrod is hypofibrinogenemia associated bleeding secondary to no human-derived inhibitor being available to inactivate or diminish the activity of such enzymes. Of interest, ancrod contains a critical histidine residue without which enzymatic activity is inhibited, and carbon monoxide has been demonstrated to inhibit biomolecular function by interacting with histidine moieties in ion channels. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of three different snake venoms containing serine proteases with thrombin-like activity (which included ancrod) to carbon monoxide derived from carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 would diminish their effects on plasmatic coagulation as assessed by thrombelastography. In the case of the Malayan pit viper and Eastern diamondback rattlesnake venoms, carbon monoxide diminished the effects of thrombin-like activity. In contrast, timber rattlesnake venom demonstrated enhancement of "thrombin-generating" activity with simultaneous loss of thrombin-like activity in response to carbon monoxide exposure. These findings may serve as the rational basis for not just continuing to investigate the potential of snake venom enzymes as clinical defibrinogenating agents, but to also to assess the potential to stop such agents from becoming a catalytic "runaway train" by judicious application of a biochemical "brake" such as carbon monoxide.

  5. Nicotine and Carbon Monoxide Exposure from Inhalation of Cigarillo Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszowski, Bartosz; Rosenberry, Zachary R.; Kanu, Alieu; Viray, Lauren C.; Potts, Jennifer L.; Pickworth, Wallace B.

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been an increase in the use of cigarillos in the US. People who smoke cigarillos typically also regularly smoke cigarettes (dual users). Methods We compared puffing topography, biomarkers of acute exposure [exhaled carbon monoxide (COex) and plasma nicotine] and physiologic effects from usual brand cigarette and Black & Mild cigarillo smoking in dual users (N=23) in two laboratory sessions. Results Participants (21 men) smoked an average of 17.5 cigarettes/day. Cigarillo consumption varied widely from as few as 1/week to daily. Participants were highly nicotine dependent (average FTND score: 6.3). There were statistically significant differences in smoking behavior between cigarette and cigarillo smoking in time to smoke, number of puffs, and total puff volume (all Pcigarettes and cigarillos. Nicotine boost was similar after both cigarettes and cigarillos. COex boost was significantly greater after cigarillo smoking compared to cigarette smoking (Psmoking pattern and exposure profile indicate that dual users inhale cigarillo smoke just as they inhale cigarette smoke thereby exposing themselves to considerable amounts of nicotine and other components of tobacco smoke. COex exposure results imply that cigarillo smoking may be associated with higher exposure to smoke-delivered volatile components of mainstream cigarillo smoke including carcinogens when compared to cigarettes. Impact The findings that cigarillos and cigarettes are smoked similarly in dual users are relevant to health and regulatory considerations on cigar products. PMID:26459155

  6. Carbon monoxide: from toxin to endogenous modulator of cardiovascular functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Johnson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a pollutant commonly recognized for its toxicological attributes, including CNS and cardiovascular effects. But CO is also formed endogenously in mammalian tissues. Endogenously formed CO normally arises from heme degradation in a reaction catalyzed by heme oxygenase. While inhibitors of endogenous CO production can raise arterial pressure, heme loading can enhance CO production and lead to vasodepression. Both central and peripheral tissues possess heme oxygenases and generate CO from heme, but the inability of heme substrate to cross the blood brain barrier suggests the CNS heme-heme oxygenase-CO system may be independent of the periphery. In the CNS, CO apparently acts in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS promoting changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission and lowering blood pressure. At the periphery, the heme-heme oxygenase-CO system can affect cardiovascular functions in a two-fold manner; specifically: 1 heme-derived CO generated within vascular smooth muscle (VSM can promote vasodilation, but 2 its actions on the endothelium apparently can promote vasoconstriction. Thus, it seems reasonable that the CNS-, VSM- and endothelial-dependent actions of the heme-heme oxygenase-CO system may all affect cardiac output and vascular resistance, and subsequently blood pressure.

  7. Simultaneous mass balance inverse modeling of methane and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, T. M.; Rayner, P. J.; Simmonds, I.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2005-11-01

    We perform a simultaneous mass-balance inversion of atmospheric methane (CH4) and carbon monoxide (CO) using measurements from the NOAA/CMDL Cooperative Air Sampling Network and a model of tropospheric transport and background chemistry over the period 1990-2000. Our method has a spatial resolution of a semihemisphere and a temporal resolution of 1 month. The deduced CO sources show relatively low interannual variability except around the major biomass burning event in 1997-1998, when we calculate an anomalous emission between July 1997 and December 1998 of 270 Tg(CO). This is enough to suppress the modeled global air mass weighted hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration during this time by 2.2%, and account for 75% of the observed increase in CH4 mixing ratios during 1998. We compare our implied CH4/CO emissions factors with published biomass burning emissions factors, suggesting that the remainder of the increase in CH4 observed in 1998 is due to anomalously high biomass burning emissions, with CH4 emissions from wetlands showing a small negative anomaly in 1998.

  8. A Wireless and Batteryless Intelligent Carbon Monoxide Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Chia; Sung, Gang-Neng; Chen, Wen-Ching; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Chue, Jin-Ju; Wu, Chieh-Ming; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning from natural gas water heaters is a common household accident in Taiwan. We propose a wireless and batteryless intelligent CO sensor for improving the safety of operating natural gas water heaters. A micro-hydropower generator supplies power to a CO sensor without battery (COSWOB) (2.5 W at a flow rate of 4.2 L/min), and the power consumption of the COSWOB is only ~13 mW. The COSWOB monitors the CO concentration in ambient conditions around natural gas water heaters and transmits it to an intelligent gateway. When the CO level reaches a dangerous level, the COSWOB alarm sounds loudly. Meanwhile, the intelligent gateway also sends a trigger to activate Wi-Fi alarms and sends notifications to the mobile device through the Internet. Our strategy can warn people indoors and outdoors, thereby reducing CO poisoning accidents. We also believe that our technique not only can be used for home security but also can be used in industrial applications (for example, to monitor leak occurrence in a pipeline). PMID:27669255

  9. Carbon monoxide poisoning in Jerusalem: epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Shaden; Amitai, Yona; Antopolsky, Meir; Rott, David; Stalnicowicz, Ruth

    2009-02-01

    To describe the epidemiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in Jerusalem and identify risk factors for such poisoning. A retrospective descriptive analysis of patients with CO poisoning who presented to the Hadassah hospitals in Jerusalem from 1994 to 2006. All patients with suspected CO poisoning were examined and those with confirmed cases [carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level >5%] were included. Sources of exposure, seasonal variation, and demographic characteristics were analyzed. There were 292 patients (49% males) with 40 family clusters that accounted for 149 patients (51%); 230 patients (79%) presented during the winter months. All but one had unintentional CO intoxication. The main sources of exposure were faulty gas heaters (n = 135), fire (n = 102), and other residential heating systems (n = 40). The estimated annual incidence of CO poisoning decreased from 6.45 per 100,000 in 1994-2000 to 3.53 per 100,000 in 2001-2006. High-risk intoxication (COHb level >25%) occurred in 84 patients (29%). Factors associated with severe intoxication were male gender, individual patients (compared with those in clusters), and faulty gas heaters (compared with other sources). Males exposed to CO may have a more severe intoxication. The lower risk in patients presenting in clusters could be explained by the assumption that severe presentation in one patient alerts the others who are less severely affected. The implementation of safer standards for residential heating systems and CO detectors together with the public education may explain the decline in the incidence of CO poisoning.

  10. Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Subsequent Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study evaluated the dementia risk after carbon monoxide poisoning (CO poisoning). Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, a total of 9041 adults newly diagnosed with CO poisoning from 2000 to 2011 were identified as the CO poisoning cohort. Four-fold (N = 36,160) of non-CO poisoning insured people were randomly selected as controls, frequency-matched by age, sex, and hospitalization year. Incidence and hazard ratio (HR) of dementia were measured by the end 2011. The dementia incidence was 1.6-fold higher in the CO exposed cohort than in the non-exposed cohort (15.2 vs 9.76 per 10,000 person-years; n = 62 vs 174) with an adjusted HR of 1.50 (95% CI = 1.11–2.04). The sex- and age-specific hazards were higher in male patients (adjusted HR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.20–2.54), and those aged poisoning patients on hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy had an adjusted HR of 1.80 (95% CI = 0.96–3.37). This study suggests that CO poisoning may have association with the risk of developing dementia, which is significant for severe cases. The effectiveness of HBO2 therapy remains unclear in preventing dementia. Patients with CO poisoning are more prevalent with depression. PMID:26735545

  11. Carbon monoxide poisoning in Utah: 1996-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Lindell K; Deru, Kayla; Churchill, Susan; Legler, Joshua; Snow, Greg; Grey, Todd

    2016-01-01

    The true incidence of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is not clearly known, but a description of possible trends could aid in prevention. Investigators searched Utah state databases for emergency department (ED) visits and admissions for CO poisoning and medical examiner records for CO-related fatalities. From 1996-2013, 7,590 individuals were diagnosed with CO poisoning: 6,469 were treated/ released from EDs; 596 were admitted; 525 died. Of 7,065 non-fatal poisonings, 5,950 (84%) were accidental and 498 (7%) were suicide attempts. Few patients (9.7%) were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. For accidental poisonings, internal combustion engines accounted for 43%, smoke inhalation, 34%, and heating sources, 22%. Internal combustion engines were implicated in 97% of suicide attempts. Non-fatal poisonings declined following a 2008 legislative change requiring CO alarms in residences, but we do not know if legislation caused the decline. One hundred forty-one (27%) fatal poisonings were accidental, 361 (70%) suicides and two (0.4%) homicides. Victims with cardiovascular autopsy findings/past cardiovascular history had lower carboxyhemoglobin levels (mean 51.2%, n=53) compared to those without (70.8%, n=472). Mean postmortem carboxyhemoglobin was highest in ages 20-29 years (72.5%). The incidence of CO poisoning in Utah is declining, but CO poisoning is still common. Alarm legislation may aid prevention efforts. An educational campaign addressing the many causes and circumstances of CO poisoning is required for prevention.

  12. Occupational carbon monoxide poisoning in Washington State, 2000-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn K; Bonauto, David K; Whittaker, Stephen G; Adams, Darrin

    2010-10-01

    Washington State workers' compensation data can be used to guide prevention efforts focused on occupational carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Between 2000 and 2005, a total of 345 individual claims comprising 221 different exposure incidents were identified for the 6-year time period. The construction industry had 43 (20%) CO incidents, followed by wholesale trade with 32 (15%), and agriculture with 27 (12%) incidents. Fuel-powered forklifts caused 29% of all incidents, while autos/trucks/buses were responsible for 26%. The number of forklift incidents in fruit packing and cold storage companies declined significantly from 1994 through 2007 (Spearman's rho = 0.6659, p poisoning, a surveillance system that lacks extensive medical records may rely principally on carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) tests. This study demonstrated that 71% of the identified workers' compensation claims had associated COHb tests. The recurrence and timing of CO poisoning as well as control of the CO-generating source were determined. Approximately 8% of all work sites had recurring CO poisoning incidents. Two percent experienced a recurrent incident within 16 days of the initial incident, and 6% experienced a recurrent incident between 16 days and 3 years after the initial incident. Sixty-seven percent of claimants exposed to CO were not in direct control of the CO-generating source; this has implications for CO prevention and underscores the need for all employees to be trained on CO hazards.

  13. Carbon Monoxide Poisonings from Forklift Use During Produce Packing Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Anne E; Langley, Ricky L; McDaniel, Jesse S

    2016-01-01

    In August 2013, the North Carolina Division of Public Health investigated a carbon monoxide (CO) exposure on a farm. Two employees were overcome by CO and lost consciousness while using a propane-powered forklift to load produce into a refrigerated trailer backed up to a warehouse. One employee died, and the second employee was admitted to the hospital for hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Eighteen people, ranging in age from 18 to 69 years, were potentially exposed to CO, including the two employees, a family member who discovered the employees, two bystanders who stopped to offer assistance, and 13 first responders. Thirteen people who assisted in the emergency response experienced symptoms such as headache and dizziness, and all 16 who assisted were evaluated in a local hospital emergency department and released after receiving 100% oxygen. Blood tests showed five people (the two employees, family member, and two bystanders) had elevated blood carboxyhemoglobin levels, but all first responders had levels within normal range. Firefighters measured a peak CO concentration of 2214 parts per million in the warehouse. The North Carolina Division of Occupational Safety and Health investigated and determined that the forklift, operated inside the trailer with no ventilation, was the source of the CO. Public health investigation activities included interviewing responders, obtaining ambient CO concentration measurements from the fire department, advising the local health director, reviewing medical records, and developing a line listing of exposed persons. To prevent CO poisoning, employers should consider replacing gas-powered equipment with electric equipment, which does not produce CO.

  14. Carbon monoxide poisoning in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The world has experienced some very large shifts in the epidemiology of carbon monoxide poisoning, but it remains one of the most important toxicological global causes of morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis can be quickly confirmed with blood gases (pulse oximeters lack both sensitivity and specificity). Several strong predictors for serious neurological sequelae (prolonged loss of consciousness and elevated S100B) and reduced life expectancy (elevated troponin) are now reasonably well established. Despite this clearly defined high-risk group and extensive research into the pathophysiology, there has been little translation into better treatment. Much of the pathophysiological research has focused on hyperbaric oxygen. Yet it is apparent that clinical trials show little evidence for benefit from hyperbaric oxygen, and the most recent even raises the possibility of harm for repeated courses. More logical and promising potential antidotes have been under-researched, although recently both animal and small human studies suggest that erythropoietin may reduce S100B and prevent neurological sequelae. Major breakthroughs are likely to require further research on this and other treatments that may inhibit post-hypoxic inflammatory responses and apoptosis.

  15. The Hydration Structure of Carbon Monoxide by Ab Initio Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Awoonor-Williams, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The solvation of carbon monoxide (CO) in liquid water is important for understanding its toxicological effects and biochemical roles. In this paper, we use ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and CCSD(T)-F12 calculations to assess the accuracy of the Straub and Karplus molecular mechanical (MM) model for CO(aq). The CCSD(T)-F12 CO--H2O potential energy surfaces show that the most stable structure corresponds to water donating a hydrogen bond to the C center. The MM-calculated surface it incorrectly predicts that the O atom is a stronger hydrogen bond acceptor than the C atom. The AIMD simulations indicate that CO is solvated like a hydrophobic solute, with very limited hydrogen bonding with water. The MM model tends to overestimate the degree of hydrogen bonding and overestimates the atomic radius of the C atom. The calculated Gibbs energy of hydration is in good agreement with experiment (9.3 kJ/mol calc. vs 10.7 kJ/mol exptl.). The calculated diffusivity of CO(aq) in TIP3P-model water was 5.19 x 10-5 cm2/s ...

  16. Carbon Monoxide Off-Gassing From Bags of Wood Pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Rossner, Alan; Hopke, Philip K

    2017-12-25

    Wood pellets are increasingly used for space heating in the United States and globally. Prior work has shown that stored bulk wood pellets produce sufficient carbon monoxide (CO) to represent a health concern and exceed regulatory standards for occupational exposures. However, most of the pellets used for residential heating are sold in 40-pound (18.1 kg) plastic bags. This study measured CO emission factors from fresh, bagged-wood pellets as a function of temperature and relative humidity. CO concentrations increased with increasing temperature and moisture in the container. CO measurements in a pellet mill warehouse with stored pallets of bagged pellets had 8-h average CO concentrations up to 100 ppm exceeding occupational standards for worker exposure. Thus, manufacturers, distributors, and home owners should be aware of the potential for CO in storage areas and design facilities with appropriate ventilation and CO sensors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  17. Carbon monoxide in gastrointestinal physiology and its potential in therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Simon J.; Verhulst, Pieter-Jan; Bharucha, Adil; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2013-01-01

    Background While carbon monoxide (CO) is a known toxin, it is now recognized that CO is also an important signaling molecule involved in physiology and pathophysiology. Aims To summarize our current understanding of the role of endogenous CO in the regulation of gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology and potential therapeutic applications of modulating CO. Methods This review is based on a comprehensive search of the Ovid Medline comprehensive database and supplemented by our ongoing studies evaluating the role of CO in gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology. Results CO derived from heme oxygenase-2 is predominantly involved in neuromodulation and in setting the smooth muscle membrane potential while CO derived from heme oxygenase-1 has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties which protect gastrointestinal smooth muscle from damage caused by injury or inflammation. Exogenous CO is being explored as a therapeutic agent in a variety of gastrointestinal disorders including diabetic gastroparesis, postoperative ileus, organ transplantation, inflammatory bowel disease and sepsis. However, identifying the appropriate mechanism for safely delivering CO in humans is a major challenge. Conclusions CO is an important regulator of gastrointestinal function and protects the gastrointestinal tract against noxious injury. CO is a promising therapeutic target in conditions associated with gastrointestinal injury and inflammation. Elucidating the mechanisms by which CO works and developing safe CO delivery mechanisms are necessary to refine therapeutic strategies. PMID:23992228

  18. Carbon monoxide and the CNS: challenges and achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroga, Cláudia S F; Vercelli, Alessandro; Vieira, Helena L A

    2015-01-01

    Haem oxygenase (HO) and its product carbon monoxide (CO) are associated with cytoprotection and maintenance of homeostasis in several different organs and tissues. This review focuses upon the role of exogenous and endogenous CO (via HO activity and expression) in various CNS pathologies, based upon data from experimental models, as well as from some clinical data on human patients. The pathophysiological conditions reviewed are cerebral ischaemia, chronic neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases), multiple sclerosis and pain. Among these pathophysiological conditions, a variety of cellular mechanisms and processes are considered, namely cytoprotection, cell death, inflammation, cell metabolism, cellular redox responses and vasomodulation, as well as the different targeted neural cells. Finally, novel potential methods and strategies for delivering exogenous CO as a drug are discussed, particularly approaches based upon CO-releasing molecules, their limitations and challenges. The diagnostic and prognostic value of HO expression in clinical use for brain pathologies is also addressed. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24758548

  19. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Pathogenesis, Management, and Future Directions of Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jason J; Wang, Ling; Xu, Qinzi; McTiernan, Charles F; Shiva, Sruti; Tejero, Jesus; Gladwin, Mark T

    2017-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning affects 50,000 people a year in the United States. The clinical presentation runs a spectrum, ranging from headache and dizziness to coma and death, with a mortality rate ranging from 1 to 3%. A significant number of patients who survive CO poisoning suffer from long-term neurological and affective sequelae. The neurologic deficits do not necessarily correlate with blood CO levels but likely result from the pleiotropic effects of CO on cellular mitochondrial respiration, cellular energy utilization, inflammation, and free radical generation, especially in the brain and heart. Long-term neurocognitive deficits occur in 15-40% of patients, whereas approximately one-third of moderate to severely poisoned patients exhibit cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmia, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and myocardial infarction. Imaging studies reveal cerebral white matter hyperintensities, with delayed posthypoxic leukoencephalopathy or diffuse brain atrophy. Management of these patients requires the identification of accompanying drug ingestions, especially in the setting of intentional poisoning, fire-related toxic gas exposures, and inhalational injuries. Conventional therapy is limited to normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen, with no available antidotal therapy. Although hyperbaric oxygen significantly reduces the permanent neurological and affective effects of CO poisoning, a portion of survivors still have substantial morbidity. There has been some early success in therapies targeting the downstream inflammatory and oxidative effects of CO poisoning. New methods to directly target the toxic effect of CO, such as CO scavenging agents, are currently under development.

  20. Carbon Monoxide in Exhaled Breath Testing and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a low molecular weight gas, is a ubiquitous environmental product of organic combustion, which is also produced endogenously in the body, as the byproduct of heme metabolism. CO binds to hemoglobin, resulting in decreased oxygen delivery to bodily tissues at toxicological concentrations. At physiological concentrations, CO may have endogenous roles as a potential signaling mediator in vascular function and cellular homeostasis. Exhaled CO (eCO), similar to exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), has been evaluated as a candidate breath biomarker of pathophysiological states, including smoking status, and inflammatory diseases of the lung and other organs. eCO values have been evaluated as potential indicators of inflammation in asthma, stable COPD and exacerbations, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, or during surgery or critical care. The utility of eCO as a marker of inflammation, and potential diagnostic value remains incompletely characterized. Among other candidate “medicinal gases” with therapeutic potential, (e.g., NO and H2S), CO has been shown to act as an effective anti-inflammatory agent in preclinical animal models of inflammatory disease, acute lung injury, sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion injury and organ graft rejection. Current and future clinical trials will evaluate the clinical applicability of this gas as a biomarker and/or therapeutic in human disease. PMID:23446063

  1. Subclinical carbon monoxide poisoning in our health area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo, I.G.; Testa, A.F.; Sangrador, C.O.; Garcia, M.T.A.; Berrocal, J.L.S.; Pastor, N.R.; Martin, J.M.; Garcia, L.S.; Garcia, M.C.F.; Maire-Richard, E.G. [Hospital of Virgen Concha, Zamora (Spain)

    2003-08-01

    We present an observation study on the relationship between high levels of carboxyhemoglobin (COHB) and subclinical poisoning by carbon monoxide (CO) in our health area. The study was carried out in February and March 2000 in 228 over 18-year-old patients of both sexes who went to the Emergency Room for various reasons. After an informed consent was conceded, a venous blood sample was obtained in order to determine the level of COHB; later, we collected the anthropometric data, the data relative to the tobacco use, and the data of the type of heating at home. The values limit of the COHB obtained were the following: in non smokers, 1.9%; in 1-10 cigarettes/day smokers, 5.2%; in 11-20 cigarettes/day smokers, 6.9%; in {gt}20 cigarettes/day smokers, 9.6%. A COHB high level was observed in 25% of the patients regardless of the smoking habits, being the coal-dust slack brazier the source of most frequent exposure to CO.

  2. Carbon monoxide and methane over Canada: July - August 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriss, R. C.; Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Wade, L.; Bartlett, K. B.; Talbot, R. W.; Browell, E. V.; Barrie, L. A.; Hill, G. F.; Burney, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) were measured in the 0.15- to 6-km portion of the troposphere over subarctic and boreal landscapes of midcontinent and eastern Canada during July - August 1990. In the mid-continent region, Arctic air entering the region was characterized by relatively uniform CO concentrations (86-108 parts per billion by volume (ppbv)) and CH4 concentrations (1729-1764 ppbv). Local biomass burning and long-range transport of CO into the area from industrial/urban sources and distant fires did frequently produce enhanced and variable concentrations. Emissions of CH4 from the Hudson Bay lowlands was the primary source for enhanced and variable concentrations, especially at altitudes of 0.15-1 km. In eastern Canada, most of the observed variability in CO and CH4 was similar in origin to the phenomena described for the midcontinent region. However, unexpectedly low concentrations of CO (51 ppbv) and CH4 (1688 ppbv) were measured in the midtroposphere on several flights. Combined meteorological and chemical data indicated that the low CO-CH4 events were the result of long-range transport of tropical Pacific marine air to subarctic latitudes.

  3. Pulling platinum atomic chains by carbon monoxide molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makk, P; Balogh, Z; Csonka, Sz; Halbritter, A

    2012-08-07

    The interaction of carbon monoxide molecules with atomic-scale platinum nanojunctions is investigated by low temperature mechanically controllable break junction experiments. Combining plateau length analysis, two-dimensional conductance-displacement histograms and conditional correlation analysis a comprehensive microscopic picture is proposed about the formation and evolution of Pt-CO-Pt single-molecule configurations. Our analysis implies that before pure Pt monoatomic chains are formed a CO molecule infiltrates the junction, first in a configuration that is perpendicular to the contact axis. This molecular junction is strong enough to pull a monoatomic platinum chain with the molecule being incorporated in the chain. Along the chain formation the molecule can either stay in the perpendicular configuration, or rotate to a parallel configuration. The evolution of the single-molecule configurations along the junction displacement shows quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions, justifying the interpretation in terms of perpendicular and parallel molecular alignment. Our analysis demonstrates that the combination of two-dimensional conductance-displacement histograms with conditional correlation analysis is a useful tool to analyze separately fundamentally different types of junction trajectories in single molecule break junction experiments.

  4. A Wireless and Batteryless Intelligent Carbon Monoxide Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chia Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO poisoning from natural gas water heaters is a common household accident in Taiwan. We propose a wireless and batteryless intelligent CO sensor for improving the safety of operating natural gas water heaters. A micro-hydropower generator supplies power to a CO sensor without battery (COSWOB (2.5 W at a flow rate of 4.2 L/min, and the power consumption of the COSWOB is only ~13 mW. The COSWOB monitors the CO concentration in ambient conditions around natural gas water heaters and transmits it to an intelligent gateway. When the CO level reaches a dangerous level, the COSWOB alarm sounds loudly. Meanwhile, the intelligent gateway also sends a trigger to activate Wi-Fi alarms and sends notifications to the mobile device through the Internet. Our strategy can warn people indoors and outdoors, thereby reducing CO poisoning accidents. We also believe that our technique not only can be used for home security but also can be used in industrial applications (for example, to monitor leak occurrence in a pipeline.

  5. A Wireless and Batteryless Intelligent Carbon Monoxide Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Chia; Sung, Gang-Neng; Chen, Wen-Ching; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Chue, Jin-Ju; Wu, Chieh-Ming; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-09-23

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning from natural gas water heaters is a common household accident in Taiwan. We propose a wireless and batteryless intelligent CO sensor for improving the safety of operating natural gas water heaters. A micro-hydropower generator supplies power to a CO sensor without battery (COSWOB) (2.5 W at a flow rate of 4.2 L/min), and the power consumption of the COSWOB is only ~13 mW. The COSWOB monitors the CO concentration in ambient conditions around natural gas water heaters and transmits it to an intelligent gateway. When the CO level reaches a dangerous level, the COSWOB alarm sounds loudly. Meanwhile, the intelligent gateway also sends a trigger to activate Wi-Fi alarms and sends notifications to the mobile device through the Internet. Our strategy can warn people indoors and outdoors, thereby reducing CO poisoning accidents. We also believe that our technique not only can be used for home security but also can be used in industrial applications (for example, to monitor leak occurrence in a pipeline).

  6. The Role of Oxygen Therapies in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

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    Suleyman Metin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to climate and socio-economic issues in Turkey, the incidence of carbon monoxide (CO poisoning is high, especially in winter. Clinical manifestations may vary depending on the type of CO source, concentration and duration of exposure. The symptoms of CO poisoning predominantly manifest in lots of organs and systems with high oxygen utilization, especially the brain and the heart. The primary aim in oxygen therapy is to eliminate CO and to reduce its toxic effects. In this context, normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen therapy are used to achieve these goals. Normobaric oxygen (NBO treatment is an easily accessible and relatively not expensive modality, where hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy requires specific equipment, certified staff and is available only in some centers. Additionally, HBO treatment has several additional advantages over NBO treatment. Despite its benefits, it is compulsory to search for some criteria in selecting patients to be treated because of the limited availability and access of hyperbaric facilities. For an effective evaluation and an optimal treatment, advanced education of the healthcare professionals on the use of oxygen delivery modalities in the management of CO poisoning is imperative. In this review, it has been aimed to outline the significance of oxygen treatment modalities and to determine patient selection criteria for HBO treatment in the management of CO poisoning which continues to be an important threat to community health care. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 487-494

  7. Carbon monoxide in exhaled breath testing and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2013-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a low molecular weight gas, is a ubiquitous environmental product of organic combustion, which is also produced endogenously in the body, as the byproduct of heme metabolism. CO binds to hemoglobin, resulting in decreased oxygen delivery to bodily tissues at toxicological concentrations. At physiological concentrations, CO may have endogenous roles as a potential signaling mediator in vascular function and cellular homeostasis. Exhaled CO (eCO), similar to exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), has been evaluated as a candidate breath biomarker of pathophysiological states, including smoking status, and inflammatory diseases of the lung and other organs. eCO values have been evaluated as potential indicators of inflammation in asthma, stable COPD and exacerbations, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, or during surgery or critical care. The utility of eCO as a marker of inflammation and its potential diagnostic value remain incompletely characterized. Among other candidate 'medicinal gases' with therapeutic potential, (e.g., NO and H2S), CO has been shown to act as an effective anti-inflammatory agent in preclinical animal models of inflammatory disease, acute lung injury, sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion injury and organ graft rejection. Current and future clinical trials will evaluate the clinical applicability of this gas as a biomarker and/or therapeutic in human disease.

  8. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Cases Autopsied in South Marmara Region

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    Filiz Eren

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonmonoxide (CO related deaths, which are generally preventable accidents that include accidents due to the coal stoves and water heaters in bath at home, the mining accidents, and other accidents. CO accept as the most common cause of poisoning cases in many countries and its prominent feature is being a colorless, odorless and nonirritant gas. In the period from 2007 until the end of 2011, the autopsy records of the ........ of Turkey were reviewed. Over a period of 5 years a total of 5782 autopsies were done of which 218 involved CO poisoning, constituting 3,8 % of total cases. Information regarding age, sex, month, year, and as well as various aspects were examined. Study data were encoded with computer and Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for windows program. Of the cases 76 were (34,9% female, 142 were (65,1% male and male/female ratio was 1,9. Of the cases average age was 46.8, range between 1 and 90 years. 57,8% of deaths were in winter markedly. The highest carboxyhemoglobin saturation was 92% in the blood. Poisoning due to CO leaks from coal heaters is an important problem in our country and surrounding regions. The mining accidents should be reduced by increasing safety in the workplace. We must more expend efforts to educate the public and prevent CO poisoning. Key words: Carbon monoxide, poisoning, autopsy.

  9. Isotopic resolution of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide by NIR diode laser spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Steffen; Salffner, Katharina; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectroscopy with tunable diode lasers allows the simultaneous detection of the three most important isotopologues of carbon dioxide (12CO2, 13CO2, 12C18O16O) and carbon monoxide (12CO, 13CO, 12C18O). The flexible and compact fiber-optic tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) allows selective measurements of CO2 and CO with high isotopic resolution without sample preparation since there is no interference with water vapour. For each species, linear ...

  10. Inhalation toxicology. IX., Times-to-incapacitation for rats exposed to carbon monoxide alone, to hydrogen cyanide alone, and to mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory rats were exposed to experimental atmospheres that contained a) carbon monoxide in air, b) hydrogen cyanide in air, and c) mixtures of CO and HCN in air. The toxic potency of each of the three types of environments was evaluated toxico-kin...

  11. Assimilation of Unusual Carbon Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelhoven, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast taxa traditionally are distinguished by growth tests on several sugars and organic acids. During the last decades it became apparent that many yeast species assimilate a much greater variety of naturally occurring carbon compounds as sole source of carbon and energy. These abilities are

  12. Evaluation of cardiac autonomic function using heart rate variability in children with acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Cagdas; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Kosger, Pelin; Bolluk, Ozge; Kilic, Zubeyir; Ucar, Birsen

    2017-11-01

    Introduction Carbon monoxide poisoning may cause myocardial toxicity and cardiac autonomic dysfunction, which may contribute to the development of life-threatening arrhythmias. We investigated the potential association between acute carbon monoxide exposure and cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability. The present study included 40 children aged 1-17 years who were admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit with acute carbon monoxide poisoning and 40 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Carboxyhaemoglobin and cardiac enzymes were measured at admission. Electrocardiography was performed on admission and discharge, and 24-hour Holter electrocardiography was digitally recorded. Heart rate variability was analysed at both time points - 24-hour recordings - and frequency domains - from the first 5 minutes of intensive care unit admission. Time domain and frequency indices such as high-frequency spectral power and low-frequency spectral power were similar between patient and control groups (p>0.05). The ratio of low-frequency spectral power to high-frequency spectral power was significantly lower in the carbon monoxide poisoning group (pcarbon monoxide poisoning group (pcarbon monoxide poisoning group compared with controls on discharge (p<0.05). The frequency domain indices, especially the ratio of low-frequency spectral power to high-frequency spectral power, are useful for the evaluation of the cardiac autonomic function. The decreased low-frequency spectral power-to-high-frequency spectral power ratio reflects a balance of the autonomic nervous system, which shifted to parasympathetic components.

  13. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Subsequent Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Feng-You; Chen, Wei-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is considered one of the most crucial health concerns. Few studies have investigated the correlation between CO poisoning and the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Therefore, we conducted a population-based, longitudinal cohort study in Taiwan to determine whether patients with CO poisoning are associated with higher risk of developing subsequent CVDs, including arrhythmia, coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF). This retrospective study used the National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised all patients aged ≥20 years with a diagnosis of CO poisoning and hospitalized during 2000 to 2011 (N = 8381), and the comparison cohort comprised randomly selected non-CO-poisoned patients (N = 33,524) frequency-matched with the study cohort by age, sex, and the year of index date. Each patient was individually tracked to identify those who develop CVD events during the follow-up period. Cox proportional hazards regression model was performed to calculate the hazard ratios of CVDs after adjusting for possible confounders. The overall incidences of arrhythmia, CAD, and CHF were higher in the patients with CO poisoning than in the controls (2.57 vs 1.25/1000 person-years, 3.28 vs 2.25/1000 person-years, and 1.32 vs 1.05/1000 person-years, respectively). After adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with CO poisoning were associated with a 1.83-fold higher risk of arrhythmia compared with the comparison cohort, and nonsignificantly associated with risk of CAD and CHF. CO-poisoned patients with coexisting comorbidity or in high severity were associated with significantly and substantially increased risk of all 3 CVDs. CO poisoning is associated with increased risk of subsequent development of arrhythmia. Future studies are required to explore the long-term effects of CO poisoning on the cardiovascular system. PMID:25761191

  14. Carbon monoxide and biliverdin suppress bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiqian; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Xiaobin; Yan, Yunhuan; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Angke; Li, Na; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2017-12-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) causes significant economic losses to the cattle industry worldwide. Previously, we demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can inhibit BVDV replication via an unknown molecular mechanism. To elucidate the mechanism involved, we assess whether the HO-1 downstream metabolites carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin (BV) and iron affect BVDV replication. We treated Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with an exogenous CO donor, CORM-2. We found that CORM-2 but not its inactive form (iCORM-2) inhibited BVDV replication in a dose-dependent and time duration-dependent manner, suggesting a CO-specific mediation of the CORM-2 antiviral effect. Direct incubation of BVDV with high-dose CORM-2 reduced virus titres, suggesting that CORM-2 attenuates BVDV growth by both physically inactivating virus particles in the extracellular environment and affecting intracellular BVDV replication, but mainly via an intracellular mechanism. Exogenous BV treatment, both post-infection and co-incubation with BVDV, inhibited BVDV replication in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that BV has potent antiviral activity against BVDV. Direct incubation of BVDV with BV had no significant effect on virus titres, indicating that BV is not virucidal and attenuates BVDV growth by affecting intracellular BVDV replication. Furthermore, BV was found to affect BVDV penetration but not attachment. However, increased iron via addition of FeCl3 did not interfere with BVDV replication. Collectively, the results of the present study demonstrate that the HO-1 metabolites BV and CO, but not iron, inhibit BVDV replication. These findings not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of HO-1 inhibition of BVDV replication but also suggest potential new control measures for future BVDV infection.

  15. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kosterin, Paul [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Salzberg, Brian M. [Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M. [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Thom, Stephen R., E-mail: sthom@smail.umaryland.edu [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.

  16. Carbon monoxide levels among patrons of hookah cafes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Tracey E; Curbow, Barbara A; Soule, Eric K; Tomar, Scott L; Thombs, Dennis L

    2011-03-01

    Individuals who use a hookah (water pipe) as a method of tobacco smoking are exposed to high levels of carbon monoxide (CO). Assessing hookah use in one of the venues of its use (hookah bars) will aid the understanding of the toxins and exposure for the user. In Florida, smoking is prohibited in public places under the Florida Clean Indoor Act but permitted in establishments that have less than 10% gross revenue from food. To assess the CO level of hookah cafe patrons, using traditional bar patrons as a comparison. After IRB approval, a nighttime field study of patrons (aged >18 years) exiting hookah cafes and traditional bars in 2009 was conducted, using sidewalk locations immediately outside these establishments in a campus community. As hookah cafes and bars are typically entered and exited in groups, every other group of people exiting the establishment was approached. For comparison purposes, the sample collected was similar in number, 173 hookah cafe and 198 traditional bar participants. Results from analysis conducted in 2010 indicate that patrons of hookah cafes had significantly higher CO levels (mean=30.8 parts per million [ppm]) compared to patrons of traditional bars (mean=8.9 ppm). Respondents who indicate no cigarette use in the past month but had visited a hookah cafe still demonstrated significantly higher CO values (mean=28.5 ppm) compared to those exiting traditional bars (mean=8.0 ppm). Current cigarette smokers also produced significantly more CO if exiting a hookah cafe (mean=34.7 ppm) compared to a traditional bar (mean=13.3 ppm). CO levels are higher for patrons of hookah cafes, for both current and non-cigarette smokers. Although users report that they perceive hookah to be less harmful than cigarettes, the greater CO exposure for hookah users that was observed in this study is not consistent with that perception. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Carbon monoxide exchange and partitioning of a managed mountain meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerle, Albin; Kitz, Florian; Spielmann, Felix; Gerdel, Katharina; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    With an average mole fraction of 100 ppb carbon monoxide (CO) plays a critical role in atmospheric chemistry and thus has an indirect global warming potential. While sources/sinks of CO on land at least partially cancel out each other, the magnitude of CO sources and sinks is highly uncertain. Even if direct CO fluxes from/to land ecosystems are very much likely clearly lower in magnitude compared to anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning, emissions from chemical precursors and the OH sink, it may be premature to neglect any direct contributions of land ecosystems to the CO budget. In addition, changes in global climate and resulting changes in global productivity may require re-evaluating older data and assumptions. One major reason for the large uncertainty is a general scarcity of empirical data. An additional factor contributing to the uncertainty is the lack of ecosystem-scale CO exchange measurements, i.e. CO flux data that encompass all sources and sinks within an ecosystem. Here we present data on continuous eddy covariance measurements of CO-fluxes above a managed mountain grassland in combination with soil chamber flux measurements, within- and above-canopy concentration profiles and an inverse Lagrangian analysis to disentangle sinks and sources of CO. Results show the grassland ecosystem to be a net source for CO during daytime, with increasing flux rates at higher solar radiation. At night, if at all, the meadow is a slight sink for CO. The same holds true regarding the soil flux measurements. Additionally, a two-month rainout experiment revealed hardly any differences in CO soil fluxes between rainout- and control-plots unless extremely dry conditions were reached.

  18. Carbon monoxide pollution and neurodevelopment: A public health concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Although an association between air pollution and adverse systemic health effects has been known for years, the effect of pollutants on neurodevelopment has been underappreciated. Recent evidence suggests a possible link between air pollution and neurocognitive impairment and behavioral disorders in children, however, the exact nature of this relationship remains poorly understood. Infants and children are uniquely vulnerable due to the potential for exposure in both the fetal and postnatal environments during critical periods in development. Carbon monoxide (CO), a common component of indoor and outdoor air pollution, can cross the placenta to gain access to the fetal circulation and the developing brain. Thus, CO is of particular interest as a known neurotoxin and a potential public health threat. Here we review overt CO toxicity and the policies regulating CO exposure, detail the evidence suggesting a potential link between CO-associated ambient air pollution, tobacco smoke, and learning and behavioral abnormalities in children, describe the effects of subclinical CO exposure on the brain during development, and provide mechanistic insight into a potential connection between CO exposure and neurodevelopmental outcome. CO can disrupt a number of critical processes in the developing brain, providing a better understanding of how this specific neurotoxin may impair neurodevelopment. However, further investigation is needed to better define the effects of perinatal CO exposure on the immature brain. Current policies regarding CO standards were established based on evidence of cardiovascular risk in adults with pre-existing comorbidities. Thus, recent and emerging data highlighted in this review regarding CO exposure in the fetus and developing child may be important to consider when the standards and guidelines are evaluated and revised in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. First Retrieval of Thermospheric Carbon Monoxide From Mars Dayglow Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Jain, Sonal; Deighan, Justin; Lumpe, Jerry; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Stewart, A. Ian; Crismani, Matteo; Stiepen, Arnaud; Chaffin, Michael S.; Mayyasi-Matta, Majd A.; McClintock, William E.; Holsclaw, Greg; Lefevre, Franck; Lo, Daniel; Clarke, John T.; Montmessin, Franck; Bougher, Stephen W.; Bell, Jared M.; Eparvier, Frank; Thiemann, Ed; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; Elrod, Meredith K.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    As a minor species in the Martian thermosphere, Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a tracer that can be used to constrain changing circulation patterns between the lower thermosphere and upper mesosphere of Mars. By linking CO density distributions to dynamical wind patterns, the structure and variability of the atmosphere will be better understood. Direct measurements of CO can therefore provide insight into the magnitude and pattern of winds and provide a metric for studying the response of the atmosphere to solar forcing. In addition, CO measurements can help solve outstanding photochemical modeling problems in explaining the abundance of CO at Mars. CO is directly observable by electron impact excitation and solar resonance fluorescence emissions in the far-ultraviolet (FUV). The retrieval of CO from solar fluorescence was first proposed over 40 years ago, but has been elusive at Mars due to significant spectral blending. However, by simulating the spectral shape of each contributing emission feature, electron impact excitation and solar fluorescence brightnesses can be extracted from the composite spectrum using a multiple linear regression approach. We use CO Fourth Positive Group (4PG) molecular band emission observed on the limb (130 - 200 km) by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft over both northern and southern hemispheres from October 2014 to December 2016. We present the first direct retrieval of CO densities by FUV remote sensing in the upper atmosphere of Mars. Atmospheric composition is inferred using the terrestrial Atmospheric Ultraviolet Radiance Integrated Code adapted to the Martian atmosphere. We investigate the sensitivity of CO density retrievals to variability in solar irradiance, solar longitude, and local time. We compare our results to predictions from the Mars Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model as well as in situ measurements by the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer

  20. Exhaled carbon monoxide in asthmatics: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Mao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non-invasive assessment of airway inflammation is potentially advantageous in asthma management. Exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO measurement is cheap and has been proposed to reflect airway inflammation and oxidative stress but current data are conflicting. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to determine whether eCO is elevated in asthmatics, is regulated by steroid treatment and reflects disease severity and control. Methods A systematic search for English language articles published between 1997 and 2009 was performed using Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. Observational studies comparing eCO in non-smoking asthmatics and healthy subjects or asthmatics before and after steroid treatment were included. Data were independently extracted by two investigators and analyzed to generate weighted mean differences using either a fixed or random effects meta-analysis depending upon the degree of heterogeneity. Results 18 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The eCO level was significantly higher in asthmatics as compared to healthy subjects and in intermittent asthma as compared to persistent asthma. However, eCO could not distinguish between steroid-treated asthmatics and steroid-free patients nor separate controlled and partly-controlled asthma from uncontrolled asthma in cross-sectional studies. In contrast, eCO was significantly reduced following a course of corticosteroid treatment. Conclusions eCO is elevated in asthmatics but levels only partially reflect disease severity and control. eCO might be a potentially useful non-invasive biomarker of airway inflammation and oxidative stress in nonsmoking asthmatics.

  1. Carbon monoxide poisoning-induced cardiomyopathy from charcoal at a barbecue restaurant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jun; Chung, Yun Kyung; Kwak, Kyeong Min; Ahn, Se-Jin; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ju, Young-Su; Kwon, Young-Jun; Kim, Eun-A

    2015-01-01

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning has important clinical value because it can cause severe adverse cardiovascular effects and sudden death. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning due to charcoal is well reported worldwide, and increased use of charcoal in the restaurant industry raises concern for an increase in occupational health problems. We present a case of carbon monoxide poisoning induced cardiomyopathy in a 47-year-old restaurant worker. A male patient was brought to the emergency department to syncope and complained of left chest pain. Cardiac angiography and electrocardiography were performed to rule out acute ischemic heart disease, and cardiac markers were checked. After relief of the symptoms and stabilization of the cardiac markers, the patient was discharged without any complications. Electrocardiography was normal, but cardiac angiography showed up to a 40% midsegmental stenosis of the right coronary artery with thrombotic plaque. The level of cardiac markers was elevated at least 5 to 10 times higher than the normal value, and the carboxyhemoglobin concentration was 35% measured at one hour after syncope. Following the diagnosis of acute carbon monoxide poisoning induced cardiomyopathy, the patient's medical history and work exposure history were examined. He was found to have been exposed to burning charcoal constantly during his work hours. Severe exposure to carbon monoxide was evident in the patient because of high carboxyhemoglobin concentration and highly elevated cardiac enzymes. We concluded that this exposure led to subsequent cardiac injury. He was diagnosed with acute carbon monoxide poisoning-induced cardiomyopathy due to an unsafe working environment. According to the results, the risk of exposure to noxious chemicals such as carbon monoxide by workers in the food service industry is potentially high, and workers in this sector should be educated and monitored by the occupational health service to prevent adverse effects.

  2. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer Observations of Water Vapor and Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, R. Todd; Murchie, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft began taking observations in September 2006 and has now collected more than a full Martian year of data. Retrievals performed using the near-infrared spectra obtained by CRISM are used to characterize the seasonal and spatial variation of the column abundance of water vapor and the column-averaged mixing ratio of carbon monoxide. CRISM retrievals show nominal behavior in water vapor during northern hemisphere spring and summer with maximum abundance reaching 50 precipitable micrometers. Water vapor abundance during the southern hemisphere spring and summer appears significantly reduced compared to observations by other instruments taken during previous years. The CRISM retrievals show the seasonally and globally averaged carbon monoxide mixing ratio to be 700 ppm, but with strong seasonal variations at high latitudes. The summertime near-polar carbon monoxide mixing ratio falls to 200 ppm in the south and 400 ppm in the north as carbon dioxide sublimates from the seasonal polar ice caps and dilutes noncondensable species including carbon monoxide. At low latitudes, the carbon monoxide mixing ratio varies in response to the mean seasonal cycle of surface pressure.

  3. A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, Michael G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10°C to 30°C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

  4. The Effect of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning on Platelet Volume in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halise Akça

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence supporting the important role of mean platelet volume (MPV as a marker of hypoxia and inflammation. In this study, we aimed to determine changes in MPV values in pediatric patients with carbon monoxide poisoning. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated children who were diagnosed with carbon monoxide poisoning in our hospital between January 2005 and 2014. Results: We included 228 children with carbon monoxide poisoning (49% male in this retrospective, controlled study. The mean age of the patients was 88±56 months. Control group consisted of 200 age-matched healthy children. There was no statistically significant difference in MPV levels between the study and control groups (8.43±1.1 fL and 8.26±0.7 fL, respectively. No correlation of MPV and platelet count with carboxyhemoglobin (COHb was found. Conclusion: In our study, it was determined that MPV value was not a helpful parameter for predicting the diagnosis of acute carbon monoxide poisoning in childhood. The difference between the MPV values and the lack of significance and the absence of correlation between MPV value and COHb level led to the fact that MPV was not a guide indicating the clinical severity of the condition.

  5. Aspiration Pneumonia in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Patients with Loss of Consciousness: Prevalence, Outcomes, and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Chang Hwan; Huh, Jin Won; Seo, Dong Woo; Oh, Bum Jin; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2017-12-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is associated with significant morbidity and mortality; however, little is known about aspiration pneumonia in patients with carbon monoxide intoxication, which is the leading cause of poisoning-related death. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence, clinical impacts, and risk factors for developing aspiration pneumonia in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning with loss of consciousness. A retrospective analysis of a carbon monoxide poisoning registry was performed at our emergency department for the period January 2008 to December 2015. All adult carbon monoxide poisoning patients with loss of consciousness were included. Aspiration pneumonia developed in 103 (19.2%) of 537 patients. It was associated with increased ventilator use (52.4% vs 3.2%), length of hospital stay (median [interquartile range], 3.6 [2.1-5.1] vs 1.3 [0.6-2.1] days), and in-hospital mortality (5.8% vs 0.0%) (all P 12,000/mm3, the odds ratio increased up to 17.75 (95% CI 10.65-29.59; P carbon monoxide poisoning patients with loss of consciousness and was associated with poor outcomes. Additionally, altered mental status on emergency department arrival, white blood cell count, and increased exposure duration were independently associated with the development of aspiration pneumonia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbon monoxide as an electron donor for the biological reduction of sulphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parshina, S.N.; Sipma, J.; Henstra, A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are able to use carbon monoxide (CO) as a carbon source and electron donor for biological sulphate reduction. These strains exhibit variable resistance to CO toxicity. The most resistant SRB can grow and use CO as an

  7. Characterization of Fe-Co-Mn catalysts after carbon monoxide hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, S.L.; Serbia, M.A.; Baechler, R.; Orozco, J. [Laboratorio de Cinetica y Catalisis, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101A (Venezuela); e-mail: goncor@ula.ve

    2003-07-01

    An Fe-Co-Mn catalysts series after hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been characterized. The XRD analysis shows the magnetite as main crystalline phase after reaction, in addition of carbon and carbide phases. All these phases lead to hydrogen consumption and oxidation rate changes on Fe-Co-Mn catalysts. A phase transformation superficial diagram is analysed. (Author)

  8. Neurological Effects of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskun YARAR

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning (COP is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity due to poisoning in all over the world. Although the incidence of COP has not been known exactly in the childhood, almost one-third of CO exposures occurred in children. The data regarding COP in children are inconclusive. Children may be more vulnerable to CO exposure than adults as a result of their high respiration and metabolic rates, high oxygen metabolism, and immature central nervous system. Recent researches proposed new theories about neurological effects of CO toxicity. The clinical presentations associated acute COP may be various and nonspecific. Unrecognized CO exposure may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. CO exposed children often become symptomatic earlier, and recover more rapidly, than similarly CO exposed adults. Mild clinical signs and symptoms associated with COP are headache, dizziness, weakness, lethargy, and myalgia; however, severe signs and symptoms such as blurred vision, syncope, convulsion, coma, cardiopulmonary arrest and death can also accompany with COP. Neurologic manifestations can include altered mental status at different degrees, neck stiffness, tremor, ataxia, and positive Babinski's sign. Delayed neurologic sequels (DNS of COP might be seen in children like adults. DNS symptoms and signs in children include memory problems, mental retardation, mutism, fecal and urinary incontinence, motor deficits, facial palsy, psychosis, chronic headache, seizures, and epilepsy. After CO exposure children must be cared to detect and treat DNS. Although hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is reported to prevent development of DNS, its indications, application duration and procedures are controversial in both of the children and adults. Although their predictive values are limited, exposing to CO more than eight hours and suffering from CO-induced coma, cardiac arrest, lactic acidosis, high COHb levels, and pathologic findings

  9. The open-ocean source of atmospheric carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbins, Aron; Uher, Günther; Kitidis, Vassilis; Law, Cliff S.; Upstill-Goddard, Robert C.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2006-07-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) atmospheric mixing ratios and surface-water concentrations were determined during Atlantic Meridional Transect cruise number 10, April-May 2000. Atmospheric CO increased from south (mean=74±9 ppbv) to north (mean=151±19 ppbv) with a steep increase around the intertropical convergence zone. Surface-water CO (0.2-2.6 nmol L -1) showed pronounced diurnal variations with afternoon maxima exceeding pre-dawn minima 5-7 fold. Modest regional variations, as indicated by maximum daily CO concentrations, were also observed. Highest CO maxima occurred at ˜11.5°N, where high solar irradiance was combined with elevated coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) levels and modest winds, while lowest CO maxima occurred during periods of high winds and lowest solar irradiance near the western European margin at 45°N. Atlantic Ocean CO emissions were estimated to be 1.5±1.1 Tg CO-C yr -1 based on near-instantaneous atmospheric CO, sea-surface CO and windspeeds from the cruise. However, as spatial and temporal variability in both terms was considered to be unique to the timing and path of the cruise, the mean Atlantic diel cycle of sea-surface CO concentration was estimated by pooling all cruise data into 1-h sections, yielding a mean of 0.94 nmol L -1; and diurnal variations from 0.4 to 1.6 nmol L -1. Using the mean diurnal cycle, the Atlantic and global open-ocean sources of CO to the atmosphere were estimated to be 0.9±0.6 and 3.7±2.6 Tg CO-C yr -1, respectively. Therefore it is our contention that IPCC-2001 (Prather, M., Ehhalt, D., Dentener, F., Derwent, R., Dlugokencky, E., Holland, E., Isaksen, I., Katima, J., Kirchhoff, V., Matson, P., Midgley, P., Wang, M., 2001. Chapter 4: Atmospheric chemistry and greenhouse gases. In: Houghton, J.T., Ding, Y., Griggs, D.J., Noguer, M., van der Linden, P.J., Dai, X., Maskell, K., Johnson, C.A. (Eds.), Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Contribution of working group 1 to the third assessment report of the

  10. Assessing recent smoking status by measuring exhaled carbon monoxide levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnSofi Sandberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoke causes both acute and chronic changes of the immune system. Excluding recent smoking is therefore important in clinical studies with chronic inflammation as primary focus. In this context, it is common to ask the study subjects to refrain from smoking within a certain time frame prior to sampling. The duration of the smoking cessation is typically from midnight the evening before, i.e. 8 hours from sampling. As it has been shown that a proportion of current smokers underestimates or denies smoking, objective assessment of recent smoking status is of great importance. Our aim was to extend the use of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO(breath, a well-established method for separating smokers from non-smokers, to assessment of recent smoking status. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The time course of CO(breath decline was investigated by hourly measurements during one day on non-symptomatic smokers and non-smokers (6+7, as well as by measurements on three separate occasions on non-smokers (n = 29, smokers with normal lung function (n = 38 and smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 19 participating in a clinical study. We used regression analysis to model the decay, and receiver operator characteristics analysis for evaluation of model performance. The decline was described as a mono-exponential decay (r(2 = 0.7 with a half-life of 4.5 hours. CO decline rate depends on initial CO levels, and by necessity a generic cut-off is therefore crude as initial CO(breath varies a lot between individuals. However, a cut-off level of 12 ppm could classify recent smokers from smokers having refrained from smoking during the past 8 hours with a specificity of 94% and a sensitivity of 90%. CONCLUSIONS: We hereby describe a method for classifying recent smokers from smokers having refrained from smoking for >8 hours that is easy to implement in a clinical setting.

  11. Air quality assessment of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tumwitike

    groups based on distribution of CO, SO2 and NO2, air temperature, wind speed and wind direction. Furthermore, factor ..... Wind direction in Blantyre illustrating the prevailing southerly winds consistent with a wind speed of 4-6 m s-1. months of May, June, ..... monoxide in underground car parks in Hong Kong. Indoor Built.

  12. Detection of carbon monoxide poisoning that occurred before a house fire in three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Toru; Yonemitsu, Kosei; Sasao, Ako; Ohtani, Maki; Mimasaka, Sohtaro

    2015-09-01

    In our institutes, we perform a quantitative evaluation of volatile hydrocarbons in post-mortem blood in all fatal fire-related cases using headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry. We previously reported that benzene concentrations in the blood were positively correlated with carbon monoxide-hemoglobin (CO-Hb) concentrations in fire-related deaths. Here, we present 3 cases in which benzene concentrations in the blood were not correlated with CO-Hb concentrations. A high CO-Hb concentration without a hydrocarbon component, such as benzene, indicates that the deceased inhaled carbon monoxide that was not related to the smoke from the fire. Comparing volatile hydrocarbons with CO-Hb concentrations can provide more information about the circumstances surrounding fire-related deaths. We are currently convinced that this is the best method to detect if carbon monoxide poisoning occurred before a house fire started. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Range of 1-3 keV Electrons in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, M.; Andersen, H.H.; Schou, Jørgen

    1985-01-01

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than that in n......The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than...... that in nitrogen whereas the range in carbon monoxide is about 20% larger than that in the nitrogen....

  14. Carbon Monoxide Accumulation in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.; Norcrosss, J. R.; Alexander, D. J.; Sanders, R. W.; Makowski, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Life support technology in large closed systems like submarines and space stations catalyzes carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide, which is easily removed. However, in a small system like the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), spacesuit, CO from exogenous (contaminated oxygen (O (sub 2) supply) and endogenous (human metabolism) sources will accumulate in the free suit volume. The free volume becomes a sink for CO that is rebreathed by the astronaut. The accumulation through time depends on many variables: the amount absorbed by the astronaut, the amount produced by the astronaut (between 0.28 and 0.34 ?moles per hour per kilogram)[1], the amount that enters the suit from contaminated O (sub 2), the amount removed through suit leak, the free volume of the suit, and the O (sub 2) partial pressure[2], just to list a few. Contamination of the EMU O (sub 2) supply with no greater than 1 part per million CO was the motivation for empirical measurements from CO pulse oximetry (SpCO) as well as mathematical modeling of the EMU as a rebreather for CO. Methods: We developed a first-order differential mixing equation as well as an iterative method to compute CO accumulation in the EMU. Pre-post measurements of SpCO (Rad-57, Masimo Corporation) from EMU ground training and on-orbit extravehicular activities (EVAs) were collected. Results: Initial modeling without consideration of the astronaut as a sink but only the source of CO showed that after 8 hours breathing 100 percent O (sub 2) with a 10 milliliter per minute (760 millimeters Hg at 21 degrees Centigrade standard) suit leak, an endogenous production rate of 0.23 moles per hour per kilogram for a 70 kilogram person with 42 liters (1.5 cubic feet) free suit volume resulted in a peak CO partial pressure (pCO) of 0.047 millimeters Hg at 4.3 pounds per square inch absolute (222 millimeters Hg). Preliminary results based on a 2008 model[3] with consideration of the astronaut as a sink and source of CO

  15. Targeting Astrocytes for Treating Neurological Disorders: Carbon Monoxide and Noradrenaline-Induced Increase in Lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Anemari; Vardjan, Nina; Zorec, Robert

    2017-06-22

    There are at least three reasons why brain astrocytes represent a new target for treating neurological disorders. First, although the human neocortex represents over 80% of brain mass, neurons are outnumbered by non-neuronal cells, including astrocytes, a neuroglial cell type. Second, as in neurons, vesicle-based release of transmitters is present in astrocytes, however with much slower kinetics than in neurons. Third, astrocytes contain glycogen, which can be transformed to L-lactate in glycolysis. L-lactate is considered to be a fuel and a signalling molecule involved in cognition and neuroprotection. The mechanisms of neuroprotection are unclear but may be linked to carbon monoxide, a product of the heme oxygenase, an evolutionarily conserved cellular cytoprotectant. Increased levels of local carbon monoxide arising from heme oxygenase activity may increase L-lactate, but direct measurements of cytosolic L-lactate are lacking. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanosensor selective for L-lactate was used to monitor cytosolic levels of L-lactate while cultured astrocytes were exposed to carbon monoxide. The results revealed that in astrocytes exposed to carbon monoxide there is no significant increase in L-lactate, however, when noradrenaline, a potent glycogenolytic agent, is applied, cytosolic levels of L-lactate are increased, but strongly attenuated in astrocytes pretreated with carbon monoxide. These first measurements of carbon monoxide-modulated L-lactate levels in astrocytes provide evidence that the L-lactate and heme oxygenase neuroprotective systems may interact. In conclusion, not only the abundance of astrocytes but their signalling capacity using vesicles and metabolites, such as L-lactate, are valid targets for neurological disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Reduction of carbon monoxide emission from a solid-fuel thermo-accumulation furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakić Dragoljub

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many households in Serbia, using electric thermo-accumulation furnaces for heating, have been forced to find an alternative solution, due to a significant increase in electricity prices during the last decade. A possible solution is replacing electric heating appliances with the solid fuel-fired ones. A prototype of a new concept of thermo-accumulation solid fuel-fired furnace has been developed to meet these growing needs, providing electricity saving together with considerable environmental benefits. Two strategies for reduction of carbon monoxide emission are examined in the paper: application of Pt/Al2O3 catalyst, in the form of 3 ± 0.3 mm spheres, providing further combustion of flue gases within the furnace, as well as an additional emission reduction by means of the air excess control. Experimental investigations of the catalyst influence on the conversion of carbon monoxide have been done for different operation regimes and positions of the catalyst. The paper presents selected results regarding carbon monoxide emission during wood and coal combustion. Investigations suggest a considerable effect of the catalyst and a strong influence of the catalyst position within the furnace to carbon monoxide emission reduction. In addition, experimental tests have been conducted to asses the effect of the air excess control in the furnace on carbon monoxide emission. The amount of combustion air, the flue gas flow rate, and the fuel feeding regime have been adjusted in order to keep the flue gas oxygen content in a relatively narrow range, thus obtaining controlled combustion conditions and lower carbon monoxide emission. In this way, the furnace has been made able to respond to the changes in heating needs, fuel quality and other parameters, which is advantageous in comparison with similar solid-fuel fired furnaces. .

  17. Selected constituents in the smokes of U. S. commercial cigaretts: tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Quincy, R.B.; Guerin, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    One hundred twenty-one brands of United States commercial cigarettes were analyzed for their deliveries of tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide under standard analytical smoking conditions. The sample included both filter and nonfilter cigarettes. Comparisons of carbon monoxide deliveries over the range of observed tar deliveries indicated a very high correlation between CO and tar for filter cigarettes, but nonfilter cigarettes tended to produce much less CO than would have been predicted from their tar deliveries. Comparison of ORNL nicotine values for specific brands with those determined by the Federal Trade Commission yield no statistically significant differences between laboratories. 4 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Range Measurements of keV Hydrogen Ions in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3–3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen....... The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees...

  19. Increased incidence of still birth in piglets associated with levels of atmospheric carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E N

    1979-03-31

    Raised levels of atmospheric carbon monoxide, associated with malfunctioning gas-fired creep heaters and inadequate ventilation, appeared responsible for an increased incidence of stillbirths in two herds. In one, a concentration of 180 to 200 ppm of carbon monoxide was readily produced. Both problems resolved when the ventilation and heating were improved, the incidence of stillbirths in one herd falling from 28 to 6.7 per cent. It is suggested that similar incidents may have occurred during cold weather but have been ascribed to other causes.

  20. Increased incidence of still birth in piglets associated with high levels of atmospheric carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E.N.

    1979-03-31

    Raised levels of atmospheric carbon monoxide, associated with malfunctioning gas-fired creep heaters and inadequate ventilation, appeared responsible for an increased incidence of stillbirths in two herds. In one, a concentration of 180 to 200 ppm of carbon monoxide was readily produced. Both problems resolved when the ventilation and heating were improved, the incidence of stillbirths in one herd falling from 28 to 6.7%. It is suggested that similar incidents may have occurred during cold weather but have been ascribed to other causes. 5 references, 1 table.

  1. Observation of black carbon, ozone and carbon monoxide in the Kali Gandaki Valley Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Kathayat, B.

    2014-12-01

    The increased melting of snow and ice in the arctic and the Himalaya is a growing concern for all of the earth's population. Deposition of black carbon (BC) on the snow and ice surface accelerates melting by absorbing the radiative energy and directly transferring all that energy onto the underlying surface. During pre-monsoon season, satellite images show a thick layer of haze covering the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) and the Himalayan foothills. Sub-micron particles are transported to the Himalaya from the IGP predominantly driven by the thermal valley wind system. The Himalayas consist of some of the tallest mountain ranges in the world, over 8000m tall that reach the stratosphere. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from IGP to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.) half-way along the Kali Gandaki valley. The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Here we present our observations of black carbon, ozone, carbon monoxide at Jomsom to show the diurnal and seasonal variability of the pollutants. The results show diurnal patterns in the concentration of these pollutants and also episodes of high pollutant transport along the valley. These transport episodes are more common during the pre-monsoon season which indicates that deep mountain valleys like the Kali Gandaki valley facilitate the transport of pollutants and thus promote snow and glacial melting.

  2. Conversion of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by pulse dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taobo; Liu, Hongxia; Xiong, Xiang; Feng, Xinxin

    2017-01-01

    The conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO) was investigated in a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor, and the effects of different process conditions on the CO2 conversion were investigated. The results showed that the increase of input power could optimize the conversion of CO2 to CO. The CO2 conversion and CO yield were negatively correlated with the gas flow rate, but there was an optimum gas flow rate, that made the CO selectivity best. The carrier gas (N2, Ar) was conducive to the conversion of CO2, and the effect of N2 as carrier gas was better than Ar. The conversion of CO2 to CO was enhanced by addition of the catalyst (5A molecular sieve).

  3. The impacts of temperature on the absorption spectral lines of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Jianqiang; Xu Yuanze; Gao Xiaorong; Wang Li; Wang Zeyong, E-mail: jianqguo@home.swjtu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In order to study the change of temperature on the effects of carbon monoxide absorption spectral lines, first of all proceed from the principle of absorption spectra, using theoretical analysis method, and the transmission and absorption database of the high-resolution molecular educed the carbon monoxide absorption spectrum intensity of spectral lines, integrated widening line type function and absorption coefficient concerned with temperature, then we got the change curve between carbon monoxide absorption spectrum intensity of spectral lines, integrated widening line type function and absorption coefficient with temperature by the numerical simulation of MATLAB, and analyzed and discussed the relationship between the temperature and them. The results showed that the temperature on the effects of carbon monoxide absorption spectral lines, especially on an Integrated widening line type function is complex, and different laser frequencies will also affect the relationship of the line type function and the absorption coefficient change with temperature, which has important reference value for the absorption and measurement of carbon in practical application.

  4. Chemical production from waste carbon monoxide: its potential for energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrmann, C.A.; Schiefelbein, G.F.; Molton, P.M.; Li, C.T.; Elliott, D.C.; Baker, E.G.

    1977-11-01

    Results of a study of the potential for energy conservation by producing chemicals from by-product or waste carbon monoxide (CO) from industrial sources are summarized. Extensive compilations of both industrial sources and uses for carbon monoxide were developed and included. Reviews of carbon monoxide purification and concentration technology and preliminary economic evaluations of carbon monoxide concentration, pipeline transportation and utilization of CO in the synthesis of ammonia and methanol are included. Preliminary technical and economic feasibility studies were made of producing ammonia and methanol from the by-product CO produced by a typical elemental phosphorus plant. Methanol synthesis appears to be more attractive than ammonia synthesis when using CO feedstock because of reduced water gas shift and carbon dioxide removal requirements. The economic studies indicate that methanol synthesis from CO appears to be competitive with conventional technology when the price of natural gas exceeds $0.82/million Btu, while ammonia synthesis from CO is probably not competitive until the price of natural gas exceeds $1.90/million Btu. It is concluded that there appears to be considerable potential for energy conservation in the chemical industry, by collecting CO rather than flaring it, and using it to make major chemicals such as ammonia and methanol.

  5. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, Sergey S.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 18}O and Δ{sup 17}O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated {sup 13}CO/{sup 12}CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in {sup 13}C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH{sub 4}) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH{sub 4} to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in {sup 13}C, were found significant

  6. Outcome of Patients with Carbon Monoxide Poisoning at a Far-East Poison Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ja-Liang; Huang, Wen-Hung; Yang, Huang-Yu; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Lin, Che-Min; Lee, Shwu-Hua; Wang, I-Kuan; Liang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Lin, Wey-Ran; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many cases of carbon monoxide poisoning in Taiwan are due to burning charcoal. Nevertheless, few reports have analyzed the mortality rate of these patients who survive to reach a hospital and die despite intensive treatment. Therefore, this study examined the clinical features, physiological markers, and outcomes after carbon monoxide poisoning and the associations between these findings. Methods We analyzed the records of 261 patients who were referred for management of carbon monoxide intoxication between 2000 and 2010. Patients were grouped according to status at discharge as alive (survivor, n = 242) or dead (non-survivor, n = 19). Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and mortality data were obtained for analysis. Results Approximately half of the cases (49.4%) attempted suicide by burning charcoal. Most of the patients were middle-aged adults (33±19 years), and were referred to our hospital in a relatively short period of time (6±10 hours). Carbon monoxide produced many serious complications after exposure: fever (26.1%), hypothermia (9.6%), respiratory failure (34.1%), shock (8.4%), myocardial infarction (8.0%), gastrointestinal upset (34.9%), hepatitis (18.4%), renal failure (25.3%), coma (18.0%) and rhabdomyolysis (21.8%). Furthermore, the non-survivors suffered greater incidences of hypothermia (Pcarbon monoxide poisoning (OR 8.696, 95% CI 2.053-37.370, P=0.003). Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed that patients with shock suffered greater cumulative mortality than without shock (Log-rank test, Chi-square 147.404, Pcarbon monoxide-poisoned patients at our center was 7.3%. Furthermore, the analysis indicates that shock was most strongly associated with higher risk of mortality. PMID:25745854

  7. 40 CFR 52.2428 - Control Strategy: Carbon monoxide and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ozone. 52.2428 Section 52.2428 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Control Strategy: Carbon monoxide and ozone. (a) Determination—EPA has determined that, as of November 5, 1997, the Richmond ozone nonattainment area, which consists of the counties of Chesterfield, Hanover...

  8. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons...

  9. Carbon monoxide oxidation using Zn–Cu–Ti hydrotalcite-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon monoxide oxidation using Zn–Cu–Ti hydrotalcite-derived catalysts. O SABERa,b,∗ and T ZAKIb. aPhysics Department, Faculty of Science, King Faisal University, Al-Hassa 31982, P. O. Box 400,. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. bPetroleum Refining Division, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, Nasr City, P.B. 11727, ...

  10. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  11. Operations and maintenance manual, atmospheric contaminant sensor. Addendum 1: Carbon monoxide monitor model 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    An instrument for monitoring the carbon monoxide content of the ambient atmosphere is described. The subjects discussed are: (1) theory of operation, (2) system features, (3) controls and monitors, (4) operational procedures, and (5) maintenance and troubleshooting. Block drawings and circuit diagrams are included to clarify the text.

  12. [Dynamics of blood gases and acid-base balance in patients with carbon monoxide acute poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polozova, E V; Shilov, V V; Bogachova, A S; Davydova, E V

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of blood gases and acid-base balance covered patients with carbon monoxide acute poisoning, in accordance with inhalation trauma presence. Evidence is that thermochemical injury of respiratory tract induced severe acid-base dysbalance remaining decompensated for a long time despite the treatment.

  13. Connections between Concepts Revealed by the Electronic Structure of Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Bihui; Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.

    2012-01-01

    Different models for the electronic structure of carbon monoxide are suggested in influential textbooks. Therefore, this electronic structure offers an interesting subject in teaching because it can be used as an example to relate seemingly conflicting concepts. Understanding the connections between ostensibly different methods and between…

  14. ' Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in d Childi'yA Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Child: A Case Report. Nge/ra/zjoz/r/m/ of Pawlz'r/nv'rs 2004; 31:56. The exact incidence of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in Nigeria is unknown. Globally, CO poisoning is frequently unrecognized and under-reported since the clinical presentation is relatively non-specific. The circumstances usually involve an ...

  15. Oxalyl chloride as a practical carbon monoxide source for carbonylation reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen V F; Ulven, Trond

    2015-01-01

    A method for generation of high-quality carbon monoxide by decomposition of oxalyl chloride in an aqueous hydroxide solution is described. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated in the synthesis of heterocycles and for hydroxy-, alkoxy-, amino-, and reductive carbonylation reactions...

  16. Palladium-catalyzed carbonylative sonogashira coupling of aryl bromides using near stoichiometric carbon monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Karoline T.; Laursen, Simon R.; Lindhardt, Anders T.

    2014-01-01

    A general procedure for the palladium-catalyzed carbonylative Sonogashira coupling of aryl bromides is reported, using near stoichiometric amounts of carbon monoxide. The method allows a broad substrate scope in moderate to excellent yields. The formed alkynone motive serves as a platform...

  17. Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction secondary to carbon monoxide intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Danuta; Palabindala, Venkataraman; Salim, Sohail Abdul

    2017-03-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning has been documented in literature to cause severe neurological and tissue toxicity within the body. However, cardiotoxicity is often overlooked, but not uncommon. Previous research studies and case reports have revealed a significant relationship between carbon monoxide intoxication and myocardial ischemic events. We report a case of a 48-year-old male, who was exposed to severe smoke inhalation due to a house fire and subsequently developed a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Ischemic changes were evident on electrocardiogram, which demonstrated T-wave inversion in lead III and ST-segment depression in leads V4-V6. Elevated cardiac enzymes were also present. After standard treatment for an acute cardiac event, the patient fully recovered. This case demonstrates that myocardial ischemic changes due to carbon monoxide poisoning may be reversible if recognized in early stages and treated appropriately, thus reminding physicians that a proper cardiovascular examination and diagnostic testing should be performed on all patients with carbon monoxide poisoning. Abbreviations: NSTEMI: Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction.

  18. Intermittent, low dose carbon monoxide exposure enhances survival and dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer-Andersen, Nanna; Almeida, Ana Sofia; Jensen, Pia

    2018-01-01

    cells constitute an alternative source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but efficient protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation need to be developed. Short-term, low-level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure has been shown to affect signaling in several tissues, resulting...

  19. CARBON MONOXIDE FLUXES OF DIFFERENT SOIL LAYERS IN UPLAND CANADIAN BOREAL FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark or low-light carbon monoxide fluxes at upland Canadian boreal forest sites were measured on-site with static chambers and with a laboratory incubation technique using cores from different depths at the same sites. Three different upland black spruce sites, burned in 1987,199...

  20. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Carbon Monoxide (Second External Review Draft, Sep 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced that the Second External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Carbon Monoxide (CO) and related Annexes was made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of t...

  1. 40 CFR 50.8 - National primary ambient air quality standards for carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS NATIONAL PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS § 50.8 National primary ambient air quality standards for carbon monoxide. (a) The national primary ambient air quality standards... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National primary ambient air quality...

  2. Multimodel simulations of carbon monoxide: Comparison with observations and projected near-future changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shindell, D.T.; Faluvegi, G.; Stevenson, D.S.; Krol, M.C.; Emmons, L.K.; Lamarque, J.F.; Petron, G.; Dentener, F.J.; Ellingsen, K.; Schultz, M.G.; Wild, O.; Amann, M.; Atherton, C.S.; Bergmann, D.J.; Bey, I.; Butler, T.; Cofala, J.; Collins, W.J.; Derwent, R.G.; Doherty, R.M.; Drevet, J.; Eskes, H.J.; Fiore, A.M.; Gauss, M.; Hauglustaine, D.A.; Horowitz, L.W.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Lawrence, M.G.; Montanaro, V.; Muller, J.F.; Pitari, G.; Prather, M.J.; Pyle, J.A.; Rast, S.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Sanderson, M.G.; Savage, N.H.; Strahan, S.E.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Unger, N.; Noije, van T.P.C.; Zeng, G.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze present-day and future carbon monoxide (CO) simulations in 26 state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry models run to study future air quality and climate change. In comparison with near-global satellite observations from the MOPITT instrument and local surface measurements, the models show

  3. Modified method for the analysis of carbon monoxide in postmortem blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannell, L.K.; Thomson, B.M.; Wilkinson, L.F.

    1981-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method is given for the determination of carbon monoxide in postmortem bloods. Duplicate determinations take about 15 minutes and are shown to be unaffected by the presence of methemoglobin. The method is therefore particularly suitable for use in a forensic laboratory. The results obtained are compared to those from the method of Commins and Lawther.

  4. Hydrogen Oxidation on Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells in the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Xiao; Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation has been studied on a carbon-supported platinum gas diffusion electrode in a phosphoric acidelectrolyte in the presence of carbon monoxide and oxygen in the feed gas. The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide presentin the feed gas was measured in the temperature range from 80...... to 150°C. It was found that throughout the temperaturerange, the potential loss due to the CO poisoning can be reduced to a great extent by the injection of small amounts ofgaseous oxygen into the hydrogen gas containing carbon monoxide. By adding 5 volume percent (v/o) oxygen, an almost...

  5. Effect of tar impregnation on carbon monoxide disintegration resistance in refractory lining of torpedo ladle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Y.T.; Ko, Y.C.

    1982-07-01

    Investigates whether the Ludwig-Sorret effect could be used to cope with the lining disintegration caused by the deposition of carbon from carbon monoxide in torpedo ladles by impregnating with tar the aluminosilicate refractory brick which are not immune to carbon monoxide attack. Explains, on the basis of Ludwig-Sorret effect, that fluids diffuse from a region of higher temperature to that of lower temperature under the driving force of a temperature gradient; tar impregnated in torpedo ladle lining will flow toward the cold end during preheating and in service. Finds that the nondisintegration portion of the specimen contained neither carbon nor iron oxide-like substance. X-ray diffraction proved that an ironoxide-like substance, collected from the sites where carbon deposited, contained hematite and magnetite. Microscopic examination indicated that most residual carbon was found in the fine pores in the matrix. Concludes that it seems unlikely that tar impregnation for refractory brick that are not immune to carbon monoxide disintegration can significantly improve the disintegration resistance in torpedo ladles in service.

  6. Free-radical carbonylation. Efficient trapping of carbon monoxide by carbon radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ilhyong; Kusano, Kazuya; Ogawa, Akiya; Kambe, Nobuaki; Sonoda, Noboru (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1990-01-31

    The authors examined the AIBN-induced radical reaction of n-octyl bromide (1) (Scheme 1) with Bu{sub 3}SnH under CO pressure in hope of trapping of carbon monoxide by octyl radical followed by hydrogen abstraction from tin hydride. When the reaction on a 0.5-mmol scale was conducted under CO pressure, using an autoclave with an inserted glass tube (5 mol % of AIBN, benzene (10 mL), 80{degree}C, 3 h), the desired aldehyde 2 was obtained together with n-octane (3), formed via simple reduction of 1. Surprisingly, this radical/CO trapping sequence proceeds even at 15 atm of CO pressure to give 2 in 38% yield (run 2). Generally, higher pressures of CO resulted in the increase of 2. These results demonstrate that the control of the relative concentrations of CO to tin hydride is an important factor to effect the CO trapping leading to aldehyde 2.

  7. Study on Impact of Variation of Carbon Monoxide Concentration to Air Temperature at Simpang Lima, Banda Aceh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi .

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on impact of variation of carbon monoxide concentration to air temperature have been conducted at Simpang Lima, Banda Aceh. Objectives of this research are to determine the level of emissions of carbon monoxide from motor vehicles, to study the fluctuations of air temperature in the area, and to analyze the impact of increasing carbon monoxide concentration to the air temperature at Simpang Lima Banda Aceh during 2010. Concentration of carbon monoxide and air temperature were recorded by Air Quality Monitoring System (AQMS device installed at Simpang Lima Banda Aceh. The result shows that carbon monoxide concentration increases as well as number of vehicles passing the area. Change of the concentration in the air is also influenced by temperature variability in the research area. For the temperature, beside affected by carbon monoxide concentrations are also influenced by weather factors such as solar radiation, wind speed and precipitation. However, levels of carbon monoxide concentration at Simpang Lima, Banda Aceh are considerably safe for the environment, i. e. less than 100 ppm.

  8. A report of dangerously high carbon monoxide levels within the passenger compartment of a snow-obstructed vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smithline Howard A

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to determine how quickly carbon monoxide would accumulate in the passenger compartment of a snow-obstructed vehicle. Methods A 1992 sedan was buried in snow to the level of the undercarriage, the ignition was then engaged and carbon monoxide levels recorded at 2.5-minute intervals. The primary outcome was the time at which a lethal carbon monoxide level was detected. Six trials were conducted: windows closed; windows open one inch; windows open 6 inches; windows closed and tailpipe swept clear of snow; windows closed and one cubic foot of snow removed around tailpipe; windows closed and tailpipe completely cleared of snow to ground level in a path 12 inches wide. Results Lethal levels of carbon monoxide occurred within 2.5 minutes in the vehicle when the windows were closed, within 5 minutes when the widows were opened one inch, and within 7.5 minutes when the widows were opened six inches. Dangerously high levels of carbon monoxide were detected within the vehicle when the tailpipe had been swept clear of snow and when a one cubic foot area had been cleared around the tailpipe. When the tailpipe was completely unobstructed the carbon monoxide level was zero. Conclusions Lethal levels of carbon monoxide occurred within minutes in this snow-obstructed vehicle.

  9. Inhibition of Apoptosis Stages of Human Blood Lymphocytes after Exposure to Carbon Monoxide in the Presence of Recombinant Interleukin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhov, V G; Tyunina, O I

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effect of carbon monoxide (60-, 75-, and 90-min exposure) on the expression of antiapoptotic proteins (survivin and Bcl-2) in human blood lymphocytes in the presence of recombinant IL-2 in an apoptosis-inducing dose (0.1 ng/ml). Incubation of cells in atmosphere with carbon monoxide in the presence of recombinant IL-2 was accompanied by accumulation of Bcl-2 protein with simultaneous decrease of survivin content. It was concluded that carbon monoxide plays a role in the dysregulation of apoptosis of human blood lymphocytes Bcl-2 (i.e. CO inhibits the proapoptotic effect of recombinant IL-2).

  10. Carbon monoxide is not always a poison gas for human organism: Physiological and pharmacological features of CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2014-10-05

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless and non-irritating gas. Even a small amount of CO exposure is possibly associated with specific toxic effects. CO is also produced endogenously in the body as a byproduct of heme degradation catalyzed by heme oxygenase. More recently CO has been identified as a gasotransmitter in various biological systems. However, the biological role and the therapeutic potential of carbon monoxide is not clear. This review summarizes the negative and the positive functions of carbon monoxide in various biological systems, including cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective oxidation of carbon monoxide in fuel processor gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasilp, Akkarat

    The trace amount of CO present in the hydrogen-rich stream coming from fuel reformers poisons the platinum anode electrode of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and reduces the power output. Removal of low levels of CO present in the reformed gas must take place before the gas enters the fuel cell. The tolerable level of CO is around 10 ppm. We investigated the performance of single step sol-gel prepared Pt/alumina catalyst and Pt supported on sol gel made alumina. The effect of water vapor, carbon dioxide, CO and oxygen concentrations, temperature, and Pt loading on the activity and selectivity are presented. Our results showed that a 2%Pt/alumina sol-gel catalyst can selectively oxide CO down to a few ppm with constant selectivity and high space velocity. Water vapor in the feed increases the activity of catalysts dramatically and in the absence of water vapor, CO2 in the feed stream decreases the activity of the catalysts significantly. We also found that the presence of potassium as an electron donor did not improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalyst to the selective CO oxidation. For Pt supported on sol gel made alumina, we found that the combination of CO2 and H2O in the gas feed has a strong effect on selective CO oxidation over Pt/Al2O3. It could be a positive or negative effect depending upon Pt loading in the catalyst. With high Pt loading, the CO2 effect tends to dominate the H2O effect resulting in the decrease in CO conversion. Moreover, the presence of CeO2 as an oxygen storage compound promotes the performance of Pt supported on alumina at low temperature ˜90°C when Pt loading was 5%. Amongst the examined catalysts, the 5%Pt/15%CeO2/Al 2O3 catalyst showed the highest selectivity, with high CO conversion at a low temperature ˜90°C. The beneficial effect of the addition of CeO2 is most likely due to spillover of O2 from CeO2 to Pt at the Pt sites at the interface of Pt and CeO 2.

  12. Compact Instrument for Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to continue the development of a rugged, compact, and automated instrument for the high sensitivity measurement of tropospheric carbon...

  13. Elevated carbon monoxide in the exhaled breath of mice during a systemic bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan G Barbour

    Full Text Available Blood is the specimen of choice for most laboratory tests for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Sampling exhaled breath is a noninvasive alternative to phlebotomy and has the potential for real-time monitoring at the bedside. Improved instrumentation has advanced breath analysis for several gaseous compounds from humans. However, application to small animal models of diseases and physiology has been limited. To extend breath analysis to mice, we crafted a means for collecting nose-only breath samples from groups and individual animals who were awake. Samples were subjected to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry procedures developed for highly sensitive analysis of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the atmosphere. We evaluated the system with experimental systemic infections of severe combined immunodeficiency Mus musculus with the bacterium Borrelia hermsii. Infected mice developed bacterial densities of ∼10(7 per ml of blood by day 4 or 5 and in comparison to uninfected controls had hepatosplenomegaly and elevations of both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. While 12 samples from individual infected mice on days 4 and 5 and 6 samples from uninfected mice did not significantly differ for 72 different VOCs, carbon monoxide (CO was elevated in samples from infected mice, with a mean (95% confidence limits effect size of 4.2 (2.8-5.6, when differences in CO2 in the breath were taken into account. Normalized CO values declined to the uninfected range after one day of treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Strongly correlated with CO in the breath were levels of heme oxygenase-1 protein in serum and HMOX1 transcripts in whole blood. These results (i provide further evidence of the informativeness of CO concentration in the exhaled breath during systemic infection and inflammation, and (ii encourage evaluation of this noninvasive analytic approach in other various other rodent models of infection and for utility in

  14. Zinc Oxide-Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites for Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Najlaa D; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Salah, Numan; Khayyat, Suzan A; Khan, Zishan H

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)/multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites based sensors with different ZnO concentrations were fabricated to improve carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing properties in comparison to the sensors based on bare MWCNTs. To study the structure, morphology and elemental composition of the resultant products, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were carried out. It has been observed that as the concentration of ZnO is increased more and more ZnO nanoparticles in the form of nodes get attached to MWCNTs resulting the reduction in average diameter of MWCNTs. The typical response of ZnO/MWCNTs composites based gas sensors for different CO concentrations (40, 100, 140 and 200 ppm) was studied by using very advanced sensing setup attached to I-V measurement system. Different sensing parameters such as: resistive response, sensitivity and response time were estimated at room temperature for all the fabricated sensors. The results indicated that the sensor based on nanocomposite which has 30 mg ZnO dispersed on 20 mg MWCNTs showing highest sensitivity and fastest response. All the sensors showed response times ranging from 8 to 23 seconds. The sensing mechanism behind the sensors based on ZnO/MWCNTs nanocomposites for CO gas at room temperature is also discussed in the present report.

  15. Risk Factors for Non-Occupational Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Anshan Prefecture, Liaoning Province, China, 2011-2012: e0129121

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qiang Lu; Weiwei Lv; Jiang Tian; Lijie Zhang; Baoping Zhu

    2015-01-01

      Background Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning can be fatal but is preventable. From October 2010 to February 2011, Anshan Prefecture reported 57 cases of non-occupational CO poisoning in District A, with two deaths...

  16. Risk Factors for Non-Occupational Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Anshan Prefecture, Liaoning Province, China, 2011-2012

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Qiang; Lv, Weiwei; Tian, Jiang; Zhang, Lijie; Zhu, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning can be fatal but is preventable. From October 2010 to February 2011, Anshan Prefecture reported 57 cases of non-occupational CO poisoning in District A, with two deaths...

  17. Acute Compartment Syndrome Which Causes Rhabdomyolysis by Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Sciatic Nerve Injury Associated with It: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jung-Woo

    2017-09-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is most frequently caused by soft tissue injury with trauma to the extremities. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis may be caused by alcohol or drug abuse, infection, collagen disease, or intensive exercise, but incidence is low. In particular, rhabdomyolysis resulting from carbon monoxide poisoning is especially rare. If caught before death, carbon monoxide poisoning has been shown to cause severe muscle necrosis and severe muscle damage leading to acute renal failure. In cases of carbon-monoxide-induced rhabdomyolsis leading to acute compartment syndrome in the buttocks and sciatic nerve injury are rare. We have experience treating patients with acute compartment syndrome due to rhabdomyolysis following carbon monoxide poisoning. We report the characteristic features of muscle necrosis observed during a decompression operation and magnetic resonance imaging findings with a one-year follow-up in addition to a review of the literature.

  18. Non-convulsive status epilepticus in a patient with carbon-monoxide poisoning treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Simone; Di Giuliano, Francesca; Picchi, Eliseo; Natoli, Silvia; Leonardis, Carlo; Leonardis, Francesca; Garaci, Francesco; Floris, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    The presentation of carbon monoxide poisoning is non-specific and highly variable. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used for the treatment of this condition. Various reports show the occurrence of self-limiting seizures after carbon monoxide poisoning and as a consequence of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Contrary to the seizures, status epilepticus has been rarely observed in these conditions. The exact pathophysiology underlying seizures and status epilepticus associated with carbon monoxide poisoning and hyperbaric oxygen therapy is not really clear, and some elements appear to be common to both conditions. We describe a case of non-convulsive status epilepticus in a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The mechanism, MRI findings and implications are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) Space Radar Laboratory - 2 (SRL2) Carbon Monoxide Second by Second data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MAPS Overview The MAPS experiment measures the global distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios in the free troposphere. Because of MAPS' previous flights...

  20. Ethanol and acetic acid production from carbon monoxide in a Clostridium strain in batch and continuous gas-fed bioreactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abubackar, Haris Nalakath; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different sources of nitrogen as well as their concentrations on the bioconversion of carbon monoxide to metabolic products such as acetic acid and ethanol by Clostridium autoethanogenum was studied...

  1. Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) Space Radar Laboratory - 1 (SRL1) Carbon Monoxide Second by Second data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MAPS Overview The MAPS experiment measures the global distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios in the free troposphere. Because of MAPS' previous flights...

  2. Effects of storage conditions on the stability of carbon monoxide in postmortem blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocak, A.; Valentour, J.C.; Blanke, R.V.

    The stability of carbon monoxide (CO) in blood was studied under various conditions of storage using both spectrophotometric and gas chromatographic-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) methods of analysis. Changes (losses) in percent carbon monoxide saturation occurred under some conditions but not under others. Various mechanisms for CO losses are considered and one (passive diffusion of CO gas) best explains these observations. Losses of up 60% of the original saturation occurred when blood was kept in uncapped containers at room temperature for 2 1/2 weeks or at 4/sup 0/C for 3 weeks. However, no changes occurred when blood was kept in tightly sealed containers for at least 4 months at either temperature.

  3. A simple semi-empirical model for predicting missing carbon monoxide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Kim N.; Johns, Murray D.; Hay, John E.; Sturman, Andrew P.

    Carbon monoxide monitoring using continuous samplers is carried out in most major urban centres in the world and generally forms the basis for air quality assessments. Such assessments become less reliable as the proportion of data missing due to equipment failure and periods of calibration increases. This paper presents a semi-empirical model for the prediction of atmospheric carbon monoxide concentrations near roads for the purpose of interpolating missing data without the need for any traffic or emissions information. The model produces reliable predictions while remaining computationally simple by being site-specifically optimized. The model was developed for, and evaluated at, both a suburban site and an inner city site in Hamilton, New Zealand. Model performance statistics were found to be significantly better than other simple methods of interpolation with little additional computational complexity.

  4. Supply Ventilation and Prevention of Carbon Monoxide (II) Ingress into Building Premises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    The article contains the relationships of carbon monoxide (II) concentration versus height-above-ground near buildings derived based on results of studies. The results of studies are crucial in preventing external pollutants ingress into a ventilation system. Being generated by external emission sources, such as motor vehicles and city heating plants, carbon monoxide (II) enters the premises during operation of a supply ventilation system. Fresh air nomographic charts were drawn to select the height of a fresh air intake into the ventilation system. Nomographic charts take into account external sources. The selected emission sources are located at various levels above ground relative to the building. The recommendations allow designing supply ventilation taking into account the quality of ambient air through the whole building height.

  5. Electricity generation from carbon monoxide and syngas in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abid; Guiot, Serge R; Mehta, Punita; Raghavan, Vijaya; Tartakovsky, Boris

    2011-05-01

    Electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been a subject of significant research efforts. MFCs employ the ability of electricigenic bacteria to oxidize organic substrates using an electrode as an electron acceptor. While MFC application for electricity production from a variety of organic sources has been demonstrated, very little research on electricity production from carbon monoxide and synthesis gas (syngas) in an MFC has been reported. Although most of the syngas today is produced from non-renewable sources, syngas production from renewable biomass or poorly degradable organic matter makes energy generation from syngas a sustainable process, which combines energy production with the reprocessing of solid wastes. An MFC-based process of syngas conversion to electricity might offer a number of advantages such as high Coulombic efficiency and biocatalytic activity in the presence of carbon monoxide and sulfur components. This paper presents a discussion on microorganisms and reactor designs that can be used for operating an MFC on syngas.

  6. Acute Compartment Syndrome Which Causes Rhabdomyolysis by Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Sciatic Nerve Injury Associated with It: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Jung-woo

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is most frequently caused by soft tissue injury with trauma to the extremities. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis may be caused by alcohol or drug abuse, infection, collagen disease, or intensive exercise, but incidence is low. In particular, rhabdomyolysis resulting from carbon monoxide poisoning is especially rare. If caught before death, carbon monoxide poisoning has been shown to cause severe muscle necrosis and severe muscle damage leading to acute renal failure. In cases of ca...

  7. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada: a trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Eric; Weichenthal, Scott; Wong, Joan; Smith-Doiron, Marc; Dugandzic, Rose; Kosatsky, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of mortality and morbidity from carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada has received little attention. Our objective was to evaluate trends in mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada. Age- and sex-standardized mortality (1981-2009) and hospital admission (1995-2010) rates by age group, sex and site of carbon monoxide exposure were calculated for each province and for all of Canada. We quantified the long-term trends by calculating the average annual percent change. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of carbon monoxide poisoning across age groups, sex and month of occurrence. In Canada, there were 1808 unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning deaths between 1981 and 2009 and 1984 admissions to hospital between 1995 and 2010. Average annual decreases of 3.46% (95% confidence interval [CI] -4.59% to -2.31%) and 5.83% (95% CI -7.79% to -3.83%) were observed for mortality and hospital admission rates, respectively. Mortality (IRR 5.31, 95% CI 4.57 to 6.17) and hospital admission (IRR 2.77, 95% CI 2.51 to 3.03) rates were elevated in males compared with females. Decreased trends in the rates were observed for all sites of carbon monoxide exposure, but the magnitude of this decrease was lowest in residential environments. Deaths and admissions to hospital were most frequent from September to April, with peaks in December and January. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada have declined steadily. Continued efforts should focus on reducing carbon monoxide poisoning during the cooler months and in residential environments.

  8. Microcontroller ATMEGA8535 based Design of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Gas Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Suyuti, Ansar

    2012-01-01

    1218204-3737-IJECS-IJENS ?? August 2012 IJENS This paper presents design of Carbon Monoxide (CO) gas detector based on microcontroller performance. The device is embedded with real-time measurement through visualization in Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and computer monitor. In addition, the data processing utilizes microcontroller ATMEGA8535 under programming environment of CodeVision AVR V2.03.4. The visualization itself is designed based on the combination between programming language of ...

  9. Validation of IASI FORLI carbon monoxide retrievals using FTIR data from NDACC

    OpenAIRE

    Kerzenmacher, T.; B. Dils; N. Kumps; Blumenstock, T.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.-F.; Demoulin, P.; García, O.; George, M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Hurtmans, D.; Jones, N; Mahieu, E.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is retrieved daily and globally from space-borne IASI radiance spectra using the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) software developed at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). The IASI CO total column product for 2008 from the most recent FORLI retrieval version (20100815) is evaluated using correlative CO profile products retrieved from ground-based solar absorption Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations at the follo...

  10. Incidence of severe unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning differs across racial/ethnic categories.

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, J D; Hampson, N B

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the incidence of severe, acute, unintentional carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning differs across racial/ethnic categories. METHODS: The authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of all Washington State residents treated with hyperbaric oxygen for severe, acute, unintentional CO poisoning from December 1, 1987, through February 28, 1997. RESULTS: Among 586 Washington State residents treated with hyperbaric oxygen for severe, acu...

  11. Increased Long-Term Risk of Dementia in Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Chung-Shun; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hong, Li-Yee; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Ma, Hon-Ping; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Tsai, Shin-Han; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Mei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning may cause toxicity of the central nervous system and heart. However, the association between CO poisoning and long-term dementia risk remains unestablished. We investigated the incidence of dementia in patients with CO poisoning in Taiwan and evaluated whether they had a higher risk of dementia than did the general population. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted among patients with CO poisoning identified using Taiwan's National Hea...

  12. Increased Risk of Parkinson Disease in Patients With Carbon Monoxide Intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Ching-Yuan; Chou, Mei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study evaluated the association of carbon monoxide intoxication (COI) with Parkinson disease (PD). A total of 9012 adults newly diagnosed with COI were enrolled in this study as the COI cohort. The control (non-COI) cohort, comprising 36,048 participants, was matched for each COI patient according to age, sex, and the year of hospitalization. We calculated the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals by using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. The overall...

  13. Effect of exhaust emissions on carbon monoxide levels in employees working at indoor car wash facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Topacoglu, H; Katsakoglou, S; Ipekci, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exhaust emissions from motor vehicles threaten the environment and human health. Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, especially the use of exhaust gas CO in suicidal attempts is well known in the literature. Recently, indoor car wash facilities established in large shopping malls with closed parking, lots is a new risk area that exposes car wash employees to prolonged periods of high level CO emissions from cars. The aim of this study was to investigate how carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) bl...

  14. Carbon monoxide pollution promotes cardiac remodeling and ventricular arrhythmia in healthy rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Andre, Lucas; Boissière, Julien; Reboul, Cyril; Perrier, Romain; Zalvidea, Santiago; Meyer, Gregory; Thireau, Jérôme; Tanguy, Stéphane; Bideaux , Patrice; Hayot, Maurice; Boucher, François; Obert, Philippe; Cazorla, Olivier; Richard, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    International audience; RATIONALE: Epidemiologic studies associate atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) pollution with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and increased cardiac mortality risk. However, there is a lack of data regarding cellular mechanisms in healthy individuals. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the chronic effects of environmentally relevant CO levels on cardiac function in a well-standardized healthy animal model. METHODS: Wistar rats were exposed for 4 weeks to filtered air (CO < 1 ppm) ...

  15. Carbon monoxide pollution aggravates ischemic heart failure through oxidative stress pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Cyril Reboul; Julien Boissière; Lucas André; Gregory Meyer; Patrice Bideaux; Gilles Fouret; Christine Feillet-Coudray; Philippe Obert; Alain Lacampagne; Jérôme Thireau; Olivier Cazorla; Sylvain Richard

    2017-01-01

    Risk of hospital readmission and cardiac mortality increases with atmospheric pollution for patients with heart failure. The underlying mechanisms are unclear. Carbon monoxide (CO) a ubiquitous environmental pollutant could be involved. We explored the effect of daily exposure of CO relevant to urban pollution on post-myocardial infarcted animals. Rats with ischemic heart failure were exposed 4 weeks to daily peaks of CO mimicking urban exposure or to standard filtered air. CO exposure worsen...

  16. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  17. Accidental carbon monoxide poisoning presenting without a history of exposure: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennetto Luke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Carbon monoxide poisoning is easy to diagnose when there is a history of exposure. When the exposure history is absent, or delayed, the diagnosis is more difficult and relies on recognising the importance of multi-system disease. We present a case of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Case presentation A middle-aged man, who lived alone in his mobile home was found by friends in a confused, incontinent state. Initial signs included respiratory failure, cardiac ischaemia, hypotension, encephalopathy and a rash, whilst subsequent features included rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, amnesia, dysarthria, parkinsonism, peripheral neuropathy, supranuclear gaze palsy and cerebral haemorrhage. Despite numerous investigations including magnetic resonance cerebral imaging, lumbar puncture, skin biopsy, muscle biopsy and electroencephalogram a diagnosis remained elusive. Several weeks after admission, diagnostic breakthrough was achieved when the gradual resolution of the patient's amnesia, encephalopathy and dysarthria allowed an accurate history to be taken for the first time. The patient's last recollection was turning on his gas heating for the first time since the spring. A gas heating engineer found the patient's gas boiler to be in a dangerous state of disrepair and it was immediately decommissioned. Conclusion This case highlights several important issues: the bewildering myriad of clinical features of carbon monoxide poisoning, the importance of making the diagnosis even at a late stage and preventing the patient's return to a potentially fatal toxic environment, and the paramount importance of the history in the diagnostic method.

  18. Nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carcinogen exposure after a single use of a water pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Peyton; Abu Raddaha, Ahmad H; Dempsey, Delia; Havel, Christopher; Peng, Margaret; Yu, Lisa; Benowitz, Neal L

    2011-11-01

    Smoking tobacco preparations in a water pipe (hookah) is widespread in many places of the world, including the United States, where it is especially popular among young people. Many perceive water pipe smoking to be less hazardous than cigarette smoking. We studied systemic absorption of nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carcinogens from one water pipe smoking session. Sixteen subjects smoked a water pipe on a clinical research ward. Expired carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin were measured, plasma samples were analyzed for nicotine concentrations, and urine samples were analyzed for the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolite biomarker concentrations. We found substantial increases in plasma nicotine concentrations, comparable to cigarette smoking, and increases in carbon monoxide levels that are much higher than those typically observed from cigarette smoking, as previously published. Urinary excretion of NNAL and PAH biomarkers increased significantly following water pipe smoking. Absorption of nicotine in amounts comparable to cigarette smoking indicates a potential for addiction, and absorption of significant amounts of carcinogens raise concerns of cancer risk in people who smoke tobacco products in water pipes. Our data contribute to an understanding of the health impact of water pipe use. © 2011 AACR.

  19. Reduced tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide exposure while smoking ultralow- but not low-yield cigarettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. III; Yu, L.; Talcott, R.; Hall, S.; Jones, R.T.

    1986-07-11

    An unresolved public health issue is whether some modern cigarettes are less hazardous than other and whether patients who cannot stop smoking should be advised to switch to lower-yield cigarettes. The authors studied tar (estimated by urine mutagenicity), nicotine, and carbon monoxide exposure in habitual smokers switched from their usual brand to high- (15 mg of tar), low- (5 mg of tar), or ultralow-yield (1 mg of tar) cigarettes. There were no differences in exposure comparing high- or low-yield cigarettes, but tar and nicotine exposures were reduced by 49% and 56%, respectively, and carbon monoxide exposure by 36% while smoking ultralow-yield cigarettes. Similarly, in 248 subjects smoking their self-selected brand, nicotine intake, estimated by blood concentrations of its metabolite continine, was 40% lower in those who smoked ultralow but no different in those smoking higher yields of cigarettes. The data indicate that ultralow-yield cigarettes do deliver substantial doses of tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide, but that exposure are considerably less than for other cigarettes.

  20. Suicidal carbon monoxide poisoning by combining formic acid and sulfuric acid within a confined space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peter T; Dunn, William A

    2014-01-01

    Suicide by inhalation of carbon monoxide produced by mixing formic acid and sulfuric acid within a confined space is a rare method of suicide. This method is similar to the so-called "detergent suicide" method where an acid-based detergent is mixed with a sulfur source to produce hydrogen sulfide. Both methods produce a toxic gas that poses significant hazards for death investigators, first responders and bystanders. Carbon monoxide is an odorless gas, while hydrogen sulfide has a characteristic rotten eggs odor, so the risks associated with carbon monoxide are potentially greater due to lack of an important warning signal. While detergent suicides have become increasingly common in the USA, suicide with formic acid and sulfuric acid is rare with only three prior cases being reported. Greater awareness of this method among death investigators is warranted because of the special risks of accidental intoxication by toxic gas and the possibility that this method of suicide will become more common in the future. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Toxicological Investigation of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Four Occupants of a Fuming Sport Utility Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Nnoli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: This toxicological investigation involves a report on the death of four occupants of a sport utility vehicle on one of the major busy Federal roads of Nigeria where they were held for up to three hours in a traffic jam while the car was steaming. Methods: Autopsy was executed using the standard procedure and toxicological analysis was done using simple spectrophotometric method to establish the level of carboxyhaemoglobin (HbCO in peripheral blood in the four occupants. Results: The autopsy report indicated generalized cyanosis, sub-conjuctival hemorrhages, marked laryngo-trachea edema with severe hyperemia with frothy fluid discharges characteristic of carbon monoxide poisoning. Toxicological report of the level of HbCO in part per million (ppm in the peripheral blood of the four occupants was A= 650 ppm; B= 500 ppm; C= 480 ppm, and D= 495 ppm against the maximum permissible level of 50 ppm. Conclusion: The sudden death of the four occupants was due to excessive inhalation of the carbon monoxide gas from the exhaust fumes leaking into the cabin of the car. The poor road network, numerous potholes, and traffic jam in most of roads in Nigeria could have exacerbated a leaky exhaust of the smoky second hand SUV car leading to the acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

  2. Carbon monoxide-induced reduction and healing of graphene oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayanan, B.; Weeks, S. L.; Jariwala, B. N.; Macco, B.; Weber, J.; Rathi, S. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Sutter, P.; Agarwal, S.; Ciobanu, C. V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide holds promise as a carbon-based nanomaterial that can be produced inexpensively in large quantities. However, its structural and electrical properties remain far from those of the graphene sheets obtained by mechanical exfoliation or by chemical vapor deposition unless efficient

  3. Electrocardiographic findings of carbon monoxide intoxication; two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ü. Kaldirim

    2013-12-01

    Discussion and Conclusion: Although there is no classic ”carbon monoxide” ECG pattern, sinus tachycardia and ST-T depressions are the most common ECG findings. Even a small amount of exposure to CO can cause myocardial infarction, especially in patients with coronary artery disease. Patients admitting to ED with chest pain and ECG changes may be considered as a possible CO poisoning and patients with CO poisoning must be carefully evaluated for cardiovascular disease.

  4. A Fleet of Low-Cost Sensor Based Air Quality Monitors Is Used to Measure Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide in Two Settings: In the Ambient Environment to Explore the Regional-Scale Spatial Variability of These Compounds Via a Distributed Network, and in Homes to Investigate How Heating during Winter Months can Impact Indoor Air Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, J. G.; Hannigan, M.; Collier, A. M.; Coffey, E.; Piedrahita, R.

    2016-12-01

    Affordable, small, portable, quiet tools to measure atmospheric trace gases and air quality enable novel experimental design and new findings. Members of the Hannigan Lab at the University of Colorado in Boulder have been working over the last few years to integrate emerging affordable gas sensors into such an air quality monitor. Presented here are carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements from two field experiments that utilized these tools. In the first experiment, ten air quality monitors were located northeast of Boulder throughout the Denver Julesburg oil and gas basin. The Colorado Department of Health and Environment has several air quality monitoring sites in this broader region, each in an Urban center. One goal of the experiment was to determine whether or not significant spatial variability of EPA criteria pollutants like CO, exists on a sub-regulatory monitoring grid scale. Another goal of the experiment was to compare rural sampling locations with urban sites. The monitors collected continuous data (sampling every 15 seconds) at each location over the course of several months. Our sensor calibration procedures are presented along with our observations and an analysis of the spatial and temporal variability in CO and CO2. In the second experiment, we used eight of our air quality monitors to better understand how home heating fuel type can impact indoor air quality in two communities on the Navajo Nation. We sought to compare air quality in homes using one of four different fuels for heat (wood, wood plus coal, pellet, and gas). There are many factors that contribute to indoor air quality and the impact of an emission source, like a woodstove, within a home. Having multiple, easily deployable, air quality monitors allowed us to account for many of these factors. We sampled four homes at a time, aiming for one home from each of our fuel groups in each sampling period. We sampled inside and outside of each home for a period of 3-4 days

  5. Cobalt monoxide-doped porous graphitic carbon microspheres for supercapacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng-Chun; Tang, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Yu; Gong, Hao; Li, Xu; Wang, John

    2013-01-01

    A novel design and facile synthesis process for carbon based hybrid materials, i.e., cobalt monoxide (CoO)-doped graphitic porous carbon microspheres (Co-GPCMs), have been developed. With the synthesis strategy, the mixture of cobalt gluconate, α-cyclodextrin and poly (ethylene oxide)106-poly (propylene oxide)70-poly (ethylene oxide)106 is treated hydrothermally, followed by pyrolysis in argon. The resultant Co-GPCMs exhibits a porous carbon matrix with localized graphitic structure while CoO nanodots are embedded in the carbon frame. Thus, the Co-GPCMs effectively combine the electric double-layer capacitance and pseudo-capacitance when used as the electrode in supercapacitor, which lead to a higher operation voltage (1.6 V) and give rise to a significantly higher energy density. This study provides a new research strategy for electrode materials in high energy density supercapacitors. PMID:24113335

  6. Minimizing the wintertime low bias of Northern Hemisphere carbon monoxide in global model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Olaf; Schultz, Martin G.; Bouarar, Idir; Clark, Hannah; Huijnen, Vincent; Gaudel, Audrey; George, Maya; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2015-04-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of incomplete combustion and is also produced from oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. It is of interest as an indirect greenhouse gas and an air pollutant causing health effects and is thus subject to emission restrictions. CO acts as a major sink for the OH radical and as a precursor for tropospheric ozone and affects the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere as well as regional air quality. Despite the developments in the global modelling of chemistry and of the parameterization of the physical processes, CO concentrations remain underestimated during NH winter by most state-of-the-art chemical transport models. The resulting model bias can in principle originate from either an underestimation of CO sources or an overestimation of its sinks. We address both the role of sources and sinks with a series of MOZART chemistry transport model sensitivity simulations for the year 2008 and compare our results to observational data from ground-based stations, satellite observations, and from MOZAIC tropospheric profile measurements on passenger aircraft. Our base case simulation using the MACCity emission inventory (Granier et al. 2011) underestimates the near-surface Northern Hemispheric CO mixing ratios by more than 20 ppb from December to April with a maximal bias of 40 ppb in January. The bias is strongest for the European region (up to 75 ppb in January). From our sensitivity studies the mismatch between observed and modelled atmospheric CO concentrations can be explained by a combination of the following emission inventory shortcuts: (i) missing anthropogenic wintertime CO emissions from traffic or other combustion processes, (ii) missing anthropogenic VOC emissions, (iii) an exaggerated downward trend in the RCP8.5 scenario underlying the MACCity inventory, (iv) a lack of knowledge about the seasonality of emissions. Deficiencies in the parameterization of the dry deposition velocities can also lead to

  7. Interaction and reactivity of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide on ruthenium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, E.E.

    1980-03-01

    A multifaceted investigation of the reduction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide using a ruthenium (102) single crystal catalyst in the pressure range 10/sup -3/ to 10 Torr and temperature range of 300 to 475/sup 0/C has been undertaken. Kinetic and isotopic results indicate that the reaction products CO/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ were produced via two reaction mechanisms. Using a reducing gas mixture (low P/sub NO//P/sub CO/ ratio) a two site mechanism was operative involving NO dissociation. The carbon monoxide kinetic order varied from +1 to -3 and the nitric oxide order varied from +1 to 0. The catalyst under these conditions was determined to be metallic ruthenium with oxygen bonded within the first surface layer. The oxygen was unreactive and formed a (1 x 3)-0 LEED pattern. Under oxidizing conditions (high P/sub NO//P/sub CO/ ratio) the catalyst was ruthenium dioxide and the functional mechanism under these reaction conditions yielded a nitric oxide order of +2 to -4. Inclusion of a site poisoning mechanism under reducing conditions and an RuO/sub 2/ growth mechanism involving ruthenium cation transfer under oxidizing conditions into the kinetic rate laws led to an overall rate law which could be fit to the carbon monoxide and nitric oxide order plots. Using isotopically oxygen labelled reactants, it was observed that the three possible isotopes of carbon dioxide were produced. A ..gamma..-CO surface species is postulated as an intermediate in the exchange process. The reaction was observed to be initially surface structure insensitive and the reaction kinetics were derived using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood formalism.

  8. Semi-coke briquettes: towards reducing emissions of primary PM2.5, particulate carbon, and carbon monoxide from household coal combustion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Li, Xinghua; Jiang, Jingkun; Duan, Lei; Ge, Su; Zhang, Qi; Deng, Jianguo; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Direct household use of unprocessed raw coals for cooking and heating without any air pollution control device has caused serious indoor and outdoor environment problems by emitting particulate matter (PM) and gaseous pollutants. This study examined household emission reduction by switching from unprocessed bituminous and anthracite coals to processed semi-coke briquettes. Two typical stoves were used to test emission characteristics when burning 20 raw coal samples commonly used in residential heating activities and 15 semi-coke briquette samples which were made from bituminous coals by industrial carbonization treatment. The carbonization treatment removes volatile compounds from raw coals which are the major precursors for PM formation and carbon emission. The average emission factors of primary PM2.5, elemental carbon, organic carbon, and carbon monoxide for the tested semi-coke briquettes are much lower than those of the tested raw coals. Based on the current coal consumption data in China, switching to semi-coke briquettes can reduce average emission factors of these species by about 92%, 98%, 91%, and 34%, respectively. Additionally, semi-coke briquette has relatively lower price and higher burnout ratio. The replacement of raw coals with semi-coke briquettes is a feasible path to reduce pollution emissions from household activities. PMID:26782059

  9. 'Not quite out of the woods': potential for misdiagnosis of delayed neurologic syndrome of carbon monoxide poisoning as relapse of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Samir; Bruxner, George

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the delayed neurologic syndrome of carbon monoxide poisoning and its clinical importance in psychiatric settings. A brief review of carbon monoxide poisoning is presented with a focus on the delayed neurologic syndrome and a case of deliberate self- poisoning is described. As in the case described, the delayed manifestations of carbon monoxide poisoning can resemble a relapse of psychiatric illness. In cases of carbon monoxide poisoning it is important to consider the delayed neurologic syndrome as misdiagnosis could lead to inappropriate treatment and worsened outcome.

  10. Unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning hospitalization and emergency department counts and rates by county, year, and fire-relatedness among California residents,2000-2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning (CO) inpatient hospitalizations and emergency...

  11. Reduction of carbon monoxide by binuclear tantalum hydride complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmonte, P.A.; Cloke, F.G.; Schrock, R.R.

    1983-05-04

    (TaCp'Cl/sub 2/H)/sub 2/ (Cp' = n/sup 5/-C/sub 5/Me/sub 4/Et) reacts with CO to give yellow, crystalline Ta/sub 2/Cp'/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(H)(CHO); the hydride bridges the two metals as does the side-on bonded formyl fragment. When PMe=3 is added to Ta/sub 2/Cp'/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(H)(CHO) the formyl C-O bond is broken to give Ta/sub 2/Cp'/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(H)(O)(CHPMe/sub 3/). The reaction of a mixture of (TaCP'Cl/sub 2/H)/sub 2/ and (TaCp'Cl/sub 2/D)/sub 2/ with CO followed by PMe/sub 3/ to give only a mixtue of Ta/sub 2/Cp'/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(H)(O)(CHPMe/sub 3/) and Ta/sub 2/Cp'/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(D)(O)(CDPMe/sub 3/) suggests that the dimer does not fragment when it reacts with CO. This was confirmed by a crossover experiment involving (TaCp'Cl/sub 2/H)/sub 2/ and (TaCp/sup s/Cl/sub 2/H)/sub 2/ (Cp/sup s/ = n/sup 5/-1,3-C/sub 5/H/sub 3/(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/). (TaCp'Cl/sub 2/H/sub 2/ forms a green, diamagnetic pyridine adduct that contains two inequivalent hydride ligands. (TaCp'Cl/sub 2/H)/sub 2/ forms an unstable, purple CO adduct that shows a terminally bound CO band (v/sub CO/ = 1939 cm/sup -1/) and two different hydride bands (v/sub MH/ = 1560 and 1599 cm/sup -1/) in the IR spectrum of a thin film at -78/sup 0/C, and a singlet ascribed to the carbonyl carbon atom at 238 ppm in the /sup 13/C NMR spectrum. (TaCp'Cl/sub 2/H)/sub 2/(CO) decomposes rapidly in solution or in the solid state at -30/sup 0/C to give Ta/sub 2/Cp'/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(H)(CHO) quantitatively. Methane is formed in approx.70% yield when Ta/sub 2/Cp'/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(H)(CHO) is treated with AlCl/sub 3/ under molecular hydrogen. Methanol is formed in high yield when Ta/sub 2/Cp'/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(H)(CHO) is hydrolyzed with aqueous HCl.

  12. A Rare Cause of Chronic Headache that May Be Misdiagnosed as Migraine: Chronic Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kenan KANBUROGLU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Differential diagnosis of primary headache disorders can be challenging for physicians. Although the association of headache with acute carbon monoxide intoxication is very well-defined, in refractory nonspecific headaches associated with chronic low dose exposure to carbon monoxide, CO intoxication is usually overlooked, mostly due to vague symptoms. Herein we present a 15-year-old female patient with chronic carbon monoxide poisoning who was undergoing two years of follow-up care for migraines. Chronic carbon monoxide intoxication may mimic the episodic nature and familial predisposition of migraine attacks. Normal carboxyhemoglobin levels do not exclude the diagnosis, and smoking is a confounding factor. In emergency rooms, patients presenting with headaches had higher levels of carboxyhemoglobin, but, as far as we know, there have been no studies investigating carboxyhemoglobin levels in migraine patients. Chronic carbon monoxide poisoning should be suspected in migraine patients, especially if the attacks occur during winter months. ÖZET: Primer baş ağrısında ayırıcı tanının yapılması bazen doktorlar açısından zor olabilmektedir. Literatürde karbon monoksit ile baş ağrısı arasındaki ilişki çok iyi ortaya konulmuş olmasına karşın, dirençli ve nonspesifik başağrısı nedenlerinden biri olan kronik düşük doz karbon monoksit maruziyeti kendine özgü bulgusu olmadığından sıklıkla atlanmaktadır. Bu yazıda, iki yıl migren tanısı ile takip ve tedavi edilen kronik karbon monoksit zehirlenmesi olan bir olgu sunuldu. Kronik karbon monoksit zehirlenmesi epizodik paterni ve aile fertlerinde benzer şikayetlerin olması nedeniyle migren ataklarını andırabilmektedir. Karboksihemoglobin konsantrasyonlarının normal saptanması tanıyı ekarte ettirmemekte, ayrıca sigara kullanımı da karıştırıcı bir faktör olabilmektedir. Acil servislerine baş ağrısı ile başvuran hastalar

  13. Carbon Monoxide Improves Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells During Sepsis by Production of Specialized Proresolving Lipid Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoyi, Konstantin; Hall, Sean R R; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A; Ghanta, Sailaja; Ith, Bonna; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Baron, Rebecca M; Choi, Augustine M K; Serhan, Charles N; Liu, Xiaoli; Perrella, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells are being investigated as a cell-based therapy for a number of disease processes, with promising results in animal models of systemic inflammation and sepsis. Studies are ongoing to determine ways to further improve the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells. A gas molecule that improves outcome in experimental sepsis is carbon monoxide. We hypothesized that preconditioning of mesenchymal stromal cells with carbon monoxide ex vivo would promote further therapeutic benefit when cells are administered in vivo after the onset of polymicrobial sepsis in mice. Animal study and primary cell culture. Laboratory investigation. BALB/c mice. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Mesenchymal stromal cells, mesenchymal stromal cells-conditioned with carbon monoxide, fibroblasts, or fibroblasts-conditioned with carbon monoxide were delivered by tail vein injections to septic mice. The mice were assessed for survival, bacterial clearance, and the inflammatory response during sepsis in each of the groups. Mesenchymal stromal cells were also assessed for their ability to promote bacterial phagocytosis by neutrophils, the production of specialized proresolving lipid mediators, and their importance for mesenchymal stromal cells function using gene silencing. Ex vivo preconditioning with carbon monoxide allowed mesenchymal stromal cells to be administered later after the onset of sepsis (6 hr), and yet maintain their therapeutic effect with increased survival. Carbon monoxide preconditioned mesenchymal stromal cells were also able to alleviate organ injury, improve bacterial clearance, and promote the resolution of inflammation. Mesenchymal stromal cells exposed to carbon monoxide, with docosahexaenoic acid substrate, produced specialized proresolving lipid mediators, particularly D-series resolvins, which promoted survival. Silencing of lipoxygenase pathways (5-lipoxygenase and 12/15-lipoxygenase), which are

  14. Analysis of patients presenting to the emergency department with carbon monoxide intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Yurtseven

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Carbon monoxide is a potentially fatal form of poisoning. The exact incidence is unclear, due to cases being undiagnosed or reported as fewer than the real number. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is of proven efficacy in the treatment of CO intoxication.The purpose of this study was to describe the general characteristics of carbon monoxide (CO intoxications presenting to the emergency department and to investigate troponin I values and the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT in these patients. Material and methods: Patients presenting to the emergency department with CO intoxication over one year and patients with such intoxications receiving HBOT were examined retrospectively. Results: One hundred seventy-one patients were included; 140 (81.9% were poisoned by stoves, 18 (10.5% by hot water boilers and 10 in (5.8% by fires. COHb levels were normal in 49 of the 163 patients whose values were investigated, and were elevated in 114 patients. Mean COHb value was 16.6. Troponin I values were investigated in 112 patients. These were normal in 86 patients and elevated in 26. Mean troponin I value was 0.38 ng/ml. One hundred twenty-three of the 171 patients in the study were discharged in a healthy condition after receiving normobaric oxygen therapy, while 48 patients received HBOT. Forty-two (87.5% of the patients receiving HBOT were discharged in a healthy condition while sequelae persisted in five (10.4%. One patient died after 15 session of HBOT. Conclusion: Although elevated carboxyhemoglobin confirms diagnosis of CO intoxication, normal levels do not exclude it. Troponin I levels may rise in CO intoxication. No significant relation was observed between carboxyhemoglobin and receipt of HBOT. A significant correlation was seen, however, between troponin I levels and receipt of HBOT. Keywords: Carbon monoxide intoxication, Hyperbaric oxygen, Troponin I, Echocardiography

  15. [Prevalence of smoking among 741 High school students from Dakar. Carbon monoxide measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, Valentin; Diaw, Mor; Sow, Abdou Khadir; Tiendrebeogo, Arnaud J F; Husseini, Cherine; Ghislain, Loubano-Voumbi; Seck, Aissatou; Ba, Fatoumata; Mbengue, Arame; Cissé, Bademba; Seck, Gora; Sarr, Fatou B; Ba, Abdoualye; Niang, Mbayang Ndiaye; Samb, Abdoulaye

    2015-05-01

    Tobacco consumption is a net increase in our areas. In Senegal, as in other African countries, sponsorship of cultural and sporting events in schools promote tobacco use among schoolchildren. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of tobacco in the French School of Jean Mermoz of Dakar by a survey completed by a measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) in expired air. seven hundred forty-one students (n = 402 girls and n = 339 boys), aged 11 to 18 years of French and African cultures, participated in the study. A questionnaire with several items of smoking has been distributed to them . Two weeks after the collection of questionnaires, the CO measuring for all students was conducted. The prevalence of smoking in High School was 23.1% and smoking was found more in boys according to the questionnaire and piCO+TM with 13.7% and 7.1% respectively. It affected over the upper age class or equal to fifteen years. The most mentioned reason for the initiation of smoking (45.4% of smokers) was curiosity with a need to be free, followed by the influence of the environment famial (44.4%) and friendly (20.5%). The measurement of carbon monoxide showed that 12.4% of our subjects had a smoking profile with 8% light smoking, 1% moderate smoking, and severe smoking was 3% of our students. A significant difference (p = 0.0021) between the two prevalences was found. The carbon monoxide intoxication by tobacco use is responsible for microcirculatory accidents such as tissue hypoxia, whereas smoking affects young students, in which the phenomenon is more precocious. Thus it is urgent to establish a policy of tobacco control in schools.

  16. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis.

  17. Treatment in carbon monoxide poisoning patients with headache: a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Tarik; Tekin, Erdal; Basturk, Mustafa; Duran, Arif; Serinken, Mustafa; Emet, Mucahit

    2016-11-01

    There is a lack of specificity of the analgesic agents used to treat headache and underlying acute carbon monoxide poisoning. To compare effectiveness of "oxygen alone" vs "metoclopramide plus oxygen" vs "metamizole plus oxygen" therapy in treating carbon monoxide-induced headache. A prospective, multicenter, double-blind, controlled trial. Three emergency departments in Turkey. Adult carbon monoxide poisoning patients with headache. A total of 117 carbon monoxide-intoxicated patients with headache were randomized into 3 groups and assessed at baseline, 30 minutes, 90 minutes, and 4 hours. The primary outcome was patient-reported improvement rates for headache. Secondary end points included nausea, need for rescue medication during treatment, and reduction in carboxyhemoglobin levels. During observation, there was no statistical difference between drug type and visual analog scale score change at 30 minutes, 90 minutes, or 4 hours, for either headache or nausea. No rescue medication was needed during the study period. The reduction in carboxyhemoglobin levels did not differ among the 3 groups. The use of "oxygen alone" is as efficacious as "oxygen plus metoclopramide" or "oxygen plus metamizole sodium" in the treatment of carbon monoxide-induced headache. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pyrrolidone Modifying Gold Nanocatalysts for Enhanced Catalytic Activities in Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols and Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingji Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the catalytic activity of supported metal nanoparticle is a great demand but extremely challenging to make. We reported a simple strategy for enhancing the activities by employing the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP additive, where a series of supported Au nanoparticle catalysts including Au/C, Au/BN, Au/TiO2, and Au/SBA-15 exhibited significantly higher activities in the oxidation of various alcohols and carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen after adding PVP to the reaction system. The XPS study indicates that PVP could electronically interact with Au to form high active Au sites for molecular oxygen, thus causing improved activities for the various oxidation reactions.

  19. Quantitative Romberg's test in acute carbon monoxide poisoning treated by hyperbaric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, Daniel; Jansen, Erik Christian; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether monitoring of acute carbon monoxide-poisoned (COP) patients by means of quantitative Romberg's test (QR-test) during a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) therapy regimen could be a useful supplement in the evaluation of neurological status. METHODS: We...... LMM, sway prior to HBO₂ therapy was set as the fixed effect and change in sway after HBO₂ therapy was set as the response variable. Patient, treatment number, weight and age were set as random effects for all LMMs. RESULTS: From the LMMs we found that larger values of sway prior to HBO₂ produced...

  20. Decreased single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in cocaine freebase smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R D; Tilles, D S; Goldenheim, P D; Mirin, S M

    1987-05-01

    The authors performed pulmonary function tests on 10 chronic cocaine freebase smokers. Testing occurred at least 2 weeks after stopping cocaine use. Mean single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCOSB) was significantly reduced (P less than 0.05) in the cocaine smokers when compared with a control group of non-smokers and non-drug users. All other parameters of lung function were normal. Since most of the cocaine smokers also smoked tobacco, the observed abnormality may have been due to an additive effect of the 2 substances. The authors conclude that smoking cocaine may damage the gas exchange surface of the lung.

  1. [Imaging diagnosis of 95 cases of moderate and severe acute carbon monoxide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, N N; Tian, C; Lian, K X; Han, T; Jin, S

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To explore the difference of radiological imaging features of delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide poisoning (DECMP) and acute carbon monoxide poisoning (ACMP) , and the correlation between the imaging findings and clinical prognosis of the disease. Methods: The correlation between imaging findings and clinical manifestations and prognosis of 95 patients with moderate and severe acute carbon monoxide poisoning were retrospectively analyzed. In the above 95 cases, there were 62 cases of ACMP and 33 cases of DEACMP. All patients underwent conventional CT, MRI and magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) . Circular regions of interest (ROI) measurement was used for analysis of average diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and fractional anisotropy (FA) value of the MRI and DTI imaging manifestations in different brain regions. Results: The main clinical manifestation of moderate acute carbon monoxide poisoning was consciousness disorder and fatigue; Severe poisoning patients showed deep coma as the main clinical manifestations; The most prominent clinical manifestations of DEACMP were mental disorders and neurological impairment in the extrapyramidal system. A total of 95 cases with moderate or severe CO poisoning showed unilateral or bilateral cerebral cortex, bilateral basal ganglia (white ball) , cerebral white matter around bilateral ventricles or bilateral centrum semiovale, around bilateral ventricles cerebral white matter around bilateral ventricles and bilateral centrum semiovale, cerebral cortex and subcortical involvement. CT showed normal or low density shadow.MRI showed that the lesion T(1)WI presented slightly low or equal signal, T(2)WI and FLAIR sequences showed equal, a slightly higher or high signal; DWI sequence showed slightly higher or high signal. ADC value and FA value in different brain white matter regions of DEACMP group was significantly lower than those of ACMP group (P<0.05) , especially for those around semi oval

  2. Forensic aspects of carbon monoxide poisoning by charcoal burning in Denmark, 2008-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pia Rude; Gheorghe, Alexandra; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation is a well-known method of committing suicide. There has been a drastic increase in suicide by inhalation of CO, produced from burning charcoal, in some parts of Asia, and a few studies have reported an increased number of these deaths in Europe. CO-related deaths...... caused by charcoal burning have, to our knowledge, not been recorded in the Danish population before. In this retrospective study we present all autopsied cases of CO poisoning caused by charcoal burning in the period 2008-2012. 19 autopsied cases were identified, comprising 11 suicides, 4 accidents...

  3. Carbon monoxide levels during indoor sporting events--Cincinnati, 1992-1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-21

    Carbon monoxide (CO) produced by internal combustion engines is an indoor health hazard. High CO levels can occur during indoor sporting events--such as tractor pulls--that involve vehicles modified to achieve high horsepower. In January and March 1992 and January 1993, the Cincinnati Health Department evaluated CO levels during tractor pulls, monster-truck jumps, and a mud race event held in an indoor arena with a seating capacity of approximately 16,000 persons. This report summarizes findings from the evaluations.

  4. FTIR study of carbon monoxide adsorption on ion-exchanged X, Y and mordenite type zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. HERCIGONJA

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work Fourier transform infrared (FTIR study has been applied to study the adsorption of carbon monoxide on transition metal (Mn+, Co2+, Ni2+ ion-exchanged zeolites type Y, X and mordenites. The adsorption of CO at room temperature produces overlapping IR absorption bands in the 2120–2200 cm-1 region. The frequency of the band around 2200 cm-1 is found to be dependent not only on the charge-balancing transition metal cation, but also on the framework composition. The frequencies of the band near 1600 cm-1 was found to be dependent on the Si/Al ratio of the investigated zeolites.

  5. Carbon monoxide migratory insertion - A comparison of cationic and neutral palladium(II) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankcombe, K.; Cavell, K.J.; Yates, B.F. [University of Tasmania, Hobart, (Australia); Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1998-12-31

    With the use of ANSTO`s resources and expertise and with support from AINSE, we have carried out extensive computer modelling on the mechanism of the palladium catalysed carbonylation reaction, a process which is used industrially in the conversion of carbon monoxide into biodegradable polymers. In this project, experimental and theoretical work has focussed on using Pd(II) complexes containing pyridine carboxylate ligands (NC{sub 5}H{sub 4}COO{sup {sub )}} to explore the fundamental mechanistic steps. The results for subsequent steps in the catalytic cycle are presented and their implication for the design of more efficient catalysts are discussed Truncated abstract. 2 figs.

  6. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in Terrabacter carboxydivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Sae Woong; Kim, Young Min; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2017-06-01

    Terrabacter carboxydivorans is able to grow aerobically at low concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole source of carbon and energy. The genes for carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO-DH) were cloned from T. carboxydivorans and analyzed. The operon encoding T. carboxydivorans CO-DH was composed of three structural genes with the transcriptional order of cutB, cutC and cutA, as well as an additional accessory gene (orf4). Phylogenetic analysis of CutA revealed that T. carboxydivorans CO-DH was classified into a group distinct from previously characterized CO-DHs. Expression of antisense RNA for the cutB or cutA gene in T. carboxydivorans led to a decrease in CO-DH activity, confirming that cutBCA genes are the functional genes encoding CO-DH. The CO-DH operon was expressed even in the absence of CO and further inducible by CO. In addition, CO-DH synthesis was increased in the stationary phase compared to the exponential phase during heterotrophic growth on glucose and glycerol. Point mutations of a partially inverted repeat sequence (TCGGA-N6-GCCCA) in the upstream region of the cutB gene almost abolished expression of the CO-DH operon, indicating that the inverted-repeat sequence might be a cis-acting regulatory site for the positive regulation of the CO-DH operon. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. An overview of carbon monoxide generation and release by home appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batey, J. [Energy Research Center, Inc., Easton, CT (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas which is highly toxic and can be produced by many combustion sources commonly found within homes. Potential sources include boilers and furnaces, water heaters, space heaters, stoves, ovens, clothes dryers, wood stoves, fireplaces, charcoal grilles, automobiles, cigarettes, oil lamps, and candles. Any fuel that contains carbon can form CO including, natural gas, propane, kerosene, fuel oil, wood, and coal. Exposure to elevated CO levels typically requires its production by a combustion source and its release into the home through a venting system malfunction. The health effects of CO range from headaches and flue-like symptoms to loss of concentration, coma and death depending on the concentration of CO and the exposure time. At levels of only 1%, which is the order of magnitude produced by automobile exhaust, carbon monoxide can cause death in less than 3 minutes. While most combustion equipment operate with low CO levels, many operating factors can contribute to elevated CO levels in the home including: burner adjustment, combustion air supply, house air-tightness, exhaust fan operation, cracked heat exchangers, vent blockages, and flue pipe damage. Test data on CO emissions is presented from a wide range of sources including Brookhaven National Laboratory, Gas Research Institute, American Gas Association, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Consumer Product Safety Commission for many potential CO sources in and near the home.

  8. The effect of modified atmosphere packaging with carbon monoxide on the storage quality of master-packaged fresh pork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, B.H.P.; Janz, J.A.M.; Morel, P.C.H.; Purchas, R.W.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    Modified atmosphere packaging with carbon dioxide is effective for prolonging shelf-life of fresh meat. Addition of carbon monoxide to the system provides the advantage of enhancing meat colour. The study objective was to determine the effect of CO2-MAP + 0.4% CO, vs. 100% CO2-MAP, on the

  9. Carbon monoxide production from five volatile anesthetics in dry sodalime in a patient model: halothane and sevoflurane do produce carbon monoxide; temperature is a poor predictor of carbon monoxide production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Roberto SGM

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desflurane and enflurane have been reported to produce substantial amounts of carbon monoxide (CO in desiccated sodalime. Isoflurane is said to produce less CO and sevoflurane and halothane should produce no CO at all. The purpose of this study is to measure the maximum amounts of CO production for all modern volatile anesthetics, with completely dry sodalime. We also tried to establish a relationship between CO production and temperature increase inside the sodalime. Methods A patient model was simulated using a circle anesthesia system connected to an artificial lung. Completely desiccated sodalime (950 grams was used in this system. A low flow anesthesia (500 ml/min was maintained using nitrous oxide with desflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, halothane or sevoflurane. For immediate quantification of CO production a portable gas chromatograph was used. Temperature was measured within the sodalime container. Results Peak concentrations of CO were very high with desflurane and enflurane (14262 and 10654 ppm respectively. It was lower with isoflurane (2512 ppm. We also measured small concentrations of CO for sevoflurane and halothane. No significant temperature increases were detected with high CO productions. Conclusion All modern volatile anesthetics produce CO in desiccated sodalime. Sodalime temperature increase is a poor predictor of CO production.

  10. On the wintertime low bias of Northern Hemisphere carbon monoxide in global model studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, O.; Schultz, M. G.; Bouarar, I.; Clark, H.; Huijnen, V.; Gaudel, A.; George, M.; Clerbaux, C.

    2014-01-01

    The uncertainties in the global budget of carbon monoxide (CO) are assessed to explain causes for the long-standing issue of Northern Hemispheric wintertime underestimation of CO concentrations in global models. With a series of MOZART sensitivity simulations for the year 2008, the impacts from changing a variety of surface sources and sinks were analyzed. The model results were evaluated with monthly averages of surface station observations from the global CO monitoring network as well as with total columns observed from satellites and with vertical profiles from measurements on passenger aircraft. Our basic simulation using MACCity anthropogenic emissions underestimated Northern Hemispheric near-surface CO concentrations on average by more than 20 ppb from December to April with the largest bias over Europe of up to 75 ppb in January. An increase in global biomass burning or biogenic emissions of CO or volatile organic compounds (VOC) is not able to reduce the annual course of the model bias and yields too high concentrations over the Southern Hemisphere. Raising global annual anthropogenic emissions results in overestimations of surface concentrations in most regions all-year-round. Instead, our results indicate that anthropogenic emissions in the MACCity inventory are too low for the industrialized countries during winter and spring. Thus we found it necessary to adjust emissions seasonally with regionally varying scaling factors. Moreover, exchanging the original resistance-type dry deposition scheme with a parameterization for CO uptake by oxidation from soil bacteria and microbes reduced the boreal winter dry deposition fluxes and could partly correct for the model bias. When combining the modified dry deposition scheme with increased wintertime road traffic emissions over Europe and North America (factors up to 4.5 and 2, respectively) we were able to optimize the match to surface observations and to reduce the model bias significantly with respect to the

  11. Quantifying Wildfire Emissions and associated Aerosol Species using Assimilation of Satellite Carbon Monoxide Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David; Barre, Jerome; Worden, Helen; Gaubert, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Intense and costly wildfires tend are predicted to increase in frequency under a warming climate. For example, the recent August 2015 Washington State fires were the largest in the state's history. Also in September and October 2015 very intense fires over Indonesia produced some of the highest concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) ever seen from satellite. Such larges fires impact not only the local environment but also affect air quality far downwind through the long-range transport of pollutants. Global to continental scale coverage showing the evolution of CO resulting from fire emission is available from satellite observations. Carbon monoxide is the only atmospheric trace gas for which satellite multispectral retrievals have demonstrated reliable independent profile information close to the surface and also higher in the free troposphere. The unique CO profile product from Terra/MOPITT clearly distinguishes near-surface CO from the free troposphere CO. Also previous studies have suggested strong correlations between primary emissions of fire organic and black carbon aerosols and CO. We will present results from the Ensemble Adjustement Kalman Filter (DART) system that has been developed to assimilate MOPITT CO in the global-scale chemistry-climate model CAM-Chem. The ensemble technique allows inference on various fire model state variables such as CO emissions, and also aerosol species resulting from fires such as organic and black carbon. The benefit of MOPITT CO profile assimilation for estimating the CO emissions from the Washington and Indonesian fire cases will be discussed, along with the ability of the ensemble approach to infer information on the black and organic carbon aerosol distribution. This study builds on capability to quantitatively integrate satellite observations and models developed in recent years through projects funded by the NASA ACMAP Program.

  12. Carbon monoxide gas sensing using zinc oxide film deposited by spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leano, J. M. G.; Villapando, J. M. L. A.; Balaaldia, A. E.; Gianan, G.; Manalo, F. K. B.; Florido, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    This study was aimed to determine the carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing ability of zinc oxide (ZnO) film fabricated by spray pyrolysis on glass substrate heated at 3000C using 0.2 M zinc acetate precursor solution. The temperature of the precursor solution was maintained at room temperature. Carbon monoxide gas was synthesized by mixing the required amount of formic acid and excess sulfuric acid in the ratio of 1:6 to produce CO gas concentrations of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 parts per million (ppm) v/v. There were five trials for each concentration. The films produced exhibited good sensor characteristics such as high linearity in current voltage relationship and voltage response versus concentration. Electrical characterization using the four-point probe showed a linear relationship between current and voltage with resistivity of 0.49 ohm-cm and R2 value of 0.994 The zinc oxide film exhibited a sensitivity of 0.19 Volt per 100 ppm of CO gas and linearity R2 value of 0.993.

  13. Characteristics of autoignited laminar lifted flames in heated coflow jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics of autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. In result, as the jet velocity increased, the blowoff was directly occurred from the nozzle-attached flame without experiencing a stabilized lifted flame, in the non-autoignited regime. In the autoignited regime, the autoignited lifted flame of carbon monoxide diluted by nitrogen was affected by the water vapor content in the compressed air oxidizer, as evidenced by the variation of the ignition delay time estimated by numerical calculation. In particular, in the autoignition regime at low temperatures with added hydrogen, the liftoff height of the autoignited lifted flames decreased and then increased as the jet velocity increased. Based on the mechanism in which the autoignited laminar lifted flame is stabilized by ignition delay time, the liftoff height can be influenced not only by the heat loss, but also by the preferential diffusion between momentum and mass diffusion in fuel jets during the autoignition process. © 2012 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  14. Combining a road pollution dispersion model with GIS to determine carbon monoxide concentration in Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleoni, Eva

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop an air pollution model that is independent from pollution monitoring sites and highly accurate through space and time. Total carbon monoxide concentration is computed with the use of traffic flow data, vehicle speed and dimensions, emission rates, wind speed, and temperature. The data are interpolated using a geographic information system universal kriging technique, and the end results produce state level air pollution maps with high local accuracy. The model is validated against Environment Protection Agency (EPA) pollution data. Overall, the model has 71 % agreement with EPA, overestimating values of carbon monoxide for less than 1 ppm. The model has three advantages over already assessed air pollution models. First, it is completely independent of any air pollution monitoring stations; thus, possible temporary or permanent unreliability or lack of the data is avoided. Second, being based on a 5,710 traffic count network, the problem of remote places coverage is avoided. Third, it is based on a straightforward equation, where minimal preprocessing of traffic and climatic data is required.

  15. A Positive Babinski Reflex Predicts Delayed Neuropsychiatric Sequelae in Chinese Patients with Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Fang Zou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the human population increased in China, the carbon monoxide is a serious environmental toxin in public health. However, predicting the delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae (DNS of carbon monoxide poisoning (COP has not been well studied. We investigated the independent predictors of DNS in patients with COP. This study was conducted at four hospitals in China. Data were retrospectively collected from 258 patients with COP between November 1990 and October 2011. DNS was the primary endpoint. A positive Babinski reflex was the independent predictor for DNS: sensitivity = 53.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 26.1–79.6, specificity = 88.6% (95% CI: 83.7–92.1, positive predictive value (PPV = 20.0% (95% CI: 9.1–37.5, and negative predictive value (NPV = 97.3% (95% CI: 94.0–98.9. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.712 (95% CI: 0.544–0.880. A positive Babinski reflex was very memorable, immediately available, and applicable in clinical practice. Even when the sensitivity and PPV of a positive Babinski reflex were unsatisfactory, it had a good specificity and NPV for excluding the risk of DNS. In patients without a positive Babinski reflex, the risk for DNS was only 2.7%. This finding may help physicians make decisions about dispositions for patients with COP.

  16. A positive Babinski reflex predicts delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae in Chinese patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian-Fang; Guo, Qiming; Shao, Hua; Li, Bin; Du, Yuxiu; Liu, Maofeng; Liu, Fengling; Dai, Lixin; Chung, Min-Hsien; Lin, Hung-Jung; Guo, How-Ran; Yang, Tzu-Meng; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin

    2014-01-01

    As the human population increased in China, the carbon monoxide is a serious environmental toxin in public health. However, predicting the delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae (DNS) of carbon monoxide poisoning (COP) has not been well studied. We investigated the independent predictors of DNS in patients with COP. This study was conducted at four hospitals in China. Data were retrospectively collected from 258 patients with COP between November 1990 and October 2011. DNS was the primary endpoint. A positive Babinski reflex was the independent predictor for DNS: sensitivity = 53.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 26.1-79.6), specificity = 88.6% (95% CI: 83.7-92.1), positive predictive value (PPV) = 20.0% (95% CI: 9.1-37.5), and negative predictive value (NPV) = 97.3% (95% CI: 94.0-98.9). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.712 (95% CI: 0.544-0.880). A positive Babinski reflex was very memorable, immediately available, and applicable in clinical practice. Even when the sensitivity and PPV of a positive Babinski reflex were unsatisfactory, it had a good specificity and NPV for excluding the risk of DNS. In patients without a positive Babinski reflex, the risk for DNS was only 2.7%. This finding may help physicians make decisions about dispositions for patients with COP.

  17. Enhanced acute anti-inflammatory effects of CORM-2-loaded nanoparticles via sustained carbon monoxide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Omer Salman; Zeb, Alam; Akram, Muhammad; Kim, Myung-Sic; Kang, Jong-Ho; Kim, Hoo-Seong; Majid, Arshad; Han, Inbo; Chang, Sun-Young; Bae, Ok-Nam; Kim, Jin-Ki

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of carbon monoxide (CO) via sustained release of CO from carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2-loaded lipid nanoparticles (CORM-2-NPs). CORM-2-NPs were prepared by hot high pressure homogenization method using trilaurin as a solid lipid core and Tween 20/Span 20/Myrj S40 as surfactant mixture. The physicochemical properties of CORM-2-NPs were characterized and CO release from CORM-2-NPs was assessed by myoglobin assay. In vitro anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated by nitric oxide assay in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity was investigated by measuring paw volumes and histological examination in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Spherical CORM-2-NPs were around 100nm with narrow particle size distribution. The sustained CO release from CORM-2-NPs was observed and the half-life of CO release increased up to 10 times compared with CORM-2 solution. CORM-2-NPs showed enhanced in vitro anti-inflammatory effects by inhibition of nitric oxide production. Edema volume in rat paw was significantly reduced after treatment with CORM-2-NPs. Taken together, CORM-2-NPs have a great potential for CO therapeutics against inflammation via sustained release of CO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of carbon monoxide on quality, nutrients and antioxidant activity of post-harvest jujube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoying; Li, Na

    2014-03-30

    To effectively extend the shelf life of fresh jujube, carbon monoxide (CO), as a small molecular gas, was applied to fumigate fresh jujube. The quality and antioxidant activity of jujubes fumigated with carbon monoxide at concentrations of 0 (control), 5, 10, 20 and 40 µmol L⁻¹ for 1 h under ambient temperature were investigated. The jujube fumigated with 10 µmol L⁻¹ CO showed the best preserving effect amongst all samples. At 30 days, the decay incidence of jujube fumigated with 10 µmol L⁻¹ CO is only two-thirds of that of control sample; its red index and weight loss rate were 22.8% and 19.4% lower, and its firmness, soluble solids content (SSC) and acidity were 18.7%, 5.4% and 12.2% higher than that of control samples, respectively. Its vitamin C and total flavonoid contents were also the highest. However, no significant difference in total polyphenol content was found. The jujubes treated with 10 µmol L⁻¹ CO exhibited the highest antioxidant activity in terms of reducing power and 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)hydrazyl radical scavenging activity. However, the jujubes fumigated with 40 µmol L⁻¹ CO showed inferior characteristics compared with the control sample. Fumigating jujubes with proper concentration of CO probably is a potential novel method for post-harvest jujube preservation in the future. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Ligand Fluorination to Optimize Preferential Oxidation (PROX) of Carbon Monoxide by Water-Soluble Rhodium Porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffinger, Justin C.; Uppaluri, ShriHarsha; Sun, Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic, low temperature preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide by aqueous [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (1[Rh(III)]) and [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-sulfonato-2,6-difluorophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (2[Rh(III)]) is reported. The PROX reaction occurs at ambient temperature in buffered (4 ≤ pH ≤ 13) aqueous solutions. Fluorination on the porphyrin periphery is shown to increase the CO PROX reaction rate, shift the metal centered redox potentials, and acidify ligated water molecules. Most importantly, β-fluorination increases the acidity of the rhodium hydride complex (pKa = 2.2 ± 0.2 for 2[Rh-D]); the dramatically increased acidity of the Rh(III) hydride complex precludes proton reduction and hydrogen activation near neutral pH, thereby permitting oxidation of CO to be unaffected by the presence of H2. This new fluorinated water-soluble rhodium porphyrin-based homogenous catalyst system permits preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen gas streams at 308 °K using dioxygen or a sacrificial electron acceptor (indigo carmine) as the terminal oxidant. PMID:21949596

  20. Liquefaction of Elbitsan and Yatagan lignites in carbon monoxide/hydrogen gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolat, E.; Oner, M.; Yalin, G.; Dincer, S. (Yildiz Univ., Chemical Engineering Dept., Istanbul (TR))

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of experimental parameters on the liquefaction yields of Elbistan and Yatagan lignites that were investigated by using different solvents, gases and catalysts. In hydroliquefaction of Elbistan lignite with anthracene and creosote oils, higher oil yields were obtained with anthracene oil. Based on this result, anthracene oil was chosen as solvent for further work done with Elbistan lignite. First, the effect of moisture in lignite samples was observed with synthesis gas as medium gas; then, the effect of carbon monoxide/hydrogen ratio in liquefaction gas mixture was determined using moist lignite samples. The highest oil yield was obtained with most lignite sample in 3CO/1H{sub 2} gas moisture and it was 57.3% (daf.) The hydroliquefaction oil yields of Yatagan lignite obtained with creosote oil were higher than those obtained in anthracene oil. On further work done with Yatagan lignite, creosote oil was chosen as solvent. First, the effects of CoMo and red mud catalysts, then in catalyzed medium, the effects of moisture in lignite samples and at last, using most lignite samples and red mud catalyst, the effects of carbon monoxide/hydrogen ratio in gas moisture, were investigated.

  1. Observation of two-dimensional compositional ordering of a carbon monoxide and argon monolayer mixture physisorbed on graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, H.; Fain, S.C. Jr.; Satija, S.; Passell, L.

    1986-01-20

    Commensurate monolayers of a mixture of 70% carbon monoxide and 30% argon on graphite are studied by neutron and low-energy-electron diffraction. A 2 x 2 superstructure due to 3:1 compositional ordering is observed below 25 K. The compositional ordering is most likely due to molecular-axis ordering of carbon monoxide molecules into a pinwheel pattern with argon atoms at the central sites of each pinwheel. Such a pinwheel structure has been predicted by Harris, Mouritsen, and Berlinsky for planar rotors with anisotropic interactions on a triangular lattice with vacancies.

  2. The effect of ambient temperature and humidity on the carbon monoxide emissions of an idling gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, C. W.; Subramaniam, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Changes in ambient temperature and humidity affect the exhaust emissions of a gas turbine engine. The results of a test program employing a JT8D combustor are presented which quantize the effect of these changes on carbon monoxide emissions at simulated idle operating conditions. Analytical results generated by a kinetic model of the combustion process and reflecting changing ambient conditions are given. It is shown that for a complete range of possible ambient variations, significant changes do occur in the amount of carbon monoxide emitted by a gas turbine engine.

  3. Measuring the Kinetics of the Reduction of Iron Oxide with Carbon Monoxide in a Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnt, C. D.; Cleeton, J. P.; Miiller, C. M.; Scotr, S. A.; Dennis, J. S.

    Combusting a solid fuel in the presence of a metal oxide rather than air, chemical looping combustion, generates CO2suitable for sequestration and the reduced metal. For the case of iron, the reduced oxide can be re-oxidized with steam to produce high-purity hydrogen. The reduction reactions of iron oxide in carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide mixtures were investigated in a fluidized bed. Activation energies and pre-exponential factors for the reactions (i) 3 Fe2O3+CO⇌2 Fe3O4+CO2 and⇌(ii)0.947 Fe3O4+0.788 CO⇌3 Fe0.947O+0.788 CO2⇌were determined. The reaction order was verified to be unity, and the change in rate with conversion was examined.

  4. Monitoring of endogenous carbon monoxide dynamics in human breath by tunable diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Eugene V.; Daraselia, Mikhail V.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Shulagin, Yurii A.; Skrupskii, Vladimir A.

    1996-01-01

    High sensitive CO gas analyzer based on tunable diode laser (TDL) was used as a real time monitor of endogenous carbon monoxide in a set of breath physiology experiments. The measurements of the CO content dynamics in exhaled air with 10 ppb sensitivity were attended with detection of carbon dioxide and O2 in breath, lung ventilation parameters, heart rate and blood analysis using conventional techniques. Temporal variations of endogenous CO in human breath caused by hyperoxia, hypoxia, hyperventilation and sport loading were first studied in real time. Scattering of the CO variation time constants was observed for different tested persons. Possible reasons for this scattering related with the organisms' physiology peculiarities are discussed.

  5. Smoke-inhalation injury and the effect of carbon monoxide in the sheep model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazu, T.; Ikeuchi, H.; Hubbard, G.B.; Langlinais, P.C.; Mason, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The role of carbon monoxide (CO) in causing the physiologic and anatomic changes characteristic of smoke inhalation injury was evaluated in 34 sheep. The smoke-exposed group received a dose of smoke known to produce mild inhalation injury. The CO group received a pure gas mixture that contained concentrations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and CO similar to those in the smoke. Cardiopulmonary function was measured immediately after exposure, and 24 and 72 hours after exposure. The CO group showed a transient increase in cardiac output, but the smoke group showed no such response. The CO group maintained normal PaO2 levels during the 72-hour study period; the smoke group gradually developed hypoxemia. The lungs of the CO exposed animals had no discernible histologic changes. These results indicate that CO per se is not the primary etiologic agent of smoke inhalation injury.

  6. Detection of carbon monoxide and water absorption lines in an exoplanet atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopacky, Quinn M; Barman, Travis S; Macintosh, Bruce A; Marois, Christian

    2013-03-22

    Determining the atmospheric structure and chemical composition of an exoplanet remains a formidable goal. Fortunately, advancements in the study of exoplanets and their atmospheres have come in the form of direct imaging--spatially resolving the planet from its parent star--which enables high-resolution spectroscopy of self-luminous planets in jovian-like orbits. Here, we present a spectrum with numerous, well-resolved molecular lines from both water and carbon monoxide from a massive planet orbiting less than 40 astronomical units from the star HR 8799. These data reveal the planet's chemical composition, atmospheric structure, and surface gravity, confirming that it is indeed a young planet. The spectral lines suggest an atmospheric carbon-to-oxygen ratio that is greater than that of the host star, providing hints about the planet's formation.

  7. Sources of greenhouse gases and carbon monoxide in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Tremper, Anja; Zazzeri, Giulia; Barlow, Janet F.; Nemitz, Eiko

    2015-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been on the scientific agenda for several decades and new technology now also allows for high-precision, continuous monitoring of fluxes of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Compared to the natural environment, flux measurements in the urban environment, which is home to over 50% of the population globally, are still rare despite high densities of anthropogenic sources of pollutants. We report on over three years of measurements atop a 192 m tower in central London (UK), Europe's largest city, which started in October 2011. Fluxes of methane, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide are measured by eddy-covariance (EC) at the British Telecom tower (51° 31' 17.4' N 0° 8' 20.04' W). In addition to the long-term measurements, EC fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured in February 2014. All four trace gases exhibit diurnal trends consistent with anthropogenic activities with minimum emissions at night and early afternoon maxima. Segregating emissions by wind direction reveals heterogeneous source distributions with temporal patterns and source strengths that differ between compounds. The lowest emissions for CO, CO2 and CH4 were recorded for NW winds. The highest emissions of methane were in the SE sector, in the NE for CO2 and in the W for CO. Fluxes of all 3 gases exhibited marked seasonal trends characterised by a decrease in emissions in summer (63% reduction for CO, 36% for CO2 and 22% for CH4). Monthly fluxes of CO and CO2 were linearly correlated to air temperature (R2 = 0.7 and 0.59 respectively); a weaker dependence upon temperature was also observed for CH4 (R2 = 0.31). Diurnal and seasonal emissions of CO and CO2 are mainly controlled by local fossil fuel combustion and vehicle cold starts are thought to account for 20-30% of additional emissions of CO during the winter. Fugitive emissions of CH4 from the natural gas distribution network are thought to be substantial, which is consistent

  8. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Jan Schut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally-relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.

  9. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Alleviates Carbon Monoxide Poisoning-Induced Delayed Memory Impairment by Preserving Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Dependent Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Chung; Yang, San-Nan; Wu, Chih-Wei J; Chen, Lee-Wei; Chan, Julie Y H

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that hyperbaric oxygen therapy ameliorates delayed cognitive impairment after acute carbon monoxide poisoning by promoting neurogenesis through upregulating the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus. Laboratory animal experiments. University/Medical center research laboratory. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were divided into five groups: (1) non-carbon monoxide-treated control, (2) acute carbon monoxide poisoning, (3) acute carbon monoxide poisoning followed by 7-day hyperbaric oxygen treatment, (4) carbon monoxide + hyperbaric oxygen with additional intracerebroventricular infusion of Fc fragment of tyrosine kinase receptor B protein (TrkB-Fc) chimera, and (5) acute carbon monoxide poisoning followed by intracerebroventricular infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning was achieved by exposing the rats to carbon monoxide at 2,500 ppm for 40 minutes, followed by 3,000 ppm for 20 minutes. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (at 2.5 atmospheres absolute with 100% oxygen for 60 min) was conducted during the first 7 days after carbon monoxide poisoning. Recombinant human TrkB-Fc chimera or brain-derived neurotrophic factor was infused into the lateral ventricle via the implanted osmotic minipump. For labeling of mitotic cells in the hippocampus, bromodeoxyuridine was injected into the peritoneal cavity. Distribution of bromodeoxyuridine and two additional adult neurogenesis markers, Ki-67 and doublecortin, in the hippocampus was evaluated by immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence staining. Tissue level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cognitive behavior was evaluated by the use of eight-arm radial maze. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning significantly suppressed adult hippocampal neurogenesis evident by the reduction in number of bromodeoxyuridine-positive, Ki-67⁺, and doublecortin⁺ cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. This

  10. Retinal venous blood carbon monoxide response to bright light in male pigs: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Dan A; Duda, Magdalena; Kozioł, Katarzyna; Romerowicz-Misielak, Maria; Koziorowska, Anna; Sołek, Przemysław; Nowak, Sławomir; Kulpa, Magdalena; Koziorowski, Marek

    2017-03-01

    The physical mechanism by which light is absorbed in the eye and has antidepressant and energizing effects in Seasonal Affective Disorder and other forms of psychiatric major depression is of scientific interest. This study was designed to explore one specific aspect of a proposed humoral phototransduction mechanism, namely that carbon monoxide (CO) levels increase in retinal venous blood in response to bright light. Eleven mature male pigs approximately six months of age were kept for 7days in darkness and fasted for 12h prior to surgery. Following mild sedation, anesthesia was induced. Silastic catheters were inserted into the dorsal nasal vein through the angular vein of the eye to reach the ophthalmic sinus, from which venous blood outflowing from the eye area was collected. The animals were exposed to 5000lx of fluorescent-generated white light. CO levels in the blood were analyzed by gas chromatography before and after 80min of light exposure. At baseline, mean CO levels in the retinal venous blood were 0.43±0.05(SE)nmol/ml. After bright light, mean CO levels increased to 0.54±0.06nmol/ml (two-tailed t-test pcarbon monoxide levels in ophthalmic venous blood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring of carbon monoxide in residences with bulk wood pellet storage in the Northeast United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Alan; Jordan, Carolyn E; Wake, Cameron; Soto-Garcia, Lydia

    2017-10-01

    The interest in biomass fuel is continuing to expand globally and in the northeastern United States as wood pellets are becoming a primary source of fuel for residential and small commercial systems. Wood pellets for boilers are often stored in basement storage rooms or large bag-type containers. Due to the enclosed nature of these storage areas, the atmosphere may exhibit increased levels of carbon monoxide. Serious accidents in Europe have been reported over the last decade in which high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) have been found in or near bulk pellet storage containers. The aim of this study was to characterize the CO concentrations in areas with indoor storage of bulk wood pellets. Data was obtained over approximately 7 months (December 2013 to June 2014) at 25 sites in New Hampshire and Massachusetts: 16 homes using wood pellet boilers with indoor pellet storage containers greater than or equal to 3 ton capacity; 4 homes with wood pellet heating systems with outdoor pellet storage; 4 homes using other heating fuels; and a university laboratory site. CO monitors were set up in homes to collect concentrations of CO in the immediate vicinity of wood pellet storage containers, and data were then compared to those of homes using fossil fuel systems. The homes monitored in this study provided a diverse set of housing stock spanning two and a half centuries of construction, with homes built from 1774 to 2013, representing a range of air exchange rates. The CO concentration data from each home was averaged hourly and then compared to a threshold of 9 ppm. While concentrations of CO were generally low for the homes studied, the need to properly design storage locations for pellets is and will remain a necessary component of wood pellet heating systems to minimize the risk of CO exposure. This paper is an assessment of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure from bulk wood pellet storage in homes in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Understanding the CO concentrations

  12. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Liping [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Bao, Lingzhi; Wu, Wenqing; Wang, Hongzhi [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, Wei, E-mail: hanw@hfcas.cn [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We show the possibility of modulate proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect with low concentration carbon monoxide. • Carbon monoxide inhibited proliferation via modulating the transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. • Exogenous carbon monoxide has potential application in clinical radiotherapy. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy.

  13. Carbon monoxide blocks oxidative stress-induced hepatocyte apoptosis via inhibition of the p54 JNK isoform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conde de la Rosa, Laura; Vrenken, Titia E.; Hannivoort, Rebekka A.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Havinga, Rick; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Kauffman, Henk F.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Moshage, Han

    2008-01-01

    Most chronic liver diseases are accompanied by oxidative stress, which may induce apoptosis in hepatocytes and liver injury. Oxidative stress induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. This stress-responsive cytoprotective protein is responsible for heme degradation into carbon monoxide (CO), free

  14. Association of the transfer coefficient of the lung for carbon monoxide with emphysema progression in male smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed Hoesein, F.A.; Zanen, P.; Ginneken, B. van; Klaveren, R.J. van; Lammers, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    A decreased transfer coefficient of the lung for carbon monoxide (K(CO)) is associated with emphysema. We evaluated whether in heavy smokers, baseline K(CO) was associated with the progression of computed tomography (CT)-detected emphysema, and the progression of airflow limitation. Heavy smokers,

  15. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity after a 1-h oxygen dive to 9 m of sea water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, P. J. A. M.; van Hulst, R. A.; Houtkooper, A.; Sterk, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    To prevent extensive pulmonary lesions in submerged oxygen divers lung function like the forced vital capacity (FVC) or the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL,co) are used to monitor pulmonary oxygen toxicity (POT). As the diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DL,no) measures more accurately

  16. Oxygen permeation flux through La1-ySryFeO3 limited by the carbon monoxide oxidation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hassel, B.A.; van Hassel, B.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen permeation flux through La1-ySryFeO3-δ (y = 0.1, 0.2) in a large oxygen partial pressure gradient (air/CO, CO2 mixture) was found to be limited by the carbon monoxide oxidation rate at the low oxygen partial pressure side of the membrane. The oxygen permeation flux through the membrane

  17. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Jjj of... - Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units 5 Table 5 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart JJJ...

  18. Satellite observations of tropospheric ammonia and carbon monoxide: Global distributions, regional correlations and comparisons to model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia (NH3) and carbon monoxide (CO) are primary pollutants emitted to the Earth's atmosphere from common as well as distinct sources associated with anthropogenic and natural activities. The seasonal and global distributions and correlations of NH3 and CO from the Tropospheric...

  19. Carbon monoxide blocks oxidative stress-induced hepatocyte apoptosis via inhibition of the p54 JNK isoform.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, L Conde de la; Woudenberg-Vrenken, T.E.; Hannivoort, R.A.; Buist-Homan, M.; Havinga, R.; Slebos, D.J.; Kauffman, H.F.; Faber, K.N.; Jansen, P.L.; Moshage, H.

    2008-01-01

    Most chronic liver diseases are accompanied by oxidative stress, which may induce apoptosis in hepatocytes and liver injury. Oxidative stress induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. This stress-responsive cytoprotective protein is responsible for heme degradation into carbon monoxide (CO), free

  20. Levels of maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide and certain cardiovascular parameters following hubble-bubble smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafagoj, Yanal A; Mohammed, Faisal I

    2002-08-01

    The physiological effects of cigarette smoking have been widely studied, however, little is known regarding the effects of smoking hubble-bubble. We examined the acute effects of hubble-bubble smoking on heart rate, systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure and maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide. This study was carried out in the student laboratory, School of Medicine, Department of Physiology, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, during the summer of 1999. In 18 healthy habitual hubble-bubble smokers, heart rate, blood pressure, and maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide was measured before, during and post smoking of one hubble-bubble run (45 minutes). Compared to base line (time zero), at the end of smoking heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, and maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide were increased 16 2.4 beats per minute, 6.7 2.5 mm Hg, 4.4 1.6 mm Hg, 5.2 1.7 mm Hg, and 14.2 1.8 ppm, (mean standard error of mean, Phubble-bubble smoking elicits a modest increase in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide in healthy hubble-bubble smokers.

  1. Synergistic effect of carbon monoxide with other biologically active injurious factors on the organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankow, D.; Ponsold, W.

    1974-09-01

    The combined effects on biological organisms are reported for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sodium nitrite, hydrocyanic acid, carbon disulfide, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, trichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, methane, benzene, iodine acetate, cholesterol, benzpyrene, hexobarbitol, zoxazolamine, nembutal, luminal, morphine, adrenalin, persantin, cytochrome c, aldrin, carbaryl, cyclodiene epoxide; and physical influences such as ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, ionizing radiation, noise, and vibration. A literature review shows that with increasing CO/sub 2/ and decreasing oxygen concentration in the inhalation air, the toxicity of CO increased in experiments with mice and canaries. Oxides of nitrogen enhance the toxic effect of CO in an additive way and at times synergistically. At 500 m from a metallurgical plant in the USSR the maximum allowable immission concentrations for CO and SO/sub 2/ were exceeded. In children residing there a higher normal erythrocyte number, hemoglobin content, and catalase activity were found in the blood along with higher concentrations of coproporphyrin and 17-ketosteroids. All values returned to normal after an 8-week stay of these children away from the metallurgical plant.

  2. A climate-scale satellite record for carbon monoxide: the MOPITT Version 7 product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeter, Merritt N.; Edwards, David P.; Francis, Gene L.; Gille, John C.; Martínez-Alonso, Sara; Worden, Helen M.; Sweeney, Colm

    2017-07-01

    The MOPITT (Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere) satellite instrument has been making observations of atmospheric carbon monoxide since 2000. Recent enhancements to the MOPITT retrieval algorithm have resulted in the release of the version 7 (V7) product. Improvements include (1) representation of growing atmospheric concentrations of N2O, (2) use of meteorological fields from the MERRA-2 (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications) reanalysis for the entire MOPITT mission (instead of MERRA), (3) use of the MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Collection 6 cloud mask product (instead of Collection 5), (4) a new strategy for radiance-bias correction and (5) an improved method for calibrating MOPITT's near-infrared (NIR) radiances. Statistical comparisons of V7 validation results with corresponding V6 results are presented, using aircraft in situ measurements as the reference. Clear improvements are demonstrated for V7 products with respect to overall retrieval biases, bias variability and bias drift uncertainty.

  3. Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule-A1 (CORM-A1) Improves Neurogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Ana S; Soares, Nuno L; Vieira, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases lead to impairment or death of neurons in the central nervous system. Stem cell based therapies are promising strategies currently under investigation. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous product of heme degradation by heme oxygenase (HO) activity......) uptake, limitation of caspase-3 activation and higher Bcl-2 expressing cells). CO supplementation did not increase the expression of RA receptors. In the case of SH-S5Y5 model, small amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation emerges as important signaling molecules during CO-promoted neuronal...... was followed by increased Bcl-2 expression, decreased levels of active caspase-3 and PI uptake. Likewise, ROS signaling emerged as key factors in CO's increasing number of differentiated neurons in OHSC. In conclusion, CO's increasing number of differentiated neurons is a novel biological role disclosed herein...

  4. Carbon monoxide: An old poison with a new way of poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsiu Chou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present two events of carbon monoxide (CO poisoning, which spread out through ventilation pipes to kill or injure neighbors. This is a previously undocumented poisoning process. In the first event, three people died and eight others suffered CO poisoning from a gas-powered water heater in an apartment building. Similar to the first event, three people expired and three others were injured by CO poisoning in the second event. We subsequently determined the cause of these tragedies were due to obstructions at the openings of ventilation pipes. CO is one of the most common causes of poisoning worldwide and these cases often result in tragedy. Early recognition of CO poisoning resulting from obstructed ventilation pipes will facilitate proper management and prevent possible lethal disasters. Additionally, all clinicians and other paramedical personnel ought to raise the suspicion of chemical-related casualties when encountering clusters of patients from a single locale.

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen for carbon monoxide poisoning-induced delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H F; Mak, S C; Chi, C S; Hung, D Z

    2001-05-01

    The clinical manifestations of delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae after carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication are variable. In addition, there is no specific therapy for these complications. Fortunately, these complications have occurred less frequently in recent years, probably due to the usage of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. We report an 8-year-old boy who developed late psychiatric disturbances 2 days after full recovery of consciousness from initial CO intoxication. His neuropsychiatric symptoms included consciousness disturbance, motor dysfunction, chorea, aphasia and agnosias. He received HBO therapy at 2.0 barr for 60 minutes once a day for 7 consecutive days. Three weeks later, he was functioning normally with no neuropsychiatric symptoms. A literature review concluded that HBO may be effective in treating neuropsychiatric sequelae. Moreover, immediate administration of HBO during acute CO intoxication may prevent these complications.

  6. Density function theory study of the adsorption and dissociation of carbon monoxide on tungsten nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Meng-Hsiung; Ju, Shin-Pon; Chen, Hsin-Tsung; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lu, Jian-Ming; Lin, Ken-Huang; Lin, Jenn-Sen; Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Yang, Hsi-Wen

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption and dissociation properties of carbon monoxide (CO) molecule on tungsten W(n) (n = 10-15) nanoparticles have been investigated by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The lowest-energy structures for W(n) (n = 10-15) nanoparticles are found by the basin-hopping method and big-bang method with the modified tight-binding many-body potential. We calculated the corresponding adsorption energies, C-O bond lengths and dissociation barriers for adsorption of CO on nanoparticles. The electronic properties of CO on nanoparticles are studied by the analysis of density of state and charge density. The characteristic of CO on W(n) nanoparticles are also compared with that of W bulk.

  7. Carbon monoxide intoxication: an event to be detected by the emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulfo Orobio-Quiñones

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The carbon monoxide poisoning (CO is a common condition. It is presented in 17.5 per 100,000 habitants. It is the main cause of poisoning mortality in developed countries. The condition requires a high index of suspicion and exhaustive evaluation of the patient circumstances. The diagnosis is complicated by the unspecific symptoms and lack of reliable markers. CO-oximetry is a tool that helps the diagnosis, therapeutic decision-making and monitoring. Although the evidence is still controversial, the best opportunity for patients intoxicated with CO is the use of oxygen at high concentrations in a hyperbaric chamber. Considering the difficult access to hyperbaric chamber in our setting, we must consider alternative therapies that can help reduce acute complications and chronic consequences.

  8. Two Storm-Related Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Outbreaks—Connecticut, October 2011 and October 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Timothy; Przysiecki, Patricia; Archambault, Gary; Sosa, Lynn; Toal, Brian; Magri, Julie; Cartter, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Storm-related carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning outbreaks occurred in Connecticut in 2011 and 2012, despite efforts to improve public messaging. We describe the cases and incidents and identify possible preventive interventions. We defined cases as blood carboxyhemoglobin ≥9.0% among persons exposed to alternative power or heat sources because of storm-related losses. We identified 133 cases, including 3 deaths, in 2011 and 30 in 2012, associated with 72 and 11 incidents, respectively. Racial/ethnic minorities were overrepresented (60% of 2011 patients; 48% in 2012), compared with Connecticut's minority population (29%). Generator or charcoal misuse (83% in 2011; 100% in 2012) caused the majority of incidents. Few CO-source operators recalled media or product CO warnings. Incorrect generator and charcoal use, racial/ethnic disparities, and incomplete penetration of warning messages characterized both outbreaks. A multifaceted approach is needed to decrease postdisaster CO poisonings.

  9. 2005 hurricane surveillance: measures to reduce carbon monoxide poisoning in all Floridians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A; Dark, T; Mason, T; Goodwin, B

    2012-05-01

    The 2005 Florida hurricanes caused widespread power outages, increasing generator use that directly resulted in a surge in carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings. Of the 126 CO poisonings documented, 77% were related to generator use and 43% of these generators were placed outside but near a window. African-Americans and Latinos had a higher incidence of CO poisoning. The strength of the authors' study described here was the inclusion of the first responder network in one surveillance system for hurricane response. Notable advances have occurred since the authors' study, including CO poisoning listed as a reportable condition, regulation requiring CO detectors, CO generator warning labeling, and the development of a local surveillance and classification program for the county health departments. To prepare for future multiple hurricane seasons, comprehensive outreach should be focused at the local level through the first responder network and community groups to reduce CO poisonings in all populations.

  10. The effect of carbon monoxide on glucose metabolism and growth of rat embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robkin, M A; Cockroft, D L

    1978-12-01

    Rat embryos at days 11-12 of gestation cultured for 18 hours in vitro respond to reduced oxygen or to elevated levels of CO. Glucose consumption and lactate production increase while the growth rate decreases. The ratio of lactate produced to glucose consumed increases to values characteristic of earlier, more anaerobic, embryos. It is suggested that most of the energy consumed by the embryo goes to support growth and that the change in glucose metabolism results in a decrease in available energy which decreases the growth rate. The response to reduced oxygen levels is more marked than the response to elevated levels of carbon monoxide and we interpret the result to imply that oxygen transport in these embryos is primarily via solution rather than via combination with hemoglobin.

  11. Population and hierarchy of active species in gold iron oxide catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qian; Freakley, Simon J.; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Carley, Albert F.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mineo, Yuki; Haruta, Masatake; Hutchings, Graham J.; Kiely, Christopher J.

    2016-09-01

    The identity of active species in supported gold catalysts for low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation remains an unsettled debate. With large amounts of experimental evidence supporting theories of either gold nanoparticles or sub-nm gold species being active, it was recently proposed that a size-dependent activity hierarchy should exist. Here we study the diverging catalytic behaviours after heat treatment of Au/FeOx materials prepared via co-precipitation and deposition precipitation methods. After ruling out any support effects, the gold particle size distributions in different catalysts are quantitatively studied using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A counting protocol is developed to reveal the true particle size distribution from HAADF-STEM images, which reliably includes all the gold species present. Correlation of the populations of the various gold species present with catalysis results demonstrate that a size-dependent activity hierarchy must exist in the Au/FeOx catalyst.

  12. 1H MR spectroscopy of gray and white matter in carbon monoxide poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, D.; Danielsen, E.R.; Hansen, K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication leads to acute and chronic neurological deficits, but little is known about the specific noxious mechanisms. (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may allow insight into the pathophysiology of CO poisoning by monitoring neurochemical disturbances, yet only...... limited information is available to date on the use of this protocol in determining the neurological effects of CO poisoning. To further examine the short-term and long-term effects of CO on the central nervous system, we have studied seven patients with CO poisoning assessed by gray and white matter MRS......-acetyl aspartate (NAA) ratios to creatine (Cr), predominantly in the white matter. Lactate peaks were detected in two patients during the early phase of high-dose CO poisoning. Two patients with chronic low-dose CO exposure and without loss of consciousness had normal MRI and MRS scans. On follow-up. five of our...

  13. A Real-Time Monitoring System of Industry Carbon Monoxide Based on Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiachen; Zhou, Jianxiong; Lv, Zhihan; Wei, Wei; Song, Houbing

    2015-11-20

    Carbon monoxide (CO) burns or explodes at over-standard concentration. Hence, in this paper, a Wifi-based, real-time monitoring of a CO system is proposed for application in the construction industry, in which a sensor measuring node is designed by low-frequency modulation method to acquire CO concentration reliably, and a digital filtering method is adopted for noise filtering. According to the triangulation, the Wifi network is constructed to transmit information and determine the position of nodes. The measured data are displayed on a computer or smart phone by a graphical interface. The experiment shows that the monitoring system obtains excellent accuracy and stability in long-term continuous monitoring.

  14. Direct measurement of the oceanic carbon monoxide flux by eddy correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Blomquist

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This report presents results from a field trial of ship-based air–sea flux measurements of carbon monoxide (CO by direct eddy correlation with an infrared-laser trace gas analyzer. The analyzer utilizes Off-Axis Integrated-Cavity-Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS to achieve high selectivity for CO, rapid response (~2 Hz and low noise. Over a two-day sea trial, peak daytime seawater CO concentrations were ~1.5 nM and wind speeds were consistently 10–12 m s−1. A clear diel cycle in CO flux with an early afternoon maximum was observed. An analysis of flux error suggests the effects of non-stationarity are important, and air–sea CO flux measurements are best performed in regions remote from continental pollution sources.

  15. The role of carbon monoxide signaling in the responses of plants to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huyi; He, Longfei

    2014-11-15

    Whether carbon monoxide (CO) exerts toxic or protective effect is dependent on the concentration and location of CO in animals. Similarly, it has been increasingly evident that CO also is involved in diverse physiological processes in plants, from seed germination and dormancy to stomatal closure to regulation of multiple environmental stresses. In this review, we focus on CO synthesis and the role of CO in plant responses to abiotic stresses, such as salinity, drought, cadmium and mercury. In general, abiotic stresses induce CO production in plants. CO can alleviate oxidative damage by improving the activities of antioxidative enzymes and antioxidant metabolism. In addition, cross talk between CO signaling and other signaling molecules including nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) also is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of the Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensing Characteristics of Tin Oxide Mixed Cerium Oxide Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad B. Haider

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of tin oxide mixed cerium oxide were grown on unheated substrates by physical vapor deposition. The films were annealed in air at 500 °C for two hours, and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical spectrophotometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy results reveal that the films were highly porous and porosity of our films was found to be in the range of 11.6–21.7%. The films were investigated for the detection of carbon monoxide, and were found to be highly sensitive. We found that 430 °C was the optimum operating temperature for sensing CO gas at concentrations as low as 5 ppm. Our sensors exhibited fast response and recovery times of 26 s and 30 s, respectively.

  17. Foucault, surveillance, and carbon monoxide testing within stop-smoking services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Aimee; Ashton, Kathryn; Phillips, Rhiannon

    2015-07-01

    Health professionals have adopted proactive testing for early evidence of disease. Researchers have identified that this leads to enumerated understandings and shapes behavior in productive ways. Smoking-cessation advisors regularly test clients for carbon monoxide (CO), but client views of this had not previously been explored. We interviewed 23 clients of a United Kingdom-based stop-smoking service regarding their experiences of CO testing. The majority of participants were successful quitters. We used ATLAS.ti 7 as a data-management tool during structured qualitative analysis. Our findings reveal that clients believed the results of their CO tests. Many became enumerated in their understanding, and thus placed themselves in a hierarchy with other members of their group. Almost all clients found that knowing their CO test score was motivating. We conclude that additional research is needed to understand the experiences of CO testing among clients who do not quit. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Effects of continuous exposure to carbon monoxide on auditory vigilance in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D.M.; Jolly, E.J.; Pethybridge, R.J.; Colquhoun, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    Six different groups of non-smoking young male subjects were studied separately for 18 consecutive days each in a closed controlled-envionmental human exposure chamber. Each group was subjected to a 5-day control period in fresh air followed successively by an 8-day period of continuous exposure to 50 ppM, 15 ppM or 0 ppM (control) by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) in air, and a 5-day recovery period in fresh air. The subjects performed a 1-h auditory vigilance task every day at the same time of day in a fixed qualitative, quantitative, and temporal relationship with food intake, consumption of stimulating beverages, physical activity, and sleep. It was concluded that such CO exposure, involving the continuous carriage of carboxyhaemoglobin loads up to 7%, was without significant effect on auditory vigilance.

  19. Effects of continuous exposure to carbon monoxide on auditory vigilance in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D.M.; Jolly, E.J.; Pethybridge, R.J.; Colquhoun, W.P.

    1981-02-01

    Six different groups of non-smoking young male subjcts were stutied separately for 18 consecutive days each in a closed controlled-environment human exposure chamber. Each group was subjected to a 5-day control period in fresh air followed successively by an 8-day period of continuous exposure to 50 ppm, 15 ppm or 0 ppm (controll) by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) in air, and a 5-day recovery period in fresh air. The subjects performed a 1-h auditory vigilance task every day at the same time of day in a fixed qualitative, quantitative, and temporal relationship with food intake, consumption of stimulating beverages, physical activity, and sleep. It was concluded that such CO exposure, involving the continuous carriage of carboxyhaemoglobin loads up to 70%, was without significant effect on auditory vigilance.

  20. Effects of continuous exposure to carbon monoxide on auditory vigilance in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D.M.; Jolly, E.J.; Pethybridge, R.J.; Colquhoun, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    Six different groups of non-smoking young male subjects were studied separately for 18 consecutive days each in a closed controlled-environmental human exposure chamber. Each group was subjected to a 5-day control period in fresh air followed successively by an 8-day period of continuous exposure to 50 ppm, 15 ppm or 0 ppm (control) by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) in air, and a 5-day recovery period in fresh air. The subjects performed a 1-h auditory vigilance task every day at the same time of day in a fixed qualitative, quantitative, and temporal relationship with food intake, consumption of stimulating beverages, physical activity, and sleep. It was concluded that such CO exposure, involving the continuous carriage of carboxyhaemoglobin loads up to 7%, was without significant effect on auditory vigilance.

  1. On Estimation of Contamination from Hydrogen Cyanide in Carbon Monoxide Line-intensity Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dongwoo T.; Li, Tony Y.; Viero, Marco P.; Church, Sarah E.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2017-09-01

    Line-intensity mapping surveys probe large-scale structure through spatial variations in molecular line emission from a population of unresolved cosmological sources. Future such surveys of carbon monoxide line emission, specifically the CO(1-0) line, face potential contamination from a disjointed population of sources emitting in a hydrogen cyanide emission line, HCN(1-0). This paper explores the potential range of the strength of HCN emission and its effect on the CO auto power spectrum, using simulations with an empirical model of the CO/HCN-halo connection. We find that effects on the observed CO power spectrum depend on modeling assumptions but are very small for our fiducial model, which is based on current understanding of the galaxy-halo connection. Given the fiducial model, we expect the bias in overall CO detection significance due to HCN to be less than 1%.

  2. Electron energy and vibrational distribution functions of carbon monoxide in nanosecond atmospheric discharges and microsecond afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Capitelli, M.

    2017-12-01

    Nanopulse atmospheric carbon monoxide discharges and corresponding afterglows have been investigated in a wide range of applied reduced electric field (130 kinetics of vibrational and electronic excited states as well as to a simplified plasma chemistry for the different species formed during the activation of CO. The molar fraction of electronically excited states generated in the discharge is sufficient to create structures in the EEDF in the afterglow regime. On the other hand, only for long duration pulses (i.e. 50 ns), non-equilibrium vibrational distributions can be observed especially in the afterglow. The trend of the results for the case study E/N = 200 Td, \\text{pulse}=2$ ns is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the corresponding case for CO2 implying that the activation of CO2 by cold plasmas should take into account the kinetics of formed CO with the same accuracy as the CO2 itself.

  3. UV-induced carbon monoxide emission from sand and living vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    The global burden of carbon monoxide, CO, is rather uncertain. In this paper we address the potential of UV-induced CO emission by terrestrial surfaces. Real-time measurements of [CO] were made with a cavity enhanced laser connected in closed loop to either an ecosystem chamber or a leaf scale...... chamber. Sand and leaves of all examined plant species exhibited emission of CO in response to artificial UV-radiation and the UV-component of natural solar radiation. The UV-induced rate of CO emission exhibited a rather low dependence on temperature, indicating an abiotic process. The emission of CO...... in response to the UV-component of natural solar radiation was also evident at the ecosystem scale. When scaled to the global level, the UV-induced emission of CO by the major types of terrestrial surfaces, living leaves and soil (here represented by sand), amounts up to 28 Tg yr−1. This source has...

  4. The deployment of carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) for ambient air monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Chaichana; Lu, Mingming; Keener, Tim C; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2014-06-16

    Wireless sensor networks are becoming increasingly important as an alternative solution for environment monitoring because they can reduce cost and complexity. Also, they can improve reliability and data availability in places where traditional monitoring methods are difficult to site. In this study, a carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) was developed to measure carbon monoxide concentrations at a major traffic intersection near the University of Cincinnati main campus. The system has been deployed over two weeks during Fall 2010, and Summer 2011-2012, traffic data was also recorded by using a manual traffic counter and a video camcorder to characterize vehicles at the intersection 24 h, particularly, during the morning and evening peak hour periods. According to the field test results, the 1 hr-average CO concentrations were found to range from 0.1-1.0 ppm which is lower than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) 35 ppm on a one-hour averaging period. During rush hour periods, the traffic volume at the intersection varied from 2,067 to 3,076 vehicles per hour with 97% being passenger vehicles. Furthermore, the traffic volume based on a 1-h average showed good correlation (R2 = 0.87) with the 1-h average CO-WSN concentrations for morning and evening peak time periods whereas CO-WSN results provided a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.42) with 24 hours traffic volume due to fluctuated changes of meteorological conditions. It is concluded that the performance and the reliability of wireless ambient air monitoring networks can be used as an alternative method for real time air monitoring.

  5. Carbon monoxide gas sensing using zinc oxide deposited by successive ionic layer adhesion and reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florido, E. A.; Dagaas, N. A. C.

    2017-05-01

    This study was aimed to determine the carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing capability of zinc oxide (ZnO) film fabricated by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) on glass substrate. Films consisting of a mixture of flower-like clusters of ZnO nanorods and nanowires were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Current-voltage characterization of the samples showed an average resistivity of 13.0 Ω-m. Carbon monoxide gas was synthesized by mixing the required amount of formic acid and excess sulfuric acid to produce CO gas concentrations of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 parts per million (ppm) v/v with five trials for each concentration. Two sets of data were obtained. One set consisted of the voltage response of the single film sensor while the other set were obtained from the double film sensor. The voltage response for the single film sensor and the double film sensor showed an average sensitivity of 0.0038 volts per ppm and 0.0024 volts per ppm, respectively. The concentration the single film can detect with a 2V output is 526 ppm while the double film sensor can detect up to 833 ppm with a 2V output. This shows that using the double film sensor is advantageous compared to single film sensor, because of its higher concentration range due to the larger surface area for the gas to interact. Moreover, the measured average resistance for the single film sensor was 10 MΩ while for the double film sensor the average resistance was 5 MΩ.

  6. Paediatric emergency department-based carbon monoxide detector intervention: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Lara B; Roberts, Kristin J; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Collins, Christy L; Comstock, R Dawn; Fernandez, Soledad; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Casavant, Marcel J; Mihalov, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Background Although non-fire-related carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is almost entirely preventable, over 400 people die and 20 000 people are injured each year in the USA from unintentional CO poisoning. Thus, there is a critical need for evidence-based interventions for preventing CO poisoning and increasing the proper use and installation of CO detectors. Methods A randomised, controlled trial (Project CODE, a Carbon Monoxide Detector Education intervention) with 2-week and 6-month follow-up home observations was conducted in 299 parents of children aged ≤18 years recruited in the emergency department of a level 1 paediatric trauma centre. The intervention group received an educational tool, a spiral-bound, laminated booklet that resembled a CO detector containing theory-based safety messages based on the precaution adoption process model, a plug-in CO detector and 9 V battery. The control group received a one page flyer on CO poisoning prevention. Results Although the difference was not statistically significant, mean CO knowledge score increased at a greater rate for the intervention group than the control group. Intervention group parents were more likely to exhibit ‘safe’ CO detector use than control group parents at the 2-week follow-up (RR: 2.75; 95% CI 2.06 to 3.69) and 6-month follow-up (RR: 2.78; 95% CI 2.06 to 3.76), after adjusting for self-reported CO detector use behaviour at enrolment and annual per capita income. Conclusions An emergency department-delivered intervention containing a theory-based educational tool paired with a CO detector can be an effective method for increasing knowledge about CO poisoning, for prevention and for appropriate use of a CO detector. Trial registration number NCT00959478. PMID:28007971

  7. [Screening for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning by general practitioners in home visits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocheton, Nicolas; Machet, Ewa; Haouache, Hakim; Houdart, Eric; Huat, Georges; Claverot, José; Fortin, Bruno; Lapostolle, Frédéric

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the interest of carbon monoxide (CO) detector used by general practionners visiting patients at home. CO detector (cost: 200 euros) was attributed to 300 general practionners visiting at least 20 patients at home per week. Alarm was triggered when ambient CO concentration exceeded 80ppm. Measurement of CO in expired breath was also possible. Activity and alarms were prospectively collected. Circumstances of intoxication were recorded. Evaluation was finally performed. The end-poind was to quantify CO-poisoning detected by the use of the device and the cost of this stratégy. From November 2001 to November 2004, 65 scenes of intoxication with 79 victims were prospectively reported by 12 general practionners. Final evaluation revealed that 23 physicians omitted to declare alarms. Alarm incidence was of 1 for 17.527 visits; with a related cost of approximately 858 euros for 24 months. Ambient carbon monoxide concentration exceeded 200ppm in 25% of cases. Hospital admission was required for 91% of the victims. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was performed in two cases. General practionners (n=272) considered that CO detector was useful for safety reasons (91%), they wanted to continue the experience, but did not plan to buy such device (59%). Use of CO detectors by general practionners visiting patients at home allowed to identify 65 scenes of CO intoxication. In most cases, the cause of the visit did not suggested CO poisoning. The cost of the device seems to limits its large use. CO detector is a safety tool for both general prationners and patients. Its large use has to be questioned. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule Accelerates Reendothelialization after Carotid Artery Balloon Injury in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing Song; Chen, Yang Xin; Huang, Qing Sheng; Deng, Bing Qing; Xie, Shuang Lun; Wang, Jing Feng; Nie, Ru Qiong

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CORM-2), a novel carbon monoxide carrier, on the reendothelialization of carotid artery in rat endothelial denudation model. Male rats subjected to carotid artery balloon injury were treated with CORM-2, inactive CORM-2 (iCORM-2) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The reendothelialization capacity was evaluated by Evans Blue dye and the immunostaining with anti-CD31 antibody. The number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was detected by flow cytometry. The proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were assessed by using [3H]thymidine, Boyden chamber and human fibronectin respectively. The expressions of protein were detected by using western blot analysis. CORM-2 remarkably accelerated the re-endothelialization 5 d later and inhibited neointima formation 28 d later. In addition, the number of peripheral EPCs significantly increased in CORM-2-treated rats than that in iCORM-2 or DMSO-treated rats after 5 d later. In vitro experiments, CORM-2 significantly enhanced the proliferation, migration and adhesion of HUVECs. The levels of Akt, eNOS phosphorylation, and NO generation in HUVECs were also much higher in CORM-2 treated group. Blocking of PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway markedly suppressed the enhanced migration and adhesion of HUVECs induced by CORM-2. CORM-2 could promote endothelial repair, and inhibit neointima formation after carotid artery balloon injury, which might be associated with the function changes of HUVECs regulated by PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  9. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell transplantation for delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong D

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dianrong Gong,1 Haiyan Yu,1 Weihua Wang,2 Haixin Yang,1 Fabin Han1,21Department of Neurology, 2Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, Liaocheng People's Hospital, The Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Stem cell transplantation is one of the potential treatments for neurological disorders. Since human umbilical cord stem cells have been shown to provide neuroprotection and promote neural regeneration, we have attempted to transplant the human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (hUCB-MNCs to treat patients with delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication (DEACOI. The hUCB-MNCs were isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood and were given to patients subarachnoidally. Physical examinations, mini-mental state examination scores, and computed tomography scans were used to evaluate the improvement of symptoms, signs, and pathological changes of the patient's brain before and after hUCB-MNC transplantation. A total of 12 patients with DEACOI were treated with hUCB-MNCs in this study. We found that most of the patients have shown significant improvements in movement, behavior, and cognitive function, and improved brain images in 1–4 months from the first transplantation of hUCB-MNCs. None of these patients have been observed to have any severe adverse effects. Our study suggests that the hUCB-MNC transplantation may be a safe and effective treatment for DEACOI. Further studies and clinical trials with more cases, using more systematic scoring methods, are needed to evaluate brain structural and functional improvements in patients with DEACOI after hUCB-MNC therapy.Keywords: human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells, transplantation, delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication, MMSE

  10. Paediatric emergency department-based carbon monoxide detector intervention: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Lara B; Roberts, Kristin J; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Collins, Christy L; Comstock, R Dawn; Fernandez, Soledad; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Casavant, Marcel J; Mihalov, Leslie

    2017-10-01

    Although non-fire-related carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is almost entirely preventable, over 400 people die and 20 000 people are injured each year in the USA from unintentional CO poisoning. Thus, there is a critical need for evidence-based interventions for preventing CO poisoning and increasing the proper use and installation of CO detectors. A randomised, controlled trial (Project CODE, a Carbon Monoxide Detector Education intervention) with 2-week and 6-month follow-up home observations was conducted in 299 parents of children aged ≤18 years recruited in the emergency department of a level 1 paediatric trauma centre. The intervention group received an educational tool, a spiral-bound, laminated booklet that resembled a CO detector containing theory-based safety messages based on the precaution adoption process model, a plug-in CO detector and 9 V battery. The control group received a one page flyer on CO poisoning prevention. Although the difference was not statistically significant, mean CO knowledge score increased at a greater rate for the intervention group than the control group. Intervention group parents were more likely to exhibit 'safe' CO detector use than control group parents at the 2-week follow-up (RR: 2.75; 95% CI 2.06 to 3.69) and 6-month follow-up (RR: 2.78; 95% CI 2.06 to 3.76), after adjusting for self-reported CO detector use behaviour at enrolment and annual per capita income. An emergency department-delivered intervention containing a theory-based educational tool paired with a CO detector can be an effective method for increasing knowledge about CO poisoning, for prevention and for appropriate use of a CO detector. NCT00959478. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mishra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review, recent works on the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich gases for fuel cell applications are summarized. H2 is used as a fuel for polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. It is produced by reforming of natural gas or liquid fuels followed by water gas shift reaction. The produced gas consists of H2, CO, and CO2. In which CO content is around 1%, which is highly poisonous for the Pt anode of the PEMFC so that further removal of CO is needed. Catalytic preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PROX is one of the most suitable methods of purification of H2 because of high CO conversion rate at low temperature range, which is preferable for PEMFC operating conditions. Catalysts used for COPROX are mainly noble metal based; gold based and base metal oxide catalysts among them Copper-Ceria based catalysts are the most appropriate due to its low cost, easy availability and result obtained by these catalysts are comparable with the conventional noble metal catalysts. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 22nd October 2010, Revised: 12nd January 2011, Accepted: 19th January 2011[How to Cite: A. Mishra, R. Prasad. (2011. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (1: 1-14. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/191] | View in 

  12. Thermal degradation kinetics of polyketone based on styrene and carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Jiali, E-mail: jiaqm411@163.com; Fan, Wenjun; Shan, Shaoyun; Su, Hongying; Wu, Shuisheng; Jia, Qingming

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • The PK were synthesized from carbon monoxide and styrene in the presence of PANI-PdCl{sub 2} catalyst and PdCl{sub 2} catalyst. • The structures and thermal behaviors of PK prepared by homogenous and the supported catalyst were investigated. • The microstructures of PK were changed in the supported catalyst system. • The alternating PK copolymer (PANI-PdCl{sub 2} catalyst) was more thermally stable than PK (PdCl{sub 2} catalyst). • The degradation activation energy values were estimated by Flynn–Wall–Ozawa method and Kissinger method. - Abstract: Copolymerization of styrene with carbon monoxide to give polyketones (PK) was carried out under homogeneous palladium catalyst and polyaniline (PANI) supported palladium(II) catalyst, respectively. The copolymers were characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR and GPC. The results indicated that the PK catalyzed by the supported catalyst has narrow molecular weight distribution (PDI = 1.18). For comparison purpose of thermal behaviors of PK prepared by the homogeneous and the supported catalyst, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) were conducted at different heating rates. The peak temperatures (396–402 °C) for PK prepared by the supported catalyst are higher than those (387–395 °C) of PK prepared by the homogeneous catalyst. The degradation activation energy (E{sub k}) values were estimated by Flynn–Wall–Ozawa method and Kissinger method, respectively. The E{sub k} values, as determined by two methods, were found to be in the range 270.72 ± 0.03–297.55 ± 0.10 kJ mol{sup −1}. Structures analysis and thermal degradation analysis revealed that the supported catalyst changed the microstructures of PK, resulting in improving thermal stability of PK.

  13. Fine particulate matter and carbon monoxide exposure concentrations in urban street transport microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, S.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M. J.; Colvile, R. N.

    Personal exposure studies are crucial alongside microenvironment and ambient studies in order to get a better understanding of the health risks posed by fine particulate matter and carbon monoxide in the urban transport microenvironment and for making informed decisions to manage and reduce the health risks. Studies specifically assessing the PM 2.5, ultrafine particle count and carbon monoxide personal exposure concentrations of adults in an urban transport microenvironment have steadily increased in number over the last decade. However, no recent collective summary is available, particularly one which also considers ultrafine particles; therefore, we present a review of the personal exposure concentration studies for the above named pollutants on different modes of surface transportation (walking, cycling, bus, car and taxi) in the urban transport microenvironment. Comparisons between personal exposure measurements and concentrations recorded at fixed monitoring sites are considered in addition to the factors influencing personal exposure in the transport microenvironment. In general, the exposure studies examined revealed pedestrians and cyclists to experience lower fine particulate matter and CO exposure concentrations in comparison to those inside vehicles—the vehicle shell provided no protection to the passengers. Proximity to the pollutant sources had a significant impact on exposure concentration levels experienced, consequently individuals should be encouraged to use back street routes. Fixed monitoring stations were found to be relatively poor predictors of CO and PM 2.5 exposure concentration levels experienced by individuals in the urban transport microenvironment. Although the mode of transport, traffic and meteorology parameters were commonly identified as significant factors influencing exposure concentrations to the different pollutants under examination, a large amount of the exposure concentration variation in the exposure studies remained

  14. Systemic Administration of Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecule-3 Protects the Skeletal Muscle in Porcine Model of Compartment Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, Aurelia; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Sanders, David; Lawendy, Abdel-Rahman

    2018-01-30

    Acute limb compartment syndrome, a complication of musculoskeletal trauma, results in muscle necrosis and cell death. Carbon monoxide, liberated from the carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-3, has been shown protective in a rat model of compartment syndrome. The purpose of this study was to test the effect of carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-3 in a preclinical large animal model of compartment syndrome, with the ultimate goal of developing a pharmacologic adjunct treatment for compartment syndrome. Animal research study. Basic research laboratory in a hospital setting. Male Yorkshire-Landrace pigs (50-60 kg). Pigs underwent 6 hours of intracompartmental pressure elevation by infusing fluid into the anterior compartment of the right hind limb. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-3 was administered systemically (2 mg/kg, IV) at fasciotomy, followed by 3-hour reperfusion. Muscle perfusion, inflammation, injury, and apoptosis were assessed in the skeletal muscle. Systemic leukocyte activation was assessed during compartment syndrome and reperfusion. Elevation of hind limb intracompartmental pressure resulted in significant microvascular perfusion deficits (44% ± 1% continuously perfused capillaries in compartment syndrome vs 76% ± 4% in sham; p compartment syndrome vs 0.17 ± 0.03 in sham; p compartment syndrome vs 0.13 ± 0.03 in sham; p compartment syndrome vs 1.0 ± 0.1 in baseline; p compartment syndrome-induced microvascular perfusion deficit, tissue injury, and systemic leukocyte activation. The data suggest the potential therapeutic application of carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-3 to patients at risk of developing compartment syndrome.

  15. Inter-comparison of four different carbon monoxide measurement techniques and evaluation of the long-term carbon monoxide time series of Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zellweger

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of carbon monoxide (CO for the overall oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, there is still considerable uncertainty in ambient measurements of CO. To address this issue, an inter-comparison between four different measurement techniques was made over a period of two months at the high-alpine site Jungfraujoch (JFJ, Switzerland. The measurement techniques were Non-dispersive Infrared Absorption (NDIR, Vacuum UV Resonance Fluorescence (VURF, gas chromatographic separation with a mercuric oxide reduction detector (GC/HgO, and gas chromatographic separation followed by reduction on a nickel catalyst and analysis by a flame ionization detector (GC/FID. The agreement among all techniques was better than 2% for one-hourly averages, which confirmed the suitability of the NDIR method for CO measurements even at remote sites. The inter-comparison added to the validation of the 12-year record (1996–2007 of continuous CO measurements at JFJ. To date this is one of the longest time series of continuous CO measurements in the free troposphere over Central Europe. This data record was further investigated with a focus on trend analysis. A significant negative trend was observed at JFJ showing a decrease of 21.4±0.3% over the investigated period, or an average annual decrease of 1.78%/yr (2.65±0.04 ppb/yr. These results were compared with emission inventory data reported to the Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP Convention. It could be shown that long range transport significantly influences the CO levels observed at JFJ, with air masses of non-European origin contributing at least one third of the observed mole fractions.

  16. Emerging concepts on the anti-inflammatory actions of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motterlini Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs are a class of organometallo compounds capable of delivering controlled quantities of CO gas to cells and tissues thus exerting a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. CO-RMs containing transition metal carbonyls were initially implemented to mimic the function of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1, a stress inducible defensive protein that degrades heme to CO and biliverdin leading to anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. Ten years after their discovery, the research on the chemistry and biological activities of CO-RMs has greatly intensified indicating that their potential use as CO delivering agents for the treatment of several pathological conditions is feasible. Although CO-RMs are a class of compounds that structurally diverge from traditional organic-like pharmaceuticals, their behaviour in the biological environments is progressively being elucidated revealing interesting features of metal-carbonyl chemistry towards cellular targets. Specifically, the presence of carbonyl groups bound to transition metals such as ruthenium, iron or manganese appears to make CO-RMs unique in their ability to transfer CO intracellularly and amplify the mechanisms of signal transduction mediated by CO. In addition to their well-established vasodilatory activities and protective effects against organ ischemic damage, CO-RMs are emerging for their striking anti-inflammatory properties which may be the result of the multiple activities of metal carbonyls in the control of redox signaling, oxidative stress and cellular respiration. Here, we review evidence on the pharmacological effects of CO-RMs in models of acute and chronic inflammation elaborating on some emerging concepts that may help to explain the chemical reactivity and mechanism(s of action of this distinctive class of compounds in biological systems.

  17. Multi-objective optimisation in carbon monoxide gas management at TRONOX KXN Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler, Johan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a by-product of the ilmenite smelting process from which titania slag and pig iron are produced. Prior to this project, the CO at Tronox KZN Sands in South Africa was burnt to get rid of it, producing carbon dioxide (CO2. At this plant, unprocessed materials are pre-heated using methane gas from an external supplier. The price of methane gas has increased significantly; and so this research considers the possibility of recycling CO gas and using it as an energy source to reduce methane gas demand. It is not possible to eliminate the methane gas consumption completely due to the energy demand fluctuation, and sub-plants have been assigned either CO gas or methane gas over time. Switching the gas supply between CO and methane gas involves production downtime to purge supply lines. Minimising the loss of production time while maximising the use of CO arose as a multi-objective optimisation problem (MOP with seven decision variables, and computer simulation was used to evaluate scenarios. We applied computer simulation and the multi-objective optimisation cross-entropy method (MOO CEM to find good solutions while evaluating the minimum number of scenarios. The proposals in this paper, which are in the process of being implemented, could save the company operational expenditure while reducing the carbon footprint of the smelter.

  18. On the wintertime low bias of Northern Hemisphere carbon monoxide found in global model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, O.; Schultz, M. G.; Bouarar, I.; Clark, H.; Huijnen, V.; Gaudel, A.; George, M.; Clerbaux, C.

    2014-09-01

    Despite the developments in the global modelling of chemistry and of the parameterization of the physical processes, carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations remain underestimated during Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter by most state-of-the-art chemistry transport models. The consequential model bias can in principle originate from either an underestimation of CO sources or an overestimation of its sinks. We address both the role of surface sources and sinks with a series of MOZART (Model for Ozone And Related Tracers) model sensitivity studies for the year 2008 and compare our results to observational data from ground-based stations, satellite observations, and vertical profiles from measurements on passenger aircraft. In our base case simulation using MACCity (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate project) anthropogenic emissions, the near-surface CO mixing ratios are underestimated in the Northern Hemisphere by more than 20 ppb from December to April, with the largest bias of up to 75 ppb over Europe in January. An increase in global biomass burning or biogenic emissions of CO or volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is not able to reduce the annual course of the model bias and yields concentrations over the Southern Hemisphere which are too high. Raising global annual anthropogenic emissions with a simple scaling factor results in overestimations of surface mixing ratios in most regions all year round. Instead, our results indicate that anthropogenic CO and, possibly, VOC emissions in the MACCity inventory are too low for the industrialized countries only during winter and spring. Reasonable agreement with observations can only be achieved if the CO emissions are adjusted seasonally with regionally varying scaling factors. A part of the model bias could also be eliminated by exchanging the original resistance-type dry deposition scheme with a parameterization for CO uptake by oxidation from soil bacteria and microbes, which reduces the boreal winter dry

  19. London atmospheric Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide: 12 year record, fluxes, and diurnal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoisellé, M.; Fisher, R. E.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Lowry, D.; Fowler, C. M. R.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) have been measured at the Royal Holloway site, 30km WSW of London, for 12 years. This site receives air that has passed over London when there are easterly winds and cleaner, background air when the wind comes from the SW. H2 and CO mixing ratios are measured continuously at 30 minute intervals on a Trace Analytical Reduction Gas Detector coupled to a HP5890 GC since September 1996, and on a Peak Performer I (or PP1) since July 2007 at 5 minute intervals. Both instruments use 2 1/8" packed columns in series: a Unibeads 1S and a Molecular Sieve 5A. The PP1 detector (Reduced Compound Photometer) is an updated version of the old RGD2, and both use zero air as the carrier gas. CO is calibrated twice a month against NOAA-CMDL standards (mixing ratios range: 186 to 300 ppb). H2 was uncalibrated until 2006, but is now calibrated monthly against internal standards (range 530 to 750 ppb) measured at MPI-Jena as part of the Eurohydros project. A linearity correction is applied to each instrument, based on the standard measurements. A secondary standard is measured before each sample on the GC-RGD and another one is measured 4 to 6 times in a row twice a day on the PP1. A target gas is measured daily on both instruments since September 2008. The secondary standards and the target gas are dry ambient air in 70L stainless steel tanks filled to a pressure of 8 bars. Comparison of results from the two instruments suggests that for the most part the data are in good agreement, but an interlaboratory round robin comparison exercise for the Eurohydros project showed that the RGD is not linear at low values of CO. This is particularly noticeable for CO levels below 150 ppb. The long-term record of CO at Royal Holloway shows a significant decline since the start of the record: the annual mean CO mixing ratio in 2008 was three times lower than in 1997. Flux calculations, by ratio against 222Rn, CH4 and CO2, suggest CO emissions

  20. Speciated hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from an internal combustion engine operating on methyl tertiary butyl ether-containing fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulopoulos, S G; Philippopoulos, C J

    2001-07-01

    In the present work, engine and tailpipe (after a three-way catalytic converter) emissions from an internal combustion engine operating on two oxygenated blend fuels [containing 2 and 11% weight/weight (w/w) methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE)] and on a nonoxygenated base fuel were characterized. The engine (OPEL 1.6 L) was operated under various conditions, in the range of 0-20 HP. Total unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, methane, hexane, ethylene, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-propanol, benzene, toluene, 1,3-butadiene, acetic acid, and MTBE were measured at each engine operating condition. As concerns the total HC emissions, the use of MTBE was beneficial from 1.90 to 3.81 HP, which were by far the most polluting conditions. Moreover, CO emissions in tailpipe exhaust were decreased in the whole operation range with increasing MTBE in the fuel. The greatest advantage of MTBE addition to gasoline was the decrease in ethylene, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and acetic acid emissions in engine exhaust, especially when MTBE content in the fuel was increased to 11% w/w. In tailpipe exhaust, the catalyst operation diminished the observed differences. Ethylene, methane, and acetaldehyde were the main compounds present in exhaust gases. Ethylene was easily oxidized over the catalyst, while acetaldehyde and methane were quite resistant to oxidation.

  1. A composition for a carbon black compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mednikov, M.M.; Babyuk, V.N.; Kasatkin, G.P.; Khaykin, M.S.; Kozlov, L.A.; Stroyev, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    Paraffinylendiamine is additionally introduced into a known compound of a carbon black paste in order to increase the degree of blackness and the total stability. The ratio of components in parts is: carbon black 100; petroleum oil, 150 to 300; butadiene and 2-methyl-5-vinylpyridine copolymer, 0.1 to 10.0 and paraffinylendiamine, 0.5 to 5.0. Furnace, thermal, channel and acetylene carbon black with a specific Brunauer Emmett Teller surface of 10 to 1,000 square meters per grain, of high, medium and low structural states, modified by different compounds, for instance, 02, are used as the carbon black. Petroleum oil with a kinematic viscosity at 50 degrees of 15 to 40 centistokes (for instance, vaseline, transformer oil and so on) is used as the petroleum oil. The compound is prepared in the following manner. The petroleum oil, carbon black, copolymer and paraffinylendiamine are loaded into an apparatus with a mixer. The compound is mixed for two hours at 80 degrees, cooled to 25 degrees, unloaded and are ground in a color mill. The coloring force is determined in the following manner. The components are mixed for 30 minutes in a glue mixer, unloaded and is ground in the color mill ten times. One gram is taken off from each sample (Ob). The sample which contains no paraffinylendiamine is used as the control sample. One gram of each sample is mixed with ZnO until the color of the compound is transformed from shiny black to a gray matte (brightening). The ratio of the ZnO volume which went to brightening of the sample to the volume which went to brightening of the control sample (1.2 grams), multiplied by 100 percent is used as the coloring force. It is shown that the composition of the proposed carbon black paste has a high degree of blackness and a high aggregate stability.

  2. Advanced Catalysts for the Ambient Temperature Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide and Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalette, Tim; Eldridge, Christopher; Yu, Ping; Alpetkin, Gokhan; Graf, John

    2010-01-01

    The primary applications for ambient temperature carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation catalysts include emergency breathing masks and confined volume life support systems, such as those employed on the Shuttle. While Hopcalite is typically used in emergency breathing masks for terrestrial applications, in the 1970s, NASA selected a 2% platinum (Pt) on carbon for use on the Shuttle since it is more active and also more tolerant to water vapor. In the last 10-15 years there have been significant advances in ambient temperature CO oxidation catalysts. Langley Research Center developed a monolithic catalyst for ambient temperature CO oxidation operating under stoichiometric conditions for closed loop carbon dioxide (CO2) laser applications which is also advertised as having the potential to oxidize formaldehyde (HCHO) at ambient temperatures. In the last decade it has been discovered that appropriate sized nano-particles of gold are highly active for CO oxidation, even at sub-ambient temperatures, and as a result there has been a wealth of data reported in the literature relating to ambient/low temperature CO oxidation. In the shorter term missions where CO concentrations are typically controlled via ambient temperature oxidation catalysts, formaldehyde is also a contaminant of concern, and requires specially treated carbons such as Calgon Formasorb as untreated activated carbon has effectively no HCHO capacity. This paper examines the activity of some of the newer ambient temperature CO and formaldehyde (HCHO) oxidation catalysts, and measures the performance of the catalysts relative to the NASA baseline Ambient Temperature Catalytic Oxidizer (ATCO) catalyst at conditions of interest for closed loop trace contaminant control systems.

  3. Mechanistical studies on the formation and destruction of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and carbon trioxide (CO3) in interstellar ice analog samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Chris J; Jamieson, Corey S; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2010-04-28

    A series of ice mixtures containing carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and molecular oxygen (O(2)) with varying carbon-to-oxygen ratios from 1 : 1.5 to 1 : 4 were irradiated at 10 K with energetic electrons to derive formation mechanisms and destruction pathways of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and carbon trioxide (CO(3)) in extraterrestrial, low temperature ices. Reactants and products were analyzed on line and in situ via absorption-reflection-absorption FTIR spectroscopy in the solid state, while the gas phase was sampled by a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). Additionally, isotopically mixed ices consisting of (i) (13)CO ratio C(18)O ratio CO(2), (ii) CO(2)ratio C(18)O(2), and (iii) CO(2)ratio(18)O(2) were irradiated in order to derive mechanistical and kinetic information on the production and destruction pathways of the following species: (i) (13)CO, C(18)O, CO(2), CO, (13)CO(2), (18)OCO, and (13)CO(3) (C(2v)), (ii) CO(2), C(18)O(2), CO, C(18)O, (18)OCO, CO(3) (C(2v)), OC(18)OO (C(2v)), OC(18)O(2) (C(2v)), (18)OCO(2) (C(2v)), (18)OC(18)OO (C(2v)), and C(18)O(3) (C(2v)), and (iii) CO(2), CO, (18)OCO, C(18)O, and C(18)O(2).

  4. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and methane at an immobilized cobalt protoporphyrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J.; Kortlever, R.; Kas, Recep; Mul, Guido; Koper, M.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide and water into useful products is a major challenge in facilitating a closed carbon cycle. Here we report a cobalt protoporphyrin immobilized on a pyrolytic graphite electrode that reduces carbon dioxide in an aqueous acidic solution at relatively low

  5. The CAMS interim Reanalysis of Carbon Monoxide, Ozone and Aerosol for 2003-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Johannes; Benedetti, Angela; Inness, Antje; Engelen, Richard J.; Jones, Luke; Huijnen, Vincent; Remy, Samuel; Parrington, Mark; Suttie, Martin; Bozzo, Alessio; Peuch, Vincent-Henri; Akritidis, Dimitris; Katragkou, Eleni

    2017-02-01

    A new global reanalysis data set of atmospheric composition (AC) for the period 2003-2015 has been produced by the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS). Satellite observations of total column (TC) carbon monoxide (CO) and aerosol optical depth (AOD), as well as several TC and profile observations of ozone, have been assimilated with the Integrated Forecasting System for Composition (C-IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting. Compared to the previous Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis (MACCRA), the new CAMS interim reanalysis (CAMSiRA) is of a coarser horizontal resolution of about 110 km, compared to 80 km, but covers a longer period with the intent to be continued to present day. This paper compares CAMSiRA with MACCRA and a control run experiment (CR) without assimilation of AC retrievals. CAMSiRA has smaller biases than the CR with respect to independent observations of CO, AOD and stratospheric ozone. However, ozone at the surface could not be improved by the assimilation because of the strong impact of surface processes such as dry deposition and titration with nitrogen monoxide (NO), which were both unchanged by the assimilation. The assimilation of AOD led to a global reduction of sea salt and desert dust as well as an exaggerated increase in sulfate. Compared to MACCRA, CAMSiRA had smaller biases for AOD, surface CO and TC ozone as well as for upper stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. Finally, the temporal consistency of CAMSiRA was better than the one of MACCRA. This was achieved by using a revised emission data set as well as by applying careful selection and bias correction to the assimilated retrievals. CAMSiRA is therefore better suited than MACCRA for the study of interannual variability, as demonstrated for trends in surface CO.

  6. Response of Hepatoma 9618a and Normal Liver to Host Carbogen and Carbon Monoxide Breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P. Robinson

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hyperoxia (induced by host carbogen 95% oxygen/5% carbon dioxide breathing. and hypoxia (induced by host carbon monoxide CO at 660 ppm. breathing were compared by using noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR methods to gain simultaneous information on blood flow/oxygenation and the bioenergetic status of rat Morris H9618a hepatomas. Both carbogen and CO breathing induced a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in signal intensity in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD MR images. This was due to a decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb, which acts as an endogenous contrast agent, caused either by formation of oxyhemoglobin in the case of carbogen breathing, or carboxyhemoglobin with CO breathing. The results were confirmed by observation of similar changes in deoxyHb in arterial blood samples examined ex vivo after carbogen or CO breathing. There was no change in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP/PI in either tumor or liver after CO breathing, whereas NTP/Pl increased twofold in the hepatoma (but not in the liver after carbogen breathing. No changes in tumor intracellular pH were seen after either treatment, whereas extracellular pH became more alkaline after CO breathing and more acid after carbogen breathing, respectively. This tumor type and the liver are unaffected by CO breathing at 660 ppm, which implies an adequate oxygen supply.

  7. Bio-Inspired Carbon Monoxide Sensors with Voltage-Activated Sensitivity

    KAUST Repository

    Savagatrup, Suchol

    2017-09-27

    Carbon monoxide (CO) outcompetes oxygen when binding to the iron center of hemeproteins, leading to a reduction in blood oxygen level and acute poisoning. Harvesting the strong specific interaction between CO and the iron porphyrin provides a highly selective and customizable sensor. We report the development of chemiresistive sensors with voltage-activated sensitivity for the detection of CO comprising iron porphyrin and functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (F-SWCNTs). Modulation of the gate voltage offers a predicted extra dimension for sensing. Specifically, the sensors show a significant increase in sensitivity toward CO when negative gate voltage is applied. The dosimetric sensors are selective to ppm levels of CO and functional in air. UV/Vis spectroscopy, differential pulse voltammetry, and density functional theory reveal that the in situ reduction of FeIII to FeII enhances the interaction between the F-SWCNTs and CO. Our results illustrate a new mode of sensors wherein redox active recognition units are voltage-activated to give enhanced and highly specific responses.

  8. Bio-Inspired Carbon Monoxide Sensors with Voltage-Activated Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savagatrup, Suchol; Schroeder, Vera; He, Xin; Lin, Sibo; He, Maggie; Yassine, Omar; Salama, Khaled N; Zhang, Xi-Xiang; Swager, Timothy M

    2017-11-06

    Carbon monoxide (CO) outcompetes oxygen when binding to the iron center of hemeproteins, leading to a reduction in blood oxygen level and acute poisoning. Harvesting the strong specific interaction between CO and the iron porphyrin provides a highly selective and customizable sensor. We report the development of chemiresistive sensors with voltage-activated sensitivity for the detection of CO comprising iron porphyrin and functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (F-SWCNTs). Modulation of the gate voltage offers a predicted extra dimension for sensing. Specifically, the sensors show a significant increase in sensitivity toward CO when negative gate voltage is applied. The dosimetric sensors are selective to ppm levels of CO and functional in air. UV/Vis spectroscopy, differential pulse voltammetry, and density functional theory reveal that the in situ reduction of FeIII to FeII enhances the interaction between the F-SWCNTs and CO. Our results illustrate a new mode of sensors wherein redox active recognition units are voltage-activated to give enhanced and highly specific responses. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Monitoring carbon monoxide pollution over the largest ten cities in the US using satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, B.; de Beurs, K.; Owsley, B.; Krehbiel, C. P.; Henebry, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the several air pollutants that are largely produced by anthropogenic activities in urban areas as a result of incomplete combustion of carbon-containing fuels. Long-term satellite data can monitor spatial and temporal changes in CO globally. Here we investigated spatial, vertical, and temporal changes in CO concentrations over the largest ten US metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) using Version 6 MOPITT TIR-only CO retrievals. The 15-year average of MOPITT Surface CO concentrations over urban areas were highest (388 ppbv) over New York City and lowest (151 ppbv) over Miami. The influence of cities on elevated CO levels extends well beyond the immediate urban area. The CO seasonal profiles above the surface show distinct seasonality with peaks March-April and troughs September-October. However, larger cities show a lack of CO seasonality near the surface. We applied the nonparametric Seasonal Kendall (SK) trend test to the CO time series. Results revealed significant decreasing trends in CO concentration, with stronger trends in the lower atmosphere (>700 hPa) than in the mid-troposphere (500-700 hPa). Our results demonstrate the strong influence of local urban emissions on (near-) surface CO concentrations. Decreasing urban CO over the past 15 years reflects improved urban metabolism through improved energy efficiency, and increasing use of alternative transportation and zero-emission vehicles.

  10. Carbon monoxide from neighbouring restaurants: the need for an integrated multi-agency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshishian, C; Sandle, H; Meltzer, M; Young, Y; Ward, R; Balasegaram, S

    2012-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colourless, odourless toxic gas produced during incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels. Most CO incidents reported to the UK Health Protection Agency (HPA) are due to faulty gas appliances, and legislation exists to ensure gas appliances are properly installed. We present three CO poisoning incidents of unusual origin reported to the HPA. In each, residents living above restaurants were poisoned after workers left charcoal smouldering overnight in specialist or traditional ovens whilst ventilation systems were turned off. This led to production of CO, which travelled through floorboards and built up to dangerous concentrations in the flats. Working with local authorities, these incidents were investigated and resolved, and work was conducted to prevent further occurrences. The novel nature of these CO incidents led to delays in recognition and subsequent remedial action. Although previously undescribed, it is likely that due to the number of residences built above restaurants and the rising popularity of traditional cooking methods, similar incidents may be occurring and could increase in frequency. Multi-agency response and reporting mechanisms could be strengthened. Awareness raising in professional groups and the public on the importance of correct ventilation of such appliances is vital.

  11. Cobalt Oxide Nanosheet and CNT Micro Carbon Monoxide Sensor Integrated with Readout Circuit on Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Liang Dai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a micro carbon monoxide (CO sensor integrated with a readout circuit-on-a-chip manufactured by the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process and a post-process. The sensing film of the sensor is a composite cobalt oxide nanosheet and carbon nanotube (CoOOH/CNT film that is prepared by a precipitation-oxidation method. The structure of the CO sensor is composed of a polysilicon resistor and a sensing film. The sensor, which is of a resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs CO gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. The post-processing of the sensor includes etching the sacrificial layers and coating the sensing film. The advantages of the sensor include room temperature operation, short response/recovery times and easy post-processing. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the CO sensor is about 0.19 mV/ppm, and the response and recovery times are 23 s and 34 s for 200 ppm CO, respectively.

  12. Long-Term Stability of a Portable Carbon Monoxide Single-Breath Diffusing Capacity Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Vázquez-García, Juan Carlos; Silva-Cerón, Mónica; Cid-Juárez, Silvia; Martínez-Briseño, David; Enright, Paul L; Jensen, Robert; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2017-02-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society guidelines for single-breath diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) recommend a weekly biological control test and/or DLCO simulator to detect instrument error drift. Very little has been published regarding the results of such a quality assurance program. Our aim was to analyze the long-term stability of a portable DLCO instrument. We used a new EasyOne Pro system and checked its accuracy using a DLCO simulator with 2 reference gases (concentration A: carbon monoxide [CO] = 0.1% and helium = 6.52%; concentration B: CO = 0.08% and helium = 7.21%) during the first 3 y of use in our large clinical laboratory. To detect instrument drift, a healthy woman (MSC), age 43 y old at baseline, tested herself every week during this period of time. More than 6,000 spirometry and 5,000 DLCO maneuvers were done using this instrument for patients during these 3 y. There were no failures in the daily volume and flow checks or the CO and helium calibration checks performed automatically by the instrument. The differences between the simulator DLCO and the measured DLCO were -0.91 ± 1.33 mL/min/mm Hg and -0.61 ± 1.45 mL/min/mm Hg for concentration A and concentration B, respectively. The results of the 110 biological control tests were: mean 30.8 ± 1.7 mL/min/mm Hg (95% CI 30.5-31.1), coefficient of variation of 5.4% in DLCO, and repeatability of 2.5 mL/min/mm Hg. Only 4 measurements were outside ±3 mL/min/mm Hg (3.6%). Her mean alveolar volume was 4.2 ± 0.25 L with coefficient of variation of 6.2%; her inspired volume was 3.05 ± 0.14 L, and coefficient of variation = 4.5%. Measurements of DLCO were stable over the 3-y period without any need for manual recalibration of the instrument. The biological control was as good as the DLCO simulator to evaluate this kind of device in a long-term laboratory quality control program. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. [Measurement of urinary free cotinine. Comparison with the level of expired air carbon monoxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, N; Berny, C; Boyer, J-C; Capolaghi, B; de l'homme, G; Desch, G; Garelik, D; Houdret, N; Le Moel, G; Moulsma, M; Plantin-Carrenard, E

    2005-01-01

    Cotinine is a very reliable index for the estimation of active or passive smoking. Sampling from a single urine void is well accepted by smokers who are willing to stop. It is not possible to exclude modification of urine cotinine according to beverage intake. The aim of this study was to determine if urine cotinine concentration must necessarily be adjusted to creatinine or not, by making comparison with expired air carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide was measured in 53 smokers coming for the first time in a smoking cessation program. Urine cotinine was measured by HPLC-UV. The cut-off value for abstinence is 8ppm and 0.05 mg/L, repectively. Urine creatinine was determined using the Jaffe reaction. Mean CO level was 18.5 +/- 10.6 ppm and mean urine cotine was 1.45 +/- 0.86 mg/L. Eight smokers had CO 8 ppm. They should be considered as abstinent. However, only one of them had a cotinine under the detection limit. Urine creatinine varied in a large range (0.7 - 35 mmol/L). But, cotinine was only weakly correlated to creatinine (r = 0.279, p = 0.037). There was a highly significant correlation between cotinine and CO (0.649, p = 0.0001). The correlation of cotinine/creatinine versus CO was not significant (r = 0.249, p = 0.072). In order to take into account fluid intake, urine cotinine of each sample was adjusted as if creatinine was equal to the mean (8.3 mmol/L) of the group of subjects. The correlation observed with adjusted or non adjusted cotinine and CO (r = 0.640, p < 0.0001) was the same. Urine cotinine from a single void is an accurate index of tobacco smoking at the individual level. There is no need to adjust cotinine concentration, taking into account urine creatinine. Measurement of urine cotinine can be useful to manage smokers who deliberately wish to overcome tobacco dependence, offering the opportunity to provide an adequate level of nicotine substitutive therapy. It is also of peculiar importance to follow-up pregnant women and smokers for whom

  14. Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) Space Radar Laboratory - 2 (SRL2) Carbon Monoxide 5 degree by 5 degree data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MAPS OverviewThe MAPS experiment measures the global distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios in the free troposphere. Because of MAPS' previous flights on...

  15. Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications - 3 (OSTA3) Carbon Monoxide 5 degree by 5 degree data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MAPS Overview The MAPS experiment measures the global distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios in the free troposphere. Because of MAPS' previous flights...

  16. Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications - 3 (OSTA3) Carbon Monoxide Second by Second data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MAPS Overview The MAPS experiment measures the global distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios in the free troposphere. Because of MAPS' previous flights...

  17. Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) Space Radar Laboratory - 1 (SRL1) Carbon Monoxide 5 degree by 5 degree data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MAPS OverviewThe MAPS experiment measures the global distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios in the free troposphere. Because of MAPS' previous flights on...

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Pt-, Fe-, and Zn-doped SnO2 Nanospheres and Carbon Monoxide Sensing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure and M-doped (M = Pt, Fe, and Zn SnO2 nanospheres were successfully synthesized via a simple and facile hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Chemical gas sensors were fabricated based on the as-synthesized nanostructures, and carbon monoxide sensing properties were systematically measured. Compared to pure, Fe-, and Zn-doped SnO2 nanospheres, the Pt-doped SnO2 nanospheres sensor exhibits higher sensitivity, lower operating temperature, more rapid response and recovery, better stability, and excellent selectivity. In addition, a theoretical study based on the first principles calculation was conducted. All results demonstrate the potential of Pt dopant for improving the gas sensing properties of SnO2-based sensors to carbon monoxide.

  19. Carbon monoxide and respiratory symptoms in young adult passive smokers: A pilot study comparing waterpipe to cigarette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouba Zeidan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studies have correlated second hand smoke (SHS with many diseases, especially respiratory effects. The goal of this study was to measure the impact of SHS on the respiratory symptoms and exhaled carbon monoxide. Material and Methods: The study population consisted of 50 young workers in restaurants serving waterpipes, 48 university students who sit frequently in the university cafeteria where cigarette smoking is allowed and 49 university students spending time in places where smoking is not allowed. Subjects completed questionnaires on socio-demographic characteristics, respiratory symptoms and exposure to SHS. Exhaled carbon monoxide levels were measured. ANOVA and Chi-square tests were used when applicable as well as linear and logistic regression analysis. Results: Exposure to cigarette smoke in university (adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 6.06 and occupational exposure to waterpipe smoke (ORa = 7.08 were predictors of chronic cough. Being married (ORa = 6.40, living near a heavy traffic road (ORa = 9.49 or near a local power generator (ORa = 7.54 appeared responsible for chronic sputum production. Moreover, predictors of chronic allergies were: being male (ORa = 7.81, living near a local power generator (ORa = 5.52 and having a family history of chronic respiratory diseases (ORa = 17.01. Carbon monoxide levels were augmented by the number of weekly hours of occupational exposure to waterpipe smoke (β = 1.46 and the number of daily hours of exposure to cigarette smoke (β = 1.14. Conclusions: In summary, young non-smoker subjects demonstrated more chronic cough and elevated carbon monoxide levels when exposed to SHS while the effect of waterpipe was even more evident.

  20. Carbon monoxide and respiratory symptoms in young adult passive smokers: a pilot study comparing waterpipe to cigarette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Rouba Karen; Rachidi, Samar; Awada, Sanaa; El Hajje, Amal; El Bawab, Wafaa; Salamé, Joseph; Bejjany, Rachelle; Salameh, Pascale

    2014-08-01

    Studies have correlated second hand smoke (SHS) with many diseases, especially respiratory effects. The goal of this study was to measure the impact of SHS on the respiratory symptoms and exhaled carbon monoxide. The study population consisted of 50 young workers in restaurants serving waterpipes, 48 university students who sit frequently in the university cafeteria where cigarette smoking is allowed and 49 university students spending time in places where smoking is not allowed. Subjects completed questionnaires on socio-demographic characteristics, respiratory symptoms and exposure to SHS. Exhaled carbon monoxide levels were measured. ANOVA and Chi-square tests were used when applicable as well as linear and logistic regression analysis. Exposure to cigarette smoke in university (adjusted odds ratio (ORa) = 6.06) and occupational exposure to waterpipe smoke (ORa = 7.08) were predictors of chronic cough. Being married (ORa = 6.40), living near a heavy traffic road (ORa = 9.49) or near a local power generator (ORa = 7.54) appeared responsible for chronic sputum production. Moreover, predictors of chronic allergies were: being male (ORa = 7.81), living near a local power generator (ORa = 5.52) and having a family history of chronic respiratory diseases (ORa = 17.01). Carbon monoxide levels were augmented by the number of weekly hours of occupational exposure to waterpipe smoke (β = 1.46) and the number of daily hours of exposure to cigarette smoke (β = 1.14). In summary, young non-smoker subjects demonstrated more chronic cough and elevated carbon monoxide levels when exposed to SHS while the effect of waterpipe was even more evident.

  1. Modeling the effect of plume-rise on the transport of carbon monoxide over Africa with NCAR CAM

    OpenAIRE

    H. Guan; Chatfield, R. B.; S. R. Freitas; Bergstrom, R. W.; Longo, K. M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of fire-induced plume-rise on the simulation of carbon monoxide (CO) over Africa and its export during SAFARI 2000 using the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) with a CO tracer and a plume-rise parameterization scheme. The plume-rise parameterization scheme simulates the consequences of strong buoyancy of hot gases emitted from biomass burning, including both dry and cloud-associated (pyro-cumulus) lofting. The current implementation of the plume-rise parameteri...

  2. Effects of N-Acetylcysteine on Auditory Brainstem Response Threshold Shift in Rabbits Exposed to Noise and Carbon Monoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedbagher Mortazavi; Masoud M. Kashani; Ali Khavanin; Abdolamir Alameh; Ramezan Mirzaee; Mehdi Akbari

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) is one of the most important occupational disease in worldwide. NIHL has been found to be potentiated by simultaneous Carbon monoxide (CO) exposure. Exposure to noise plus CO is common in occupational and environmental settings. Free radicals have been implicated in cochlear damage resulting from exposure to noise and due to CO hypoxia This study examined whether N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) administration cause attenuation of Auditory Brainstem ...

  3. Modeling Potential Carbon Monoxide Exposure Due to Operation of a Major Rocket Engine Altitude Test Facility Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotzer, Michael J.; Woods, Jody L.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews computational fluid dynamics as a tool for modelling the dispersion of carbon monoxide at the Stennis Space Center's A3 Test Stand. The contents include: 1) Constellation Program; 2) Constellation Launch Vehicles; 3) J2X Engine; 4) A-3 Test Stand; 5) Chemical Steam Generators; 6) Emission Estimates; 7) Located in Existing Test Complex; 8) Computational Fluid Dynamics; 9) Computational Tools; 10) CO Modeling; 11) CO Model results; and 12) Next steps.

  4. Transient kinetic modeling of the ethylene and carbon monoxide oxidation over a commercial automotive exhaust gas catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, J.M.A.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J.; Schouten, J.C.

    2000-03-01

    The transient kinetics of ethylene oxidation by oxygen over a commercial Pt/Rh/CeO{sub 2}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} three-way catalyst were modeled. Experiments were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor with two separate inlets, enabling alternate feeding of ethylene and oxygen with frequencies up to {1/4} Hz. The experimental conditions resemble the cold-start period of an Otto engine in a car. Two types of adsorbed ethylene species seem to exist. A selective catalyst deactivation for oxygen adsorption, due to deposition of carbonaceous species, was found. A kinetic model was developed, based on elementary reaction steps, that allows one to describe the experiments quantitatively. Furthermore, this model was combined with the published model for transient carbon monoxide oxidation over the same catalyst, which enables one to predict the results of simultaneous ethylene and carbon monoxide oxidation. Both components react in rather distinct zones, with ethylene being converted only when carbon monoxide oxidation is almost complete.

  5. Characterizing electrocatalytic surfaces: Electrochemical and NMR studies of methanol and carbon monoxide on Pt/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Patrick; Fojas, Aurora Marie; Rush, Benjamin; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; Cairns, Elton J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-12-20

    We use cyclic voltammetry (CV) on fuel cell electrodes to elucidate the important differences between adsorbates resulting from carbon monoxide adsorption and methanol adsorption onto commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts in a sulfuric acid electrolyte. Under open circuit conditions, methanol was found to adsorb preferentially onto the Pt sites associated with 'strongly bound' hydrogen. The sites associated with 'weakly bound' hydrogen adsorbed methanol more slowly. In the case of CO adsorption, which requires no adsorbate dehydrogenation, all adsorption sites showed similar affinity towards the adsorbate. Electrochemical oxidation of the adsorbates derived from both methanol and CO exposure exhibit slower oxidation when the adsorbate is associated with cubic-packed-like sites than from close-packed-steps and other sites. NMR of a {sup 13}CO-adlayer prepared by electrochemical adsorption from low concentration {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH shows a lower NMR shift and smaller linewidth than the previously reported values for electrochemically adsorbed {sup 13}CO gas. These results are interpreted in terms of adsorbate motion on the electrocatalyst surface. (author)

  6. Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of carbon monoxide: Wavelength, pressure and temperature dependency.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Davis, Ryan; Ahmed, Musahid; Jackson, Teresa L.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2012-01-03

    Several absorption bands exist in the VUV region of Carbon monoxide (CO). Emission spectra indicate that these bands are all predissociative. An experimental investigation of CO photodissociation by vacuum ultraviolet photons (90 to 108 nm; ~13 to 11 eV) from the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron and direct measurement of the associated oxygen isotopic composition of the products are presented here. A wavelength dependency of the oxygen isotopic composition in the photodissociation product was observed. Slope values (δ'{sup 18}O/ δ'{sup 17}O) ranging from 0.76 to 1.32 were observed in oxygen three-isotope space (δ'{sup 18}O vs. δ'{sup 17}O) which correlated with increasing synchrotron photon energy, and indicate a dependency of the upper electronic state specific dissociation dynamics (e.g., perturbation and coupling associated with a particular state). An unprecedented magnitude in isotope separation was observed for photodissociation at the 105 and 107 nm synchrotron bands and are found to be associated with accidental predissociation of the vibrational states ({nu} = 0 and 1) of the upper electronic state E{sup 1}Π. For each synchrotron band, a large (few hundred per mil) extent of isotopic fractionation was observed and the range of fractionation is a combination of column density and exposure time. A significant temperature dependency in oxygen isotopic fractionation was observed, indicating a rotational level dependency in the predissociation process.

  7. Feasibility of separating carbon monoxide from producer gas. Final report, Oct 1974--Aug 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Buder, M.K.; Mcone, A.I.; Wong, M.J.

    1975-09-01

    An evaluation is presented of Tenneco's COSORB process as it might be applied to coal gasification, considering the production of large amounts of CO for use as a medium-Btu gas. The analysis compares (a) cost of producing pure CO from producer gas with (b) the cost of producing CO/H/sub 2/ mixture from coal by gasification. In the first case coal is gasified with air, and CO is extracted from the reaction products with COSORB solvent (proprietary). In the second case, the CO/H/sub 2/ is generated directly by the gasification of coal with oxygen. The study measures the value of the carbon monoxide only in terms of heating value, not in terms of potential value as a chemical feedstock. The costs are developed from analysis of the plants required for production. Three variations of the producer gas plant are considered. The conclusion is that CO produced by extraction from producer gas is at least 50 percent more expensive as a fuel than the CO/H/sub 2/ mixture.

  8. Iron and carbon monoxide attenuate degradation of plasmatic coagulation by Crotalus atrox venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Boyer, Leslie V

    2016-07-01

    Hypofibrinogenemia is an important clinical consequence following envenomation by Crotalus species, usually attenuated or prevented by administration of antivenom. It has been determined that iron and carbon monoxide (CO) enhance fibrinogen as a thrombin substrate, likely secondary to conformational changes in molecular structure. We tested the hypothesis that pretreatment of plasma with iron and CO could attenuate the effects of exposure to Crotalus atrox venom. Human plasma was exposed to 0 to 10 μmol/l ferric chloride (iron source) and 0 to 100 μmol/l CO-releasing molecule-2 (CO source) followed by exposure to 0 to 0.5 μg/ml venom for 5 to 20 min. Changes in coagulation kinetics were determined with thrombelastography. Iron and CO significantly attenuated venom-mediated degradation of plasmatic coagulation in terms of onset time, velocity of clot growth and final clot strength. Further preclinical investigation of iron and CO administration as a 'bridge-to-antivenom' to preserve plasmatic coagulation is justified.

  9. Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernigan, Glenn Geoffrey [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-10-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu2O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu2O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu2O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N2 and CO2. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu2O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

  10. High Performance Colorimetric Carbon Monoxide Sensor for Continuous Personal Exposure Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenwen; Xian, Xiaojun; Qin, Xingcai; Wang, Di; Tsow, Francis; Forzani, Erica; Tao, Nongjian

    2018-01-17

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a highly poisonous gas, which can cause serious health risk. CO monitoring helps protect us from excessive exposure at home and in the workplace, and reduce occupation-related health risks for workers. Conventional electrochemical and metal oxide semiconductors (MOS) based CO sensors have been widely used, but the drawbacks such as poor selectivity and calibration burden also limit their applications, e.g., as wearable exposure monitors. Aiming at the reliable, miniaturized, and easy-to-use personal exposure device development, we report a colorimetric CO sensing platform, which achieves a detection limit of 1 ppm, dynamic range of 0-500 ppm, and high selectivity to CO over common interferents in air, such as CO 2 , NO 2 , SO 2 , and O 3 . This optical sensing platform can be expanded to other air pollutants by adding other chemical sensing probes. We believe the new sensing platform we introduced can provide a potential high performance sensing unit for wearable personal exposure assessment devices.

  11. Satellite monitoring for carbon monoxide and particulate matter during forest fire episodes in Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukitpaneenit, Manlika; Kim Oanh, Nguyen Thi

    2014-04-01

    This study explored the use of satellite data to monitor carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM) in Northern Thailand during the dry season when forest fires are known to be an important cause of air pollution. Satellite data, including Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol optical depth (MODIS AOD), and MODIS fire hotspots, were analyzed with air pollution data measured at nine automatic air quality monitoring stations in the study area for February-April months of 2008-2010. The correlation analysis showed that daily CO and PM with size below 10 μm (PM10) were associated with the forest fire hotspot counts, especially in the rural areas with the maximum correlation coefficient (R) of 0.59 for CO and 0.65 for PM10. The correlations between MODIS AOD and PM10, between MOPITT CO and CO, and between MODIS AOD and MOPITT CO were also analyzed, confirming the association between these variables. Two forest fire episodes were selected, and the dispersion of pollution plumes was studied using the MOPITT CO total column and MODIS AOD data, together with the surface wind vectors. The results showed consistency between the plume dispersion, locations of dense hotspots, ground monitoring data, and prevalent winds. The satellite data were shown to be useful in monitoring the regional transport of forest fire plumes.

  12. Determination of carboxyhaemoglobin in humans following low-level exposures to carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Nathalie H; Brunet, Robert C; Carrier, Gaétan

    2009-11-01

    This study proposes to estimate carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) levels in the blood of men and women of various ages exposed to common concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) using a model with only one free parameter while integrating alveoli-blood and blood-tissue CO exchanges. The model retained is essentially that of Coburn et al. (1965) with two important additions: an alveoli compartment for the dynamics of CO exchanges between alveoli and blood, and a compartment for the significant amounts of CO bound to heme proteins in extravascular spaces. The model was validated by comparing its simulations with various published data sets for the COHb time profiles of volunteers exposed to known CO concentrations. Once the model was validated, it was used to simulate various situations of interest for their impact on public health. This approach yields reliable estimations of the time profiles of COHb levels resulting from different levels of CO exposure over various periods of time and under various conditions (resting, exercise, working, and smoking). The non-linear kinetics of CO, observed experimentally, were correctly reproduced by simulations with the model. Simulations were also carried out iteratively to determine the exposure times and CO concentrations in ambient air needed to reach the maximum levels of COHb recommended by Health Canada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the World Health Organisation (WHO) for each age group of the general population. The lowest CO concentrations leading to maximum COHb levels of 1.5, 2, and 2.5% were determined.

  13. Validation of IASI FORLI carbon monoxide retrievals using FTIR data from NDACC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kerzenmacher

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is retrieved daily and globally from space-borne IASI radiance spectra using the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI software developed at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB. The IASI CO total column product for 2008 from the most recent FORLI retrieval version (20100815 is evaluated using correlative CO profile products retrieved from ground-based solar absorption Fourier transform infrared (FTIR observations at the following FTIR spectrometer sites from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC: Ny-Ålesund, Kiruna, Bremen, Jungfraujoch, Izaña and Wollongong. In order to have good statistics for the comparisons, we included all IASI data from the same day, within a 100 km radius around the ground-based stations. The individual ground-based data were adjusted to the lowest altitude of the co-located IASI CO profiles. To account for the different vertical resolutions and sensitivities of the ground-based and satellite measurements, the averaging kernels associated with the various retrieved products have been used to properly smooth coincident data products. It has been found that the IASI CO total column products compare well on average with the co-located ground-based FTIR total columns at the selected NDACC sites and that there is no significant bias for the mean values at all stations.

  14. Infrared absorption spectroscopy of carbon monoxide on nickel films: a low temperature thermal detection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, R.B.

    1978-11-01

    Sensitive vibrational spectra of carbon monoxide molecules adsorbed on evaporated nickel films have been measured by attaching a thermometer to the sample, cooling the assembly to liquid helium temperatures, and recording the temperature changes which occur when infrared radiation is absorbed. The measurements are made in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber in which the sample surface can be cleaned, heated, exposed to gas molecules and cooled to 1.6 K for the infrared measurements. The spectra of chemisorbed CO molecules are interpreted in terms of the linear and bridge adsorption sites on the nickel surface, and they show how the distribution of molecules among these sites changes when the CO coverage increases and intermolecular forces become important. The spectra of physically adsorbed molecules in both monolayer and multilayer films are also reported. Absorptions as small as five parts in 10/sup 5/ of the incident radiation can presently be detected in spectra covering broad bands of infrared frequencies with a resolution of 2 cm/sup -1/. This high sensitivity is attributable to the low noise and reduced background signal of the thermal detection scheme, to the stability of the rapid scan Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and to the automated computerized data acquisition electronics. Better performance is expected in future experiments on single crystal samples as well as evaporated films. This will make it possible to study molecules with weaker absorptions than CO and to look for evidence of chemical reactions between different adsorbed molecules.

  15. Influence of surface vacancy defects on the carburisation of Fe 110 surface by carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Aurab; Bouhali, Othmane; Mousseau, Normand; Becquart, Charlotte S; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-07-28

    Adsorption and dissociation of gaseous carbon monoxide (CO) on metal surfaces is one of the most frequently occurring processes of carburisation, known as primary initiator of metal dusting corrosion. Among the various factors that can significantly influence the carburisation process are the intrinsic surface defects such as single surface vacancies occurring at high concentrations due to their low formation energy. Intuitively, adsorption and dissociation barriers of CO are expected to be lowered in the vicinity of a surface vacancy, due to the strong attractive interaction between the vacancy and the C atom. Here the adsorption energies and dissociation pathways of CO on clean and defective Fe 110 surface are explored by means of density functional theory. Interestingly, we find that the O adatom, resulting from the CO dissociation, is unstable in the electron-deficit neighbourhood of the vacancy due to its large electron affinity, and raises the barrier of the carburisation pathway. Still, a full comparative study between the clean surface and the vacancy-defected surface reveals that the complete process of carburisation, starting from adsorption to subsurface diffusion of C, is more favourable in the vicinity of a vacancy defect.

  16. Effects of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning on ECG and Echocardiographic Parameters in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Abdullah; Karpuz, Derya; Yucel, Aydin; Tosun, Mehtap Durukan; Kibar, Ayse Esin; Hallioglu, Olgu

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate the effects of CO (carbon monoxide) on the cardiovascular system via electrocardiographic, echocardiographic and biochemical findings in children. This prospective study included 22 children with CO poisoning and 24 healthy children as a control group. The CO-intoxicated children were evaluated via electrocardiography and echocardiography 1 h after admission to the emergency department and daily until their discharge from the hospital. Blood gasses, complete blood account, troponin I and creatinine kinase-MB(CK-MB) were assessed daily. Tpeak-end (p:0.001), QTc durations (p:0.02), Tpeak-end dispersion (p:0.001) and Tpeak-end/QT ratio (p:0.001) of CO-intoxicated patients were significantly higher than those in the control group. Mitral E duration (p:0.001), mitral E/A ratio (p:0.001) and left ventricle contractile fraction (p:0.023) at admission were significantly lower, and left ventricle myocardial performance index was higher (p:0.001) in the CO poisoning group. Troponin I and CK-MB levels were higher at admission in 6 (27 %) and 4 (18 %) patients, respectively. The heart is the most critical organ in pediatric CO poisoning. These children present subclinical systolic and diastolic left ventricle dysfunction even in mild cases. Although, in children with acute CO-intoxication ventricular repolarization is impaired, it seems to be reversible like other findings.

  17. Mid-infrared carbon monoxide detection system using differential absorption spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ming; Sui, Yue; Li, Guo-lin; Zheng, Chuan-tao; Chen, Mei-mei; Wang, Yi-ding

    2015-11-01

    A differential carbon monoxide (CO) concentration sensing device using a self-fabricated spherical mirror (e.g. light-collector) and a multi-pass gas-chamber is presented in this paper. Single-source dual-channel detection method is adopted to suppress the interferences from light source, optical path and environmental changes. Detection principle of the device is described, and both the optical part and the electrical part are developed. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the sensing performance on CO concentration. The results indicate that at 1.013×105 Pa and 298 K, the limit of detection (LoD) is about 11.5 mg/m3 with an absorption length of 40 cm. As the gas concentration gets larger than 115 mg/m3 (1.013×105 Pa, 298 K), the relative detection error falls into the range of -1.7%—+1.9%. Based on 12 h long-term measurement on the 115 mg/m3 and 1 150 mg/m3 CO samples, the maximum detection errors are about 0.9% and 5.5%, respectively. Due to the low cost and competitive characteristics, the proposed device shows potential applications in CO detection in the circumstances of coal-mine production and environmental protection.

  18. Predicting duration of mechanical ventilation in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chih-Hao; Peng, Chung-Kan; Chou, Yu-Ching; Pan, Ke-Ting; Chang, Shun-Cheng; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2015-02-01

    Patients with severe carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning may develop acute respiratory failure, which needs endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV). The objective of this study was to identify the predictors for duration of MV in patients with severe CO poisoning and acute respiratory failure. This is a retrospective observational study of 796 consecutive patients diagnosed with acute CO poisoning that presented to the emergency department. Patients who received MV were divided into 2 groups: the early extubation (EE) consisting of patients who were on MV for less than 72 hours and the nonearly extubation (NEE) consisting of patients who were on MV for more than 72 hours. Demographic and clinical data of the two groups were extracted for analysis. The intubation rate of all CO-poisoned patients was 23.4%. A total of 168 patients were enrolled in this study. The main source of CO exposure was intentional CO poisoning by charcoal burning (137 patients). Positive toxicology screening result was found in 104 patients (61.9%). The EE group had 105 patients (62.5%). On arriving at the emergency department, high incidence of hypotension; high white blood cell count; and elevation of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and troponin-I levels were statistically significant in the NEE group (P poisoning and acute respiratory failure. On the other hand, elevation of initial troponin-I level is a predictor for a longer duration of MV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Indoor Carbon Monoxide: A Case Study in England for Detection and Interventions to Reduce Population Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. McCann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Potential exposure to carbon monoxide (CO in private homes is largely unquantified. Aim. To estimate prevalence of potential exposure to CO in residential dwellings and describe associated interventions in an inner-city community. Methods. A housing association in London, Hackney Homes, began fitting CO alarms in the 22,831 local authority homes it is responsible for in January 2010. A gas engineer investigated each alarm activation and recorded the information on a standard form. We undertook a cross-sectional study of all 22,831 homes, using data from these forms. Descriptive analysis was performed, including incidence, monthly variation, cause of alarm activation, and actions taken. Results. Between November 2011 and April 2012, 106 incidents were reported. Of these, 34.6% identified an issue with a gas appliance, and 10.6% identified misuse of cooking methods as the cause of activation. Relevant interventions were put in place, including disconnection of the gas appliance and education around cooking methods. Discussion. Little is known about the burden of CO poisoning in residential dwellings. This study provides important information on the path to quantifying population exposure to CO as well as establishing a possible approach to access this key information and realistic interventions to reduce potential exposure.

  20. Garage carbon monoxide levels from sources commonly used in intentional poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B; Holm, James R; Courtney, Todd G

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of intentional carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is believed to have declined due to strict federal CO emissions standards for motor vehicles and the uniform application of catalytic converters (CC). We sought to compare ambient CO levels produced by automobiles with and without catalytic converters in a residential garage, as well as from other CO sources commonly used for intentional poisoning. CO levels were measured inside a freestanding 73 m3 one-car garage. CO sources included a 1971 automobile without CC, 2003 automobile with CC, charcoal grill, electrical generator, lawn mower and leaf blower. After 20 minutes of operation, the CO level in the garage was 253 PPM for the car without a catalytic converter and 30 PPM for the car equipped withone. CO levels after operating or burning the other sources were: charcoal 200 PPM; generator >999 PPM; lawn mower 198 PPM; and leaf blower 580 PPM. While emissions controls on automobiles have reduced intentional CO poisonings, alternate sources may produce CO at levels of the same magnitude as vehicles manufactured prior to the use of catalytic converters. Those involved in the care of potentially suicidal individuals should be aware of this.

  1. Incidence and Clinical Course of Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction in Patients with Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Kim, Min Su; Sun, Byung Joo; Ryu, Seung; Kim, Song Soo; Jin, Seon Ah; Kim, Jun Hyung; Choi, Si Wan; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Kwon, In-Sun; Seong, In-Whan

    2016-09-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning can cause tissue hypoxia and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) requiring intensive medical management. Our objectives were to find incidence and clinical course of LVSD CO intoxicated patients and make a clinical scoring to predict LVSD. We included all consecutive patients with CO exposure in the emergency room. LVSD was defined by LVEF 100/min), pulmonary edema on chest X-ray, serum NT pro-BNP (>100 pg/mL), troponin-I (>0.1 ng/mL) and lactic acid (>4.0 mg/dL) after a univariate analysis. Combining these into a clinical score, according to their beta score after a multivariate analysis (rage=0-16), allowed prediction of LVSD with a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 91% (reference ≥8, area under the curve=0.952, ppoisoning, and most of them (86%, 18 of 21 patients) recovered within 3 days. Patients with a higher clinical score (≥8) might have LVSD.

  2. Long-term prognosis of patients with carbon monoxide poisoning: a nationwide cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Cheng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide poisoning (COP often produces severe complications and can be fatal. Because this topic has not been well delineated, we investigated long-term prognoses of patients with COP (COP[+]. METHODS: In this retrospective nationwide cohort study, 441 COP[+] patients and 8820 COP[-] controls (120 from 1999 to 2010 were selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. RESULTS: Thirty-seven (8.39% COP[+] patients and 142 (1.61% controls died (P<0.0001 during follow-up. Incidence rate ratios (IRR of death were 5.24 times higher in COP[+] patients than in controls (P<0.0001. The risk of death was particularly high in the first month after COP (IRR: 308.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 40.79-2337.56, 1 to 6 months after (IRR: 18.92; 95% CI: 7.69-46.56, and 6-12 months after (IRR: 4.73; 95% CI: 1.02-21.90. After adjusting for age, gender, and selected comorbidities, the hazard ratio of death for COP[+] patients was still 4.097 times higher than for controls. Moreover, older age (≥30 years old, male gender, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and low income were also independent mortality predictors. CONCLUSIONS: COP significantly increases the risk for long-term mortality. Early follow-up and secondary prevention of death are needed for patients with COP.

  3. Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Subsequent Dementia: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the dementia risk after carbon monoxide poisoning (CO poisoning). Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, a total of 9041 adults newly diagnosed with CO poisoning from 2000 to 2011 were identified as the CO poisoning cohort. Four-fold (N = 36,160) of non-CO poisoning insured people were randomly selected as controls, frequency-matched by age, sex, and hospitalization year. Incidence and hazard ratio (HR) of dementia were measured by the end 2011. The dementia incidence was 1.6-fold higher in the CO exposed cohort than in the non-exposed cohort (15.2 vs 9.76 per 10,000 person-years; n = 62 vs 174) with an adjusted HR of 1.50 (95% CI = 1.11-2.04). The sex- and age-specific hazards were higher in male patients (adjusted HR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.20-2.54), and those aged poisoning patients on hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy had an adjusted HR of 1.80 (95% CI = 0.96-3.37). This study suggests that CO poisoning may have association with the risk of developing dementia, which is significant for severe cases. The effectiveness of HBO2 therapy remains unclear in preventing dementia. Patients with CO poisoning are more prevalent with depression.

  4. Domicile-related carbon monoxide poisoning in cold months and its relation with climatic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tiekuan; Zhang, Yanping; Wu, Jack S; Wang, Houli; Ji, Xu; Xu, Tengda; Li, Yi; Xu, Lingjie; Lewin, Matthew R

    2010-10-01

    Many studies have identified strong correlations between winter months and acute, unintentional carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence pattern of acute domicile-related CO poisoning in Beijing and its relation with climatic factors. Data on CO poisoning were collected from the emergency medical service system during August 1, 2005, to July 31, 2007, in Beijing. Variations of the monthly and seasonal distribution of CO poisoning occurrences were examined with χ(2) testing. Climatic data including temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, wind speed, and visibility were obtained from the Beijing Meteorological Bureau. Correlations between the occurrence of CO poisoning and mean of each meteorological parameter spanning 3 days were analyzed with partial correlation test, with related parameters controlled. Significant differences were found among the cases occurring each month of the year (P poisoning (P incidences of CO poisoning were highest during winter, particularly during the time period when charcoal or coal use for indoor heating would be most prevalent in Beijing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [The relationship between lactate clearance rate and delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-zhan; Ma, Guo-ying; Zhao, Ling-jun; Li, Jing; Wang, Pu; Li, Ya-qin; Xiao, Qing-mian; Liu, Yong-jian

    2013-10-01

    To study the relationship between lactate clearance rate (LCR) and prognosis after acute carbon monoxide poisoning in patients with delayed encephalopathy (DEACMP). Data from 354 patients with acute severe carbon monoxide poisoning (ASCOP) were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into hyperlactacidemia group (arterial lactic acid > 2 mmol/L, n=263) and low lactic acidosis group (arterial lactate ≤2 mmol/L, n=91) according to the blood lactic acid level at admission. Arterial blood (1 mL) was collected from all patients before and 6, 24, 72 hours after treatment at ambient air, and arterial blood lactic acid was determined, and LCR was calculated. The initial level of blood lactic acid and LCR at 6, 24, 72 hours were compared between two groups. At the same time, the patients with hyperlactacidemia were divided into high LCR group (LCR more than 10%, n=101) and low LCR group (LCR less than or equal to 10%, n=162) according to 6-hour LCR, and the incidence of DEACMP was compared between two groups. The relationship between LCR and the incidence of DEACMP was analyzed with Spearman linear correlation analysis. The risk factors associated with DEACMP were analyzed with logistic regression analysis. The initial level of blood lactic acid (2.73±0.57 mmol/L vs. 1.69±0.20 mmol/L, t=5.327, P=0.001) and LCR at 6, 24, 72 hours [6 hours: (9.0±2.4)% vs. (1.2±0.6)%, t=9.468, P=0.001; 24 hours: (8.6±3.7)% vs. (1.2±0.4)%, t=4.889, P=0.001; 72 hours: (14.0±3.9)% vs. (1.7±1.0)%, t=5.211, P=0.001] in hyperlactacidemia group were significantly higher than those in low lactic acidosis group. The initial level of blood lactic acid in high LCR group was significantly lower than that in low LCR group (2.41±0.23 mmol/L vs. 2.92±0.63 mmol/L, t=2.429, P=0.023), and LCR at 6 hours and 24 hours were significantly higher than those in low LCR group [6 hours: (11.0±1.2)% vs. (8.0±2.1)%, t=4.487, P=0.001; 24 hours: (12.2±3.0)% vs. (6.3±1.8)%, t=6.264, P=0.001]. But

  6. Risk Factors and Outcome Analysis in Children with Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ching; Lee, Hao-Yuan; Huang, Jing-Long; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Wu, Chang-Teng

    2017-04-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is one of the common causes of poisoning in patients and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. However, few studies have focused on the pediatric group. We retrospectively reviewed children (age poisoning from nonfire accidents at a tertiary medical center in Taiwan from 2002 to 2010. We analyzed the patients' characteristics, management, and outcome; compared the data of patients who received hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) to those who received normobaric oxygen (NBO) therapy; and identified the ri0sk factors for patients who developed delayed neurological sequelae (DNS) or permanent neurological sequelae (PNS). A total of 81 children were enrolled. The annual case number increased from five cases in 2002 to 20 in 2010, particularly during the cold months (December to February). The most common source of exposure was an indoor heating system (54.3%). The most common presenting symptoms were vomiting (32.1%) and consciousness changes (30.9%). HBO treatment tended to be administered to patients with a higher initial COHb (%) (p incidence of inducing DNS or PNS after multivariate analysis. For those with treatment in the intensive care unit because of prolonged loss of consciousness and rescue by a ventilator, special attention should be given and follow-up should be performed to determine whether DNS or PNS occurs, particularly epilepsy and cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. A review of disaster-related carbon monoxide poisoning: surveillance, epidemiology, and opportunities for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shahed; Clower, Jacquelyn H; Hernandez, Sandra A; Damon, Scott A; Yip, Fuyuen Y

    2012-10-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review to better understand aspects of disaster-related carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning surveillance and determine potentially effective prevention strategies. This review included information from 28 journal articles on disaster-related CO poisoning cases occurring between 1991 and 2009 in the United States. We identified 362 incidents and 1888 disaster-related CO poisoning cases, including 75 fatalities. Fatalities occurred primarily among persons who were aged 18 years or older (88%) and male (79%). Hispanics and Asians accounted for 20% and 14% of fatal cases and 21% and 7% of nonfatal cases, respectively. Generators were the primary exposure source for 83% of fatal and 54% of nonfatal cases; 67% of these fatal cases were caused by indoor generator placement. Charcoal grills were a major source of exposure during winter storms. Most fatalities (94%) occurred at home. Nearly 89% of fatal and 53% of nonfatal cases occurred within 3 days of disaster onset. Public health prevention efforts could benefit from emphasizing predisaster risk communication and tailoring interventions for racial, ethnic, and linguistic minorities. These findings highlight the need for surveillance and CO-related information as components of disaster preparedness, response, and prevention.

  8. Increased Long-Term Risk of Dementia in Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chung-Shun; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hong, Li-Yee; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Ma, Hon-Ping; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Tsai, Shin-Han; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Mei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning may cause toxicity of the central nervous system and heart. However, the association between CO poisoning and long-term dementia risk remains unestablished. We investigated the incidence of dementia in patients with CO poisoning in Taiwan and evaluated whether they had a higher risk of dementia than did the general population. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted among patients with CO poisoning identified using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) during 2004 to 2013. CO poisoning was defined according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. The study cohort comprised patients with CO poisoning between 2005 and 2010 (N = 14,590). Each patient was age-, sex-, and index date-matched with 4 randomly selected controls from the comparison cohort (N = 58,360). All patients were followed from the study date until dementia development, death, or the end of 2013. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed for comparing the hazard ratios for dementia between the 2 cohorts. Incident cases of dementia were identified from the NHIRD. After adjustment for potential confounders, the study cohort was independently associated with a higher dementia risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.75; 95% confidence interval, 2.26–3.35). This population-based cohort study indicated that patients with CO poisoning have a higher risk of dementia than do people without CO poisoning. PMID:26817904

  9. Long-term prognosis of patients with carbon monoxide poisoning: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Chung, Min-Hsien; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Shio-Jean; Lin, Hung-Jung; Guo, How-Ran; Su, Shih-Bin; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Juan, Chi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning (COP) often produces severe complications and can be fatal. Because this topic has not been well delineated, we investigated long-term prognoses of patients with COP (COP[+]). In this retrospective nationwide cohort study, 441 COP[+] patients and 8820 COP[-] controls (120) from 1999 to 2010 were selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Thirty-seven (8.39%) COP[+] patients and 142 (1.61%) controls died (PIncidence rate ratios (IRR) of death were 5.24 times higher in COP[+] patients than in controls (P<0.0001). The risk of death was particularly high in the first month after COP (IRR: 308.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 40.79-2337.56), 1 to 6 months after (IRR: 18.92; 95% CI: 7.69-46.56), and 6-12 months after (IRR: 4.73; 95% CI: 1.02-21.90). After adjusting for age, gender, and selected comorbidities, the hazard ratio of death for COP[+] patients was still 4.097 times higher than for controls. Moreover, older age (≥30 years old), male gender, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and low income were also independent mortality predictors. COP significantly increases the risk for long-term mortality. Early follow-up and secondary prevention of death are needed for patients with COP.

  10. Indoor carbon monoxide: a case study in England for detection and interventions to reduce population exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, L J; Close, R; Staines, L; Weaver, M; Cutter, G; Leonardi, G S

    2013-01-01

    Potential exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) in private homes is largely unquantified. To estimate prevalence of potential exposure to CO in residential dwellings and describe associated interventions in an inner-city community. A housing association in London, Hackney Homes, began fitting CO alarms in the 22,831 local authority homes it is responsible for in January 2010. A gas engineer investigated each alarm activation and recorded the information on a standard form. We undertook a cross-sectional study of all 22,831 homes, using data from these forms. Descriptive analysis was performed, including incidence, monthly variation, cause of alarm activation, and actions taken. Between November 2011 and April 2012, 106 incidents were reported. Of these, 34.6% identified an issue with a gas appliance, and 10.6% identified misuse of cooking methods as the cause of activation. Relevant interventions were put in place, including disconnection of the gas appliance and education around cooking methods. Little is known about the burden of CO poisoning in residential dwellings. This study provides important information on the path to quantifying population exposure to CO as well as establishing a possible approach to access this key information and realistic interventions to reduce potential exposure.

  11. A novel carbon monoxide-releasing molecule fully protects mice from severe malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Ana C; Penacho, Nuno; Mancio-Silva, Liliana; Neres, Rita; Seixas, João D; Fernandes, Afonso C; Romão, Carlos C; Mota, Maria M; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Pamplona, Ana

    2012-03-01

    Severe forms of malaria infection, such as cerebral malaria (CM) and acute lung injury (ALI), are mainly caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Primary therapy with quinine or artemisinin derivatives is generally effective in controlling P. falciparum parasitemia, but mortality from CM and other forms of severe malaria remains unacceptably high. Herein, we report the design and synthesis of a novel carbon monoxide-releasing molecule (CO-RM; ALF492) that fully protects mice against experimental CM (ECM) and ALI. ALF492 enables controlled CO delivery in vivo without affecting oxygen transport by hemoglobin, the major limitation in CO inhalation therapy. The protective effect is CO dependent and induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1, which contributes to the observed protection. Importantly, when used in combination with the antimalarial drug artesunate, ALF492 is an effective adjunctive and adjuvant treatment for ECM, conferring protection after the onset of severe disease. This study paves the way for the potential use of CO-RMs, such as ALF492, as adjunctive/adjuvant treatment in severe forms of malaria infection.

  12. Personal carbon monoxide exposures of preschool children in Helsinki, Finland - comparison to ambient air concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, S.; Mukala, K.; Tittanen, P.; Jantunen, M.J. [KTL National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Health

    2001-07-01

    The associations of personal carbon monoxide (CO) exposures with ambient air CO concentrations measured at fixed monitoring sites, were studied among 194 children aged 3-6yr in four downtown and four suburban day-care centers in Helsinki, Finland. Each child carried a personal CO exposure monitor between 1 and 4 times for a time period of between 20 and 24h. CO concentrations at two fixed monitoring sites were measured simultaneously. The CO concentrations measured at the fixed monitoring sites were usually lower (mean maximum 8-h concentration: 0.9 and 2.6mgm{sup -3}) than the personal CO exposure concentrations (mean maximum 8-h concentration: 3.3mgm{sup -3}).The fixed site CO concentrations were poor predictors of the personal CO exposure concentrations. However, the correlations between the personal CO exposure and the fixed monitoring site CO concentrations increased (-0.03 -- -0.12 to 0.13-0.16) with increasing averaging times from 1 to 8h. Also, the fixed monitoring site CO concentrations explained the mean daily or weekly personal CO exposures of a group of simultaneously measured children better than individual exposure CO concentrations. This study suggests that the short-term CO personal exposure of children cannot be meaningfully assessed using fixed monitoring sites. (author)

  13. Carbon monoxide in human physiology – its role in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jasnos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is produced endogenously in the body as a byproduct of heme degradation catalyzed by the action of heme oxygenase (HO enzymes. An inducible form, HO-1, responds to many factors such as oxidative stress, hypoxia, heme, bacterial endotoxins, proinflammatory cytokines and heavy metals. HO-2 is constitutively expressed under basal conditions in most human tissues including brain and gonads. Recent data show that CO is a gaseous mediator with multidirectional biological activity. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. CO shares many properties with another established vasodilatator and neurotransmitter – nitric oxide (NO. Both CO and NO are involved in neural transmission, modulation of blood vessel function and inhibition of platelet aggregation. The binding to guanylate cyclase, stimulation of the production of cGMP, activation of Ca2+-dependent potassium channels and stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases are well known cellular targets of CO action. Since CO is nowadays a subject of extensive investigation in many centers worldwide, the aim of the present study was to present the role of CO in various aspects of human physiology with special focus on its activity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. [Carbon monoxide in human physiology--its role in the gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasnos, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Kwiecień, Sławomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-30

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is produced endogenously in the body as a byproduct of heme degradation catalyzed by the action of heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes. An inducible form, HO-1, responds to many factors such as oxidative stress, hypoxia, heme, bacterial endotoxins, proinflammatory cytokines and heavy metals. HO-2 is constitutively expressed under basal conditions in most human tissues including brain and gonads. Recent data show that CO is a gaseous mediator with multidirectional biological activity. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. CO shares many properties with another established vasodilatator and neurotransmitter - nitric oxide (NO). Both CO and NO are involved in neural transmission, modulation of blood vessel function and inhibition of platelet aggregation. The binding to guanylate cyclase, stimulation of the production of cGMP, activation of Ca2+-dependent potassium channels and stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases are well known cellular targets of CO action. Since CO is nowadays a subject of extensive investigation in many centers worldwide, the aim of the present study was to present the role of CO in various aspects of human physiology with special focus on its activity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Effects of exogenous carbon monoxide on radiation-induced bystander effect in zebrafish embryos in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, V.W.Y.; Wong, M.Y.P. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Cheng, S.H. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: appetery@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2012-07-15

    In the present work, the influence of a low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) liberated from tricarbonylchloro(glycinato)ruthenium (II) (CORM-3) on the radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in vivo between embryos of the zebrafish was studied. RIBE was assessed through the number of apoptotic signals revealed on embryos at 25 h post fertilization (hpf). A significant attenuation of apoptosis on the bystander embryos induced by RIBE in a CO concentration dependent manner was observed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIBE between zebrafish embryos in vivo was assessed by the level of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO from 10 and 20 {mu}M CORM-3 entirely suppressed the RIBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO from 5 {mu}M CORM-3 significantly attenuated the level of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactive CORM-3 did not lead to suppression of RIBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of RIBE by CO depended on the concentration of CORM-3.

  16. Incorporation of photo-carbon monoxide releasing materials into electrospun scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Eden; Abeyrathna, Nawodi; Patel, Aatish V; Liao, Yi; Bashur, Chris A

    2016-03-23

    Hyper-proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and a reduction in endothelial cell function are reasons for poor patency rates of current tissue engineered small-diameter vascular grafts. The controlled delivery of carbon monoxide (CO), a gasotransmitter involved in cell signaling, could improve vascular cell function in these grafts. Current CO releasing molecules (CORMs) can improve endothelialization of injured vessels with appropriate doses, but they still have limitations. The goal of this project was to generate a novel tissue engineered scaffold that includes a non-toxic and photoactivatable CORM. This is the first use of a CORM for tissue engineering. The results demonstrated that CORM-loaded, electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds can be photo-activated and release CO. The fluorescence that develops after CO release can be used to non-destructively track the extent of reaction. Further, activation can occur when both dry and incubated in cell culture conditions. However, incubation in serum protein-containing media decreases the time frame for activation, demonstrating the importance of testing the release profile in culture conditions. Rat SMCs were able to attach, grow, and express contractile SMC markers on activated CORM-loaded meshes and controls. Overall, these findings demonstrate that CORM-loaded electrospun scaffolds provide a promising delivery system for vascular tissue engineering.

  17. Carbon Monoxide Inhibits Receptor Activator of NF-κB (RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Jen Tseng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO have anti-inflammatory effects and can reduce bone erosion in a murine collagen-induced arthritis model. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of CO on receptor activator of NF-γB ligand (RANKL, one of the key stimulators of osteoclastogenesis. Methods: The in vivo effects of CO on RANKL expression were assessed in a collagen antibody-induced arthritis model in mice. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in the RAW246.7 cell line stimulated with RANKL and exposed to either air or CO. The number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive RAW246.7 cells was also examined after treatment with RANKL and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ agonist, Troglitazone. Results: CO reduced RANKL expression in the synovium of arthritic mice. Although CO slightly increased RAW246.7 cell proliferation, no differences in activated caspase 3 levels were detected. In addition, Troglitazone ameliorated the inhibitory effects of CO on RANKL-induced TRAP expression by RAW246.7 cells. Conclusions: CO suppresses osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting the RANKL-induced activation of PPAR-γ. Given the role of the PPAR-γ/cFos (AP-1 pathway in regulating the transcription factor, NFATc1, the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, further studies are warranted to explore CO in treating inflammatory bone disorders.

  18. Heme oxygenases from Arabidopsis thaliana reveal different mechanisms of carbon monoxide binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisk, Björn; Molitor, Bastian; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Kötting, Carsten

    2012-03-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) are widely distributed enzymes involved in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide and Fe2+. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana possesses three functional HOs (HY1, HO3 and HO4) which are thus far biochemically indistinguishable. Here, we investigate binding of the reaction product and putative inhibitor CO to these three HOs with various spectroscopic techniques: Nanosecond time-resolved absorption, millisecond time-resolved multi-wavelength absorption and Fourier-transform-infrared difference spectroscopy. Kinetics of CO rebinding were found to differ substantially among the HOs. At low CO concentrations a novel intermediate was identified for HO3 and HO4, substantially slowing down rebinding. All HOs show relatively slow geminate rebinding of CO indicating the existence of an additional transient binding niche for CO. The positions found for the IR absorptions of νCO and νFeC suggest a nonpolar distal binding site for all three HOs. The frequency of the νFeC vibration was calculated by a combination band on which we report here for the first time. Another band in the FTIR difference spectrum could be assigned to a histidine residue, probably the proximal ligand of the heme-iron. The observed different rebinding kinetics among the HOs could indicate adaptation of the HOs to different environments.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 end-products carbon monoxide and biliverdin ameliorate murine collagen induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, M; Savitskaya, A; Steiner, C-W; Rath, E; Bilban, M; Wagner, O; Bach, F H; Smolen, J S; Scheinecker, C

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which degrades Heme to free iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO) plays an important role in inflammation. There are, however, conflicting data concerning the role of HO-1 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the therapeutic potential of individual heme degradation products remains to be determined. We therefore investigated the effect of CO and biliverdin upon therapeutic administration in the murine collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. CIA was induced in DBA/1 mice. Anti-CII antibody levels were determined by ELISA. Mice were scored for paw swelling and grip strength. After the first clinical signs of arthritis one group of animals was treated with biliverdin, the second group was treated with CO. After 60 days all animals were sacrificed and analysed for histomorphological signs of arthritis. All animals immunised with CII developed serum anti-CII antibodies. Antibody levels were decreased in the CO-treated group. Both, Biliverdin and the CO-treated animals, showed an improvement in clinical disease activity. Histological analysis revealed significantly less inflammation, erosion and reduced numbers of osteoclasts in CO-treated animals only, whereas cartilage degradation was prevented in both biliverdin and CO-treated animals. Our data demonstrate a beneficial effect of CO, in particular, and biliverdin, on inflammation and bone destruction in the CIA mouse model.

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Heme Oxygenase-1/Carbon Monoxide in Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Constantin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase (HO, a catabolic enzyme, provides the rate-limiting step in the oxidative breakdown of heme, to generate carbon monoxide (CO, iron, and biliverdin-IXα. Induction of the inducible form, HO-1, in tissues is generally regarded as a protective mechanism. Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made in defining the therapeutic potential of HO-1 in a number of preclinical models of lung tissue injury and disease. Likewise, tissue-protective effects of CO, when applied at low concentration, have been observed in many of these models. Recent studies have expanded this concept to include chemical CO-releasing molecules (CORMs. Collectively, salutary effects of the HO-1/CO system have been demonstrated in lung inflammation/acute lung injury, lung and vascular transplantation, sepsis, and pulmonary hypertension models. The beneficial effects of HO-1/CO are conveyed in part through the inhibition or modulation of inflammatory, apoptotic, and proliferative processes. Recent advances, however, suggest that the regulation of autophagy and the preservation of mitochondrial homeostasis may serve as additional candidate mechanisms. Further preclinical and clinical trials are needed to ascertain the therapeutic potential of HO-1/CO in human clinical disease.

  1. Heme oxygenase 1-generated carbon monoxide and biliverdin attenuate the course of experimental necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuhn, Philipp; Mitkus, Tomas; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Künzli, Beat M; Bergmann, Frank; Fischer, Lars; Giese, Nathalia; Friess, Helmut; Berberat, Pascal O

    2013-03-01

    The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is highly up-regulated in acute pancreatitis (AP). In this study, we tested its metabolites as potential therapeutic agents for AP in rats. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was induced by retrograde intraductal injection of sodium taurocholate in rats. Biliverdin hydrochloride (BV HCl) (50 μmol/kg subcutaneously), the carbon monoxide, donor methylene chloride (MC) (500 mg/kg orally), or iron-chelating desferrioxamine (DFO) (125 mg/kg subcutaneously) were administered in a therapeutic manner starting with the first dose 4 hours after taurocholate injection to mimic the effects of HO-1 metabolites. Administration of BV HCl, MC, or DFO showed significant reduction of inflammatory activity in comparison to controls leading to lower myeloperoxidase activity in the pancreas, less edema, lower ascites volumes, and preservation of tissue integrity (P < 0.05). Administration of either BV HCl or MC markedly increased 5-day survival rate (70% and 75% vs 40%; P < 0.05), whereas DFO had no significant effect on survival (60%). When given in therapeutic manner, all 3 substances led to diminished nuclear factor κB activity in the pancreas (P < 0.05). Therapeutic use of BV HCl and MC led to marked reduction of mortality in experimental pancreatitis. Thus, HO-1 metabolites may present a novel therapeutic approach in AP treatment.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Attenuates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis via Inhibition of GSK-3β Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Jamal Uddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO is produced by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 which mediates the degradation of heme into CO, iron, and biliverdin. Also, CO ameliorates the human inflammatory bowel diseases and ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism for the effect of CO on the inflammatory bowel disease has not yet been known. In this study, we showed that CO significantly increases survival percentage, body weight, colon length as well as histologic parameters in DSS-treated mice. In addition, CO inhalation significantly decreased DSS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibition of GSK-3β in mice model. To support the in vivo observation, TNF-α, iNOS and IL-10 after CO and LiCl treatment were measured in mesenteric lymph node cells (MLNs and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs from DSS treated mice. In addition, we determined that CO potentially inhibited GSK-3β activation and decreased TNF-α and iNOS expression by inhibition of NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated U937 and MLN cells pretreated with CO. Together, our findings indicate that CO attenuates DSS-induced colitis via inhibition of GSK-3β signaling in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, this is the first report that investigated the molecular mechanisms mediated the novel effects of CO via inhibition GSK-3β in DSS-induced colitis model.

  3. Control of Disease Tolerance to Malaria by Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktória Jeney

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO are gasotransmitters that suppress the development of severe forms of malaria associated with Plasmodium infection. Here, we addressed the mechanism underlying their protective effect against experimental cerebral malaria (ECM, a severe form of malaria that develops in Plasmodium-infected mice, which resembles, in many aspects, human cerebral malaria (CM. NO suppresses the pathogenesis of ECM via a mechanism involving (1 the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF-2, (2 induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and (3 CO production via heme catabolism by HO-1. The protection afforded by NO is associated with inhibition of CD4+ T helper (TH and CD8+ cytotoxic (TC T cell activation in response to Plasmodium infection via a mechanism involving HO-1 and CO. The protective effect of NO and CO is not associated with modulation of host pathogen load, suggesting that these gasotransmitters establish a crosstalk-conferring disease tolerance to Plasmodium infection.

  4. Improving Outreach and Surveillance Efforts Following a Large-Scale Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Paul D; Vogt, Christy M; Wozniak, Ryan J; Camponeschi, Jenny; Werner, Mark A; Meiman, Jonathan G

    In December 2014, the largest carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in Wisconsin's history occurred at an ice arena. Following this event, the Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking (WI EPHT) Program sought to improve outreach and surveillance efforts. WI EPHT designed and distributed educational materials on CO poisoning prevention and surveyed stakeholders to gauge the effectiveness of outreach efforts. To enhance surveillance, WI EPHT utilized data from the Wisconsin Poison Center (WPC) to generate real-time alerts of anomalous numbers of CO-related calls. WI EPHT found that 42% of stakeholders reviewed the outreach materials, and 1 ice arena had installed a CO detector as a result. CO alerts were developed using WPC data and are now routinely used in statewide public health surveillance. WI EPHT staff improved CO poisoning prevention outreach and saw a positive response among stakeholders. This work demonstrates ways that health agencies can improve outreach and surveillance for CO poisoning. Improvements in these areas can bolster public health response and may prevent CO-related illness and injury.

  5. Linking the variability of atmospheric carbon monoxide to climate modes in the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Rebecca; Monks, Sarah; Hammerling, Dorit; Worden, Helen; Deeter, Merritt; Emmons, Louisa; Edwards, David

    2017-04-01

    Biomass burning is a major driver of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) variability in the Southern Hemisphere. The magnitude of emissions, such as CO, from biomass burning is connected to climate through both the availability and dryness of fuel. We investigate the link between CO and climate using satellite measured CO and climate indices. Observations of total column CO from the satellite instrument MOPITT are used to build a record of interannual variability in CO since 2001. Four biomass burning regions in the Southern Hemisphere are explored. Data driven relationships are determined between CO and climate indices for the climate modes: El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO); the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD); the Tropical Southern Atlantic (TSA); and the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Stepwise forward and backward regression is used to select the best statistical model from combinations of lagged indices. We find evidence for the importance of first-order interaction terms of the climate modes when explaining CO variability. Implications of the model results are discussed for the Maritime Southeast Asia and Australasia regions. We also draw on the chemistry-climate model CAM-chem to explain the source contribution as well as the relative contributions of emissions and meteorology to CO variability.

  6. Waterpipe cafes in Baltimore, Maryland: Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and nicotine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Christine M; Moon, Katherine A; Williams, D' Ann L; Green, Tim; Cohen, Joanna E; Navas-Acien, Ana; Breysse, Patrick N

    2015-01-01

    Waterpipe smoking has been growing in popularity in the United States and worldwide. Most tobacco control regulations remain limited to cigarettes. Few studies have investigated waterpipe tobacco smoke exposures in a real world setting. We measured carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM)2.5, and airborne nicotine concentrations in seven waterpipe cafes in the greater Baltimore area. Area air samples were collected between two and five hours, with an average sampling duration of three hours. Waterpipe smoking behaviors were observed at each venue. Indoor air samplers for CO, PM2.5, and airborne nicotine were placed in the main seating area 1-2 m above the floor. Indoor airborne concentrations of PM2.5 and CO were markedly elevated in waterpipe cafes and exceeded concentrations that were observed in cigarette smoking bars. Air nicotine concentrations, although not as high as in venues that allow cigarette smoking, were markedly higher than in smoke-free bars and restaurants. Concentrations of PM approached occupational exposure limits and CO exceeded occupational exposure guidelines suggesting that worker protection measures need to be considered. This study adds to the literature indicating that both employees and patrons of waterpipe venues are at increased risk from complex exposures to secondhand waterpipe smoke.

  7. N-Butylphthalide Improves Cognitive Function in Rats after Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ming-Jun; Sun, Xian-Ni; Zou, Yong; Ding, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yue-Heng; Guo, Da-Dong; Li, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is the most common neurologic sequelae after carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, and the previous investigations have demonstrated that N-Butylphthalide (NBP) could exert a broad spectrum of neuroprotective properties. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of NBP on cognitive dysfunction in rats after acute severe CO poisoning. Rats were randomly divided into a normal control group, a CO poisoning group and a CO+NBP group. The animal model of CO poisoning was established by exposure to CO in a chamber, and then all rats received hyperbaric oxygen therapy once daily, while rats in CO+NBP group were administered orally NBP (6 mg/ 100g) by gavage twice a day additionally. The results indicated that CO poisoning could induce cognitive impairment. The ultrastructure of hippocampus was seriously damaged under transmission electron microscopy, and the expressions of calpain 1 and CaMK II proteins were significantly elevated after CO exposure according to the analysis of immunofluorescence staining and western blot. NBP treatment could evidently improve cognitive function, and maintain ultrastructure integrity of hippocampus. The expression levels of both calpain 1 and CaMK II proteins in CO+NBP group were considerably lower than that of CO poisoning group (P CaMK II proteins. The administration of NBP could balance the expressions of calpain 1 and CaMK II proteins and improve cognitive function through maintaining ultrastructural integrity of hippocampus, and thus may play a neuroprotective role in brain tissue in rats with CO poisoning. PMID:28232802

  8. Direct Inhibitory Effects of Carbon Monoxide on Six Venoms Containing Fibrinogenolytic Metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Losada, Philip A

    2017-02-01

    Since the introduction of antivenom administration over a century ago to treat venomous snake bite, it has been the most effective therapy for saving life and limb. However, this treatment is not always effective and not without potential life-threatening side effects. We tested a new paradigm to abrogate the plasmatic anticoagulant effects of fibrinogenolytic snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP) by inhibiting these Zn(+2) -dependent enzymes directly with carbon monoxide (CO) exposure. Assessment of the fibrinogenolytic effects of venoms collected from the Arizona black rattlesnake, Northern Pacific rattlesnake, Western cottonmouth, Eastern cottonmouth, Broad-banded copperhead and Southern copperhead on human plasmatic coagulation kinetics was performed with thrombelastography in vitro. Isolated exposure of all but one venom (Southern copperhead) to CO significantly decreased the ability of the venoms to compromise coagulation. These results demonstrated that direct inhibition of transition metal-containing venom enzymes by yet to be elucidated mechanisms (e.g. CO, binding to Zn(+2) or displacing Zn(+2) from the catalytic site, CO binding to histidine residues) can in many instances significantly decrease fibrinogenolytic activity. This new paradigm of CO-based inhibition of the anticoagulant effects of SVMP could potentially diminish haemostatic compromise in envenomed patients until antivenom can be administered. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  9. Carbon monoxide poisoning in two workers using an LPG forklift truck within a coldstore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, F; Mason, H J

    2004-10-01

    This report describes carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in two workers using a hired forklift truck within a coldstore. The diagnosis was not considered until day 6 of the incident, and so measurements of blood or breath CO at the time of acute illness were unavailable. To determine whether CO poisoning may be diagnosed retrospectively, where blood or breath CO measurements are unavailable, in the context of this particular incident. Detailed clinical histories were obtained. Estimation of possible levels of CO exposure were made based on computer biokinetic modelling based on the Coburn-Foster-Kane equation. The combined method used supports the diagnosis of CO poisoning in these two cases. Clinical assessment, in combination with mathematical exposure modelling, may lead to successful retrospective diagnosis of CO poisoning and identify putative work activities. CO poisoning should be suspected whenever internal combustion engines are used within buildings and workers complain of relevant symptoms. Hospital departments should maintain a high level of vigilance towards such incidents as this, and should routinely undertake a direct measure of the saturation of haemoglobin by CO, i.e. blood carboxyhaemoglobin or breath CO.

  10. Model-simulated trend of surface carbon monoxide for the 2001–2010 decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    We present decadal trend estimates of surface carbon monoxide (CO) simulated using the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy for Atmospheric Chemistry) based on the emission scenarios Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 for anthropogenic activity and Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) v3.1 for biomass burning from 2001 through 2010. The spatial distribution of the modeled surface CO is evaluated with monthly data from the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) thermal infrared product. The global means of correlation coefficient and relative bias for the decade 2001-2010 are 0.95 and -4.29 %, respectively. We also find a reasonable correlation (R =0.78) between the trends of EMAC surface CO and full 10-year monthly records from ground-based observation (World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases, WDCGG). Over western Europe, eastern USA, and northern Australia, the significant decreases in EMAC surface CO are estimated at -35.5±5.8, -59.6±9.1, and -13.7±9.5 ppbv per decade, respectively. In contrast, the surface CO increases by +8.9±4.8 ppbv per decade over southern Asia. A high correlation (R =0.92) between the changes in EMAC-simulated surface CO and total emission flux shows that the significant regional trends are attributed to the changes in primary and direct emissions from both anthropogenic activity and biomass burning.

  11. Bactericidal Effect of a Photoresponsive Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Nonwoven against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Gläser, Steve; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Wyrwa, Ralf; Weisser, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading pathogen in skin and skin structure infections, including surgical and traumatic infections that are associated with biofilm formation. Because biofilm formation is accompanied by high phenotypic resistance of the embedded bacteria, they are almost impossible to eradicate by conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative therapeutic strategies are of high interest. We generated nanostructured hybrid nonwovens via the electrospinning of a photoresponsive carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule [CORM-1, Mn2(CO)10] and the polymer polylactide. This nonwoven showed a CO-induced antimicrobial activity that was sufficient to reduce the biofilm-embedded bacteria by 70% after photostimulation at 405 nm. The released CO increased the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biofilms, suggesting that in addition to inhibiting the electron transport chain, ROS might play a role in the antimicrobial activity of CORMs on S. aureus. The nonwoven showed increased cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells after longer exposure, most probably due to the released lactic acid, that might be acceptable for local and short-time treatments. Therefore, CO-releasing nonwovens might be a promising local antimicrobial therapy against biofilm-associated skin wound infections. PMID:27114272

  12. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  13. Use of Carbon Monoxide in Minimizing Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Kikumi S.; Kimura, Shoko; Murase, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Although carbon monoxide (CO) is known to be toxic due to its ability to interfere with oxygen delivery at high concentrations, mammalian cells endogenously generate CO primarily via the catalysis of heme by heme oxygenases (HO). Recent findings have indicated that HO and generation of CO serve as a key mechanism to maintain the integrity of the physiological function of organs, and supported the development of a new paradigm that CO, at low concentrations, functions as a signaling molecule in the body and exerts significant cytoprotection. Consequently, exogenously delivered CO has been shown to mediate potent protection in various injury models through its anti-inflammatory, vasodilating, and anti-apoptotic functions. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury associated with organ transplantation is one of the major deleterious factors limiting the success of transplantation. I/R injury is a complex cascade of interconnected events involving cell damage, apoptosis, vigorous inflammatory responses, microcirculation disturbance, and thrombogenesis. CO has a great potential in minimizing I/R injury. This review will provide an overview of the basic physiology of CO, preclinical studies examining efficacy of CO in I/R injury models, and possible protective mechanisms. CO could be developed to be a valuable therapeutic molecule in minimizing I/R injury in transplantation. PMID:22000659

  14. Performance of a carbon monoxide sensor based on zirconia-doped ceria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriya Izu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Resistive-type carbon monoxide sensors were fabricated using zirconia-doped ceria, and their sensing properties were evaluated and compared with equivalent devices based on non-doped ceria. The response of both sensor types was found to increase with decreasing temperature, while the response at 450 °C of a sensor fired at 950 °C was greater than that of a sensor fired at 1100 °C. When fired at 950 °C, however, the response at 450 °C of a sensor created using zirconia-doped ceria was slightly less than that of a sensor constructed from non-doped ceria. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the response of both sensor types is proportional to the resistance raised to the power of about 0.5, and inversely proportional to the particle size raised to a power of about 0.8. The sensor response time can be considered almost the same regardless of whether zirconia doping is used or not.

  15. Effects of acute hypoventilation and hyperventilation on exhaled carbon monoxide measurement in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Donato Michele

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High levels of exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO are a marker of airway or lung inflammation. We investigated whether hypo- or hyperventilation can affect measured values. Methods Ten healthy volunteers were trained to achieve sustained end-tidal CO2 (etCO2 concentrations of 30 (hyperventilation, 40 (normoventilation, and 50 mmHg (hypoventilation. As soon as target etCO2 values were achieved for 120 sec, exhaled breath was analyzed for eCO with a photoacoustic spectrometer. At etCO2 values of 30 and 40 mmHg exhaled breath was sampled both after a deep inspiration and after a normal one. All measurements were performed in two different environmental conditions: A ambient CO concentration = 0.8 ppm and B ambient CO concentration = 1.7 ppm. Results During normoventilation, eCO mean (standard deviation was 11.5 (0.8 ppm; it decreased to 10.3 (0.8 ppm during hyperventilation (p 2 changes (hyperventilation: 10% Vs 25% decrease; hypoventilation 3% Vs 25% increase. Taking a deep inspiration before breath sampling was associated with lower eCO values (p Conclusions eCO measurements should not be performed during marked acute hyperventilation, like that induced in this study, but the influence of less pronounced hyperventilation or of hypoventilation is probably negligible in clinical practice

  16. Validation of six years of SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide observations using MOZAIC CO profile measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. J. de Laat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation study of SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide (CO total column measurements from the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method (IMLM algorithm using vertically integrated profile aircraft measurements obtained within the MOZAIC project for the six year time period of 2003–2008.

    Overall we find a good agreement between SCIAMACHY and airborne measurements for both mean values – also on a year-to-year basis – as well as seasonal variations. Several locations show large biases that are attributed to local effects like orography and proximity of large emission sources. Differences were detected for individual years: 2003, 2004 and 2006 have larger biases than 2005, 2007 and 2008, which appear to be related to SCIAMACHY instrumental issues but require more research. Results from this study are consistent with, and complementary to, findings from a previous validation study using ground-based measurements (de Laat et al., 2010b. According to this study, the SCIAMACHY data, if individual measurements are of sufficient quality – good signal-to-noise, can be used to determine the spatial distribution and seasonal cycles of CO total columns over clean areas. Biases found over areas with strong emissions (Africa, China could be explained by low sensitivity of the instrument in the boundary layer and users are recommended to avoid using the SCIAMACHY data while trying to quantify CO burden and/or retrieve CO emissions in such areas.

  17. Otoneurological symptoms in Brazilian fishermen exposed over a long period to carbon monoxide and noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Santos da Carvalho, Hugo Amilton; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Albizu, Evelyn Joice; Marques, Jair Mendes; Fuck, Bruna Carla; Cardoso, Rafaella

    2015-01-01

    Fishing, one of the oldest productive activities, is an important sector of the Brazilian economy as well as the world economy. To evaluate the vestibular behavior in population of fishermen. It was realized as a retrospective and cross-sectional study. Thirty fishermen [mean age 49.5 (± 8.5) years] whose age ranged from 33 years to 67 years were submitted to anamnesis, otorhinolaryngological evaluation, and vestibular examination through the electronystagmography (ENG). The most evident otoneurological symptoms were: Tinnitus (66.7%), dizziness (63.3%), and hearing loss (53.3%). The most evident clinical symptoms were: Fatigue (36.7%), anxiety (23.3%), and depression (16.7%). There were alterations in the vestibular examination of 13 (43.3%) fishermen in the caloric test. There was a prevalence of alteration in the peripheral vestibular system and there was a major frequency of the peripheral vestibular irritative syndrome (30.0%). The otoneurological complaints were frequent in the population studied that verifies the importance of allowing labyrinth examinations and the need for adopting preventive measures related to noise exposure to carbon monoxide (CO), since they can cause and/enhance various manifestations of labyrinthine vestibular impairment that can affect the quality of life of these workers.

  18. Otoneurological symptoms in Brazilian fishermen exposed over a long period to carbon monoxide and noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishing, one of the oldest productive activities, is an important sector of the Brazilian economy as well as the world economy. To evaluate the vestibular behavior in population of fishermen. It was realized as a retrospective and cross-sectional study. Thirty fishermen [mean age 49.5 (±8.5 years] whose age ranged from 33 years to 67 years were submitted to anamnesis, otorhinolaryngological evaluation, and vestibular examination through the electronystagmography (ENG. The most evident otoneurological symptoms were: Tinnitus (66.7%, dizziness (63.3%, and hearing loss (53.3%. The most evident clinical symptoms were: Fatigue (36.7%, anxiety (23.3%, and depression (16.7%. There were alterations in the vestibular examination of 13 (43.3% fishermen in the caloric test. There was a prevalence of alteration in the peripheral vestibular system and there was a major frequency of the peripheral vestibular irritative syndrome (30.0%. Conclusion: The otoneurological complaints were frequent in the population studied that verifies the importance of allowing labyrinth examinations and the need for adopting preventive measures related to noise exposure to carbon monoxide (CO, since they can cause and/enhance various manifestations of labyrinthine vestibular impairment that can affect the quality of life of these workers.

  19. Bactericidal Effect of a Photoresponsive Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Nonwoven against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Gläser, Steve; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Wyrwa, Ralf; Weisser, Jürgen; Pletz, Mathias W; Schiller, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading pathogen in skin and skin structure infections, including surgical and traumatic infections that are associated with biofilm formation. Because biofilm formation is accompanied by high phenotypic resistance of the embedded bacteria, they are almost impossible to eradicate by conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative therapeutic strategies are of high interest. We generated nanostructured hybrid nonwovens via the electrospinning of a photoresponsive carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule [CORM-1, Mn2(CO)10] and the polymer polylactide. This nonwoven showed a CO-induced antimicrobial activity that was sufficient to reduce the biofilm-embedded bacteria by 70% after photostimulation at 405 nm. The released CO increased the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biofilms, suggesting that in addition to inhibiting the electron transport chain, ROS might play a role in the antimicrobial activity of CORMs on S. aureus The nonwoven showed increased cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells after longer exposure, most probably due to the released lactic acid, that might be acceptable for local and short-time treatments. Therefore, CO-releasing nonwovens might be a promising local antimicrobial therapy against biofilm-associated skin wound infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Storm-Related Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: An Investigation of Target Audience Knowledge and Risk Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, Scott A; Poehlman, Jon A; Rupert, Douglas J; Williams, Peyton N

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings in the United States consistently occur when residents improperly use portable gasoline-powered generators and other tools following severe storms and power outages. However, protective behaviors-such as installing CO alarms and placing generators more than 20 feet away from indoor structures-can prevent these poisonings. This study identified knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs that lead consumers to adopt risk and protective behaviors for storm-related CO poisoning and post-storm generator use. Four focus groups (32 participants in total) were conducted with generator owners in winter and summer storm-prone areas to explore home safety, portable generator use, CO poisoning knowledge, and generator safety messages. Discussions were transcribed, and findings analyzed using an ordered meta-matrix approach. Although most generator owners were aware of CO poisoning, many were unsure what constitutes a safe location for generator operation and incorrectly stated that enclosed areas outside the home-such as attached garages, sheds, and covered porches-were safe. Convenience and access to appliances often dictated generator placement. Participants were receptive to installing CO alarms in their homes but were unsure where to place them. These findings suggest a deficit in understanding how to operate portable generators safely and a need to correct misconceptions around safe placement. In terms of behavioral price, the simple installation and maintenance of inexpensive CO alarms may be the most important strategy for ultimately protecting homes from both storm-related and other CO exposures.