WorldWideScience

Sample records for compound mass spectrometry

  1. Use of mass spectrometry for study of coordination compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrbehlehu, N.V.; Indrichan, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    A review on mass-spectrometry of coordination compounds including the works published up to 1979 inclusive is provided. Mainly the products of metals with bi- and tetradentate ligands are considered using the method. Mo and Be carboxylates for which molecular ions lines are found in mass-spectra are studied. The study of mass-spectra for VO chelates with thiosemicarbazone of salicyl aldehyde is carried out. Application of the mass-spectrometry method permits to establish the mass of coordination compounds, the structure of complexes, dentate structure and the way of ligand coordination, the bond strength [ru

  2. Analysis of organic compounds by secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewinger, H.P.

    1993-05-01

    This study is about the use of secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) as analytical techniques with depth resolution in determining organic components in environmental solid microparticles. The first application of plasma SNMS to organic compounds revealed the spectra to be composed mainly of signals from the atoms of all participating elements, such as C, H, O, N, S, P, and Cl. In addition, signals produced by multi-atomic clusters can be detected, such as CH, C 2 , CH 2 , C 2 H, and C 3 , as well as signals indicating the presence of organic compounds with hetero elements, such as OH, NH, and CN. Their intensity decreases very markedly with increasing numbers of atoms. Among the signals from bi-atomic clusters, those coming from elements with large mass differences are most intense. The use of plasma SNMS with organic compounds has shown that, except for spurious chemical reactions induced by ion bombardment and photodesorption by the photons of the plasma, it is possible to analyze with resolution in depth, elements of organic solids. A more detailed molecular characterization of organic compounds is possible by means of SIMS on the basis of multi-atomic fragments and by comparison with suitable signal patterns. (orig./BBR) [de

  3. Automatic Compound Annotation from Mass Spectrometry Data Using MAGMa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, L.O.; Hooft, van der J.J.J.; Verhoeven, S.

    2014-01-01

    The MAGMa software for automatic annotation of mass spectrometry based fragmentation data was applied to 16 MS/MS datasets of the CASMI 2013 contest. Eight solutions were submitted in category 1 (molecular formula assignments) and twelve in category 2 (molecular structure assignment). The MS/MS

  4. Determination of gaseous compounds using online mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praun, S.

    1999-08-01

    The work is divided in three major parts and describes various measurements of gaseous compounds. The first part tasks the problem of transit traffic along the motorway from Kufstein, Northern Tyrol/Austria until Ala, Trentino/Italy. During three periods measurements of the immissions of many compounds were carried out simultaneously in Northern Tyrol, Southern Tyrol and Trentino. The influence of the ban of heavy lorry traffic during the weekend and during the night on the reduction of NO 2 could be demonstrated. Furthermore certain compounds (e.g. Benzene) were monitored online for the first time along the motorway at lowest concentrations using the mass spectrometer 'Airsense 500'. In the second part online measurements of exhaled human breath after the oral application of a medicine against bronchitis was performed. In that way beside clinical and pharmacological studies the effectiveness of this pharmacon could be proved. The last part of the present work shows adsorption- and desorption measurements on four different adsorbents. During this procedure seven different gases with an increasing number of carbon atoms were monitored online by the hyphenation of these adsorbents with the mass spectrometer 'Airsense 500'. Thereby, the various properties of the adsorbents in the interaction with the gases could be demonstrated. (author)

  5. Automatic Compound Annotation from Mass Spectrometry Data Using MAGMa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, Lars; van der Hooft, Justin J J; Verhoeven, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The MAGMa software for automatic annotation of mass spectrometry based fragmentation data was applied to 16 MS/MS datasets of the CASMI 2013 contest. Eight solutions were submitted in category 1 (molecular formula assignments) and twelve in category 2 (molecular structure assignment). The MS/MS peaks of each challenge were matched with in silico generated substructures of candidate molecules from PubChem, resulting in penalty scores that were used for candidate ranking. In 6 of the 12 submitted solutions in category 2, the correct chemical structure obtained the best score, whereas 3 molecules were ranked outside the top 5. All top ranked molecular formulas submitted in category 1 were correct. In addition, we present MAGMa results generated retrospectively for the remaining challenges. Successful application of the MAGMa algorithm required inclusion of the relevant candidate molecules, application of the appropriate mass tolerance and a sufficient degree of in silico fragmentation of the candidate molecules. Furthermore, the effect of the exhaustiveness of the candidate lists and limitations of substructure based scoring are discussed.

  6. Characterization of Volatile Compounds from Ethnic Agave Alcoholic Beverages by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Escalante-Minakata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic Agave alcoholic beverages such as raicilla, sisal, tequila, mezcal, bacanora, sotol and pulque have been analyzed by gas chromatography and headspace solid-phase microextraction- gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS. There were 105 compounds identified, eleven were classified as major compounds and the others were classified as minor compounds. Seventeen minor compounds could be used as authenticity markers since they were beverage specific. Cluster analysis (CA showed that Agave alcoholic beverages could be distinguished by multivariate analysis of major compounds; however, the analysis of minor compounds provided a better fingerprinting.

  7. Profiling of volatile organic compounds produced by clinical Aspergillus isolates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M G; Brinkman, P; Escobar Salazar, Natalia; Bos, L D; de Heer, K; Meijer, M; Janssen, H-G; de Cock, H; Wösten, H A B; Visser, C.E.; van Oers, M H J; Sterk, P J

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath may identify the presence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. We aimed to detect VOC profiles emitted by in vitro cultured, clinical Aspergillus isolates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three clinical Aspergillus isolates and a

  8. Profiling of volatile organic compounds produced by clinical Aspergillus isolates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M. G.; Brinkman, P.; Escobar, N.; Bos, L. D.; de Heer, K.; Meijer, M.; Janssen, H.-G.; de Cock, H.; Wösten, H. A. B.; Visser, C. E.; van Oers, M. H. J.; Sterk, P. J.

    2018-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath may identify the presence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. We aimed to detect VOC profiles emitted by in vitro cultured, clinical Aspergillus isolates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three clinical Aspergillus isolates and a

  9. A qualitative study of amlodipine and its related compounds by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John; Pugh, Jonathan; Dimopoulos-Italiano, Gina; Pike, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive structural analysis of amlodipine and certain related compounds was performed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Triple quadrupole and quadrupole time-of-flight instruments were used to provide collision-induced dissociation and accurate mass measurement for selected product and second-generation product ions. A unique ion rearrangement was observed, which was found to be characteristic of certain dihydropyridines. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the fragmentation of these compounds. The structural elucidation of an unknown impurity is presented as an example. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Meet interesting abbreviations in clinical mass spectrometry: from compound classification by REIMS to multimodal and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luptáková, Dominika; Pluháček, Tomáš; Palyzová, Andrea; Přichystal, Jakub; Balogh, J.; Lemr, Karel; Juránek, I.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 353-360 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : REIMS * multimodal * mass spectrometry imaging Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  11. Classification of wine by determination of bioactive phenolic compounds using high resolution mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Violeta; Dimovska, Violeta; Mitrev, Sasa; Gulaboski, Rubin; Bogeva, Elena; Petruseva, Dragana; Causon, Tim; Hann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In this project proposal, metabolomic fingerprinting of wine samples will be examined using high performance liquid chromatography combined with ion mobility quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC–IMS-QTOF-MS) for the first time. Bioactive compounds in wines from various red and white varieties produced in Macedonia and Austria from different wine regions and different vintages will be determined for the first time using a non-targeted fingerprinting approach on this analytical plat...

  12. Accounting for undetected compounds in statistical analyses of mass spectrometry 'omic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sandra L; Leiserowitz, Gary S; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important high-throughput technique for profiling small molecular compounds in biological samples and is widely used to identify potential diagnostic and prognostic compounds associated with disease. Commonly, this data generated by mass spectrometry has many missing values resulting when a compound is absent from a sample or is present but at a concentration below the detection limit. Several strategies are available for statistically analyzing data with missing values. The accelerated failure time (AFT) model assumes all missing values result from censoring below a detection limit. Under a mixture model, missing values can result from a combination of censoring and the absence of a compound. We compare power and estimation of a mixture model to an AFT model. Based on simulated data, we found the AFT model to have greater power to detect differences in means and point mass proportions between groups. However, the AFT model yielded biased estimates with the bias increasing as the proportion of observations in the point mass increased while estimates were unbiased with the mixture model except if all missing observations came from censoring. These findings suggest using the AFT model for hypothesis testing and mixture model for estimation. We demonstrated this approach through application to glycomics data of serum samples from women with ovarian cancer and matched controls.

  13. Mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang Hartmeyer, Gitte; Jensen, Anne Kvistholm; Böcher, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being introduced for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria. We describe 2 MALDI-TOF MS identification cases - 1 directly on spinal fluid and 1 on grown bacteria. Rapidly obtained...

  14. Analysis of volatile compounds by open-air ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2017-05-08

    This study demonstrates a simple method for rapid and in situ identification of volatile and endogenous compounds in culinary spice samples through mass spectrometry (MS). This method only requires a holder for solid spice sample (2-3 mm) that is placed close to a mass spectrometer inlet, which is applied with a high voltage. Volatile species responsible for the aroma of the spice samples can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Sample pretreatment is not required prior to MS analysis, and no solvent was used during MS analysis. The high voltage applied to the inlet of the mass spectrometer induces the ionization of volatile compounds released from the solid spice samples. Furthermore, moisture in the air also contributes to the ionization of volatile compounds. Dried spices including cinnamon and cloves are used as the model sample to demonstrate this straightforward MS analysis, which can be completed within few seconds. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the suitability of the current method for rapid screening of cinnamon quality through detection of the presence of a hepatotoxic agent, i.e. coumarin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of Protein-Phenolic Compound Modifications Using Electrochemistry Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinich, Constanze; Schefer, Simone; Rohn, Sascha

    2018-01-29

    In the last decade, electrochemical oxidation coupled with mass spectrometry has been successfully used for the analysis of metabolic studies. The application focused in this study was to investigate the redox potential of different phenolic compounds such as the very prominent chlorogenic acid. Further, EC/ESI-MS was used as preparation technique for analyzing adduct formation between electrochemically oxidized phenolic compounds and food proteins, e.g., alpha-lactalbumin or peptides derived from a tryptic digestion. In the first step of this approach, two reactant solutions are combined and mixed: one contains the solution of the digested protein, and the other contains the phenolic compound of interest, which was, prior to the mixing process, electrochemically transformed to several oxidation products using a boron-doped diamond working electrode. As a result, a Michael-type addition led to covalent binding of the activated phenolic compounds to reactive protein/peptide side chains. In a follow-up approach, the reaction mix was further separated chromatographically and finally detected using ESI-HRMS. Compound-specific, electrochemical oxidation of phenolic acids was performed successfully, and various oxidation and reaction products with proteins/peptides were observed. Further optimization of the reaction (conditions) is required, as well as structural elucidation concerning the final adducts, which can be phenolic compound oligomers, but even more interestingly, quite complex mixtures of proteins and oxidation products.

  16. Study of cyclization of chelating compounds using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Ying; Campbell, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used for the study of cyclization of organic chelating compounds (chelators). Four chelating compounds were studied: Symmetrical ethylenediaminediacetic acid (s-EDDA), Unsymmetrical ethylenediaminediacetic acid (u-EDDA), N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), and N-(2-hydroxyethyl)iminodiacetic acid (HEIDA). The chelators were cyclized with treatments of acids and heating. The open and cyclized form of the chelators were semi-quantified by both positive and negative ion modes ESI-MS. The kinetics of chelator cyclization was studied as a function of reaction temperature and the pH of the matrix. The cyclization of s-EDDA was found to be a pseudo-first order reaction in s-EDDA and overall second order. The cyclizations of HEIDA and HEDTA are reversible reactions. Higher temperature and lower pH favors cyclization. (author)

  17. Strategies for dereplication of natural compounds using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Complete structural elucidation of natural products is commonly performed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), but annotating compounds to most likely structures using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry is a faster and feasible first step. The CASMI contest 2016 (Critical Assessment of Small Molecule Identification) provided spectra of eighteen compounds for the best manual structure identification in the natural products category. High resolution precursor and tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) were available to characterize the compounds. We used the Seven Golden Rules, Sirius2 and MS-FINDER software for determination of molecular formulas, and then we queried the formulas in different natural product databases including DNP, UNPD, ChemSpider and REAXYS to obtain molecular structures. We used different in-silico fragmentation tools including CFM-ID, CSI:FingerID and MS-FINDER to rank these compounds. Additional neutral losses and product ion peaks were manually investigated. This manual and time consuming approach allowed for the correct dereplication of thirteen of the eighteen natural products.

  18. Liquid separation techniques coupled with mass spectrometry for chiral analysis of pharmaceuticals compounds and their metabolites in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erny, G L; Cifuentes, A

    2006-02-24

    Determination of the chiral composition of drugs is nowadays a key step in order to determine purity, activity, bioavailability, biodegradation, etc., of pharmaceuticals. In this article, works published for the last 5 years on the analysis of chiral drugs by liquid separation techniques coupled with mass spectrometry are reviewed. Namely, chiral analysis of pharmaceuticals including, e.g., antiinflammatories, antihypertensives, relaxants, etc., by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry are included. The importance and interest of the analysis of the enantiomers of the active compound and its metabolites in different biological fluids (plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, etc.) are also discussed.

  19. [Simultaneous determination of ten organotin compounds in polyvinyl chloride plastics using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Li, Bin; Liu, Li; Zhang, Chen; Wu, Jingwu; Liu, Zhihong; Li, Xintian

    2009-01-01

    A rapid and effective gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry method has been developed systematically and studied for the simultaneous determination of 10 organotin compounds, dibutyltin-dichloride (DBT), n-butyltin-trichloride (MBT), triethyltinchloride (TET), fentin-chloride (TPhT), chlorotributylstannane (TBT), tri-n-propyltinchloride (TPrT), diphenyltin-dichloride (DPhT), tetrabutyltin (TeBT), di-n-octyltin-dichloride (DOT), phenyltin trichloride (MPhT)), in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics. The PVC sample was dissolved with tetrahydrofuran and the polymer in the sample was precipitated with methanol, and then the target compounds were derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate and extracted with hexane under ultrasonication. The qualitative and quantitative analysis were carried out by GC-MS and the total ion chromatogram and selected ion chromatogram were obtained. The derivatization and extraction conditions, such as the derivatization time, derivatization pH value, dosages of derivatization reagent and precipitation reagent were optimized. The good linearities, recoveries and precisions were obtained. The linearity ranges were 0.5 - 50 mg/L. The linearity correlation coefficients of 10 organotin compounds were between 0.997 8 and 0.999 7. The average recoveries were 84.23% - 109.1% with relative standard deviations of 4.24% - 10.75%. The established method has been successfully applied to the determination of organotin compounds in PVC plastics.

  20. Quantification of low molecular weight compounds by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry - A tutorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzagalinski, Ignacy; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2017-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) permits label-free in situ analysis of chemical compounds directly from the surface of two-dimensional biological tissue slices. It links qualitative molecular information of compounds to their spatial coordinates and distribution within the investigated tissue. MALDI-MSI can also provide the quantitative amounts of target compounds in the tissue, if proper calibration techniques are performed. Obviously, as the target molecules are embedded within the biological tissue environment and analysis must be performed at their precise locations, there is no possibility for extensive sample clean-up routines or chromatographic separations as usually performed with homogenized biological materials; ion suppression phenomena therefore become a critical side effect of MALDI-MSI. Absolute quantification by MALDI-MSI should provide an accurate value of the concentration/amount of the compound of interest in relatively small, well-defined region of interest of the examined tissue, ideally in a single pixel. This goal is extremely challenging and will not only depend on the technical possibilities and limitations of the MSI instrument hardware, but equally on the chosen calibration/standardization strategy. These strategies are the main focus of this article and are discussed and contrasted in detail in this tutorial review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Qualitative screening of undesirable compounds from feeds to fish by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Ibáñez, María; Serrano, Roque; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Hernández, Félix

    2013-03-06

    This paper describes the development, validation, and application of a rapid screening method for the detection and identification of undesirable organic compounds in aquaculture products. A generic sample treatment was applied without any purification or preconcentration step. After extraction of the samples with acetonitrile/water 80:20 (0.1% formic acid), the extracts were centrifuged and directly injected in the LC-HRMS system, consisting of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS). A qualitative validation was carried out for over 70 representative compounds, including antibiotics, pesticides, and mycotoxins, in fish feed and fish fillets spiked at 20 and 100 μg/kg. At the highest level, the great majority of compounds were detected (using the most abundant ion, typically the protonated molecule) and unequivocally identified (on the basis of the presence of two accurate-mass measured ions). At the 20 μg/kg level, many contaminants could already be detected, although identification using two ions was not fully reached for some of them, mainly in fish feed due to the complexity of this matrix. Subsequent application of this screening methodology to aquaculture samples made it possible to find several compounds from the target list, such as the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, the insecticide pirimiphos-methyl, and the mycotoxins fumonisin B2 and zearalenone. A retrospective analysis of accurate-mass full-spectrum acquisition data provided by QTOF MS was also made, without either reprocessing or injecting the samples. This allowed the detection and tentative identification of other organic undesirables different from those included in the validated list.

  2. Data on coffee composition and mass spectrometry analysis of mixtures of coffee related carbohydrates, phenolic compounds and peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana S.P. Moreira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here are related to the research paper entitled “Transglycosylation reactions, a main mechanism of phenolics incorporation in coffee melanoidins: inhibition by Maillard reaction” (Moreira et al., 2017 [1]. Methanolysis was applied in coffee fractions to quantify glycosidically-linked phenolics in melanoidins. Moreover, model mixtures mimicking coffee beans composition were roasted and analyzed using mass spectrometry-based approaches to disclose the regulatory role of proteins in transglycosylation reactions extension. This article reports the detailed chemical composition of coffee beans and derived fractions. In addition, it provides gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS chromatograms and respective GC–MS spectra of silylated methanolysis products obtained from phenolic compounds standards, as well as the detailed identification of all compounds observed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS analysis of roasted model mixtures, paving the way for the identification of the same type of compounds in other samples.

  3. Chromatography mass spectrometry and its use in identification in the radiolysis products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibadov, N.A.; Suleymanov, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text : Increased attention to the environment is the result of dramatically increased human activity, which in turn is caused by the rapid growth of population of the planet. Extremely powerful tool for control of pollution of different environmental objects - Chromatographic methods to analyze complex mixtures of components. This work is devoted to methods of gas chromatography - mass - spectroscopy and its use in identifying the pollutants of natural environments. Devices that allow obtaining the mass spectra are called mass spectrometers. Sensitivity of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (typically 10-6-10-9 g) determined by the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer detector. Its essence lies in the fact that the recording of chromatograms is not the full ion current and the most characteristic ions of the substance. With varying degrees of probability in the water identified over 100 individual organic compounds, including PHs. The method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified compounds in natural waters, soils, soil and sediments.

  4. Application of Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Vitellogenin, a Unique Biomarker for Xenobiotic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alejandro M.; Banoub, Joseph H.

    Vitellogenin is a complex phosphoglycolipoprotein that is secreted into the bloodstream of sexually mature, female, oviparous animals in response to circulating estrogens. It is then incorporated into the ovaries by receptor mediated endocytosis, where it is further cleaved to form the major constituents of the egg yolk proteins. It is generally accepted that these protein and peptide products serve as the main nutritional reserve for the developing embryo. Quantification of vitellogenin in blood is useful for different purposes. The reproductive status and degree of sexual maturation of oviparous animals can be assessed according to the levels of vitellogenin in plasma. The expression of this protein can also be induced in males under the effect of estrogenic compounds. Relying on this observation, vitellogenin has been used as a unique biomarker of environmental endocrine disruption in many species. In this respect, vitellogenin levels could potentially be used to assess the use of chemical warefare compounds with estrogenic activity. In this paper we review a technique developed for measuring vitellogenin plasma levels of different fish species using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

  5. Mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    A brief description is given of the functional elements of a mass spectrometer and of some currently employed mass spectrometric techniques, such as combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, mass chromatography, and selected ion monitoring. Various areas of application of mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry are discussed, such as inborn errors of metabolism and other metabolic disorders, intoxications, quantitative determinations of drugs, hormones, gases, and trace elements, and the use of isotope dilution mass spectrometry as a definitive method for the establishment of true values for concentrations of various compounds in reference sera. It is concluded that mass spectrometry is of great value in clinical chemistry. (Auth.)

  6. Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrometry for Absolute Quantification of Aroma Compounds in the Headspace of Dry Fermented Sausages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olivares, A.; Dryahina, Kseniya; Navarro, J. L.; Flores, M.; Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 13 (2010), s. 5819-5829 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : mass spectrometry * aroma compounds * dry fermented sausages Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.874, year: 2010

  7. Targeted metabolite profile of food bioactive compounds by Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry: The 'FancyTiles' approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.; Ferracane, R.; Palermo, M.; Fogliano, V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a new targeted metabolic profile approach using Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry was described. For each foodmatrix various classes of bioactive compounds and some specificmetabolites of interest were selected on the basis of the existing knowledge creating an easy-to-read

  8. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry volatile organic compound fingerprinting for monovarietal extra virgin olive oil identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Samblas, C.; Tres, A.; Koot, A.H.; Ruth, van S.M.; Gonzalez-Casado, A.; Cuadros-Rodriguez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new technique that allows the fast and accurate qualification of the volatile organic compound (VOC) fingerprint. This paper describes the analysis of thirty samples of extra virgin olive oil, of five different varieties of olive

  9. Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of volatile organic compound fluxes using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taipale, R.

    2011-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources, vegetation being the dominant source on a global scale. Some of these reactive compounds are deemed major contributors or inhibitors to aerosol particle formation and growth, thus making VOC measurements essential for current climate change research. This thesis discusses ecosystem scale VOC fluxes measured above a boreal Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland. The flux measurements were performed using the micrometeorological disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), which is an online technique for measuring VOC concentrations. The measurement, calibration, and calculation procedures developed in this work proved to be well suited to long-term VOC concentration and flux measurements with PTR-MS. A new averaging approach based on running averaged covariance functions improved the determination of the lag time between wind and concentration measurements, which is a common challenge in DEC when measuring fluxes near the detection limit. The ecosystem scale emissions of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone were substantial. These three oxygenated VOCs made up about half of the total emissions, with the rest comprised of monoterpenes. Contrary to the traditional assumption that monoterpene emissions from Scots pine originate mainly as evaporation from specialized storage pools, the DEC measurements indicated a significant contribution from de novo biosynthesis to the ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions. This thesis offers practical guidelines for long-term DEC measurements with PTR-MS. In particular, the new averaging approach to the lag time determination seems useful in the automation of DEC flux calculations. Seasonal variation in the monoterpene biosynthesis and the detailed structure of a revised hybrid algorithm, describing both de novo and pool emissions, should be determined in

  10. Determination of drugs and drug-like compounds in different samples with direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernetsova, Elena S; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2011-01-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART), a relatively new ionization source for mass spectrometry, ionizes small-molecule components from different kinds of samples without any sample preparation and chromatographic separation. The current paper reviews the published data available on the determination of drugs and drug-like compounds in different matrices with DART-MS, including identification and quantitation issues. Parameters that affect ionization efficiency and mass spectra composition are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Approaches for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds with laser desorption/ionization techniques and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Nina; Shevchenko, Denys; Bergquist, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes various approaches for the analysis of low molecular weight (LMW) compounds by different laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry techniques (LDI-MS). It is common to use an agent to assist the ionization, and small molecules are normally difficult to analyze by, e.g., matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) using the common matrices available today, because the latter are generally small organic compounds themselves. This often results in severe suppression of analyte peaks, or interference of the matrix and analyte signals in the low mass region. However, intrinsic properties of several LDI techniques such as high sensitivity, low sample consumption, high tolerance towards salts and solid particles, and rapid analysis have stimulated scientists to develop methods to circumvent matrix-related issues in the analysis of LMW molecules. Recent developments within this field as well as historical considerations and future prospects are presented in this review.

  12. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical compounds by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, J.J. van; Burgers, P.C.; Groot, R. de; Luider, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we discuss key issues for the successful application of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to quantify drugs. These include choice and preparation of matrix, nature of cationization agent, automation, and data analysis procedures. The high molecular weight matrix

  13. Column liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry: selected techniques in environmental applications for polar pesticides and related compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slobodnik, J.; van Baar, B.L.M.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    A review covering the field of environmental applications of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is presented. Recent developments and advances are discussed with emphasis on the presently popular thermospray, particle beam and atmospheric pressure ionisation interfaces. Each interface

  14. [Determination of flavor compounds in foxtail millet wine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with headspace solid phase microextraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingke; Zhang, Aixia; Li, Shaohui; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yuzong; Xing, Guosheng

    2017-11-08

    To comprehensively understand flavor compounds and aroma characteristics of foxtail millet wine, extraction conditions were optimized with 85 μm polyacrylate (PA), 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), 75 μm carboxen (CAR)/PDMS and 50/30 μm divinylbenzene (DVB)/CAR/PDMS fibers. The flavor compounds in foxtail millet wine were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled with headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), and the odor characteristics and intensity were analyzed by odor active values (OAVs). The samples of 8 mL were placed in headspace vials with 1.5 g NaCl, then the headspace vials were heated at 60℃ for 40 min. Using HS-SPME with different fibers, a total of 55 flavor compounds were identified from the samples, including alcohols, esters, benzene derivatives, hydrocarbons, acids, aldehydes, ketones, terpenes, phenols and heterocycle compounds. The main flavor compounds were alcohols compounds. According to their OAVs, phenylethyl alcohol, styrene, 1-methyl-naphthalene, 2-methyl-naphthalene, benzaldehyde, benzeneacetaldehyde and 2-methoxy-phenol were established to be odor-active compounds. Phenylethyl alcohol and benzeneacetaldehyde were the most prominent odor-active compounds. PA and PDMS fibers had good extraction effect for polar and nonpolar compounds, respectively. CAR/PDMS and DVB/CAR/PDMS provided a similar compounds profile for moderate polar compounds. This research comprehensively determined flavor compounds of foxtail millet wine, and provided theoretical basis for product development and quality control.

  15. Matrix-assisted laser desorption fourier transform mass spectrometry for biological compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettich, R.; Buchanan, M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent development of matrix-assisted UV laser desorption (LD) mass spectrometry has made possible the ionization and detection of extremely large molecules (with molecular weights exceeding 100,000 Daltons). This technique has generated enormous interest in the biological community for the direct examination of large peptides and oligonucleotides. Although this matrix-assisted ionization method has been developed and used almost exclusively with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers, research is currently in progress to demonstrate this technique with trapped ion mass spectrometers, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTMS). The potential capabilities of FTMS for wide mass range, high resolution measurement, and ion trapping experiments suggest that this instrumental technique should be useful for the detailed structural characterization of large ions generated by the matrix-assisted technique. We have recently demonstrated that matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption can be successfully used with FTMS for the ionization of small peptides. The objective of this report is to summarize the application and current limitations of matrix-assisted laser desorption FTMS for the characterization of peptides and oligonucleotides at the isomeric level. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Direct analysis of volatile organic compounds in foods by headspace extraction atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hurtado, P; Palmer, E; Owen, T; Aldcroft, C; Allen, M H; Jones, J; Creaser, C S; Lindley, M R; Turner, M A; Reynolds, J C

    2017-11-30

    The rapid screening of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by direct analysis has potential applications in the areas of food and flavour science. Currently, the technique of choice for VOC analysis is gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, the long chromatographic run times and elaborate sample preparation associated with this technique have led a movement towards direct analysis techniques, such as selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS), proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and electronic noses. The work presented here describes the design and construction of a Venturi jet-pump-based modification for a compact mass spectrometer which enables the direct introduction of volatiles for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Volatile organic compounds were extracted from the headspace of heated vials into the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer using a Venturi pump. Samples were analysed directly with no prior sample preparation. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to differentiate between different classes of samples. The interface is shown to be able to routinely detect problem analytes such as fatty acids and biogenic amines without the requirement of a derivatisation step, and is shown to be able to discriminate between four different varieties of cheese with good intra and inter-day reproducibility using an unsupervised PCA model. Quantitative analysis is demonstrated using indole standards with limits of detection and quantification of 0.395 μg/mL and 1.316 μg/mL, respectively. The described methodology can routinely detect highly reactive analytes such as volatile fatty acids and diamines without the need for a derivatisation step or lengthy chromatographic separations. The capability of the system was demonstrated by discriminating between different varieties of cheese and monitoring the spoilage of meats. © 2017 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass

  17. Determination of some volatile compounds in alcoholic beverage by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Feher, I.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The volatile composition of alcoholic beverage was studied by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME) method and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Some volatile compounds, such as alcohols, esters, terpenes and other are mainly responsible for the flavor of fortified wines and their amounts specify the quality of the alcoholic beverages. From this perspective it is interesting to develop a rapid, selective and sensitive analytical method suitable for simultaneous quantification of the main molecules being responsible for the organoleptic characteristic of alcoholic beverages. Vermouth fortified drink was analyzed in order to characterize the volatile profile. Using the HS-SPME/GC-MS a number of twenty-six volatile compounds from a commercial market alcoholic beverage were identified. The most abundant compounds were m-thymol, o-thymol and eugenol, alongside of the ethyl ester compounds.

  18. Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in surface waters by means of chromatographic techniques coupled to mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Carro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two analytical methods were developed to study five endocrine disrupting compounds (4-n-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol in waters. One method includes a fast liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS analysis, while the second comprise a Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE followed by a headspace derivatization and gaschromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. Passive samplers POCIS (Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers were used as sampling and preconcentration steps in order to reach the very low levels of the analytes in environmental waters. Both methods were then applied to the determination of the analytes in different water samples.

  19. EPA Method 8321B (SW-846): Solvent-Extractable Nonvolatile Compounds by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Thermospray-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-TS-MS) or Ultraviolet (UV) Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method 8321B describes procedures for preparation and analysis of solid, aqueous liquid, drinking water and wipe samples using high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for extractable non-volatile compounds.

  20. Tandem Extraction/Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Protocol for the Analysis of Acrylamide and Surfactant-related Compounds in Complex Aqueous Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of a liquid chromatography‐mass spectrometry (LC‐MS)‐based strategy for the detection and quantitation of acrylamide and surfactant‐related compounds in aqueous complex environmental samples.

  1. Temperature-dependent release of volatile organic compounds of eucalypts by direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleknia, Simin D; Vail, Teresa M; Cody, Robert B; Sparkman, David O; Bell, Tina L; Adams, Mark A

    2009-08-01

    A method is described for the rapid identification of biogenic, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants, including the analysis of the temperature dependence of those emissions. Direct analysis in real time (DART) enabled ionization of VOCs from stem and leaf of several eucalyptus species including E. cinerea, E. citriodora, E. nicholii and E. sideroxylon. Plant tissues were placed directly in the gap between the DART ionization source skimmer and the capillary inlet of the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Temperature-dependent emission of VOCs was achieved by adjusting the temperature of the helium gas into the DART ionization source at 50, 100, 200 and 300 degrees C, which enabled direct evaporation of compounds, up to the onset of pyrolysis of plant fibres (i.e. cellulose and lignin). Accurate mass measurements facilitated by TOF mass spectrometry provided elemental compositions for the VOCs. A wide range of compounds was detected from simple organic compounds (i.e. methanol and acetone) to a series of monoterpenes (i.e. pinene, camphene, cymene, eucalyptol) common to many plant species, as well as several less abundant sesquiterpenes and flavonoids (i.e. naringenin, spathulenol, eucalyptin) with antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. The leaf and stem tissues for all four eucalypt species showed similar compounds. The relative abundances of methanol and ethanol were greater in stem wood than in leaf tissue suggesting that DART could be used to investigate the tissue-specific transport and emissions of VOCs. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Application of Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization H/D-exchange Mass Spectrometry for Speciation of Sulfur-containing Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acter, Thamina; Kim, Donghwi; Ahmed, Arif; Ha, Ji-Hyoung; Kim, Sunghwan

    2017-08-01

    Herein we report the observation of atmospheric pressure in-source hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) of thiol group for the first time. The HDX for thiol group was optimized for positive atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) mass spectrometry (MS). The optimized HDX-MS was applied for 31 model compounds (thiols, thiophenes, and sulfides) to demonstrate that exchanged peaks were observed only for thiols. The optimized method has been successfully applied to the isolated fractions of sulfur-rich oil samples. The exchange of one and two thiol hydrogens with deuterium was observed in the thiol fraction; no HDX was observed in the other fractions. Thus, the results presented in this study demonstrate that the HDX-MS method using APPI ionization source can be effective for speciation of sulfur compounds. This method has the potential to be used to access corrosion problems caused by thiol-containing compounds. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Effect of Aging and Surface Interactions on the Diffusion of Endogenous Compounds in Latent Fingerprints Studied by Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kelly C; Lee, Young Jin

    2018-05-01

    The ability to determine the age of fingerprints would be immeasurably beneficial in criminal investigations. We explore the possibility of determining the age of fingerprints by analyzing various compounds as they diffuse from the ridges to the valleys of fingerprints using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging. The diffusion of two classes of endogenous fingerprint compounds, fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TGs), was studied in fresh and aged fingerprints on four surfaces. We expected higher molecular weight TGs would diffuse slower than fatty acids and allow us to determine the age of older fingerprints. However, we found interactions between endogenous compounds and the surface have a much stronger impact on diffusion than molecular weight. For example, diffusion of TGs is faster on hydrophilic plain glass or partially hydrophilic stainless steel surfaces, than on a hydrophobic Rain-x treated surface. This result further complicates utilizing a diffusion model to age fingerprints. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Estimate the Chemical Formula of Organic Compounds from Mass Spectrometry Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tigor Nauli

    2002-01-01

    Mass spectrometer is one of the analysis methods that can determine molecular weight of a substance precisely. Molecular ionic mass measured by the spectrometer represents sum of its isotopes weight with high abundance. It is not equal to the atomic weights from average total of natural isotope of elements. Therefore, a single mass measurement suffices to decide the formula of a substance. Formula determination using mass data by trial and error is a cumbersome work. An algorithm developed by Lederberg can be used to predict molecular formulas from an integer molecular weight. It will search for all linear combination of mass after the molecular weight divided by one of its isotopes weight. Selection of the right molecular formula from a list of possible formulas can be assisted by the relative abundance of its isotopes. The heavy isotopes will appear in the spectrum as small peaks at one or more unit m/z next to the parent peak. The heights of smaller peak (P M+1 , P M+2 , ... ) compared with the height of parent peak (P M ) depend on the atom and its relative heavy isotopes. Hence, the relative peak heights could designate molecular formula of the substance. A computer application will help in producing a list of all possible molecular formulas from inputs of molecular ion peak results from mass spectrometry. The program calculates relative peak heights implementing Beynon rule. The output becomes a tool for choosing the actual formula of the substance. Although the formula algorithm could be implemented in all chemical groups, the computer program is purely made for an organic substance consists of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. The computer outputs will inform the odd or even of ionic pairs and the number of bond and rings in the substance also. (author)

  5. Identification of novel synthetic organic compounds with supersonic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2004-11-26

    Several novel synthetic organic compounds were successfully analyzed with a unique type of GC-MS titled Supersonic GC-MS following a failure in their analysis with standard GC-MS. Supersonic GC-MS is based on interfacing GC and MS with a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) and on electron ionization of sample compounds as vibrationally cold molecules while in the SMB, or by cluster chemical ionization. The analyses of novel synthetic organic compounds significantly benefited from the extended range of compounds amenable to analyses with the Supersonic GC-MS. The Supersonic GC-MS enabled the analysis of thermally labile compounds that usually degrade in the GC injector, column and/or ion source. Due to the high carrier gas flow rate at the injector liner and column these compounds eluted without degradation at significantly lower elution temperatures and the use of fly-through EI ion source eliminated any sample degradation at the ion source. The cold EI feature of providing trustworthy enhanced molecular ion (M+), complemented by its optional further confirmation with cluster CI was highly valued by the synthetic organic chemists that were served by the Supersonic GC-MS. Furthermore, the provision of extended mass spectral structural, isomer and isotope information combined with short (a few minutes) GC-MS analysis times also proved beneficial for the analysis of unknown synthetic organic compounds. As a result, the synthetic organic chemists were provided with both qualitative and quantitative data on the composition of their synthetic mixture, and could better follow the path of their synthetic chemistry. Ten cases of such analyses are demonstrated in figures and discussed.

  6. Identification of new natural sweet compounds in wine using centrifugal partition chromatography-gustatometry and Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Axel; Waffo-Téguo, Pierre; Génin, Eric; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2011-12-15

    Sweetness contributes notably to the taste-balance of dry wines and increases during oak-barrel aging owing to the release of natural sweeteners from wood. The search for such taste-active molecules, which are sometimes present at very low concentrations in wine or other complex matrixes, requires both reliable purification tools and powerful identification techniques. Here, we report the development of an original inductive method using centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) and sensorial analysis. This method, called CPC-gustatometry, was implemented to isolate a sweet fraction with only four compounds from a complex oak wood extract. The recently developed Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FT-MS, Orbitrap analyzer) was used jointly with two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D (1)H and (13)C NMR) to obtain the structural elucidation of the purified compounds. The tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra obtained with resonant and nonresonant fragmentation modes were compared, thus providing complementary information about the molecular structure. Two oleanane-type triterpenoids substituted with galloyl and glucosyl moieties were identified, one of which exhibits sweet properties. We term these compounds which have never been reported, Quercotriterpenoside I and II.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Imaging of low Molecular Weight Compounds in Garlic (Allium sativum L.) with Gold Nanoparticle Enhanced Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorek, Maria; Sekuła, Justyna; Ruman, Tomasz

    2017-11-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is the subject of many studies due to its numerous beneficial properties. Although compounds of garlic have been studied by various analytical methods, their tissue distributions are still unclear. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) appears to be a very powerful tool for the identification of the localisation of compounds within a garlic clove. Visualisation of the spatial distribution of garlic low-molecular weight compounds with nanoparticle-based MSI. Compounds occurring on the cross-section of sprouted garlic has been transferred to gold-nanoparticle enhanced target (AuNPET) by imprinting. The imprint was then subjected to MSI analysis. The results suggest that low molecular weight compounds, such as amino acids, dipeptides, fatty acids, organosulphur and organoselenium compounds are distributed within the garlic clove in a characteristic manner. It can be connected with their biological functions and metabolic properties in the plant. New methodology for the visualisation of low molecular weight compounds allowed a correlation to be made between their spatial distribution within a sprouted garlic clove and their biological function. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air.

  9. Capture compound mass spectrometry sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of liver toxicity of two Parkinson drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jenny J; Michaelis, Simon; Schrey, Anna K; Graebner, Olivia Graebner nee; Glinski, Mirko; Dreger, Mathias; Kroll, Friedrich; Koester, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Capture compound mass spectrometry (CCMS) is a novel technology that helps understand the molecular mechanism of the mode of action of small molecules. The Capture Compounds are trifunctional probes: A selectivity function (the drug) interacts with the proteins in a biological sample, a reactivity function (phenylazide) irreversibly forms a covalent bond, and a sorting function (biotin) allows the captured protein(s) to be isolated for mass spectrometric analysis. Tolcapone and entacapone are potent inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. We aimed to understand the molecular basis of the difference of both drugs with respect to side effects. Using Capture Compounds with these drugs as selectivity functions, we were able to unambiguously and reproducibly isolate and identify their known target COMT. Tolcapone Capture Compounds captured five times more proteins than entacapone Capture Compounds. Moreover, tolcapone Capture Compounds isolated mitochondrial and peroxisomal proteins. The major tolcapone-protein interactions occurred with components of the respiratory chain and of the fatty acid beta-oxidation. Previously reported symptoms in tolcapone-treated rats suggested that tolcapone might act as decoupling reagent of the respiratory chain (Haasio et al., 2002b). Our results demonstrate that CCMS is an effective tool for the identification of a drug's potential off targets. It fills a gap in currently used in vitro screens for drug profiling that do not contain all the toxicologically relevant proteins. Thereby, CCMS has the potential to fill a technological need in drug safety assessment and helps reengineer or to reject drugs at an early preclinical stage.

  10. Identifying the related compounds using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry: bromotyrosine alkaloids from marine sponge Psammaplysilla purpurea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tilvi, S.; DeSouza, L.

    electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). This sponge has tremendous chemical diversity of bromotyrosine alkaloids. Here we have used the proteomics approach in identifying related bromotyrosine alkaloids based on the predicated mass...

  11. Quantification of character-impacting compounds in Ocimum basilicum and 'Pesto alla Genovese' with selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadei, Gianluca; Ross, Brian M

    2012-02-15

    Basil (Ocimum basilicum) is an important flavourant plant which constitutes the major ingredient of the pasta sauce 'Pesto alla Genovese'. The characteristic smell of basil stems mainly from a handful of terpenoids (methyl cinnamate, eucalyptol, linalool and estragole), the concentration of which varies according to basil cultivars. The simple and rapid analysis of the terpenoid constituents of basil would be useful as a means to optimise harvesting times and to act as a quality control process for basil-containing foodstuffs. Classical analytical techniques such as gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) are, however, slow, technically demanding and therefore less suitable for routine analysis. A new chemical ionisation technique which allows real-time quantification of traces gases, Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS), was therefore utilised to determine its usefulness for the assay of terpenoid concentrations in basil and pesto sauce headspace. Trace gas analysis was performed using the NO(+) precursor ion which minimised interference from other compounds. Character-impacting compound concentration was measured in basil headspace with good reproducibility and statistically significant differences were observed between cultivars. Quantification of linalool in pesto sauce headspace proved more difficult due to the presence of interfering compounds. This was resolved by careful selection of reaction product ions which allowed us to detect differences between various commercial brands of pesto. We conclude that SIFT-MS may be a valid tool for the fast and reproducible analysis of flavourant terpenoids in basil and basil-derived foodstuffs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in plastic products using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerlis Pajaro-Castro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plastic materials are widely used in daily life. They contain a wide range of compounds with low molecular mass, including monomeric and oligomeric residues of polymerization, solvent-related chemicals residues, and various additives. Plastic products made of expanded polystyrene (EPS are currently employed as food containers. This study therefore sought to identify volatile organic compounds released by EPS from food packages and utensils used in Cartagena, Colombia. EPS-based plates, food and soup containers were subjected to various temperatures and released chemicals captured by solid phase microextraction, followed by on-column thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. The results revealed the presence of at least 30 different compounds in the EPS-based products examined; the most frequently found were benzaldehyde, styrene, ethylbenzene and tetradecane. The release of these molecules was temperature-dependent. It is therefore advisable to regulate the use of EPS products which may be subjected to heating in order to protect human health by decreasing the exposure to these chemicals.

  13. Determination of heat purgeable and ambient purgeable volatile organic compounds in water by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Donna L.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Murtagh, Lucinda K.

    2016-09-08

    Two new analytical methods have been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) that allow the determination of 37 heat purgeable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (USGS Method O-4437-16 [NWQL Laboratory Schedule (LS) 4437]) and 49 ambient purgeable VOCs (USGS Method O-4436-16 [NWQL LS 4436]) in unfiltered water. This report documents the procedures and initial performance of both methods. The compounds chosen for inclusion in the methods were determined as having high priority by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Both methods use a purge-and-trap technique with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The compounds are extracted from the sample by bubbling helium through a 25-milliliter sample. For the polar and less volatile compounds, the sample is heated at 60 degrees Celsius, whereas the less polar and more volatile compounds are purged using a separate analytical procedure at ambient temperature. The compounds are trapped on a sorbent trap, desorbed into a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer for separation, and then identified and quantified. Sample preservation is recommended for both methods by adding a 1:1 solution of hydrochloric acid (HCl [1:1]) to water samples to adjust the pH to 2. Analysis within 14 days from sampling is recommended.The heat purgeable method (USGS Method O-4437-16) operates with the mass spectrometer in the simultaneous full scan/selected ion monitoring mode. This method supersedes USGS Method O-4024-03 (NWQL LS 4024). Method detection limits (MDLs) for fumigant compounds 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, chloropicrin, and 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane range from 0.002 to 0.010 microgram per liter (µg/L). The MDLs for all remaining heat purgeable VOCs range from 0.006 µg/L for tert-butyl methyl ether to 3 µg/L for alpha-terpineol. Calculated holding times indicate that 36 of the 37 heat purgeable VOCs are stable for a minimum of 14 days

  14. High-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino and ureido compounds using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruo-Jing; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Qi, Wan-Shu; Guan, Qing; Sun, Tuan-Qi; Guo, Yin-Long

    2017-04-08

    The present work focused on the high-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino compounds (GCs) and ureido compounds (UCs) in human thyroid tissues. The strategy employed benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling (BRSIL) for the sample preparation and then detection using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS). A short reversed-phase LC realized an on-line desalting and a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. DTIMS separation enhanced the better specificity and selectivity for the benzil labeled GCs and UCs. The elevated mass resolution of QTOF MS enabled measure of the characteristic ions at accurate mass in MS and tandem MS spectra. Collision cross section (CCS) from DTIMS and accurate mass from QTOF MS were used as two qualifiers for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. In addition, an integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (retention time, drift time, m/z) was applied to quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. The quantitative validation indicated good linearity (coefficient values ≥ 0.9981), good precision (1.0%-12.3% for intra-day and 0.9%-7.8% for inter-day) and good accuracy (91%-109%). The results demonstrated that the developed BRSIL coupled with LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS can be a powerful analysis platform to investigate GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of Extraction Methods for the Analysis of Perfluorinated Compounds in Leather with High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Youchao; Tang, Chuanjiang; Nie, Jingmei; Xu, Chengtao

    2018-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), used to provide water, oil, grease, heat and stain repellency to a range of textile and other products, have been found to be persistent in the environment and are associated with adverse effects on humans and wildlife. This study presents the development and validation of an analytical method to determine the simultaneous presence of eleven PFCs in leather using solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The perfluorinated compounds were primarily extracted from the samples by a liquid extraction procedure by ultrasonic, in which the parameters were optimized. Then the solid-phase extraction (SPE) is the most important advantages of the developed methodology. The sample volume and elution conditions were optimized by means of an experimental design. The proposed method was applied to determine the PFCs in leather, where the detection limits of the eleven compounds were 0.09-0.96 ng/L, and the recoveries of all compounds spiked at 5 ng/L concentration level were in the range of 65-96%, with a better RSD lower than 19% (n = 7).

  16. Assessing the sensitivity of benzene cluster cation chemical ionization mass spectrometry toward a wide array of biogenic volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Avi; Vermeuel, Michael; Novak, Gordon; Bertram, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry is a real-time, sensitive and selective measurement technique for the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The benefits of CIMS technology make it highly suitable for field measurements that requires fast (10Hz and higher) response rates, such as the study of surface-atmosphere exchange processes by the eddy covariance method. The use of benzene cluster cations as a regent ion was previously demonstrated as a sensitive and selective method for the detection of select biogenic VOCs (e.g. isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) [Kim et al., 2016; Leibrock and Huey, 2000]. Quantitative analysis of atmospheric trace gases necessitates calibration for each analyte as a function of atmospheric conditions. We describe a custom designed calibration system, based on liquid evaporation, for determination of the sensitivity of the benzene-CIMS to a wide range of organic compounds at atmospherically relevant mixing ratios (volatile organic compounds, Atmos Meas Tech, 9(4), 1473-1484, doi:10.5194/amt-9-1473-2016. Leibrock, E., and L. G. Huey (2000), Ion chemistry for the detection of isoprene and other volatile organic compounds in ambient air, Geophys Res Lett, 27(12), 1719-1722, doi:Doi 10.1029/1999gl010804.

  17. Glycomics using mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays an increasingly important role in structural glycomics. This review provides an overview on currently used mass spectrometric approaches such as the characterization of glycans, the analysis of glycopeptides obtained by proteolytic cleavage of proteins and the analysis of glycosphingolipids. The given examples are demonstrating the application of mass spectrometry to study glycosylation changes associated with congenital disorders of glycosylation, lysosomal storage di...

  18. Optimization of a Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for High-Throughput Analysis of Nicotine and Related Compounds: Application to Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Jorge; Giri, Anupam; Wenzl, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    Fast market penetration of electronic cigarettes is leading to an exponentially growing number of electronic refill liquids with different nicotine contents and an endless list of flavors. Therefore, rapid and simple methods allowing a fast screening of these products are necessary to detect harmful substances which can negatively impact the health of consumers. In this regard, the present work explores the capabilities of differential ion mobility spectrometry coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for high-throughput analysis of nicotine and 11 related compounds in commercial refill liquids for electronic cigarettes. The influence of main factors affecting the ion mobility separation, such as modifier types and concentration, separation voltage, and temperature, was systematically investigated. Despite small molecular weight differences among the studied compounds, a good separation was achieved in the ion mobility cell under the optimized conditions, which involved the use of ethanol as a polar gas-phase chemical modifier. Indeed, differential ion mobility was able to resolve (resolution >4) nicotine from its structural isomer anabasine without the use of any chromatographic separation. The quantitative performance of the proposed method was then evaluated, showing satisfactory precision (RSD ≤ 16%) and recoveries ranging from 85 to 100% for nicotine, and from 84 to 126% for the rest of the target analytes. Several commercial electronic cigarette refill liquids were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the method. In some cases, significant differences were found between labeled and measured levels of nicotine. Anatabine, cotinine, myosmine, and nornicotine were also found in some of the analyzed samples.

  19. Full evaporation dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for uniform enrichment of odor compounds in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    A method for analysis of a wide range of odor compounds in aqueous samples at sub-ng mL⁻¹ to μg mL⁻¹ levels was developed by full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compared to conventional DHS and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), FEDHS provides more uniform enrichment over the entire polarity range for odor compounds in aqueous samples. FEDHS at 80°C using 3 L of purge gas allows complete vaporization of 100 μL of an aqueous sample, and trapping and drying it in an adsorbent packed tube, while providing high recoveries (85-103%) of the 18 model odor compounds (water solubility at 25°C: log0.54-5.65 mg L⁻¹, vapor pressure at 25°C: 0.011-3.2 mm Hg) and leaving most of the low volatile matrix behind. The FEDHS-GC-MS method showed good linearity (r²>0.9909) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.21-5.2 ng mL⁻¹) for the model compounds even with the scan mode in the conventional MS. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analyses of key odor compounds including hydrophilic and less volatile characteristics in beverages (whiskey and green tea). In a single malt whiskey sample, phenolic compounds including vanillin could be determined in the range of 0.92-5.1 μg mL⁻¹ (RSDfuraneol, indole, maltol, and pyrazine congeners) were determined in the range of 0.21-110 ng mL⁻¹ (RSD<10%, n=6). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of quaternary ammonium compounds in seawater samples by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassarab, P; Williams, D; Dean, J R; Ludkin, E; Perry, J J

    2011-02-04

    A method for the simultaneous determination of two biocidal quaternary ammonium compounds; didecyldimethylammonium chloride (didecyldimethyl quat) and dodecylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride (benzyl quat), in seawater by solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was developed. The optimised procedure utilised off-line extraction of the analytes from seawater using polymeric (Strata-X) SPE cartridges. Recoveries ranged from 80 to 105%, with detection limits at the low parts-per-trillion (ng/l) level for both analytes. To demonstrate sensitivity, environmental concentrations were measured at three different locations along the North East coast of England with measured values in the range 120-270ng/l. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Purification and Quantification of an Isomeric Compound in a Mixture by Collisional Excitation in Multistage Mass Spectrometry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanne Dit Fouque, Dany; Maroto, Alicia; Memboeuf, Antony

    2016-11-15

    The differentiation, characterization, and quantification of isomers and/or isobars in mixtures is a recurrent problem in mass spectrometry and more generally in analytical chemistry. Here we present a new strategy to assess the purity of a compound that is susceptible to be contaminated with another isomeric side-product in trace levels. Providing one of the isomers is available as pure sample, this new strategy allows the detection of isomeric contamination. This is done thanks to a "gas-phase collisional purification" inside an ion trap mass spectrometer paving the way for an improved analysis of at least similar samples. This strategy consists in using collision induced dissociation (CID) multistage mass spectrometry (MS 2 and MS 3 ) experiments and the survival yield (SY) technique. It has been successfully applied to mixtures of cyclic poly( L -lactide) (PLA) with increasing amounts of its linear topological isomer. Purification in gas phase of PLA mixtures was established based on SY curves obtained in MS 3 mode: all samples gave rise to the same SY curve corresponding then to the pure cyclic component. This new strategy was sensitive enough to detect traces of linear PLA (<3%) in a sample of cyclic PLA that was supposedly pure according to other characterization techniques ( 1 H NMR, MALDI-HRMS, and size-exclusion chromatography). Moreover, in this case, the presence of linear isomer was undetectable according to MS/MS or MS/MS/MS analysis only as fragment ions are also of the same m/z values. This type of approach could easily be implemented in hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques to improve the structural and quantitative analysis of complex samples.

  2. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  3. Determination of Volatile Compounds in Four Commercial Samples of Japanese Green Algae Using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Yamamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS, has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera, Tokushima (Ulva prolifera, and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza. Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera. Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum. Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings.

  4. Determination of volatile compounds in four commercial samples of Japanese green algae using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Baldermann, Susanne; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings.

  5. Direct sample introduction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of haloanisole compounds in cork stoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, J I; Nicolás, J; Viñas, P; Campillo, N; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2016-12-02

    A solventless analytical method is proposed for analyzing the compounds responsible for cork taint in cork stoppers. Direct sample introduction (DSI) is evaluated as a sample introduction system for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) determination of four haloanisoles (HAs) in cork samples. Several parameters affecting the DSI step, including desorption temperature and time, gas flow rate and other focusing parameters, were optimized using univariate and multivariate approaches. The proposed method shows high sensitivity and minimises sample handling, with detection limits of 1.6-2.6ngg -1 , depending on the compound. The suitability of the optimized procedure as a screening method was evaluated by obtaining decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) for each analyte, which were found to be in 6.9-11.8 and 8.7-14.8ngg -1 , respectively, depending on the compound. Twenty-four cork samples were analysed, and 2,4,6-trichloroanisole was found in four of them at levels between 12.6 and 53ngg -1 . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with in-source atmospheric pressure ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for compound speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunju; Choi, Man-Ho; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-04-29

    An experimental setup for the speciation of compounds by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) with atmospheric pressure ionization while performing chromatographic separation is presented. The proposed experimental setup combines the high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) system that can be readily used as an inlet for mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) HDX. This combination overcomes the limitation of an approach using conventional liquid chromatography (LC) by minimizing the amount of deuterium solvents used for separation. In the SFC separation, supercritical CO2 was used as a major component of the mobile phase, and methanol was used as a minor co-solvent. By using deuterated methanol (CH3OD), AP HDX was achieved during SFC separation. To prove the concept, thirty one nitrogen- and/or oxygen-containing standard compounds were analyzed by SFC-AP HDX MS. The compounds were successfully speciated from the obtained SFC-MS spectra. The exchange ions were observed with as low as 1% of CH3OD in the mobile phase, and separation could be performed within approximately 20min using approximately 0.24 mL of CH3OD. The results showed that SFC separation and APPI/APCI HDX could be successfully performed using the suggested method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of pharmaceutical and other organic wastewater compounds in filtered and unfiltered water samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Smith, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effects of exposure of stream biota to complex mixtures of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds associated with wastewater requires the development of additional analytical capabilities for these compounds in water samples. Two gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analytical methods used at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to analyze organic compounds associated with wastewater were adapted to include additional pharmaceutical and other organic compounds beginning in 2009. This report includes a description of method performance for 42 additional compounds for the filtered-water method (hereafter referred to as the filtered method) and 46 additional compounds for the unfiltered-water method (hereafter referred to as the unfiltered method). The method performance for the filtered method described in this report has been published for seven of these compounds; however, the addition of several other compounds to the filtered method and the addition of the compounds to the unfiltered method resulted in the need to document method performance for both of the modified methods. Most of these added compounds are pharmaceuticals or pharmaceutical degradates, although two nonpharmaceutical compounds are included in each method. The main pharmaceutical compound classes added to the two modified methods include muscle relaxants, opiates, analgesics, and sedatives. These types of compounds were added to the original filtered and unfiltered methods largely in response to the tentative identification of a wide range of pharmaceutical and other organic compounds in samples collected from wastewater-treatment plants. Filtered water samples are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Unfiltered samples are extracted by using continuous liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. The compounds of interest for filtered and unfiltered sample

  8. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  9. Atomic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1997-01-01

    The elemental inorganic analysis seems to be dominated today by techniques based on atomic spectrometry. After an evaluation of advantages and limitations of using mass analysers (ion detectors) versus conventional photomultipliers (photon detector) a brief review of the more popular techniques of the emerging Atomic Mass spectrometry is carried out. Their huge potential for inorganic trace analysis is such that in the future we could well witness how this end of the century and millennium marked the fall of the photons empire in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry. (Author)

  10. Chromatography and mass spectrometry of chemical warfare agents, toxins and related compounds: state of the art and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kientz, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    Methods for the identification of chemical warfare agents, toxins, bioregulators and related products are frequently reported in literature. These methods are often based on instrumental analysis using chromatography (gas and liquid) and mass spectrometry. Here, these instrumental techniques are

  11. High-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino and ureido compounds using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Ruo-Jing; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Qi, Wan-Shu; Guan, Qing; Sun, Tuan-Qi; Guo, Yin-Long

    2017-01-01

    The present work focused on the high-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino compounds (GCs) and ureido compounds (UCs) in human thyroid tissues. The strategy employed benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling (BRSIL) for the sample preparation and then detection using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS). A short reversed-phase LC realized an on-line desalting and a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. DTIMS separation enhanced the better specificity and selectivity for the benzil labeled GCs and UCs. The elevated mass resolution of QTOF MS enabled measure of the characteristic ions at accurate mass in MS and tandem MS spectra. Collision cross section (CCS) from DTIMS and accurate mass from QTOF MS were used as two qualifiers for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. In addition, an integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (retention time, drift time, m/z) was applied to quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. The quantitative validation indicated good linearity (coefficient values ≥ 0.9981), good precision (1.0%–12.3% for intra-day and 0.9%–7.8% for inter-day) and good accuracy (91%–109%). The results demonstrated that the developed BRSIL coupled with LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS can be a powerful analysis platform to investigate GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. - Highlights: • The separation power of DTIMS-MS enhanced peak capacity, spectral clarity, and specificity of benzil labeled GCs and UCs. • Short-column LC for on-line desalting increased the throughput with a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. • CCS and accurate mass as a pair of qualifiers were used for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. • An integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (RT, DT, m/z) was used as a novel quantifier for quantitation. • The developed method was applied to screen and quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues.

  12. High-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino and ureido compounds using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ruo-Jing [National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhang, Fang, E-mail: fzhang@sioc.ac.cn [National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, Xiu-Ping; Qi, Wan-Shu [National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Guan, Qing [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Sun, Tuan-Qi, E-mail: tuanqisun@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Guo, Yin-Long, E-mail: ylguo@sioc.ac.cn [National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2017-04-08

    The present work focused on the high-throughput screening and quantitation of guanidino compounds (GCs) and ureido compounds (UCs) in human thyroid tissues. The strategy employed benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling (BRSIL) for the sample preparation and then detection using liquid chromatography-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS). A short reversed-phase LC realized an on-line desalting and a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. DTIMS separation enhanced the better specificity and selectivity for the benzil labeled GCs and UCs. The elevated mass resolution of QTOF MS enabled measure of the characteristic ions at accurate mass in MS and tandem MS spectra. Collision cross section (CCS) from DTIMS and accurate mass from QTOF MS were used as two qualifiers for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. In addition, an integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (retention time, drift time, m/z) was applied to quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. The quantitative validation indicated good linearity (coefficient values ≥ 0.9981), good precision (1.0%–12.3% for intra-day and 0.9%–7.8% for inter-day) and good accuracy (91%–109%). The results demonstrated that the developed BRSIL coupled with LC-DTIMS-QTOF MS can be a powerful analysis platform to investigate GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues. - Highlights: • The separation power of DTIMS-MS enhanced peak capacity, spectral clarity, and specificity of benzil labeled GCs and UCs. • Short-column LC for on-line desalting increased the throughput with a measurement cycle of 5.0 min. • CCS and accurate mass as a pair of qualifiers were used for the profiling and identification of GCs and UCs. • An integral abundance arising from 3-D ion features (RT, DT, m/z) was used as a novel quantifier for quantitation. • The developed method was applied to screen and quantify the GCs and UCs in human thyroid tissues.

  13. Determination of naphthalene-derived compounds in apples by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, X; Moyano, E; Cosialls, J R; Galceran, M T

    2013-06-11

    Naphthylacetic acid, naphthyloxy acetic acid and naphthylacetamide belong to a group of synthetic substances known as "auxin-like" compounds which are used as growth regulators in vegetables and fruits due to their structure similarities with the indoleacetic acid, the most important plant auxin. This paper reports a selective, sensitive and fast ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of naphthylacetamide (NAD) and the isomers (α and β) of naphthylacetic acid (NAA) and naphthyloxy acetic (NOA) acid in apple samples. A baseline separation between the respective isomers was achieved using an RP-Amide column with gradient elution. The UHPLC-MS/MS method developed, using electrospray and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition mode led to a reliable determination of these family of compounds in apple samples at low quantitation levels, down to 1.0 μg kg(-1) and 0.25 μg kg(-1) respectively. For confirmation of NAA accurate mass measurement is proposed giving at these conditions quantitation limits of 10 μg kg(-1) for this compound. The UHPLC-MS/MS method developed was used for the analysis of apple samples harvested in three different apple fields from Lleida (Spain) during the blooming period. NAD and NAA were found in samples collected during 4-5 weeks after application at concentrations between the quantification limits and 43 μg kg(-1) and 24 μg kg(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Liquid separation techniques coupled with mass spectrometry for chiral analysis of pharmaceuticals compounds and their metabolites in biological fluids.

    OpenAIRE

    Erny, Guillaume L.; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    Determination of the chiral composition of drugs is nowadays a key step in order to determine purity, activity, bioavailability, biodegradation, etc, of pharmaceuticals. In this manuscript, works published for the last 5 years on the analysis of chiral drugs by liquid separation techniques coupled with mass spectrometry are reviewed. Namely, chiral analysis of pharmaceuticals including e.g., antiinflammatories, antihypertensives, relaxants, etc, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and ...

  15. Standard test method for determination of impurities in nuclear grade uranium compounds by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of 67 elements in uranium dioxide samples and nuclear grade uranium compounds and solutions without matrix separation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elements are listed in Table 1. These elements can also be determined in uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), uranium hexafluoride (UF6), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and uranium trioxide (UO3) if these compounds are treated and converted to the same uranium concentration solution. 1.2 The elements boron, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and iron can be determined using different techniques. The analyst's instrumentation will determine which procedure is chosen for the analysis. 1.3 The test method for technetium-99 is given in Annex A1. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish ...

  16. Argon direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry in conjunction with makeup solvents: a method for analysis of labile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongmei; Wan, Debin; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2013-02-05

    Helium direct analysis in real time (He-DART) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of labile compounds usually tends to be challenging because of the occurrence of prominent fragmentation, which obscures the assigning of an ion to an independent species or merely a fragment in a mixture. In the present work, argon DART (Ar-DART) MS in conjunction with makeup solvents has been demonstrated to analyze a variety of labile compounds including nucleosides, alkaloids, glucose, and other small molecules. The results presented here confirm that Ar-DART can generate significantly less energetic ions than conventional He-DART and is able to produce the intact molecular ions with little or no fragmentation in both positive and negative ion modes. Adding a makeup solvent (absolute ethyl alcohol, methanol, fluorobenzene, or acetone) to the argon gas stream at the exit of the DART ion source can result in 1-2 orders of magnitude increase in detection signals. The sensitivity attainable by Ar-DART was found to be comparable to that by He-DART. The investigation of influence of solvents improves our understanding of the fundamental desorption and ionization processes in DART. The practical application of this rapid and high throughput method is demonstrated by the successful analysis of a natural product (Crude Kusnezoff Monkshood) extract, demonstrating the great potential in mixture research.

  17. Sensitive electrospray mass spectrometry analysis of one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries labeled by quaternary ammonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąchor, Remigiusz; Cydzik, Marzena; Rudowska, Magdalena; Kluczyk, Alicja; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2012-08-01

    A rapid and straightforward method for high-throughput analysis of single resin beads from one-bead-one-compound combinatorial libraries with high resolution electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS/MS) is presented. The application of an efficient method of peptide derivatization by quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) formation increases ionization efficiency and reduces the detection limit, allowing analysis of trace amounts of compounds by ESI-MS. Peptides, synthesized on solid support, contain a new cleavable linker composed of a Peg spacer (9-aza-3,6,12,15-tetraoxa-10-on-heptadecanoic acid), lysine with ɛ-amino group marked by the N,N,N-triethylglycine salt, and methionine, which makes possible the selective cleavage by cyanogen bromide. Even a small portion of peptides derivatized by QAS cleaved from a single resin bead is sufficient for sequencing by HR ESI-MS/MS experiments. The developed strategy was applied to a small training library of α chymotrypsin substrates. The obtained results confirm the applicability of the proposed method in combinatorial chemistry.

  18. Air and Surface Sampling Method for Assessing Exposures to Quaternary Ammonium Compounds Using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBouf, Ryan F; Virji, Mohammed Abbas; Ranpara, Anand; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B

    2017-07-01

    This method was designed for sampling select quaternary ammonium (quat) compounds in air or on surfaces followed by analysis using ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Target quats were benzethonium chloride, didecyldimethylammonium bromide, benzyldimethyldodecylammonium chloride, benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride, and benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium chloride. For air sampling, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters are recommended for 15-min to 24-hour sampling. For surface sampling, Pro-wipe® 880 (PW) media was chosen. Samples were extracted in 60:40 acetonitrile:0.1% formic acid for 1 hour on an orbital shaker. Method detection limits range from 0.3 to 2 ng/ml depending on media and analyte. Matrix effects of media are minimized through the use of multiple reaction monitoring versus selected ion recording. Upper confidence limits on accuracy meet the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 25% criterion for PTFE and PW media for all analytes. Using PTFE and PW analyzed with multiple reaction monitoring, the method quantifies levels among the different quats compounds with high precision (detection limits to capture quats on air sampling filters with only a 15-min sample duration with a maximum assessed storage time of 103 days before sample extraction. This method will support future exposure assessment and quantitative epidemiologic studies to explore exposure-response relationships and establish levels of quats exposures associated with adverse health effects. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  19. An improved, automated whole air sampler and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis system for volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Brian M.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Goldan, Paul D.; Graus, Martin; Hendershot, Roger; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel A.; Koss, Abigail; Kuster, William C.; Lueb, Richard A.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Peischl, Jeff; Sueper, Donna; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Tokarek, Travis W.; Warneke, Carsten; Yuan, Bin; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were quantified during two aircraft-based field campaigns using highly automated, whole air samplers with expedited post-flight analysis via a new custom-built, field-deployable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrument. During flight, air samples were pressurized with a stainless steel bellows compressor into electropolished stainless steel canisters. The air samples were analyzed using a novel gas chromatograph system designed specifically for field use which eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. Instead, a Stirling cooler is used for cryogenic sample pre-concentration at temperatures as low as -165 °C. The analysis system was fully automated on a 20 min cycle to allow for unattended processing of an entire flight of 72 sample canisters within 30 h, thereby reducing typical sample residence times in the canisters to less than 3 days. The new analytical system is capable of quantifying a wide suite of C2 to C10 organic compounds at part-per-trillion sensitivity. This paper describes the sampling and analysis systems, along with the data analysis procedures which include a new peak-fitting software package for rapid chromatographic data reduction. Instrument sensitivities, uncertainties and system artifacts are presented for 35 trace gas species in canister samples. Comparisons of reported mixing ratios from each field campaign with measurements from other instruments are also presented.

  20. Comparison of two common adsorption materials for thermal desorption gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of biogenic volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcillo, Andrea; Jakimovska, Viktorija; Widdig, Anja; Birkemeyer, Claudia

    2017-09-08

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are commonly collected from gaseous samples by adsorption to materials such as the porous polymer Tenax TA. Adsorbed compounds are subsequently released from these materials by thermal desorption (TD) and separated then by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization (FID) or mass spectrometry (MS) detection. Tenax TA is known to be particularly suitable for non-polar to semipolar volatiles, however, many volatiles from environmental and biological samples possess a rather polar character. Therefore, we tested if the polymer XAD-2, which so far is widely used to adsorb organic compounds from aqueous and organic solvents, could provide a broader coverage for (semi)polar VOCs during gas-phase sampling. Mixtures of volatile compounds covering a wide range of volatility (bp. 20-256°C) and different chemical classes were introduced by liquid spiking into sorbent tubes with one of the two porous polymers, Tenax TA or XAD-2, and analyzed by TD/GC-MS. At first, an internal standard mixture composed of 17 authentic standards was used to optimize desorption temperature with respect to sorbent degradation and loading time for calibration. Secondly, we tested the detectability of a complex standard mixture composed of 57 volatiles, most of them common constituents of the body odor of mammals. Moreover, the performance of XAD-2 compared with Tenax TA was assessed as limit of quantitation and linearity for the internal standard mixture and 33 compounds from the complex standard mixture. Volatiles were analyzed in a range between 0.01-∼250ng/tube depending on the compound and material. Lower limits of quantitation were between 0.01 and 3 ng±0.9). Interestingly, we found different kinetics for compound adsorption with XAD-2, and a partially better sensitivity in comparison with Tenax TA. For these analytes, XAD-2 might be recommended as an alternative of Tenax TA for TD/GC-MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of Umami Compounds by Ion-Pair Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulier, L.; Bas, R.; Hekman, M.; Werff, B.J.C. van der; Burgering, M.; Thissen, U.

    2011-01-01

    An ion-pair LC-ESI-MS method was developed capable of analyzing various reported umami or umami-enhancing compounds, including glutamic acid and 5'-ribonucleotides. The method was validated using tomato and potato samples and showed overall good analytical performance with respect to selectivity,

  2. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  3. Chapter 3. Determination of semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Burbank, Teresa L.; Olson, Mary C.; Iverson, Jana L.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 38 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semivolatile organic compounds in solid samples is described. Samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from the solid sample twice at 13,800 kilopascals; first at 120 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (50:50, volume-to-volume ratio), and then the sample is extracted at 200 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio). The compounds are isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing divinylbenzene-vinylpyrrolidone copolymer resin. The cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted from the SPE material using a dichloromethane/diethyl ether mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio) and passed through a sodium sulfate/Florisil SPE cartridge to remove residual water and to further clean up the extract. The concentrated extract is solvent exchanged into ethyl acetate and the solvent volume reduced to 0.5 milliliter. Internal standard compounds are added prior to analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Comparisons of PAH data for 28 sediment samples extracted by Soxhlet and the accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) method described in this report produced similar results. Extraction of PAH compounds from standard reference material using this method also compared favorably with Soxhlet extraction. The recoveries of PAHs less than molecular weight 202 (pyrene or fluoranthene) are higher by up to 20 percent using this ASE method, whereas the recoveries of PAHs greater than or equal to molecular weight 202 are equivalent. This ASE method of sample extraction of solids has advantages over conventional Soxhlet extraction by increasing automation of the extraction process, reducing extraction time, and using less solvent. Extract cleanup also is greatly simplified because SPE replaces

  4. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the identification of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from coniferous forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallio, M.; Jussila, M.; Rissanen, T.; Anttila, P.; Hartonen, K.; Reissell, A.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Adahchour, M.; Hyotylainen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOF-MS) was applied in the identification of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from coniferous forest. The samples were collected at Hyytiälä, Finland, as part of the QUEST campaign, in

  5. Analysis of carotenoid compounds in aphids by Raman imaging and mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Pierre Brat, Jean Christophe Valmalette, Christian Mertz, George de Sousa, Aviv Dombrovsky, Maria Capovilla & Alain Robichon ### Abstract Carotenoids are compounds synthesized in plants, bacteria and fungi, closely associated to the chlorophyll to perform photosynthesis. A spectacular evolutionary achievement allowed the aphid to produce carotenoids obviously by lateral transfer of genes from fungi. We have recently documented that these molecules are involved in photo condi...

  6. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction – Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Fortner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs were measured by proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry (PTR-MS on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of the Megacity Initiative – Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO 2006 field campaign. Thirty eight individual masses were monitored during the campaign and many species were quantified including methanol, acetaldehyde, toluene, the sum of C2 benzenes, the sum of C3 benzenes, acetone, isoprene, benzene, and ethyl acetate. The VOC measurements were analyzed to gain a better understanding of the type of VOCs present in the MCMA, their diurnal patterns, and their origins. Diurnal profiles of weekday and weekend/holiday aromatic VOC concentrations showed the influence of vehicular traffic during the morning rush hours and during the afternoon hours. Plumes including elevated toluene as high as 216 parts per billion (ppb and ethyl acetate as high as 183 ppb were frequently observed during the late night and early morning hours, indicating the possibility of significant industrial sources of the two compounds in the region. Wind fields during those peak episodes revealed no specific direction for the majority of the toluene plumes but the ethyl acetate plumes arrived at the site when winds were from the Southwest or West. The PTR-MS measurements combined with other VOC measuring techniques at the field site as well as VOC measurements conducted in other areas of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA will help to develop a better understanding of the spatial pattern of VOCs and its variability in the MCMA.

  7. High-Throughput Screening and Quantitation of Target Compounds in Biofluids by Coated Blade Spray-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tascon, Marcos; Gómez-Ríos, Germán Augusto; Reyes-Garcés, Nathaly; Poole, Justen; Boyacı, Ezel; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2017-08-15

    Most contemporary methods of screening and quantitating controlled substances and therapeutic drugs in biofluids typically require laborious, time-consuming, and expensive analytical workflows. In recent years, our group has worked toward developing microextraction (μe)-mass spectrometry (MS) technologies that merge all of the tedious steps of the classical methods into a simple, efficient, and low-cost methodology. Unquestionably, the automation of these technologies allows for faster sample throughput, greater reproducibility, and radically reduced analysis times. Coated blade spray (CBS) is a μe technology engineered for extracting/enriching analytes of interest in complex matrices, and it can be directly coupled with MS instruments to achieve efficient screening and quantitative analysis. In this study, we introduced CBS as a technology that can be arranged to perform either rapid diagnostics (single vial) or the high-throughput (96-well plate) analysis of biofluids. Furthermore, we demonstrate that performing 96-CBS extractions at the same time allows the total analysis time to be reduced to less than 55 s per sample. Aiming to validate the versatility of CBS, substances comprising a broad range of molecular weights, moieties, protein binding, and polarities were selected. Thus, the high-throughput (HT)-CBS technology was used for the concomitant quantitation of 18 compounds (mixture of anabolics, β-2 agonists, diuretics, stimulants, narcotics, and β-blockers) spiked in human urine and plasma samples. Excellent precision (∼2.5%), accuracy (≥90%), and linearity (R 2 ≥ 0.99) were attained for all the studied compounds, and the limits of quantitation (LOQs) were within the range of 0.1 to 10 ng·mL -1 for plasma and 0.25 to 10 ng·mL -1 for urine. The results reported in this paper confirm CBS's great potential for achieving subsixty-second analyses of target compounds in a broad range of fields such as those related to clinical diagnosis, food, the

  8. PhosProtect - a novel and superior compound to tag and protect phospho-groups during mass spectrometry based phospho-proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Value Proposition The PhosProtect compound alone (developed and tested, IP secured)* • protects phospho-groups during tandem mass spectrometry, thus reducing problematic neutral loss of phosphate. • provides unique phospho-tag by causing isotopic distribution patterns in MS and MS/MS data. The PhosProtect...... compound covalently bound to column material (in progress , IP secured)** • Combines enrichment, protection and tagging of phospho-peptides and phospho-lipids in one easy workflow....

  9. Mass spectrometry in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2000-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays an important role in oceanography for various applications. Different types of inorganic as well as organic mass spectrometric techniques are being exploited world-wide to understand the different aspects of marine science, for palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology and palaeoecology, for isotopic composition and concentrations of different elements as well as for speciation studies. The present paper reviews some of the applications of atomic mass spectrometric techniques in the area of oceanography

  10. RESEARCH OF SOPHORA JAPONICA L. FLOWER BUDS VOLATILE COMPOUNDS WITH GAS-CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS- SPECTROMETRY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cholak I.S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work represents the results of the research ofessential oil contained in Sophora japonica L. flowerbuds volatile compounds collected during the nextstages of their development: green flower buds, formedflower buds and the beginning of flower buds opening.Essential oil assay content in Sophora japonica L.flower buds was determined with hydrodistillationmethod. Content of essential oil in the raw material isless than 0,1%. Qualitative composition and assaycontent of Sophora japonica L. flower buds essential oilconstituents were determined with chromato-massspectrometry method. In consequence of the research 80constituents were identified in Sophora japonica L.flower buds out of which 61 substances are during thegreen flower buds and beginning of flower budsopening stages, 66 substances are during formed flowerbuds stage. Substances are represented by aliphatic andcyclic terpenoids, their alcohols and ketones. Mostvolatile substances were extracted on the stage offormed buds.

  11. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, A T

    2015-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references

  12. Analysis of Trace Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (QACs) in Vegetables Using Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Lei; Wang, Xiong-Ke; Li, Yan-Wen; Huang, Xian-Pei; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Li, Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui

    2015-08-05

    A reliable, sensitive, and cost-effective method was developed for determining three quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) including dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, and didodecyldimethylammonium chloride in various vegetables using ultrasonic-assisted extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The variety and acidity of extraction solvents, extraction times, and cleanup efficiency of sorbents were estimated to obtain an optimized procedure for extraction of the QACs in nine vegetable matrices. Excellent linearities (R(2) > 0.992) were obtained for the analytes in the nine matrices. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.7-6.0 and 2.3-20.0 μg/kg (dry weight, dw) in various matrices, respectively. The recoveries in the nine matrices ranged from 70.5% to 108.0% with relative standard deviations below 18.0%. The developed method was applied to determine the QACs in 27 vegetable samples collected from Guangzhou in southern China, showing very high detection frequency with a concentration of 23-180 μg/kg (dw).

  13. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection of the quaternary ammonium compound mebezonium as an active ingredient in t61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Katrin M; Grellner, Wolfgang; Rochholz, Gertrud; Musshoff, Frank; Madea, Burkhard

    2011-03-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds pose an analytical challenge. Mebezonium, a muscle-relaxing agent contained in veterinary euthanasia solution T61, was analyzed in body fluids, organs, and injection sites of a veterinarian by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method. Additionally, embutramide and tetracaine, which are two other active ingredients contained in T61, methadone, xylazine, and analgesics were detected by LC-MS-MS and high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection methods. For detection of mebezonium a solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with ionpairing reagent heptafluorobutyric acid was developed. Separation was achieved on Phenomenex Synergi Hydro RP C(18) column combined with ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile (pH 3.5). To enrich other drugs, liquid-liquid extraction procedures were used. Most of these drugs were separated on a Restek Allure PFP Propyl column using the mentioned mobile phase. Mebezonium and embutramide were detected in femoral vein serum in concentrations of 10.9 and 2.0 mg/L, respectively. The concentration of xylazine and methadone in serum was 2.0 and 0.4 mg/L, respectively. The LC-MS-MS method with SPE combined with an ion-pairing reagent allowed the quantitation of mebezonium. Methadone was detected in toxic concentrations and was, in combination with xylazine and T61, considered to be the cause of death.

  14. Analysis of 14C-bearing compounds released by the corrosion of irradiated steel using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, B Z; Salazar, G; Kunz, D; Szidat, S; Wieland, E

    2018-06-25

    The combination of ion chromatography (IC) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was developed to determine the speciation of 14C-(radiocarbon) bearing organic compounds in the femto to pico molar concentration range. The development of this compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of carboxylic acids is reported and the application of the method on a leaching solution from neutron-irradiated steel is demonstrated. The background and the dynamic range of the AMS-based method were quantified. On using 14C-labelled standards, the measurements demonstrate the repeatability of the analytical method and the reproducible recovery of the main target carboxylic acids (i.e., acetate, formate, malonate, and oxalate). The detection limit was determined to be in the mid fmol 14C per L level while the dynamic range of the analytical method covers three orders of magnitude from the low fmol to the mid pmol 14C per L level. Cross contamination was found to be negligible during IC fractionation and was accounted for during eluate processing and 14C detection by AMS. The 14C-bearing carboxylates released from an irradiated steel nut into an alkaline leaching solution were analysed using the CSRA-based analytical method with the aim to check the applicability of the approach and develop appropriate sample preparation. The concentrations of 14C-bearing formate and acetate, the main organic corrosion products, were at a low pmol 14C per L level for convenient dimensions of the alkaline leaching experiment which demonstrates that compound-specific 14C AMS is an extremely sensitive analytical method for analysing 14C-bearing compounds. The content of total organic 14C in solution (TO14C) determined by the direct measurement of an aliquot of the leaching solution agrees well with the sum of the 14C concentrations of the individual carboxylates within the uncertainty of the data. Furthermore, the TO14C content is in good agreement with the calculated value using the corrosion rate

  15. Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Gac, S.; le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2009-01-01

    With this book we want to illustrate how two quickly growing fields of instrumentation and technology, both applied to life sciences, mass spectrometry and microfluidics (or microfabrication) naturally came to meet at the end of the last century and how this marriage impacts on several types of

  16. Analytical mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  17. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  18. Determination of endocrine-disrupting compounds in drinking waters by fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Emanuele; Scapolla, Carlo; Di Carro, Marina; Liscio, Camilla

    2010-09-01

    Growing attention has been recently paid to safety of food and drinking water, making necessary the adoption of policies for water sources protection and the development of sensitive and rapid analytical methods to identify micropollutants. Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) have emerged as a major issue as they alter the functioning of the endocrine system. Since ingestion of EDCs via food is considered the major exposure route, there is a growing interest in understanding EDC fate during drinking water treatment and in monitoring potential contamination of surface waters and groundwaters. In this work, a fast liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in drinking waters. In the literature analytical articles seldom provide details regarding fragmentation pathways. In this paper spectra of the five EDCs in negative ESI were interpreted with the support of accurate mass spectra acquired by a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument; fragmentation pathways were also proposed. The chromatographic separation of EDCs was optimized on a Pinnacle DB Biphenylic column with a water-acetonitrile gradient. Quantitative analysis was performed in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using bisphenol A-d(16) (BPA-d(16)) as internal standard; calibration curves showed good correlation coefficients (0.9989-0.9997). All figures of merit of the method were satisfactory; limits of detection were in the range 0.2-0.4 ng/ml. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in waters sampled by polar organic chemical integrative samplers in a drinking water treatment plant. Rather low concentration of BPA, NP and E1 were measured in the inlet, while none of the considered EDCs was detected in the outlet. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Non-targeted acquisition strategy for screening doping compounds based on GC-EI-hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry: A focus on exogenous anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Gustavo; Rodrigues, Lucas Martins; Dos Santos, Leonardo; Zheng, Xin; Gujar, Amit; Cole, Jason; Padilha, Monica Costa; de Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler

    2018-03-01

    This is a first look at a non-targeted screening method based on Orbitrap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology for a large number of banned compounds in sports found in urine, including exogenous anabolic steroids, β-agonists, narcotics, stimulants, hormone modulators, and diuretics. A simple sample preparation was processed in four steps: an enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, evaporation, and trimethylsilylation. All compounds were able to meet the World Anti-Doping Agency's sensitivity criteria with mass accuracies less than 1 ppm and with sufficient points across the peak by running the Orbitrap GC-MS in full-scan mode. In addition, we discuss our initial findings of using a full-scan selected ion monitoring-tandem mass spectrometry (SIM-MS/MS) approach as a way to obtain lower detection limits and reach desirable selectivity for some exogenous anabolic steroids. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The EPA iCSS Chemistry Dashboard to Support Compound Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data (ACS Fall meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: There is a growing need for rapid chemical screening and prioritization to inform regulatory decision-making on thousands of chemicals in the environment. We have previously used high-resolution mass spectrometry to examine household vacuum dust samples using liquid chr...

  1. Environmental Chemistry Compound Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data Integrated to the EPA Chemistry Dashboard (EAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a growing need for rapid chemical screening and prioritization to inform regulatory decision-making on thousands of chemicals in the environment. We have previously used high-resolution mass spectrometry to examine household vacuum dust samples using liquid chromatograph...

  2. Quantification of Volatile Compounds in the Headspace of Aqueous Liguids Using Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španěl, Patrik; Diskin, A. M.; Abbott, S. M.; Wang, T.; Smith, D.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2002), s. 2148-2153 ISSN 0951-4198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632; GA ČR GA203/02/0737 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : mass spectrometry * SIFT-MS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2002

  3. Rapid profiling of polymeric phenolic acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza by hybrid data-dependent/targeted multistage mass spectrometry acquisition based on expected compounds prediction and fragment ion searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Feng, Zijin; Yang, Min; Zhou, Zhe; Han, Sumei; Hou, Jinjun; Li, Zhenwei; Wu, Wanying; Guo, De-An

    2018-04-01

    Phenolic acids are the major water-soluble components in Salvia miltiorrhiza (>5%). According to previous studies, many of them contribute to the cardiovascular effects and antioxidant effects of S. miltiorrhiza. Polymeric phenolic acids can be considered as the tanshinol derived metabolites, e.g., dimmers, trimers, and tetramers. A strategy combined with tanshinol-based expected compounds prediction, total ion chromatogram filtering, fragment ion searching, and parent list-based multistage mass spectrometry acquisition by linear trap quadropole-orbitrap Velos mass spectrometry was proposed to rapid profile polymeric phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. More than 480 potential polymeric phenolic acids could be screened out by this strategy. Based on the fragment information obtained by parent list-activated data dependent multistage mass spectrometry acquisition, 190 polymeric phenolic acids were characterized by comparing their mass information with literature data, and 18 of them were firstly detected from S. miltiorrhiza. Seven potential compounds were tentatively characterized as new polymeric phenolic acids from S. miltiorrhiza. This strategy facilitates identification of polymeric phenolic acids in complex matrix with both selectivity and sensitivity, which could be expanded for rapid discovery and identification of compounds from complex matrix. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The detection and mapping of the spatial distribution of insect defense compounds by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Vaikkinen, Anu; Haapala, Markus; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-30

    Many insects use chemicals synthesized in exocrine glands and stored in reservoirs to protect themselves. Two chemically defended insects were used as models for the development of a new rapid analytical method based on desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS). The distribution of defensive chemicals on the insect body surface was studied. Since these chemicals are predominantly nonpolar, DAPPI was a suitable analytical method. Repeatability of DAPPI-MS signals and effects related to non-planarity and roughness of samples were investigated using acrylic sheets uniformly covered with an analyte. After that, analytical figures of merit of the technique were determined. The spatial distribution of (E)-1-nitropentadec-1-ene, a toxic nitro compound synthesized by soldiers of the termite Prorhinotermes simplex, was investigated. Then, the spatial distribution of the unsaturated aldehydes (E)-hex-2-enal, (E)-4-oxohex-2-enal, (E)-oct-2-enal, (E,E)-deca-2,4-dienal and (E)-dec-2-enal was monitored in the stink bug Graphosoma lineatum. Chemicals present on the body surface were scanned along the median line of the insect from the head to the abdomen and vice versa, employing either the MS or MS(2) mode. In this fast and simple way, the opening of the frontal gland on the frons of termite soldiers and the position of the frontal gland reservoir, extending deep into the abdominal cavity, were localized. In the stink bug, the opening of the metathoracic scent glands (ostiole) on the ventral side of the thorax as well as the gland reservoir in the median position under the ventral surface of the anterior abdomen were detected and localized. The developed method has future prospects in routine laboratory use in life sciences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  6. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Leland

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data. PMID:26791986

  7. Optimization and application of atmospheric pressure chemical and photoionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for speciation of oxygen-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acter, Thamina; Kim, Donghwi; Ahmed, Arif; Jin, Jang Mi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the feasibility of optimized positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) for structural assignment of diverse oxygen-containing compounds. The important parameters for optimization of HDX MS were characterized. The optimized techniques employed in the positive and negative modes showed satisfactory HDX product ions for the model compounds when dichloromethane and toluene were employed as a co-solvent in APCI- and APPI-HDX, respectively. The evaluation of the mass spectra obtained from 38 oxygen-containing compounds demonstrated that the extent of the HDX of the ions was structure-dependent. The combination of information provided by different ionization techniques could be used for better speciation of oxygen-containing compounds. For example, (+) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with alcohol, ketone, or aldehyde substituents, while (-) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with carboxylic functional groups. In addition, the compounds with alcohol can be distinguished from other compounds by the presence of exchanged peaks. The combined information was applied to study chemical compositions of degraded oils. The HDX pattern, double bond equivalent (DBE) distribution, and previously reported oxidation products were combined to predict structures of the compounds produced from oxidation of oil. Overall, this study shows that APCI- and APPI-HDX MS are useful experimental techniques that can be applied for the structural analysis of oxygen-containing compounds.

  8. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Compounds Containing Carboxyl Groups Using CdTe and CuO Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Megumi Sakurai; Taro Sato; Jiawei Xu; Soichi Sato; Tatsuya Fujino

    2018-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of compounds containing carboxyl groups was carried out by using semiconductor nanoparticles (CdTe and CuO) as the matrix. Salicylic acid (Sal), glucuronic acid (Glu), ibuprofen (Ibu), and tyrosine (Tyr) were ionized as deprotonated species (carboxylate anions) by using electrons ejected from CdTe after the photoexcitation. When CuO was used as the matrix, the peak intensity of Tyr became high compared with that obtained with CdTe....

  9. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with cryotrap gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Peipei; Wang, Hong; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with cryotrap gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was applied to the analysis of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions. The highly volatile organic compounds were separated successfully with high sensitivity by the employment of a cryotrap device, with the construction of a cold column head by freezing a segment of metal capillary with liquid nitrogen. A total of 76 volatile organic compounds were identified in 50 pleural effusion samples (20 malignant effusions and 30 benign effusions). Among them, 34 more volatile organic compounds were detected with the retention time less than 8 min, by comparing with the normal headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry method. Furthermore, 24 volatile organic compounds with high occurrence frequency in pleural effusion samples, 18 of which with the retention time less than 8 min, were selected for the comparative analysis. The results of average peak area comparison and box-plot analysis showed that except for cyclohexanone, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, and tetramethylbenzene, which have been reported as potential cancer biomarkers, cyclohexanol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-heptane, ethylbenzene, and xylene also had differential expression between malignant and benign effusions. Therefore, the proposed approach was valuable for the comprehensive characterization of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The detection and mapping of the spatial distribution of insect defense compounds by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Vaikkinen, A.; Haapala, M.; Kauppila, T. J.; Kostiainen, R.; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 886, Jul 30 (2015), s. 91-97 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-25137P Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551204 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization * ambient mass spectrometry * insect chemical defense * exocrine glands * termite * stink bug Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.712, year: 2015

  11. Applications of Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS in the Study of Grape and Wine Volatile Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita Panighel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile compounds are responsible for the wine “bouquet”, which is perceived by sniffing the headspace of a glass, and of the aroma component (palate-aroma of the overall flavor, which is perceived on drinking. Grape aroma compounds are transferred to the wine and undergo minimal alteration during fermentation (e.g., monoterpenes and methoxypyrazines; others are precursors of aroma compounds which form in winemaking and during wine aging (e.g., glycosidically-bound volatile compounds and C13-norisoprenoids. Headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME is a fast and simple technique which was developed for analysis of volatile compounds. This review describes some SPME methods coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS used to study the grape and wine volatiles.

  12. Identification of Organic Iodine Compounds and Their Transformation Products in Edible Iodized Salt Using Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Lifen; Peng, Yue'e; Chang, Qing; Zhu, Qingxin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Yanxin

    2017-07-05

    The consumption of edible iodized salt is a key strategy to control and eliminate iodine deficiency disorders worldwide. We herein report the identification of the organic iodine compounds present in different edible iodized salt products using liquid chromatography combined with high resolution mass spectrometry. A total of 38 organic iodine compounds and their transformation products (TPs) were identified in seaweed iodine salt from China. Our experiments confirmed that the TPs were generated by the replacement of I atoms from organic iodine compounds with Cl atoms. Furthermore, the organic iodine compound contents in 4 seaweed iodine salt samples obtained from different manufacturers were measured, with significant differences in content being observed. We expect that the identification of organic iodine compounds in salt will be important for estimating the validity and safety of edible iodized salt products.

  13. Determination of organic compounds in nano-particles by laser breakdown and resonant ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Laser breakdown and resonance ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) was developed and applied to detect compositions and organic substances in nano-particles. The laser breakdown TOFMS method is capable of reaching pptv sensitivity, which is generally much better than the normal LIBS techniques. The system was demonstrated to successfully detect signals in the mass range of 1 to 300 amu for 60 and 140 nm particles in diesel engine exhaust. The detected signals showed that the nano-particles contained both aromatic and chain hydrocarbons

  14. Regiospecific analysis of neutral ether lipids by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/single quadrupole mass spectrometry: validation with synthetic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Karsten; Ravandi, A.; Bukhave, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with on-line electrospray ionization/collision-induced dissociation/mass spectrometry (ESI/CID/MS) is presented for the regiospecific analysis of synthetic reference compounds of neutral ether lipids. The reference compounds were...... characterized by chromatographic retention times, full mass spectra, and fragmentation patterns as an aid to clarify the regiospecificity of ether lipids from natural sources. The results clearly show that single quadrupole mass spectroscopic analysis may elucidate the regiospecific structure of neutral ether...... + H - H2O](+), whereas the reverse situation characterized the sn-3 species. Furthermore, corresponding sn-2 and sn-3 species were separated by the chromatographic system. However, loss of water was promoted as fatty acid unsaturation was raised, which may complicate interpretation of the mass spectra...

  15. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon [Oil and POPs Research Group, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, KIOST, Geoje 656-834 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan, E-mail: sunghwank@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Green Nano Center, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N{sub 1} class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S{sub 1}O{sub 1} compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N{sup +}· and [N − H + D]{sup +} ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H]{sup +} and [N + D]{sup +} ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + H]{sup +} and [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + D]{sup +} ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S{sub 1} class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  16. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N 1 class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S 1 O 1 compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N + · and [N − H + D] + ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H] + and [N + D] + ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S 1 O 1 + H] + and [S 1 O 1 + D] + ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S 1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components

  17. Effect of a new matrix system for low-polar organic compounds in fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Fukai, Toshio; Nomura, Taro

    1988-01-01

    A new matrix system m-NBA-DTDE (1:1) for FABMS of low-polar compounds, such as cholesterol and stearic acid methyl ester, was prepared. The system, i.e., a 1:1 mixture of m-NBA (m-nitrobenzyl alcohol) to DTDE (2,2-dithiodiethanol or 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide), contributed to measuring the positive ion FAB mass spectra of above compounds and morusin permethyl ether, and it brought an effective result on the ion current lifetime and the reproducibility of their spectra. The positive ion FAB mass spectra of these low-polar compounds were compared with the corresponding positive ion EI and CI mass spectra. (author)

  18. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for molecular analysis of organic compounds in medicines, tea, and coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren-Qi; Bao, Kai; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Ng, Siu Choon

    2013-11-21

    Natural occurring organic compounds from food, natural organic matter, as well as metabolic products have received intense attention in current chemical and biological studies. Examination of unknown compounds in complex sample matrices is hampered by the limited choices for data readout and molecular elucidation. Herein, we report a generic method of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the rapid characterization of ingredients in pharmaceutical compounds, tea, and coffee. The analytes were first fractionated using a cationic HILIC column prior to MALDI-MS analyses. It was found that the retention times of a compound arising from different samples were consistent under the same conditions. Accordingly, molecules can be readily characterized by both the mass and chromatographic retention time. The retention behaviors of acidic and basic compounds on the cationic HILIC column were found to be significantly influenced by the pH of mobile phases, whereas neutral compounds depicted a constant retention time at different pH. The general HILIC-MALDI-MS method is feasible for fast screening of naturally occurring organic compounds. A series of homologs can be determined if they have the same retention behavior. Their structural features can be elucidated by considering their mass differences and hydrophilic properties as determined by HILIC chromatogram.

  19. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for molecular analysis of organic compounds in medicines, tea, and coffee

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Renqi

    2013-01-01

    Natural occurring organic compounds from food, natural organic matter, as well as metabolic products have received intense attention in current chemical and biological studies. Examination of unknown compounds in complex sample matrices is hampered by the limited choices for data readout and molecular elucidation. Herein, we report a generic method of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the rapid characterization of ingredients in pharmaceutical compounds, tea, and coffee. The analytes were first fractionated using a cationic HILIC column prior to MALDI-MS analyses. It was found that the retention times of a compound arising from different samples were consistent under the same conditions. Accordingly, molecules can be readily characterized by both the mass and chromatographic retention time. The retention behaviors of acidic and basic compounds on the cationic HILIC column were found to be significantly influenced by the pH of mobile phases, whereas neutral compounds depicted a constant retention time at different pH. The general HILIC-MALDI-MS method is feasible for fast screening of naturally occurring organic compounds. A series of homologs can be determined if they have the same retention behavior. Their structural features can be elucidated by considering their mass differences and hydrophilic properties as determined by HILIC chromatogram. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds in Equisetum palustre L. by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry combined with matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zuofu; Pan, Youzhi; Li, Lu; Huang, Yuyang; Qi, Xiaolin; Luo, Meng; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie

    2014-11-01

    A method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction followed by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry is presented for the extraction and determination of phenolic compounds in Equisetum palustre. This method combines the high efficiency of matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction and the rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy of ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The influential parameters of the matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction were investigated and optimized. The optimized conditions were as follows: silica gel was selected as dispersing sorbent, the ratio of silica gel to sample was selected to be 2:1 (400/200 mg), and 8 mL of 80% methanol was used as elution solvent. Furthermore, a fast and sensitive ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of nine phenolic compounds in E. palustre. This method was carried out within <6 min, and exhibited satisfactory linearity, precision, and recovery. Compared with ultrasound-assisted extraction, the proposed matrix solid-phase dispersion procedure possessed higher extraction efficiency, and was more convenient and time saving with reduced requirements on sample and solvent amounts. All these results suggest that the developed method represents an excellent alternative for the extraction and determination of active components in plant matrices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Profiling monoterpenol glycoconjugation in Vitis vinifera L. cv. Muscat of Alexandria using a novel putative compound database approach, high resolution mass spectrometry and collision induced dissociation fragmentation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmeland, Anna K; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Ebeler, Susan E

    2015-08-05

    In this work we present a novel approach for the identification of plant metabolites using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The workflow involves developing an in-house compound database consisting of exact masses of previously identified as well as putative compounds. The database is used to screen accurate mass spectrometry (MS) data to identify possible compound matches. Subsequent tandem MS data is acquired for possible matches and used for structural elucidation. The methodology is applied to profile monoterpene glycosides in Vitis vinifera cv. Muscat of Alexandria grape berries over three developmental stages. Monoterpenes are a subclass of terpenes, the largest class of plant secondary metabolites, and are found in two major forms in the plant, "bound" to one or more sugar moieties or "free" of said sugar moieties. In the free form, monoterpenes are noted for their fragrance and play important roles in plant defense and as attractants for pollinators. However, glycoconjugation renders these compounds odorless, and it is this form that the plant uses for monoterpene storage. In order to gain insight into monoterpene biochemistry and their fate in the plant an analysis of intact glycosides is essential. Eighteen monoterpene glycosides were identified including a monoterpene trisaccharide glycoside, which is tentatively identified here for this first time in any plant. Additionally, while previous studies have identified monoterpene malonylated glucosides in other grapevine tissue, we tentatively identify them for the first time in grape berries. This analytical approach can be readily applied to other plants and the workflow approach can also be used for other classes of compounds. This approach, in general, provides researchers with data to support the identification of putative compounds, which is especially useful when no standard is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Rapid profiling of antimicrobial compounds characterising B. subtilis TR50 cell-free filtrate by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution Orbitrap™ mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaci, Linda; Quintieri, Laura; Caputo, Leonardo; Visconti, Angelo; Baruzzi, Federico

    2016-01-15

    Several Bacillus strains, typically isolated from different food sources, represent renowned producers of a multitude of low and high molecular weight compounds, including lipopeptides and macrolactones, with an importance for their antimicrobial activity. The high homology shared by many of these compounds also occurring as closely related isoforms poses a challenge in their prompt detection. Identification and structural elucidation is generally achieved by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) after a pre-fractionation and/or purification step of the extract. In this paper we report the application of a method based on LC separation and high-resolution Orbitrap™-based MS for the rapid screening of raw filtrate of the strain Bacillus subtilis TR50 endowed with antimicrobial activity, without requiring any sample pre-treatment. Upon direct analysis of the cell-free filtrate of Bacillus subtilis TR50 by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), different compounds families, that proved to exert a remarked antimicrobial activity against several foodborne pathogens, can be readily displayed along the chromatographic run. Among them, three different classes were identified and characterized belonging to the iturin, fengycin and surfactin groups. The high resolving power and accurate mass accuracy provided by the HRMS system in use ensured an enhanced selectivity compared to other mass spectrometers. In addition, after activation of the HCD cell, the HR-MS/MS spectra can provide insights in the structural elucidation of several compounds. The acquisition of HRMS spectra of raw filtrates of subtilis strains allows untargeted analysis of the major classes of compounds produced to be performed, thus facilitating identification of other unknown bioactive molecules after retrospective analysis. These features make this approach a fast tool applicable to the rapid screening and further

  3. Analysis of air-, moisture- and solvent-sensitive chemical compounds by mass spectrometry using an inert atmospheric pressure solids analysis probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosely, Jackie A; Stokes, Peter; Parker, David; Dyer, Philip W; Messinis, Antonis M

    2018-02-01

    A novel method has been developed that enables chemical compounds to be transferred from an inert atmosphere glove box and into the atmospheric pressure ion source of a mass spectrometer whilst retaining a controlled chemical environment. This innovative method is simple and cheap to implement on some commercially available mass spectrometers. We have termed this approach inert atmospheric pressure solids analysis probe ( iASAP) and demonstrate the benefit of this methodology for two air-/moisture-sensitive chemical compounds whose characterisation by mass spectrometry is now possible and easily achieved. The simplicity of the design means that moving between iASAP and standard ASAP is straightforward and quick, providing a highly flexible platform with rapid sample turnaround.

  4. Analysis of hydrolyzable tannins and other phenolic compounds in emblic leafflower (Phyllanthus emblica L.) fruits by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baoru; Kortesniemi, Maaria; Liu, Pengzhan; Karonen, Maarit; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2012-09-05

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from dried emblic leafflower (Phyllanthus emblica L.) fruits with methanol and separated by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The raw extracts and fractions were analyzed with HPLC coupled with diode array UV spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry. Mucic acid gallate, mucic acid lactone gallate, monogalloylglucose, gallic acid, digalloylglucose, putranjivain A, galloyl-HHDP-glucose, elaeocarpusin, and chebulagic acid were suggested to be the most abundant compounds in the crude methanol extracts of the fruits. In addition, 144 peaks were detected, of which 67 were tentatively identified mostly as ellagitannins, flavonoids, and simple gallic acid derivatives in the fractions. The results indicated the presence of neochebulagic acid, isomers of neochebuloyl galloylglucose, chebuloyl neochebuloyl galloylglucose, ellagic acid glycosides, quercetin glycosides, and eriodictyol coumaroyl glycosides in the fruits. The study provides a systematic report of the retention data and characteristics of UV, MS, and MS/MS spectra of the phenolic compounds in the fruits of emblic leafflower. The fruits of two varieties (Ping Dan No 1 and Fruity) from Guangxi Province differed from those of wild Tian Chuan emblic leafflower from Fujian Province in the content and profile of phenolic compounds.

  5. Rapid Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Method Quantifies Oxygen-Rich Lignin Compound in Complex Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Kelsey S.; Roberts, Michael S.; Vinueza, Nelson R.

    2018-03-01

    Complex mixture analysis is a costly and time-consuming task facing researchers with foci as varied as food science and fuel analysis. When faced with the task of quantifying oxygen-rich bio-oil molecules in a complex diesel mixture, we asked whether complex mixtures could be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed on a single mass spectrometer with mid-range resolving power without the use of lengthy separations. To answer this question, we developed and evaluated a quantitation method that eliminated chromatography steps and expanded the use of quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry from primarily qualitative to quantitative as well. To account for mixture complexity, the method employed an ionization dopant, targeted tandem mass spectrometry, and an internal standard. This combination of three techniques achieved reliable quantitation of oxygen-rich eugenol in diesel from 300 to 2500 ng/mL with sufficient linearity (R2 = 0.97 ± 0.01) and excellent accuracy (percent error = 0% ± 5). To understand the limitations of the method, it was compared to quantitation attained on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, the gold standard for quantitation. The triple quadrupole quantified eugenol from 50 to 2500 ng/mL with stronger linearity (R2 = 0.996 ± 0.003) than the quadrupole-time-of-flight and comparable accuracy (percent error = 4% ± 5). This demonstrates that a quadrupole-time-of-flight can be used for not only qualitative analysis but also targeted quantitation of oxygen-rich lignin molecules in complex mixtures without extensive sample preparation. The rapid and cost-effective method presented here offers new possibilities for bio-oil research, including: (1) allowing for bio-oil studies that demand repetitive analysis as process parameters are changed and (2) making this research accessible to more laboratories. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Gas chromatography--inductively coupled plasma--time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the speciation analysis of organolead compounds in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisterkamp, M; Adams, F C

    2001-07-01

    The application of inductively coupled plasma--time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the speciation analysis of organolead compounds in environmental waters is described. Construction of the transfer line was achieved by means of a relatively simple and rapid coupling procedure. Derivatization of the ionic lead species was achieved by in-situ propylation with sodium tetrapropylborate; simultaneous extraction of the derivatized compounds in hexane was followed by separation and detection by capillary gas chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Detection limits for the different organolead species ranged from 10 to 15 fg (as Pb), corresponding to procedural detection limits between 50 and 75 ng L(-1), on the basis of a 50 mL snow sample, extraction with 200 microL hexane, and subsequent injection of 1 microL of the organic extract on to the column. The accuracy of the system was confirmed by additional analysis of the water samples by capillary gas chromatography coupled with microwave-induced plasma-atomic-emission spectrometry and the analysis of a standard reference material CRM 605 (road dust) with a certified content of trimethyllead.

  7. Characterization of the Key Aroma Compounds in Proso Millet Wine Using Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingke Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The volatile compounds in proso millet wine were extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction (85 μm polyacrylate (PA, 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, 75 μm Carboxen (CAR/PDMS, and 50/30 μm divinylbenzene (DVB/CAR/PDMS fibers, and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; the odor characteristics and intensities were analyzed by the odor activity value (OAV. Different sample preparation factors were used to optimize this method: sample amount, extraction time, extraction temperature, and content of NaCl. A total of 64 volatile compounds were identified from the wine sample, including 14 esters, seven alcohols, five aldehydes, five ketones, 12 benzene derivatives, 12 hydrocarbons, two terpenes, three phenols, two acids, and two heterocycles. Ethyl benzeneacetate, phenylethyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde were the main volatile compounds found in the samples. According to their OAVs, 14 volatile compounds were determined to be odor-active compounds (OAV > 1, and benzaldehyde, benzeneacetaldehyde, 1-methyl-naphthalene, 2-methyl-naphthalene, and biphenyl were the prominent odor-active compounds (OAV > 50, having a high OAV. Principal component analysis (PCA showed the difference of distribution of the 64 volatile compounds and 14 odor-active compounds with four solid-phase microextraction (SPME fibers.

  8. ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION SPIKING CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS RELATED TO CHEMICAL WEAPON CONVENTION IN UNKNOWN WATER SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY ELECTRON IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Budiman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification and analysis of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products is one of important component for the implementation of the convention. Nowadays, the analytical method for determination chemical warfare agent and their degradation products has been developing and improving. In order to get the sufficient analytical data as recommended by OPCW especially in Proficiency Testing, the spiking chemical compounds related to Chemical Weapon Convention in unknown water sample were determined using two different techniques such as gas chromatography and gas chromatography electron-impact ionization mass spectrometry. Neutral organic extraction, pH 11 organic extraction, cation exchanged-methylation, triethylamine/methanol-silylation were performed to extract the chemical warfare agents from the sample, before analyzing with gas chromatography. The identification of chemical warfare agents was carried out by comparing the mass spectrum of chemicals with mass spectrum reference from the OPCW Central Analytical Database (OCAD library while the retention indices calculation obtained from gas chromatography analysis was used to get the confirmation and supported data of  the chemical warfare agents. Diisopropyl methylphosphonate, 2,2-diphenyl-2-hydroacetic acid and 3-quinuclidinol were found in unknown water sample. Those chemicals were classified in schedule 2 as precursor or reactant of chemical weapons compound in schedule list of Chemical Weapon Convention.   Keywords: gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, retention indices, OCAD library, chemical warfare agents

  9. Next generation offline approaches to trace organic compound speciation: Approaching comprehensive speciation with soft ionization and very high resolution tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, P.; Marcotte, A.; Sheu, R.; Ditto, J.; Gentner, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    Intermediate- and semi-volatile organic compounds (IVOCs and SVOCs) have high secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields, as well as significant ozone formation potentials. Yet, their emission sources and oxidation pathways remain largely understudied due to limitations in current analytical capabilities. Online mass spectrometers are able to collect real time data but their limited mass resolving power renders molecular level characterization of IVOCs and SVOCs from the unresolved complex mixture unfeasible. With proper sampling techniques and powerful analytical instrumentation, our offline tandem mass spectrometry (i.e. MS×MS) techniques provide molecular-level and structural identification over wide polarity and volatility ranges. We have designed a novel analytical system for offline analysis of gas-phase SOA precursors collected on custom-made multi-bed adsorbent tubes. Samples are desorbed into helium via a gradual temperature ramp and sample flow is split equally for direct-MS×MS analysis and separation via gas chromatography (GC). The effluent from GC separation is split again for analysis via atmospheric pressure chemical ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-Q×TOF) and traditional electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS). The compounds for direct-MS×MS analysis are delivered via a transfer line maintained at 70ºC directly to APCI-Q×TOF, thus preserving the molecular integrity of thermally-labile, or other highly-reactive, organic compounds. Both our GC-MS×MS and direct-MS×MS analyses report high accuracy parent ion masses as well as information on molecular structure via MS×MS, which together increase the resolution of unidentified complex mixtures. We demonstrate instrument performance and present preliminary results from urban atmospheric samples collected from New York City with a wide range of compounds including highly-functionalized organic compounds previously understudied in outdoor air. Our work offers new

  10. Simultaneous determination of five major compounds in the traditional medicine Pyeongwee-San by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bohyoung; Weon, Jin Bae; Yun, Bo-Ra; Lee, Jiwoo; Eom, Min Rye; Ma, Choong Je

    2014-01-01

    Pyeongwee-San (PWS) has been widely used for treating acute gastritis, chronic, and gastritis. In this paper, simultaneous determination of five compounds (naringin, hesperidin, glycyrrhizin, atractylenolide III, and magnolol) from traditional medicine PWS using the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was established for quality control. Optimum separations were obtained with a SHISEIDO C18 reverse-phase column by gradient elution with 0.1% Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) water-acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The flow rate was 1 mL/min and detection wavelength was set at 205 nm and 250 nm. Validation of the analytical method was evaluated by linearity, precision, and accuracy test. The calibration curves were linear over the established range with R (2) > 0.9978. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.09 to 0.43 and 0.27 to 1.29 μg/mL. The method exhibited intra-day and inter-day precision range between 0.01-1.86% and 0.04-0.35% respectively. The recoveries of five compounds in PWS were in the range between 93.18-106.40%, and 0.20-1.51%. The application of this method was identified through the successful analysis of five compounds in 12 batches of PWS. In addition, identification of five compounds was confirmed by a liquid chromatography method and mass spectrometry. The HPLC method was could be accomplished to the quality control and stable experiment for the preparations consisted of five major compounds.

  11. Rapid screening and distribution of bioactive compounds in different parts of Berberis petiolaris using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awantika Singh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Berberis petiolaris Wall. ex G. Don, an unexplored medicinal plant belonging to the family Berberidaceae, is a large deciduous shrub found in Western Himalaya between 1800–3000 m. Chemical profiling of fruit, leaf, root and stem was done by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry followed by multivariate analysis for discrimination among the plant parts. The bioactive compounds, including magnoflorine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, thalifendine/berberrubine, demethyleneberberine, reticuline, 8-oxoberberine, N-methyltetrahydroberberine, tetrahydropalmatine, tetrahydroberberine and palmatine, were identified by their exact mass measurement and the corresponding molecular formula of each compound. A comparative study of distribution pattern for all these bioactive alkaloids showed qualitative and quantitative variations in different parts of B. petiolaris. Principal component analysis clearly discriminated each part of B. petiolaris plant. Keywords: Berberis petiolaris, Alkaloids, Profiling, DART–TOF–MS, Statistical analysis

  12. Compound-specific isotope analysis of light elements using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) and its application to geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraoka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Keita; Matsumoto, Kohei; Ishiwatari, Ryoshi

    1997-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has been developed recently using gas chromatography/combustion/mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). This paper summarizes principles and progress of GC/C/IRMS, and reviews recent some important works using this new method. GC/C/IRMS is a novel tool for (1) biomarker analysis in sediments and living matter, (2) paleoenvironment analysis including reconstruction of ancient biogeochemical processes, (3) geochemical cycle study of organic compounds in a terrestrial-marine system, (4) evaluation of maturity and diagenesis of organic matter including petroleum formation, (5) ecological analysis, (6) evaluation of anthropologenic pollution in environment, (7) detection of extraterrestrial organic compounds and the formation mechanism study, (8) tracer studies in environment. (author)

  13. Use of thermal desorption gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry for the comparison of identified and unidentified odor active compounds emitted from building products containing linseed oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P. A.; Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose; Larsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The emission of odor active volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a floor oil based on linseed oil, the linseed oil itself and a low-odor linseed oil was investigated by thermal desorption gas chromatography combined with olfactometry and mass spectrometry (TD-GC-O/MS). The oils were applied...... to filters and conditioned in the micro emission cell, FLEC, for 1-3 days at ambient temperature, an air exchange rate of 26.9 h-1 and a 30% relative humidity. These conditions resulted in dynamic headspace concentrations and composition of the odor active VOCs that may be similar to real indoor setting...

  14. Identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in different colour carrot (Daucus carota L.) cultivars using static headspace/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zehra Güler; Fatih Karaca; Halit Yetisir

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as well as sugar and acid contents affect carrot flavour. This study compared VOCs in 11 carrot cultivars. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using static headspace technique was applied to analyse the VOCs. The number of VOCs per sample ranged from 17 to 31. The primarily VOCs identified in raw carrots with the exception of “Yellow Stone” were terpenes, ranging from 65 to 95%. The monoterpenes with values ranging from 31 to 89% were higher than those (from...

  15. Applicability of generic assays based on liquid chromatography–electrospray mass spectrometry to study in vitro metabolism of 55 structurally diverse compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Rousu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS with generic gradient elution for a large number of chemically different compounds is a common approach in drug development, used to acquire a large amount of data in a short time frame for drug candidates. The analysis with non-optimised parameters however may lead to a poor method performance for many compounds, and contains a risk of losing important information. Here, generic electrospray-time-of-flight (ESI-TOF MS methods in various pH conditions were tested for 55 chemically diverse compounds (10 acids, 25 bases, 17 neutrals and 3 amphoterics, aiming to find best analytical conditions for each compound, for studies of in vitro metabolic properties in liver preparations. The effect of eluent pH and elution gradient strength on chromatographic performance and electrospray MS ionisation efficiency were examined for each compound. The data are evaluated how well the best generic approach could cover the analysis of test compounds and how many compounds would still need completely different analytical conditions after that. Aqueous mobile phase consisting of 0.05% acetic acid and 5 mM ammonium acetate (pH 4.4 showed the best general suitability for the analyses, showing adequate performance for metabolite profiling for 41 out of 55 compounds either in positive or negative ion mode. In positive ion mode, the main limitation of performance in various pH conditions was generally not the lack of ionisation, but rather the poor chromatographic performance (inadequate retention or poor peak shape, suggesting that more emphasis should be put in finding conditions providing best chromatographic performance, rather than highest ionisation properties. However, a single generic approach for a large number of different compounds is not likely to produce good results for all compounds. Preferably, at least two or three different conditions are needed for the coverage of a larger number of structurally diverse

  16. Composite glycerol/graphite/aromatic acid matrices for thin-layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, Cesar; Borisov, R S; Varlamov, A V; Zaikin, V G

    2016-10-28

    New composite matrices have been suggested for the analysis of mixtures of different synthetic organic compounds (N-containing heterocycles and erectile dysfunction drugs) by thin layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC/MALDI-TOF). Different mixtures of classical MALDI matrices and graphite particles dispersed in glycerol were used for the registration of MALDI mass spectra directly from TLC plates after analytes separation. In most of cases, the mass spectra possessed [M+H] + ions; however, for some analytes only [M+Na] + and [M+K] + ions were observed. These ions have been used to generate visualized TLC chromatograms. The described approach increases the desorption/ionization efficiencies of analytes separated by TLC, prevent spot blurring, simplifies and decrease time for sample preparation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preface Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; le Gac, Severine; le Gac, S.; van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.

    2009-01-01

    Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry illustrates this trend and focuses on one particular analysis technique, mass spectrometry whose popularity has "dramatically" increased in the last two decades with the explosion of the field of biological analysis and the development of two "soft" ionization

  18. Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, A.L.C.

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes some aspects of Negative Chemical Ionization (NCI) mass spectrometry. The reasons for the growing interest in NCI are: (i) to extend the basic knowledge of negative ions and their reactions in the gas phase; (ii) to investigate whether or not this knowledge of negative ions can be used successfully to elucidate the structure of molecules by mass spectrometry. (Auth.)

  19. Laboratory of acceleration mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybler, P.; Chrapan, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper authors describe the principle of the method of acceleration mass spectrometry and the construction plans of this instrument at the Faculty of ecology and environmental sciences in Banska Stiavnica. Using of this instrument for radiocarbon dating is discussed. A review of laboratories with acceleration mass spectrometry is presented

  20. Investigations of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial compounds with proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry for a real-time threat monitoring scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebacher, Thomas; Sulzer, Philipp; Jürschik, Simone; Hartungen, Eugen; Jordan, Alfons; Edtbauer, Achim; Feil, Stefan; Hanel, Gernot; Jaksch, Stefan; Märk, Lukas; Mayhew, Chris A; Märk, Tilmann D

    2013-01-30

    Security and protection against terrorist attacks are major issues in modern society. One especially challenging task is the monitoring and protection of air conditioning and heating systems of buildings against terrorist attacks with toxic chemicals. As existing technologies have low selectivity, long response times or insufficient sensitivity, there is a need for a novel approach such as we present here. We have analyzed various chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and/or toxic industrial compounds (TICs) and related compounds, namely phosgene, diphosgene, chloroacetone, chloroacetophenone, diisopropylaminoethanol, and triethyl phosphate, utilizing a high-resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) instrument with the objective of finding key product ions and their intensities, which will allow a low-resolution quadrupole mass spectrometry based PTR-MS system to be used with high confidence in the assignment of threat agents in the atmosphere. We obtained high accuracy PTR-TOFMS mass spectra of the six compounds under study at two different values for the reduced electric field in the drift tube (E/N). From these data we have compiled a table containing product ions, and isotopic and E/N ratios for highly selective threat compound detection with a compact and cost-effective quadrupole-based PTR-MS instrument. Furthermore, using chloroacetophenone (tear gas), we demonstrated that this instrument's response is highly linear in the concentration range of typical Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs). On the basis of the presented results it is possible to develop a compact and cost-effective PTR-QMS instrument that monitors air supply systems and triggers an alarm as soon as the presence of a threat agent is detected. We hope that this real-time surveillance device will help to seriously improve safety and security in environments vulnerable to terrorist attacks with toxic chemicals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Characterization of aromatic organosulfur model compounds relevant to fossil fuels by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with CS2 and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weijuan; Sheng, Huaming; Jin, Chunfen; Riedeman, James S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-04-15

    The chemistry of desulfurization involved in processing crude oil is greatly dependent on the forms of sulfur in the oil. Sulfur exists in different chemical bonding environments in fossil fuels, including those in thiophenes and benzothiophenes, thiols, sulfides, and disulfides. In this study, the fragmentation behavior of the molecular ions of 17 aromatic organosulfur compounds with various functionalities was systematically investigated by using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometric experiments were carried out using a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source. (+)APCI/CS2 was used to generate stable dominant molecular ions for all the compounds studied except for three sulfides that also showed abundant fragment ions. The LQIT coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer was used for elemental composition analysis, which facilitated the identification of the neutral molecules lost during fragmentation. The characteristic fragment ions generated in MS(2) and MS(3) experiments provide clues for the chemical bonding environment of sulfur atoms in the examined compounds. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the molecular ions can lose the sulfur atom in a variety of ways, including as S (32 Da), HS(•) (33 Da), H2 S (34 Da), CS (44 Da), (•) CHS (45 Da) and CH2 S (46 Da). These neutral fragments are not only indicative of the presence of sulfur, but also of the type of sulfur present in the compound. Generally, losses of HS(•) and H2 S were found to be associated with compounds containing saturated sulfur functionalities, while losses of S, CS and (•) CHS were more common for heteroaromatic sulfur compounds. High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry with APCI/CS2 ionization is a viable approach to determining the types of organosulfur compounds. It can potentially be applied to analysis of complex mixtures, which is beneficial to improving the

  2. Study by mass spectrometry of the formation of cluster ions generated by laser ablation/ionization of inorganic compounds: application to the differentiation of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubriet, Frederic

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of new ionization techniques allows a fast growth of mass spectrometry applications in an increasing number of fields. More particularly, the introduction of laser ablation/ionization process and the design of new instruments (laser microprobes), has been very important for a better knowledge of inorganic compound mass spectrometry. The purposes of this work were mainly focussed firstly in the understanding of cluster ions formation process by laser ablation/ionization and secondly in the development of a new mass spectrometry technique for the speciation between trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds. We show that cluster ion formation are multiple. The difficulty to identify clearly the processes involved is due to the superposition of many mechanisms. Mostly, these processes are representative of the complexity of the gas-phase chemistry between the various species generated by laser ablation/ionization. Thus, four mechanisms for the cluster ion formation have been highlighted. The most frequently met correspond to aggregative processes of neutral molecules on precursor ions. The knowledge of the processes of cluster ion formation allows us to explain why it is possible to distinguish the oxidation number of chromium. The organigram of chromium valence speciation proposed is based on the calculation of the ratio of negative cluster ion intensities after systematic analysis of nearly twenty chromium reference compounds using the same instrumental conditions. The examination of mixtures between 1) calcium. silicon, trivalent iron or zinc oxides and 2) the standard chromium compound allows us to observe the influence of these oxides on the fingerprints of the pure chromium compounds and to determine up to which point and with which limitations, the methodology suggested, could be applied to the analysis of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds in complex and polyphasic matrices

  3. Tandem mass spectrometry at low kinetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooks, R.G.; Hand, O.W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in mass spectrometry, as applied to molecular analysis, is reviewed with emphasis on tandem mass spectrometry. Tandem instruments use multiple analyzers (sector magnets, quadrupole mass filters and time-of-flight devices) to select particular molecules in ionic form, react them in the gas-phase and then record the mass, momenta or kinetic energies of their products. The capabilities of tandem mass spectrometry for identification of individual molecules or particular classes of compounds in complex mixtures are illustrated. Several different types of experiments can be run using a tandem mass spectrometer; all share the feature of sifting the molecular mixture being analyzed on the basis of chemical properties expressed in terms of ionic mass, kinetic energy or charge state. Applications of mass spectrometry to biological problems often depend upon desorption methods of ionization in which samples are bombarded with particle beams. Evaporation of preformed charged species from the condensed phase into the vacuum is a particularly effective method of ionization. It is suggested that the use of accelerator mass spectrometers be extended to include problems of molecular analysis. In such experiments, low energy tandem mass spectrometry conducted in the eV or keV range of energies, would be followed by further characterization of the production ion beam using high selective MeV collision processes

  4. Fragmentation pathways and structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds related to the Chemical Weapons Convention by electron ionization and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Esmaeil; Saeidian, Hamid; Amozadeh, Ali; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Babri, Mehran

    2016-12-30

    For unambiguous identification of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC)-related chemicals in environmental samples, the availability of mass spectra, interpretation skills and rapid microsynthesis of suspected chemicals are essential requirements. For the first time, the electron ionization single quadrupole and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra of a series of O-alkyl N-[bis(dimethylamino)methylidene]-P-methylphosphonamidates (Scheme 1, cpd 4) were studied for CWC verification purposes. O-Alkyl N-[bis(dimethylamino)methylidene]-P-methylphosphonamidates were prepared through a microsynthetic method and were analyzed using electron ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with gas and liquid chromatography, respectively, as MS-inlet systems. General EI and ESI fragmentation pathways were proposed and discussed, and collision-induced dissociation studies of the protonated derivatives of these compounds were performed to confirm proposed fragment ion structures by analyzing mass spectra of deuterated analogs. Mass spectrometric studies revealed some interesting fragmentation pathways during the ionization process, such as McLafferty rearrangement, hydrogen rearrangement and a previously unknown intramolecular electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The EI and ESI fragmentation routes of the synthesized compounds 4 were investigated with the aim of detecting and identifying CWC-related chemicals during on-site inspection and/or off-site analysis and toxic chemical destruction monitoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled to Capillary Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization-Mass Spectrometry for Direct Analysis of Polar and Nonpolar Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Mario F; Zenobi, Renato

    2018-04-17

    A novel capillary ionization source based on atmospheric pressure photoionization (cAPPI) was developed and used for the direct interfacing between solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and mass spectrometry (MS). The efficiency of the source was evaluated for direct and dopant-assisted photoionization, analyzing both polar (e.g., triazines and organophosphorus pesticides) and nonpolar (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) compounds. The results show that the range of compound polarity, which can be addressed by direct SPME-MS can be substantially extended by using cAPPI, compared to other sensitive techniques like direct analysis in real time (DART) and dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI). The new source delivers a very high sensitivity, down to sub parts-per-trillion (ppt), making it a viable alternative when compared to previously reported and less comprehensive direct approaches.

  7. Imaging mass spectrometry statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emrys A; Deininger, Sören-Oliver; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Deelder, André M; McDonnell, Liam A

    2012-08-30

    Imaging mass spectrometry is increasingly used to identify new candidate biomarkers. This clinical application of imaging mass spectrometry is highly multidisciplinary: expertise in mass spectrometry is necessary to acquire high quality data, histology is required to accurately label the origin of each pixel's mass spectrum, disease biology is necessary to understand the potential meaning of the imaging mass spectrometry results, and statistics to assess the confidence of any findings. Imaging mass spectrometry data analysis is further complicated because of the unique nature of the data (within the mass spectrometry field); several of the assumptions implicit in the analysis of LC-MS/profiling datasets are not applicable to imaging. The very large size of imaging datasets and the reporting of many data analysis routines, combined with inadequate training and accessible reviews, have exacerbated this problem. In this paper we provide an accessible review of the nature of imaging data and the different strategies by which the data may be analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the assumptions of the data analysis routines to ensure that the reader is apprised of their correct usage in imaging mass spectrometry research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficient mining of myxobacterial metabolite profiles enabled by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and compound-based principal component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, Daniel; Zurek, Gabriela; Schneider, Birgit; Garcia, Ronald; Mueller, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria producing secondary metabolites are an important source of natural products with highly diverse structures and biological activities. Developing methods to efficiently mine procaryotic secondary metabolomes for the presence of potentially novel natural products is therefore of considerable interest. Modern mass spectrometry-coupled liquid chromatography can effectively capture microbial metabolic diversity with ever improving sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, computational and statistical tools increasingly enable the targeted analysis and exploration of information-rich LC-MS datasets. In this article, we describe the use of such techniques for the characterization of myxobacterial secondary metabolomes. Using accurate mass data from high-resolution ESI-TOF measurements, target screening has facilitated the rapid identification of known myxobacterial metabolites in extracts from nine Myxococcus species. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA), implementing an advanced compound-based bucketing approach, readily revealed the presence of further compounds which contribute to variation among the metabolite profiles under investigation. The generation of molecular formulae for putative novel compounds with high confidence due to evaluation of both exact mass position and isotopic pattern, is exemplified as an important key for de-replication and prioritization of candidates for further characterization

  9. Peptidylation for the determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Feng; Cen, Si-Ying; He, Huan; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-05-23

    Determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has been a great challenge in the analytical research field. Here we developed a universal peptide-based derivatization (peptidylation) strategy for the sensitive analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS. Upon peptidylation, the molecular weights of target analytes increase, thus avoiding serious matrix ion interference in the low-molecular-weight region in MALDI-TOF-MS. Since peptides typically exhibit good signal response during MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, peptidylation endows high detection sensitivities of low-molecular-weight analytes. As a proof-of-concept, we analyzed low-molecular-weight compounds of aldehydes and thiols by the developed peptidylation strategy. Our results showed that aldehydes and thiols can be readily determined upon peptidylation, thus realizing the sensitive and efficient determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS. Moreover, target analytes also can be unambiguously detected in biological samples using the peptidylation strategy. The established peptidylation strategy is a universal strategy and can be extended to the sensitive analysis of various low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS, which may be potentially used in areas such as metabolomics.

  10. Molecular-level characterization of crude oil compounds combining reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with off-line high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Arum; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Daae; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Kim, Byung Ju; Kim, Sunghwan

    2014-01-01

    A reversed-phase separation technique was developed in a previous study (Loegel et al., 2012) and successfully applied to the de-asphalted fraction of crude oil. However, to the best of our knowledge, the molecular-level characterization of oil fractions obtained by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) has not yet been reported. A detailed characterization of the oil fractions prepared by reversed-phase HPLC was performed in this study. HPLC fractionation was carried out on conventional crude oil and an oil shale pyrolysate. The analyses of the fractions showed that the carbon number of alkyl chains and the double bond equivalent (DBE) value were the major factors determining elution order. The compounds with larger DBE (presumably more condensed aromatic structures) and smaller carbon number (presumably compounds with short side chains) were eluted earlier but those compounds with lower DBE values (presumably less aromatic structures) and higher carbon number (presumably compounds with longer alkyl chains) eluted later in the chromatograms. This separation behavior is in good agreement with that expected from the principles of reversed-phase separation. The data presented in this study show that reversed-phase chromatography is effective in separating crude oil compounds and can be combined with ultrahigh-resolution MS data to better understand natural oils and oil shale pyrolysates.

  11. Characterisation of organic compounds in aerosol particles from a finnish forest by on-line coupled supercritical fluid extraction-liquid chromatography-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimmo, Masahiko; Jaentti, Jaana; Hartonen, Kari; Hyoetylaeinen, Tuulia; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, 00014, Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku [Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-04-01

    During the European Union project Quantification of Aerosol Nucleation in the European Boundary Layer (QUEST), which began in spring 2003, atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in a Finnish Scots pine forest using a high-volume sampler. The organic compounds in the filter samples were then analysed by on-line coupled supercritical fluid extraction-liquid chromatography-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SFE-LC-GC-MS). The sample was first extracted by SFE. During LC the extracts were fractionated into three fractions according to polarity. The final separation was carried out by GC-MS. A fraction volume as high as 840 {mu}L was transferred to the GC, using the partial concurrent eluent evaporation technique. The same instrumentation, with an in-situ SFE derivatisation method, was used to analyse organic acids. Major compounds such as n-alkanes and PAH were analysed quantitatively. Their concentrations were lower than those usually observed in urban areas or in other forest areas in Europe. The wind direction was one of the most important factors affecting changes in the daily concentrations of these compounds. Scots pine needles were analysed with the same system to obtain reference data for identification of biogenic compounds in aerosol particles. Other organic compounds found in this study included hopanes, steranes, n-alkanals, n-alkan-2-ones, oxy-PAH, and alkyl-PAH; some biogenic products, including oxidation products of monoterpenes, were also identified. (orig.)

  12. Tentative identification of polar and mid-polar compounds in extracts from wine lees by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in high-resolution mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado de la Torre, M P; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2015-06-01

    Sustainable agriculture has a pending goal in the revalorization of agrofood residues. Wine lees are an abundant residue in the oenological industry. This residue, so far, has been used to obtain tartaric acid or pigments but not for being qualitatively characterized as a source of polar and mid-polar compounds such as flavonoids, phenols and essential amino acids. Lees extracts from 11 Spanish wineries have been analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in high resolution mode. The high-resolution power of LC-MS/MS has led to the tentative identification of the most representative compounds present in wine lees, comprising primary amino acids, anthocyans, flavanols, flavonols, flavones and non-flavonoid phenolic compounds, among others. Attending to the profile and content of polar and mid-polar compounds in wine lees, this study underlines the potential of wine lees as an exploitable source to isolate interesting compounds. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Determination of antimony compounds in waters and juices using ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-An; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2017-09-01

    A method was developed by coupling ion chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the speciation of antimony. In this study, antimony species such as antimonite [Sb(III)], antimonate [Sb(V)] and trimethyl antimony(V) (TMeSb) were separated in less than 8min using anion exchange chromatography with a Hamilton PRP-X100 column as the stationary phase. Mobile phase A was 20mmolL -1 ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), 2mmolL -1 potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) in 1% v/v methanol (pH 5.5) and 20mmolL -1 EDTA, 2mmolL -1 KHP, 40mmolL -1 (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 in 1% v/v methanol (pH 9.0) formed mobile phase B. Detection limits and relative standard deviations (RSD) were 0.012-0.032ngmL -1 and 2.2-2.8% respectively. This method was applied to bottled waters and fruit juices purchased in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. In water samples, Sb(V) was the major species where as in juices organometallic Sb species were also present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dehydrodimerization of pterostilbene during electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen; Amad, Maan H.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Pterostilbene is a member of the hydroxystilbene family of compounds commonly found in plants such as blueberry and grapes. During the analysis of this compound by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), an ion was observed

  15. Accelerator-based ultrasensitive mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gove, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter describes a new mass spectrometry technique involving charged particle accelerators normally used for basic research in nuclear science. Topics considered include the limitations of conventional mass spectrometry, the limitations of the direct measurement of radioactive decay, mass spectrometry using a tandem electrostatic accelerator, mass spectrometry using a cyclotron, how accelerator mass spectrometry circumvents the limitations of conventional mass spectrometry, measurements of stable isotopes, nuclear physics and astrophysics applications, modifications to existing accelerators, descriptions of dedicated systems, and future applications

  16. Development of soft ionization using direct current pulse glow discharge plasma source in mass spectrometry for volatile organic compounds analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunome, Yoko; Kodama, Kenji; Ueki, Yasuaki; Yoshiie, Ryo; Naruse, Ichiro; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2018-01-01

    This study describes an ionization source for mass analysis, consisting of glow discharge plasma driven by a pulsed direct-current voltage for soft plasma ionization, to detect toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) rapidly and easily. The novelty of this work is that a molecular adduct ion, in which the parent molecule attaches with an NO+ radical, [M + NO]+, can be dominantly detected as a base peak with little or no fragmentation of them in an ambient air plasma at a pressure of several kPa. Use of ambient air as the discharge plasma gas is suitable for practical applications. The higher pressure in an ambient air discharge provided a stable glow discharge plasma, contributing to the soft ionization of organic molecules. Typical mass spectra of VOCs toluene, benzene, o-xylene, chlorobenzene and n-hexane were observed as [M + NO]+ adduct ion whose peaks were detected at m/z 122, 108, 136, 142 and 116, respectively. The NO generation was also confirmed by emission bands of NO γ-system. The ionization reactions were suggested, such that NO+ radical formed in an ambient air discharge could attach with the analyte molecule.

  17. Characterization of phenolic compounds in Helichrysum melaleucum by high-performance liquid chromatography with on-line ultraviolet and mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Sandra C; Castilho, Paula C

    2010-07-15

    Helicrysum melaleucum is a medicinal plant traditionally used in the islands of the Macaronesia region for the treatment of respiratory diseases. In this work, the phenolic compounds of Helicrysum melaleucum plants collected in different geographical locations of Madeira Island and their morphological parts (total aerial parts, leaves, flowers and stems) were extracted and analyzed separately by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS(n)). A total of 68 compounds were characterized based mainly on their UV and mass spectra. These included derivatives of O-glycosylated flavonoids (flavonol and flavones type), quinic acid, caffeic acid, lignans and polyphenols. The flowers were found to be the morphological part with higher variety of phenolic compounds. The large differences in the phenolic composition of plants collected from different geographical locations allowed the identification of a few components, such as pinoresinol and methoxylated flavone derivatives, likely to be useful as geographical markers. Also, these results promote further comparison of the bioactivities of the different samples analyzed. This paper marks the first report on the chemical analysis of Helichrysum melaleucum species. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Trace detection of organic compounds in complex sample matrixes by single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry: real-time detection of security-relevant compounds and online analysis of the coffee-roasting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Kürten, Andreas; Hölzer, Jasper; Mitschke, Stefan; Mühlberger, Fabian; Sklorz, Martin; Wieser, Jochen; Ulrich, Andreas; Pütz, Michael; Schulte-Ladbeck, Rasmus; Schultze, Rainer; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2009-06-01

    An in-house-built ion trap mass spectrometer combined with a soft ionization source has been set up and tested. As ionization source, an electron beam pumped vacuum UV (VUV) excimer lamp (EBEL) was used for single-photon ionization. It was shown that soft ionization allows the reduction of fragmentation of the target analytes and the suppression of most matrix components. Therefore, the combination of photon ionization with the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) capability of an ion trap yields a powerful tool for molecular ion peak detection and identification of organic trace compounds in complex matrixes. This setup was successfully tested for two different applications. The first one is the detection of security-relevant substances like explosives, narcotics, and chemical warfare agents. One test substance from each of these groups was chosen and detected successfully with single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (SPI-ITMS) MS/MS measurements. Additionally, first tests were performed, demonstrating that this method is not influenced by matrix compounds. The second field of application is the detection of process gases. Here, exhaust gas from coffee roasting was analyzed in real time, and some of its compounds were identified using MS/MS studies.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Bioactive Compounds from Aromatic Plants by Means of Dynamic Headspace Extraction and Multiple Headspace Extraction-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omar, Jone; Olivares, Maitane; Alonso, Ibone; Vallejo, Asier; Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2016-01-01

    Seven monoterpenes in 4 aromatic plants (sage, cardamom, lavender, and rosemary) were quantified in liquid extracts and directly in solid samples by means of dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DHS-GC-MS) and multiple headspace extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

  20. Mass Spectrometry of Halopyrazolium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Egsgaard, Helge; Pande, U. C.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven halogen substituted 1-methyl-2-phenylpyrazolium bromides or chlorides were investigated by field desorption, field ionization, and electron impact mass spectrometry. Dealkylation was found to be the predominant thermal decomposition. An exchange between covalent and ionic halogen prior...

  1. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Characterization of the Key Aroma Compounds in Chinese Syrah Wine by Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry-Mass Spectrometry and Aroma Reconstitution Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengtao; Gao, Jinxin; Qian, Michael; Li, Hua

    2017-06-24

    The key aroma compounds and the organoleptic quality of two Chinese Syrah wines from the Yunnan Shangri-La region and Ningxia Helan mountain region were characterized. The most important eighty aroma-active compounds were identified by Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry. In both Syrah samples, ethyl 2-methylpropanoate, ethyl 3-methylbutanoate, 3-methylbutyl acetate, 2- and 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, 2-phenethyl acetate, methional, 3-methylbutanoic acid, hexanoic acid, octanoic acid, β -damascenone, guaiacol, 2-phenylethanol, trans -whiskylactone, 4-ethylguaiacol, eugenol, 4-ethylphenol, and sotolon were detected to have the highest odor intensities. In the chemical analysis, 72 compounds were quantitated by Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction combined with Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry. Based on the Odor Activity Value (OAV), the aromas were reconstituted by combining aroma compounds in the synthetic wine, and sensory descriptive analysis was used to verify the chemical data. Fatty acid ethyl esters, acetate esters, and β -damascenone were found with higher OAVs in the more fruity-smelling sample of Helan Mountain rather than Shangri-La.

  3. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry applied to the identification of valuable phenolic compounds from Eucalyptus wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sónia A O; Vilela, Carla; Freire, Carmen S R; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Silvestre, Armando J D

    2013-11-01

    Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) was applied for the first time in the analysis of wood extracts. The potential of this technique coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry in the rapid and effective detection and identification of bioactive components in complex vegetal samples was demonstrated. Several dozens of compounds were detected in less than 30min of analysis time, corresponding to more than 3-fold reduction in time, when compared to conventional HPLC analysis of similar extracts. The phenolic chemical composition of Eucalyptus grandis, Eucalyptus urograndis (E. grandis×E. urophylla) and Eucalyptus maidenii wood extracts was assessed for the first time, with the identification of 51 phenolic compounds in the three wood extracts. Twenty of these compounds are reported for the first time as Eucalyptus genus components. Ellagic acid and ellagic acid-pentoside are the major components in all extracts, followed by gallic and quinic acids in E. grandis and E. urograndis and ellagic acid-pentoside isomer, isorhamnetin-hexoside and gallic acid in E. maidenii. The antioxidant scavenging activity of the extracts was evaluated, with E. grandis wood extract showing the lowest IC50 value. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of these extracts was higher than that of the commercial antioxidant BHT and of those of the corresponding bark extracts. These results, together with the phenolic content values, open good perspectives for the exploitation of these renewable resources as a source of valuable phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analyses of Indole Compounds in Sugar Cane (Saccharum officinarum L. Juice by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after Solid-Phase Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Wan Hong Yong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous quantitative analysis of 10 indole compounds, including indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, one of the most important naturally occurring auxins and some of its metabolites, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS after solid-phase extraction (SPE was reported for the first time. The analysis was carried out using a reverse phase HPLC gradient elution, with an aqueous mobile phase (containing 0.1% formic acid modified by methanol. Furthermore, a novel SPE procedure was developed for the pre-concentration and purification of indole compounds using C18 SPE cartridges. The combination of SPE, HPLC, and LC-MS was applied to screen for the indole compounds present in sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L. juice, a refreshing beverage with various health benefits. Finally, four indole compounds were successfully detected and quantified in sugar cane juice by HPLC, which were further unequivocally confirmed by LC-MS/MS experiments operating in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM mode.

  5. Compound-Specific Chlorine Isotope Analysis of Tetrachloromethane and Trichloromethane by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry vs Gas Chromatography-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry: Method Development and Evaluation of Precision and Trueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Benjamin; Rodríguez-Fernández, Diana; Torrentó, Clara; Meyer, Armin; Palau, Jordi; Domènech, Cristina; Rosell, Mònica; Soler, Albert; Hunkeler, Daniel; Elsner, Martin

    2017-03-21

    Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of tetrachloromethane (CCl 4 ) and trichloromethane (CHCl 3 ) was explored by both, gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) and GC-quadrupole MS (GC-qMS), where GC-qMS was validated in an interlaboratory comparison between Munich and Neuchâtel with the same type of commercial GC-qMS instrument. GC-IRMS measurements analyzed CCl isotopologue ions, whereas GC-qMS analyzed the isotopologue ions CCl 3 , CCl 2 , CCl (of CCl 4 ) and CHCl 3 , CHCl 2 , CHCl (of CHCl 3 ), respectively. Lowest amount dependence (good linearity) was obtained (i) in H-containing fragment ions where interference of 35 Cl- to 37 Cl-containing ions was avoided; (ii) with tuning parameters favoring one predominant rather than multiple fragment ions in the mass spectra. Optimized GC-qMS parameters (dwell time 70 ms, 2 most abundant ions) resulted in standard deviations of 0.2‰ (CHCl 3 ) and 0.4‰ (CCl 4 ), which are only about twice as large as 0.1‰ and 0.2‰ for GC-IRMS. To compare also the trueness of both methods and laboratories, samples from CCl 4 and CHCl 3 degradation experiments were analyzed and calibrated against isotopically different reference standards for both CCl 4 and CHCl 3 (two of each). Excellent agreement confirms that true results can be obtained by both methods provided that a consistent set of isotopically characterized reference materials is used.

  6. Ammonium Sulfate Improves Detection of Hydrophilic Quaternary Ammonium Compounds through Decreased Ion Suppression in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Eiji; Masaki, Noritaka; Matsushita, Shoko; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2015-11-17

    Hydrophilic quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) include derivatives of carnitine (Car) or choline, which are known to have essential bioactivities. Here we developed a technique for improving the detection of hydrophilic QACs using ammonium sulfate (AS) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS). In MALDI mass spectrometry for brain homogenates, the addition of AS greatly increased the signal intensities of Car, acetylcarnitine (AcCar), and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) by approximately 300-, 700-, and 2500-fold. The marked improvement required a higher AS concentration than that needed for suppressing the potassium adduction on phosphatidylcholine and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Adding AS also increased the signal intensities of Car, AcCar, and GPC by approximately 10-, 20-, and 40-fold in MALDI-IMS. Consequently, the distributions of five hydrophilic QACs (Car, AcCar, GPC, choline, and phosphocholine) were simultaneously visualized by this technique. The distinct mechanism from other techniques such as improved matrix application, derivatization, or postionization suggests the great potential of AS addition to achieve higher sensitivity of MALDI-IMS for various analytes.

  7. Screening of marine seaweeds for bioactive compound against fish pathogenic bacteria and active fraction analysed by gas chromatography– mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekar Thirunavukkarasu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate bioactive molecules from marine seaweeds and check the antimicrobial activity against the fish pathogenic bacteria. Methods: Fresh marine seaweeds Gracilaria edulis, Kappaphycus spicifera, Sargassum wightii (S. wightii were collected. Each seaweed was extracted with different solvents. In the study, test pathogens were collected from microbial type culture collection. Antibacterial activity was carried out by using disc diffusion method and minimum inhibition concentration (MIC was calculated. Best seaweed was analysed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cured extract was separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC. Fraction was collected from TLC to check the antimicrobial activity. Best fraction was analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCMS. Results: Based on the disc diffusion method, S. wightii showed a better antimicrobial activity than other seaweed extracts. Based on the MIC, methanol extract of S. wightii showed lower MIC than other solvents. S. wightii were separated by TLC. In this TLC, plate showed a two fraction. These two fractions were separated in preparative TLC and checked for their antimicrobial activity. Fraction 2 showed best MIC value against the tested pathogen. Fraction 2 was analysed by GCMS. Based on the GCMS, fraction 2 contains n-hexadecanoic acid (59.44%. Conclusions: From this present study, it can be concluded that S. wightii was potential sources of bioactive compounds.

  8. [Target and non-target screening of volatile organic compounds in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huilian; Jin, Jing; Li, Yun; Chen, Jiping

    2017-10-08

    A method of comprehensive screening of the target and non-target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed. In this paper, two types of solid phase adsorption column were compared, and the Tenex SS TD Tube was selected. The analytes were enriched into the adsorption tube by constant flow sampling, and detected by TD-GC-MS in full scan mode. Target compounds were quantified by internal standard method, and the quantities of non-target compounds were calculated by response coefficient of toluene. The method detection limits (MDLs) for the 24 VOCs were 1.06 to 5.44 ng, and MDLs could also be expressed as 0.004 to 0.018 mg/m 3 assuming that the sampling volume was 300 mL. The average recoveries were in the range of 78.4% to 89.4% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.9% to 14.4% ( n =7). The established analytical method was applied for the comprehensive screening of VOCs in a waste incineration power plant in Dalian city. Twenty-nine VOCs were identified. In these compounds, only five VOCs were the target compounds set in advance, which accounted for 26.7% of the total VOCs identified. Therefore, this study further proved the importance of screening non-target compounds in the analysis of VOCs in industrial exhaust gas, and has certain reference significance for the complete determination of VOCs distribution.

  9. Determination of pharmaceutical compounds in surface- and ground-water samples by solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, J.D.; Furlong, E.T.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Kolpin, D.; Anderson, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Commonly used prescription and over-the-counter pharmaceuticals are possibly present in surface- and ground-water samples at ambient concentrations less than 1 μg/L. In this report, the performance characteristics of a combined solid-phase extraction isolation and high-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC–ESI-MS) analytical procedure for routine determination of the presence and concentration of human-health pharmaceuticals are described. This method was developed and used in a recent national reconnaissance of pharmaceuticals in USA surface waters. The selection of pharmaceuticals evaluated for this method was based on usage estimates, resulting in a method that contains compounds from diverse chemical classes, which presents challenges and compromises when applied as a single routine analysis. The method performed well for the majority of the 22 pharmaceuticals evaluated, with recoveries greater than 60% for 12 pharmaceuticals. The recoveries of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, a histamine (H2) receptor antagonist, and antihypoglycemic compound classes were less than 50%, but were retained in the method to provide information describing the potential presence of these compounds in environmental samples and to indicate evidence of possible matrix enhancing effects. Long-term recoveries, evaluated from reagent-water fortifications processed over 2 years, were similar to initial method performance. Method detection limits averaged 0.022 μg/L, sufficient for expected ambient concentrations. Compound-dependent matrix effects on HPLC/ESI-MS analysis, including enhancement and suppression of ionization, were observed as a 20–30% increase in measured concentrations for three compounds and greater than 50% increase for two compounds. Changing internal standard and more frequent ESI source maintenance minimized matrix effects. Application of the method in the national survey demonstrates that several

  10. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  11. Enantiomeric Profiling of Chiral Pharmacologically Active Compounds in the Environment with the Usage of Chiral Liquid Chromatography 
Coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Muñoz, Dolores; Petrie, Bruce; Castrignanò, Erika; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The issue of drug chirality is attracting increasing attention among the scientific community. The phenomenon of chirality has been overlooked in environmental research (environmental occurrence, fate and toxicity) despite the great impact that chiral pharmacologically active compounds (cPACs) can provoke on ecosystems. The aim of this paper is to introduce the topic of chirality and its implications in environmental contamination. Special attention has been paid to the most recent advances in chiral analysis based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and the most popular protein based chiral stationary phases. Several groups of cPACs of environmental relevance, such as illicit drugs, human and veterinary medicines were discussed. The increase in the number of papers published in the area of chiral environmental analysis indicates that researchers are actively pursuing new opportunities to provide better understanding of environmental impacts resulting from the enantiomerism of cPACs. PMID:27713682

  12. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental Analysis Using Plasmas 5.Speciation of Arsenic Compounds in Biological Samples by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaise, Toshikazu

    Arsenic originating from the lithosphere is widely distributed in the environment. Many arsenicals in the environment are in organic and methylated species. These arsenic compounds in drinking water or food products of marine origin are absorbed in human digestive tracts, metabolized in the human body, and excreted viatheurine. Because arsenic shows varying biological a spects depending on its chemical species, the biological characteristics of arsenic must be determined. It is thought that some metabolic pathways for arsenic and some arsenic circulation exist in aqueous ecosystems. In this paper, the current status of the speciation analysis of arsenic by HPLC/ICP-MS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass spectrometry) in environmental and biological samples is summarized using recent data.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap......, Orbitrap and ion mobility instruments. Together they offer various and complementary capabilities in terms of ionization, sensitivity, speed, resolution, mass accuracy, dynamic range and methods of fragmentation. Mass spectrometers can acquire qualitative and quantitative information on a large scale...

  14. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  15. Application of high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) for determination of chromium compounds in the air at the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislawska, Magdalena; Janasik, Beata; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2013-12-15

    The toxicity and bioavailability of chromium species are highly dependable on the form or species, therefore determination of total chromium is insufficient for a complete toxicological evaluation and risk assessment. An analytical method for determination of soluble and insoluble Cr (III) and Cr (VI) compounds in welding fume at workplace air has been developed. The total chromium (Cr) was determined by using quadruple inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) equipped with a dynamic reaction cell (DRC(®)). Soluble trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). A high-speed, reversed-phase CR C8 column (PerkinElmer, Inc., Shelton, CT, USA) was used for the speciation of soluble Cr (III) and soluble Cr (VI). The separation was accomplished by interaction of the chromium species with the different components of the mobile phase. Cr (III) formed a complex with EDTA, i.e. retained on the column, while Cr (VI) existed in the solutions as dichromate. Alkaline extraction (2% KOH and 3% Na2CO3) and anion exchange column (PRP-X100, PEEK, Hamilton) were used for the separation of the total Cr (VI). The results of the determination of Cr (VI) were confirmed by the analysis of the certified reference material BCR CRM 545 (Cr (VI) in welding dust). The results obtained for the certified material (40.2±0.6 g kg(-1)) and the values recorded in the examined samples (40.7±0.6 g kg(-1)) were highly consistent. This analytical method was applied for the determination of chromium in the samples in the workplace air collected onto glass (Whatman, Ø 37 mm) and membrane filters (Sartorius, 0.8 μm, Ø 37 mm). High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is a remarkably powerful and versatile technique for determination of chromium species in welding fume at workplace air. Crown Copyright © 2013 Published by

  16. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  17. A Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF MS) Study for Analyzing 35 Corticosteroid Compounds: Elucidation of MS/MS Fragmentation Pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Eunyoung; Yoon, Chang-Yong; Lee, Ji Hyun; Baek, Sun-Young; Do, Jung-Ah; Lee, Jung-min; Oh, Han Bin

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids have been often found to be added to a dietary supplement for the purpose of illegally improving the effect of their products. Thus, it is imperative to develop or improve a method that enables one to rapidly and reliably analyze corticosteroids in health or dietary supplements, for the safety management purpose. In the present study, results from liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) experiments for the selected 35 corticosteroid compounds are presented, which can be useful for the qualitative screening of corticosteroids in health or dietary supplements. Specifically, retention times, accurate mass data of the protonated steroids, m/z values of major fragment ions are given for the 35 corticosteroids. Further, fragmentation pathways for the selected steroids are also suggested. Based on the suggested fragmentation pathways, it was shown that an unknown steroid compound can be readily identified using the knowledge of a group of unique and specific common skeletal fragments. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the LC-Q-TOF-MS/MS results combined with the knowledge of the fragmentation pathways can offer a new opportunity for rapid and accurate screening of corticosteroids, thus preventing health-related incidents involving adulterated products and clamping down on illegally circulated health products.

  18. A Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF MS) Study for Analyzing 35 Corticosteroid Compounds: Elucidation of MS/MS Fragmentation Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Eunyoung; Yoon, Chang-Yong; Lee, Ji Hyun; Baek, Sun-Young; Do, Jung-Ah [Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-min; Oh, Han Bin [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Corticosteroids have been often found to be added to a dietary supplement for the purpose of illegally improving the effect of their products. Thus, it is imperative to develop or improve a method that enables one to rapidly and reliably analyze corticosteroids in health or dietary supplements, for the safety management purpose. In the present study, results from liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) experiments for the selected 35 corticosteroid compounds are presented, which can be useful for the qualitative screening of corticosteroids in health or dietary supplements. Specifically, retention times, accurate mass data of the protonated steroids, m/z values of major fragment ions are given for the 35 corticosteroids. Further, fragmentation pathways for the selected steroids are also suggested. Based on the suggested fragmentation pathways, it was shown that an unknown steroid compound can be readily identified using the knowledge of a group of unique and specific common skeletal fragments. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the LC-Q-TOF-MS/MS results combined with the knowledge of the fragmentation pathways can offer a new opportunity for rapid and accurate screening of corticosteroids, thus preventing health-related incidents involving adulterated products and clamping down on illegally circulated health products.

  19. Effects of Conventional Heating on the Stability of Major Olive Oil Phenolic Compounds by Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Isotope Dilution Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Sindona

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of olive oils is sensorially tested by accurate and well established methods. It enables the classification of the pressed oils into the classes of extra virgin oil, virgin oil and lampant oil. Nonetheless, it would be convenient to have analytical methods for screening oils or supporting sensorial analysis using a reliable independent approach based on exploitation of mass spectrometric methodologies. A number of methods have been proposed to evaluate deficiencies of extra virgin olive oils resulting from inappropriate technological treatments, such as high or low temperature deodoration, and home cooking processes. The quality and nutraceutical value of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO can be related to the antioxidant property of its phenolic compounds. Olive oil is a source of at least 30 phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, oleocanthal, hydroxytyrosol, and tyrosol, all acting as strong antioxidants, radical scavengers and NSAI-like drugs. We now report the efficacy of MRM tandem mass spectrometry, assisted by the isotope dilution assay, in the evaluation of the thermal stability of selected active principles of extra virgin olive oil.

  20. Effects of conventional heating on the stability of major olive oil phenolic compounds by tandem mass spectrometry and isotope dilution assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attya, Mohamed; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Perri, Enzo; Russo, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2010-12-01

    The quality of olive oils is sensorially tested by accurate and well established methods. It enables the classification of the pressed oils into the classes of extra virgin oil, virgin oil and lampant oil. Nonetheless, it would be convenient to have analytical methods for screening oils or supporting sensorial analysis using a reliable independent approach based on exploitation of mass spectrometric methodologies. A number of methods have been proposed to evaluate deficiencies of extra virgin olive oils resulting from inappropriate technological treatments, such as high or low temperature deodoration, and home cooking processes. The quality and nutraceutical value of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) can be related to the antioxidant property of its phenolic compounds. Olive oil is a source of at least 30 phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, oleocanthal, hydroxytyrosol, and tyrosol, all acting as strong antioxidants, radical scavengers and NSAI-like drugs. We now report the efficacy of MRM tandem mass spectrometry, assisted by the isotope dilution assay, in the evaluation of the thermal stability of selected active principles of extra virgin olive oil.

  1. Trace-level determination of polar flavour compounds in butter by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adahchour, M; Vreuls, R J; van der Heijden, A; Brinkman, U A

    1999-06-04

    Volatile compounds are responsible for the aromas of butter. A simple technique for the determination of these components is described which is based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) after melting of the butter and separation of the aqueous phase from the fat. Volatile flavours present in the water fraction are collected by off-line SPE on cartidges packed with a copolymer sorbent. After desorption with 500 microliters of methyl acetate, 1-microliter aliquots are quantified and/or identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The procedure was tested with respect to recovery, linearity and limit of detection in real-life samples using five polar model analytes. It allows the characterisation of polar flavour compounds in butter prior to and after heat treatment at 170 degrees C. From the five model compounds, vanillin, traces of diacetyl and maltol were found to be present in the butter samples. After heat treatment 500-1000-fold increased concentration of maltol, and substantial amounts of furaneol were detected.

  2. Identification of key aromatic compounds in Congou black tea by PLSR with variable importance of projection scores and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shihong; Lu, Changqi; Li, Meifeng; Ye, Yulong; Wei, Xu; Tong, Huarong

    2018-04-13

    Gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) is the most frequently used method to estimate the sensory contribution of single odorant, but disregards the interactions between volatiles. In order to select the key volatiles responsible for the aroma attributes of Congou black tea (Camellia sinensis), instrumental, sensory and multivariate statistical approaches were applied. By sensory analysis, nine panelists developed 8 descriptors, namely, floral, sweet, fruity, green, roasted, oil, spicy, and off-odor. Linalool, (E)-furan linalool oxide, (Z)-pyran linalool oxide, methyl salicylate, β-myrcene, phenylethyl alcohol which identified from the most representative samples by GC-O procedure, were the essential aroma-active compounds in the formation of basic Congou black tea aroma. In addition, 136 volatiles were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), among which 55 compounds were determined as the key factors for the six sensory attributes by partial least-square regression (PLSR) with variable importance of projection (VIP) scores. Our results demonstrated that HS-SPME/GC-MS/GC-O was a fast approach for isolation and quantification aroma-active compounds. PLSR method was also considered to be a useful tool in selecting important variables for sensory attributes. These two strategies allowed us to comprehensively evaluate the sensorial contribution of single volatile from different perspectives, can be applied to related products for comprehensive quality control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of endocrine-disrupting compounds in waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carro, Marina; Scapolla, Carlo; Liscio, Camilla; Magi, Emanuele

    2010-09-01

    A fast liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed to study five endocrine-disrupting compounds (4-n-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol) in water. Different columns were tested; the chromatographic separation of the analytes was optimized on a Pinnacle DB biphenylic column with a water-acetonitrile gradient elution, which allowed the separation of the selected endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in less than 6 min. Quantitative analysis was performed in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode; two transitions were chosen for each compound, using the most abundant for quantitation. Calibration curves using bisphenol A-d (16) as internal standard were drawn, showing good correlation coefficients (0.9993-0.9998). All figures of merit of the method were satisfactory; limits of detection were in the low pg range for all analytes. The method was then applied to the determination of the analytes in real water samples: to this aim, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were deployed in the influent and in the effluent of a drinking water treatment plant in Liguria (Italy). The EDC level was rather low in the influent and negligible in the outlet, reflecting the expected function of the treatment plant.

  4. Determination of selected quaternary ammonium compounds by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Part II. Application to sediment and sludge samples in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Carballo, Elena; Gonzalez-Barreiro, Carmen; Sitka, Andrea; Kreuzinger, Norbert; Scharf, Sigrid; Gans, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Soxhlet extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry detection (MS/MS) was used for the determination of selected quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) in solid samples. The method was applied for the determination of alkyl benzyl, dialkyl and trialkyl quaternary ammonium compounds in sediment and sludge samples in Austria. The overall method quantification limits range from 0.6 to 3 μg/kg for sediments and from 2 to 5 μg/kg for sewage sludges. Mean recoveries between 67% and 95% are achieved. In general sediments were especially contaminated by C12 chain benzalkonium chloride (BAC-C12) as well as by the long C-chain dialkyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC-C18) with a maximum concentration of 3.6 mg/kg and 2.1 mg/kg, respectively. Maxima of 27 mg/kg for DDAC-C10, 25 mg/kg for BAC-C12 and 23 mg/kg for BAC-C14 were determined for sludge samples. The sums of the 12 selected target compounds range from 22 mg/kg to 103 mg/kg in the sludge samples. - The presence of quaternary ammonium surfactants in sediment and sludge samples is reported for the first time in Austria

  5. Addressing the need for biomarker liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry assays: a protocol for effective method development for the bioanalysis of endogenous compounds in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitex, Yulia; McNaney, Colleen A; Luchetti, David; Schaeffer, Eric; Olah, Timothy V; Morgan, Daniel G; Drexler, Dieter M

    2013-08-30

    Research on disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) has shown that an imbalance in the levels of specific endogenous neurotransmitters may underlie certain CNS diseases. These alterations in neurotransmitter levels may provide insight into pathophysiology, but can also serve as disease and pharmacodynamic biomarkers. To measure these potential biomarkers in vivo, the relevant sample matrix is cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is in equilibrium with the brain's interstitial fluid and circulates through the ventricular system of the brain and spinal cord. Accurate analysis of these potential biomarkers can be challenging due to low CSF sample volume, low analyte levels, and potential interferences from other endogenous compounds. A protocol has been established for effective method development of bioanalytical assays for endogenous compounds in CSF. Database searches and standard-addition experiments are employed to qualify sample preparation and specificity of the detection thus evaluating accuracy and precision. This protocol was applied to the study of the histaminergic neurotransmitter system and the analysis of histamine and its metabolite 1-methylhistamine in rat CSF. The protocol resulted in a specific and sensitive novel method utilizing pre-column derivatization ultra high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS/MS), which is also capable of separating an endogenous interfering compound, identified as taurine, from the analytes of interest. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Environmentally Friendly Procedure Based on Supercritical Fluid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry Molecular Networking for the Discovery of Potent Antiviral Compounds from Euphorbia semiperfoliata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothias, Louis-Félix; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Cachet, Xavier; De La Torre, Erick; Laboureur, Laurent; Gallard, Jean-François; Retailleau, Pascal; Brunelle, Alain; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Costa, Jean; Bedoya, Luis M; Roussi, Fanny; Leyssen, Pieter; Alcami, José; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc; Touboul, David

    2017-10-27

    A supercritical fluid chromatography-based targeted purification procedure using tandem mass spectrometry and molecular networking was developed to analyze, annotate, and isolate secondary metabolites from complex plant extract mixture. This approach was applied for the targeted isolation of new antiviral diterpene esters from Euphorbia semiperfoliata whole plant extract. The analysis of bioactive fractions revealed that unknown diterpene esters, including jatrophane esters and phorbol esters, were present in the samples. The purification procedure using semipreparative supercritical fluid chromatography led to the isolation and identification of two new jatrophane esters (13 and 14) and one known (15) and three new 4-deoxyphorbol esters (16-18). The structure and absolute configuration of compound 16 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. This compound was found to display antiviral activity against Chikungunya virus (EC 50 = 0.45 μM), while compound 15 proved to be a potent and selective inhibitor of HIV-1 replication in a recombinant virus assay (EC 50 = 13 nM). This study showed that a supercritical fluid chromatography-based protocol and molecular networking can facilitate and accelerate the discovery of bioactive small molecules by targeting molecules of interest, while minimizing the use of toxic solvents.

  7. Simultaneous detection of low and high molecular weight carbonylated compounds derived from lipid peroxidation by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Ivana; Hoffmann, Ralf; Fedorova, Maria

    2013-01-02

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other oxidative agents such as free radicals can oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) as well as PUFA in lipids. The oxidation products can undergo consecutive reactions including oxidative cleavages to yield a chemically diverse group of products, such as lipid peroxidation products (LPP). Among them are aldehydes and ketones ("reactive carbonyls") that are strong electrophiles and thus can readily react with nucleophilic side chains of proteins, which can alter the protein structure, function, cellular distribution, and antigenicity. Here, we report a novel technique to specifically derivatize both low molecular and high molecular weight carbonylated LPP with 7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carbohydrazide (CHH) and analyze all compounds by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in positive ion mode. CHH-derivatized compounds were identified by specific neutral losses or fragment ions. The fragment ion spectra displayed additional signals that allowed unambiguous identification of the lipid, fatty acids, cleavage sites, and oxidative modifications. Oxidation of docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6), arachidonic (AA, 20:4), linoleic (LA, 18:2), and oleic acids (OA, 18:1) yielded 69 aliphatic carbonyls, whose structures were all deduced from the tandem mass spectra. When four phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles containing the aforementioned unsaturated fatty acids were oxidized, we were able to deduce the structures of 122 carbonylated compounds from the tandem mass spectra of a single shotgun analysis acquired within 15 min. The high sensitivity (LOD ∼ 1 nmol/L for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, HNE) and a linear range of more than 3 orders of magnitude (10 nmol/L to 10 μmol/L for HNE) will allow further studies on complex biological samples including plasma.

  8. Use of Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Volatile Organic Compound Sources at the La Porte Super Site During the Texas Air Quality Study 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, Thomas G.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, Eric; Stutz, Jochen P.; Shetter, Rick; Hall, Samual R.; Goldan, P. D.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Lindinger, Werner

    2003-08-19

    Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was deployed for continuous real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a site near the Houston Ship Channel during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000. Overall, 28 ions dominated the PTR-MS mass spectra and were assigned as anthropogenic aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, xylenes) and hydrocarbons (propene, isoprene), oxygenated compounds (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, C7 carbonyls), and three nitrogencontaining compounds (e.g., HCN, acetonitrile and acrylonitrile). Biogenic VOCs were minor components at this site. Propene was the most abundant lightweight hydrocarbon detected by this technique with concentrations up to 100+ nmol mol-1, and was highly correlated with its oxidation products, formaldehyde (up to ~40 nmol mol-1) and acetaldehyde (up to ~80 nmol/mol), with typical ratios close to 1 in propene-dominated plumes. In the case of aromatic species the high time resolution of the obtained data set helped in identifying different anthropogenic sources (e.g., industrial from urban emissions) and testing current emission inventories. A comparison with results from complimentary techniques (gas chromatography, differential optical absorption spectroscopy) was used to assess the selectivity of this on-line technique in a complex urban and industrial VOC matrix and give an interpretation of mass scans obtained by ‘‘soft’’ chemical ionization using proton-transfer via H3O+. The method was especially valuable in monitoring rapidly changing VOC plumes which passed over the site, and when coupled with meteorological data it was possible to identify likely sources.

  9. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Sediment and Soil by Pressurized Solvent Extraction, Solid-Phase Extraction, and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 61 compounds in environmental sediment and soil samples is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater and wastewater-impacted sediment on aquatic organisms. This method also may be used to evaluate the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water and sediment quality of urban streams. Method development focused on the determination of compounds that were chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from interfering matrix components by high-pressure water/isopropyl alcohol extraction. The compounds were isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing chemically modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. The cartridges were dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds were eluted with methylene chloride (80 percent)-diethyl ether (20 percent) through Florisil/sodium sulfate SPE cartridge, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-sand samples fortified at 4 to 72 micrograms averaged 76 percent ?13 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method reporting levels for single-component compounds ranged from 50 to 500 micrograms per kilogram. The concentrations of 20 out of 61 compounds initially will be reported as estimated with the 'E' remark code for one of three reasons: (1) unacceptably low-biased recovery (less than 60 percent) or highly variable method performance

  10. Bipolar Mass Spectrometry of Labile Coordination Complexes, Redox Active Inorganic Compounds, and Proteins Using a Glass Nebulizer for Sonic-Spray Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakis, Manolis M.; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Kanaki, Katerina; Milios, Constantinos J.; Pergantis, Spiros A.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a novel nebulizer configuration for sonic-spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (MS), more specifically for a version of SSI that is referred to as Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI) MS. The developed nebulizer configuration is based on a commercially available pneumatic glass nebulizer that has been used extensively for aerosol formation in atomic spectrometry. In the present study, the nebulizer was modified in order to achieve efficient V-EASI-MS operation. Upon evaluating this system, it has been demonstrated that V-EASI-MS offers some distinct advantages for the analysis of coordination compounds and redox active inorganic compounds over the predominantly used electrospray ionization (ESI) technique. Such advantages, for this type of compounds, are demonstrated here for the first time. More specifically, a series of labile heptanuclear heterometallic [CuII 6LnIII] clusters held together with artificial amino acid ligands, in addition to easily oxidized inorganic oxyanions of selenium and arsenic, were analyzed. The observed advantages pertain to V-EASI appearing to be a "milder" ionization source than ESI, not requiring electrical potentials for gas phase ion formation, thus eliminating the possibility of unwanted redox transformations, allowing for the "simultaneous" detection of negative and positive ions (bipolar analysis) without the need to change source ionization conditions, and also not requiring the use of syringes and delivery pumps. Because of such features, especially because of the absence of ionization potentials, EASI can be operated with minimal requirements for source parameter optimization. We observed that source temperature and accelerating voltage do not seem to affect labile compounds to the extent they do in ESI-MS. In addition, bipolar analysis of proteins was demonstrated here by acquiring both positive and negative ion mass spectra from the same protein solutions

  11. Electrospray[+] tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry in the elucidation of ergot alkaloids chromatographed by HPLC: screening of grass or forage samples for novel toxic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Andreas F; Craig, Morrie; Fannin, Neil; Bush, Lowell; Tobin, Tom

    2005-11-01

    Ergot alkaloids are mycotoxins generated by grass and grain pathogens such as Claviceps, for example. Ergot alkaloid-poisoning syndromes, such as tall fescue toxicosis from endophyte-infected tall fescue grass, are important veterinary problems for cattle, horses, sheep, pigs and chickens, with consequent impact on food, meat and dairy industries. Damage to livestock is of the order of a billion dollars a year in the United States alone. HPLC with UV and fluorescence detection are the predominant means of ergot alkaloid determination, with focus on quantitation of the marker compound ergovaline, although ELISA methods are undergoing investigation. These techniques are excellent for rapid detection, but of poor specificity in defining new or poorly characterized ergot alkaloids and related compounds. This paper demonstrates the facility of using electrospray(+) mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detection during chromatographic examination of ergot alkaloid standards of lysergic acid, lysergol, ergonovine, ergovaline, ergotamine, ergocornine, ergocryptine and ergocrystine by HPLC. Ergoline-8 position epimers could be separated on the gradient HPLC system for ergocornine, ergocrystine and ergonovine and appeared as shoulders for ergotamine and ergovaline; epimers generally showed different patterns of relative intensity for specific MRM transitions. There was reasonable correspondence between retention of standards on the 2-mm ESI(+)MS phenyl-hexyl-based reverse phase column and those on the 4-mm C18-based column. Since up to 10% of clinical cases involving toxin exposure display unidentified chromatographic peaks, 11 samples of feed components associated with such cases were studied with developed MRM methods to attempt elucidation of crucial components if possible. Ergotamine appeared in all, ergovaline appeared in five and ergocornine appeared in six; ergonovine, ergocryptine, ergocrystine and lysergol also appeared in several. In addition

  12. Bioactive compounds of fourth generation gamma-irradiated Typhoniumflagelliforme Lodd. mutants based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sianipar, N. F.; Purnamaningsih, R.; Rosaria

    2016-08-01

    Rodent tuber (Typhonium flagelliforme Lodd.) is an Indonesian anticancer medicinal plant. The natural genetic diversity of rodent tuber is low due to vegetative propagation. Plant's genetic diversity has to be increased for obtaining clones which contain a high amount of anticancer compounds. In vitro calli were irradiated with 6 Gy of gamma ray to produce in vitro mutant plantlets. Mutant plantlets were acclimated and propagated in a greenhouse. This research was aimed to identify the chemical compounds in the leaves and tubers ofthe fourth generation of rodent tuber's vegetative mutant clones (MV4) and control plantsby using GC- MS method. Leaves and tubers of MV4 each contained 2 and 5 anticancer compounds which quantities were higher compared to control plants. MV4 leaves contained 5 new anticancer compounds while its tubers contained 3 new anticancer compounds which were not found in control. The new anticancer compounds in leaves were hexadecanoic acid, stigmast-5-en-3-ol, ergost-5-en-3-ol, farnesol isomer a, and oleic acid while the new anticancer compounds in tubers were alpha tocopherol, ergost-5-en-3-ol, and beta-elemene. Rodent tuber mutant clones are very potential to be developed into anticancer drugs.

  13. MCX based solid phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of 31 endocrine-disrupting compounds in surface water of Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Chang; Yu, Xue-jun; Yang, Wen-chao; Peng, Jin-feng; Xu, Ting; Yin, Da-Qiang; Hu, Xia-lin

    2011-10-15

    A novel analytical method employing MCX (mixed-mode cationic exchange) based solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed to detect 31 endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in surface water samples simultaneously. The target EDCs belong to five classes, including seven estrogens, eight androgens, six progesterones, five adrenocortical hormones and five industrial compounds. In order to simultaneously concentrate the target EDCs and eliminate matrix interferences in the water samples, MCX SPE cartridges were employed for SPE, and then followed by a simple and highly efficient three-step sequential elution procedure. Two electrospray ionization (ESI) detection modes, positive (ESI+) and (ESI-), were optimized for HPLC-MS/MS analysis to obtain the highest sensitivity for all the EDCs. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.02-1.9 ng L(-1), which are lower than or comparable to these reported in references. Wide linear ranges (LOD-100 ng L(-1) for ESI+ mode, and LOD-200 ng L(-1) for ESI- mode) were obtained with determination coefficients (R(2)) higher than 0.99 for all the compounds. With five internal standards, good recoveries (84.4-103.0%) of all the target compounds were obtained in selected surface water samples. The developed method was successfully applied to investigate the EDCs occurrence in the surface water of Shanghai by analyzing surface water samples from 11 sites. The results showed that nearly all the target compounds (30 in 31) were present in the surface water samples of Shanghai, of which three industrial compounds (4-t-OP, BPA, and BPF) showed the highest concentrations (median concentrations were 11.88-23.50 ng L(-1)), suggesting that industrial compounds were the dominating EDCs in the surface water of Shanghai, and much more attention should be paid on these compounds. Our present research demonstrated that SPE with MCX cartridges combined with HPLC-MS/MS was convenient

  14. Determination of a wide range of volatile organic compounds in ambient air using multisorbent adsorption/thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, J.F.; Luo, W.; Isabelle, L.M.; Bender, D.A.; Baker, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Adsorption/thermal desorption with multisorbent air-sampling cartridges was developed for the determination of 87 method analytes including halogenated alkanes, halogenated alkenes, ethers, alcohols, nitriles, esters, ketones, aromatics, a disulfide, and a furan. The volatilities of the compounds ranged from that of dichlorofluoromethane (CFC12) to that of 1,2,3- trichlorobenzene. The eight most volatile compounds were determined using a 1.5-L air sample and a sample cartridge containing 50 mg of Carbotrap B and 280 mg of Carboxen 1000; the remaining 79 compounds were determined using a 5-L air sample and a cartridge containing 180 mg of Carbotrap B and 70 mg of Carboxen 1000. Analysis and detection were by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The minimum detectable level (MDL) concentration values ranged from 0.01 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for chlorobenzene to 0.4 ppbv for bromomethane; most of the MDL values were in the range 0.02-0.06 ppbv. No breakthrough was detected with the prescribed sample volumes. Analyte stability on the cartridges was very good. Excellent recoveries were obtained with independent check standards. Travel spike recoveries ranged from 90 to 110% for 72 of the 87 compounds. The recoveries were less than 70% for bromomethane and chloroethene and for a few compounds such as methyl acetate that are subject to losses by hydrolysis; the lowest travel spike recovery was obtained for bromomethane (62%). Blank values for all compounds were either below detection or very low. Ambient atmospheric sampling was conducted in New Jersey from April to December, 1997. Three sites characterized by low, moderate, and high densities of urbanization/traffic were sampled. The median detected concentrations of the compounds were either similar at all three sites (as with the chlorofluorocarbon compounds) or increased with the density of urbanization/traffic (as with dichloromethane, MTBE, benzene, and toluene). For toluene, the median detected

  15. In cleanroom, sub-ppb real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using proton-transfer reaction/time of flight/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayeck, Nathalie; Maillot, Philippe; Vitrani, Thomas; Pic, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri; Gligorovski, Sasho; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Mizzi, Aurélie; Poulet, Irène

    2014-04-01

    Refractory compounds such as Trimethylsilanol (TMS) and other organic compounds such as propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA) used in the photolithography area of microelectronic cleanrooms have irreversible dramatic impact on optical lenses used on photolithography tools. There is a need for real-time, continuous measurements of organic contaminants in representative cleanroom environment especially in lithography zone. Such information is essential to properly evaluate the impact of organic contamination on optical lenses. In this study, a Proton-Transfer Reaction-Time-of-Flight Mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) was applied for real-time and continuous monitoring of fugitive organic contamination induced by the fabrication process. Three types of measurements were carried out using the PTR-TOF-MS in order to detect the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) next to the tools in the photolithography area and at the upstream and downstream of chemical filters used to purge the air in the cleanroom environment. A validation and verification of the results obtained with PTR-TOF-MS was performed by comparing these results with those obtained with an off-line technique that is Automated Thermal Desorber - Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (ATD-GC-MS) used as a reference analytical method. The emerged results from the PTR-TOF-MS analysis exhibited the temporal variation of the VOCs levels in the cleanroom environment during the fabrication process. While comparing the results emerging from the two techniques, a good agreement was found between the results obtained with PTR-TOF-MS and those obtained with ATD-GC-MS for the PGMEA, toluene and xylene. Regarding TMS, a significant difference was observed ascribed to the technical performance of both instruments.

  16. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base

  17. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  18. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  19. Quantification of prominent volatile compounds responsible for muskmelon and watermelon aroma by purge and trap extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredes, Alejandro; Sales, Carlos; Barreda, Mercedes; Valcárcel, Mercedes; Roselló, Salvador; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic headspace purge-and-trap (DHS-P&T) methodology for the determination and quantification of 61 volatile compounds responsible for muskmelon and watermelon aroma has been developed and validated. The methodology is based on the application of purge-and-trap extraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to (ion trap) mass spectrometry detection. For this purpose two different P&T sorbent cartridges have been evaluated. The influence of different extraction factors (sample weight, extraction time, and purge flow) on extraction efficiency has been studied and optimised using response surface methodology. Precision, expressed as repeatability, has been evaluated by analysing six replicates of real samples, showing relative standard deviations between 3% and 27%. Linearity has been studied in the range of 10-6130 ng mL(-1) depending on the compound response, showing coefficients of correlation between 0.995 and 0.999. Detection limits ranged between 0.1 and 274 ng g(-1). The methodology developed is well suited for analysis of large numbers of muskmelon and watermelon samples in plant breeding programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous Determination of Perfluorinated Compounds in Edible Oil by Gel-Permeation Chromatography Combined with Dispersive Solid-Phase Extraction and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lili; Jin, Fen; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yanxin; Wang, Jian; Shao, Hua; Jin, Maojun; Wang, Shanshan; Zheng, Lufei; Wang, Jing

    2015-09-30

    A simple analytical method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of 18 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in edible oil. The target compounds were extracted by acetonitrile, purified by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE) using graphitized carbon black (GCB) and octadecyl (C18), and analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ES-MS/MS) in negative ion mode. Recovery studies were performed at three fortification levels. The average recoveries of all target PFCs ranged from 60 to 129%, with an acceptable relative standard deviation (RSD) (1-20%, n = 3). The method detection limits (MDLs) ranged from 0.004 to 0.4 μg/kg, which was significantly improved compared with the existing liquid-liquid extraction and cleanup method. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of all target PFCs in edible oil samples collected from markets in Beijing, China, and the results revealed that C6-C10 perfluorocarboxylic acid (PFCAs) and C7 perfluorosulfonic acid PFSAs were the major PFCs detected in oil samples.

  1. [Sample preparation and bioanalysis in mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Wagner, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of compounds of clinical interest of low molecular weight (sample preparation. Sample preparation is a crucial part of chemical/biological analysis and in a sense is considered the bottleneck of the whole analytical process. The main objectives of sample preparation are the removal of potential interferences, analyte preconcentration, and converting (if needed) the analyte into a more suitable form for detection or separation. Without chromatographic separation, endogenous compounds, co-eluted products may affect a quantitative method in mass spectrometry performance. This work focuses on three distinct parts. First, quantitative bioanalysis will be defined, different matrices and sample preparation techniques currently used in bioanalysis by mass spectrometry of/for small molecules of clinical interest in biological fluids. In a second step the goals of sample preparation will be described. Finally, in a third step, sample preparation strategies will be made either directly ("dilute and shoot") or after precipitation.

  2. [Determination of di (hydrogenated tallow alkyl) dimethyl ammonium compounds in textile auxiliaries by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of di (hydrogenated tallow alkyl) dimethyl ammonium compounds (DHTDMAC) in textile auxiliaries by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. (UPLC-MS/MS). The samples were extracted and diluted with acidified methanol by 5% (v/v) formic acid under ultrasonic assistance. The separation was performed on an Eclipse Plus C18 column (50 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.8 microm) using 0.1% (v/v) formic acid solution and methanol as the mobile phases. Identification and quantification were achieved by UPLC-MS/MS with electrospray ionization (ESI) source in positive ion mode and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The results indicated that the calibration curve of DHTDMAC showed good linear relationship between peak area and mass concentration in the range of 10-280 microg/L with the correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.9991. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3) and the limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N= 10) of this method were 3 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The average recoveries from three typical textile auxiliary matrices including dispersant, antistatic agent and fabric softener, at three spiked levels were in the range of 97.2%-108.3% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.5%-4.6%. The method is sensitive, accurate, simple and effective for the analysis of DHTDMAC in textile auxiliaries.

  3. Eleventh ISMAS workshop on mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jaison, P.G.

    2004-10-01

    This volume deals with the latest developments in this field, exposing the innumerable applications of mass spectrometry. The topics covered include basic fundamentals of mass spectrometry, qualitative and quantitative aspects and data interpretation, maintenance of mass spectrometers, selection of a mass spectrometer, its applications in various branches of science as well as recent advances in mass spectrometry. Emphasis is also laid on the practical aspects of mass spectrometry. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  4. Speciation of four selenium compounds using high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method for the speciation of selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenite and selenate by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with atomic spectrometric detection is presented. An organic polymeric strong anion exchange column was used as the stationary phase in combination...... spectrometry (ICP-MS). The signal-to-noise ratio of the FAAS detector was optimized using a hydrogen-argon entrained-air flame and a slotted-tube atom trap (STAT) in the flame. The limit of detection (3 sigma) achieved by the HPLC-FAAS system was 1 mg L-1 of selenium (100 mu L injections) for each of the four...

  5. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  6. Mass spectrometry in epigenetic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian

    2010-01-01

    cancers has gained tremendous interest in recent years, and many of these inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical trials. Despite intense research, however, the exact molecular mechanisms of action of these molecules remain, to a wide extent, unclear. The recent application of mass spectrometry...

  7. Mass spectrometry of large molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchetti, S.

    1985-01-01

    The lectures in this volume were given at a course on mass spectrometry of large molecules, organized within the framework of the Training and Education programme of the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities. Although first presented in 1983, most of the lectures have since been updated by their authors. (orig.)

  8. Mass spectrometry with particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator use is renewing the ultrasensitive mass spectrometry in extending the detection limits. These new devices allow the measurement of rare isotope ratio, as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl or 41 Ca, from the earth natural reservoirs [fr

  9. Analytical method for biomonitoring of endocrine-disrupting compounds (bisphenol A, parabens, perfluoroalkyl compounds and a brominated flame retardant) in human hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene, E-mail: iaparicio@us.es; Alonso, Esteban

    2016-11-16

    In this paper, a method for the determination of four groups of endocrine-disrupting compounds in human hair is proposed. Target compounds were a plastic monomer (bisphenol A), three parabens commonly used as preservatives (methylparaben, ethylparaben and propylparaben), six perfluoroalkyl compounds commonly used as water, oil and dirt repellents (perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and five perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, with alkyl chains from four to eight carbon atoms) and a brominated flame retardant (hexabromocyclododecane). All of them are of especial concern to human health because they are utilized in many everyday products. The method is based on hair incubation with methanol/acetic acid solution (85:15, v/v), extraction with acetone for 15 min in an ultrasonic bath and analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Limits of quantification in hair samples ranged from 0.6 ng g{sup −1} to 6.1 ng g{sup −1}, except for hexabromocyclododecane (36 ng g{sup −1}). Recoveries were higher than 69%. Intra-day and inter-day precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, were lower than 15% and 10%, respectively. The applicability of the method was proven by analyzing the target compounds in hair samples from six volunteers. High frequencies of detection and concentrations were obtained for bisphenol A (83% of samples; concentrations up to 158 ng g{sup −1}) and parabens (100% of samples; concentrations up to 624 ng g{sup −1}). Lower concentrations were detected for the perfluoroalkyl compounds (up to 13 ng g{sup −1}). Hexabromocyclododecane was not detected. - Highlights: • Method for biomonitoring of endocrine-disrupting compounds in human hair. • Target compounds are commonly present in everyday products. • Method based on hair digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. • Good sensitivity, recoveries and precision and low matrix effect were obtained.

  10. Analytical method for biomonitoring of endocrine-disrupting compounds (bisphenol A, parabens, perfluoroalkyl compounds and a brominated flame retardant) in human hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method for the determination of four groups of endocrine-disrupting compounds in human hair is proposed. Target compounds were a plastic monomer (bisphenol A), three parabens commonly used as preservatives (methylparaben, ethylparaben and propylparaben), six perfluoroalkyl compounds commonly used as water, oil and dirt repellents (perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and five perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, with alkyl chains from four to eight carbon atoms) and a brominated flame retardant (hexabromocyclododecane). All of them are of especial concern to human health because they are utilized in many everyday products. The method is based on hair incubation with methanol/acetic acid solution (85:15, v/v), extraction with acetone for 15 min in an ultrasonic bath and analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Limits of quantification in hair samples ranged from 0.6 ng g"−"1 to 6.1 ng g"−"1, except for hexabromocyclododecane (36 ng g"−"1). Recoveries were higher than 69%. Intra-day and inter-day precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, were lower than 15% and 10%, respectively. The applicability of the method was proven by analyzing the target compounds in hair samples from six volunteers. High frequencies of detection and concentrations were obtained for bisphenol A (83% of samples; concentrations up to 158 ng g"−"1) and parabens (100% of samples; concentrations up to 624 ng g"−"1). Lower concentrations were detected for the perfluoroalkyl compounds (up to 13 ng g"−"1). Hexabromocyclododecane was not detected. - Highlights: • Method for biomonitoring of endocrine-disrupting compounds in human hair. • Target compounds are commonly present in everyday products. • Method based on hair digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. • Good sensitivity, recoveries and precision and low matrix effect were obtained. • Method was successfully

  11. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis of small molecular weight compounds (under 10 KDa) as biomarkers of rat hearts undergoing arecoline challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tung-Sheng; Chang, Mu-Hsin; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Lin, Yueh-Min; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lin, Chien-Chung; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2013-04-01

    Statistical and clinical reports indicate that betel nut chewing is strongly associated with progression of oral cancer because some ingredients in betel nuts are potential cancer promoters, especially arecoline. Early diagnosis for cancer biomarkers is the best strategy for prevention of cancer progression. Several methods are suggested for investigating cancer biomarkers. Among these methods, gel-based proteomics approach is the most powerful and recommended tool for investigating biomarkers due to its high-throughput. However, this proteomics approach is not suitable for screening biomarkers with molecular weight under 10 KDa because of the characteristics of gel electrophoresis. This study investigated biomarkers with molecular weight under 10 KDa in rats with arecoline challenge. The centrifuging vials with membrane (10 KDa molecular weight cut-off) played a crucial role in this study. After centrifuging, the filtrate (containing compounds with molecular weight under 10 KDa) was collected and spotted on a sample plate for MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. Compared to control, three extra peaks (m/z values were 1553.1611, 1668.2097 and 1740.1832, respectively) were found in sera and two extra peaks were found in heart tissue samples (408.9719 and 524.9961, respectively). These small compounds should play important roles and may be potential biomarker candidates in rats with arecoline. This study successfully reports a mass-based method for investigating biomarker candidates with small molecular weight in different types of sample (including serum and tissue). In addition, this reported method is more time-efficient (1 working day) than gel-based proteomics approach (5~7 working days).

  12. Identification of molecules in graphite furnace by laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: sulfur and chlorine containing compounds

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Raseleka, RM

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An electro thermal vaporizer (ETV) coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) with laser ionization (LI) was applied to the identification of molecules from sulphur and chlorine matrices in the furnace. An interface was developed...

  13. Alternative CHCA-based matrices for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds by UV-MALDI-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Tiffany; Grivet, Chantal; Knochenmuss, Richard; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Analysis of low molecular weight compounds (LMWC) in complex matrices by vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) often suffers from matrix interferences, which can severely degrade limits of quantitation. It is, therefore, useful to have available a range of suitable matrices, which exhibit complementary regions of interference. Two newly synthesized α-cyanocinnamic acid derivatives are reported here; (E)-2-cyano-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)acrylic acid (NpCCA) and (2E)-3-(anthracen-9-yl)-2-cyanoprop-2enoic acid (AnCCA). Along with the commonly used α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), and the recently developed 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (Cl-CCA) matrices, these constitute a chemically similar series of matrices covering a range of molecular weights, and with correspondingly differing ranges of spectral interference. Their performance was compared by measuring the signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) of 47 analytes, mostly pharmaceuticals, with the different matrices using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode on a triple quadrupole instrument equipped with a vacuum MALDI source. AnCCA, NpCCA and Cl-CCA were found to offer better signal-to-noise ratios in SRM mode than CHCA, but Cl-CCA yielded the best results for 60% of the compounds tested. To better understand the relative performance of this matrix series, the proton affinities (PAs) were measured using the kinetic method. Their relative values were: AnCCA > CHCA > NpCCA > Cl-CCA. This ordering is consistent with the performance data. The synthesis of the new matrices is straightforward and they provide (1) tunability of matrix background interfering ions and (2) enhanced analyte response for certain classes of compounds. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Microbial metabolomics with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, M.M.; Muilwijk, B.; Werf, M.J. van der; Hankemeier, T.

    2006-01-01

    An analytical method was set up suitable for the analysis of microbial metabolomes, consisting of an oximation and silylation derivatization reaction and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Microbial matrixes contain many compounds that potentially interfere with

  15. Micron Scale Mapping and Depth Profiling of Organic Compounds in Geologic Material: Femtosecond - Laser Desorption Laser Postionization - Mass Spectrometry (fs-LDPI-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasterski, M. J.; Barry, G. E.; Hanley, L.; Kenig, F. P. H.

    2017-12-01

    One of the major challenges within the field of organic geochemistry is to determine whether an observed biomarker signature is indigenous (emplaced during sedimentation), non-indigenous (emplaced after sedimentation) or contaminant (incorporated during sampling, storage or analysis). The challenge of determining the mode of emplacement of an observed biomarker signature is accentuated in analyses of Precambrian samples, and may be an issue upon Mars sample return. Current geochemical techniques (e.g. gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS, GC×GC-MS) can determine the composition and structure of the organic constituents of a sample. However, the preparatory steps necessary prior to GC-MS analysis (sample crushing, solvent extraction) make it impossible to determine the precise spatial distribution of organic molecules within rocks and sediments. Here, we will present data from the first set of micron (2-5 μm width × 8 μm depth) resolution MS-images of organic compounds in geologic material. Fs-LDPI-MS was utilized to create MS-images of organic compounds in four samples: (1) an Antarctic igneous dike used as a sample blank; (2) a 93 million year-old (Ma) burrowed carbonate collected near Pueblo, CO; (3) a 164 Ma organic rich mudstone collected in central England; and (4) a 2680 Ma metasediment collected in Timmins, ON, Canada. Prior to this study, all samples had been analyzed via GC-MS to determine the bulk hydrocarbon composition. For this study, thick sections (70-100 μm thick) were prepared in-house using custom-designed clean preparation techniques. Petrographic maps of the thick sections were created to highlight geologic features such as burrows (sample 2), particulate organic matter (sample 3) and hydrothermal veins (sample 4). Fs-LDPI-MS analysis was performed on the mapped thick sections. MS-images of targeted organic compounds were created, and the MS-images were overlain with the petrographic maps to determine the spatial distribution of the

  16. Mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of citrus limonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qingguo; Schwartz, Steven J

    2003-10-15

    Methods for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) of citrus limonoid aglycones and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of limonoid glucosides are reported. The fragmentation patterns of four citrus limonoid aglycones (limonin, nomilin, obacunone, and deacetylnomilin) and six limonoid glucosides, that is, limonin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (LG), nomilin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NG), nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NAG), deacetyl nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (DNAG), obacunone 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG), and obacunoic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OAG) were investigated using a quadruple mass spectrometer in low-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). The four limonoid aglycones and four limonoid glucosides (LG, OG, NAG, and DNAG) were purified from citrus seeds; the other two limonoid glucosides (NG and OAG) were tentatively identified in the crude extract of grapefruit seeds by ESI mass spectrometry in both positive and negative ion analysis. Ammonium hydroxide or acetic acid was added to the mobile phase to facilitate ionization. During positive ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, protonated molecular ion, [M + H]+, or adduct ion, [M + NH3 + H]-, was formed as base peaks when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. Molecular anions or adduct ions with acetic acid ([M + HOAc - H] and [M + HOAc]-) or a deprotonated molecular ion were produced during negative ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, depending on the mobile-phase modifier used. Positive ion ESI-MS of limonoid glucosides produced adduct ions of [M + H + NH3]+, [M + Na]+, and [M + K]+ when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. After collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the limonoid aglycone molecular ions in negative ion APCI analysis, fragment ions indicated structural information of the precursor ions, showing the presence of methyl, carboxyl, and oxygenated ring

  17. Silver nanostructures in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekuła, Justyna; Nizioł, Joanna; Rode, Wojciech; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-09-21

    Silver nanoparticles have been successfully applied as a matrix replacement for the laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). Nanoparticles, producing spectra with highly reduced chemical background in the low m/z region, are perfectly suited for low-molecular weight compound analysis and imaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can efficiently absorb ultraviolet laser radiation, transfer energy to the analyte and promote analyte desorption, but also constitute a source of silver ions suitable for analyte cationisation. This review provides an overview of the literature on silver nanomaterials as non-conventional desorption and ionization promoters in LDI-MS and mass spectrometry imaging.

  18. Analysis of endocrine disruptor compounds in marine sediments by in cell clean up-pressurized liquid extraction-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro-González, N; Turnes-Carou, I; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2014-12-10

    A less time-, solvent- and sorbent-consuming analytical methodology for the determination of bisphenol A and alkylphenols (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol) in marine sediment was developed and validated. The method was based on selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) with a simultaneous in cell clean up combined with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative mode (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The SPLE extraction conditions were optimized by a Plackett-Burman design followed by a central composite design. Quantitation was performed by standard addition curves in order to correct matrix effects. The analytical features of the method were satisfactory: relative recoveries varied between 94 and 100% and repeatability and intermediate precision were <6% for all compounds. Uncertainty assessment of measurement was estimated on the basis of an in-house validation according to EURACHEM/CITAC guide. Quantitation limits of the method (MQL) ranged between 0.17 (4-n-nonylphenol) and 4.01 ng g(-1) dry weight (nonylphenol). Sensitivity, selectivity, automaticity and fastness are the main advantages of this green methodology. As an application, marine sediment samples from Galicia coast (NW of Spain) were analysed. Nonylphenol and 4-tert-octylphenol were measured in all samples at concentrations between 20.1 and 1409 ng g(-1) dry weight, respectively. Sediment toxicity was estimated and no risk to aquatic biota was found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Doping-assisted low-pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for the real-time detection of lung cancer-related volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Xu, Ce; Shu, Jinian; Yang, Bo; Zou, Yao

    2017-04-01

    Real-time detection of lung cancer-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a promising, non-intrusive technique for lung cancer (LC) prescreening. In this study, a novel method was designed to enhance the detection selectivity and sensitivity of LC-related polar VOCs by dichloromethane (CH 2 Cl 2 ) doping-assisted low-pressure photoionization mass spectrometry (LPPI-MS). Compared with conventional LPPI-MS, CH 2 Cl 2 doping-assisted LPPI-MS boosted the peak intensities of n-propanol, n-pentanal, acetone, and butyl acetate in nitrogen specifically by 53, 18, 16, and 43 times, respectively. The signal intensities of their daughter ions were inhibited or reduced. At relative humidity (RH) of 20%, the sensitivities of n-propanol, n-pentanal, acetone, and butyl acetate detection ranged from 116 to 452 counts/ppbv with a detection time of 10s and R 2 >0.99 for the linear calibration curves. The method was also applicable under higher RH levels of 50% and 90%. Breath samples obtained from 10 volunteers and spiked samples were investigated. Eight-fold enhancements in the signal intensities of polar VOCs were observed in the normal and spiked samples. These preliminary results demonstrate the efficacy of the dichloromethane doping-assisted LPPI technique for the detection of LC-related polar VOCs. Further studies are indispensible to illustrating the detailed mechanism and applying the technique to breath diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in different colour carrot (Daucus carota L. cultivars using static headspace/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Güler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs as well as sugar and acid contents affect carrot flavour. This study compared VOCs in 11 carrot cultivars. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using static headspace technique was applied to analyse the VOCs. The number of VOCs per sample ranged from 17 to 31. The primarily VOCs identified in raw carrots with the exception of “Yellow Stone” were terpenes, ranging from 65 to 95%. The monoterpenes with values ranging from 31 to 89% were higher than those (from 2 to 15% of sesquiterpenes. Monoterpene α-terpinolene (with ranging from 23 to 63% and (--α-pinene (26%, and alcohol ethanol (35% was the main VOC in extracts from the nine carrot cultivars, “Purple” and “Yellow Stone”, respectively. As a result, among 16 identified monoterpenes, 7 monoterpenes (--α-pinene, (--β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, γ-terpinene, α-terpinolene and p-cymene constituted more than 60% of total VOCs identified in carrots including “Atomic Red”, “Nantes”, “Cosmic Purple”, “Red Samurai”, “Eregli Black”, “White Satin”, “Parmex” and “Baby Carrot”. Thus, these cultivars may advise to carrot breeders due to the beneficial effects of terpenes, especially monoterpenes on health.

  1. Odour-active compounds of Citrus deliciosa Tenore var. Caí essential oils detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Minteguiaga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mandarins are a complex taxonomic group including different species, cultivars and hybrids growing around the world being fruits greatly appreciated by the consumers. Citrus deliciosa Tenore var. Caí originates from Rio Grande do Sul State (Brazil and the fruit is characterised by its pleasant properties, especially its aroma. Aims: To evaluate the C. deliciosa cold-pressed essential oils, classified as “green”, “yellow” and “red” according to fruit maturity, and the one produced by distillation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O. Methods: The essential oils aromatic quality was evaluated by GC-O through a panel of trained judges. The identification of the volatile compounds was performed by GC-MS and their quantification by GC-FID. Results: The chemical composition of the three types of cold-pressed essential oils was very similar. However, the distilled oil presented a higher concentration of oxygenated monoterpenes (mainly α-terpineol, 4-terpineol and sabinene hydrates. Herbaceous and floral aromatic notes were able to describe the “green” oil, while for the distilled oil wood and unpleasant notes were perceived. Conclusions: The cold-pressed oils did not show nor chemical, or aromatic differences, by the fruit maturity. The distilled oil was characterized by aromatic nuances making the oil less appreciated (inferior quality than the cold-pressed oil. Probably as consequence of artifacts formation during the distillation process.

  2. Real-time monitoring of respiratory absorption factors of volatile organic compounds in ambient air by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhonghui [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yanli [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Center for Excellence in Urban Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Yan, Qiong [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou No. 12 People' s Hospital, Guangzhou 510620 (China); Zhang, Zhou [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Xinming, E-mail: wangxm@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Center for Excellence in Urban Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Respiratory absorption factors (AFs) are essential parameters in the evaluation of human health risks from toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air. A method for the real time monitoring of VOCs in inhaled and exhaled air by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) has been developed to permit the calculation of respiratory AFs of VOCs. Isoprene was found to be a better breath tracer than O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, humidity, or acetone for distinguishing between the expiratory and inspiratory phases, and a homemade online breath sampling device with a buffer tube was used to optimize signal peak shapes. Preliminary tests with seven subjects exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons in an indoor environment revealed mean respiratory AFs of 55.0%, 55.9%, and 66.9% for benzene, toluene, and C8-aromatics (ethylbenzene and xylenes), respectively. These AFs were lower than the values of 90% or 100% used in previous studies when assessing the health risks of inhalation exposure to hazardous VOCs. The mean respiratory AFs of benzene, toluene and C8-aromatics were 66.5%, 70.2% and 82.3% for the three female subjects; they were noticeably much higher than that of 46.4%, 45.2% and 55.3%, respectively, for the four male subjects.

  3. Enantioselective column coupled electrophoresis employing large bore capillaries hyphenated with tandem mass spectrometry for ultra-trace determination of chiral compounds in complex real samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piešťanský, Juraj; Maráková, Katarína; Kovaľ, Marián; Havránek, Emil; Mikuš, Peter

    2015-12-01

    A new multidimensional analytical approach for the ultra-trace determination of target chiral compounds in unpretreated complex real samples was developed in this work. The proposed analytical system provided high orthogonality due to on-line combination of three different methods (separation mechanisms), i.e. (1) isotachophoresis (ITP), (2) chiral capillary zone electrophoresis (chiral CZE), and (3) triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ MS). The ITP step, performed in a large bore capillary (800 μm), was utilized for the effective sample pretreatment (preconcentration and matrix clean-up) in a large injection volume (1-10 μL) enabling to obtain as low as ca. 80 pg/mL limits of detection for the target enantiomers in urine matrices. In the chiral CZE step, the different chiral selectors (neutral, ionizable, and permanently charged cyclodextrins) and buffer systems were tested in terms of enantioselectivity and influence on the MS detection response. The performance parameters of the optimized ITP - chiral CZE-QqQ MS method were evaluated according to the FDA guidance for bioanalytical method validation. Successful validation and application (enantioselective monitoring of renally eliminated pheniramine and its metabolite in human urine) highlighted great potential of this chiral approach in advanced enantioselective biomedical applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  5. Mass spectrometry imaging: Towards a lipid microscope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Laprévote, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Biological imaging techniques are the most efficient way to locally measure the variation of different parameters on tissue sections. These analyses are gaining increasing interest since 20 years and allow observing extremely complex biological phenomena at lower and lower time and resolution scale. Nevertheless, most of them only target very few compounds of interest, which are chosen a priori, due to their low resolution power and sensitivity. New chemical imaging technique has to be introduced in order to overcome these limitations, leading to more informative and sensitive analyses for biologists and physicians. Two major mass spectrometry methods can be efficiently used to generate the distribution of biological compounds over a tissue section. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) needs the co-crystallization of the sample with a matrix before to be irradiated by a laser, whereas the analyte is directly desorbed by a primary ion bombardment for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) experiments. In both cases, energy used for desorption/ionization is locally deposited -some tens of microns for the laser and some hundreds of nanometers for the ion beam- meaning that small areas over the surface sample can be separately analyzed. Step by step analysis allows spectrum acquisitions over the tissue sections and the data are treated by modern informatics software in order to create ion density maps, i.e., the intensity plot of one specific ion versus the (x,y) position. Main advantages of SIMS and MALDI compared to other chemical imaging techniques lie in the simultaneous acquisition of a large number of biological compounds in mixture with an excellent sensitivity obtained by Time-of-Flight (ToF) mass analyzer. Moreover, data treatment is done a posteriori, due to the fact that no compound is selectively marked, and let us access to the localization of different lipid classes in only one complete acquisition. Copyright © 2010

  6. Molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction using stable isotope labeled compounds as template and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for trace analysis of bisphenol A in water sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Migaku; Hayatsu, Yoshio; Nakata, Hisao; Ishii, Yumiko; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) using a stable isotope labeled compound as the template molecule and called it the ''isotope molecularly imprinted polymer'' (IMIP). In this study, bisphenol A (BPA) was used as the model compound. None imprinted polymer (NIP), MIP, dummy molecularly imprinted polymer (DMIP) and IMIP were prepared by the suspension polymerization method using without template, BPA, 4-tert-butylphenol (BP) and bisphenol A-d 16 (BPA-d 16 ), respectively. The polymers were subjected to molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MI-SPE), and the extracted samples were subjected to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Although the leakage of BPA-d 16 from the IMIP was observed and that of BPA was not observed. The selectivity factors of MIP and IMIP for BPA were 4.45 and 4.43, respectively. Therefore, IMIP had the same molecular recognition ability as MIP. When MI-SPE with IMIP was used and followed by LC-MS in the analysis of river water sample, the detection limit of BPA was 1 ppt with high sensitivity. Moreover, the average recovery was higher than 99.8% (R.S.D.: 3.7%) by using bisphenol A- 13 C 12 (BPA- 13 C 12 ) as the surrogate standard. In addition, the IMIP were employed in MI-SPE of BPA in river water sample by LC-MS. The concentration of BPA in the river water sample was determined to be 32 pg ml -1 . We confirmed that it was possible to measure trace amounts of a target analyte by MI-SPE using IMIP

  7. Use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry and a conventional flask test to identify off-flavor compounds generated from phenylalanine during chlorination of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Taku; Sakuma, Miki; Tazawa, Shiori; Hatase, Taiki; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Matsui, Yoshihiko

    2017-11-15

    Off-flavor in drinking water can be caused by transformation products (TPs) generated from organic compounds, such as amino acids, present during chlorination. However, the contributions of many of these TPs to overall off-flavor have not been quantified, mainly because the lack of appropriate chemical standards prevents sensory evaluation by means of a conventional flask test. In the present study, we used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O) to identify compounds responsible for the off-flavor generated by chlorination of an aqueous solution of the amino acid phenylalanine, and we propose a sensory evaluation procedure for quantification of the contributions of the identified TPs to the overall off-flavor, regardless of the availability of chemical standards of the TPs. GC-MS-O revealed that two TPs, N-chlorophenylacetaldimine and 2-chloro-2-phenylacetaldehyde, for which chemical standards are not commercially available, were the main components responsible for the off-flavor of the chlorinated solution. By using a sensory evaluation procedure involving a combination of GC-MS-O and a conventional flask test, we quantified the contributions of TPs to the overall off-flavor of the chlorinated solution. Approximately 60% of the off-flavor was attributable to free chlorine (13%), 2-chloro-2-phenylacetaldehyde (13%), trichloramine (12%) phenylacetaldehyde (11%) phenylacetonitrile (8%), and N-chlorophenylacetaldimine (2%). Treatment with powdered activated carbon (PAC) removed the off-flavor. Experiments with chlorination of 15 N-labeled phenylalanine suggested that PAC reductively decomposed trichloramine into N 2 gas and adsorbed all of the other identified TPs. Superfine PAC (median diameter, 0.7 μm) removed the off-flavor more rapidly than normal-size PAC (median diameter, 8.0 μm). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorocarbon-bonded magnetic mesoporous microspheres for the analysis of perfluorinated compounds in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaodan; Yu, Yingjia; Li, Yan; Zhang, Haiying; Ling, Jin; Sun, Xueni; Feng, Jianan; Duan, Gengli

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New SPE method was developed for analysis of PFCs in human serum. • Fluorocarbon-bonded magnetic mesoporous microspheres were used as SPE absorbents. • PFCs in serum were directly extracted without any other pretreatment procedure. • The PFCs-adsorbed microspheres were simply and rapidly isolated by using a magnet. - Abstract: We report herein an extraction method for the analysis of perfluorinated compounds in human serum based on magnetic core–mesoporous shell microspheres with decyl-perfluorinated interior pore-walls (Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 -F 17 ). Thanks to the unique properties of the Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 -F 17 microspheres, macromolecules like proteins could be easily excluded from the mesoporous channels due to size exclusion effect, and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in protein-rich biosamples such as serum could thus be directly extracted with the fluorocarbon modified on the channel wall without any other pretreatment procedure. The PFCs adsorbed Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 -F 17 microspheres could then be simply and rapidly isolated by using a magnet, followed by being identified and quantified by LC–MS/MS (high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry). Five perfluorinatedcarboxylic acids (C6, C8–C11) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) were selected as model analytes. In order to achieve the best extraction efficiency, some important factors including the amount of Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 -F 17 microspheres added, adsorption time, type of elution solvent, eluting solvent volume and elution time were investigated. The ranges of the LOD were 0.02–0.05 ng mL −1 for the six PFCs. The recovery of the optimized method varies from 83.13% to 92.42% for human serum samples

  9. Determination of volatile organic compounds in water by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with triple quadrupole analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervera, M.I.; Beltran, J.; Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Employing a statistical optimization improves results reducing experiments. → Use of MS (QqQ) allows high sensitivity determination and improves identification capabilities. → Using Q/q intensity ratios is a powerful tool to ensure compound identification. → HS SPME GC-MS/MS method allows determination of VOCs in complex matrix water samples. - Abstract: In the present work, a rapid method with little sample handling has been developed for determination of 23 selected volatile organic compounds in environmental and wastewater samples. The method is based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) determination using triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ) in electron ionization mode. The best conditions for extraction were optimised with a factorial design taking into account the interaction between different parameters and not only individual effects of variables. In the optimized procedure, 4 mL of water sample were extracted using a 10 mL vial and adding 0.4 g NaCl (final NaCl content of 10%). An SPME extraction with carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane 75 μm fiber for 30 min at 50 deg. C (with 5 min of previous equilibration time) with magnetic stirring was applied. Chromatographic determination was carried out by GC-MS/MS working in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode. For most analytes, two MS/MS transitions were acquired, although for a few compounds it was difficult to obtain characteristic abundant fragments. In those cases, a pseudo selected reaction monitoring (pseudo-SRM) with three ions was used instead. The intensity ratio between quantitation (Q) and confirmation (q) signals was used as a confirmatory parameter. The method was validated by means of recovery experiments (n = 6) spiking mineral water samples at three concentration levels (0.1, 5 and 50 μg L -1 ). Recoveries between 70% and 120% were generally obtained with relative standard deviations (RSDs

  10. Determination of volatile organic compounds in water by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with triple quadrupole analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervera, M.I. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Beltran, J., E-mail: joaquim.beltran@uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} Employing a statistical optimization improves results reducing experiments. {yields} Use of MS (QqQ) allows high sensitivity determination and improves identification capabilities. {yields} Using Q/q intensity ratios is a powerful tool to ensure compound identification. {yields} HS SPME GC-MS/MS method allows determination of VOCs in complex matrix water samples. - Abstract: In the present work, a rapid method with little sample handling has been developed for determination of 23 selected volatile organic compounds in environmental and wastewater samples. The method is based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) determination using triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ) in electron ionization mode. The best conditions for extraction were optimised with a factorial design taking into account the interaction between different parameters and not only individual effects of variables. In the optimized procedure, 4 mL of water sample were extracted using a 10 mL vial and adding 0.4 g NaCl (final NaCl content of 10%). An SPME extraction with carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane 75 {mu}m fiber for 30 min at 50 deg. C (with 5 min of previous equilibration time) with magnetic stirring was applied. Chromatographic determination was carried out by GC-MS/MS working in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode. For most analytes, two MS/MS transitions were acquired, although for a few compounds it was difficult to obtain characteristic abundant fragments. In those cases, a pseudo selected reaction monitoring (pseudo-SRM) with three ions was used instead. The intensity ratio between quantitation (Q) and confirmation (q) signals was used as a confirmatory parameter. The method was validated by means of recovery experiments (n = 6) spiking mineral water samples at three concentration levels (0.1, 5 and 50 {mu}g L{sup -1}). Recoveries between 70% and 120% were generally obtained with

  11. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  12. Antioxidant activity and identification of bioactive compounds from leaves of Anthocephalus cadamba by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madhu Chandel; Upendra Sharma; Neeraj Kumar; Bikram Singh; Satwinderjeet Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant potential of different extract/fractions of Anthocephalus cadamba (A. cadamba) (Roxb.) Miq. (Rubiaceae) and study the tentative identification of their active constituents. Methods: The extract/fractions were screened for antioxidant activity using various in vitro assays viz. DPPH assay, ABTS assay, superoxide anion radical scavenging assay, reducing power assay and plasmid DNA nicking assay. Total phenolic content of extract/fractions was determined by colorimetric method. An ultra-performance LC-electrospray-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry method was used to analyse the active constituents of extract/fractions of A. cadamba. Results: The ethyl acetate fraction was found to be most active fraction in all the assays as compared to other extract/fractions. The IC50 value of ethyl acetate fraction (ETAC fraction) was 21.24 μg/mL, 1.12 μg/mL, 9.68 μg/mL and 57.81 μg/mL in DPPH assay, ABTS assay, reducing power assay and superoxide scavenging assay respectively. All the extract/fractions also showed the potential to protect the plasmid DNA (pBR322) against the attack of hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton’s reagent. The bioactive compounds were identified by UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS, by comparing the mass and λmax with literature values. Conclusions: The potential of the extract/fractions to scavenge different free radicals in different systems indicated that they may be useful therapeutic agents for treating radical-related pathologic damage.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.; Langman, Loralie J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used i...

  14. Analysis of Selected Carbonyl Compounds in Tobacco Samples by Using Pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine Derivatization and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Mingliang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nous avons mis au point une méthode, à la fois fiable, précise et simple, d’analyse courante des composés carbonylés, en ce compris le formaldéhyde, l’acétaldéhyde, l’acétone, le propionaldéhyde, la méthyléthylcétone (MEC, le butyraldéhyde et le crotonaldéhyde, présents à l’état de traces dans les produits de tabac ouvré. Un échantillon d’un gramme de tabac, additionné d’un mélange de carbonyles marqués d’un isotope en guise de normes internes, a été extrait par l’eau. Une part de l’extrait aqueux a subi un processus de dérivatisation à l’aide de chlorhydrate d’o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyle-hydroxylamine (PFBHA. Les dérivés carbonylés obtenus à l’aide du PFBHA ont ensuite été extraits par l’hexane et analysés par chromatographie en phase gazeuse couplée à la spectrométrie de masse (GC-MS. La précision et l’exactitude de la méthode ont été évaluées au regard d’une cigarette de référence Kentucky « additionnée » 3R4F et de produits de référence sans fumée CORESTA CRP1, CRP2, CRP3 et CRP4. Eu égard aux composés carbonylés analysés, d’excellents taux de précision (5-10% et de récupération (95-107% ont été observés avec divers produits du tabac « additionnés », à l’exception de l’acroléine, qui s’est avérée instable dans tous les produits du tabac testés. L’intervalle linéaire de la méthode mise au point s’est étendu de 0,07 à 36 μg/g avec des limites de quantification variant de 0,10 à 0,15 μg/g. Grâce à la présente méthode, le formaldéhyde (0,31-6,24 μg/g et l’acétaldéhyde (0,84- 17,7 μg/g ont été décelés dans tous les produits de référence testés. L’acétone (0,55-2,12 μg/g a été trouvée dans les produits 3R4F, CRP1, CRP2 et CRP3. Des niveaux décelables de propionaldéhyde n’ont été observés que dans les produits CRP1 et CRP3. Les niveaux de MEC, butyraldéhyde et crotonaldéhyde décelés dans tous

  15. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  16. Functional genomics by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M

    2000-01-01

    Systematic analysis of the function of genes can take place at the oligonucleotide or protein level. The latter has the advantage of being closest to function, since it is proteins that perform most of the reactions necessary for the cell. For most protein based ('proteomic') approaches to gene f...... numbers of intact proteins by mass spectrometry directly. Examples from this laboratory illustrate biological problem solving by modern mass spectrometric techniques. These include the analysis of the structure and function of the nucleolus and the analysis of signaling complexes....

  17. Screening for anabolic steroids and related compounds in illegal cocktails by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry with accurate mass measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Vissers, J.P.C.; Fuchs, R.E.M.; Velde, van J.W.; Lommen, A.

    2001-01-01

    Findings of illegal hormone preparations such as syringes, bottles, cocktails, and so on, are an important information source for the nature of the current abuse of anabolic steroids and related compounds as growth-promoting agents in cattle. A new screening method for steroids in cocktails is

  18. Rapid isolation of biomarkers for compound specific radiocarbon dating using high-performance liquid chromatography and flow injection analysis-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Smittenberg, R.H.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.

    2002-01-01

    Repeated semi-preparative normal-phase HPLC was performed to isolate selected biomarkers from sediment extracts for radiocarbon analysis. Flow injection analysis mass spectrometry was used for rapid analysis of collected fractions to evaluate the separation procedure, taking only 1 min per fraction.

  19. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B V; Clarke, M; Hu, H; Betz, [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Enhancement of sensitivity in the determination of organic trace compounds in complex matrices with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascher, D.G.

    2002-05-01

    The PhD-thesis deals with 'enhancement of sensitivity in the determination of organic trace compounds in complex matrices with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)'. Almost the most important factor is the enhancement of the ionization yield with Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI) or Electrospray Ionization (ESI) in LC-MS. Ionization yields of different compounds can vary by a factor of 10000. Three ways to solve this problem of little ionization yield were tried: 1) Modification of the mobile phase in HPLC 2) Chemical modification of the analytes 3) A new type of ionization called Atmospheric Pressure Photo Ionization (APPI). ad 1) By using specific additives to mobile phases ion suppression that might derive from an ion pair reagent that was necessary for chromatography could be omitted. General remarks cannot be done. ad 2) Chemical modification or so called derivatization is well known for UV- and fluorescence-detection for a long period of time. As substances containing nitrogene (e.g. primary, secondary or tertiary amines) often have good ionization yields, poor or relatively poor ionizable substances like carboxylic acids, sugars and partially phenolic steroids were used as analytes for derivatization reactions. By using Dansyl as Dansylchlorid or Dansylhydrazine a basic derivatization agent could be found that ionizes very well. A 200 times more sensitive determination of estrogenes is possible after derivatization with Dansylchlorid. Using a tandem-mass-spectrometer a lower limit of quantification of 2 pg/mL plasma could be reached by using 1 mL of plasma. For ketones like carvon and campher an enhancement by a factor of 500 and 4000 could be reached by using Dansylhydrazine as the derivatization agent. For fatty acids DMEQ as derivatization agent enhanced the sensitivity by a factor of 20 to 100. ad 3) APPI as a new ionization mode showed really good results for specific molecules. Relatively unpolar substances as diphenylsulfide

  2. Ninth ISMAS workshop on mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.

    2000-12-01

    Mass spectrometry has wide-ranging applications in such diverse areas as nuclear industry, agriculture, drugs, environment, petroleum and lentils. There is an urgent need to absorb and assimilate state-of-the-art technological developments in the field. Emerging trends in atomic mass spectrometry, advances in organic mass spectrometry, qualitative and quantitative analyses by mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry in oceanography are some of the areas that need to be expeditiously examined and are covered in this volume. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Determination of steroid hormones and related compounds in filtered and unfiltered water by solid-phase extraction, derivatization, and gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Lindley, Chris E.; Losche, Scott A.; Barber, Larry B.

    2012-01-01

    activated -methyl--trimethylsilyl trifluoroacetamide at 65 degrees Celsius for 1 hour to form trimethylsilyl or trimethylsilyl-enol ether derivatives that are more amenable to gas chromatographic separation than the underivatized compounds. Analysis is carried out by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry using calibration standards that are derivatized concurrently with the sample extracts. Analyte concentrations are quantified relative to specific IDS compounds in the sample, which directly compensate for procedural losses (incomplete recovery) in the determined and reported analyte concentrations. Thus, reported analyte concentrations (or analyte recoveries for spiked samples) are corrected based on recovery of the corresponding IDS compound during the quantification process. Recovery for each IDS compound is reported for each sample and represents an absolute recovery in a manner comparable to surrogate recoveries for other organic methods used by the National Water Quality Laboratory. Thus, IDS recoveries provide a useful tool for evaluating sample-specific analytical performance from an absolute mass recovery standpoint. IDS absolute recovery will differ and typically be lower than the corresponding analyte’s method recovery in spiked samples. However, additional correction of reported analyte concentrations is unnecessary and inappropriate because the analyte concentration (or recovery) already is compensated for by the isotope-dilution quantification procedure. Method analytes were spiked at 10 and 100 nanograms per liter (ng/L) for most analytes (10 times greater spike levels were used for bisphenol A and 100 times greater spike levels were used for 3--coprostanol and cholesterol) into the following validation-sample matrices: reagent water, wastewater-affected surface water, a secondary-treated wastewater effluent, and a primary (no biological treatment) wastewater effluent. Overall method recovery for all analytes in these matrices averaged 100

  4. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  5. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  6. Benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling for quantitation of guanidino and ureido compounds in thyroid tissues by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Ruo-Jing; Guan, Qing; Zhang, Fang; Leng, Jia-Peng; Sun, Tuan-Qi; Guo, Yin-Long

    2016-01-01

    Benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling (BRSIL) was explored to quantify the guanidino and ureido compounds (GCs and UCs). This method employed a common reagent, benzil, to label the guanidino and ureido groups through nucleophilic attacking then benzylic migrating. The use of BRSIL was investigated in the analysis of five GCs (creatine, L-arginine, homoarginine, 4-guanidinobutyric acid, and methylguanidine) and two UCs (urea and citrulline). The labeling was found simple and specific. The introduction of bi-phenyl group and the generation of nitrogen heterocyclic ring in the benzil-d0/d5 labeled GCs and UCs improved the retention behaviors in liquid chromatography (LC) and increased the sensitivity of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) detection. The fragment ion pairs of m/z 182/187 and m/z 210/215 from the benzil-d0/d5 tags facilitated the discovery of potential GCs and UCs candidates residing in biological matrices. The use of BRSIL combined with LC-ESI MS was applied for simultaneously quantitation of GCs and UCs in thyroid tissues. It was demonstrated that nine GCs and UCs were detected, six of which were further quantified based on corresponding standards. It was concluded that five GCs and UCs (L-arginine, homoarginine, 4-guanidinobutyric acid, methylguanidine, and citrulline) were statistically significantly different (p < 0.05) between the para-carcinoma and carcinoma thyroid tissue samples. - Highlights: • A common reagent, benzil-d0/d5 was employed to label the GCs and UCs through BRSIL. • The benzil-d0/d5 labeling improved the retention behavior in RPLC and increased the sensitivity by ESI MS detection. • BRSIL coupled with LC-ESI MS was applied to the qualitation and quantitation of GCs and UCs in thyroid tissues.

  7. Annotation of metabolites from gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry data using an in silico generated compound database and MetFrag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttkies, Christoph; Strehmel, Nadine; Scheel, Dierk; Neumann, Steffen

    2015-08-30

    Gas chromatography (GC) coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-QTOFMS) is an emerging technology in metabolomics. Reference spectra for GC/APCI-MS/MS barely exist; therefore, in silico fragmentation approaches and structure databases are prerequisites for annotation. To expand the limited coverage of derivatised structures in structure databases, in silico derivatisation procedures are required. A cheminformatics workflow has been developed for in silico derivatisation of compounds found in KEGG and PubChem, and validated on the Golm Metabolome Database (GMD). To demonstrate this workflow, these in silico generated databases were applied together with MetFrag to APCI-MS/MS spectra acquired from GC/APCI-MS/MS profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana and Solanum tuberosum. The Metabolite-Likeness of the original candidate structure was included as additional scoring term aiming at candidate structures of natural origin. The validation of our in silico derivatisation workflow on the GMD showed a true positive rate of 94%. MetFrag was applied to two datasets. In silico derivatisation of the KEGG and PubChem database served as a candidate source. For both datasets the Metabolite-Likeness score improved the identification performance. The derivatised data sources have been included into the MetFrag web application for the annotation of GC/APCI-MS/MS spectra. We demonstrated that MetFrag can support the identification of components from GC/APCI-MS/MS profiles, especially in the (common) case where reference spectra are not available. This workflow can be easily adapted to other types of derivatisation and is freely accessible together with the generated structure databases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling for quantitation of guanidino and ureido compounds in thyroid tissues by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ruo-Jing [State Key Laboratory of Organmetallic Chemistry and National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Guan, Qing [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Zhang, Fang, E-mail: fzhang@sioc.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organmetallic Chemistry and National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Leng, Jia-Peng [State Key Laboratory of Organmetallic Chemistry and National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Sun, Tuan-Qi, E-mail: tuanqisun@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Guo, Yin-Long, E-mail: ylguo@sioc.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organmetallic Chemistry and National Center for Organic Mass Spectrometry in Shanghai, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 345 Lingling Road, Shanghai, 200032 (China)

    2016-02-18

    Benzylic rearrangement stable isotope labeling (BRSIL) was explored to quantify the guanidino and ureido compounds (GCs and UCs). This method employed a common reagent, benzil, to label the guanidino and ureido groups through nucleophilic attacking then benzylic migrating. The use of BRSIL was investigated in the analysis of five GCs (creatine, L-arginine, homoarginine, 4-guanidinobutyric acid, and methylguanidine) and two UCs (urea and citrulline). The labeling was found simple and specific. The introduction of bi-phenyl group and the generation of nitrogen heterocyclic ring in the benzil-d0/d5 labeled GCs and UCs improved the retention behaviors in liquid chromatography (LC) and increased the sensitivity of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) detection. The fragment ion pairs of m/z 182/187 and m/z 210/215 from the benzil-d0/d5 tags facilitated the discovery of potential GCs and UCs candidates residing in biological matrices. The use of BRSIL combined with LC-ESI MS was applied for simultaneously quantitation of GCs and UCs in thyroid tissues. It was demonstrated that nine GCs and UCs were detected, six of which were further quantified based on corresponding standards. It was concluded that five GCs and UCs (L-arginine, homoarginine, 4-guanidinobutyric acid, methylguanidine, and citrulline) were statistically significantly different (p < 0.05) between the para-carcinoma and carcinoma thyroid tissue samples. - Highlights: • A common reagent, benzil-d0/d5 was employed to label the GCs and UCs through BRSIL. • The benzil-d0/d5 labeling improved the retention behavior in RPLC and increased the sensitivity by ESI MS detection. • BRSIL coupled with LC-ESI MS was applied to the qualitation and quantitation of GCs and UCs in thyroid tissues.

  9. Non-targeted, high resolution mass spectrometry strategy for simultaneous monitoring of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds in green sea turtles on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Amy L; Gómez-Ramos, Maria M; Gaus, Caroline; Vijayasarathy, Soumini; Bell, Ian; Hof, Christine; Mueller, Jochen F; Gómez-Ramos, Maria J

    2017-12-01

    Chemical contamination poses a threat to ecosystem, biota and human health, and identifying these hazards is a complex challenge. Traditional hazard identification relies on a priori-defined targets of limited chemical scope, and is generally inappropriate for exploratory studies such as explaining toxicological effects in environmental systems. Here we present a non-target high resolution mass spectrometry environmental monitoring study with multivariate statistical analysis to simultaneously detect biomarkers of exposure (e.g. xenobiotics) and biomarkers of effect in whole turtle blood. Borrowing the concept from clinical chemistry, a case-control sampling approach was used to investigate the potential influence of xenobiotics of anthropogenic origin on free-ranging green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) from a remote, offshore 'control' site; and two coastal 'case' sites influenced by urban/industrial and agricultural activities, respectively, on the Great Barrier Reef in North Queensland, Australia. Multiple biomarkers of exposure, including sulfonic acids (n=9), a carbamate insecticide metabolite, and other industrial chemicals; and five biomarkers of effect (lipid peroxidation products), were detected in case sites. Additionally, two endogenous biomarkers of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress were identified, and showed moderate-to-strong correlations with clinical measures of inflammation and liver dysfunction. Our data filtering strategy overcomes limitations of traditional a priori selection of target compounds, and adds to the limited environmental xenobiotic metabolomics literature. To our knowledge this is the first case-control study of xenobiotics in marine megafauna, and demonstrates the utility of green sea turtles to link internal and external exposure, to explain potential toxicological effects in environmental systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry multiresidue method for the analysis of quaternary ammonium compounds in cheese and milk products: Development and validation using the total error approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Kahina; Féret, Aurélie; Pirotais, Yvette; Maris, Pierre; Abjean, Jean-Pierre; Hurtaud-Pessel, Dominique

    2017-09-29

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are both cationic surfactants and biocidal substances widely used as disinfectants in the food industry. A sensitive and reliable method for the analysis of benzalkonium chlorides (BACs) and dialkyldimethylammonium chlorides (DDACs) has been developed that enables the simultaneous quantitative determination of ten quaternary ammonium residues in dairy products below the provisional maximum residue level (MRL), set at 0.1mgkg -1 . To the best of our knowledge, this method could be the one applicable to milk and to three major processed milk products selected, namely processed or hard pressed cheeses, and whole milk powder. The method comprises solvent extraction using a mixture of acetonitrile and ethyl acetate, without any further clean-up. Analyses were performed by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry detection (LC-ESI-MS/MS) operating in positive mode. A C18 analytical column was used for chromatographic separation, with a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and water both containing 0.3% formic acid; and methanol in the gradient mode. Five deuterated internal standards were added to obtain the most accurate quantification. Extraction recoveries were satisfactory and no matrix effects were observed. The method was validated using the total error approach in accordance with the NF V03-110 standard in order to characterize the trueness, repeatability, intermediate precision and analytical limits within the range of 5-150μgkg -1 for all matrices. These performance criteria, calculated by e.noval ® 3.0 software, were satisfactory and in full accordance with the proposed provisional MRL and with the recommendations in the European Union SANTE/11945/2015 regulatory guidelines. The limit of detection (LOD) was low (ammoniums in foodstuffs from dairy industries at residue levels, and could be used for biocide residues monitoring plans and to measure the exposition consumer to biocides products

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease and patterns of volatile organic compounds in the exhaled breath of children: A case-control study using Ion Molecule Reaction-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monasta, Lorenzo; Pierobon, Chiara; Princivalle, Andrea; Martelossi, Stefano; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Pasini, Francesco; Perbellini, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) profoundly affect quality of life and have been gradually increasing in incidence, prevalence and severity in many areas of the world, and in children in particular. Patients with suspected IBD require careful history and clinical examination, while definitive diagnosis relies on endoscopic and histological findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the alveolar air of pediatric patients with IBD presents a specific volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) pattern when compared to controls. Patients 10-17 years of age, were divided into four groups: Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), controls with gastrointestinal symptomatology, and surgical controls with no evidence of gastrointestinal problems. Alveolar breath was analyzed by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry. Four models were built starting from 81 molecules plus the age of subjects as independent variables, adopting a penalizing LASSO logistic regression approach: 1) IBDs vs. controls, finally based on 18 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 95%, specificity = 69%, AUC = 0.925); 2) CD vs. UC, finally based on 13 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 76%, AUC = 0.934); 3) IBDs vs. gastroenterological controls, finally based on 15 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 65%, AUC = 0.918); 4) IBDs vs. controls, built starting from the 21 directly or indirectly calibrated molecules only, and finally based on 12 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 71%, AUC = 0.888). The molecules identified by the models were carefully studied in relation to the concerned outcomes. This study, with the creation of models based on VOCs profiles, precise instrumentation and advanced statistical methods, can contribute to the development of new non-invasive, fast and relatively inexpensive diagnostic tools, with high sensitivity and specificity. It also represents a crucial step towards gaining further insights on the etiology of IBD through the

  12. Imaging mass spectrometry in drug development and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-06-01

    During the last decades, imaging mass spectrometry has gained significant relevance in biomedical research. Recent advances in imaging mass spectrometry have paved the way for in situ studies on drug development, metabolism and toxicology. In contrast to whole-body autoradiography that images the localization of radiolabeled compounds, imaging mass spectrometry provides the possibility to simultaneously determine the discrete tissue distribution of the parent compound and its metabolites. In addition, imaging mass spectrometry features high molecular specificity and allows comprehensive, multiplexed detection and localization of hundreds of proteins, peptides and lipids directly in tissues. Toxicologists traditionally screen for adverse findings by histopathological examination. However, studies of the molecular and cellular processes underpinning toxicological and pathologic findings induced by candidate drugs or toxins are important to reach a mechanistic understanding and an effective risk assessment strategy. One of IMS strengths is the ability to directly overlay the molecular information from the mass spectrometric analysis with the tissue section and allow correlative comparisons of molecular and histologic information. Imaging mass spectrometry could therefore be a powerful tool for omics profiling of pharmacological/toxicological effects of drug candidates and toxicants in discrete tissue regions. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of imaging mass spectrometry, with particular focus on MALDI imaging mass spectrometry, and its use in drug development and toxicology in general.

  13. Rapid identification and quantitation of compounds with forensic interest using fast liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry and library searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlainen, Katja; Sippola, Erkki; Kostiainen, Risto

    2003-04-25

    A fast liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method by using a monolithic column, gradient elution and ion trap mass spectrometer was developed for 14 forensically interesting and chemically different compounds. All compounds were eluted within 2.5 min and the total analysis time was 5 min including stabilisation time required for the next injection. All the compounds, basics, neutrals and acids were efficiently ionised by positive ion ESI. A laboratory library including MS-MS spectra and retention times was developed and tested. Results with 476 standard samples and 50 authentic samples showed that the compounds studied can be unambiguously identified with the library. A quantitative method was developed for the compounds using external calibration. The evaluation process showed good linearity of the method and reasonable repeatability. Limits of detection ranged from 10.0 to 50.0 ng/ml.

  14. Principle of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    The principle of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is described mainly on technical aspects: hardware construction of AMS, measurement of isotope ratio, sensitivity of measurement (measuring limit), measuring accuracy, and application of data. The content may be summarized as follows: rare isotope (often long-lived radioactive isotope) can be detected by various use of the ion energy obtained by the acceleration of ions, a measurable isotope ratio is one of rare isotope to abundant isotopes, and a measured value of isotope ratio is uncertainty to true one. Such a fact must be kept in mind on the use of AMS data to application research. (M.H.)

  15. Rapid fingerprinting of sterols and related compounds in vegetable and animal oils and phytosterol enriched- margarines by transmission mode direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberici, Rosana M; Fernandes, Gabriel D; Porcari, Andréia M; Eberlin, Marcos N; Barrera-Arellano, Daniel; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-11-15

    Plant-derived sterols, often referred to as phytosterols, are important constituents of plant membranes where they assist in maintaining phospholipid bilayer stability. Consumption of phytosterols has been suggested to positively affect human health by reducing cholesterol levels in blood via inhibition of its absorption in the small intestine, thus protecting against heart attack and stroke. Sterols are challenging analytes for mass spectrometry, since their low polarity makes them difficult to ionize by both electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), typically requiring derivatization steps to overcome their low ionization efficiencies. We present a fast and reliable method to characterize the composition of phytosterols in vegetable oils and enriched margarines. The method requires no derivatization steps or sample extraction procedures thanks to the use of transmission mode direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (TM-DART-MS). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindic, M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft ionization techniques, electrospray (ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI make the analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry (MS possible. MS is used for determination of the molecular weight of peptides and protein, sequence analysis, characterization of protein-ligand interactions etc. The detection limit, resolution and mass accuracy depend on instrument used (Table 1. Impurities (buffers, salts, detergents can reduce the ion intensities or even totally suppress them, so a separation method (chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis must be used for purification of the sample.Molecular mass of intact protein can be determined by ESI or MALDI MS. Multiply charged ions are produced by ESI MS, while singly charged ions are predominant in MALDI spectra (Fig. 2.Sequence analysis of proteins by MS can be performed using peptide mass fingerprint. In this method, proteins are separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis and digested with specific protease (Table 2 or digested and then separated by two-dimensional chromatography (Fig. 1. The obtained peptide mixtures are analyzed by MS or MALDI-TOF technique. The masses determined by MS are compared with calculated masses from database entries. Different algorithms have been developed for protein identification. Example of posttranslational modifications (N- and O-glycosylation and protein sequence complex analysis after dual digestion (endoproteinase digestion followed by endoglycosidase digestion is shown in Fig. 3.It is known that detection of peptides by MS is influenced by intrinsic properties like amino acid composition, the basicity of the C-terminal amino acid, hydrophobicity, etc. Arginine-containing peptides dominate in MS spectra of tryptic digest, so the chemical derivatization of lysine terminal residue by O-methilisourea or 2-methoxy-4,5-1H-imidazole was suggested (Fig. 4.The peptide mass fingerprint method can be improved further by peptide fragmentation using tandem

  17. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the analysis of acidic compounds in atmospheric aerosols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pól, Jaroslav; Hohnová, B.; Jussila, M.; Hyötyläinen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1130, č. 1 (2006), s. 64-71 ISSN 0021-9673. [International Symposium on Hyphenated Techniques in Chromatography and Hyphenated Chromatographic Analyzers /9./. York, 08.02.2006-10.02.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography * time-of-flight mass spectrometry * atmospheric aerosol analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.554, year: 2006

  18. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  19. Ion detection in mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolbach, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    This course aims at providing some elements for a better understanding of ion detectors used in mass spectrometers, of their operations, and of their limitations. A first part addresses the functions and properties of an ideal detector, how to detect ions in gas phase, and particle detectors and ion detectors used in mass spectrometry. The second part proposes an overview of currently used detectors with respect to their operation principle: detection from the ion charge (Faraday cylinder), detection by inductive effects (FTICR, Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance), and detection by secondary electron emission. The third part discusses the specificities of secondary electron emission. The fourth one addresses operating modes and parameters related to detectors. The sixth part proposes a prospective view on future detectors by addressing the following issues: cryo-detector, inductive effect and charge detectors, ion detection and nano materials

  20. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M; Jannetto, Paul J; Langman, Loralie J

    2016-12-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS n ) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology.

  1. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MSn) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology. PMID:28149262

  2. A statistical analysis of volatile organic compounds observed during the TEXAQS2000 air quality study at LaPorte, Tx, using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuster, B.; Williams, E.; Fehsenfeld, F.; Jobson, T.; Fall, R.; Lindinger, W.; Karl, T.

    2002-01-01

    Statistical analysis of online VOC measurements obtained by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) during the TEXAQS2000 intensive period is presented. The experiment was based at the La Porte site, near the Houston ship channel (HSC), and deployed for continuous long-term monitoring. Multivariate techniques helped to identify various VOC sources in the vicinity of HSC and distinguish between different anthropogenic emissions. An assessment is given of the selectivity and interpretation of mass scans from this online technique in complex urban and industrial VOC matrix. (author)

  3. Improved quantification of livestock associated odorous volatile organic compounds in a standard flow-through system using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuyan; Zhu, Wenda; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Jenks, William S; Laor, Yael; Leeuwen, J Hans van; Hoff, Steven J

    2015-10-02

    Aerial emissions of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are an important nuisance factor from livestock production systems. Reliable air sampling and analysis methods are needed to develop and test odor mitigation technologies. Quantification of VOCs responsible for livestock odor remains an analytical challenge due to physicochemical properties of VOCs and the requirement for low detection thresholds. A new air sampling and analysis method was developed for testing of odor/VOCs mitigation in simulated livestock emissions system. A flow-through standard gas generating system simulating odorous VOCs in livestock barn emissions was built on laboratory scale and tested to continuously generate ten odorous VOCs commonly defining livestock odor. Standard VOCs included sulfur VOCs (S-VOCs), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), and p-cresol. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was optimized for sampling of diluted odorous gas mixtures in the moving air followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. CAR/PDMS 85μm fiber was shown to have the best sensitivity for the target odorous VOCs. A practical 5-min sampling time was selected to ensure optimal extraction of VFAs and p-cresol, as well as minimum displacement of S-VOCs. Method detection limits ranged from 0.39 to 2.64ppbv for S-VOCs, 0.23 to 0.77ppbv for VFAs, and 0.31ppbv for p-cresol. The method developed was applied to quantify VOCs and odorous VOC mitigation with UV light treatment. The measured concentrations ranged from 20.1 to 815ppbv for S-VOCs, 10.3 to 315ppbv for VFAs, and 4.73 to 417ppbv for p-cresol. Relative standard deviations between replicates ranged from 0.67% to 12.9%, 0.50% to 11.4%, 0.83% to 5.14% for S-VOCs, VFAs, and p-cresol, respectively. This research shows that a simple manual SPME sampler could be used successfully for quantification of important classes of odorous VOCs at concentrations relevant for real aerial emissions from livestock operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  4. Analysis of factors affecting volatile compound formation in roasted pumpkin seeds with selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) and sensory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, T; Barringer, S

    2012-01-01

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo and maxima) seeds are uniquely flavored and commonly consumed as a healthy roasted snack. The objective was to determine dominant volatiles in raw and roasted pumpkin seeds, and the effect of seed coat, moisture content, fatty acid ratio, total lipids, reducing sugars, and harvest year on volatile formation. Sensory was conducted to evaluate overall liking of seed variety and texture. Seed processing included extraction from the fruit, dehydration, and roasting (150 °C). Oil extraction was done using soxhlet, fatty acid profile using Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector, and reducing sugars using 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid and UV-spectroscopy. Headspace analysis of seeds was performed by selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). Volatiles dominating in raw pumpkin seeds were lipid aldehydes, ethyl acetate, 2,3-butandione, and dimethylsulfide. Compounds contributing to roasted aroma include alkylpyrazines and Strecker and lipid aldehydes. Overall, hull-less seeds had higher volatile lipid aldehydes and Strecker aldehydes. Seeds dehydrated to a moisture content of 6.5% before roasting had higher initial and final volatile concentrations than seeds starting at 50% moisture. Higher oil content resulted in higher lipid aldehyde formation during roasting with a moderate correlation between free fatty acid ratio and corresponding lipid aldehyde. Harvest year (2009 compared with 2010) had a significant impact on volatile formation in hull-less seeds, but not as much as variety differences. No significant correlation was found between reducing sugars and volatile formation. Sensory showed that hull-less seeds were liked significantly more than hulled seeds. Elucidation of aromatic flavor development during roasting with SIFT-MS provides information on flavor release and offers better control during processing. Knowledge of volatiles in raw and roasted pumpkin seeds and effects of seed coat, moisture content, seed composition, and

  5. Role of Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketha, Siva S; Singh, Ravinder J; Ketha, Hemamalini

    2017-09-01

    The advent of mass spectrometry into the clinical laboratory has led to an improvement in clinical management of several endocrine diseases. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry found some of its first clinical applications in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism, in quantitative steroid analysis, and in drug analysis laboratories. Mass spectrometry assays offer analytical sensitivity and specificity that is superior to immunoassays for many analytes. This article highlights several areas of clinical endocrinology that have witnessed the use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry in NIPNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M; Marinescu, L.; Dima, R.; Cata-Danil, D.; Petrascu, M.; Popescu, I.; Stan-Sion, C.; Radulescu, M.; Plostinaru, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is today the method capable to measure the lowest concentration of a particular nuclide in sample materials. The method has applications in environmental physics, medicine, measurements of cosmic-ray or nuclear power plant produced radionuclides in the earth's atmosphere. All over the world, more than 40 charged particles and heavy ion accelerators are performing such analyses concerning the research interest of a huge number of laboratories. The Romanian Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest has initiated a construction project for the AMS facility at the FN - Van de Graaff Tandem accelerator. This program benefits of technical and financial assistance provided by IAEA in the frame of the IAEA-TC Project ROM 8014-265C. A general lay-out of the AMS project is presented. The construction work has begun and first tests of the AMS injector will take place between July - September this year. (authors)

  7. Resolution of co-eluting compounds of Cannabis Sativa in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry detection with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Jone; Olivares, Maitane; Amigo, José Manuel; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive Two Dimensional Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC × GC/qMS) analysis of Cannabis sativa extracts shows a high complexity due to the large variety of terpenes and cannabinoids and to the fact that the complete resolution of the peaks is not straightforwardly achieved. In order to support the resolution of the co-eluted peaks in the sesquiterpene and the cannabinoid chromatographic region the combination of Multivariate Curve Resolution and Alternating Least Squares algorithms was satisfactorily applied. As a result, four co-eluting areas were totally resolved in the sesquiterpene region and one in the cannabinoid region in different samples of Cannabis sativa. The comparison of the mass spectral profiles obtained for each resolved peak with theoretical mass spectra allowed the identification of some of the co-eluted peaks. Finally, the classification of the studied samples was achieved based on the relative concentrations of the resolved peaks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A REVIEW ON MASS SPECTROMETRY DETECTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Khatri Neetu; Gupta Ankit; Taneja Ruchi; Bilandi Ajay; Beniwal Prashant

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique for "weighing" molecules. Obviously, this is not done with a conventional scale or balance. Instead, mass spectrometry is based upon the principle of the motion of a charged particle that is called an ion, in an electric or magnetic field. The mass to charge ratio (m/z) of the ion affects particles motion. Since the charge of an electron is known, the mass to charge ratio (m/z) is a measurement of mass of an ion. Mass spectrometry research focuses ...

  9. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange in mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Acter, Thamina; Zherebker, Alexander; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Sunghwan; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2018-03-30

    The isotopic exchange approach is in use since the first observation of such reactions in 1933 by Lewis. This approach allows the investigation of the pathways of chemical and biochemical reactions, determination of structure, composition, and conformation of molecules. Mass spectrometry has now become one of the most important analytical tools for the monitoring of the isotopic exchange reactions. Investigation of conformational dynamics of proteins, quantitative measurements, obtaining chemical, and structural information about individual compounds of the complex natural mixtures are mainly based on the use of isotope exchange in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry. The most important reaction is the Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange, which is mainly performed in the solution. Recently we have developed the approach allowing performing of the Hydrogen/Deuterium reaction on-line directly in the ionization source under atmospheric pressure. Such approach simplifies the sample preparation and can accelerate the exchange reaction so that certain hydrogens that are considered as non-labile will also participate in the exchange. The use of in-ionization source H/D exchange in modern mass spectrometry for structural elucidation of molecules serves as the basic theme in this review. We will focus on the mechanisms of the isotopic exchange reactions and on the application of in-ESI, in-APCI, and in-APPI source Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange for the investigation of petroleum, natural organic matter, oligosaccharides, and proteins including protein-protein complexes. The simple scenario for adaptation of H/D exchange reactions into mass spectrometric method is also highlighted along with a couple of examples collected from previous studies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Identification of non-volatile compounds and their migration from hot melt adhesives used in food packaging materials characterized by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Paula; Canellas, Elena; Nerín, Cristina

    2013-05-01

    The identification of unknown non-volatile migrant compounds from adhesives used in food contact materials is a very challenging task because of the number of possible compounds involved, given that adhesives are complex mixtures of chemicals. The use of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/QTOF) is shown to be a successful tool for identifying non-targeted migrant compounds from two hot melt adhesives used in food packaging laminates. Out of the seven migrants identified and quantified, five were amides and one was a compound classified in Class II of the Cramer toxicity. None of the migration values exceeded the recommended Cramer exposure values.

  11. Screening anti-tumor compounds from Ligusticum wallichii using cell membrane chromatography combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Ding, Yuanyuan; An, Hongli; Feng, Liuxin; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-14

    Tyrosine 367 Cysteine-fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 cell membrane chromatography combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry was developed. Tyrosine 367 Cysteine-HEK293 cells were used as cell membrane stationary phase. Specificity and reproducibility of the cell membrane chromatography was evaluated using 1-tert-butyl-3-{2-[4-(diethylamino)butylamino]-6-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl}urea, Nimodipine and dexamethasone acetate. Then, anti-tumor components acting on Tyrosine 367 Cysteine-fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 were screened and identified from extracts of Ligusticum wallichii. Components from the extract were retained on the cell membrane chromatographic column. The retained fraction was directly eluted into high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry system for separation and identification. Finally, Levistolide A was identified as an active component from Ligusticum wallichii extracts. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide-formazan colorimetric assay revealed that Levistolide A inhibits proliferation of overexpressing the mutated receptor cells with dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 was also decrease under Levistolide A treatment. Flex dock simulation verified that Levistolide A could bind with the tyrosine kinase domain of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4. Therefore, Levistolide A screened by the cell membrane chromatography combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry can arrest cell growth. In conclusion, the two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography method can screen and identify potential anti-tumor ingredients which specifically act on the tyrosine kinase domain of the mutated fibroblast growth factor receptor 4. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid isolation of biomarkers for compound specific radiocarbon dating using high-performance liquid chromatography and flow injection analysis-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smittenberg, Rienk H; Hopmans, Ellen C; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2002-11-29

    Repeated semi-preparative normal-phase HPLC was performed to isolate selected biomarkers from sediment extracts for radiocarbon analysis. Flow injection analysis-mass spectrometry was used for rapid analysis of collected fractions to evaluate the separation procedure, taking only 1 min per fraction. In this way 100-1000 microg of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers, sterol fractions and chlorophyll-derived phytol were isolated from typically 100 g of marine sediment, i.e., in sufficient quantities for radiocarbon analysis, without significant carbon isotopic fractionation or contamination.

  13. Alpha spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, Jana; Kuruc, Jozef; Galanda, Dusan; Matel, Lubomir; Velic, Dusan; Aranyosiova, Monika

    2009-01-01

    A sample of thorium content on steel discs was prepared by electrodeposition with a view to determining the natural thorium isotope. Thorium was determined by alpha spectrometry and by secondary ion mass spectrometry and the results of the two methods were compared

  14. NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility was created under the auspices of the Office of the Scientific Director to provide high-end mass-spectrometric...

  15. Atom counting with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, Walter

    1995-01-01

    A brief review of the current status and some recent applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are presented. Some connections to resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIS) as the alternate atom counting method are discussed

  16. Sampling and analyte enrichment strategies for ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianjiang; Ma, Wen; Li, Hongmei; Ai, Wanpeng; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2018-01-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry provides great convenience for fast screening, and has showed promising potential in analytical chemistry. However, its relatively low sensitivity seriously restricts its practical utility in trace compound analysis. In this review, we summarize the sampling and analyte enrichment strategies coupled with nine modes of representative ambient mass spectrometry (desorption electrospray ionization, paper vhspray ionization, wooden-tip spray ionization, probe electrospray ionization, coated blade spray ionization, direct analysis in real time, desorption corona beam ionization, dielectric barrier discharge ionization, and atmospheric-pressure solids analysis probe) that have dramatically increased the detection sensitivity. We believe that these advances will promote routine use of ambient mass spectrometry. Graphical abstract Scheme of sampling stretagies for ambient mass spectrometry.

  17. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    -phase chromatography they are analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and the substrates identified by database searching. The proof of principle in this study is demonstrated by incubating immobilized human plasma proteins with thrombin and by identifying by tandem mass spectrometry the fibrinopeptides, released...

  18. Inorganic mass spectrometry of solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.; Vertes, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this review some recent developments in the field of inorganic mass spectrometry of solids are described with special emphasis on the actual state of understanding of the ionization processes. It concentrates on the common characteristics of methods such as spark source-, laser-, secondary ion-, inductively coupled plasma- and glow discharge mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  19. Surface analysis by imaging mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vidová, Veronika; Volný, Michael; Lemr, Karel; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, 7-8 (2009), s. 1101-1116 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : secondary ion mass spectrometry * matrix assisted laser desorption ionization * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2009

  20. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive informati...

  1. Solvent Composition-Dependent Signal-Reduction of Molecular Ions Generated from Aromatic Compounds in (+) Atmospheric Pressure Photo Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seulgidaun; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Sunghwan

    2018-03-30

    The ionization process is essential for successful mass spectrometry (MS) analysis because of its influence on selectivity and sensitivity. In particular, certain solvents reduce the ionization of the analyte, thereby reducing the overall sensitivity in APPI. Since the sensitivity varies greatly depending on the solvents, a fundamental understanding of the mechanism is required. Standard solutions were analyzed by (+) Atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) QExactive ion trap mass spectrometer (Thermo Scientific). Each solution was infused directly to the APPI source at a flow rate 100 μl/min and the APPI source temperature was 300 °C. Other operating mass spectrometric parameters were maintained under the same conditions. Quantum mechanical calculations were carried out using the Gaussian 09 suite program. Density functional theory was used to calculate the reaction enthalpies (∆H) of reaction between toluene and other solvents. The experimental and theoretical results showed good agreement. The abundances of analyte ions were well correlated with the calculated ∆H values. Therefore, the results strongly support the suggested signal reduction mechanism. In addition, linear correlations between the abundance of toluene and analyte molecular ions were observed, which also supports the suggested mechanism. A solvent composition-dependent signal reduction mechanism was suggested and evaluated for the (+) atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) mass spectrometry analysis of poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) generating mainly molecular ions. Overall, the evidence provided in this work suggests that reactions between solvent cluster(s) and toluene molecular ions are responsible for the observed signal reductions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Soft ionization of saturated hydrocarbons, alcohols and nonpolar compounds by negative-ion direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Robert B; Dane, A John

    2013-03-01

    Large polarizable n-alkanes (approximately C18 and larger), alcohols, and other nonpolar compounds can be detected as negative ions when sample solutions are injected directly into the sampling orifice of the atmospheric pressure interface of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer with the direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source operating in negative-ion mode. The mass spectra are dominated by peaks corresponding to [M + O2]‾(•). No fragmentation is observed, making this a very soft ionization technique for samples that are otherwise difficult to analyze by DART. Detection limits for cholesterol were determined to be in the low nanogram range.

  3. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for elemental analysis and isotope ratio determinations in individual organic compounds separated by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, N.S.; Houk, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    A gas chromatograph (GC) with a packed column was interfaced to an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) to yield atomic mass spectra from volatile organic compounds. Atomization of injected compounds was nearly complete and independent of molecular structure, so that elemental ratios could be determined. Detection limits were in the range 0.001 to 400 ng s -1 , depending on the ionization energy of the element and its abundance in the background spectrum. The relative standard deviation of measured isotope ratios varied from 0.4% for Br (i.e., a ratio close to unity) to 18% for N (a very large ratio). Thus, GC-ICP-MS provides elemental and isotope ratio information that is complementary to the molecular information derived from GC-MS with conventional ionization methods

  4. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  5. Lipid imaging by mass spectrometry - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gode, David; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-03-07

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has proven to be extremely useful for applications such as the spatial analysis of peptides and proteins in biological tissue, the performance assessment of drugs in vivo or the measurement of protein or metabolite expression as tissue classifiers or biomarkers from disease versus control tissue comparisons. The most popular MSI technique is MALDI mass spectrometry. First invented by Richard Caprioli in the mid-1990s, it is the highest performing MSI technique in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity for intact biomolecules and application range today. The unique ability to identify and spatially resolve numerous compounds simultaneously, based on m/z values has inter alia been applied to untargeted and targeted chemical mapping of biological compartments, revealing changes of physiological states, disease pathologies and metabolic faith and distribution of xenobiotics. Many MSI applications focus on lipid species because of the lipids' diverse roles as structural components of cell membranes, their function in the surfactant cycle, and their involvement as second messengers in signalling cascades of tissues and cells. This article gives a comprehensive overview of lipid imaging techniques and applications using established MALDI and SIMS methods but also other promising MSI techniques such as DESI.

  6. The allure of mass spectrometry: From an earlyday chemist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tőkés, László

    2017-07-01

    This reminiscing review article is an account of the author's fascination and involvements with mass spectrometry from the perspective of an organic chemist with an interest in natural product chemistry. It covers a period from 1961 through the mid 1990s as mass spectrometry evolved form a novelty technique to become a most widely used analytical technique. Following a brief synopsis of my pathway to mass spectrometry, my research efforts in this field are presented with a focus mainly on evolving principles and technologies which I had personal involvements with. To provide historical perspectives, discussions of these developments are accompanied by brief outlines of the relevant state-of-the-art, shedding light on the technical and conceptual challenges encountered during those early days in mass spectrometry. Examples are presented of my involvements with basic and applied research in mass spectrometry during graduate studies at Stanford University and close to three decade tenure in pharmaceutical research at Syntex Research. My basic research interests focused mainly on principles of electron ionization induced fragmentation mechanisms, with an emphasis on steroids and other model compounds. Extensive deuterium labeling evidence was used to determine the fragmentation mechanisms of the diagnostically significant ions in the spectra of numerous model compounds, uncovering examples of wide-ranging hydrogen transfers, skeletal rearrangements, methyl and phenyl migrations, stereoselective fragmentations and low and high energy fragmentation processes. Depiction of the industrial research phase of my career includes comments on the pivotal role mass spectrometry played on advancing modern pharmaceutical research. Examples are presented of involvements with instrumental developments and a few select cases of applied research, including studies of bile mechanisms in vertebrates, identification of bisphenol-A leaching from sterilized polycarbonate containers, high

  7. Real-time analysis of organic compounds in ship engine aerosol emissions using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation and proton transfer mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radischat, Christian; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Sklorz, Martin; Rabe, Rom; Streibel, Thorsten; Harndorf, Horst; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Organic combustion aerosols from a marine medium-speed diesel engine, capable to run on distillate (diesel fuel) and residual fuels (heavy fuel oil), were investigated under various operating conditions and engine parameters. The online chemical characterisation of the organic components was conducted using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (REMPI TOF MS) and a proton transfer reaction-quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS). Oxygenated species, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons were characterised. Especially the aromatic hydrocarbons and their alkylated derivatives were very prominent in the exhaust of both fuels. Emission factors of known health-hazardous compounds (e.g. mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons) were calculated and found in higher amounts for heavy fuel oil (HFO) at typical engine loadings. Lower engine loads lead in general to increasing emissions for both fuels for almost every compound, e.g. naphthalene emissions varied for diesel fuel exhaust between 0.7 mg/kWh (75 % engine load, late start of injection (SOI)) and 11.8 mg/kWh (10 % engine load, late SOI) and for HFO exhaust between 3.3 and 60.5 mg/kWh, respectively. Both used mass spectrometric techniques showed that they are particularly suitable methods for online monitoring of combustion compounds and very helpful for the characterisation of health-relevant substances. Graphical abstract Three-dimensional REMPI data of organic species in diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil exhaust.

  8. A multiple-dimension liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry data strategy for the rapid discovery and identification of unknown compounds from a Chinese herbal formula (Er-xian decoction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caihong; Zhang, Jinlan; Wu, Caisheng; Wang, Zhe

    2017-10-06

    It is very important to rapidly discover and identify the multiple components of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula. High performance liquid chromatography with high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS/MS) has been widely used to analyze TCM formula and contains multiple-dimension data including retention time (RT), high resolution mass (HRMS), multiple-stage mass spectrometric (MS n ), and isotope intensity distribution (IID) data. So it is very necessary to exploit a useful strategy to utilize multiple-dimension data to rapidly probe structural information and identify chemical compounds. In this study, a new strategy to initiatively use the multiple-dimension LC-MS data has been developed to discover and identify unknown compounds of TCM in many styles. The strategy guarantees the fast discovery of candidate structural information and provides efficient structure clues for identification. The strategy contains four steps in sequence: (1) to discover potential compounds and obtain sub-structure information by the mass spectral tree similarity filter (MTSF) technique, based on HRMS and MS n data; (2) to classify potential compounds into known chemical classes by discriminant analysis (DA) on the basis of RT and HRMS data; (3) to hit the candidate structural information of compounds by intersection sub-structure between MTSF and DA (M,D-INSS); (4) to annotate and confirm candidate structures by IID data. This strategy allowed for the high exclusion efficiency (greater than 41%) of irrelevant ions in er-xian decoction (EXD) while providing accurate structural information of 553 potential compounds and identifying 66 candidates, therefore accelerating and simplifying the discovery and identification of unknown compounds in TCM formula. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Extension of the analytical window for characterizing aromatic compounds in oils using a comprehensive suite of high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques and double bond equivalence versus carbon number plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunju; Birdwell, Justin E.; Hur, Manhoi; Lee, Joonhee; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS), and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) were used to study the aromatic fractions of crude oil and oil shale pyrolysates (shale oils). The collected data were compared and combined in the double bond equivalence (DBE) versus carbon number plot to obtain a more complete understanding of the composition of the oil fractions. The numbers of peaks observed by each technique followed the order 2D GC–MS plots of DBE and carbon number showed an extended range of higher values relative to the other methods. For the aromatic fraction of an oil shale pyrolysate generated by the Fischer assay, only a few nitrogen-containing compounds were observed by 2D GC–MS but a large number of these compounds were detected by Orbitrap MS and FT-ICR MS. This comparison clearly shows that the data obtained from these three techniques can be combined to more completely characterize oil composition. The data obtained by Orbitrap MS and FT-ICR MS agreed well with one another, and the combined DBE versus carbon number plot provided more complete coverage of compounds present in the fractions. In addition, the chemical structure information provided by 2D GC–MS could be matched with the chemical formulas in the DBE versus carbon number plots, providing information not available in ultrahigh-resolution MS results. It was therefore concluded that the combination of 2D GC–MS, Orbitrap MS, and FT-ICR MS in the DBE versus carbon number space facilitates structural assignment of heavy oil components.

  10. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer–chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) is responsible for non-quantitative H2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer–Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems.

  11. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Shiea, Jentaie, E-mail: jetea@fac.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {yields} Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. {yields} We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. {yields} The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  12. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. → We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. → The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  13. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha; Li, Yafeng

    2017-10-10

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  14. A Review of the Emerging Field of Underwater Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Chua

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometers are versatile sensor systems, owing to their high sensitivity and ability to simultaneously measure multiple chemical species. Over the last two decades, traditional laboratory-based membrane inlet mass spectrometers have been adapted for underwater use. Underwater mass spectrometry has drastically improved our capability to monitor a broad suite of gaseous compounds (e.g., dissolved atmospheric gases, light hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds in the aquatic environment. Here we provide an overview of the progress made in the field of underwater mass spectrometry since its inception in the 1990s to the present. In particular, we discuss the approaches undertaken by various research groups in developing in situ mass spectrometers. We also provide examples to illustrate how underwater mass spectrometers have been used in the field. Finally, we present future trends in the field of in situ mass spectrometry. Most of these efforts are aimed at improving the quality and spatial and temporal scales of chemical measurements in the ocean. By providing up-to-date information on underwater mass spectrometry, this review offers guidance for researchers interested in adapting this technology as well as goals for future progress in the field.

  15. Hyphenation of ultra high performance supercritical fluid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation high resolution mass spectrometry: Part 1. Study of the coupling parameters for the analysis of natural non-polar compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Johanna; Colas, Cyril; Pecher, Virginie; Poujol, Marion; Tranchant, Jean-François; Lesellier, Eric

    2017-08-04

    An analytical method based on Ultra-High-Performance Supercritical Fluid Chromatography (UHPSFC) coupled with Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization - High-resolution mass spectrometry (APCI-Q-TOF-HRMS) was developed for compounds screening from oily samples. The hyphenation was made using a commercial UHPLC device coupled to a CO 2 pump in order to perform the chromatographic analysis. An adaptation of the injection system for compressible fluids was accomplished for this coupling: this modification of the injection sequence was achieved to prevent unusual variations of the injected volume related to the use of a compressible fluid. UHPSFC-HRMS hyphenation was optimized to enhance the response of the varied compounds from a seed extract (anthraquinones, free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, hydroxylated triacylglycerols and triacylglycerols). No split was used prior to the APCI ionization source, allowing introducing all the compounds in the spectrometer, ensuring a better sensitivity for minor compounds. The effects of a mechanical make-up (T-piece) added before this ionization source was discussed in terms of standard deviation of response, response intensity and fragmentation percentage. The location of the T-piece with regards to the backpressure regulator (BPR), the flow rate and the nature of the make-up solvent were studied. Results show that the effects of the studied parameters depend on the nature of the compounds, whereas the make-up addition favours the robustness of the mass response (quantitative aspect). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mass spectrometry at the Pittsburgh conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borman, S.

    1987-01-01

    Each year analytical chemists flock to the Pittsburgh Conference to learn about the latest trends in analytical instrumentation. In this Focus, a number of prominent mass spectroscopists who attended this year's meeting in Atlantic City, NJ, discuss their perceptions of current developments in the field of mass spectrometry (MS). In the June 1 issue of Analytical Chemistry, the authors coverage of the Pittsburgh Conferences continues with a follow-up article on specific developments in hyphenated mass spectrometry - primarily liquid chromatography - MS (LC/MS) and gas chromatography - infrared spectrometry MS (GC/IR/MS)

  17. Chromatography–mass spectrometry in aerospace industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buryak, Alexey K; Serduk, T M

    2013-01-01

    The applications of chromatography–mass spectrometry in aerospace industry are considered. The primary attention is devoted to the development of physicochemical grounds of the use of various chromatography–mass spectrometry procedures to solve topical problems of this industry. Various methods for investigation of the composition of rocket fuels, surfaces of structural materials and environmental media affected by aerospace activities are compared. The application of chromatography–mass spectrometry for the development and evaluation of processes for decontaminations of equipment, industrial wastes and soils from rocket fuel components is substantiated. The bibliography includes 135 references.

  18. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry: advances and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Emerging trends in the applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are identified and illustrated with specific examples. Areas of application covered include rapid landscape evolution, calibration of the radiocarbon time scale, compound-specific radiocarbon studies, tracing of nuclear discharges, and searches for extraterrestrial isotopes

  19. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.J. Karchesy; L.Y. Foo; Richard W. Hemingway; E. Barofsky; D.F. Barofsky

    1989-01-01

    Condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives were studied by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) to assess the feasibility of using this technique for determining molecular weight and structural information about these compounds. Both positive- and negative-ion spectra provided useful data with regard to molecular weight, cation species present, and presence of...

  20. Traveling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry of protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salbo, Rune; Bush, Matthew F; Naver, Helle

    2012-01-01

    The collision cross-section (Ω) of a protein or protein complex ion can be measured using traveling-wave (T-wave) ion mobility (IM) mass spectrometry (MS) via calibration with compounds of known Ω. The T-wave Ω-values depend strongly on instrument parameters and calibrant selection. Optimization ...

  1. Mass spectrometry of long-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine.

    2003-01-01

    The capability of determining element concentrations at the trace and ultratrace level and isotope ratios is a main feature of inorganic mass spectrometry. The precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios of long-lived natural and artificial radionuclides is required, e.g. for their environmental monitoring and health control, for studying radionuclide migration, for age dating, for determining isotope ratios of radiogenic elements in the nuclear industry, for quality assurance and determination of the burn-up of fuel material in a nuclear power plant, for reprocessing plants, nuclear material accounting and radioactive waste control. Inorganic mass spectrometry, especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the most important inorganic mass spectrometric technique today, possesses excellent sensitivity, precision and good accuracy for isotope ratio measurements and practically no restriction with respect to the ionization potential of the element investigated--therefore, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), which has been used as the dominant analytical technique for precise isotope ratio measurements of long-lived radionuclides for many decades, is being replaced increasingly by ICP-MS. In the last few years instrumental progress in improving figures of merit for the determination of isotope ratio measurements of long-lived radionuclides in ICP-MS has been achieved by the application of a multiple ion collector device (MC-ICP-MS) and the introduction of the collision cell interface in order to dissociate disturbing argon-based molecular ions, to reduce the kinetic energy of ions and neutralize the disturbing noble gas ions (e.g. of 129 Xe + for the determination of 129 I). The review describes the state of the art and the progress of different inorganic mass spectrometric techniques such as ICP-MS, laser ablation ICP-MS vs. TIMS, glow discharge mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass

  2. Ultra-sensitive radionuclide spectrometry. Radiometrics and mass spectrometry synergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in radiometrics and mass spectrometry techniques for ultra-sensitive analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment are reviewed. In the radiometrics sector the dominant development has been the utilization of large HPGe detectors in underground laboratories with anti-cosmic or anti-Compton shielding for the analysis of short and medium-lived radionuclides in the environment. In the mass spectrometry sector, applications of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for the analysis of long-lived radionuclides in the environment are the most important recent achievements. The recent developments do not only considerably decrease the detection limits for several radionuclides (up to several orders of magnitude), but they also enable to decrease sample volumes so that sampling, e.g., of the water column can be much easier and more effective. A comparison of radiometrics and mass spectrometry results for the analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment shows a reasonable agreement - within quoted uncertainties, for wide range of activities and different sample matrices analyzed. (author)

  3. Simultaneous measurement of proline and related compounds in oak leaves by high-performance ligand-exchange chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for environmental stress studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oufir, Mouhssin; Schulz, Nadine; Sha Vallikhan, Patan Shaik; Wilhelm, Eva; Burg, Kornel; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Hoffmann, Lucien; Guignard, Cedric

    2009-02-13

    A mass spectrometer was coupled to high-performance ligand-exchange liquid chromatography (HPLEC) for simultaneous analysis of stress associated solutes such as proline, hydroxyproline, methylproline, glycine betaine and trigonelline extracted from leaves of drought stressed oaks and an internal standard namely N-acetylproline. Methanol/chloroform/water extracts were analyzed using an Aminex HPX-87C column and specifically quantified by the positive ion mode of an electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The recovery of N-acetyl proline added to oak leaf extracts ranged from 85.2 to 122.1% for an intra-day study. Standard calibration curves showed good linearity in the measured range from 0.3125 to 10micromolL(-1) with the lowest correlation coefficient of 0.99961 for trigonelline. The advantages of this alternative procedure, compared to previously published methods using fluorescence or amperometric detections, are the simultaneous and direct detection of osmoprotectants in a single chromatographic run, a minimal sample preparation, a good specificity and reduced limits of quantification, ranging from 0.1 to 0.6micromolL(-1). Fifty-six days of water deficit exposure resulted in increased foliar free proline levels (2.4-fold, P<0.001, 155micromolg(-1) FW) and glycine betaine contents (2.5-fold, P<0.05, 175micromolg(-1) FW) of drought stressed oak compared to control.

  4. Temperature-programmed desorption for membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketola, R.A.; Grøn, C.; Lauritsen, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a novel technique for analyzing volatile organic compounds in air samples using a solid adsorbent together with temperature-programmed desorption and subsequent detection by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (TPD-MIMS). The new system has the advantage of a fast separation of compounds...... to diffuse through the membrane into the mass spectrometer in a few seconds. In this fashion we could completely separate many similar volatile compounds, for example toluene from xylene and trichloroethene from tetrachloroethene. Typical detection limits were at low or sub-nanogram levels, the dynamic range...

  5. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2009-03-03

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  6. Pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Gonzalez-Vila, F J

    1979-01-01

    Milled wood lignins from spruce, beech and bamboo were pyrolysed. The high-boiling products of pyrolysis were studied by GLC and mass spectrometry. The forty-three products identified provide information on the structural units of lignin.

  7. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  8. Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Longo, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of candidate biomarkers within the entire proteome is one of the most important and challenging goals in proteomic research. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a modern and promising technology for semiquantitative and qualitative assessment of proteins, enabling protein sequencing and identification with exquisite accuracy and sensitivity. For mass spectrometry analysis, protein extractions from tissues or body fluids and subsequent protein fractionation represent an important and unavoidable step in the workflow for biomarker discovery. Following extraction of proteins, the protein mixture must be digested, reduced, alkylated, and cleaned up prior to mass spectrometry. The aim of our chapter is to provide comprehensible and practical lab procedures for sample digestion, protein fractionation, and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis.

  9. Radiation Biomarker Research Using Mass Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bach, Stephan B; Hubert, Walter

    2007-01-01

    .... This review is intended to give an overview of mass spectrometry and its application to biological systems and biomarker discovery and how that might relate to relevant radiation dosimetry studies...

  10. Mass Spectrometry Analyses of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acland, Mitchell; Mittal, Parul; Lokman, Noor A; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are a powerful biological in vitro model, which closely mimics the 3D structure of primary avascularized tumors. Mass spectrometry (MS) has established itself as a powerful analytical tool, not only to better understand and describe the complex structure of MCTS, but also to monitor their response to cancer therapeutics. The first part of this review focuses on traditional mass spectrometry approaches with an emphasis on elucidating the molecular characteristics of these structures. Then the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) approaches used to obtain spatially defined information from MCTS is described. Finally the analysis of primary spheroids, such as those present in ovarian cancer, and the great potential that mass spectrometry analysis of these structures has for improved understanding of cancer progression and for personalized in vitro therapeutic testing is discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Ripening-dependent metabolic changes in the volatiles of pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) fruit: I. Characterization of pineapple aroma compounds by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingass, Christof Björn; Carle, Reinhold; Schmarr, Hans-Georg

    2015-03-01

    Qualitative ripening-dependent changes of pineapple volatiles were studied via headspace solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography quadrupole mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC×GC-qMS). Early green-ripe stage, post-harvest ripened, and green-ripe fruits at the end of their commercial shelf-life were compared to air-freighted pineapples harvested at full maturity. In total, more than 290 volatiles could be identified by mass spectrometry and their linear retention indices. The majority of compounds comprise esters (methyl and ethyl esters of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, acetates), terpenes, alcohols, aldehydes, 2-ketones, free fatty acids, and miscellaneous γ- and δ-lactones. The structured separation space obtained by GC×GC allowed revealing various homologous series of compound classes as well as clustering of sesquiterpenes. Post-harvest ripening increased the diversity of the volatile profile compared to both early green-ripe maturity stages and on-plant ripened fruits.

  12. Mass spectrometry in life science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Stefan; Markgraf, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Investigating complex signatures of biomolecules by mass spectrometry approaches has become indispensable in molecular life science research. Nowadays, various mass spectrometry-based omics technologies are available to monitor qualitative and quantitative changes within hundreds or thousands of biological active components, including proteins/peptides, lipids and metabolites. These comprehensive investigations have the potential to decipher the pathophysiology of disease development at a molecular level and to monitor the individual response of pharmacological treatment or lifestyle intervention.

  13. Simultaneous speciation of mercury and butyltin compounds in natural waters and snow by propylation and species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monperrus, M.; Tessier, E.; Veschambre, S.; Amouroux, D.; Donard, O. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de L' Adour, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-inorganique et Environnement, CNRS UMR 5034, Helioparc, Pau (France)

    2005-02-01

    A robust method has been developed for simultaneous determination of mercury and butyltin compounds in aqueous samples. This method is capable of providing accurate results for analyte concentrations in the picogram per liter to nanogram per liter range. The simultaneous determination of the mercury and tin compounds is achieved by species-specific isotope dilution, derivatization, and gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (GC-ICP-MS). In derivatization by ethylation and propylation, reaction conditions such as pH and the effect of chloride were carefully studied. Ethylation was found to be more sensitive to matrix effects, especially for mercury compounds. Propylation was thus the preferred derivatization method for simultaneous determination of organomercury and organotin compounds in environmental samples. The analytical method is highly accurate and precise, with RSD values of 1 and 3% for analyte concentrations in the picogram per liter to nanogram per liter range. By use of cleaning procedures and SIDMS blank measurements, detection limits in the range 10-60 pg L{sup -1} were achieved; these are suitable for determination of background levels of these contaminants in environmental samples. This was demonstrated by using the method for analysis of real snow and seawater samples. This work illustrates the great advantage of species-specific isotope dilution for the validation of an analytical speciation method - the possibility of overcoming species transformations and non-quantitative recovery. Analysis time is saved by use of the simultaneous method, because of the use of a single sample-preparation procedure and one analysis. (orig.)

  14. Simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds and saponins in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) by a liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2011-10-26

    A new liquid chromatography methodology coupled to a diode array detector and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed for the simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds and saponins in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd). This method has allowed the simultaneous determination of these two families of compounds with the same analytical method for the first time. A fused-core column C18 has been used, and the analysis has been performed in less than 27 min. Both chromatographic and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry parameters have been optimized to improve the sensitivity and to maximize the number of compounds detected. A validation of the method has also been carried out, and free and bound polar fractions of quinoa have been studied. Twenty-five compounds have been tentatively identified and quantified in the free polar fraction, while five compounds have been tentatively identified and quantified in the bound polar fraction. It is important to highlight that 1-O-galloyl-β-D-glucoside, acacetin, protocatechuic acid 4-O-glucoside, penstebioside, ethyl-m-digallate, (epi)-gallocatechin, and canthoside have been tentatively identified for the first time in quinoa. Free phenolic compounds have been found to be in the range of 2.746-3.803 g/kg of quinoa, while bound phenolic compounds were present in a concentration that varies from 0.139 and 0.164 g/kg. Indeed, saponins have been found to be in a concentration that ranged from 5.6 to 7.5% of the total composition of whole quinoa flour.

  15. Report on three aliphatic dimethylarsinoyl compounds as common minor constituents in marine samples. An investigation using high-performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Julshamn, K.

    2005-01-01

    for the structures of the three compounds. The concentrations of the three arsenicals were determined in 37 marine organisms comprising algae, crustaceans, bivalves, fish and mammals by HPLC/ICPMS. The three arsenicals DMAA, DMAE and DMAP, which occurred at mug kg(-1) concentrations, were detected in 25, 23 and 17......Three water-soluble aliphatic arsenicals, dimethylarsinoyl acetate (DMAA), dimethylarsinoyl ethanol (DMAE), and dimethylarsinoyl propionate (DMAP), were identified in marine biological samples. Sample extracts in methanol/water (1 + 1) were analysed by cation-exchange high-performance liquid...

  16. Determination of polydimethylsiloxane–water partition coefficients for ten 1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene-related compounds and twelve polychlorinated biphenyls using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eganhouse, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer-water partition coefficients (Kpw) of ten DDT-related compounds were determined in pure water at 25 °C using commercial polydimethylsiloxane-coated optical fiber. Analyte concentrations were measured by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/full scan mass spectrometry (TD–GC/MSFS; fibers) and liquid injection-gas chromatography/selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry (LI–GC/MSSIM; water). Equilibrium was approached from two directions (fiber uptake and depletion) as a means of assessing data concordance. Measured compound-specific log Kpw values ranged from 4.8 to 6.1 with an average difference in log Kpw between the two approaches of 0.05 log units (∼12% of Kpw). Comparison of the experimentally-determined log Kpw values with previously published data confirmed the consistency of the results and the reliability of the method. A second experiment was conducted with the same ten DDT-related compounds and twelve selected PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) congeners under conditions characteristic of a coastal marine field site (viz., seawater, 11 °C) that is currently under investigation for DDT and PCB contamination. Equilibration at lower temperature and higher ionic strength resulted in an increase in log Kpw for the DDT-related compounds of 0.28–0.49 log units (61–101% of Kpw), depending on the analyte. The increase in Kpw would have the effect of reducing by approximately half the calculated freely dissolved pore-water concentrations (Cfree). This demonstrates the importance of determining partition coefficients under conditions as they exist in the field.

  17. Enantioselectivity of mass spectrometry: challenges and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hanan; El-Aneed, Anas

    2013-01-01

    With the fast growing market of pure enantiomer drugs and bioactive molecules, new chiral-selective analytical tools have been instigated including the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Even though MS is one of the best analytical tools that has efficiently been used in several pharmaceutical and biological applications, traditionally MS is considered as a "chiral-blind" technique. This limitation is due to the MS inability to differentiate between two enantiomers of a chiral molecule based merely on their masses. Several approaches have been explored to assess the potential role of MS in chiral analysis. The first approach depends on the use of MS-hyphenated techniques utilizing fast and sensitive chiral separation tools such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to MS detector. More recently, several alternative separation techniques have been evaluated such as supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC); the latter being a hybrid technique that combines the efficiency of CE with the selectivity of LC. The second approach is based on using the MS instrument solely for the chiral recognition. This method depends on the behavioral differences between enantiomers towards a foreign molecule and the ability of MS to monitor such differences. These behavioral differences can be divided into three types: (i) differences in the enantiomeric affinity for association with the chiral selector, (ii) differences of the enantiomeric exchange rate with a foreign reagent, and (iii) differences in the complex MS dissociation behaviors of the enantiomers. Most recently, ion mobility spectrometry was introduced to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate chiral compounds. This article provides an overview of MS role in chiral analysis by discussing MS based methodologies and presenting the challenges and promises associated with each approach. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of complex mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the analysis of complex mixtures results in increased specificity and selectivity by using a variety of reagent gases in both negative and positive ion modes. Natural isotopic abundance ratios were examined in both simple and complex mixtures using parent, daughter and neutral loss scans. MS/MS was also used to discover new compounds. Daughter scans were used to identify seven new alkaloids in a cactus species. Three of these alkaloids were novel compounds, and included the first simple, fully aromatic isoquinoline alkaloids reported in Cactaceae. MS/MS was used to characterize the chemical reaction products of coal in studies designed to probe its macromolecular structure. Negative ion chemical ionization was utilized to study reaction products resulting from the oxidation of coal. Possible structural units in the precursor coal were predicted based on the reaction products identified, aliphatic and aromatic acids and their anhydrides. The MS/MS method was also used to characterize reaction products resulting from coal liquefaction and/or extraction. These studies illustrate the types of problems for which MS/MS is useful. Emphasis has been placed on characterization of complex mixtures by selecting experimental parameters which enhance the information obtained. The value of using MS/MS in conjunction with other analytical techniques as well as the chemical pretreatment is demonstrated

  19. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  20. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, L; Perraudin, E; Durand-Jolibois, R; Doussin, J F

    2006-11-01

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91compounds.

  1. Inter-laboratory comparison of elemental analysis and gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Part I: delta13C measurements of selected compounds for the development of an isotopic Grob-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, F; Janeiro, A; Calderone, G; Rojas, J M Moreno; Rhodes, C; Gonthier, L A; Martin, F; Lees, M; Mosandl, A; Sewenig, S; Hener, U; Henriques, B; Ramalho, L; Reniero, F; Teixeira, A J; Guillou, C

    2007-03-01

    This study was directed towards investigating suitable compounds to be used as stable isotope reference materials for gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) calibration. Several compounds were selected from those used in the 'Grob-test' mixture. Oxygen- and nitrogen-containing substances were added to these compounds to allow the mixture to be used as a possible multi-isotopic calibration tool for 2H/1H, 13C/12C, 15N/14N and 18O/16O ratio determinations. In this paper we present the results of delta13C measurements performed by the consortium of the five laboratories taking part in this inter-calibration exercise. All the compounds were individually assessed for homogeneity, short-term stability and long-term stability by means of EA-IRMS, as required by the bureau communitaire de reference (BCR) Guide for Production of Certified Reference Materials. The results were compared then with the GC-C-IRMS measurements using both polar and non-polar columns, and the final mixture of selected compounds underwent a further certification exercise assessing limits of accuracy and reproducibility under specified GC-C-IRMS conditions. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiappini, L.; Perraudin, E.; Durand-Jolibois, R.; Doussin, J.F. [Universites Paris, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, UMR CNRS 7583, Creteil (France)

    2006-11-15

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m{sup 3} Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91 < R < 0.98) of the method were both good and detection limits ranged from 1.2 to 6.4 ng for the investigated compounds. (orig.)

  3. Elucidating rhizosphere processes by mass spectrometry – A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugova, Ariana [Division of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences-BOKU, Vienna (Austria); Puschenreiter, Markus [Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Rhizosphere Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences-BOKU, Vienna (Austria); Koellensperger, Gunda [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Hann, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.hann@boku.ac.at [Division of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences-BOKU, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-03-01

    The presented review discusses state-of-the-art mass spectrometric methods, which have been developed and applied for investigation of chemical processes in the soil-root interface, the so-called rhizosphere. Rhizosphere soil's physical and chemical characteristics are to a great extent influenced by a complex mixture of compounds released from plant roots, i.e. root exudates, which have a high impact on nutrient and trace element dynamics in the soil-root interface as well as on microbial activities or soil physico-chemical characteristics. Chemical characterization as well as accurate quantification of the compounds present in the rhizosphere is a major prerequisite for a better understanding of rhizosphere processes and requires the development and application of advanced sampling procedures in combination with highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques. During the last years, targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometry-based methods have emerged and their combination with specific separation methods for various elements and compounds of a wide polarity range have been successfully applied in several studies. With this review we critically discuss the work that has been conducted within the last decade in the context of rhizosphere research and elemental or molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques as GC, LC and CE. Moreover, selected applications such as metal detoxification or nutrient acquisition will be discussed regarding the mass spectrometric techniques applied in studies of root exudates in plant-bacteria interactions. Additionally, a more recent isotope probing technique as novel mass spectrometry based application is highlighted. - Highlights: • State-of-the-art mass spectrometry methods developed and applied in rhizosphere research are reviewed. • Elemental and molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques (GC, LC or CE) are discussed. • Case studies on metal detoxification

  4. Elucidating rhizosphere processes by mass spectrometry – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugova, Ariana; Puschenreiter, Markus; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    The presented review discusses state-of-the-art mass spectrometric methods, which have been developed and applied for investigation of chemical processes in the soil-root interface, the so-called rhizosphere. Rhizosphere soil's physical and chemical characteristics are to a great extent influenced by a complex mixture of compounds released from plant roots, i.e. root exudates, which have a high impact on nutrient and trace element dynamics in the soil-root interface as well as on microbial activities or soil physico-chemical characteristics. Chemical characterization as well as accurate quantification of the compounds present in the rhizosphere is a major prerequisite for a better understanding of rhizosphere processes and requires the development and application of advanced sampling procedures in combination with highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques. During the last years, targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometry-based methods have emerged and their combination with specific separation methods for various elements and compounds of a wide polarity range have been successfully applied in several studies. With this review we critically discuss the work that has been conducted within the last decade in the context of rhizosphere research and elemental or molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques as GC, LC and CE. Moreover, selected applications such as metal detoxification or nutrient acquisition will be discussed regarding the mass spectrometric techniques applied in studies of root exudates in plant-bacteria interactions. Additionally, a more recent isotope probing technique as novel mass spectrometry based application is highlighted. - Highlights: • State-of-the-art mass spectrometry methods developed and applied in rhizosphere research are reviewed. • Elemental and molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques (GC, LC or CE) are discussed. • Case studies on metal detoxification and

  5. Gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry of Pinot Noir wine volatile compounds (δ13C) and solid residues (δ13C, δ15N) for the reassessment of vineyard water-status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E; Vogiatzaki, Maria; Zufferey, Vivian

    2017-09-29

    This paper describes a novel approach to reassess the water status in vineyards based on compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of wine volatile organic compounds (δ 13 C VOC/VPDB ) and bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopes, and the C/N molar ratios of the wine solid residues (δ 13 C SR/VPDB , δ 15 N SR/Air-N2 ). These analyses link gas chromatography/combustion and elemental analysis to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS, EA/IRMS). Field-grown cultivars of Pinot Noir grapevines were exposed during six growing seasons (2009-2014) to controlled soil water availability, while maintaining identical the other environmental variables and agricultural techniques. Wines were produced from the grapes by the same oenological protocol. This permitted for the assessment of the effects in the biochemistry of wines solely induced by the changes in the plant-soil water status. This mimicked the more recurrent and prolonged periods of soil water deficiency due to climate changes. Water stress in grapevine was assessed by the measurement of the predawn leaf water potential (Ψ pd ) and the stable carbon isotope composition of the berry sugars during harvest (must sugars). For quantitation purposes and the normalization of the measured stable carbon isotope ratios of the VOCs, the wine samples were spiked with three standard compounds with known concentration and δ 13 C VPDB values. VOCs were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID), gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and GC/C/IRMS. δ 13 C values were obtained for eighteen VOCs. The solid residues were obtained by freeze-drying wine aliquots and were analyzed for their C and N content and isotope composition by EA/IRMS. All the isotopic ratios (δ 13 C SR , δ 15 N SR , δ 13 C VOC ) are highly correlated with the Ψ pd values, indicating that the proposed gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry approach is a useful tool to

  6. Liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis of pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.

    2003-01-01

    The drugs represent mostly non-volatile and thermally labile solutes, often available only in small amounts like it is in case of radiopharmaceuticals. Therefor, the favourable separation techniques for such compounds are HPLC, capillary electrophoresis and also TLC 1. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detector (LC/MS) is especially powerful for their microanalysis. Mass spectrometry separating the ions in high vacuum was presumably used as detector for gas chromatography effluent but the on-line coupling with liquid eluant flow 0.1-1 mL/min is far more challenging. New types of ion sources were constructed for simultaneous removal of solvent and ionisation of solutes at atmospheric pressure (API). At present, a relatively wide choice of successfully designed commercial equipment is available either for small organic molecules and larger biomolecules (Perkin-Elmer, Agilent, Jeol, Bruker Daltonics, ThermoQuest, Shimadzu). The features of the LC/MS systems are presented. LC/MS as a new quality control tool for [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) radiopharmaceutical, which has became the most spread radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET), was proposed. Other applications of the LC/MS are reviewed. (author)

  7. A new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection coupled to electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry analytical strategy for fast analysis and improved characterization of phenolic compounds in apple products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Ambrosi, M; Abad-Garcia, B; Viloria-Bernal, M; Garmon-Lobato, S; Berrueta, L A; Gallo, B

    2013-11-05

    A new, rapid, selective and sensitive ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection coupled to electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-DAD-ESI-Q-ToF-MS) strategy using automatic and simultaneous acquisition of exact mass at high and low collision energy, MS(E), has been developed to obtain polyphenolic profile of apples, apple pomace and apple juice from Asturian cider apples in a single run injection of 22 min. MS(E) spectral data acquisition overcomes chromatographic co-elution problems, performing simultaneous collection of precursor ions as well as other ions produced as a result of their fragmentation, which allows resolving complex spectra from mixtures of precursor ions in an unsupervised way and eases their interpretation. Using this technique, 52 phenolic compounds of five different classes were readily characterized in these apple extracts in both positive and negative ionization modes. The spectral data for phenolic compounds obtained using this acquisition mode are comparable to those obtained by conventional LC-MS/MS as exemplified in this work. Among the 52 phenolic compounds identified in this work, 2 dihydrochalcones and 3 flavonols have been tentatively identified for the first time in apple products. Moreover, 2 flavanols, 4 dihydrochalcones, 9 hydroxycinnamic acids and 4 flavonols had not been previously reported in apple by ToF analysis to our knowledge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography accurate mass spectrometry for extraction and non-targeted profiling of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in grape marc distillates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Ariel; Rodríguez, Isaac; Cela, Rafael

    2018-04-20

    The suitability of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and gas chromatography accurate mass spectrometry (GC-MS), based on a time-of-flight (TOF) MS analyzer and using electron ionization (EI), for the characterization of volatile and semi-volatile profiles of grape marc distillates (grappa) are evaluated. DLLME conditions are optimized with a selection of compounds, from different chemical families, present in the distillate spirit. Under final working conditions, 2.5 mL of sample and 0.5 mL of organic solvents are consumed in the sample preparation process. The absolute extraction efficiencies ranged from 30 to 100%, depending on the compound. For the same sample volume, DLLME provided higher responses than solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for most of the model compounds. The GC-EI-TOF-MS records of grappa samples were processed using a data mining non-targeted search algorithm. In this way, chromatographic peaks and accurate EI-MS spectra of sample components were linked. The identities of more than 140 of these components are proposed from comparison of their accurate spectra with those in a low resolution EI-MS database, accurate masses of most intense fragment ions of known structure, and available chromatographic retention index. The use of chromatographic and spectral data, associated to the set of components mined from different grappa samples, for multivariate analysis purposes is also illustrated in the study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality data...... that in turn allow protein identification, annotation of secondary modifications, and determination of the absolute or relative abundance of individual proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics rely on robust bioinformatics tools that enable large-scale data analysis. This chapter describes...... some of the basic concepts and current approaches to the analysis of MS and MS/MS data in proteomics....

  10. Mass spectrometry: a revolution in clinical microbiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Espinal, Paula; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Messad, Nourredine; Pantel, Alix; Sotto, Albert

    2013-02-01

    Recently, different bacteriological laboratory interventions that decrease reporting time have been developed. These promising new broad-based techniques have merit, based on their ability to identify rapidly many bacteria, organisms difficult to grow or newly emerging strains, as well as their capacity to track disease transmission. The benefit of rapid reporting of identification and/or resistance of bacteria can greatly impact patient outcomes, with an improvement in the use of antibiotics, in the reduction of the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria and in mortality rates. Different techniques revolve around mass spectrometry (MS) technology: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), PCR combined with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESIMS), iPLEX MassArray system and other new evolutions combining different techniques. This report emphasizes the (r)evolution of these technologies in clinical microbiology.

  11. Development of an analytical method coupling cell membrane chromatography with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry via microextraction by packed sorbent and its application in the screening of volatile active compounds in natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Wang, Sicen; He, Langchong

    2015-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are important sources of lead compounds in modern drug discovery. To facilitate the screening of volatile active compounds in NPs, we have developed a new biochromatography method that uses rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which are rich in L-type calcium channels (LCC), to prepare the stationary phase. This integrated method, which couples cell membrane chromatography (CMC) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) via microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) technology, has been termed VSMC/CMC-MEPS-GC-MS. Methodological validation confirmed its specificity, reliability and convenience. Screening results for Radix Angelicae Dahuricae and Fructus Cnidii obtained using VSMC/CMC-MEPS-GC-MS were consistent with those obtained using VSMC/CMC-offline-GC-MS. MEPS connection plays as simplified solid-phase extraction and replaces the uncontrollable evaporation operation in reported offline connections, so our new method is supposed to be more efficient and reliable than the offline ones, especially for compounds that are volatile, thermally unstable or difficult to purify. In application, senkyunolide A and ligustilide were preliminary identified as the volatile active components in Rhizoma Chuanxiong. We have thus confirmed the suitability of VSMC/CMC-MEPS-GC-MS for volatile active compounds screening in NP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mass spectrometry in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Takuji

    1985-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely used and playing a very important role in the field of nuclear science and technology. A major reason for this is that not only the types of element but also its isotopes have to be identified and measured in this field. Thus, some applications of this analytical method are reviewed and discussed in this article. Its application to analytical chemistry is described in the second section following an introductory section, which includes subsections for isotropic dilution mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry and isotopic correlation technique. The isotopic ratio measurement for hydrogen, uranium and plutonium as well as nuclear material control and safeguards are also reviewed in this section. In the third section, mass spectrometry is discussed in relation to nuclear reactors, with subsections on natural uranium reactor and neutron flux observation. Some techniques for measuring the burnup fraction, including the heavy isotopic ratio method and fission product monitoring, are also described. In the fourth section, application of mass spectrometry to measurement of nuclear constants, such as ratio of effective cross-sectional area for 235 U, half-life and fission yield is reviewed. (Nogami, K.)

  13. Development of an analytical strategy based on liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry for measuring perfluorinated compounds in human breast milk: application to the generation of preliminary data regarding perinatal exposure in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Hanane; Veyrand, Bruno; Barbarossa, Andrea; Pagliuca, Giampiero; Legrand, Arnaud; Bosher, Cécile; Boquien, Clair-Yves; Durand, Sophie; Monteau, Fabrice; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are man-made chemicals for which endocrine disrupting properties and related possible side effects on human health have been reported, particularly in the case of an exposure during the early stages of development, (notably the perinatal period). Existing analytical methods dedicated to PFCs monitoring in food and/or human fluids are currently based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, and were recently demonstrated to present some limitations in terms of sensitivity and/or specificity. An alternative strategy dedicated to the analysis of fourteen PFCs in human breast milk was proposed, based on an effective sample preparation followed by a liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry measurement (LC-HRMS). This methodology confirmed the high interest for HRMS after negative ionization for such halogenated substances, and finally permitted to reach detection limits around the pg mL(-1) range with an outstanding signal specificity compared to LC-MS/MS. The proposed method was applied to a first set of 30 breast milk samples from French women. The main PFCs detected in all these samples were PFOS and PFOA with respective median values of 74 (range from 24 to 171) and 57 (range from 18 to 102) pg mL(-1), respectively. These exposure data appeared in the same range as other reported values for European countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for molecular analysis of organic compounds in medicines, tea, and coffee

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Renqi; Bao, Kai; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Ng, Siuchoon

    2013-01-01

    Natural occurring organic compounds from food, natural organic matter, as well as metabolic products have received intense attention in current chemical and biological studies. Examination of unknown compounds in complex sample matrices is hampered

  15. Current medical research with the application of coupled techniques with mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ka?u?na-Czapli?ska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most effective methods of analysis of organic compounds in biological fluids are coupled chromatographic techniques. Capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) allows the most efficient separation, identification and quantification of volatile metabolites in biological fluids. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is especially suitable for the analysis of non-volatile and/or thermally unstable compounds. A major drawback of liquid chromatography-mass spectro...

  16. [Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Histopathologic Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Seto, Mitsutoshi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enables visualization of the distribution of a range of biomolecules by integrating biochemical information from mass spectrometry with positional information from microscopy. IMS identifies a target molecule. In addition, IMS enables global analysis of biomolecules containing unknown molecules by detecting the ratio of the molecular weight to electric charge without any target, which makes it possible to identify novel molecules. IMS generates data on the distribution of lipids and small molecules in tissues, which is difficult to visualize with either conventional counter-staining or immunohistochemistry. In this review, we firstly introduce the principle of imaging mass spectrometry and recent advances in the sample preparation method. Secondly, we present findings regarding biological samples, especially pathological ones. Finally, we discuss the limitations and problems of the IMS technique and clinical application, such as in drug development.

  17. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Wastewater Compounds by Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Barber, Larry B.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of 67 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater on aquatic organisms. This method also may be useful for evaluating the impact of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are an indicator of wastewater or that have been chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted with dichloromethane-diethyl ether (4:1) and determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 4 micrograms per liter averaged 74 percent ? 7 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds (excluding hormones and sterols) averaged 0.15 microgram per liter. Samples are preserved by filtration, the addition of 60 grams NaCl, and storage at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory has established a sample-holding time (prior to sample extraction) of 14 days from the date of sample collection until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of these sample-preservation procedures.

  18. Characterization of organic aromatic compounds in soils affected by an uncontrolled tire landfill fire through the use of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Arnanz, J; Mekni, S; Blanco, G; Eljarrat, E; Barceló, D; Ramos, L

    2018-02-09

    Discarded vehicle tires have become an increasing concern worldwide due to the enormous amount of wastes generated and the increasing evidence of health problems associated to their disposal and accidental combustion. Previous studies conducted involving either simulated or open uncontrolled tire fires have identified aromatics belonging to two main classes, volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs), as the most relevant chemicals generated in these burning processes. As a consequence, and due to their recognized toxicity, most studies reported up to now have mainly focused on these two categories of compounds being information concerning the possible occurrence of other aromatic classes rather limited. In this study, the enhanced separation power and structural confirmation capabilities provided by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToF MS) has been used, for the first time, for the non-targeted analysis of soils impacted by a tire fire and an ash collected at the scene of the fire. In total, 118 volatile and semi-volatile aromatic compounds have been differentiated. Among them, 104 compounds have been either positively or tentatively identified. PAHs with 3-5 rings and their alkyl-derivatives were the most numerous and relevant classes in the investigated samples. A significant number of sulfur, oxygen- and nitrogen-containing PAHs were also detected in the samples. The application of a script function to the raw GC×GC-ToF MS data allowed the fast filtering and automatic recognition of compounds containing halogens in their structure. This part of the study evidenced that only a limited number of regulated persistent organic pollutants were present in the investigated samples. However, it also revealed the presence of emerging organophosphorous flame retardants, whose levels in tire fire impacted soils are reported for the first time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. LC-MS/MS Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Phenolic Compounds and Pentacyclic Triterpenes in Antifungal Extracts of Terminalia brownii (Fresen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enass Y. A. Salih

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Decoctions and macerations of the stem bark and wood of Terminalia brownii Fresen. are used in traditional medicine for fungal infections and as fungicides on field crops and in traditional granaries in Sudan. In addition, T. brownii water extracts are commonly used as sprays for protecting wooden houses and furniture. Therefore, using agar disc diffusion and macrodilution methods, eight extracts of various polarities from the stem wood and bark were screened for their growth-inhibitory effects against filamentous fungi commonly causing fruit, vegetable, grain and wood decay, as well as infections in the immunocompromised host. Ethyl acetate extracts of the stem wood and bark gave the best antifungal activities, with MIC values of 250 µg/mL against Nattrassia mangiferae and Fusarium verticillioides, and 500 µg/mL against Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. Aqueous extracts gave almost as potent effects as the ethyl acetate extracts against the Aspergillus and Fusarium strains, and were slightly more active than the ethyl acetate extracts against Nattrassia mangiferae. Thin layer chromatography, RP-HPLC-DAD and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, were employed to identify the chemical constituents in the ethyl acetate fractions of the stem bark and wood. The stem bark and wood were found to have a similar qualitative composition of polyphenols and triterpenoids, but differed quantitatively from each other. The stilbene derivatives, cis- (3 and trans- resveratrol-3-O-β-galloylglucoside (4, were identified for the first time in T. brownii. Moreover, methyl-(S-flavogallonate (5, quercetin-7-β-O-di-glucoside (8, quercetin-7-O-galloyl-glucoside (10, naringenin-4′-methoxy-7-pyranoside (7, 5,6-dihydroxy-3′,4′,7-tri-methoxy flavone (12, gallagic acid dilactone (terminalin (6, a corilagin derivative (9 and two oleanane type triterpenoids (1 and (2 were characterized. The flavonoids, a corilagin derivative and terminalin, have not been

  20. 14C Accelerator mass spectrometry in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macario, K.D.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, Roberto M.; Linares, R.; Queiroz, E.A.; Oliveira, F.M.; Cardozo, L.; Carvalho, C.R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive technique that enables the direct measurement of carbon isotopes in samples as small as a few milligrams. The possibility of dating or tracing rare or even compound specific carbon samples has application in many fields of science such as Archaeology, Geosciences and Biomedicine. Several kinds of material such as wood, charcoal, carbonate and bone can be chemically treated and converted to graphite to be measured in the accelerator system. The Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil will soon be able to perform the complete 14 C-AMS measurement of samples. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are prepared and converted to carbon dioxide. A stainless steel vacuum system was constructed for carbon dioxide purification and graphitization is performed in sealed tubes in a muffle oven. Graphite samples will be analyzed in a 250 kV Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation which will be installed in the beginning of 2012. With the sample preparation laboratory at LACRON and the SSAMS system, the Physics Institute of UFF will be the first 14 C-AMS facility in Latin America. (author)

  1. Development and validation of a multi-residue method for the detection of a wide range of hormonal anabolic compounds in hair using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambaud, Lauriane; Monteau, Fabrice; Deceuninck, Yoann; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Andre, Francois; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of anabolic steroid residues in hair is undoubtedly one of the most efficient strategies to demonstrate the long-term administration of these molecules in meat production animals. A multi-residue sample preparation procedure was developed and validated for 28 steroids. A 100 mg hair sample was grinded into powder and extracted at 50 deg. C with methanol. After acidic hydrolysis and extraction with ethyl acetate, phenolsteroids, such as estrogens, resorcyclic acid lactones and stilbens in one hand, are separated from androgens and progestagens in the other hand. Solid phase extractions were performed before applying a specific derivatisation for each compound sub-group. Detection and identification were achieved using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with acquisition in the selected reaction monitoring mode after electron ionisation. The method was validated according to the 2002/657/EC guideline. Decision limits (CCα) for main steroids were in the 0.1-10 μg kg -1 range

  2. Parsimonious Charge Deconvolution for Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Charge deconvolution infers the mass from mass over charge (m/z) measurements in electrospray ionization mass spectra. When applied over a wide input m/z or broad target mass range, charge-deconvolution algorithms can produce artifacts, such as false masses at one-half or one-third of the correct mass. Indeed, a maximum entropy term in the objective function of MaxEnt, the most commonly used charge deconvolution algorithm, favors a deconvolved spectrum with many peaks over one with fewer peaks. Here we describe a new “parsimonious” charge deconvolution algorithm that produces fewer artifacts. The algorithm is especially well-suited to high-resolution native mass spectrometry of intact glycoproteins and protein complexes. Deconvolution of native mass spectra poses special challenges due to salt and small molecule adducts, multimers, wide mass ranges, and fewer and lower charge states. We demonstrate the performance of the new deconvolution algorithm on a range of samples. On the heavily glycosylated plasma properdin glycoprotein, the new algorithm could deconvolve monomer and dimer simultaneously and, when focused on the m/z range of the monomer, gave accurate and interpretable masses for glycoforms that had previously been analyzed manually using m/z peaks rather than deconvolved masses. On therapeutic antibodies, the new algorithm facilitated the analysis of extensions, truncations, and Fab glycosylation. The algorithm facilitates the use of native mass spectrometry for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of protein and protein assemblies. PMID:29376659

  3. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Transformation of Modern Environmental Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lucy; Yan, Fangzhi; Bach, Stephen; Pihakari, Katianna; Klein, David

    2016-01-01

    Unknown compounds in environmental samples are difficult to identify using standard mass spectrometric methods. Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) has revolutionized how environmental analyses are performed. With its unsurpassed mass accuracy, high resolution and sensitivity, researchers now have a tool for difficult and complex environmental analyses. Two features of FTMS are responsible for changing the face of how complex analyses are accomplished. First is the ability to quickly and with high mass accuracy determine the presence of unknown chemical residues in samples. For years, the field has been limited by mass spectrometric methods that were based on knowing what compounds of interest were. Secondly, by utilizing the high resolution capabilities coupled with the low detection limits of FTMS, analysts also could dilute the sample sufficiently to minimize the ionization changes from varied matrices. PMID:26784175

  4. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Transformation of Modern Environmental Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Lim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unknown compounds in environmental samples are difficult to identify using standard mass spectrometric methods. Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS has revolutionized how environmental analyses are performed. With its unsurpassed mass accuracy, high resolution and sensitivity, researchers now have a tool for difficult and complex environmental analyses. Two features of FTMS are responsible for changing the face of how complex analyses are accomplished. First is the ability to quickly and with high mass accuracy determine the presence of unknown chemical residues in samples. For years, the field has been limited by mass spectrometric methods that were based on knowing what compounds of interest were. Secondly, by utilizing the high resolution capabilities coupled with the low detection limits of FTMS, analysts also could dilute the sample sufficiently to minimize the ionization changes from varied matrices.

  5. Statistical analysis of proteomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics data using mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, Bart

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an overview of computational and statistical design and analysis of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics data. This contributed volume provides an introduction to the special aspects of statistical design and analysis with mass spectrometry data for the new omic sciences. The text discusses common aspects of design and analysis between and across all (or most) forms of mass spectrometry, while also providing special examples of application with the most common forms of mass spectrometry. Also covered are applications of computational mass spectrometry not only in clinical study but also in the interpretation of omics data in plant biology studies. Omics research fields are expected to revolutionize biomolecular research by the ability to simultaneously profile many compounds within either patient blood, urine, tissue, or other biological samples. Mass spectrometry is one of the key analytical techniques used in these new omic sciences. Liquid chromatography mass ...

  6. Dual solid-phase and stir bar sorptive extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis provides a suitable tool for assaying limonene-derived mint aroma compounds in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Magali; Franc, Céline; de Revel, Gilles; Marchand, Stéphanie

    2018-02-25

    A novel analytical method was developed for quantitative determination of eight limonene-derived monoterpenes responsible for the mint aroma in red wine. As these aromatic compounds are present at trace levels, a new dual extraction approach was proposed, combining solid-phase extraction (SPE) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The various parameters affecting the efficiency of extracting the analytes from wine samples in both the SPE and SBSE steps were first investigated, to determine the best compromise for the simultaneous analysis of the compounds studied. Following preliminary optimization of the dilution factor, phase ratio, and methanol content in the SBSE sample, cartridge sorbent mass, type of solvent, elution volume, and wine sample volume in the pre-concentration SPE step were studied. Highest response values were obtained when a 90 mL wine sample was extracted on a 500 mg SPE C18 cartridge and eluted with 1.5 mL methanol. The wine extract was then diluted in 10 mL water to obtain a final methanol content of 15% before the SBSE step. Good linearity, repeatability, reproducibility, accuracy and the required low detection and quantification limits were obtained under the conditions described, making this SPE-SBSE combination a suitable, powerful tool for routine analysis of the selected limonene-derived mint aroma compounds in large series of wine samples. Finally, the validated method was applied to 15 commercial red Bordeaux wines, aged from 3 to 23 years. Most of the compounds studied, present within the ng.L -1 range, were easily quantified for the first time in wine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A rapid method for simultaneous determination of 52 marker compounds in Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Qi, Wen; Xu, Cong; Makino, Toshiaki; Yuan, Dan

    2014-11-01

    Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang (XQLT) is a classical Chinese medicine formula. It is generally used for the treatment of common cold, bronchial asthma, and allergic rhinitis in Asia. In this study, a multicomponent quantification fingerprinting approach based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been developed for the analysis of compounds in XQLT in 14.5 min. A total of 52 compounds were identified by co-chromatography of sample extract with authentic standards and comparing the retention time, UV spectra, molecular ions and characteristic fragment ions with those of authentic standards, or tentatively identified by MS(E) determination along with Mass Fragment software. Moreover, the method was validated for the simultaneous quantification of 16 components in XQLT commercial products. The method is practical for comprehensive standardization of XQLT and holistic comparison of its commercial products from different manufacturers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Membrane introduction proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, M.; Boscaini, E.; Maerk, T.; Lindinger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a rapidly expanding field with multiple applications in ion physics, atmospheric chemistry, food chemistry, volatile organic compounds monitoring and biology. Initial studies that combine PTR-MS and membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) were researched and outlined. First using PTR-MS, certain fundamental physical properties of a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane including solubilities and diffusion coefficients were measured. Second, it was shown how the chemical selectivity of the (PDMS) can be used to extend the capabilities of the PTR-MS instrument by eliminating certain isobaric interferences and excluding water from volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Experiments with mixtures of several VOCs (toluene, benzene, acetone, propanal, methanol) are presented. (nevyjel)

  9. Fingerprint analysis and quality consistency evaluation of flavonoid compounds for fermented Guava leaf by combining high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and chemometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Tian, Xiaofei; Wei, Wenhao; Chen, Gong; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2016-10-01

    Guava leaves are used in traditional herbal teas as antidiabetic therapies. Flavonoids are the main active of Guava leaves and have many physiological functions. However, the flavonoid compositions and activities of Guava leaves could change due to microbial fermentation. A high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method was applied to identify the varieties of the flavonoids in Guava leaves before and after fermentation. High-performance liquid chromatography, hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to quantitatively determine the changes in flavonoid compositions and evaluate the consistency and quality of Guava leaves. Monascus anka Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermented Guava leaves contained 2.32- and 4.06-fold more total flavonoids and quercetin, respectively, than natural Guava leaves. The flavonoid compounds of the natural Guava leaves had similarities ranging from 0.837 to 0.927. The flavonoid compounds from the Monascus anka S. cerevisiae fermented Guava leaves had similarities higher than 0.993. This indicated that the quality consistency of the fermented Guava leaves was better than that of the natural Guava leaves. High-performance liquid chromatography fingerprinting and chemometric analysis are promising methods for evaluating the degree of fermentation of Guava leaves based on quality consistency, which could be used in assessing flavonoid compounds for the production of fermented Guava leaves. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Analysis of volatile organic compounds released from the decay of surrogate human models simulating victims of collapsed buildings by thermal desorption-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapiou, A; Zorba, E; Mikedi, K; McGregor, L; Spiliopoulou, C; Statheropoulos, M

    2015-07-09

    Field experiments were devised to mimic the entrapment conditions under the rubble of collapsed buildings aiming to investigate the evolution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the early dead body decomposition stage. Three pig carcasses were placed inside concrete tunnels of a search and rescue (SAR) operational field terrain for simulating the entrapment environment after a building collapse. The experimental campaign employed both laboratory and on-site analytical methods running in parallel. The current work focuses only on the results of the laboratory method using thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOF MS). The flow-modulated TD-GC×GC-TOF MS provided enhanced separation of the VOC profile and served as a reference method for the evaluation of the on-site analytical methods in the current experimental campaign. Bespoke software was used to deconvolve the VOC profile to extract as much information as possible into peak lists. In total, 288 unique VOCs were identified (i.e., not found in blank samples). The majority were aliphatics (172), aromatics (25) and nitrogen compounds (19), followed by ketones (17), esters (13), alcohols (12), aldehydes (11), sulfur (9), miscellaneous (8) and acid compounds (2). The TD-GC×GC-TOF MS proved to be a sensitive and powerful system for resolving the chemical puzzle of above-ground "scent of death". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential Rapid Screening of Phytochemicals by Leaf Spray Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Thomas; Graham Cooks, R. [Univ. of Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-03-15

    Ambient ionization can be achieved by generating an electrospray directly from plant tissue ('leaf spray'). The resulting mass spectra are characteristic of ionizable phytochemicals in the plant material. By subtracting the leaf spray spectra recorded from the petals of two hibiscus species H. moscheutos and H. syriacus one gains rapid access to the metabolites that differ most in the two petals. One such compound was identified as the sambubioside of quercitin (or delphinidin) while others are known flavones. Major interest centered on a C{sub 19}H{sub 29}NO{sub 5} compound that occurs only in the large H. moscheutos bloom. Attempts were made to characterize this compound by mass spectrometry alone as a test of such an approach. This showed that the compound is an alkaloid, assigned to the polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine class, and bound via a C{sub 3} hydrocarbon unit to a monoterpene.

  12. Differential Rapid Screening of Phytochemicals by Leaf Spray Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Thomas; Graham Cooks, R.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient ionization can be achieved by generating an electrospray directly from plant tissue ('leaf spray'). The resulting mass spectra are characteristic of ionizable phytochemicals in the plant material. By subtracting the leaf spray spectra recorded from the petals of two hibiscus species H. moscheutos and H. syriacus one gains rapid access to the metabolites that differ most in the two petals. One such compound was identified as the sambubioside of quercitin (or delphinidin) while others are known flavones. Major interest centered on a C 19 H 29 NO 5 compound that occurs only in the large H. moscheutos bloom. Attempts were made to characterize this compound by mass spectrometry alone as a test of such an approach. This showed that the compound is an alkaloid, assigned to the polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine class, and bound via a C 3 hydrocarbon unit to a monoterpene

  13. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-06-01

    As for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) interferometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the introduction of pulsed Fourier transform techniques revolutionized ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: increased speed (factor of 10,000), increased sensitivity (factor of 100), increased mass resolution (factor of 10,000-an improvement not shared by the introduction of FT techniques to IR or NMR spectroscopy), increased mass range (factor of 500), and automated operation. FT-ICR mass spectrometry is the most versatile technique for unscrambling and quantifying ion-molecule reaction kinetics and equilibria in the absence of solvent (i.e., the gas phase). In addition, FT-ICR MS has the following analytically important features: speed (~1 second per spectrum); ultrahigh mass resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy for analysis of mixtures and polymers; attomole sensitivity; MSn with one spectrometer, including two-dimensional FT/FT-ICR/MS; positive and/or negative ions; multiple ion sources (especially MALDI and electrospray); biomolecular molecular weight and sequencing; LC/MS; and single-molecule detection up to 108 Dalton. Here, some basic features and recent developments of FT-ICR mass spectrometry are reviewed, with applications ranging from crude oil to molecular biology.

  14. A history of mass spectrometry in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downard, K.M.; de Laeter, J.R. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2005-09-01

    An interest in mass spectrometry in Australia can be traced back to the 1920s with an early correspondence with Francis Aston who first visited these shores a decade earlier. The region has a rich tradition in both the development of the field and its application, from early measurements of ionization and appearance potentials by Jim Morrison at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) around 1950 to the design and construction of instrumentation including the first use of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for tandem mass spectrometry, the first suite of programs to simulate ion optics (SIMION), the development of early TOF/TOF instruments and orthogonal acceleration and the local design and construction of several generations of a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) instrument. Mass spectrometry has been exploited in the study and characterization of the constituents of this nation's unique flora and fauna from Australian apples, honey, tea plant and eucalyptus oil, snake, spider, fish and frog venoms, coal, oil, sediments and shale, environmental studies of groundwater to geochronological dating of limestone and granite, other terrestrial and meteoritic rocks and coral from the Great Barrier Reef. This article traces the history of mass spectrometry in its many guises and applications in the island continent of Australia. It focuses on contributions of scientists who played a major role in the early establishment of mass spectrometry in Australia. In general, those who are presently active in the field, and whose histories are incomplete, have been mentioned at best only briefly despite their important contributions to the field.

  15. Laser-induced mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polanyi, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the spectroscopic analysis of gas. The gas molecules are internally excited by irradiation with laser light having a wavelength which is absorbed by the sample. The gas is then ionized and passed through a mass spectrometer and the amount of the ionized species in the irradiated and ionized sample is compared with that in a similar ionized but not irradiated sample

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis Using Protein Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shiyong; Downard, Kevin M; Wong, Jason W H

    2017-01-01

    Through advances in molecular biology, comparative analysis of DNA sequences is currently the cornerstone in the study of molecular evolution and phylogenetics. Nevertheless, protein mass spectrometry offers some unique opportunities to enable phylogenetic analyses in organisms where DNA may be difficult or costly to obtain. To date, the methods of phylogenetic analysis using protein mass spectrometry can be classified into three categories: (1) de novo protein sequencing followed by classical phylogenetic reconstruction, (2) direct phylogenetic reconstruction using proteolytic peptide mass maps, and (3) mapping of mass spectral data onto classical phylogenetic trees. In this chapter, we provide a brief description of the three methods and the protocol for each method along with relevant tools and algorithms.

  17. Identification of bacteria using mass spectrometry techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krásný, Lukáš; Hynek, R.; Hochel, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 353, NOV 2013 (2013), s. 67-79 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/10/0664 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Mass spectrometry * Bacteria * Identification Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2013

  18. Four decades of joy in mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibbering, N.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Tremendous developments in mass spectrometry have taken place in the last 40 years. This holds for both the science and the instrumental revolutions in this field. In chemistry the research was heavily focused on organic molecules that upon electron ionization fragmented via complex mechanistic

  19. Inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry. Chapter 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalingam, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a new technique for elemental and isotopic analysis which is currently attracting a great deal of interest. This relatively new technique has found wide applications in different fields of research viz., nuclear, geological, biological and environmental sciences

  20. Characterization of synthetic peptides by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Mirza, Osman Asghar; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI......-TOF-MS and LC-MS of synthetic peptides....

  1. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  2. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, D.; Milde, D.; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2016), s. 35-47 ISSN 0277-7037 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13038; GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : iron * siderophores * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 9.373, year: 2016

  3. Polymer and Additive Mass Spectrometry Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-06

    The use of mass spectrometry in fields related to polymers has increased significantly over the past three decades and will be explored in this literature review. The importance of this technique is highlighted when exploring how polymers degrade, verifying purchased materials, and as internal requirements change. The primary focus will be on four ionization techniques and the triple quadrupole and quadrupole / time-of-flight mass spectrometers. The advantages and limitations of each will also be explored.

  4. Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry: background and contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukens, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    Since the advent of radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) many studies have been conducted to understand the background from mass spectrometric processes and the origins of contamination associated with the ion source and sample preparation. By studying the individual contributions a better understanding of these processes has been obtained and it has been demonstrated that it is possible to date samples reliably up to 60 000 BP. (orig.)

  5. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  6. Systematic approach to optimize a pretreatment method for ultrasensitive liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analysis of multiple target compounds in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Kazutaka; Mutaguchi, Kuninori; Komuro, Setsuko; Kataoka, Makoto; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    In current approaches for new drug development, highly sensitive and robust analytical methods for the determination of test compounds in biological samples are essential. These analytical methods should be optimized for every target compound. However, for biological samples that contain multiple compounds as new drug candidates obtained by cassette dosing tests, it would be preferable to develop a single method that allows the determination of all compounds at once. This study aims to establish a systematic approach that enables a selection of the most appropriate pretreatment method for multiple target compounds without the use of their chemical information. We investigated the retention times of 27 known compounds under different mobile phase conditions and determined the required pretreatment of human plasma samples using several solid-phase and liquid-liquid extractions. From the relationship between retention time and recovery in a principal component analysis, appropriate pretreatments were categorized into several types. Based on the category, we have optimized a pretreatment method for the identification of three calcium channel blockers in human plasma. Plasma concentrations of these drugs in a cassette-dose clinical study at microdose level were successfully determined with a lower limit of quantitation of 0.2 pg/mL for diltiazem, 1 pg/mL for nicardipine, and 2 pg/mL for nifedipine. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds in Cynthiana grape (Vitis aestivalis) by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Lopez, L M; McGlynn, W; Goad, C L; Mireles Dewitt, C A

    2014-04-15

    Phenolic acids, flavanols, flavonols and stilbenes (PAFFS) were isolated from whole grapes, juice, or pomace and purified using enzymatic hydrolysis. Only anthocyanin mono-glucosides and a few of the oligomers from Cynthiana grape (Vitis aestivalis) were analysed. Flavonoid-anthocyanin mono-glucosides (FA) were isolated using methanol/0.1% hydrochloric acid extraction. In addition, crude extractions of phenolic compounds from Cynthiana grape using 50% methanol, 70% methanol, 50% acetone, 0.01% pectinase, or petroleum ether were also evaluated. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with photodiode array (PDA) detector was used to identify phenolic compounds. A method was developed for simultaneous separation, identification and quantification of both PAFFS and FA. Quantification was performed by the internal standard method using a five points regression graph of the UV-visible absorption data collected at the wavelength of maximum absorbance for each analyte. From whole grape samples nine phenolic compounds were tentatively identified and quantified. The individual phenolic compounds content varied from 3 to 875 mg kg⁻¹ dry weight. For juice, twelve phenolic compounds were identified and quantified. The content varied from 0.07 to 910 mg kg⁻¹ dry weight. For pomace, a total of fifteen phenolic compounds were tentatively identified and quantified. The content varied from 2 mg kg⁻¹ to 198 mg kg⁻¹ dry matter. Results from HPLC analysis of the samples showed that gallic acid and (+)-catechin hydrate were the major phenolic compounds in both whole grapes and pomace. Cyanidin and petunidin 3-O-glucoside were the major anthocyanin glucosides in the juice. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Quantification of selected volatile organic compounds in human urine by gas chromatography selective reagent ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-SRI-TOF-MS) coupled with head-space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalski, Paweł; Unterkofler, Karl

    2016-08-07

    Selective reagent ionization time of flight mass spectrometry with NO(+) as the reagent ion (SRI-TOF-MS(NO(+))) in conjunction with gas chromatography (GC) and head-space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used to determine selected volatile organic compounds in human urine. A total of 16 volatiles exhibiting high incidence rates were quantified in the urine of 19 healthy volunteers. Amongst them there were ten ketones (acetone, 2-butanone, 3-methyl-2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 2-heptanone, and 4-heptanone), three volatile sulphur compounds (dimethyl sulfide, allyl methyl sulfide, and methyl propyl sulfide), and three heterocyclic compounds (furan, 2-methylfuran, 3-methylfuran). The concentrations of the species under study varied between 0.55 nmol L(-1) (0.05 nmol mmol(-1)creatinine) for allyl methyl sulfide and 11.6 μmol L(-1) (1.54 μmol mmol(-1)creatinine) for acetone considering medians. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.08 nmol L(-1) for allyl methyl sulfide to 1.0 nmol L(-1) for acetone and furan (with RSDs ranging from 5 to 9%). The presented experimental setup assists both real-time and GC analyses of volatile organic compounds, which can be performed consecutively using the same analytical system. Such an approach supports the novel concept of hybrid volatolomics, an approach which combines VOC profiles obtained from two or more body fluids to improve and complement the chemical information on the physiological status of an individual.

  9. Accelerator mass spectrometry: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. The main use of AMS has been in the analysis of radiocarbon and other cosmogenic radionuclides for archaeological, geological and environmental applications. In addition, AMS has been recently applied in biomedicine to study exposure of human tissues to chemicals and biomolecules at attomole levels. There is also a world-wide effort to analyse rare nuclides of heavier masses, such as long-lived actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. The use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required and there are several attempts to develop smaller and cheaper AMS spectrometers. 5 refs.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. The main use of AMS has been in the analysis of radiocarbon and other cosmogenic radionuclides for archaeological, geological and environmental applications. In addition, AMS has been recently applied in biomedicine to study exposure of human tissues to chemicals and biomolecules at attomole levels. There is also a world-wide effort to analyse rare nuclides of heavier masses, such as long-lived actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. The use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required and there are several attempts to develop smaller and cheaper AMS spectrometers. 5 refs.

  11. Guideline on Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, Amy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry is used to determine the concentration of an element of interest in a bulk sample. It is a destructive analysis technique that is applicable to a wide range of analytes and bulk sample types. With this method, a known amount of a rare isotope, or ‘spike’, of the element of interest is added to a known amount of sample. The element of interest is chemically purified from the bulk sample, the isotope ratio of the spiked sample is measured by mass spectrometry, and the concentration of the element of interest is calculated from this result. This method is widely used, although a mass spectrometer required for this analysis may be fairly expensive.

  12. Simultaneous determination of various aromatic amines and metabolites of aromatic nitro compounds in urine for low level exposure using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tobias; Angerer, Jürgen

    2002-10-05

    A newly developed method permits the simultaneous quantitative determination of various aromatic amines (or metabolites of aromatic nitro compounds, respectively) in human urine in one analytical run. Applying this method it is possible to determine aniline, toluidines, 4-isopropylaniline, o-anisidine, 3- and 4-chloroaniline, 4-bromoaniline, aminonitrotoluenes, aminodinitrotoluenes, 3,5- and 3,4-dichloroaniline, alpha- and beta-naphtylamine and 4-aminodiphenyl. After separation from the urinary matrix by a simple liquid-liquid extraction at pH 6.2-6.4 the analytes are converted into their pentafluoropropionic acid amides. Separation and quantitative analysis is carried out by capillary gas chromatography and mass-selective detection in the single ion monitoring mode. The limits of detection were within the range from 0.05 microg/l (4-aminobiphenyl, o-anisidine, 3,5-dichloroaniline) to 2 microg/l urine (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene). The relative standard deviation of the within-series imprecision (determined at spiked concentrations of 2.0 microg/l and 10 microg/l) was between 2.9 and 13.6% depending on analyte and concentration. The relative recovery rates were in the range of 70-121%. The analytes that do not contain a nitro function showed better performance regarding the analytical reliability criteria. In order to determine the suitability of this new method for biological monitoring we analysed 20 12-h urine samples of persons without known exposure to aromatic amines, nitroaromatics or precursors in a pilot study. In these samples various aromatic amines could be clearly identified. The general population renally excretes aniline (median: 3.5 microg/l; 95th percentile: 7.9 microg/l), o- (0.12 microg/l; 2.7 microg/l), m- (0.17 microg/l; 2.2 microg/l) and p-toluidine (0.11 microg/l; 0.43 microg/l), and o-anisidine (0.22 microg/l; 0.68 microg/l). Additionally, we found that the persons investigated also excrete 3- (<0.05 microg/l; 0.55 microg/l) and 4

  13. Analysis of acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, and related compounds in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    A headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the residual levels of acrylonitrile (AN), 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD), and their related compounds containing propionitrile (PN) and 4-vinyl-1-cyclohexene (4-VC) in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys. A sample was cut into small pieces, then N,N-dimethylacetamide and an internal standard were added in a sealed headspace vial. The vial was incubated for 1 h at 90 degrees C and the headspace gas was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The recovery rates of the analytes were 93.3-101.8% and the coefficients of variation were 0.3-6.5%. In ABS copolymers, the levels were 0.3-50.4 microg/g for AN, ND-4.5 microg/g for PN, 0.06-1.58 microg/g for 1,3-BD, and 1.1-295 microg/g for 4-VC. The highest level was found for 4-VC, which is a dimer of 1,3-BD, and the next highest was for AN, which is one of the monomers of the ABS copolymer. Furthermore, the method was also applied to acrylonitrile-styrene (AS) copolymers and polystyrenes (PS) for kitchen utensils, and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves. In AS copolymers, AN and PN were detected at 16.8-54.5 and 0.8-6.9 microg/g, respectively. On the other hand, the levels in PS and NBR samples were all low.

  14. Development of a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of sulfonamides, trimethoprim and dapsone in honey and validation according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC for banned compounds [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Anastasios; Petraki, Olympia; Tsipi, Despina; Botitsi, Eleni

    2012-08-15

    This work reports a sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for identification and quantification of seven sulfonamides, trimethoprim and dapsone in honey. The method is based on a solid-phase extraction (SPE) step of the target analytes with Oasis HLB cartridges after acidic hydrolysis of the honey sample to liberate the sugar-bound sulfonamides. Analysis was performed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in the positive electro-spray ionization (ESI) mode with two different isotopically labeled internal standards with the view to improve the quantitative performance of the method. The method validation has been performed according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC; the average recoveries, measured at three concentration levels (1.5, 2.5 and 5.0 μg kg(-1)), have been estimated in the range 70 to 106% while the respective % relative standard deviations of the within-laboratory reproducibility ranged from 6 to 18%. Mean values of the expanded uncertainties calculated were in the range 22-41% at the 99% confidence level. Decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) values were in the ranges 0.4-0.9 and 0.7-1.4 μg kg(-1), respectively. Matrix effects have been investigated demonstrating a moderate signal suppression/enhancement for most of the target compounds. The method described has been successfully applied to the analysis of honey samples; sulfamethoxazole, sulfathiazole and trimethoprim were detected in some cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantification of the Triazole Antifungal Compounds Voriconazole and Posaconazole in Human Serum or Plasma Using Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinelli, Alejandro R; Rose, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole and posaconazole are triazole antifungal compounds used in the treatment of fungal infections. Therapeutic drug monitoring of both compounds is recommended in order to guide drug dosing to achieve optimal blood concentrations. In this chapter we describe an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for the quantification of both compounds in human plasma or serum following a simple specimen preparation procedure. Specimen preparation consists of protein precipitation using methanol and acetonitrile followed by a cleanup step that involves filtration through a cellulose acetate membrane. The specimen is then injected into an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS equipped with a C18 column and separated over an acetonitrile gradient. Quantification of the drugs in the specimen is achieved by comparing the response of the unknown specimen to that of the calibrators in the standard curve using multiple reaction monitoring.

  16. A charged aerosol detector/chemiluminescent nitrogen detector/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system for regular and fragment compound analysis in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yutao; Hascall, Daniel; Li, Delia; Pease, Joseph H

    2015-09-11

    In this paper, we introduce a high throughput LCMS/UV/CAD/CLND system that improves upon previously reported systems by increasing both the quantitation accuracy and the range of compounds amenable to testing, in particular, low molecular weight "fragment" compounds. This system consists of a charged aerosol detector (CAD) and chemiluminescent nitrogen detector (CLND) added to a LCMS/UV system. Our results show that the addition of CAD and CLND to LCMS/UV is more reliable for concentration determination for a wider range of compounds than either detector alone. Our setup also allows for the parallel analysis of each sample by all four detectors and so does not significantly increase run time per sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isolation and identification of phenolic compounds from rum aged in oak barrels by high-speed countercurrent chromatography/high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and screening for antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, Erik L; Tolle, Sebastian; Pino, Jorge A; Winterhalter, Peter; Menendez, Roberto; Morales, Ana R; Rodríguez, José L

    2011-10-14

    Beverages, especially wines are well-known to contain a variety of health-beneficial bioactive substances, mainly of phenolic nature which frequently exhibit antioxidant activity. Significant information is available about the separation and identification of polyphenols from some beverages by chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques, but considerably poor is chemical data related to the polyphenolic content in rums. In this paper, a method involving the all-liquid chromatographic technique of high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) combined with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n)) has been successfully applied for separation and identification of phenolic compounds in an aged rum. Besides, the phenolic fraction (PF) was assayed for its antioxidant effects using three different free radical in vitro assays (DPPH·, RO(2)· and spontaneous lipid peroxidation (LPO) on brain homogenates) and on ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Results showed that PF potently scavenged DPPH and strongly scavenged peroxyl radicals compared to ascorbic acid and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT); and almost equally inhibited LPO on brain homogenates subjected to spontaneous LPO when compared to quercetin. Moreover, PF also exhibited strong reducing power. This chemical analysis illustrates the rich array of phenols in the aged rum and represents a rapid and suitable method for the isolation and identification of phenolic compounds from mixtures of considerable complexity, achieving high purity and reproducibility with the use of two separation steps. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. More than 170 polyunsaturated tocopherol-related compounds in a vitamin E capsule: Countercurrent chromatographic enrichment, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and preliminary identification of the potential artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, Simon; Kröpfl, Alexander; Vetter, Walter

    2016-12-09

    Tocopherols and tocotrienols (usually summed up as vitamin E) are a class of structurally related natural antioxidants. Commonly, only some of the eight classic representatives (four tocopherols and four tocotrienols) are found with varied composition in food. In this study we fractionated 230mg oil from commercial vitamin E supplement capsules by countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of silylated CCC fractions showed that these eight isomers represented only about 70% of total tocopherol compounds. Detailed analysis enabled the detection of 161T 3 isomers (α-, γ- and δ-T 3 ) along with 18 tetra- and several penta-unsaturated isomers (tocools), two tocomonoenol isomers, and several degradation products with shorter isoprenoid side chain (apo-tocools). Altogether, over 170 tocool compounds, most likely artefacts which originated from an inappropriate oil refining process were described in this study. Silver ion high performance liquid chromatography (Ag + -HPLC) was used to separate one fraction rich in γ-T 3 into four peaks each consisting of at least five peaks according to GC/MS. About ten γ-T 3 isomers were also detected in rice bran oils from one producer bought retail in Germany. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of 1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene and related compounds in marine pore water by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using disposable optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eganhouse, Robert P.; DiFilippo, Erica L

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for determination of ten DDT-related compounds in marine pore water based on equilibrium solid-phase microextraction (SPME) using commercial polydimethylsiloxane-coated optical fiber with analysis by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). Thermally cleaned fiber was directly exposed to sediments and allowed to reach equilibrium under static conditions at the in situ field temperature. Following removal, fibers were rinsed, dried and cut into appropriate lengths for storage in leak-tight containers at -20°C. Analysis by TD-GC/MS under full scan (FS) and selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes was then performed. Pore-water method detection limits in FS and SIM modes were estimated at 0.05-2.4ng/L and 0.7-16pg/L, respectively. Precision of the method, including contributions from fiber handling, was less than 10%. Analysis of independently prepared solutions containing eight DDT compounds yielded concentrations that were within 6.9±5.5% and 0.1±14% of the actual concentrations in FS and SIM modes, respectively. The use of optical fiber with automated analysis allows for studies at high temporal and/or spatial resolution as well as for monitoring programs over large spatial and/or long temporal scales with adequate sample replication. This greatly enhances the flexibility of the technique and improves the ability to meet quality control objectives at significantly lower cost.

  20. Validated method for the determination of perfluorinated compounds in placental tissue samples based on a simple extraction procedure followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, J; Rodríguez-Gómez, R; Zafra-Gómez, A; Alonso, E; Vílchez, J L; Navalón, A

    2016-04-01

    Xenobiotic exposure during pregnancy is inevitable. Determination of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), chemicals described as environmental contaminants by Public Health Authorities due to their persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity, is a challenge. In the present work, a method based on a simplified sample treatment involving freeze-drying, solvent extraction and dispersive clean-up of the extracts using C18 sorbents followed by an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis was developed and validated for the determination of five perfluorinated carboxylic acids (C4-C8) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in placental tissue samples. The most influential parameters affecting the extraction method and clean-up were optimized using Design of Experiments (DOE). The method was validated using matrix-matched calibration. Found limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.03 to 2 ng g(-1) and limits of quantification (LOQs) from 0.08 to 6 ng g(-1), while inter- and intra-day variability was under 14% in all cases. Recovery rates for spiked samples ranged from 94% to 113%. The method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of compounds in human placental tissue samples collected at delivery from 25 randomly selected women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  2. A strategy for efficient discovery of new natural compounds by integrating orthogonal column chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis: Its application in Panax ginseng, Panax quinquefolium and Panax notoginseng to characterize 437 potential new ginsenosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-zhi; Ye, Min; Qiao, Xue; Liu, Chun-fang; Miao, Wen-juan; Bo, Tao; Tao, Hai-yan; Guo, De-an

    2012-08-20

    To discover new natural compounds from herbal medicines tends to be more and more difficult. In this paper, a strategy integrating orthogonal column chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis was proposed, and was applied for rapid discovery of new ginsenosides from Panax ginseng (PG), Panax quinquefolium (PQ), and Panax notoginseng (PN). The ginsenosides extracts were fractionated by MCI gel×silica gel orthogonal column chromatography. The fractions were then separated on a C(18) HPLC column, eluted with a three-component mobile phase (CH(3)CN/CH(3)OH/3mM CH(3)COONH(4)H(2)O), and detected by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The structures of unknown ginsenosides were elucidated by analyzing negative and positive ion mass spectra, which provided complementary information on the sapogenins and oligosaccharide chains, respectively. A total of 623 comprising 437 potential new ginsenosides were characterized from the ethanol extracts of PG, PQ and PN. New acylations, diversified saccharide chains and C-17 side chains constituted novelty of the newly identified ginsenosides. An interpretation guideline was proposed for structural characterization of unknown ginsenosides by LC/MS. To confirm reliability of this strategy, two targeted unknown trace ginsenosides were obtained in pure form by LC/MS-guided isolation. Based on extensive NMR spectroscopic analysis and other techniques, they were identified as 3-O-[6-O-(E)-butenoyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl]-20(S)-protopanaxadiol-20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (named ginsenoside IV) and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3β,12β,20(S),24(R)-tetra hydroxy-dammar-25-ene-20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (ginsenoside V), respectively. The fully established structures were consistent with the MS-oriented structural elucidation. This study expanded our understanding on ginsenosides of Panax species, and the

  3. Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS): what, how and why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) is one of the oldest mass spectrometric techniques, which has been used for determining the isotopic composition and concentration of different elements using isotope dilution. In spite of the introduction of many other inorganic mass spectrometric techniques like spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the TIMS technique plays the role of a definitive analytical methodology and still occupies a unique position in terms of its capabilities with respect to precision and accuracy as well as sensitivity

  4. A study of sulfur-containing compounds in mouth- and nose-exhaled breath and in the oral cavity using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pysanenko, A.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, - (2008), 046004-1-13 ISSN 1752-7155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : sulfur-containing compounds * SIFT-MS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Trace-level determination of polar flavour compounds in butter by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adahchour, M.; Vreuls, J.J.; van der Heijden, A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    Volatile compounds are responsible for the aromas of butter. A simple technique for the determination of these components is described which is based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) after melting of the butter and separation of the aqueous phase from the fat. Volatile flavours present in the water

  6. Identification of Aroma-active Compounds in Essential Oil from Uncaria Hook by Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Megumi; Nakaya, Satoshi; Maki, Yusuke; Marumoto, Shinsuke; Usami, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil extracted from Uncaria Hook ("Chotoko" in Japanese), the branch with curved hook of the herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla has been investigated by GC and GC-MS analyses. Eighty-four compounds, representing 90.8% of the total content was identified in oil obtained from Uncaria Hook. The main components i were (E)-cinnamaldehyde (13.4%), α-copaene (8.0%), methyl eugenol (6.8%), δ-cadinene (5.3%), and curcumene (3.6%). The important key aroma-active compounds in the oil were detected by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA), using the flavor dilution (FD) factor to express the odor potency of each compounds. Furthermore, the odor activity value (OAV) has been used as a measure of the relative contribution of each compound to the aroma of the Uncaria Hook oil. The GC-O and AEDA results showed that α-copaene (FD = 4, OAV = 4376), (E)-linalool oxide (FD = 64, OAV = 9.1), and methyl eugenol (FD = 64, OAV = 29) contributed to the woody and spicy odor of Uncaria Hook oil, whereas furfural (FD = 8, OAV = 4808) contributed to its sweet odor. These results warrant further investigations of the application of essential oil from Uncaria Hook in the phytochemical and medicinal fields.

  7. An exploratory comparative study of volatile compounds in exhaled breath and emitted by skin using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turner, C.; Parekh, B.; Walton, Ch.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.; Evans, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2008), s. 526-532 ISSN 0951-4198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : SIFT-MS * volatile compounds * aldehydes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.772, year: 2008

  8. Volatilizable Biogenic Organic Compounds (VBOCs with two dimensional Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS: sampling methods, VBOC complexity, and chromatographic retention data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC with detection by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS was applied in the rapid analysis of air samples containing highly complex mixtures of volatilizable biogenic organic compounds (VBOCs. VBOC analytical methodologies are briefly reviewed, and optimal conditions are discussed for sampling with both adsorption/thermal desorption (ATD cartridges and solid-phase microextraction (SPME fibers. Air samples containing VBOC emissions from leaves of two tree species (Cedrus atlantica and Calycolpus moritzianus were obtained by both ATD and SPME. The optimized gas chromatographic conditions utilized a 45 m, 0.25 mm I.D. low-polarity primary column (DB-VRX, 1.4 μm film and a 1.5 m, 0.25 mm I.D. polar secondary column (StabilwaxTM, 0.25 μm film. Excellent separation was achieved in a 36 min temperature programmed GC × GC chromatogram. Thousands of VBOC peaks were present in the sample chromatograms; hundreds of tentative identifications by NIST mass spectral matching are provided. Very few of the tentatively identified compounds are currently available as authentic standards. Minimum detection limit values for a 5 l ATD sample were 3.5 pptv (10 ng m−3 for isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein, and ~1.5 pptv (~10 ng m−3 for monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Kovats-type chromatographic retention index values on the primary column and relative retention time values on the secondary column are provided for 21 standard compounds and for 417 tentatively identified VBOCs. 19 of the 21 authentic standard compounds were found in one of the Cedrus atlantica SPME samples. In addition, easily quantifiable levels of at least 13 sesquiterpenes were found in an ATD sample obtained from a branch enclosure of Calycolpus moritzianus. Overall, the results obtained via GC × GC-TOFMS highlight an extreme, and largely uncharacterized diversity of VBOCs, consistent with the hypothesis that sesquiterpenes and

  9. Volatilizable Biogenic Organic Compounds (VBOCs) with two dimensional Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS): sampling methods, VBOC complexity, and chromatographic retention data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, J. F.; Luo, W.; Melnychenko, A. N.; Barsanti, K. C.; Isabelle, L. M.; Chen, C.; Guenther, A. B.; Rosenstiel, T. N.

    2012-02-01

    Two dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) with detection by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) was applied in the rapid analysis of air samples containing highly complex mixtures of volatilizable biogenic organic compounds (VBOCs). VBOC analytical methodologies are briefly reviewed, and optimal conditions are discussed for sampling with both adsorption/thermal desorption (ATD) cartridges and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. Air samples containing VBOC emissions from leaves of two tree species (Cedrus atlantica and Calycolpus moritzianus) were obtained by both ATD and SPME. The optimized gas chromatographic conditions utilized a 45 m, 0.25 mm I.D. low-polarity primary column (DB-VRX, 1.4 μm film) and a 1.5 m, 0.25 mm I.D. polar secondary column (StabilwaxTM, 0.25 μm film). Excellent separation was achieved in a 36 min temperature programmed GC × GC chromatogram. Thousands of VBOC peaks were present in the sample chromatograms; hundreds of tentative identifications by NIST mass spectral matching are provided. Very few of the tentatively identified compounds are currently available as authentic standards. Minimum detection limit values for a 5 l ATD sample were 3.5 pptv (10 ng m-3) for isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein, and ~1.5 pptv (~10 ng m-3) for monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Kovats-type chromatographic retention index values on the primary column and relative retention time values on the secondary column are provided for 21 standard compounds and for 417 tentatively identified VBOCs. 19 of the 21 authentic standard compounds were found in one of the Cedrus atlantica SPME samples. In addition, easily quantifiable levels of at least 13 sesquiterpenes were found in an ATD sample obtained from a branch enclosure of Calycolpus moritzianus. Overall, the results obtained via GC × GC-TOFMS highlight an extreme, and largely uncharacterized diversity of VBOCs, consistent with the hypothesis that sesquiterpenes and other compounds

  10. Characterization of individual particles in gaseous media by mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    An introduction is given to a system for particle analysis by mass spectrometry (PAMS) which employs particle-beam techniques to measure mass spectra on a continuous real-time basis. The system is applied to particles of both organic and inorganic compounds, and the measurements give the chemical characteristics of particles in mixtures and indicate source apportionment. The PAMS system can be used for process control and studying heterogeneous/catalytic reactions in particles, and can be fitted to study the real-time attributes of PAMS.

  11. Alpha spectrometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, J.; Kuruc, J.; Galanda, D.; Matel, L.; Aranyosiova, M.; Velic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this master thesis was preparation of samples with thorium content on the steel discs by electrodeposition for determination of natural thorium isotope by alpha spectrometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry and finding out their possible linear correlation between these methods. The samples with electrolytically excluded isotope of 232 Th were prepared by electrodeposition from solution Th(NO 3 ) 4 ·12 H2 O on steel discs in electrodeposition cell with use of solutions Na 2 SO 4 , NaHSO 4 , KOH and (NH 4 ) 2 (C 2 O 4 ) by electric current 0.75 A. Discs were measured by alpha spectrometer. Activity was calculated from the registered impulses for 232 Th and surface's weight. After alpha spectrometry measurements discs were analyzed by TOF-SIMS IV which is installed in the International Laser Centre in Bratislava. Intensities of isotope of 232 Th and ions of ThO + , ThOH + , ThO 2 H + , Th 2 O 4 H + , ThO 2 - , ThO 3 H - , ThH 3 O 3 - and ThN 2 O 5 H - were identified. The linear correlation is between surface's weights of Th and intensities of ions of Th + from SIMS, however the correlation coefficient has relatively low value. We found out with SIMS method that oxidized and hydride forms of thorium are significantly represented in samples with electroplated thorium. (authors)

  12. Rapid method for the simultaneous detection of boar taint compounds by means of solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanken, Kaat; Wauters, Jella; Van Durme, Jim; Claus, Dirk; Vercammen, Joeri; De Saeger, Sarah; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2016-09-02

    Because of animal welfare issues, the voluntary ban on surgical castration of male piglets, starting January 2018 was announced in a European Treaty. One viable alternative is the fattening of entire male pigs. However, this can cause negative consumer reactions due to the occurrence of boar taint and possibly lead to severe economic losses in pig husbandry. In this study, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to GC-MS was used in the development and optimization of a candidate method for fast and accurate detection of the boar taint compounds. Remarkably fast extraction (45s) of the boar taint compounds from adipose tissue was achieved by singeing the fat with a soldering iron while released volatiles were extracted in-situ using HS-SPME. The obtained method showed good performance characteristics after validation according to CD 2002/657/EC and ISO/IEC 17025 guidelines. Moreover, cross-validation with an in-house UHPLC-HR-Orbitrap-MS method showed good agreement between an in-laboratory method and the new candidate method for the fast extraction and detection of skatole and androstenone, which emphasizes the accuracy of this new SPME-GC-MS method. Threshold detection of the boar taint compounds on a portable GC-MS could not be achieved. However, despite the lack of sensitivity obtained on the latter instrument, a very fast method with run-to-run time of 3.5min for the detection of the boar taint compounds was developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of the isobaric compounds propanol, acetic acid and methyl formate in humid air and breath by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pysanenko, A.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 285, 1-2 (2009), s. 42-48 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0256; GA ČR GA202/09/0800 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : SIFT-MS * isobaric compound * propanol * acetic acid Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.117, year: 2009

  14. Boundaries of mass resolution in native mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lössl, Philip|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371559693; Snijder, Joost|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338018328; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332

    Over the last two decades, native mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a valuable tool to study intact proteins and noncovalent protein complexes. Studied experimental systems range from small-molecule (drug)-protein interactions, to nanomachineries such as the proteasome and ribosome, to even

  15. Automatic on-line monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection as complementary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, Maite de; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves; Iza, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally air quality networks have been carrying out the continuous, on-line measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in ambient air with GC-FID. In this paper some identification and coelution problems observed while using this technique in long-term measurement campaigns are described. In order to solve these problems a GC-MS was set up and operated simultaneously with a GC-FID for C 2 -C 11 VOCs measurement. There are few on-line, unattended, long term measurements of atmospheric VOCs performed with GC-MS. In this work such a system has been optimized for that purpose, achieving good repeatability, linearity, and detection limits of the order of the GC-FID ones, even smaller in some cases. VOC quantification has been made by using response factors, which is not frequent in on-line GC-MS. That way, the identification and coelution problems detected in the GC-FID, which may led to reporting erroneous data, could be corrected. The combination of GC-FID and GC-MS as complementary techniques for the measurement of speciated VOCs in ambient air at sub-ppbv levels is proposed. Some results of the measurements are presented, including concentration values for some compounds not found until now on public ambient air VOC databases, which were identified and quantified combining both techniques. Results may also help to correct previously published VOC data with wrongly identified compounds by reprocessing raw chromatographic data.

  16. Burnup determination of mass spectrometry for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunhua.

    1987-01-01

    The various methods currently being used in burnup determination of nuclear fuels are studied and reviewed. The mass spectrometry method of destructive testing is discussed emphatically. The burnup determination of mass spectrometry includes heavy isotopic abundance ratio method and isotope dilution mass spectrometry used as burnup indicator for the fission products. The former is applied to high burnup level, but the later to various burnup level. According to experiences, some problems which should be noticed in burnup determination of mass spectrometry are presented

  17. Elucidating rhizosphere processes by mass spectrometry - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugova, Ariana; Puschenreiter, Markus; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    The presented review discusses state-of-the-art mass spectrometric methods, which have been developed and applied for investigation of chemical processes in the soil-root interface, the so-called rhizosphere. Rhizosphere soil's physical and chemical characteristics are to a great extent influenced by a complex mixture of compounds released from plant roots, i.e. root exudates, which have a high impact on nutrient and trace element dynamics in the soil-root interface as well as on microbial activities or soil physico-chemical characteristics. Chemical characterization as well as accurate quantification of the compounds present in the rhizosphere is a major prerequisite for a better understanding of rhizosphere processes and requires the development and application of advanced sampling procedures in combination with highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques. During the last years, targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometry-based methods have emerged and their combination with specific separation methods for various elements and compounds of a wide polarity range have been successfully applied in several studies. With this review we critically discuss the work that has been conducted within the last decade in the context of rhizosphere research and elemental or molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques as GC, LC and CE. Moreover, selected applications such as metal detoxification or nutrient acquisition will be discussed regarding the mass spectrometric techniques applied in studies of root exudates in plant-bacteria interactions. Additionally, a more recent isotope probing technique as novel mass spectrometry based application is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for support of in vitro drug discovery assays: increasing scope, robustness and throughput of the LDTD technique for use with chemically diverse compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Iain; Smith, Aaron; Weston, Daniel J; White, Peter; Szwandt, Simon; Sealey, Laura

    2012-02-05

    Within the drug discovery environment, the key process in optimising the chemistry of a structural series toward a potential drug candidate is the design, make and test cycle, in which the primary screens consist of a number of in vitro assays, including metabolic stability, cytochrome P450 inhibition, and time-dependent inhibition assays. These assays are often carried out using multiple drug compounds with chemically diverse structural features, often in a 96 well-plate format for maximum time-efficiency, and are supported using rapid liquid chromatographic (LC) sample introduction with a tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) selected reaction monitoring (SRM) endpoint, taking around 6.5 h per plate. To provide a faster time-to-decision at this critical point, there exists a requirement for higher sample throughput and a robust, well-characterized analytical alternative. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD), a relatively new ambient sample ionization technique, for compound screening assays. By systematic modification of typical LDTD instrumentation and workflow, and providing deeper understanding around overcoming a number of key issues, this work establishes LDTD as a practical, rapid alternative to conventional LC-MS/MS in drug discovery, without need for extensive sample preparation or expensive, scope-limiting internal standards. Analysis of both the five and three cytochrome P450 competitive inhibition assay samples by LDTD gave improved sample throughput (0.75 h per plate) and provided comparable data quality as the IC₅₀ values obtained were within 3 fold of those calculated from the LC-MS/MS data. Additionally when applied generically to a chemically diverse library of over 250 proprietary compounds from the AstraZeneca design, make and test cycle, LDTD demonstrated a success rate of 98%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-speed counter-current chromatography coupled online to high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry for purification, analysis and identification of target compounds from natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuejuan; Zhang, Yuping; Chen, Wei; Cai, Ping; Zhang, Shuihan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Shi, Shuyun

    2015-03-13

    A challenge in coupling high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) online with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for purity analysis was their time incompatibility. Consequently, HSCCC-HPLC was conducted by either controlling HPLC analysis time and HSCCC flow rate or using stop-and-go scheme. For natural products containing compounds with a wide range of polarities, the former would optimize experimental conditions, while the latter required more time. Here, a novel HSCCC-HPLC-diode array detector-mass spectrometry (HSCCC-HPLC-DAD-MS) was developed for undisrupted purification, analysis and identification of multi-compounds from natural products. Two six-port injection valves and a six-port switching valve were used as interface for collecting key HSCCC effluents alternatively for HPLC-DAD-MS analysis and identification. The ethyl acetate extract of Malus doumeri was performed on the hyphenated system to verify its efficacy. Five main flavonoids, 3-hydroxyphloridzin (1), phloridzin (2), 4',6'-dihydroxyhydrochalcone-2'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, first found in M. doumeri), phloretin (4), and chrysin (5), were purified with purities over 99% by extrusion elution and/or stepwise elution mode in two-step HSCCC, and 25mM ammonium acetate solution was selected instead of water to depress emulsification in the first HSCCC. The online system shortened manipulation time largely compared with off-line analysis procedure and stop-and-go scheme. The results indicated that the present method could serve as a simple, rapid and effective way to achieve target compounds with high purity from natural products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing [Daly City, CA; Yang, Peidong [Kensington, CA; Kim, Woong [Seoul, KR; Fan, Rong [Pasadena, CA

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry - From DNA to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    2013-01-01

    A brief review of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is presented. The present work touches on a few technical aspects and recent developments of AMS, and describes two specific applications of AMS, the dating of human DNA with the 14 C bomb peak and the search for superheavy elements in nature. Since two extended general reviews on technical developments in AMS [1] and applications of AMS [2] will appear in 2013, frequent reference to these reviews is made. (authors)

  2. A mass spectrometry proteomics data management platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K; Maccoss, Michael J; Riffle, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used in biomedical research. These experiments typically generate a large volume of highly complex data, and the volume and complexity are only increasing with time. There exist many software pipelines for analyzing these data (each typically with its own file formats), and as technology improves, these file formats change and new formats are developed. Files produced from these myriad software programs may accumulate on hard disks or tape drives over time, with older files being rendered progressively more obsolete and unusable with each successive technical advancement and data format change. Although initiatives exist to standardize the file formats used in proteomics, they do not address the core failings of a file-based data management system: (1) files are typically poorly annotated experimentally, (2) files are "organically" distributed across laboratory file systems in an ad hoc manner, (3) files formats become obsolete, and (4) searching the data and comparing and contrasting results across separate experiments is very inefficient (if possible at all). Here we present a relational database architecture and accompanying web application dubbed Mass Spectrometry Data Platform that is designed to address the failings of the file-based mass spectrometry data management approach. The database is designed such that the output of disparate software pipelines may be imported into a core set of unified tables, with these core tables being extended to support data generated by specific pipelines. Because the data are unified, they may be queried, viewed, and compared across multiple experiments using a common web interface. Mass Spectrometry Data Platform is open source and freely available at http://code.google.com/p/msdapl/.

  3. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Barrow, Mark P; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry with a tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of accelerator mass spectrometry are discussed. A short overview is given of the current status of mass spectrometry with high-energy (MeV/nucleon) heavy-ion accelerators. Emphasis is placed on studies with tandem accelerators and on future mass spectrometry of heavier isotopes with the new generation of higher-voltage tandems

  5. Model studies on the release of aroma compounds from structured and nonstructured oil systems using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Pascale; Pollien, Philippe; Rytz, Andreas; Leser, Martin E; Sagalowicz, Laurent; Blank, Imre; Spadone, Jean-Claude

    2007-03-07

    Relative retention, volatility, and temporal release of volatile compounds taken from aldehyde, ester, and alcohol chemical classes were studied at 70 degrees C in model systems using equilibrium static headspace analysis and real time dynamic headspace analysis. These systems were medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), sunflower oil, and two structured systems, i.e., water-in-oil emulsion and L2 phase (water-in-oil microemulsion). Hydrophilic domains of the emulsion type media retained specifically the hydrophilic compounds and alcohols. Four kinetic parameters characterizing the concentration- and time-dependent releases were extracted from the aroma release curves. Most of the kinetic parameter values were higher in structured systems than in oils particularly when using MCT. The oil nature was found to better control the dynamic release profiles than the system structures. The release parameters were well-related (i) to the volatile hydrophobicity as a function of the oil used and (ii) to the retention data in the specific case of the L2 phase due to a specific release behavior of alcohols.

  6. Comparing two metabolic profiling approaches (liquid chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry) for extra-virgin olive oil phenolic compounds analysis: A botanical classification perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajoub, Aadil; Pacchiarotta, Tiziana; Hurtado-Fernández, Elena; Olmo-García, Lucía; García-Villalba, Rocío; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegría

    2016-01-08

    Over the last decades, the phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil (VOO) have become the subject of intensive research because of their biological activities and their influence on some of the most relevant attributes of this interesting matrix. Developing metabolic profiling approaches to determine them in monovarietal virgin olive oils could help to gain a deeper insight into olive oil phenolic compounds composition as well as to promote their use for botanical origin tracing purposes. To this end, two approaches were comparatively investigated (LC-ESI-TOF MS and GC-APCI-TOF MS) to evaluate their capacity to properly classify 25 olive oil samples belonging to five different varieties (Arbequina, Cornicabra, Hojiblanca, Frantoio and Picual), using the entire chromatographic phenolic profiles combined to chemometrics (principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA)). The application of PCA to LC-MS and GC-MS data showed the natural clustering of the samples, seeing that 2 varieties were dominating the models (Arbequina and Frantoio), suppressing any possible discrimination among the other cultivars. Afterwards, PLS-DA was used to build four different efficient predictive models for varietal classification of the samples under study. The varietal markers pointed out by each platform were compared. In general, with the exception of one GC-MS model, all exhibited proper quality parameters. The models constructed by using the LC-MS data demonstrated superior classification ability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mass spectrometry by means of tandem accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1985-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based on an accelerator allows to measure rare cosmogenic isotopes found in natural samples with isotopic abundances up to 10E-15. The XTU Tandem of Legnaro National Laboratories can measure mean heavy isotopes (36Cl, 41Ca, 129I) in applications interesting cosmochronology and Medicine. The TTT-3 Tandem of the Naples University has been modified in view of precision studies of C14 in Archeology, Paleantology and Geology. In this paper a review is made of principles and methodologies and of some applicationy in the framework of the National Program for mass spectrametry research with the aid of accelerators

  8. Determination of quaternary ammonium compounds in oranges and cucumbers using QuEChERS extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrebola-Liébanas, Francisco Javier; Abdo, María Angeles Herrera; Moreno, José Luis Fernandez; Martínez-Vidal, José L; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast method has been developed for determining relevant quaternary ammonium compounds in cucumber and orange samples. The target compounds were benzoalkonium chloride (BAC-10, BAC-12, BAC-14, and BAC-16), didecyldimethylammonium chloride, and benzethonium chloride, all frequently used biocides in the agrifood industry. An extraction based on the buffered Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe method and determination by ultra-performance LC/MS/MS that eluted the biocides in less than 5 min were used. The method was fully validated and implemented in a UNE-EN-ISO/IEC 17025 accredited laboratory for its application to the analysis of real samples. Performance characteristics of the method are reported, including an estimation of measurement uncertainty. Calibration curves were set between 0.01 and 0.150 mg/kg, LOD values were always between 0.4 and 1.0 microg/kg, LOQ values were in the range 1-4 microg/kg, recovery was between 81 and 115%, intraday and interday precision were always lower than 17% (expressed as RSD), and expanded uncertainty was always lower than 40%. The validation was accomplished for the two studied matrixes at spiking concentrations of 0.011 and 0.050 mg/kg. The method has been applied to the analysis of 30 cucumber and orange samples that were found to contain concentrations of BAC-12 that ranged between 0.015 and 0.210 mg/kg and of BAC-14 between 0.018 and 0.081 mg/kg.

  9. New approaches for metabolomics by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Small molecules constitute a large part of the world around us, including fossil and some renewable energy sources. Solar energy harvested by plants and bacteria is converted into energy rich small molecules on a massive scale. Some of the worst contaminants of the environment and compounds of interest for national security also fall in the category of small molecules. The development of large scale metabolomic analysis methods lags behind the state of the art established for genomics and proteomics. This is commonly attributed to the diversity of molecular classes included in a metabolome. Unlike nucleic acids and proteins, metabolites do not have standard building blocks, and, as a result, their molecular properties exhibit a wide spectrum. This impedes the development of dedicated separation and spectroscopic methods. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a strong contender in the quest for a quantitative analytical tool with extensive metabolite coverage. Although various MS-based techniques are emerging for metabolomics, many of these approaches include extensive sample preparation that make large scale studies resource intensive and slow. New ionization methods are redefining the range of analytical problems that can be solved using MS. This project developed new approaches for the direct analysis of small molecules in unprocessed samples, as well as pushed the limits of ultratrace analysis in volume limited complex samples. The projects resulted in techniques that enabled metabolomics investigations with enhanced molecular coverage, as well as the study of cellular response to stimuli on a single cell level. Effectively individual cells became reaction vessels, where we followed the response of a complex biological system to external perturbation. We established two new analytical platforms for the direct study of metabolic changes in cells and tissues following external perturbation. For this purpose we developed a novel technique, laser ablation electrospray

  10. Complex profiles of hydrophobic paralytic shellfish poisoning compounds in Gymnodinium catenatum identified by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Paulo

    2008-06-27

    The presence of hydrophobic analogues of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins (PSTs) was studied in a Portuguese strain of Gymnodinium catenatum by conventional pre-column oxidation HPLC after a prolonged acetonitrile gradient coupled with fluorescence detection. Prior separation of hydrophobic PSTs analogues from hydrophilic analogues was done by solid-phase extraction (SPE) partitioning on a C18 cartridge. Several unknown oxidation products, with emission spectra similar to known PSTs, appeared after periodate or hydrogen peroxide oxidation. The compounds producing these oxidation products could be grouped into three major sub-groups according to SPE partitioning. The first one eluting with 10 and 20% MeOH, produced the first set of oxidation products observed after the saxitoxin oxidation product. The second one eluting with 30-100% MeOH produced the second set of oxidation products. The third one eluted with acidified 90% MeOH produced the third and last set of oxidation products. Additionally, the oxidation products corresponding to decarbamoyl gonyautoxins and decarbamoyl saxitoxins were also abundant, resulting from ester cleavage of the benzoate side chain of these compounds during the oxidation. Analysis of these fractions by LC-MS demonstrated the second sub-group was constituted by analogues of the 11-hydroxysulfated GC1/GC2, while the third sub-group was constituted by analogues of GC3, which lack the 11-hydroxysulfate. In addition to GC1/GC2 and GC3, novel analogues differing by 16u could be related, respectively, to the N1-hydroxyl analogues of GC1-GC3, designated GC4-GC6. A novel family of GC analogues, differing, by 16u from GC1-GC6, were hypothesized to possess an extra hydroxyl in the benzoate side chain, existing in both N1-hydroxylated and non-N1-hydroxylated variants, and tentatively designated GC1a-GC6a. The first sub-group was hypothesized to constitute an additional novel family of GC analogues with a hydroxysulfate group instead of the

  11. Determination of organotin compounds in waters by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry under the European Water Framework Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso-Pérez, C; Fernández-González, V; Moreda-Piñeiro, J; López-Mahía, P; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2015-03-13

    The European Union Water Framework Directive (2013/39/EU) sets very restrictive environmental quality standards for 45 priority substances and other pollutants, including organotin compounds (OTCs). Therefore, it is necessary to develop analytical methods in compliance with the environmental quality standard (EQSs) proposed to protect the aquatic environment and humans. The proposed method (HS-SPME-GC-QqQ-MS/MS) allows the determination of OTCs, i.e. monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT) and TBT in water in the range of few ng L(-1). The method is nearly full automated, sensitive and simple; it involves less reagents, reduces waste, and is less-time consuming than traditional methods for OTCs. As such, the procedure connects with the principles of green analytical chemistry. Additionally, good precision (RSD<20%), a very low method quantification limit (MQL) (0.76 ng L(-1) for TBT by using only 10 mL of sample) and excellent linearity (range MQL-20 ng L(-1)) are achieved. Under these conditions, the very restrictive limits for the environmental quality standards (EQS) fixed by the 2013/39/EU Directive are achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Single-laboratory validation of a method for the determination of select volatile organic compounds in foods by using vacuum distillation with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Patricia J; Limm, William; Begley, Timothy H; Chirtel, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed that headspace and purge and trap methods have limitations when used to determine volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in foods, including matrix effects and artifact formation from precursors present in the sample matrix or from thermal decomposition. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 8261A liberates VOCs from the sample matrix by using vacuum distillation at room temperature. The method was modified and validated for the determination of furan, chloroform, benzene, trichloroethene, toluene, and sytrene in infant formula, canned tuna (in water), peanut butter, and an orange beverage (orange-flavored noncarbonated beverage). The validation studies showed that the LOQ values ranged from 0.05 ng/g toluene in infant formula to 5.10 ng/g toluene in peanut butter. Fortified recoveries were determined at the first, second, and third standard additions, and concentrations ranged from 0.07 to 6.9 ng/g. When quantified by the method of standard additions, the recoveries ranged from 56 to 218% at the first standard addition and 89 to 117% at the third. The validated method was used to conduct a survey of the targeted VOCs in 18 foods. The amounts found ranged from none detected to 73.8 ng/g furan in sweet potato baby food.

  13. Development and validation of a multi-residue method for the detection of a wide range of hormonal anabolic compounds in hair using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaud, Lauriane [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Monteau, Fabrice [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Deceuninck, Yoann [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Bichon, Emmanuelle [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Andre, Francois [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Le Bizec, Bruno [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)]. E-mail: lebizec@vet-nantes.fr

    2007-03-14

    The monitoring of anabolic steroid residues in hair is undoubtedly one of the most efficient strategies to demonstrate the long-term administration of these molecules in meat production animals. A multi-residue sample preparation procedure was developed and validated for 28 steroids. A 100 mg hair sample was grinded into powder and extracted at 50 deg. C with methanol. After acidic hydrolysis and extraction with ethyl acetate, phenolsteroids, such as estrogens, resorcyclic acid lactones and stilbens in one hand, are separated from androgens and progestagens in the other hand. Solid phase extractions were performed before applying a specific derivatisation for each compound sub-group. Detection and identification were achieved using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with acquisition in the selected reaction monitoring mode after electron ionisation. The method was validated according to the 2002/657/EC guideline. Decision limits (CC{alpha}) for main steroids were in the 0.1-10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} range.

  14. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P; Go, Eden P; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have K i values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Characterisation of dissolved organic compounds in hydrothermal fluids by stir bar sorptive extraction - gas chomatography - mass spectrometry. Case study: the Rainbow field (36°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konn Cecile

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The analysis of the dissolved organic fraction of hydrothermal fluids has been considered a real challenge due to sampling difficulties, complexity of the matrix, numerous interferences and the assumed ppb concentration levels. The present study shows, in a qualitative approach, that Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE followed by Thermal Desorption – Gas Chromatography – Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-MS is suitable for extraction of small sample volumes and detection of a wide range of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds dissolved in hydrothermal fluids. In a case study, the technique was successfully applied to fluids from the Rainbow ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal field located at 36°14’N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR. We show that n-alkanes, mono- and poly- aromatic hydrocarbons as well as fatty acids can be easily identified and their retention times determined. Our results demonstrate the excellent repeatability of the method as well as the possibility of storing stir bars for at least three years without significant changes in the composition of the recovered organic matter. A preliminary comparative investigation of the organic composition of the Rainbow fluids showed the great potential of the method to be used for assessing intrafield variations and carrying out time series studies. All together our results demonstrate that SBSE-TD-GC-MS analyses of hydrothermal fluids will make important contributions to the understanding of geochemical processes, geomicrobiological interactions and formation of mineral deposits.

  16. Profile of phenolic compounds of Brazilian virgin olive oils by rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RRLC-ESI-TOF-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballus, Cristiano Augusto; Quirantes-Piné, Rosa; Bakhouche, Abdelhakim; da Silva, Luiz Fernando de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Adelson Francisco; Coutinho, Enilton Fick; da Croce, Dorli Mario; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Godoy, Helena Teixeira

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, agronomical researchers began to cultivate several olive varieties in different regions of Brazil to produce virgin olive oil (VOO). Because there has been no reported data regarding the phenolic profile of the first Brazilian VOO, the aim of this work was to determine phenolic contents of these samples using rapid-resolution liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. 25 VOO samples from Arbequina, Koroneiki, Arbosana, Grappolo, Manzanilla, Coratina, Frantoio and MGS Mariense varieties from three different Brazilian states and two crops were analysed. It was possible to quantify 19 phenolic compounds belonging to different classes. The results indicated that Brazilian VOOs have high total phenolic content because the values were comparable with those from high-quality VOOs produced in other countries. VOOs from Coratina, Arbosana and Grappolo presented the highest total phenolic content. These data will be useful in the development and improvement of Brazilian VOO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction integrated with QuEChERS for determining endocrine-disrupting compounds in fish by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhoufei; Lu, Jing; Li, Haipu; Tu, Yi; Wan, Yuehao; Yang, Zhaoguang

    2018-09-15

    A new, sensitive, and rapid method based on the Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe (QuEChERS) approach and air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) technology was developed for the determination of 20 endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in fish by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method first integrates AALLME into QuEChERS to achieve clean-up and enrichment of the EDCs in one step. A self-made glass tube was enfolded with plasticine to withstand the high centrifugal force. The established method was developed by optimization of the parameters. High linearities (R 2  > 0.9924) and recoveries (78.2-118.6%) at three spiked levels (5, 10, and 20 ng g -1 ), and low relative standard deviation values (1.1-14.5%) and limits of detection (0.03-0.80 ng g -1 ) were obtained. The method comparison shows that the proposed method is superior as it involves less organic solvent usage, simple operation and high efficiency. This method was successfully applied to different fishes for analyzing EDCs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Forensic analysis of explosives using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)--part 2: forensic inter-laboratory trial: bulk carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in a range of chemical compounds (Australia and New Zealand).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sarah J; Lennard, Christopher J; Maynard, Philip; Hill, David M; Andrew, Anita S; Neal, Ken; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Hope, Janet; Walker, G Stewart; Roux, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Comparability of data over time and between laboratories is a key issue for consideration in the development of global databases, and more broadly for quality assurance in general. One mechanism that can be utilized for evaluating traceability is an inter-laboratory trial. This paper addresses an inter-laboratory trial conducted across a number of Australian and New Zealand isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) laboratories. The main objective of this trial was to determine whether IRMS laboratories in these countries would record comparable values for the distributed samples. Four carbon containing and four nitrogen containing compounds were distributed to seven laboratories in Australia and one in New Zealand. The laboratories were requested to analyze the samples using their standard procedures. The data from each laboratory was evaluated collectively using International Standard ISO 13528 (Statistical methods for use in proficiency testing by inter-laboratory comparisons). "Warning signals" were raised against one participant in this trial. "Action signals" requiring corrective action were raised against four participants. These participants reviewed the data and possible sources for the discrepancies. This inter-laboratory trial was successful in providing an initial snapshot of the potential for traceability between the participating laboratories. The statistical methods described in this article could be used as a model for others needing to evaluate stable isotope results derived from multiple laboratories, e.g., inter-laboratory trials/proficiency testing. Ongoing trials will be conducted to improve traceability across the Australian and New Zealand IRMS community.

  19. Performance evaluation of elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry methods for the determination of the D/H ratio in tetramethylurea and other compounds--results of a laboratory inter-comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréas, Olivier; Thomas, Freddy; Zeleny, Reinhard; Calderone, Giovanni; Jamin, Eric; Guillou, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Tetramethylurea (TMU) with a certified D/H ratio is the internal standard for Site-specific Natural Isotope Fractionation measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNIF-NMR) analysis of wine ethanol for detection of possible adulterations (Commission Regulation 2676/90). A new batch of a TMU certified reference material (CRM) is currently being prepared. Whereas SNIF-NMR has been employed up to now, Elemental Analysis/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry ((2)H-EA-IRMS) was envisaged as the method of choice for value assignment of the new CRM, as more precise (better repeatable) data might be obtained, resulting in lower uncertainty of the certified value. In order to evaluate the accuracy and intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of (2)H-EA-IRMS methods, a laboratory inter-comparison was carried out by analysing TMU and other organic compounds, as well as some waters. The results revealed that experienced laboratories are capable of generating robust and well comparable data, which highlights the emerging potential of IRMS in food authenticity testing. However, a systematic bias between IRMS and SNIF-NMR reference data was observed for TMU; this lack of data consistency rules out the (2)H-IRMS technique for the characterisation measurement of the new TMU CRM.

  20. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of aging effects on the mineral fibers treated with aminopropylsilane and quaternary ammonium compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zafar, Ashar; Schjødt-Thomsen, Jan; Sodhi, R.

    2012-01-01

    (PCA) was applied to the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry spectra, and an increase in the intensities of APS characteristic peaks were observed after aging. The observed increase in the signals of APS originates from underlying silanized fibers after the removal of the surfactant......X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to investigate the aging effects on the aminopropylsilane (APS) and quaternary ammonium surfactant-treated mineral fibers. APS-coated mineral fiber samples were treated with cationic surfactant...

  1. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of semivolatile organic compounds in bottom sediment by solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatographic fractionation, and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, E.T.; Vaught, D.G.; Merten, L.M.; Foreman, W.T.; Gates, Paul M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the determination of 79 semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) and 4 surrogate compounds in soils and bottom sediment is described. The SOCs are extracted from bottom sediment by solvent extraction, followed by partial isolation using high-performance gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The SOCs then are qualitatively identified and quantitative concentrations determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This method also is designed for an optional simultaneous isolation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine (OC) insecticides, including toxaphene. When OCs and PCBs are determined, an additional alumina- over-silica column chromatography step follows GPC cleanup, and quantitation is by dual capillary- column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC/ECD). Bottom-sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess water and extracted overnight with dichloromethane. The extract is concentrated, centrifuged, and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoro-ethylene syringe filter. Two aliquots of the sample extract then are quantitatively injected onto two polystyrene- divinylbenzene GPC columns connected in series. The SOCs are eluted with dichloromethane, a fraction containing the SOCs is collected, and some coextracted interferences, including elemental sulfur, are separated and discarded. The SOC-containing GPC fraction then is analyzed by GC/MS. When desired, a second aliquot from GPC is further processed for OCs and PCBs by combined alumina-over-silica column chromatography. The two fractions produced in this cleanup then are analyzed by GC/ECD. This report fully describes and is limited to the determination of SOCs by GC/MS.

  2. Quantification of the PR-39 cathelicidin compound in porcine blood by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolira, Anna; Hałas, Stanisław; Wessely-Szponder, Joanna

    2015-10-15

    The PR-39 porcine cathelicidin occurs naturally in animal neutrophils. Its main function is antimicrobial activity, which potentially can be used in antibiotic treatments in veterinary medicine. Investigations concerning such a use require the detection and quantification of PR-39 in a given sample. The aim of this work is to determine the concentration of PR-39 contained in porcine blood. Prior to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) analysis, the porcine blood sample was subjected to crude extraction in order to release the active form of PR-39 from the neutrophil granules. Next, gel filtration chromatography was performed to separate PR-39 from other cathelicidins present in porcine blood. Positive ion MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra of the resulting portion of lyophilisate with unknown PR-39 content were acquired in linear mode. To quantify PR-39 in the lyophilisate sample, the standard addition method was applied. The PR-39 concentration obtained in the lyophilisate sample was then converted into the peptide concentration in porcine blood. The linear fit function of the constructed calibration curve indicates an excellent correlation between the PR-39 peak intensity and the added quantity of synthetic PR-39 (R(2) = 0.994) and a low relative standard deviation of the slope = 1.98%. From the x-intercept of the straight line, we estimated the PR-39 concentration in porcine blood to be 20.5 ± 4.6 ng/mL. The MALDI method was successfully applied for the quantitative analysis of PR-39 found in porcine blood. Compared with other available methods, it is relatively easy, inexpensive and not time-consuming. Despite the method having lower accuracy than the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the results obtained here, by a much simpler method, are in good agreement with the literature data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Diesel characterization by high-resolution mass spectrometry - gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldrich, C.A

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry-gas chromatography is combined with the HC22 method in order to obtain detailed information about the chemical composition of diesel and the distribution of different compound types in terms of its final boiling temperature from a single analysis. The total time elapsed from sample injection and signal processing to obtain final results is 90 minutes. This fact makes this methodology a new and very important tool for the decision making process concerning the most suitable final boiling temperature and the type of treatment of the product in order to obtain diesel that fulfills the international standards. The consistency and repeatability of the experimental results are demonstrated

  4. Analysis of posttranslational modifications of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Trelle, Morten B; Thingholm, Tine E

    2006-01-01

    -temporal distribution in cells and tissues. Most PTMs can be detected by protein and peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), either as a mass increment or a mass deficit relative to the nascent unmodified protein. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides a series of analytical features that are highly useful...

  5. Depth resolution of secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, A.N.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the solid body discreteness in the direction of the normal to the sample surface on the depth resolution of the secondary ion mass spectrometry method is analyzed. It is shown that for this case the dependence of the width at the semi-height of the delta profiles of the studied elements depth distribution on the energy and angle of incidence of the initial ions should have the form of the stepwise function. This is experimentally proved by the silicon-germanium delta-layers in the silicon samples [ru

  6. Mass spectrometry investigation of magnetron sputtering discharges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Petr; Musil, Jindřich; Lančok, Ján; Fitl, Přemysl; Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří; Vlček, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 143, č. 6 (2017), s. 438-443 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk LM2015088; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010490; GA ČR GA17-13427S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : mass spectrometry * atoms * radicals and ions * RF discharge * contamination * metallic films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.530, year: 2016

  7. Mass Determination of Entire Amyloid Fibrils by Using Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussineau, Tristan; Mathevon, Carole; Altamura, Lucie; Vendrely, Charlotte; Dugourd, Philippe; Forge, Vincent; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2016-02-12

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled protein structures with important roles in biology (either pathogenic or physiological), and are attracting increasing interest in nanotechnology. However, because of their high aspect ratio and the presence of some polymorphism, that is, the possibility to adopt various structures, their characterization is challenging and basic information such as their mass is unknown. Here we show that charge-detection mass spectrometry, recently developed for large self-assembled systems such as viruses, provides such information in a straightforward manner. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Simultaneous mass detection for direct inlet mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.L.

    1979-05-01

    The evolution of analytical techniques for application in trace analysis has led to interest in practical methods for real-time monitoring. Direct inlet mass spectrometry (DIMS) has been the subject of considerable activity in recent years. A DIMS instrument is described which consists of an inlet system designed to permit particles entrained in the inlet air stream to strike a hot, oxidized rhenium filament which serves as a surface ionization source. A mass analyzer and detection system then permits identification of the elemental composition of particulates which strike the filament

  9. Fast and simple screening for the simultaneous analysis of seven metabolites derived from five volatile organic compounds in human urine using on-line solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Chao-Yu; Lee, Ting-Chen; Lee, Hui-Ling; Lin, Yu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the International Agency for Research on cancer classified outdoor air pollution and particulate matter from outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans (IARC Group 1), based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and experimental animals and strong mechanistic evidence. In particular, a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are volatized or released into the atmosphere and can become ubiquitous, as they originate from many different natural and anthropogenic sources, such as paints, pesticides, vehicle exhausts, cooking fumes, and tobacco smoke. Humans may be exposed to VOCs through inhalation, ingestion, or dermal contact, which may increase the risk of leukemia, birth defects, neurocognitive impairment, and cancer. Therefore, the focus of this study was the development of a simple, effective and rapid sample preparation method for the simultaneous determination of seven metabolites (6 mercaptic acids+t,t-muconic acid) derived from five VOCs (acrylamide, 1,3-butadiene, acrylonitrile, benzene, and xylene) in human urine by using automated on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). An aliquot of each diluted urinary sample was directly injected into an autosampler through a trap column to reduce contamination, and then the retained target compounds were eluted by back-flush mode into an analytical column for separation. Negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was utilized for quantification. The coefficients of correlation (r(2)) for the calibration curves were greater than 0.995. Reproducibility was assessed by the precision and accuracy of intra-day and inter-day precision, which showed results for coefficient of variation (CV) that were low 0.9 to 6.6% and 3.7 to 8.5%, respectively, and results for recovery that ranged from 90.8 to 108.9% and 92.1 to 107.7%, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of

  10. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of opiates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanov, D.T.

    2009-07-01

    Key words: surface ionization, adsorption, heterogeneous reactions, surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy, thermoemitter, opiates, extracts of biosamples. Subjects of study. The mass - spectrometric study of thermal - ion emission: surface ionization of opiates by on the surface of oxidized refractory metals. Purpose of work is to establish the regularities of surface ionization (SI) of multi-atomic molecule opiates and their mixtures develop the scientific base of SI methods for high sensitive and selective detection and analysis of these substances in the different objects, including biosamples. Methods of study: surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy. The results obtained and their novelty. For the first time, SI of molecule opiates on the oxidized tungsten surface has been studied and their SI mass-spectra and temperature dependences of ion currents have been obtained, the characteristic heterogeneous reactions of an adsorbed molecules and the channels of monomolecular decays vibrationally-excited ions on their way in mass-spectrometry have been revealed, sublimation energy has been defined, the activation energy of E act , of these decays has been estimated for given period of time. Additivity of the SI mass-spectra of opiate mixtures of has been established under conditions of joint opiate adsorption. High selectivity of SI allows the extracts of biosamples to be analyzed without their preliminary chromatographic separation. The opiates are ionized by SI with high efficiency (from 34 C/mol to 112 C/mol), which provides high sensitivity of opiate detection by SI/MS and APTDSIS methods from - 10 -11 g in the samples under analysis. Practical value. The results of these studies create the scientific base for novel SI methods of high sensitive detection and analysis of the trace amounts of opiates in complicated mixtures, including biosamples without their preliminary

  11. Boundaries of mass resolution in native mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lössl, Philip; Snijder, Joost; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-06-01

    Over the last two decades, native mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a valuable tool to study intact proteins and noncovalent protein complexes. Studied experimental systems range from small-molecule (drug)-protein interactions, to nanomachineries such as the proteasome and ribosome, to even virus assembly. In native MS, ions attain high m/z values, requiring special mass analyzers for their detection. Depending on the particular mass analyzer used, instrumental mass resolution does often decrease at higher m/z but can still be above a couple of thousand at m/z 5000. However, the mass resolving power obtained on charge states of protein complexes in this m/z region is experimentally found to remain well below the inherent instrument resolution of the mass analyzers employed. Here, we inquire into reasons for this discrepancy and ask how native MS would benefit from higher instrumental mass resolution. To answer this question, we discuss advantages and shortcomings of mass analyzers used to study intact biomolecules and biomolecular complexes in their native state, and we review which other factors determine mass resolving power in native MS analyses. Recent examples from the literature are given to illustrate the current status and limitations.

  12. Recent development in isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzner, I.

    1992-01-01

    Within the limited of this review the following topics will be briefly discussed: a) Accuracy, precision, internal relative standard deviation (RISD) and external relative standard deviation (RESD) of isotope ratio measurements. With advanced instrumentation and use of standard reference materials, high accuracy and RESD = 0.002% (or better) may be achieved; b) The advantages of modern automatic isotope ratio mass spectrometer are briefly described. Computer controlled operation and data acquisition, and multiple ion collection are the recent important improvement; c) The isotopic fractionation during the course of isotope ratio measurement is considered as a major source of errors in thermal ionization of metallic elements. The phenomenon in strontium, neodymium, uranium, lead and calcium and methods to correct the measured data are discussed; d) Applications of isotope ratio mass spectrometry in atomic weight determinations, the isotope dilution technique, isotope geology, and isotope effects in biological systems are described together with specific applications in various research and technology area. (author)

  13. Radiocarbon positive-ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.; Shanks, Richard P.; Donzel, Xavier; Gaubert, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Proof-of-principle of a new mass spectrometric technique for radiocarbon measurement is demonstrated. Interfering nitrogen and hydrocarbon molecules are largely eliminated in a charge-exchange cell operating on non-metallic gas. The positive-to-negative ion conversion is the reverse of that conventionally used in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and is compatible with plasma ion sources that may be significantly more efficient and capable of greater output than are AMS sputter ion sources. The Nanogan electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source employed exhibited no sample memory and the >50 kyrs age range of AMS was reproduced. A bespoke prototype new instrument is now required to optimise the plasma and cell physics and to realise hypothetical performance gains over AMS.

  14. Radiocarbon positive-ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.; Shanks, Richard P. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Donzel, Xavier; Gaubert, Gabriel [Pantechnik S.A., 13 Rue de la Résistance, 14400 Bayeux (France)

    2015-10-15

    Proof-of-principle of a new mass spectrometric technique for radiocarbon measurement is demonstrated. Interfering nitrogen and hydrocarbon molecules are largely eliminated in a charge-exchange cell operating on non-metallic gas. The positive-to-negative ion conversion is the reverse of that conventionally used in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and is compatible with plasma ion sources that may be significantly more efficient and capable of greater output than are AMS sputter ion sources. The Nanogan electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source employed exhibited no sample memory and the >50 kyrs age range of AMS was reproduced. A bespoke prototype new instrument is now required to optimise the plasma and cell physics and to realise hypothetical performance gains over AMS.

  15. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer-chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-03-30

    Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) is responsible for non-quantitative H 2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer-Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems. The EA-Cr/HTC reactor was substantially modified for the conversion of halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples. The performance of the novel conversion setup for solid and liquid samples was monitored and optimized using a simultaneously operating dual-detection system of IRMS and ion trap MS. The method with several variants in the reactor, including the addition of manganese metal chips, was evaluated in three laboratories using EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (on-line method) and compared with traditional uranium-reduction-based conversion combined with manual dual-inlet IRMS analysis (off-line method) in one laboratory. The modified EA-Cr/HTC reactor setup showed an overall H 2 -recovery of more than 96% for all halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds. All results were successfully normalized via two-point calibration with VSMOW-SLAP reference waters. Precise and accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis was achieved for a variety of organics containing F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, and S-bearing heteroelements. The robust nature of the on-line EA-Cr/HTC technique was demonstrated by a series of 196 consecutive measurements with a single reactor filling. The optimized EA-Cr/HTC reactor design can be implemented in existing analytical equipment using commercially available material and

  16. Impact of automation on mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan Victoria; Rockwood, Alan

    2015-10-23

    Mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS) is an analytical technique that has rapidly grown in popularity in clinical practice. In contrast to traditional technology, mass spectrometry is superior in many respects including resolution, specificity, multiplex capability and has the ability to measure analytes in various matrices. Despite these advantages, LC-MS/MS remains high cost, labor intensive and has limited throughput. This specialized technology requires highly trained personnel and therefore has largely been limited to large institutions, academic organizations and reference laboratories. Advances in automation will be paramount to break through this bottleneck and increase its appeal for routine use. This article reviews these challenges, shares perspectives on essential features for LC-MS/MS total automation and proposes a step-wise and incremental approach to achieve total automation through reducing human intervention, increasing throughput and eventually integrating the LC-MS/MS system into the automated clinical laboratory operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Martró Català, Elisa; Ausina Ruiz, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases are still a cause of high mortality and morbidity rates. Current microbiological diagnostic methods are based on culture and phenotypic identification of isolated microorganisms, which can be obtained in about 24-48 h. Given that the microbiological identification is of major importance for patient management, new diagnostic methods are needed in order to detect and identify microorganisms in a timely and accurate manner. Over the last few years, several molecular techniques based on the amplification of microbial nucleic acids have been developed with the aim of reducing the time needed for the identification of the microorganisms involved in different infectious processes. On the other hand, mass spectrometry has emerged as a rapid and consistent alternative to conventional methods for microorganism identification. This review describes the most widely used mass spectrometry technologies -matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF)-, both for protein and nucleic acid analysis, as well as the commercial platforms available. Related publications of most interest in clinical microbiology are also reviewed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Mass spectrometry for determination of bioactive compounds

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tilvi, S.; Majik, M.S.; Singh, K.S.

    attached to, for example, carbohydrates and phosphates, they function as key regulators of a wide range of biological process.[58] Many disease states including diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are strongly associated...

  19. Dehydrodimerization of pterostilbene during electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen

    2013-04-30

    RATIONALE Pterostilbene is a member of the hydroxystilbene family of compounds commonly found in plants such as blueberry and grapes. During the analysis of this compound by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), an ion was observed that corresponds to the dehydrodimer of pterostilbene in mass-to-charge ratio. Since such unexpected dimerization may lead to decreased monomer signal during quantitative analysis, it was of interest to identify the origin and structure of the observed pterostilbene dimer and examine the experimental conditions that influence its formation. METHODS Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) were used to examine the origin of the dimerization products. The structure of the formed pterostilbene dimer was examined by performing MSn analysis on the dimer ion. Effects of solvent composition, analyte concentration, radical scavenger, and other experimental conditions on the dimerization were also studied. RESULTS LC/MS and NMR analyses clearly showed that the starting solution did not contain the pterostilbene dimer. Solvent type and radical scavenger concentration were found to have pronounced effects on the dimer formation. Particularly, presence of acetonitrile or ammonium acetate had favorable effects on the extent of dimerization during ESI-MS analysis whereas hydroquinone and butylated hydroquinone had negative effects. Dimer formation decreased at high flow rates and when fused-silica capillary was used as the spray needle. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that this dimerization occurs as a result of solution-phase electrochemical reactions taking place during the electrospray process. A possible structure for this dimer was proposed based on the MSn analysis and was similar to that of the enzymatically derived pterostilbene dehydrodimer already reported in the literature. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  20. Identification of inorganic anions by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakayanagi, Masataka; Yamada, Yaeko; Sakabe, Chikako; Watanabe, Kunio; Harigaya, Yoshihiro

    2006-03-10

    Inorganic anions were identified by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Derivatization of the anions was achieved with pentafluorobenzyl p-toluenesulphonate (PFB-Tos) as the reaction reagent and a crown ether as a phase transfer catalyst. When PFB-Br was used as the reaction reagent, the retention time of it was close to those of the derivatized inorganic anions and interfered with the analysis. In contrast, the retention time of PFB-Tos differed greatly from the PFB derivatives of the inorganic anions and the compounds of interest could be detected without interference. Although the PFB derivatives of SO4, S2O3, CO3, ClO4, and ClO3 could not be detected, the derivatives of F, Cl, Br, I, CN, OCN, SCN, N3, NO3, and NO2 were detected using PFB-Tos as the derivatizing reagent. The inorganic anions were detectable within 30 ng approximately, which is of sufficient sensitivity for use in forensic chemistry. Accurate mass number was measured for each PFB derivative by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) within a measurement error of 2 millimass units (mmu), which allowed determination of the compositional formula from the mass number. In addition, actual analysis was performed successively by our method using trial samples of matrix.

  1. Lipidomic mass spectrometry and its application in neuroscience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mabel; Enriquez-Algeciras; Sanjoy; K; Bhattacharya

    2013-01-01

    Central and peripheral nervous systems are lipid rich tissues. Lipids, in the context of lipid-protein complexes, surround neurons and provide electrical insulation for transmission of signals allowing neurons to remain embedded within a conducting environment. Lipids play a key role in vesicle formation and fusion in synapses. They provide means of rapid signaling, cell motility and migration for astrocytes and other cell types that surround and play supporting roles neurons. Unlike many other signaling molecules, lipids are capable of multiple signaling events based on the different fragments generated from a single precursor during each event. Lipidomics, until recently suffered from two major disadvantages:(1) level of expertise required an overwhelming amount of chemical detail to correctly identify a vast number of different lipids which could be close in their chemical reactivity; and(2) high amount of purified compounds needed by analytical techniques to determine their structures. Advances in mass spectrometry have enabled overcoming these two limitations. Mass spectrometry offers a great degree of simplicity in identification and quantification of lipids directly extracted from complex biological mixtures. Mass spectrometers can be regarded to as mass analyzers. There are those that separate and analyze the product ion fragments in space(spatial) and those which separate product ions in time in the same space(temporal). Databases and standardized instrument parameters have further aided the capabilities of the spatial instruments while recent advances in bioinformatics have made the identification and quantification possible using temporal instruments.

  2. Recent applications of gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špánik, Ivan; Machyňáková, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical method that combines excellent separation power of gas chromatography with improved identification based on an accurate mass measurement. These features designate gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry as the first choice for identification and structure elucidation of unknown volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. Gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry quantitative analyses was previously focused on the determination of dioxins and related compounds using magnetic sector type analyzers, a standing requirement of many international standards. The introduction of a quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass analyzer broadened interest in this method and novel applications were developed, especially for multi-target screening purposes. This review is focused on the development and the most interesting applications of gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry towards analysis of environmental matrices, biological fluids, and food safety since 2010. The main attention is paid to various approaches and applications of gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry for non-target screening to identify contaminants and to characterize the chemical composition of environmental, food, and biological samples. The most interesting quantitative applications, where a significant contribution of gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry over the currently used methods is expected, will be discussed as well. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Mass Spectrometry for Large Undergraduate Laboratory Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illies, A.; Shevlin, P. B.; Childers, G.; Peschke, M.; Tsai, J.

    1995-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is routinely covered in undergraduate organic chemistry courses and a number of valuable laboratory experiments featuring its use have been discussed (1-7). Although such experiments work well at institutions with limited laboratory enrollments, we typically teach laboratories with enrollments of 160 or more in which it is difficult to allow each student to carry out a meaningful "hands on" mass spectrometry experiment. Since we feel that some practical experience with this technique is important, we have designed a simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (gc/ms) exercise that allows each student to analyze the products of a simple synthesis that they have performed. The exercise starts with the microscale SN2 synthesis of 1-bromobutane from 1-butanol as described by Williamson (8). The students complete the synthesis and place one drop of the distilled product in a screw capped vial. The vials are then sealed, labeled with the students name and taken to the mass spectrometry laboratory by a teaching assistant. Students are instructed to sign up for a 20-min block of time over the next few days in order to analyze their sample. When the student arrives at the laboratory, he or she adds 1 ml CH2Cl2 to the sample and injects 0.3 microliters of the solution into the gas chromatograph. The samples typically contain the 1-butanol starting material and the 1-bromobutane product along with traces of dibutyl ether. The figure shows a mass chromatogram along with the mass spectra of the starting material and product from an actual student run. For this analysis to be applicable to large numbers of students, the gc separation must be as rapid as possible. We have been able to analyze each sample in 6 minutes on a 30 m DB-5 capillary column with the following temperature program: 70 oC for 1 min, 70-80 oC at 10 oC/min, 86-140 oC at 67.5 oC/min, 140-210 oC at 70 oC/min, and 210 oC for 1 min. A mass range of 20-200 amu is scanned with a solvent delay of 2

  4. High-efficiency thermal ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, Jose A.

    1996-01-01

    A version of the thermal ionization cavity (TIC) source developed specifically for use in mass spectrometry is presented. The performance of this ion source has been characterized extensively both with the use of an isotope separator and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A detailed description of the TIC source for mass spectrometry is given along with the performance characteristics observed

  5. Cs+ ion source for secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, B.L.; Weiss, H.; Liebl, H.

    1981-12-01

    Various types of cesium ionization sources currently used in secondary ion mass spectrometry are briefly reviewed, followed by a description of the design and performance of a novel, thermal surface ionization Cs + source developed in this laboratory. The source was evaluated for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications using the COALA ion microprobe mass analyzer. (orig.)

  6. The emergence of mass spectrometry in biochemical research

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The initial steps toward routinely applying mass spectrometry in the biochemical laboratory have been achieved. In the past, mass spectrometry was confined to the realm of small, relatively stable molecules; large or thermally labile molecules did not survive the desorption and ionization processes intact. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allow for the analysis of both small and large biomolecules through "mild" desorption...

  7. Petroleomics by Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romão, Wanderson; Tose, Lilian V; Vaz, Boniek G; Sama, Sara G; Lobinski, Ryszard; Giusti, Pierre; Carrier, Hervé; Bouyssiere, Brice

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of crude oil and its fractions by applying ambient ionization techniques remains underexplored in mass spectrometry (MS). Direct analysis in real time (DART) in the positive-ion mode was coupled to a linear quadrupole ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer (LTQ Orbitrap) to analyze crude oil, paraffin samples, and porphyrin standard compounds. The ionization parameters of DART-MS were optimized for crude oil analysis. DART-MS rendered the optimum conditions of the operation using paper as the substrate, T = 400°C, helium as the carrier gas, and a sample concentration ≥6 mg mL(-1). In the crude oils analysis, the DART(+)-Orbitrap mass spectra detected the typical N, NO, and O-containing compounds. In the paraffin samples, oxidized hydrocarbon species (Ox classes, where x = 1-4) with double-bond equivalent of 1-4 were detected, and their structures and connectivity were confirmed by collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. DART(+)-MS has identified the porphyrin standard compounds as [M + H](+) ions of m/z 615.2502 and 680.1763, where M = C44H30N4 and C44H28N4OV, respectively, based on the formula assignment and by phenyl losses observed on CID experiments.

  8. Mass spectrometry a versatile aid to inorganic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Rene

    1976-01-01

    Several hundred publications have appeared in the last three years that deal with applications of Mass Spectrometry to inorganic analysis. Bulk and localized trace analysis, surface and thin film characterization and microstructure examination are currently performed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Spark Source Mass Spectrometry and the newly developed Laser Probe Mass Spectrometry. Suitable experimental procedures allow insulators, biologic materials and microsamples to be analysed. In spite of the classification by techniques this review is essentially devoted to the most significant papers in analytical applications but instrumental and basic features are sometimes introduced to support the discussions

  9. Inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price Russ, G. III

    1993-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a relatively new (5 y commercial availability) technique for simultaneously determining the concentration and isotopic composition of a large number of elements at trace levels. The principle advantages of ICP-MS are the ability to measure essentially all the metallic elements at concentrations as low as 1 part in 10 12 by weight, to analyse aqueous samples directly, to determine the isotopic composition of essentially all the metallic elements, and to analyse samples rapidly (minutes). The history of the development of ICP-MS and discussions of a variety of applications have been discussed in detail in Date and Gray (1988). Koppenaal (1988, 1990) has reviewed the ICP-MS literature. In that ICP-MS is a relatively new and still evolving technique, this chapter will discuss potential capability more than proven performance. (author). 24 refs

  10. Application of Nanodiamonds in Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Cheng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanodiamond (ND with biomolecular mass spectrometry (MS makes rapid, sensitive detection of biopolymers from complex biosamples feasible. Due to its chemical inertness, optical transparency and biocompatibility, the advantage of NDs in MS study is unique. Furthermore, functionalization on the surfaces of NDs expands their application in the fields of proteomics and genomics for specific requirements greatly. This review presents methods of MS analysis based on solid phase extraction and elution on NDs and different application examples including peptide, protein, DNA, glycan and others. Owing to the quick development of nanotechnology, surface chemistry, new MS methods and the intense interest in proteomics and genomics, a huge increase of their applications in biomolecular MS analysis in the near future can be predicted.

  11. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles Melero, Inmaculada; Peláez, Teresa; Rezusta López, Antonio; Garcia-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming an essential tool in most microbiology laboratories. At present, by using a characteristic fungal profile obtained from whole cells or through simple extraction protocols, MALDI-TOF MS allows the identification of pathogenic fungi with a high performance potential. This methodology decreases the laboratory turnaround time, optimizing the detection of mycoses. This article describes the state-of-the-art of the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of human clinical fungal pathogens in the laboratory and discusses the future applications of this technology, which will further improve routine mycological diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Calibration samples for accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, R.L.; Flynn, D.S.; Gabbard, F.

    1981-01-01

    Radioactive samples with precisely known numbers of atoms are useful as calibration sources for lifetime measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry. Such samples can be obtained in two ways: either by measuring the production rate as the sample is created or by measuring the decay rate after the sample has been obtained. The latter method requires that a large sample be produced and that the decay constant be accurately known. The former method is a useful and independent alternative, especially when the decay constant is not well known. The facilities at the University of Kentucky for precision measurements of total neutron production cross sections offer a source of such calibration samples. The possibilities, while quite extensive, would be limited to the proton rich side of the line of stability because of the use of (p,n) and (α,n) reactions for sample production

  13. Subattomole sensitivity in biological accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Bryhni, Helge

    2008-05-15

    The Uppsala University 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has been used to study (14)C-labeled biological samples utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) technology. We have adapted a sample preparation method for small biological samples down to a few tens of micrograms of carbon, involving among others, miniaturizing of the graphitization reactor. Standard AMS requires about 1 mg of carbon with a limit of quantitation of about 10 amol. Results are presented for a range of small sample sizes with concentrations down to below 1 pM of a pharmaceutical substance in human blood. It is shown that (14)C-labeled molecular markers can be routinely measured from the femtomole range down to a few hundred zeptomole (10 (-21) mol), without the use of any additional separation methods.

  14. Radiocarbon dating with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has two great advantages over conventional dating: 1) much smaller samples can be handled and 2) counting time is significantly shorter. Three examples are given for Holocene-age material from east-central Ellesmere Island. The results demonstrate the potential use of this technique as a powerful research tool in studies of Quaternary chronology. Individual fragments of marine shells as small as 0.1 g have been dated successfully at the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. In the case of an aquatic moss from a lake sediment core, an increment 0.5 cm thick could be used instead of a 5 cm-thick slice, thus allowing a much more precise estimate of the onset of organic sedimentation

  15. Analysis of barium by isotope mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Kaiming; Jia Baoting; Liu Xuemei

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic abundance ratios for barium at sub-microgram level are analyzed by thermal surface ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Rhenium trips used for sample preparation are firstly treated to eliminate possible barium background interference. During the preparation of barium samples phosphoric acid is added as an emitting and stabilizing reagent. The addition of phosphoric acid increases the collection efficiency and ion current strength and stability for barium. A relative standard deviation of 0.02% for the isotopic abundance ratio of 137 Ba to 138 Ba is achieved when the 138 Ba ion current is (1-3) x 10 -12 A. The experimental results also demonstrate that the isotope fractionation effect is negligibly small in the isotopic analysis of barium

  16. Mass spectrometry as a quantitative tool in plant metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Tiago F.; Mata, Ana T.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a research field used to acquire comprehensive information on the composition of a metabolite pool to provide a functional screen of the cellular state. Studies of the plant metabolome include the analysis of a wide range of chemical species with very diverse physico-chemical properties, and therefore powerful analytical tools are required for the separation, characterization and quantification of this vast compound diversity present in plant matrices. In this review, challenges in the use of mass spectrometry (MS) as a quantitative tool in plant metabolomics experiments are discussed, and important criteria for the development and validation of MS-based analytical methods provided. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644967

  17. Origin of the chemical noise in ambient mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shuiping; Zhu Zhiqiang; Huang Longzhu; Zhang Xinglei; Zhu Tenggao; Chen Huanwen

    2012-01-01

    The instrumental background of ambient mass spectrometry, (API-MS) is analyzed and the possible potential origins of the background noise is identified. According to the mass spectra obtained using the API-MS instruments by different manufacturers, the characteristic fragment ions all indicated that the background noise are resulted from the phthalates such as diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and silicones such as decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6). These chemicals are probably released from the polymeric materials used in the ionization sources, such as O-type sealing ring etc. In addition, the instrumental background has to be considered especially during the analysis of phthalate and peptide compounds. (authors)

  18. Mass Spectrometry Based Lipidomics: An Overview of Technological Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köfeler, Harald C.; Fauland, Alexander; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Trötzmüller, Martin

    2012-01-01

    One decade after the genomic and the proteomic life science revolution, new ‘omics’ fields are emerging. The metabolome encompasses the entity of small molecules—Most often end products of a catalytic process regulated by genes and proteins—with the lipidome being its fat soluble subdivision. Within recent years, lipids are more and more regarded not only as energy storage compounds but also as interactive players in various cellular regulation cycles and thus attain rising interest in the bio-medical community. The field of lipidomics is, on one hand, fuelled by analytical technology advances, particularly mass spectrometry and chromatography, but on the other hand new biological questions also drive analytical technology developments. Compared to fairly standardized genomic or proteomic high-throughput protocols, the high degree of molecular heterogeneity adds a special analytical challenge to lipidomic analysis. In this review, we will take a closer look at various mass spectrometric platforms for lipidomic analysis. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of various experimental setups like ‘shotgun lipidomics’, liquid chromatography—Mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) based approaches. We will also examine available software packages for data analysis, which nowadays is in fact the rate limiting step for most ‘omics’ workflows. PMID:24957366

  19. Mass Spectrometry Based Lipidomics: An Overview of Technological Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald C. Köfeler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One decade after the genomic and the proteomic life science revolution, new ‘omics’ fields are emerging. The metabolome encompasses the entity of small molecules—Most often end products of a catalytic process regulated by genes and proteins—with the lipidome being its fat soluble subdivision. Within recent years, lipids are more and more regarded not only as energy storage compounds but also as interactive players in various cellular regulation cycles and thus attain rising interest in the bio-medical community. The field of lipidomics is, on one hand, fuelled by analytical technology advances, particularly mass spectrometry and chromatography, but on the other hand new biological questions also drive analytical technology developments. Compared to fairly standardized genomic or proteomic high-throughput protocols, the high degree of molecular heterogeneity adds a special analytical challenge to lipidomic analysis. In this review, we will take a closer look at various mass spectrometric platforms for lipidomic analysis. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of various experimental setups like ‘shotgun lipidomics’, liquid chromatography—Mass spectrometry (LC-MS and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF based approaches. We will also examine available software packages for data analysis, which nowadays is in fact the rate limiting step for most ‘omics’ workflows.

  20. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption.

  1. Measurement parameter selection for quantitative isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, B.N.; Rosecrance, A.E.; Colby, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    By use of the two-isotope model of isotope dilution, selection criteria were developed for identifying optimum m/z's for quantitation of compounds by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, it was possible to predict the optimum ratio of naturally abundant to labeled compound and to identify appropriate data reduction methods. The validity of these predictions was confirmed by using experimental GC/MS data for several organic compounds

  2. Radiocarbon mass spectrometry for drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Schulze-Konig Tim

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Radiocarbon has a huge potential as a tracer for metabolism studies in humans. By using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for its detection, a unique sensitivity is reached reducing required radiation doses to a negligible level. Until recently, a widespread use of AMS in biomedical research was impeded by the high complexity of the instrument, time-consuming sample preparation, and a limited availability of measurement capacity. Over the last few years, tremendous progress has been achieved in the reduction of size and complexity of AMS instruments. It allowed designing a compact AMS system, dubbed BioMICADAS to address the needs of biomedical users. For more than two years, this system is in successful operation at a commercial service provider for the pharmaceutical industry. A further drastic simplification of radiocarbon mass spectrometers seems possible and could establish a regular usage of this technology in drug development. However, to reach this goal a better integration of AMS into the workflow of bioanalytical laboratories will be necessary. For this purpose, CO 2 accepting ion sources may be a key, since they enable an almost automated sample preparation. The status of radiocarbon AMS in biomedical research and its perspective will be discussed

  3. Compressed sensing in imaging mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, Andreas; Dülk, Patrick; Trede, Dennis; Alexandrov, Theodore; Maaß, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a technique of analytical chemistry for spatially resolved, label-free and multipurpose analysis of biological samples that is able to detect the spatial distribution of hundreds of molecules in one experiment. The hyperspectral IMS data is typically generated by a mass spectrometer analyzing the surface of the sample. In this paper, we propose a compressed sensing approach to IMS which potentially allows for faster data acquisition by collecting only a part of the pixels in the hyperspectral image and reconstructing the full image from this data. We present an integrative approach to perform both peak-picking spectra and denoising m/z-images simultaneously, whereas the state of the art data analysis methods solve these problems separately. We provide a proof of the robustness of the recovery of both the spectra and individual channels of the hyperspectral image and propose an algorithm to solve our optimization problem which is based on proximal mappings. The paper concludes with the numerical reconstruction results for an IMS dataset of a rat brain coronal section. (paper)

  4. Characterization of a Distributed Plasma Ionization Source (DPIS) for Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltman, Melanie J.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hill, Herbert; Blanchard, William C.; Ewing, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in air yielding both positive and negative ions depending on the polarity of the applied potential. These reactant ions subsequently ionized the analyte vapors. The reactant ions generated were similar to those created in a conventional point-to-plane corona discharge ion source. The positive reactant ions generated by the source were mass identified as being solvated protons of general formula (H2O)nH+ with (H2O)2H+ as the most abundant reactant ion. The negative reactant ions produced were mass identified primarily as CO3-, NO3-, NO2-, O3- and O2- of various relative intensities. The predominant ion and relative ion ratios varied depending upon source construction and supporting gas flow rates. A few compounds including drugs, explosives and environmental pollutants were selected to evaluate the new ionization source. The source was operated continuously for several months and although deterioration was observed visually, the source continued to produce ions at a rate similar that of the initial conditions. The results indicated that the DPIS may have a longer operating life than a conventional corona discharge.

  5. Technical and economical aspects of mass spectrometry in food and agricultural industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornu, Ayme

    1975-01-01

    Mass spectrometry proved to be very useful for solving analytical problems in food and agricultural industries. Its essential properties are: high resolution mass spectrometry allows to find the molecular structure of an isolated compound, even with a very small sample; associated with on line gas chromatographic separation, it gives the possibility to identify a great number of components in a small complex extract; isotope determinations by mass spectrometry give an essential contribution to follow kinetic mechanisms of formation of natural molecules in plant-growing, photosynthesis, fertilization, ..., leading to identification of the origin of foods and beverages. The economical aspect of mass spectrometry is characterized by the cost of investment in instrumentation and the necessary high level of competence of the technicians [fr

  6. Probing the Composition, Assembly and Activity of Protein Molecular Machines using Native Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waterbeemd, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry in general, are powerful analytical tools for studying proteins and protein complexes. Native mass spectrometry may provide accurate mass measurements of large macromolecular assemblies enabling the investigation of their composition and stoichiometry.

  7. Statistical methods for mass spectrometry-based clinical proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kakourou, A.

    2018-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis focuses on methods for the construction of diagnostic rules based on clinical mass spectrometry proteomic data. Mass spectrometry has become one of the key technologies for jointly measuring the expression of thousands of proteins in biological samples.

  8. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry to nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiyu; Zhang Chuan

    2002-01-01

    As an ultra high sensitive analyzing method, accelerator mass spectrometry is playing an important role in the studies of nuclear physics and astrophysics. The accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) applications in searching for violation of Pauli exclusion principle and study on supernovae are discussed as examples

  9. Mass spectrometry for real-time quantitative breath analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik; Herbig, J.; Beauchamp, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2014), 027101 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : breath analysis * proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry * selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.631, year: 2014

  10. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  11. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry SIMS XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, G.; Lareau, R.; Bennett, J.; Stevie, F.

    2003-05-01

    This volume contains 252 contributions presented as plenary, invited and contributed poster and oral presentations at the 11th International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS XI) held at the Hilton Hotel, Walt Disney World Village, Orlando, Florida, 7 12 September, 1997. The book covers a diverse range of research, reflecting the rapid growth in advanced semiconductor characterization, ultra shallow depth profiling, TOF-SIMS and the new areas in which SIMS techniques are being used, for example in biological sciences and organic surface characterization. Papers are presented under the following categories: Isotopic SIMS Biological SIMS Semiconductor Characterization Techniques and Applications Ultra Shallow Depth Profiling Depth Profiling Fundamental/Modelling and Diffusion Sputter-Induced Topography Fundamentals of Molecular Desorption Organic Materials Practical TOF-SIMS Polyatomic Primary Ions Materials/Surface Analysis Postionization Instrumentation Geological SIMS Imaging Fundamentals of Sputtering Ion Formation and Cluster Formation Quantitative Analysis Environmental/Particle Characterization Related Techniques These proceedings provide an invaluable source of reference for both newcomers to the field and experienced SIMS users.

  12. New applications of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Since its invention in the late 70's, and reduction to near-routine practice by the mid-80's, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful tool for archaeological and geochemical measurements in which cosmogenic isotopes such as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I are used as either tracers or chronometers. The utility of such measurements is demonstrated by the fact that most accelerators having AMS capabilities have significant backlogs of samples awaiting measurement. In designing and justifying a new accelerator facility in which AMS was to be a major feature, we sought to advance the field and increase the resources available for it by two steps: (1) development of new research applications in which intentionally added isotopic labels were used rather than just naturally present ones; and (2) enhancement of spectrometer throughout, making new classes of experiments possible by greatly increasing the number of samples that could be measured in individual experiments. Results of the effort to date suggest that development of a family of very small spectrometers optimized for just tritium and/or radiocarbon will be attractive in the near future

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronk, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been used routinely for radiocarbon measurements for several years. This thesis describes theoretical work to understand the reasons for low accuracy and range and offers practical solutions. The production and transport of the ions used in the measurements are found to be the most crucial stages in the process. The theories behind ion production by sputtering are discussed and applied to the specific case of carbon sputtered by caesium. Experimental evidence is also examined in relation to the theories. The phenomena of space charge and lens aberrations are discussed along with the interaction between ion beams and gas molecules in the vacuum. Computer programs for calculating phase space transformations are then described; these are designed to help investigations of the effects of space charge and aberrations on AMS measurements. Calculations using these programs are discussed in relation both to measured ion beam profiles in phase space and to the current dependent transmission of ions through the Oxford radiocarbon accelerator. Improvements have been made to this accelerator and these are discussed in the context of the calculations. C - ions are produced directly from carbon dioxide at the Middleton High Intensity Sputter Source. Experiments to evaluate the performance of such a source are described and detailed design criteria established. An ion source designed and built specifically for radiocarbon measurements using carbon dioxide is described. Experiments to evaluate its performance and investigate the underlying physical processes are discussed. (author)

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry of small biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2008-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive technique for isotopic ratio measurements. In the biomedical field, AMS can be used to measure femtomolar concentrations of labeled drugs in body fluids, with direct applications in early drug development such as Microdosing. Likewise, the regenerative properties of cells which are of fundamental significance in stem-cell research can be determined with an accuracy of a few years by AMS analysis of human DNA. However, AMS nominally requires about 1 mg of carbon per sample which is not always available when dealing with specific body substances such as localized, organ-specific DNA samples. Consequently, it is of analytical interest to develop methods for the routine analysis of small samples in the range of a few tens of microg. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator to study small biological samples using AMS. Different methods are presented and compared. A (12)C-carrier sample preparation method is described which is potentially more sensitive and less susceptible to contamination than the standard procedures.

  15. ISMAS international discussion meet on elemental mass spectrometry in health and environmental sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jaison, P.G.; Telmore, V.M.

    2011-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is an indispensable analytical tool associated with almost all branches of science including biology, chemistry, earth sciences, nuclear science, physics, etc. The technique holds tremendous potential owing to its high sensitivity, selectivity and its ability to measure small changes in the isotopic abundances of different elements. Innovations in mass spectrometry instrumentation are further widening the scope by making it possible to handle very large bio-molecules and polymers. New techniques for mass analysis, novel designs for ionization and developments in electronic accessories have contributed to elevate mass spectrometry to a position of prime importance in research. Development in mass spectrometry has revolutionized the study of micro-nutrient metabolism, of biologically active compounds and for drug discovery in pharmaceutical research. Elemental mass spectrometry is making major contributions to food toxicology, food forensics, and study of metabolism of nutrient minerals including Fe, Zn, Ca, Cu and Se. The area of speciation analysis using hyphenated techniques as well as electro-spray ionization have undergone a phenomenal evolution and development in the recent past. Impressive progress in mass spectrometry towards lower detection limits, higher resolution and molecule-specific detection at trace levels in complex matrices allows new frontiers to be crossed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  16. Arsenic speciation by liquid chromatography coupled with ionspray tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corr, J. J.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1996-01-01

    Ionspray mass spectrometry, a well established organic analysis technique, has been coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for speciation of organic arsenic compounds, The ionspray source and differentially pumped interface of the mass spectrometer were operated in dual modes...... fragmentation patterns showing molecular dissociation through an expected common product ion were obtained for the four arsenosugars, Molecular mode detection was utilized for qualitative verification of speciation analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass...

  17. Estimation of brassylic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah, Erica N. Pfarr, Pooja Thapliyal, Nicholas S. Dusek, Kristofer L. Schiele, Christy Gallagher-Lein, and James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to estimate Brassylic Acid (BA) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BA is a product obtained from the oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). BA has various applications for making nylons and high performance polymers. BA is a 13 carbon compound with two carboxylic acid functional groups at the terminal end. BA has a long hydrocarbon chain that makes the molecule less sensitive to some of the characterization techniques. Although BA can be characterized by NMR, both the starting material (EA) and products BA and nonanoic acid (NA) have peaks at similar {delta}, ppm values. Hence it becomes difficult for the quick estimation of BA during its synthesis.

  18. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  19. Correcting mass shifts: A lock mass-free recalibration procedure for mass spectrometry imaging data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulkarni, P.; Kaftan, F.; Kynast, P.; Svatoš, Aleš; Böcker, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 407, č. 25 (2015), s. 7603-7613 ISSN 1618-2642 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mass spectrometry imaging * recalibration * mass shift correction * data processing Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation Impact factor: 3.125, year: 2015

  20. Laser mass spectrometry of chemical warfare agents using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weickhardt, C.; Grun, C.; Grotemeyer, J.

    1998-01-01

    Fast relaxation processes in excited molecules such as IC, ISC, and fragmentation are observed in many environmentally and technically relevant substances. They cause severe problems to resonance ionization mass spectrometry because they reduce the ionization yield and lead to mass spectra which do not allow the identification of the compound. By the use of ultrashort laser pulses these problems can be overcome and the advantages of REMPI over conventional ionization techniques in mass spectrometry can be regained. This is demonstrated using soil samples contaminated with a chemical warfare agent

  1. Direct molecular analysis of whole-body animal tissue sections by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyzer, Michelle L; Chaurand, Pierre; Angel, Peggi M; Caprioli, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    The determination of the localization of various compounds in a whole animal is valuable for many applications, including pharmaceutical absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies and biomarker discovery. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for localizing compounds of biological interest with molecular specificity and relatively high resolution. Utilizing imaging mass spectrometry for whole-body animal sections offers considerable analytical advantages compared to traditional methods, such as whole-body autoradiography, but the experiment is not straightforward. This chapter addresses the advantages and unique challenges that the application of imaging mass spectrometry to whole-body animal sections entails, including discussions of sample preparation, matrix application, signal normalization, and image generation. Lipid and protein images obtained from whole-body tissue sections of mouse pups are presented along with detailed protocols for the experiments.

  2. Chemically assisted laser ablation ICP mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takafumi

    2003-01-15

    A new laser ablation technique combined with a chemical evaporation reaction has been developed for elemental ratio analysis of solid samples using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS). Using a chemically assisted laser ablation (CIA) technique developed in this study, analytical repeatability of the elemental ratio measurement was successively improved. To evaluate the reliability of the CLA-ICPMS technique, Pb/U isotopic ratios were determined for zircon samples that have previously been analyzed by other techniques. Conventional laser ablation for Pb/U shows a serious elemental fractionation during ablation mainly due to the large difference in elemental volatility between Pb and U. In the case of Pb/U ratio measurement, a Freon R-134a gas (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) was introduced into the laser cell as a fluorination reactant. The Freon gas introduced into the laser cell reacts with the ablated sample U, and refractory U compounds are converted to a volatile U fluoride compound (UF6) under the high-temperature condition at the ablation site. This avoids the redeposition of U around the ablation pits. Although not all the U is reacted with Freon, formation of volatile UF compounds improves the transmission efficiency of U. Typical precision of the 206Pb/238U ratio measurement is 3-5% (2sigma) for NIST SRM 610 and Nancy 91500 zircon standard, and the U-Pb age data obtained here show good agreement within analytical uncertainties with the previously reported values. Since the observed Pb/U ratio for solid samples is relatively insensitive to laser power and ablation time, optimization of ablation conditions or acquisition parameters no longer needs to be performed on a sample-to-sample basis.

  3. Current use of high-resolution mass spectrometry in drug screening relevant to clinical and forensic toxicology and doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojanperä, Ilkka; Kolmonen, Marjo; Pelander, Anna

    2012-05-01

    Clinical and forensic toxicology and doping control deal with hundreds or thousands of drugs that may cause poisoning or are abused, are illicit, or are prohibited in sports. Rapid and reliable screening for all these compounds of different chemical and pharmaceutical nature, preferably in a single analytical method, is a substantial effort for analytical toxicologists. Combined chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques with standardised reference libraries have been most commonly used for the purpose. In the last ten years, the focus has shifted from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, because of progress in instrument technology and partly because of the polarity and low volatility of many new relevant substances. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), which enables accurate mass measurement at high resolving power, has recently evolved to the stage that is rapidly causing a shift from unit-resolution, quadrupole-dominated instrumentation. The main HRMS techniques today are time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Orbitrap Fourier-transform mass spectrometry. Both techniques enable a range of different drug-screening strategies that essentially rely on measuring a compound's or a fragment's mass with sufficiently high accuracy that its elemental composition can be determined directly. Accurate mass and isotopic pattern acts as a filter for confirming the identity of a compound or even identification of an unknown. High mass resolution is essential for improving confidence in accurate mass results in the analysis of complex biological samples. This review discusses recent applications of HRMS in analytical toxicology.

  4. Interpretation of Tandem Mass Spectrometry (MSMS) Spectra for Peptide Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to give a short introduction to peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS) and interpretation of fragment mass spectra. Through examples and guidelines we demonstrate how to understand and validate search results and how to perform de novo sequencing based on the often...... very complex fragmentation pattern obtained by tandem mass spectrometry (also referred to as MSMS). The focus is on simple rules for interpretation of MSMS spectra of tryptic as well as non-tryptic peptides....

  5. Mass spectrometry in grape and wine chemistry. Part I: polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamini, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, had and still has, a very important role for research and quality control in the viticulture and enology field, and its analytical power is relevant for structural studies on aroma and polyphenolic compounds. Polyphenols are responsible for the taste and color of wine, and confer astringency and structure to the beverage. The knowledge of the anthocyanic structure is very important to predict the aging attitude of wine, and to attempt to resolve problems about color stability. Moreover, polyphenols are the main compounds related to the benefits of wine consumption in the diet, because of their properties in the treatment of circulatory disorders such as capillary fragility, peripheral chronic venous insufficiency, and microangiopathy of the retina. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) techniques are nowadays the best analytical approach to study polyphenols in grape extracts and wine, and are the most effective tool in the study of the structure of anthocyanins. The MS/MS approach is a very powerful tool that permits anthocyanin aglycone and sugar moiety characterization. LC-MS allows the characterization of complex structures of grape polyphenols, such as procyanidins, proanthocyanidins, prodelphinidins, and tannins, and provides experimental evidence for structures that were previously only hypothesized. The matrix-assisted-laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) technique is suitable to determine the presence of molecules of higher molecular weight with high accuracy, and it has been applied with success to study procyanidin oligomers up to heptamers in the reflectron mode, and up to nonamers in the linear mode. The levels of resveratrol in wine, an important polyphenol well-known for its beneficial effects, have been determined by SPME and LC-MS, and the former approach led to the best results in terms of sensitivity. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Infrared laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Shrestha, Bindesh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Vertes, Akos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-02-07

    In this paper we introduce laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI), a novel atmospheric pressure ion source for mass spectrometry. In LAAPPI the analytes are ablated from water-rich solid samples or from aqueous solutions with an infrared (IR) laser running at 2.94 μm wavelength. Approximately 12 mm above the sample surface, the ablation plume is intercepted with an orthogonal hot solvent (e.g., toluene or anisole) jet, which is generated by a heated nebulizer microchip and directed toward the mass spectrometer inlet. The ablated analytes are desolvated and ionized in the gas-phase by atmospheric pressure photoionization using a 10 eV vacuum ultraviolet krypton discharge lamp. The effect of operational parameters and spray solvent on the performance of LAAPPI is studied. LAAPPI offers ~300 μm lateral resolution comparable to, e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. In addition to polar compounds, LAAPPI efficiently ionizes neutral and nonpolar compounds. The bioanalytical application of the method is demonstrated by the direct LAAPPI analysis of rat brain tissue sections and sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaves. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  7. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper.