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Sample records for composition heterogeneity control

  1. Hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity.

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic life contains hierarchical vesicular architectures (i.e. organelles that are crucial for material production and trafficking, information storage and access, as well as energy production. In order to perform specific tasks, these compartments differ among each other in their membrane composition and their internal cargo and also differ from the cell membrane and the cytosol. Man-made structures that reproduce this nested architecture not only offer a deeper understanding of the functionalities and evolution of organelle-bearing eukaryotic life but also allow the engineering of novel biomimetic technologies. Here, we show the newly developed vesicle-in-water-in-oil emulsion transfer preparation technique to result in giant unilamellar vesicles internally compartmentalized by unilamellar vesicles of different membrane composition and internal cargo, i.e. hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity. The compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles were subsequently isolated by a separation step exploiting the heterogeneity of the membrane composition and the encapsulated cargo. Due to the controlled, efficient, and technically straightforward character of the new preparation technique, this study allows the hierarchical fabrication of compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity and will ease the development of eukaryotic cell mimics that resemble their natural templates as well as the fabrication of novel multi-agent drug delivery systems for combination therapies and complex artificial microreactors.

  2. Comparison of DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity control methods

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ko, Won Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    A method to reduce the fuel composition heterogeneity effect on the core performance parameters has been studied for the DUPIC fuel which is made of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuels by a dry refabrication process. This study focuses on the reactivity control method which uses either slightly enriched, depleted, or natural uranium to minimize the cost rise effect on the manufacturing of DUPIC fuel, when adjusting the excess reactivity of the spent PWR fuel. In order to reduce the variation of isotopic composition of the DUPIC fuel, the inter-assembly mixing operation was taken three times. Then, three options have been considered: reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, reactivity control by natural uranium for high reactivity spent PWR fuels, and reactivity control by natural uranium for linear reactivity spent PWR fuels. The results of this study have shown that the reactivity of DUPIC fuel can be tightly controlled with the minimum amount of fresh uranium feed. For the reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, all the spent PWR fuels can be utilized as the DUPIC fuel and the fraction of fresh uranium feed is 3.4% on an average. For the reactivity control by natural uranium, about 88% of spent PWR fuel can be utilized as the DUPIC fuel when the linear reactivity spent PWR fuels are used, and the amount of natural uranium feed needed to control the DUPIC fuel reactivity is negligible. 13 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  3. Comparison of DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity control methods

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ko, Won Il

    1999-08-01

    A method to reduce the fuel composition heterogeneity effect on the core performance parameters has been studied for the DUPIC fuel which is made of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuels by a dry refabrication process. This study focuses on the reactivity control method which uses either slightly enriched, depleted, or natural uranium to minimize the cost rise effect on the manufacturing of DUPIC fuel, when adjusting the excess reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, reactivity control by natural uranium for high reactivity spent PWR fuels, and reactivity control by natural uranium for linear reactivity spent PWR fuels. The results of this study have shown that the reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, all the spent PWR fuels can be utilized as the DUPIC fuel and the fraction of fresh uranium feed is 3.4% on an average. For the reactivity control by natural uranium, about 88% of spent PWR fuel can be utilized as the DUPIC fuel when the linear reactivity spent PWR fuels are used, and the amount of natural uranium feed needed to control the DUPIC fuel reactivity is negligible. (author). 13 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs

  4. The fluid control mechanism of bionic structural heterogeneous composite materials and its potential application in enhancing pump efficiency

    Limei Tian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the structure of dolphin skin controls fluid media dynamically. Gaining inspiration from this phenomenon, a kind of bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was designed. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material is composed of two materials: a rigid metal base layer with bionic structures and an elastic polymer surface layer with the corresponding mirror structures. The fluid control mechanism of the bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was investigated using a fluid–solid interaction method in ANSYS Workbench. The results indicated that the bionic structural heterogeneous composite material’s fluid control mechanism is its elastic deformation, which is caused by the coupling action between the elastic surface material and the bionic structure. This deformation can decrease the velocity gradient of the fluid boundary layer through changing the fluid–solid actual contact surface and reduce the frictional force. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material can also absorb some energy through elastic deformation and avoid energy loss. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was applied to the impeller of a centrifugal pump in a contrast experiment, increasing the pump efficiency by 5% without changing the hydraulic model of the impeller. The development of this bionic structural heterogeneous composite material will be straightforward from an engineering point of view, and it will have valuable practical applications.

  5. Heterogeneous dissipative composite structures

    Ryabov, Victor; Yartsev, Boris; Parshina, Ludmila

    2018-05-01

    The paper suggests mathematical models of decaying vibrations in layered anisotropic plates and orthotropic rods based on Hamilton variation principle, first-order shear deformation laminated plate theory (FSDT), as well as on the viscous-elastic correspondence principle of the linear viscoelasticity theory. In the description of the physical relationships between the materials of the layers forming stiff polymeric composites, the effect of vibration frequency and ambient temperature is assumed as negligible, whereas for the viscous-elastic polymer layer, temperature-frequency relationship of elastic dissipation and stiffness properties is considered by means of the experimentally determined generalized curves. Mitigation of Hamilton functional makes it possible to describe decaying vibration of anisotropic structures by an algebraic problem of complex eigenvalues. The system of algebraic equation is generated through Ritz method using Legendre polynomials as coordinate functions. First, real solutions are found. To find complex natural frequencies of the system, the obtained real natural frequencies are taken as input values, and then, by means of the 3rd order iteration method, complex natural frequencies are calculated. The paper provides convergence estimates for the numerical procedures. Reliability of the obtained results is confirmed by a good correlation between analytical and experimental values of natural frequencies and loss factors in the lower vibration tones for the two series of unsupported orthotropic rods formed by stiff GRP and CRP layers and a viscoelastic polymer layer. Analysis of the numerical test data has shown the dissipation & stiffness properties of heterogeneous composite plates and rods to considerably depend on relative thickness of the viscoelastic polymer layer, orientation of stiff composite layers, vibration frequency and ambient temperature.

  6. Composition heterogeneity analysis for DUPIC fuel(I) - Statistical analysis

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    The fuel composition heterogeneity effect on reactor performance parameters was assessed by refueling simulations for three DUPIC fuel options of fuel composition heterogeneity control: the fissile content adjustment, the reactivity control by slightly enriched and depleted uranium, and the reactivity control by natural uranium. For each DUPIC fuel option, the simulations were performed using 30 heterogeneous fuel types which were determined by the agglomerative hierarchical clustering method. The heterogeneity effect was considered during the refueling simulation by randomly selecting fuel types for the refueling operation. The refueling simulations of the heterogeneous core have shown that the key performance parameters such as the maximum channel power (MCP), maximum bundle power (MBP), and channel power peaking factor (CPPF) are close to those of the core that has single fuel type. For the three DUPIC fuel options, the uncertainties of MCP, MBP, and CPPF due to the fuel composition heterogeneity are less than 0.6, 1.5 and 0.8%, respectively, including the uncertainty of the group-average fuel property. This study has shown that the three DUPIC fuel options reduces the composition heterogeneity effectively and the zone power control system has a sufficient margin to adjust the perturbations cased by the fuel composition heterogeneity. 15 refs., 28 figs.,10 tabs. (Author)

  7. Optimal Control of Heterogeneous Systems with Endogenous Domain of Heterogeneity

    Belyakov, Anton O.; Tsachev, Tsvetomir; Veliov, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with optimal control of heterogeneous systems, that is, families of controlled ODEs parameterized by a parameter running over a domain called domain of heterogeneity. The main novelty in the paper is that the domain of heterogeneity is endogenous: it may depend on the control and on the state of the system. This extension is crucial for several economic applications and turns out to rise interesting mathematical problems. A necessary optimality condition is derived, where one of the adjoint variables satisfies a differential inclusion (instead of equation) and the maximization of the Hamiltonian takes the form of “min-max”. As a consequence, a Pontryagin-type maximum principle is obtained under certain regularity conditions for the optimal control. A formula for the derivative of the objective function with respect to the control from L ∞ is presented together with a sufficient condition for its existence. A stylized economic example is investigated analytically and numerically.

  8. Heterogeneous composite bodies with isolated lenticular shaped cermet regions

    Sherman, Andrew J [Cirtland Hills, OH

    2009-12-22

    A heterogeneous body having ceramic rich cermet regions in a more ductile metal matrix. The heterogeneous bodies are formed by thermal spray operations on metal substrates. The thermal spray operations apply heat to a cermet powder and project it onto a solid substrate. The cermet powder is composed of complex composite particles in which a complex ceramic-metallic core particle is coated with a matrix precursor. The cermet regions are generally comprised of complex ceramic-metallic composites that correspond approximately to the core particles. The cermet regions are approximately lenticular shaped with an average width that is at least approximately twice the average thickness. The cermet regions are imbedded within the matrix phase and generally isolated from one another. They have obverse and reverse surfaces. The matrix phase is formed from the matrix precursor coating on the core particles. The amount of heat applied during the formation of the heterogeneous body is controlled so that the core particles soften but do not become so fluid that they disperse throughout the matrix phase. The force of the impact on the surface of the substrate tends to flatten them. The flattened cermet regions tend to be approximately aligned with one another in the body.

  9. Large-scale compositional heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle

    Ballmer, M.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic imaging of subducted Farallon and Tethys lithosphere in the lower mantle has been taken as evidence for whole-mantle convection, and efficient mantle mixing. However, cosmochemical constraints point to a lower-mantle composition that has a lower Mg/Si compared to upper-mantle pyrolite. Moreover, geochemical signatures of magmatic rocks indicate the long-term persistence of primordial reservoirs somewhere in the mantle. In this presentation, I establish geodynamic mechanisms for sustaining large-scale (primordial) heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using numerical models. Mantle flow is controlled by rock density and viscosity. Variations in intrinsic rock density, such as due to heterogeneity in basalt or iron content, can induce layering or partial layering in the mantle. Layering can be sustained in the presence of persistent whole mantle convection due to active "unmixing" of heterogeneity in low-viscosity domains, e.g. in the transition zone or near the core-mantle boundary [1]. On the other hand, lateral variations in intrinsic rock viscosity, such as due to heterogeneity in Mg/Si, can strongly affect the mixing timescales of the mantle. In the extreme case, intrinsically strong rocks may remain unmixed through the age of the Earth, and persist as large-scale domains in the mid-mantle due to focusing of deformation along weak conveyor belts [2]. That large-scale lateral heterogeneity and/or layering can persist in the presence of whole-mantle convection can explain the stagnation of some slabs, as well as the deflection of some plumes, in the mid-mantle. These findings indeed motivate new seismic studies for rigorous testing of model predictions. [1] Ballmer, M. D., N. C. Schmerr, T. Nakagawa, and J. Ritsema (2015), Science Advances, doi:10.1126/sciadv.1500815. [2] Ballmer, M. D., C. Houser, J. W. Hernlund, R. Wentzcovitch, and K. Hirose (2017), Nature Geoscience, doi:10.1038/ngeo2898.

  10. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  11. Bio-inspired heterogeneous composites for broadband vibration mitigation.

    Chen, Yanyu; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-12-08

    Structural biological materials have developed heterogeneous and hierarchical architectures that are responsible for the outstanding performance to provide protection against environmental threats including static and dynamic loading. Inspired by this observation, this research aims to develop new material and structural concepts for broadband vibration mitigation. The proposed composite materials possess a two-layered heterogeneous architecture where both layers consist of high-volume platelet-shape reinforcements and low-volume matrix, similar to the well-known "brick and mortar" microstructure of biological composites. Using finite element method, we numerically demonstrated that broadband wave attenuation zones can be achieved by tailoring the geometric features of the heterogeneous architecture. We reveal that the resulting broadband attenuation zones are gained by directly superimposing the attenuation zones in each constituent layer. This mechanism is further confirmed by the investigation into the phonon dispersion relation of each layer. Importantly, the broadband wave attenuation capability will be maintained when the mineral platelet orientation is locally manipulated, yet a contrast between the mineral platelet concentrations of the two constituent layers is essential. The findings of this work will provide new opportunities to design heterogeneous composites for broadband vibration mitigation and impact resistance under mechanically challenging environmental conditions.

  12. Compositional Synthesis of Safety Controllers

    Kuijper, W.

    2012-01-01

    In my thesis I investigate compositional techniques for synthesis of safety controllers. A safety controller, in this context, is a state machine that gives the set of safe control outputs for every possible sequence of observations from the plant under control. Compositionality, in this context,

  13. Accuracy increasing in the nuclear-physical analysis of mineral raw materials of heterogeneous composition

    Pak, Yu.; Vdovkin, A.; Pak, D.

    2002-01-01

    the analysis of heterogeneous raw material by the gamma-albedo method it's necessary to optimize the primary gamma-radiation energy choose depending on the material composition of the raw material, its granulometric composition and to reach the maximal presentability of the analysis. For this a method has been suggested which allows to increase substantially the effective study surface without increasing the analyzed object size. The essence of the method consists in the rotation of the object around its axis relatively to the detector reciprocating parallel to the sample in the process of measuring. The optimal laws of the detector motion and the sample rotation provide for the equal presentability of each unit study surface. The experimental approving of the suggested method showed that the optimization of the methodical and geometrical control parameters in the dynamic measuring conditions allow to increase the accuracy of the analysis of disperse raw materials more that twice as large

  14. Compositional multiphase flow and transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Huber, R U

    2000-07-01

    This work first treats the conceptual models for the description of multiphase flow processes in porous media. The thermodynamic laws are explained and the description and quantification of multi-fluid equilibria are discussed in order to account for fluid composition. The fully and weakly coupled approaches for the mathematical description of such flow processes with respect to systems consisting of two and three fluid phases as well as with respect to compositional single and multiphase systems are assessed. For the discretization of the two-phase flow equations node- and cell-centered finite volume methods and mixed and mixed-hybrid finite element approaches are applied. Based upon these methods five solution algorithms are developed. Four of these algorithms are based on the simultaneous solution of the discretized equations in combination with the Newton-Raphson technique. Methods 1 and 2 treat two- three-phase flow processes, Method 3 applies to the solution of partially miscible three-component systems while Method 4 is created for three-phase three-component systems. The latter method uses a variable substitution dependent on the local presence of the fluid phases. Method 5 is based on the IMPES/IMPESC concept. The time-implicit pressure equation is discretized with the mixed-hybrid finite element method. The saturation and concentration equations, respectively, are solved with a cell-centered finite volume scheme. The developed algorithms are applied to the two- and three-phase Buckley-Leverett problems. A partitioning interwell tracer test is simulated. The propagation behavior of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the saturated and unsaturated ground zone under the influence of heterogeneities are examined. In addition, a larger-scale experiment is simulated, which involves an injection of trichloroethylene into the subsurface and the subsequent distribution. Here, the development of a dissolved contaminant plume as well as the behavior of organic

  15. Heterogeneous recurrence monitoring and control of nonlinear stochastic processes

    Yang, Hui, E-mail: huiyang@usf.edu; Chen, Yun [Complex Systems Monitoring, Modeling and Analysis Laboratory, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Recurrence is one of the most common phenomena in natural and engineering systems. Process monitoring of dynamic transitions in nonlinear and nonstationary systems is more concerned with aperiodic recurrences and recurrence variations. However, little has been done to investigate the heterogeneous recurrence variations and link with the objectives of process monitoring and anomaly detection. Notably, nonlinear recurrence methodologies are based on homogeneous recurrences, which treat all recurrence states in the same way as black dots, and non-recurrence is white in recurrence plots. Heterogeneous recurrences are more concerned about the variations of recurrence states in terms of state properties (e.g., values and relative locations) and the evolving dynamics (e.g., sequential state transitions). This paper presents a novel approach of heterogeneous recurrence analysis that utilizes a new fractal representation to delineate heterogeneous recurrence states in multiple scales, including the recurrences of both single states and multi-state sequences. Further, we developed a new set of heterogeneous recurrence quantifiers that are extracted from fractal representation in the transformed space. To that end, we integrated multivariate statistical control charts with heterogeneous recurrence analysis to simultaneously monitor two or more related quantifiers. Experimental results on nonlinear stochastic processes show that the proposed approach not only captures heterogeneous recurrence patterns in the fractal representation but also effectively monitors the changes in the dynamics of a complex system.

  16. Expert Advice, Control, and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    de la Rosa, Leonidas Enrique

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of overconfidence in an investment-decision setting. A risk-averse agent privately observes information relevant to an investment decision, that he can report to a principal. In a standard common-priors setting, the optimal contract provides full insurance to the ag...... in exchange for a more liberal investment rule. This can be interpreted as giving more control to the agent. It is somewhat counterintuitive that the principal will surrender more control to an agent with whom she disagrees more sharply....

  17. Modeling heterogeneous (co)variances from adjacent-SNP groups improves genomic prediction for milk protein composition traits

    Gebreyesus, Grum; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Accurate genomic prediction requires a large reference population, which is problematic for traits that are expensive to measure. Traits related to milk protein composition are not routinely recorded due to costly procedures and are considered to be controlled by a few quantitative trait loci...... of large effect. The amount of variation explained may vary between regions leading to heterogeneous (co)variance patterns across the genome. Genomic prediction models that can efficiently take such heterogeneity of (co)variances into account can result in improved prediction reliability. In this study, we...... developed and implemented novel univariate and bivariate Bayesian prediction models, based on estimates of heterogeneous (co)variances for genome segments (BayesAS). Available data consisted of milk protein composition traits measured on cows and de-regressed proofs of total protein yield derived for bulls...

  18. Elastic Rock Heterogeneity Controls Brittle Rock Failure during Hydraulic Fracturing

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    For interpretation and inversion of microseismic data it is important to understand, which properties of the reservoir rock control the occurrence probability of brittle rock failure and associated seismicity during hydraulic stimulation. This is especially important, when inverting for key properties like permeability and fracture conductivity. Although it became accepted that seismic events are triggered by fluid flow and the resulting perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir rock, the magnitude of stress perturbations, capable of triggering failure in rocks, can be highly variable. The controlling physical mechanism of this variability is still under discussion. We compare the occurrence of microseismic events at the Cotton Valley gas field to elastic rock heterogeneity, obtained from measurements along the treatment wells. The heterogeneity is characterized by scale invariant fluctuations of elastic properties. We observe that the elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation controls the occurrence of brittle failure. In particular, we find that the density of events is increasing with the Brittleness Index (BI) of the rock, which is defined as a combination of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We evaluate the physical meaning of the BI. By applying geomechanical investigations we characterize the influence of fluctuating elastic properties in rocks on the probability of brittle rock failure. Our analysis is based on the computation of stress fluctuations caused by elastic heterogeneity of rocks. We find that elastic rock heterogeneity causes stress fluctuations of significant magnitude. Moreover, the stress changes necessary to open and reactivate fractures in rocks are strongly related to fluctuations of elastic moduli. Our analysis gives a physical explanation to the observed relation between elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation and the occurrence of brittle failure during hydraulic reservoir stimulations. A crucial factor for understanding

  19. Nanoscale high-content analysis using compositional heterogeneities of single proteoliposomes

    Mathiasen, Signe; Christensen, Sune M.; Fung, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Proteoliposome reconstitution is a standard method to stabilize purified transmembrane proteins in membranes for structural and functional assays. Here we quantified intrareconstitution heterogeneities in single proteoliposomes using fluorescence microscopy. Our results suggest that compositional...... heterogeneities can severely skew ensemble-average proteoliposome measurements but also enable ultraminiaturized high-content screens. We took advantage of this screening capability to map the oligomerization energy of the β2-adrenergic receptor using ∼10(9)-fold less protein than conventional assays....

  20. Tree species, spatial heterogeneity, and seasonality drive soil fungal abundance, richness, and composition in Neotropical rainforests.

    Kivlin, Stephanie N; Hawkes, Christine V

    2016-12-01

    Tropical ecosystems remain poorly understood and this is particularly true for belowground soil fungi. Soil fungi may respond to plant identity when, for example, plants differentially allocate resources belowground. However, spatial and temporal heterogeneity in factors such as plant inputs, moisture, or nutrients can also affect fungal communities and obscure our ability to detect plant effects in single time point studies or within diverse forests. To address this, we sampled replicated monocultures of four tree species and secondary forest controls sampled in the drier and wetter seasons over 2 years. Fungal community composition was primarily related to vegetation type and spatial heterogeneity in the effects of vegetation type, with increasing divergence partly reflecting greater differences in soil pH and soil moisture. Across wetter versus drier dates, fungi were 7% less diverse, but up to four-fold more abundant. The combined effects of tree species and seasonality suggest that predicted losses of tropical tree diversity and intensification of drought have the potential to cascade belowground to affect both diversity and abundance of tropical soil fungi. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. IEPLC Framework, Automated Communication in a Heterogeneous Control System Environment

    Locci, F

    2014-01-01

    In CERN accelerators control system several components are essential such as: Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), PCI Extensions for Instrumentation (PXI), and other micro-controller families. Together with their weaknesses and their strength points they typically present custom communication protocols and it is therefore difficult to federate them into the control system using a single communication strategy. Furthermore this dependency to the physical device interfaces and protocols makes most of the code not reusable and the replacement of old technology a difficult problem. The purpose of IEPLC ([1]) is to mitigate the communication issues given by this heterogeneity; it proposes a framework to define communication interfaces in a hardware independent manner. In addition it automatically generates all the resources needed on master side (typically represented by a FEC: Front-End Computer) and slave side (typically represented by the controller) to implement a common and generic Ethernet communication. Th...

  2. A model-based approach to studying changes in compositional heterogeneity

    Baeten, L.; Warton, D.; Calster, van H.; Frenne, De P.; Verstraeten, G.; Bonte, D.; Bernhardt-Romermann, M.; Cornelis, R.; Decocq, G.; Eriksson, O.; Hommel, P.W.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    1. Non-random species loss and gain in local communities change the compositional heterogeneity between communities over time, which is traditionally quantified with dissimilarity-based approaches. Yet, dissimilarities summarize the multivariate species data into a univariate index and obscure the

  3. A method to calculate the effect of heterogeneous composition on bundle power

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-09-01

    In the DUPIC fuel cycle, the spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel is used in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor. Depending on the initial condition and burnup history of PWR fuel, the DUPIC fuel composition varies accordingly. In order to see the effect of the fuel composition, a simple and fast method was developed and applied to the DUPIC fuel. This report discusses the method developed to predict the effect of heterogeneous fuel composition on the bundle power. (author). 3 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  5. Control rod homogenization in heterogeneous sodium-cooled fast reactors

    Andersson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor is one of the candidates for a sustainable nuclear reactor system. In particular, the French ASTRID project employs an axially heterogeneous design, proposed in the so-called CFV (low sodium effect) core, to enhance the inherent safety features of the reactor. This thesis focuses on the accurate modeling of the control rods, through the homogenization method. The control rods in a sodium-cooled fast reactor are used for reactivity compensation during the cycle, power shaping, and to shutdown the reactor. In previous control rod homogenization procedures, only a radial description of the geometry was implemented, hence the axially heterogeneous features of the CFV core could not be taken into account. This thesis investigates the different axial variations the control rod experiences in a CFV core, to determine the impact that these axial environments have on the control rod modeling. The methodology used in this work is based on previous homogenization procedures, the so-called equivalence procedure. The procedure was newly implemented in the PARIS code system in order to be able to use 3D geometries, and thereby be take axial effects into account. The thesis is divided into three parts. The first part investigates the impact of different neutron spectra on the homogeneous control-rod cross sections. The second part investigates the cases where the traditional radial control-rod homogenization procedure is no longer applicable in the CFV core, which was found to be 5-10 cm away from any material interface. In the third part, based on the results from the second part, a 3D model of the control rod is used to calculate homogenized control-rod cross sections. In a full core model, a study is made to investigate the impact these axial effects have on control rod-related core parameters, such as the control rod worth, the capture rates in the control rod, and the power in the adjacent fuel assemblies. All results were compared to a Monte

  6. Glassy aerosols with a range of compositions nucleate ice heterogeneously at cirrus temperatures

    T. W. Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA is likely to exist in a semi-solid or glassy state, particularly at low temperatures and humidities. Previously, it has been shown that glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol is able to nucleate ice heterogeneously under conditions relevant to cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. In this study we test if glassy aerosol distributions with a range of chemical compositions heterogeneously nucleate ice under cirrus conditions. Three single component aqueous solution aerosols (raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA and levoglucosan and one multi component aqueous solution aerosol (raffinose mixed with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate were studied in both the liquid and glassy states at a large cloud simulation chamber. The investigated organic compounds have similar functionality to oxidised organic material found in atmospheric aerosol and have estimated temperature/humidity induced glass transition thresholds that fall within the range predicted for atmospheric SOA. A small fraction of aerosol particles of all compositions were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously in the deposition mode at temperatures relevant to the TTL (<200 K. Raffinose and HMMA, which form glasses at higher temperatures, nucleated ice heterogeneously at temperatures as high as 214.6 and 218.5 K respectively. We present the calculated ice active surface site density, ns, of the aerosols tested here and also of glassy citric acid aerosol as a function of relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi. We also propose a parameterisation which can be used to estimate heterogeneous ice nucleation by glassy aerosol for use in cirrus cloud models up to ~220 K. Finally, we show that heterogeneous nucleation by glassy aerosol may compete with ice nucleation on mineral dust particles in mid-latitudes cirrus.

  7. Page 1 Heterogeneous doping effects in KC-AlO composites 213 of ...

    Heterogeneous doping effects in KC-AlO composites 213 of Al-O in KCl at 500°C for three different sizes of Al-O particles (0-05, 0-3 and. 1-0 um). The figure shows that as the concentration of Al Os increases, the conductivity increases slowly initially, then rather rapidly before it peaks at a 45mol%. Al2O. Moreover, as the ...

  8. Laser pulse control of bridge mediated heterogeneous electron transfer

    Wang Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer from surface attached dye molecules into semiconductor band states is analyzed. The focus is on systems where the dye is separated from the surface by different bridge anchor groups. To simulate the full quantum dynamics of the transfer process a model of reduced dimensionality is used. It comprises the electronic levels of the dye, the bridge anchor group electronic levels and the continuum of semiconductor band states, all defined versus a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate. The effect of the bridge states is demonstrated, firstly, in studying the injection dynamics following an impulsive excitation of the dye. Then, by discussing different control tasks it is demonstrate in which way the charge injection process can be influenced by tailored laser pulses. To highlight the importance of electron wave function interference emphasis is put on asymmetric two-bridge molecule systems which are also characterized by different and complex valued electronic transfer matrix elements.

  9. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Laboratory-generated Mixed Composition and Biomass Burning Particles

    Lim, C. Y.; Sugrue, R. A.; Hagan, D. H.; Cappa, C. D.; Kroll, J. H.; Browne, E. C.

    2016-12-01

    Heterogeneous oxidation of organic aerosol (OA) can significantly transform the chemical and physical properties of particulate matter in the atmosphere, leading to changes to the chemical composition of OA and potential volatilization of organic compounds. It has become increasingly apparent that the heterogeneous oxidation kinetics of OA depend on the phase and morphology of the particles. However, most laboratory experiments to date have been performed on single-component, purely organic precursors, which may exhibit fundamentally different behavior than more complex particles in the atmosphere. Here we present laboratory studies of the heterogeneous oxidation of two more complex chemical systems: thin, organic coatings on inorganic seed particles and biomass burning OA. In the first system, squalane (C30H62), a model compound for reduced OA, is coated onto dry ammonium sulfate particles at various thicknesses (10-20 nm) and exposed to hydroxyl radical (OH) in a flow tube reactor. In the second, we use a semi-batch reactor to study the heterogeneous OH-initiated oxidation of biomass burning particles as a part of the 2016 FIREX campaign in Missoula, MT. The resulting changes in chemical composition are monitored with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a soot-particle AMS for the non-refractory and refractory systems, respectively. We show that the heterogeneous oxidation kinetics of these multicomponent particles are substantially different than that of the single-component particles. The oxidation of organic coatings is rapid, undergoing dramatic changes to carbon oxidation state and losing a significant amount of organic mass after relatively low OH exposures (equivalent to several days of atmospheric processing). In the case of biomass burning particles, the kinetics are complex, with different components (inferred by aerosol mass spectrometry) undergoing oxidation at different rates.

  10. Multiscale Characterization of Structural Compositional and Textural Heterogeneity of Nano-porous Geomaterials

    Yoon, Hongkyu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the project was to perform multiscale characterization of low permeability rocks to determine the effect of physical and chemical heterogeneity on the poromechanical and flow responses of shales and carbonate rocks with a broad range of physical and chemical heterogeneity . An integrated multiscale imaging of shale and carbonate rocks from nanometer to centimeter scales include s dual focused ion beam - scanning electron microscopy (FIB - SEM) , micro computed tomography (micro - CT) , optical and confocal microscopy, and 2D and 3D energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In addition, mineralogical mapping and backscattered imaging with nanoindentation testing advanced the quantitative evaluat ion of the relationship between material heterogeneity and mechanical behavior. T he spatial distribution of compositional heterogeneity, anisotropic bedding patterns, and mechanical anisotropy were employed as inputs for brittle fracture simulations using a phase field model . Comparison of experimental and numerical simulations reveal ed that proper incorporation of additional material information, such as bedding layer thickness and other geometrical attributes of the microstructures, can yield improvements on the numerical prediction of the mesoscale fracture patterns and hence the macroscopic effective toughness. Overall, a comprehensive framework to evaluate the relationship between mechanical response and micro-lithofacial features can allow us to make more accurate prediction of reservoir performance by developing a multi - scale understanding of poromechanical response to coupled chemical and mechanical interactions for subsurface energy related activities.

  11. To the question the unity of composition of fluids of heterogeneous geological objects.

    Galant, Yuri

    2017-04-01

    Creation of Unit Theory Oil Generation based on a number of the provisions, one of which is the unity of the hydrocarbon composition in various geological objects. Studies conducted in various geological conditions and tectonic - magmatic environment. In studying the hydrocarbon composition of various geological objects, untraditional for petroleum geology (igneous rocks, metamorphic rocks, mineral deposits, etc.) progressively manifested that hydrocarbons are also distributed and have the following features. Studies have shown: 1. The composition of the hydrocarbon components presented by, light hydrocarbons, heavy hydrocarbons up to including hexane, normal forms, isoforms, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. 2. Hydrocarbon composition and the ratio of methane to heavy hydrocarbons corresponds to the composition of gases gas fields. 3. The composition and the ratio of hydrocarbons do not depend on genetic types of heterogeneous geological objects. 4. Gas saturation meets the prevailing structure of rocks - pores or fractures. The foregoing allows us to speak of a single source of generating and delivering hydrocarbons in the Earth's Crust, regardless of the geological situation. I.e. the presence of hydrocarbons in the Earth's Crust is UNITED! 5. From a practical point of view - virtually unconventional for hydrocarbons rock can serve as unconventional hydrocarbon resources.

  12. Spatial heterogeneity of physicochemical properties explains differences in microbial composition in arid soils from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico

    Silvia Pajares

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Arid ecosystems are characterized by high spatial heterogeneity, and the variation among vegetation patches is a clear example. Soil biotic and abiotic factors associated with these patches have also been well documented as highly heterogeneous in space. Given the low vegetation cover and little precipitation in arid ecosystems, soil microorganisms are the main drivers of nutrient cycling. Nonetheless, little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms and the relationship that their diversity holds with nutrients and other physicochemical gradients in arid soils. In this study, we evaluated the spatial variability of soil microbial diversity and chemical parameters (nutrients and ion content at local scale (meters occurring in a gypsum-based desert soil, to gain knowledge on what soil abiotic factors control the distribution of microbes in arid ecosystems. We analyzed 32 soil samples within a 64 m2 plot and: (a characterized microbial diversity using T-RFLPs of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (b determined soil chemical parameters, and (c identified relationships between microbial diversity and chemical properties. Overall, we found a strong correlation between microbial composition heterogeneity and spatial variation of cations (Ca2, K+ and anions (HCO ${}_{3}^{-}$ 3 − , Cl−, SO ${}_{4}^{2-}$ 4 2 − content in this small plot. Our results could be attributable to spatial differences of soil saline content, favoring the patchy emergence of salt and soil microbial communities.

  13. Heterogeneity of the Caribbean plateau mantle source: Sr, O and He isotopic compositions of olivine and clinopyroxene from Gorgona Island

    Révillon, S.; Chauvel, C.; Arndt, N. T.; Pik, R.; Martineau, F.; Fourcade, S.; Marty, B.

    2002-12-01

    The composition of the mantle plumes that created large oceanic plateaus such as Ontong Java or the Caribbean is still poorly known. Geochemical and isotopic studies on accreted portions of the Caribbean plateau have shown that the plume source was heterogeneous and contained isotopically depleted and relatively enriched portions. A distinctive feature of samples from the Caribbean plateau is their unusual Sr isotopic compositions, which, at a given Nd isotopic ratio, are far higher than in samples from other oceanic plateaus. Sr, O and He isotopic compositions of whole rocks and magmatic minerals (clinopyroxene or olivine) separated from komatiites, gabbros and peridotites from Gorgona Island in Colombia were determined to investigate the origin of these anomalously radiogenic compositions. Sequentially leached clinopyroxenes have Sr isotopic compositions in the range 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.70271-0.70352, systematically lower than those of leached and unleached whole rocks. Oxygen isotopic ratios of clinopyroxene vary within the range δ 18O=5.18-5.35‰, similar to that recorded in oceanic island basalts. He isotopic ratios are high ( R/ Ra=8-19). The lower 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of most of the clinopyroxenes shift the field of the Caribbean plateau in Nd-Sr isotope diagrams toward more 'normal' values, i.e. a position closer to the field defined by mid-ocean ridge basalts and oceanic-island basalts. Three clinopyroxenes have slightly higher 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios that cannot be explained by an assimilation model. The high 87Sr/ 86Sr and variations of 143Nd/ 144Nd are interpreted as a source characteristic. Trace-element ratios, however, are controlled mainly by fractionation during partial melting. We combine these isotopic data in a heterogeneous plume source model that accounts for the diversity of isotopic signatures recorded on Gorgona Island and throughout the Caribbean plateau. The heterogeneities are related to old recycled oceanic lithosphere in the plume source; the high 3

  14. Optimization and real-time control for laser treatment of heterogeneous soft tissues.

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David; Hawkins, Andrea; Bass, Jon M; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2009-01-01

    Predicting the outcome of thermotherapies in cancer treatment requires an accurate characterization of the bioheat transfer processes in soft tissues. Due to the biological and structural complexity of tumor (soft tissue) composition and vasculature, it is often very difficult to obtain reliable tissue properties that is one of the key factors for the accurate treatment outcome prediction. Efficient algorithms employing in vivo thermal measurements to determine heterogeneous thermal tissues properties in conjunction with a detailed sensitivity analysis can produce essential information for model development and optimal control. The goals of this paper are to present a general formulation of the bioheat transfer equation for heterogeneous soft tissues, review models and algorithms developed for cell damage, heat shock proteins, and soft tissues with nanoparticle inclusion, and demonstrate an overall computational strategy for developing a laser treatment framework with the ability to perform real-time robust calibrations and optimal control. This computational strategy can be applied to other thermotherapies using the heat source such as radio frequency or high intensity focused ultrasound.

  15. Coupled petrological-geodynamical modeling of a compositionally heterogeneous mantle plume

    Rummel, Lisa; Kaus, Boris J. P.; White, Richard W.; Mertz, Dieter F.; Yang, Jianfeng; Baumann, Tobias S.

    2018-01-01

    Self-consistent geodynamic modeling that includes melting is challenging as the chemistry of the source rocks continuously changes as a result of melt extraction. Here, we describe a new method to study the interaction between physical and chemical processes in an uprising heterogeneous mantle plume by combining a geodynamic code with a thermodynamic modeling approach for magma generation and evolution. We pre-computed hundreds of phase diagrams, each of them for a different chemical system. After melt is extracted, the phase diagram with the closest bulk rock chemistry to the depleted source rock is updated locally. The petrological evolution of rocks is tracked via evolving chemical compositions of source rocks and extracted melts using twelve oxide compositional parameters. As a result, a wide variety of newly generated magmatic rocks can in principle be produced from mantle rocks with different degrees of depletion. The results show that a variable geothermal gradient, the amount of extracted melt and plume excess temperature affect the magma production and chemistry by influencing decompression melting and the depletion of rocks. Decompression melting is facilitated by a shallower lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and an increase in the amount of extracted magma is induced by a lower critical melt fraction for melt extraction and/or higher plume temperatures. Increasing critical melt fractions activates the extraction of melts triggered by decompression at a later stage and slows down the depletion process from the metasomatized mantle. Melt compositional trends are used to determine melting related processes by focusing on K2O/Na2O ratio as indicator for the rock type that has been molten. Thus, a step-like-profile in K2O/Na2O might be explained by a transition between melting metasomatized and pyrolitic mantle components reproducible through numerical modeling of a heterogeneous asthenospheric mantle source. A potential application of the developed method

  16. Intelligent Overload Control for Composite Web Services

    Meulenhoff, P.J.; Ostendorf, D.R.; Zivkovic, Miroslav; Meeuwissen, H.B.; Gijsen, B.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze overload control for composite web services in service oriented architectures by an orchestrating broker, and propose two practical access control rules which effectively mitigate the effects of severe overloads at some web services in the composite service. These two rules

  17. Catchment heterogeneity controls emergent archetype concentration-discharge relationships

    Musolff, A.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Rao, P. S.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Relationships between in-stream dissolved solute concentrations (C) and discharge (Q) are often-used indicators of catchment-scale processes and their interference with human activities. Here we analyze observational C-Q relationships from 61 catchments and 8 different solutes across a wide range of land-uses and discharge regimes. This analysis is combined with a parsimonious stochastic modeling approach to test how C-Q relationships arise from spatial heterogeneity in catchment solute sources coupled with different timescales of biogeochemical reactions. The observational data exhibit archetypical dilution, enrichment, and constant C-Q patterns. Moreover, with land-use intensification we find decreasing C variability relative to Q variability (chemostatic export regime). Our model indicates that the dominant driver of emergent C-Q patterns was structured heterogeneity of solute sources implemented as correlation of source concentration to travel time. Regardless of the C-Q pattern, with decreasing source heterogeneity we consistently find lower variability in C than in Q and a dominance of chemostatic export regimes. Here, the variance in exported loads is determined primarily by variance of Q. We conclude that efforts to improve stream water quality and ecological integrity in intensely managed catchments should lead away from landscape homogenization by introducing structured source heterogeneity. References: Musolff, A., J. H. Fleckenstein, P. S. C. Rao, and J. W. Jawitz (2017), Emergent archetype patterns of coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical responses in catchments, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44(9), 4143-4151, doi: 10.1002/2017GL072630.

  18. Heterogeneous Teams of Autonomous Vehicles: Advanced Sensing & Control

    2009-03-01

    Final Technical 3. DATES COVERED (From To) 7/1/05-12/31708 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Heterogeneous Teams of Autonomous Vehicles Advanced Sensing...assimilating data from underwater and surface autonomous vehicles in addition to the usual sources of Eulerian and Lagrangian systems into a small scale

  19. Decentralized control using compositional analysis techniques

    Kerber, F.; van der Schaft, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized control strategies aim at achieving a global control target by means of distributed local controllers acting on individual subsystems of the overall plant. In this sense, decentralized control is a dual problem to compositional analysis where a global verification task is decomposed

  20. High heterogeneity in soil composition and quality in different mangrove forests of Venezuela.

    Otero, X L; Méndez, A; Nóbrega, G N; Ferreira, T O; Meléndez, W; Macías, F

    2017-09-18

    Mangrove forests play an important role in biogeochemical cycles of metals, nutrients, and C in coastal ecosystems. However, these functions could be strongly affected by the mangrove soil degradation. In this study, we performed an intensive sampling characterizing mangrove soils under different types of environment (lagoon/gulf) and vegetation (Rhizophora/Avicennia/dead mangrove) in the Venezuelan coast. To better understand the spatial heterogeneity of the composition and characteristics of the soils, a wide range of the soil attributes were analyzed. In general, the soils were anoxic (Eh mangroves presented a low Fe Pyrite content due to a limitation in the Fe oxyhydroxide contents, especially in soils with higher organic C content (TOC > 15%). Finally, the dead mangrove showed significantly lower amounts of TOC and fibers (in comparison to the well-preserved mangrove forest), which indicates that the C pools in mangrove soils are highly sensitive also to natural impact, such as ENSO.

  1. Hydraulic concrete composition and properties control system

    PSHINKO O.M.; KRASNYUK A.V.; HROMOVA O.V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Scientific work aims at the development and testing of information system to meet the challenges of concrete composition design and control (for railway structures and buildings) based on the physico-analytical method algorithm for hydraulic concrete composition calculation. Methodology. The proposed algorithm of hydraulic concrete composition calculation is based on the physicochemical mechanics and in particular on the rheology of elastic–viscous–plastic bodies. The system of canon...

  2. Physical heterogeneity control on effective mineral dissolution rates

    Jung, Heewon; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis

    2018-04-01

    Hydrologic heterogeneity may be an important factor contributing to the discrepancy in laboratory and field measured dissolution rates, but the governing factors influencing mineral dissolution rates among various representations of physical heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Here, we present multiple reactive transport simulations of anorthite dissolution in 2D latticed random permeability fields and link the information from local grid scale (1 cm or 4 m) dissolution rates to domain-scale (1m or 400 m) effective dissolution rates measured by the flux-weighted average of an ensemble of flow paths. We compare results of homogeneous models to heterogeneous models with different structure and layered permeability distributions within the model domain. Chemistry is simplified to a single dissolving primary mineral (anorthite) distributed homogeneously throughout the domain and a single secondary mineral (kaolinite) that is allowed to dissolve or precipitate. Results show that increasing size in correlation structure (i.e. long integral scales) and high variance in permeability distribution are two important factors inducing a reduction in effective mineral dissolution rates compared to homogeneous permeability domains. Larger correlation structures produce larger zones of low permeability where diffusion is an important transport mechanism. Due to the increased residence time under slow diffusive transport, the saturation state of a solute with respect to a reacting mineral approaches equilibrium and reduces the reaction rate. High variance in permeability distribution favorably develops large low permeability zones that intensifies the reduction in mixing and effective dissolution rate. However, the degree of reduction in effective dissolution rate observed in 1 m × 1 m domains is too small (equilibrium conditions reduce the effective dissolution rate by increasing the saturation state. However, in large domains where less- or non-reactive zones develop, higher

  3. Smart Control of Energy Distribution Grids over Heterogeneous Communication Networks

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter; Silva, Nuno; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein

    2018-01-01

    Off-the shelf wireless communication technologies reduce infrastructure deployment costs and are thus attractive for distribution system control. Wireless communication however may lead to variable network performance. Hence the impact of this variability on overall distribution system control be...

  4. Effects of annealing on the compositional heterogeneity and structure in zirconium-based bulk metallic glass thin films

    He, L.; Chu, J.P.; Li, C.-L.; Lee, C.-M.; Chen, Y.-C.; Liaw, P.K.; Voyles, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    In-situ heating fluctuation electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy have been utilized to study compositional and structural heterogeneities in Zr 51 Cu 32 Al 9 Ni 8 thin films upon annealing. Composition fluctuations are present in the as-deposited thin films. Well below the glass transition temperature, the composition fluctuations increase with annealing time. Short- and medium-range order also change with annealing temperature. The observed heterogeneities in the glass structure persist until annealing causes crystallization. The 20 nm thick Zr 51 Cu 32 Al 9 Ni 8 films contain oxide layers both at the surface and the film/substrate interface with the total thickness of 7–8 nm. In-situ annealing increased the oxygen content of the whole films to about 24 wt.% after 2 h at 400 °C. - Highlights: • Zr 51 Cu 32 Al 9 Ni 8 thin films were studied with in-situ heating electron microscopy. • Annealing at 400 °C increases the Zr and Cu compositional fluctuations. • Short-range order in Zr 51 Cu 32 Al 9 Ni 8 becomes less homogeneous above 350 °C. • Medium-range order changes in degree and types at 400 °C, well below T g . • Annealing increases composition and structure heterogeneities until crystallization

  5. Triple pulse shape discrimination and capture-gated spectroscopy in a composite heterogeneous scintillator

    Sharma, M., E-mail: mksharma@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Nattress, J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wilhelm, K. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jovanovic, I. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2017-06-11

    We demonstrate an all-solid-state design for a composite heterogeneous scintillation detector sensitive to interactions with high-energy photons (gammas), fast neutrons, and thermal neutrons. The scintillator exhibits triple pulse shape discrimination, effectively separating electron recoils, fast neutron recoils, and neutron captures. This is accomplished by combining the properties of two distinct scintillators, whereby a 51-mm diameter, 51-mm tall cylinder of pulse shape discriminating plastic is wrapped by a 320-µm thick sheet of {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag), optically coupling the scintillators to each other and to the photomultiplier tube. In this way, the sensitivity to neutron captures is achieved without the need to load the plastic scintillator with a capture agent. We demonstrate a figure of merit of up to 1.2 for fast neutrons/gammas and 5.7 for thermal neutrons/gammas. Intrinsic capture efficiency is found to be 0.46±0.05% and is in good agreement with simulation, while gamma rejection was 10{sup −6} with respect to the capture region and 10{sup −4} with respect to the recoil region using a 300 keVee threshold. Finally, we show an improvement in capture-gated neutron spectroscopy by rejecting accidental gamma coincidences using pulse shape discrimination in the plastic scintillator.

  6. Determining two-step control in heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    Chakrabarty, T; Silveston, P L; Hudgins, R R

    1979-10-01

    The data by Thaller and Thodos on the sec.-butanol dehydrogenation to methyl ethyl ketone on brass catalyst indicated that a dual site surface reaction was rate-controlling below 575/sup 0/K and hydrogen desorption was rate-controlling above 616/sup 0/K (Vertical BarAIChE J.

  7. Representational Similarity Analysis Reveals Heterogeneous Networks Supporting Speech Motor Control

    Zheng, Zane; Cusack, Rhodri; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    The everyday act of speaking involves the complex processes of speech motor control. One important feature of such control is regulation of articulation when auditory concomitants of speech do not correspond to the intended motor gesture. While theoretical accounts of speech monitoring posit...... multiple functional components required for detection of errors in speech planning (e.g., Levelt, 1983), neuroimaging studies generally indicate either single brain regions sensitive to speech production errors, or small, discrete networks. Here we demonstrate that the complex system controlling speech...... is supported by a complex neural network that is involved in linguistic, motoric and sensory processing. With the aid of novel real-time acoustic analyses and representational similarity analyses of fMRI signals, our data show functionally differentiated networks underlying auditory feedback control of speech....

  8. Smart Control of Energy Distribution Grids over Heterogeneous Communication Networks

    Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Iov, Florin; Hägerling, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The expected growth in distributed generation will significantly affect the operation and control of todays distribution grids. Being confronted with short time power variations of distributed generations, the assurance of a reliable service (grid stability, avoidance of energy losses) and the qu......The expected growth in distributed generation will significantly affect the operation and control of todays distribution grids. Being confronted with short time power variations of distributed generations, the assurance of a reliable service (grid stability, avoidance of energy losses...

  9. HYDRAULIC CONCRETE COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES CONTROL SYSTEM

    O. M. Pshinko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Scientific work aims at the development and testing of information system to meet the challenges of concrete composition design and control (for railway structures and buildings based on the physico-analytical method algorithm for hydraulic concrete composition calculation. Methodology. The proposed algorithm of hydraulic concrete composition calculation is based on the physicochemical mechanics and in particular on the rheology of elastic–viscous–plastic bodies. The system of canonical equations consists of the equations for concrete strength, absolute volume, concrete mix consistency as well as the equation for optimal concrete saturation with aggregates while minimizing cement content. The joint solution of these four equations related to composition allows determining for the materials the concrete composition of required strength, concrete workability with minimum cement content. The procedure for calculation of hydraulic concrete composition according to the physico-analytical method consists of two parts: 1 physical, which is laboratory testing of concrete mix components in different concrete compositions; 2 analytical, which represents the calculation algorithm for concrete compositions equivalent in concrete strength and workability that comply with the specific conditions of concrete placing. Findings. To solve the problem of designing the concrete composition with the desired properties for railway structures and buildings it was proposed to use the information technology in the form of a developed computer program whose algorithm includes the physico-analytical method for hydraulic concrete composition determination. Originality. The developed concrete composition design method takes into account the basic properties of raw materials, concrete mix and concrete, which are pre-determined. The distinctive feature of physico-analytical method is obtaining of a set of equivalent compositions with a certain concrete mix

  10. Exoskeleton Heterogeneity in Crustaceans: Quantifying Compositional and Structural Variations Across Body Parts

    Ulrich, R. N.; Mergelsberg, S. T.; Dove, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Crustacean exoskeletons are a complex biocomposite of organic macromolecules and calcium carbonate minerals. The highly divergent functions and diverse morphologies of these biominerals across taxa raise the question of whether these differences are systematically reflected in exoskeleton composition and structure. Previous studies that investigated element concentrations in exoskeletons used spectroscopic methods. However, the findings were largely inconclusive because of analytical limitations and most studies concluded that magnesium, phosphorus, and other trace elements are mostly contained in the mineral fraction because concentrations in the organic framework could not be resolved. This experimental study was designed to quantify the distributions of Ca, P, Mg, and Sr in the mineral versus organic fractions of exoskeletons from the American Lobster (H. americanus), Dungeness Crab (M. magister), and Red Rock Crab (M. productus). Samples of exoskeleton from 10 body parts were collected in triplicate and dissolved using three procedures specific to extracting the 1) mineral, 2) protein, and 3) chitin phases separately. Chemical analyses of the resulting effluents using ICP-OES show the mineral fraction of the skeleton can contain significant amounts of mineralized Mg and P particularly for body parts associated with a significant difference in mineral structural ordering. The protein fraction contains more Mg and P than expected based on estimates from previous studies (Hild et al., 2008). While the element distributions vary greatly depending on the location, in body parts with thicker cuticle (e.g. claw) the mineral component appears to control overall composition. The findings have implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions based upon exoskeleton composition. First, the chemical composition of an exoskeleton cannot be assumed constant across the different body parts of an entire organism. This is particularly true when the exoskeleton of the claw is

  11. Compositional heterogeneity of the Sugarloaf melilite nephelinite flow, Honolulu Volcanics, Hawai'i

    Clague, David A.; Frey, Frederick A.; Garcia, Michael O.; Huang, Shichun; McWilliams, Michael; Beeson, Melvin H.

    2016-07-01

    The Sugarloaf flow is a melilite nephelinite erupted from the Tantalus rift during rejuvenated-stage volcanism on O'ahu, the Honolulu Volcanics. The flow ponded in Mānoa Valley forming a ∼15 m thick flow which was cored and sampled in a quarry. Nepheline from a pegmatoid segregation in the flow yielded a 40Ar-39Ar age of 76 ka. This age, combined with others, indicates that the Tantalus rift eruptions are some of the youngest on O'ahu. Honolulu Volcanics erupt on average about every 35-40 ka indicating that future eruptions are possible. We evaluated the compositional variability of 19 samples from the flow, including 14 from the core. Twelve samples are representative of the bulk flow, four are dark- or light-colored variants, one is a heavy rare earth element (REE)-enriched pegmatoid, and two visually resemble the bulk flow, but have chemical characteristics of the dark and light variants. Our objective was to determine intraflow heterogeneity in mineralogy and composition. Variable abundances of Na2O, K2O, Sr, Ba, Rb, Pb and U in the flow were caused by post-eruptive mobility in a vapor phase, most likely during or soon after flow emplacement, and heterogeneous deposition of secondary calcite and zeolites. Relative to fine-grained samples, a pegmatoid vein that crosscuts the flow is enriched in incompatible trace elements except Sr and TiO2. Element mobility after eruption introduced scatter in trace element ratios including light-REE/heavy-REE, and all ratios involving mobile elements K, Rb, Ba, Sr, Pb, and U. Lavas from some of the 37 Honolulu Volcanics vents have crosscutting REE patterns in a primitive mantle-normalized plot. Such patterns have been interpreted to reflect variable amounts of residual garnet during partial melting. Previous studies of lavas from different vents concluded that garnet, phlogopite, amphibole, and Fe-Ti oxides were residual phases of the partial melting processes that created the Honolulu Volcanics (Clague and Frey, 1982; Yang

  12. Molecular- and nm-scale Investigation of the Structure and Compositional Heterogeneity of Naturally Occurring Ferrihydrite

    Cismasu, C.; Michel, F. M.; Stebbins, J. F.; Tcaciuc, A. P.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    methods to study such naturally occurring nanomaterials, both at the molecular- and nm-scale. This work provides structural information at the short-, medium- and long- range, as well as evidence of compositional heterogeneity, and mineral/organic matter associations.

  13. Heterogeneities in metallic glasses. Atomistic computer simulations on the structure and mechanical properties of copper-zirconium alloys and composites

    Brink, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The present thesis deals with molecular dynamics computer simulations of heterogeneities in copper-zirconium metallic glasses, ranging from intrinsic structural fluctuations to crystalline secondary phases. These heterogeneities define, on a microscopic scale, the properties of the glass, and an understanding of their nature and behaviour is required for deriving the proper structure-property relations. In terms of composite systems, we start with the amorphisation of copper nanolayers embedded in a metallic glass matrix. While copper is an fcc metal with a high propensity for crystallisation, amorphisation can in fact occur in such systems for thermodynamic reasons. This is due to interface effects, which are also known from heterogeneous interfaces in crystals or from grain boundary complexions, although in absence of lattice mismatch. In single-phase glasses, intrinsic heterogeneities are often discussed in terms of soft spots or geometrically unfavourable motifs (GUMs), which can be considered to be mechanically weaker, defective regions of the glass. We investigate the relation between these motifs and the boson peak, an anomaly in the vibrational spectrum of all glasses. We demonstrate a relation between the boson peak and soft spots by analysing various amorphous and partially amorphous samples as well as highentropy alloys. Finally, we treat the plastic deformation of glasses, with and without crystalline secondary phases. We propose an explanation for the experimentally observed variations of propagation direction, composition, and density along a shear band. These variations of propagation direction are small in the case of single-phase glasses. A considerably greater influence on shear band propagation can be exerted by precipitates. We systematically investigate composites ranging from low crystalline volume fraction up to systems which resemble a nanocrystalline metal. In this context, we derive a mechanism map for composite systems and observe the

  14. Heterogeneities in metallic glasses. Atomistic computer simulations on the structure and mechanical properties of copper-zirconium alloys and composites

    Brink, Tobias

    2017-07-01

    The present thesis deals with molecular dynamics computer simulations of heterogeneities in copper-zirconium metallic glasses, ranging from intrinsic structural fluctuations to crystalline secondary phases. These heterogeneities define, on a microscopic scale, the properties of the glass, and an understanding of their nature and behaviour is required for deriving the proper structure-property relations. In terms of composite systems, we start with the amorphisation of copper nanolayers embedded in a metallic glass matrix. While copper is an fcc metal with a high propensity for crystallisation, amorphisation can in fact occur in such systems for thermodynamic reasons. This is due to interface effects, which are also known from heterogeneous interfaces in crystals or from grain boundary complexions, although in absence of lattice mismatch. In single-phase glasses, intrinsic heterogeneities are often discussed in terms of soft spots or geometrically unfavourable motifs (GUMs), which can be considered to be mechanically weaker, defective regions of the glass. We investigate the relation between these motifs and the boson peak, an anomaly in the vibrational spectrum of all glasses. We demonstrate a relation between the boson peak and soft spots by analysing various amorphous and partially amorphous samples as well as highentropy alloys. Finally, we treat the plastic deformation of glasses, with and without crystalline secondary phases. We propose an explanation for the experimentally observed variations of propagation direction, composition, and density along a shear band. These variations of propagation direction are small in the case of single-phase glasses. A considerably greater influence on shear band propagation can be exerted by precipitates. We systematically investigate composites ranging from low crystalline volume fraction up to systems which resemble a nanocrystalline metal. In this context, we derive a mechanism map for composite systems and observe the

  15. Modeling heterogeneous populations of thermostatically controlled loads using diffusion-advection PDEs

    Moura, Scott; Ruiz, Victor; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing a partial differential equation (PDE)-based model and parameter identification scheme for heterogeneous populations of thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs). First, a coupled two-state hyperbolic PDE model for homogenous TCL populations is derived. This model i...

  16. A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial of Zephyr Endobronchial Valve Treatment in Heterogeneous Emphysema (TRANSFORM)

    Kemp, Samuel V.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Kirk, Alan; Kornaszewska, Malgorzata; Carron, Kris; Ek, Lars; Broman, Gustav; Hillerdal, Gunnar; Mal, Herve; Pison, Christophe; Briault, Amandine; Downer, Nicola; Darwiche, Kaid; Rao, Jagan; Huebner, Ralf-Harto; Ruwwe-Glosenkamp, Christof; Trosini-Desert, Valery; Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix J.; Derom, Eric; Malfait, Thomas; Shah, Pallav L.; Garner, Justin L.; ten Hacken, Nick H.; Fallouh, Hazem; Leroy, Sylvie; Marquette, Charles H.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Single-center randomized controlled trials of the Zephyr endobronchial valve (EBV) treatment have demonstrated benefit in severe heterogeneous emphysema. This is the first multicenter study evaluating this treatment approach. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Zephyr EBVs

  17. Federated Access Control in Heterogeneous Intercloud Environment: Basic Models and Architecture Patterns

    Demchenko, Y.; Ngo, C.; de Laat, C.; Lee, C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents on-going research to define the basic models and architecture patterns for federated access control in heterogeneous (multi-provider) multi-cloud and inter-cloud environment. The proposed research contributes to the further definition of Intercloud Federation Framework (ICFF)

  18. Heterogeneous shedding of Escherichia coli O157 in cattle and its implications for control

    Matthews, L.; Low, J.C.; Gally, D.L.; Pearce, M.C.; Mellor, D.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Chase-Topping, M.; Naylor, S.W.; Shaw, D.J.; Reid, S.W.J.; Gunn, G.J.; Woolhouse, M.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Identification of the relative importance of within- and between-host variability in infectiousness and the impact of these heterogeneities on the transmission dynamics of infectious agents can enable efficient targeting of control measures. Cattle, a major reservoir host for the zoonotic pathogen

  19. Process and control systems for composites manufacturing

    Tsiang, T. H.; Wanamaker, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A precise control of composite material processing would not only improve part quality, but it would also directly reduce the overall manufacturing cost. The development and incorporation of sensors will help to generate real-time information for material processing relationships and equipment characteristics. In the present work, the thermocouple, pressure transducer, and dielectrometer technologies were investigated. The monitoring sensors were integrated with the computerized control system in three non-autoclave fabrication techniques: hot-press, self contained tool (self heating and pressurizing), and pressure vessel). The sensors were implemented in the parts and tools.

  20. A comparison of chemical compositions of reported altered oceanic crusts and global MORB data set: implication for isotopic heterogeneity of recycled materials

    Shimoda, G.; Kogiso, T.

    2017-12-01

    Chemical composition of altered oceanic crust is one of important constraints to delineate chemical heterogeneity of the mantle. Accordingly, many researchers have been studied to determine bulk chemical composition of altered oceanic crust mainly based on chemical compositions of old oceanic crusts at Site 801 and Site 417/418, and young crust at Site 504 (e.g., Staudigel et al., 1996; Bach et al. 2003; Kuo et al., 2016). Their careful estimation provided reliable bulk chemical compositions of these Sites and revealed common geochemical feature of alteration. To assess effect of recycling of altered oceanic crust on chemical evolution of the mantle, it might be meaningful to discuss whether the reported chemical compositions of altered oceanic crusts can represent chemical composition of globally subducted oceanic crusts. Reported chemical compositions of fresh glass or less altered samples from Site 801, 417/418 and 504 were highly depleted compared to that of global MORB reported by Gale et al. (2013), suggesting that there might be sampling bias. Hence, it could be important to consider chemical difference between oceanic crusts of these three Sites and global MORB to discuss effect of recycling of oceanic crust on isotopic heterogeneity of the mantle. It has been suggested that one of controlling factors of chemical variation of oceanic crust is crustal spreading rate because different degree of partial melting affects chemical composition of magmas produced at a mid-ocean ridge. Crustal spreading rate could also affect intensity of alteration. Namely, oceanic crusts produced at slow-spreading ridges may prone to be altered due to existence of larger displacement faults compared to fast spreading ridges which have relatively smooth topography. Thus, it might be significant to evaluate isotopic evolution of oceanic crusts those were produced at different spreading rates. In this presentation, we will provide a possible chemical variation of altered oceanic

  1. Distributed Circumnavigation Control with Dynamic Spacings for a Heterogeneous Multi-robot System

    Yao, Weijia; Luo, Sha; Lu, Huimin; Xiao, Junhao

    2018-01-01

    Circumnavigation control is useful in real-world applications such as entrapping a hostile target. In this paper, we consider a heterogeneous multi-robot system where robots have different physical properties, such as maximum movement speeds. Instead of equal-spacings, dynamic spacings according to robots' properties, which are termed utilities in this paper, will be more desirable in a scenario such as target entrapment. A distributed circumnavigation control algorithm based on utilities is ...

  2. Provably Secure Heterogeneous Access Control Scheme for Wireless Body Area Network.

    Omala, Anyembe Andrew; Mbandu, Angolo Shem; Mutiria, Kamenyi Domenic; Jin, Chunhua; Li, Fagen

    2018-04-28

    Wireless body area network (WBAN) provides a medium through which physiological information could be harvested and transmitted to application provider (AP) in real time. Integrating WBAN in a heterogeneous Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem would enable an AP to monitor patients from anywhere and at anytime. However, the IoT roadmap of interconnected 'Things' is still faced with many challenges. One of the challenges in healthcare is security and privacy of streamed medical data from heterogeneously networked devices. In this paper, we first propose a heterogeneous signcryption scheme where a sender is in a certificateless cryptographic (CLC) environment while a receiver is in identity-based cryptographic (IBC) environment. We then use this scheme to design a heterogeneous access control protocol. Formal security proof for indistinguishability against adaptive chosen ciphertext attack and unforgeability against adaptive chosen message attack in random oracle model is presented. In comparison with some of the existing access control schemes, our scheme has lower computation and communication cost.

  3. Group Composition of Cooperative Learning: Does Heterogeneous Grouping Work in Asian Classrooms?

    Thanh, Pham Thi Hong; Gillies, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Constructing an appropriate group is important to teamwork success. Although, heterogeneous grouping is widely recommended in Western countries, this method of grouping is questioned in Asian classrooms because Asian and Western students have different cultures of learning. Unfortunately, this issue has not been addressed in any research to date.…

  4. Lithological and hydrological influences on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous carbonate-clay aquifer system

    Kauffman, S.J.; Herman, J.S.; Jones, B.F.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of clay units on ground-water composition was investigated in a heterogeneous carbonate aquifer system of Miocene age in southwest Florida, known as the Intermediate aquifer system. Regionally, the ground water is recharged inland, flows laterally and to greater depths in the aquifer systems, and is discharged vertically upward at the saltwater interface along the coast. A depth profile of water composition was obtained by sampling ground water from discrete intervals within the permeable carbonate units during coring and by squeezing pore water from a core of the less-permeable clay layers. A normative salt analysis of solute compositions in the water indicated a marine origin for both types of water and an evolutionary pathway for the clay water that involves clay diagenesis. The chemical composition of the ground water in the carbonate bedrock is significantly different from that of the pore water in the clay layers. Dissolution of clays and opaline silica results in high silica concentrations relative to water in other parts of the Intermediate aquifer system. Water enriched in chloride relative to the overlying and underlying ground water recharges the aquifer inland where the confining clay layer is absent, and it dissolves carbonate and silicate minerals and reacts with clays along its flow path, eventually reaching this coastal site and resulting in the high chloride and silica concentrations observed in the middle part of the Intermediate aquifer system. Reaction-path modeling suggests that the recharging surficial water mixes with sulfate-rich water upwelling from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and carbonate mineral dissolution and precipitation, weathering and exchange reactions, clay mineral diagenesis, clay and silica dissolution, organic carbon oxidation, and iron and sulfate reduction result in the observed water compositions.A study was conducted to clarify the influence of clay units on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous

  5. Formation Learning Control of Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles With Heterogeneous Nonlinear Uncertain Dynamics.

    Yuan, Chengzhi; Licht, Stephen; He, Haibo

    2017-09-26

    In this paper, a new concept of formation learning control is introduced to the field of formation control of multiple autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), which specifies a joint objective of distributed formation tracking control and learning/identification of nonlinear uncertain AUV dynamics. A novel two-layer distributed formation learning control scheme is proposed, which consists of an upper-layer distributed adaptive observer and a lower-layer decentralized deterministic learning controller. This new formation learning control scheme advances existing techniques in three important ways: 1) the multi-AUV system under consideration has heterogeneous nonlinear uncertain dynamics; 2) the formation learning control protocol can be designed and implemented by each local AUV agent in a fully distributed fashion without using any global information; and 3) in addition to the formation control performance, the distributed control protocol is also capable of accurately identifying the AUVs' heterogeneous nonlinear uncertain dynamics and utilizing experiences to improve formation control performance. Extensive simulations have been conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  6. A realistic closed-form radiobiological model of clinical tumor-control data incorporating intertumor heterogeneity

    Roberts, Stephen A.; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of intertumor heterogeneity in clinical tumor control datasets and the relationship to in vitro measurements of tumor biopsy samples. Specifically, to develop a modified linear-quadratic (LQ) model incorporating such heterogeneity that it is practical to fit to clinical tumor-control datasets. Methods and Materials: We developed a modified version of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model for tumor control, incorporating a (lagged) time factor to allow for tumor cell repopulation. We explicitly took into account the interpatient heterogeneity in clonogen number, radiosensitivity, and repopulation rate. Using this model, we could generate realistic TCP curves using parameter estimates consistent with those reported from in vitro studies, subject to the inclusion of a radiosensitivity (or dose)-modifying factor. We then demonstrated that the model was dominated by the heterogeneity in α (tumor radiosensitivity) and derived an approximate simplified model incorporating this heterogeneity. This simplified model is expressible in a compact closed form, which it is practical to fit to clinical datasets. Using two previously analysed datasets, we fit the model using direct maximum-likelihood techniques and obtained parameter estimates that were, again, consistent with the experimental data on the radiosensitivity of primary human tumor cells. This heterogeneity model includes the same number of adjustable parameters as the standard LQ model. Results: The modified model provides parameter estimates that can easily be reconciled with the in vitro measurements. The simplified (approximate) form of the heterogeneity model is a compact, closed-form probit function that can readily be fitted to clinical series by conventional maximum-likelihood methodology. This heterogeneity model provides a slightly better fit to the datasets than the conventional LQ model, with the same numbers of fitted parameters. The parameter estimates of the clinically

  7. Correction of heterogeneities in the issue compositions in the construction plans optimized in radiotherapy using linear programming

    Viana, Rodrigo Sartorelo S.; Lima, Ernesto A.B.F.; Florentino, Helenice de Oliveira; Fonseca, Paulo Roberto da; Homem, Thiago Pedro Donadon

    2009-01-01

    Linear programming models are widely found in the literature addressing various aspects involved in the creation of optimized planning for radiotherapy. However, most mathematical formulations does not incorporate certain factors that are of extreme importance for the formulation of a real planning like the attenuation of the beam of radiation and heterogeneity in the composition of tissue irradiated. In this context are proposed in this paper some modifications in the formulation of a linear programming problem with the objective of making the simulation closer to the real planning for radiotherapy and thus enable a more reliable and comprehensive planning requirements. (author)

  8. Supervisory control of drilling of composite materials

    Ozaki, Motoyoshi

    Composite materials have attractive features, such as high ratios of strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight. However, they are easily damaged when they are machined. A typical damage is delamination, which can occur when fiber reinforced composite laminates are drilled. The objective of this research is to study the drilling processes of carbon fiber reinforced laminates, and to develop and test a supervisory control strategy for their delamination-free drilling. Characterization of thrust force and torque is achieved through constant feedrate drilling experiments. The average values of thrust force and torque during the full engagement of the drill are utilized to obtain the Shaw's equations' parameters. The thrust force profile just before exit is given special attention. The Hocheng-Dharan equations, which give conservative values of delamination at the entrance and at the exit, are modified to express the influence of one lamina thickness explicitly. They are utilized not only for the characterization of thrust force but also for the determination of the thrust force reference for force control. In the design of the controllers of thrust force and torque, both thrust force and torque are assumed to be proportional to FPHR (Feed Per Half Revolution). A discrete-time dynamic model is established for the case when the time interval for a half revolution of the drill is divided by the sampling time, and the model is extended to the case of general spindle speeds. PI controllers are designed for the dynamic models of thrust force and torque. Root-locus techniques are used in the analysis. The phases of the drilling process are introduced and the control strategy at each phase is explained. The supervisory controller chooses not only the best control strategy for each phase, but also the reference value and the controller gain that are suitable at each drill position. Drilling experiments are conducted to show the usefulness of the concepts introduced in this

  9. Nanostructural Features of Radiation Cured Networks for High Performance Composites: From Incurred Heterogeneities to Tailored Nanocomposites

    Krzeminski, Mickael; Ranoux, Guillaume; Coqueret, Xavier; Molinari, Michael; Chabbert, Brigitte; Aguié, Véronique; Defoort, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    The radiation-induced polymerization of multiacrylates is suspected to generate heterogeneous networks at various dimension scales. In order to gain an insight into the polymer microstructure, a combination of analytic methods was used to quantify polymer segment mobility in the different domains [4,5]. Model epoxy or ethoxylated bis-phenol A diacrylates, EPAC and ETAC respectively, were used as precursors of representative networks for our investigations

  10. Nanostructural Features of Radiation Cured Networks for High Performance Composites: From Incurred Heterogeneities to Tailored Nanocomposites

    Krzeminski, Mickael [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims (France); EADS Astrium, BP 20011, 33165 Saint Médard en Jalles Cedex (France); Ranoux, Guillaume; Coqueret, Xavier [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims (France); Molinari, Michael [Laboratoire des Microscopies et d’Etude des Nanostructures (France); Chabbert, Brigitte; Aguié, Véronique [UMR INRA Fractionnement des Agro-ressources et Environnement, Université de Reims Champagne Ardenne - 51687 Reims (France); Defoort, Brigitte [EADS Astrium, BP 20011, 33165 Saint Médard en Jalles Cedex, (France)

    2011-07-01

    The radiation-induced polymerization of multiacrylates is suspected to generate heterogeneous networks at various dimension scales. In order to gain an insight into the polymer microstructure, a combination of analytic methods was used to quantify polymer segment mobility in the different domains [4,5]. Model epoxy or ethoxylated bis-phenol A diacrylates, EPAC and ETAC respectively, were used as precursors of representative networks for our investigations.

  11. Control of DWPF melter feed composition

    Brown, K.G.; Edwards, R.E.; Postles, R.L.; Randall, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility will be used to immobilize Savannah River Site high-level waste into a stable borosilicate glass for disposal in a geologic repository. Proper control of the melter feed composition in this facility is essential to the production of glass which meets product durability constraints dictated by repository regulations and facility processing constraints dictated by melter design. A technique has been developed which utilizes glass property models to determine acceptable processing regions based on the multiple constraints imposed on the glass product and to display these regions graphically. This system along with the batch simulation of the process is being used to form the basis for the statistical process control system for the facility

  12. Compositional and mutational rate heterogeneity in mitochondrial genomes and its effect on the phylogenetic inferences of Cimicomorpha (Hemiptera: Heteroptera).

    Yang, Huanhuan; Li, Teng; Dang, Kai; Bu, Wenjun

    2018-04-18

    Mitochondrial genome (mt-genome) data can potentially return artefactual relationships in the higher-level phylogenetic inference of insects due to the biases of accelerated substitution rates and compositional heterogeneity. Previous studies based on mt-genome data alone showed a paraphyly of Cimicomorpha (Insecta, Hemiptera) due to the positions of the families Tingidae and Reduviidae rather than the monophyly that was supported based on morphological characters, morphological and molecular combined data and large scale molecular datasets. Various strategies have been proposed to ameliorate the effects of potential mt-genome biases, including dense taxon sampling, removal of third codon positions or purine-pyrimidine coding and the use of site-heterogeneous models. In this study, we sequenced the mt-genomes of five additional Tingidae species and discussed the compositional and mutational rate heterogeneity in mt-genomes and its effect on the phylogenetic inferences of Cimicomorpha by implementing the bias-reduction strategies mentioned above. Heterogeneity in nucleotide composition and mutational biases were found in mt protein-coding genes, and the third codon exhibited high levels of saturation. Dense taxon sampling of Tingidae and Reduviidae and the other common strategies mentioned above were insufficient to recover the monophyly of the well-established group Cimicomorpha. When the sites with weak phylogenetic signals in the dataset were removed, the remaining dataset of mt-genomes can support the monophyly of Cimicomorpha; this support demonstrates that mt-genomes possess strong phylogenetic signals for the inference of higher-level phylogeny of this group. Comparison of the ratio of the removal of amino acids for each PCG showed that ATP8 has the highest ratio while CO1 has the lowest. This pattern is largely congruent with the evolutionary rate of 13 PCGs that ATP8 represents the highest evolutionary rate, whereas CO1 appears to be the lowest. Notably

  13. Size and composition-controlled fabrication of VO2 nanocrystals by terminated cluster growth

    Anders, Andre; Slack, Jonathan

    2013-05-14

    A physical vapor deposition-based route for the fabrication of VO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated, consisting of reactive sputtering and vapor condensation at elevated pressures. The oxidation of vanadium atoms is an efficient heterogeneous nucleation method, leading to high nanoparticle throughtput. Fine control of the nanoparticle size and composition is obtained. Post growth annealing leads to crystalline VO2 nanoparticles with optimum thermocromic and plasmonic properties.

  14. Scaling impacts on environmental controls and spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon stocks

    Mishra, U.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-07-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces affects energy, moisture, and greenhouse gas exchanges with the atmosphere. However, representing the heterogeneity of terrestrial hydrological and biogeochemical processes in Earth system models (ESMs) remains a critical scientific challenge. We report the impact of spatial scaling on environmental controls, spatial structure, and statistical properties of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks across the US state of Alaska. We used soil profile observations and environmental factors such as topography, climate, land cover types, and surficial geology to predict the SOC stocks at a 50 m spatial scale. These spatially heterogeneous estimates provide a data set with reasonable fidelity to the observations at a sufficiently high resolution to examine the environmental controls on the spatial structure of SOC stocks. We upscaled both the predicted SOC stocks and environmental variables from finer to coarser spatial scales (s = 100, 200, and 500 m and 1, 2, 5, and 10 km) and generated various statistical properties of SOC stock estimates. We found different environmental factors to be statistically significant predictors at different spatial scales. Only elevation, temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and scrub land cover types were significant predictors at all scales. The strengths of control (the median value of geographically weighted regression coefficients) of these four environmental variables on SOC stocks decreased with increasing scale and were accurately represented using mathematical functions (R2 = 0.83-0.97). The spatial structure of SOC stocks across Alaska changed with spatial scale. Although the variance (sill) and unstructured variability (nugget) of the calculated variograms of SOC stocks decreased exponentially with scale, the correlation length (range) remained relatively constant across scale. The variance of predicted SOC stocks decreased with spatial scale over the range of 50 m to ~ 500 m, and remained

  15. Automation of multi-agent control for complex dynamic systems in heterogeneous computational network

    Oparin, Gennady; Feoktistov, Alexander; Bogdanova, Vera; Sidorov, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    The rapid progress of high-performance computing entails new challenges related to solving large scientific problems for various subject domains in a heterogeneous distributed computing environment (e.g., a network, Grid system, or Cloud infrastructure). The specialists in the field of parallel and distributed computing give the special attention to a scalability of applications for problem solving. An effective management of the scalable application in the heterogeneous distributed computing environment is still a non-trivial issue. Control systems that operate in networks, especially relate to this issue. We propose a new approach to the multi-agent management for the scalable applications in the heterogeneous computational network. The fundamentals of our approach are the integrated use of conceptual programming, simulation modeling, network monitoring, multi-agent management, and service-oriented programming. We developed a special framework for an automation of the problem solving. Advantages of the proposed approach are demonstrated on the parametric synthesis example of the static linear regulator for complex dynamic systems. Benefits of the scalable application for solving this problem include automation of the multi-agent control for the systems in a parallel mode with various degrees of its detailed elaboration.

  16. Research and Design of Dynamic Migration Access Control Technology Based on Heterogeneous Network

    Wang Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the continuous development of wireless networks, the amount of privacy services in heterogeneous mobile networks is increasing, such as information storage, user access, and so on. Access control security issues for heterogeneous mobile radio network, this paper proposes a dynamic migration access control technology based on heterogeneous network. Through the system architecture of the mutual trust system, we can understand the real-time mobile node failure or abnormal state. To make the service can be terminated for the node. And adopt the 802.1X authentication way to improve the security of the system. Finally, it by combining the actual running test data, the trust update algorithm of the system is optimized to reduce the actual security threats in the environment. Experiments show that the system’s anti-attack, the success rate of access, bit error rate is in line with the expected results. This system can effectively reduce the system authentication information is illegally obtained after the network security protection mechanism failure and reduce the risk of user data leakage.

  17. Infection control implications of heterogeneous resistance mechanisms in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE).

    Goodman, K E; Simner, P J; Tamma, P D; Milstone, A M

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) based upon a phenotypic demonstration of carbapenem resistance. However, considerable heterogeneity exists within this definitional umbrella. CRE may mechanistically differ by whether they do or do not produce carbapenemases. Moreover, patients can acquire CRE through multiple pathways: endogenously through antibiotic selective pressure on intestinal microbiota, exogenously through horizontal transmission or through a combination of these factors. Some evidence suggests that non-carbapenemase-producing CRE may be more frequently acquired by antibiotic exposure and carbapenemase-producing CRE via horizontal transmission, but definitive data are lacking. This review examines types of CRE resistance mechanisms, antibiotic exposure and horizontal transmission pathways of CRE acquisition, and the implications of these heterogeneities to the development of evidence-based CRE healthcare epidemiology policies. In our Expert Commentary & Five-Year View, we outline specific nosocomial CRE knowledge gaps and potential methodological approaches for their resolution.

  18. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Heterogeneous Ceramic-Polymer Composite Using Interpenetrating Network

    Eun-Hee, K.; Yeon-Gil, J.; Chang-Yong, J.

    2012-01-01

    Prepolymer, which can be polymerized by a photo, has been infiltrated into a porous ceramic to improve the addition effect of polymer into the ceramic, as a function of the functionality of prepolymer. It induces the increase in the mechanical properties of the ceramic. The porous alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and the polyurethane acrylate (PUA) with a network structure by photo-polymerization were used as the matrix and infiltration materials, respectively. The porous Al 2 O 3 matrix without the polymer shows lower values in fracture strength than the composites, since the stress is transmitted more quickly via propagation of cracks from intrinsic defects in the porous matrix. However, in the case of composites, the distribution of stress between hetero phases results in the improved mechanical properties. In addition, the mechanical properties of composites, such as elastic modulus and fracture strength, are enhanced with increasing the functionality of prepolymer attributed to the crosslinking density of polymer.

  20. Dielectric and Energy Storage Properties of the Heterogeneous P(VDF-HFP)/PC Composite Films

    Zhao, Xiaojia; Peng, Guirong; Zhan, Zaiji

    2017-12-01

    Polymer-based materials with a high discharge energy and low energy loss have attracted considerable attention for energy storage applications. A new class of polymer-based composite films composed of amorphous polycarbonate (PC) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) [P(VDF-HFP)] has been fabricated by simply solution blending followed by thermal treatment under vacuum. The results show that the diameter of the spherical phase for PC and the melting temperature of P(VDF-HFP) increase, and the crystallinity and crystallization temperature of P(VDF-HFP) decrease with increasing PC content. The phase transition from the polar β phase to weak polarity γ phase is induced by PC addition. Moreover, the Curie temperature of the P(VDF-HFP)/PC composite films shifts to a lower temperature. With the addition of PC, the permittivity, polarization and discharge energy of the P(VDF-HFP)/PC composite films slightly decrease. However, the energy loss is significantly reduced.

  1. Well-Controlled Cell-Trapping Systems for Investigating Heterogeneous Cell-Cell Interactions.

    Kamiya, Koki; Abe, Yuta; Inoue, Kosuke; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kawano, Ryuji; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2018-03-01

    Microfluidic systems have been developed for patterning single cells to study cell-cell interactions. However, patterning multiple types of cells to understand heterogeneous cell-cell interactions remains difficult. Here, it is aimed to develop a cell-trapping device to assemble multiple types of cells in the well-controlled order and morphology. This device mainly comprises a parylene sheet for assembling cells and a microcomb for controlling the cell-trapping area. The cell-trapping area is controlled by moving the parylene sheet on an SU-8 microcomb using tweezers. Gentle downward flow is used as a driving force for the cell-trapping. The assembly of cells on a parylene sheet with round and line-shaped apertures is demonstrated. The cell-cell contacts of the trapped cells are then investigated by direct cell-cell transfer of calcein via connexin nanopores. Finally, using the device with a system for controlling the cell-trapping area, three different types of cells in the well-controlled order are assembled. The correct cell order rate obtained using the device is 27.9%, which is higher than that obtained without the sliding parylene system (0.74%). Furthermore, the occurrence of cell-cell contact between the three cell types assembled is verified. This cell-patterning device will be a useful tool for investigating heterogeneous cell-cell interactions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The global influence of dust mineralogical composition on heterogeneous ice nucleation in mixed-phase clouds

    Hoose, C; Lohmann, U; Erdin, R; Tegen, I

    2008-01-01

    Mineral dust is the dominant natural ice nucleating aerosol. Its ice nucleation efficiency depends on the mineralogical composition. We show the first sensitivity studies with a global climate model and a three-dimensional dust mineralogy. Results show that, depending on the dust mineralogical composition, coating with soluble material from anthropogenic sources can lead to quasi-deactivation of natural dust ice nuclei. This effect counteracts the increased cloud glaciation by anthropogenic black carbon particles. The resulting aerosol indirect effect through the glaciation of mixed-phase clouds by black carbon particles is small (+0.1 W m -2 in the shortwave top-of-the-atmosphere radiation in the northern hemisphere)

  3. A Metric and Workflow for Quality Control in the Analysis of Heterogeneity in Phenotypic Profiles and Screens

    Gough, Albert; Shun, Tongying; Taylor, D. Lansing; Schurdak, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is well recognized as a common property of cellular systems that impacts biomedical research and the development of therapeutics and diagnostics. Several studies have shown that analysis of heterogeneity: gives insight into mechanisms of action of perturbagens; can be used to predict optimal combination therapies; and to quantify heterogeneity in tumors where heterogeneity is believed to be associated with adaptation and resistance. Cytometry methods including high content screening (HCS), high throughput microscopy, flow cytometry, mass spec imaging and digital pathology capture cell level data for populations of cells. However it is often assumed that the population response is normally distributed and therefore that the average adequately describes the results. A deeper understanding of the results of the measurements and more effective comparison of perturbagen effects requires analysis that takes into account the distribution of the measurements, i.e. the heterogeneity. However, the reproducibility of heterogeneous data collected on different days, and in different plates/slides has not previously been evaluated. Here we show that conventional assay quality metrics alone are not adequate for quality control of the heterogeneity in the data. To address this need, we demonstrate the use of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic as a metric for monitoring the reproducibility of heterogeneity in an SAR screen, describe a workflow for quality control in heterogeneity analysis. One major challenge in high throughput biology is the evaluation and interpretation of heterogeneity in thousands of samples, such as compounds in a cell-based screen. In this study we also demonstrate that three heterogeneity indices previously reported, capture the shapes of the distributions and provide a means to filter and browse big data sets of cellular distributions in order to compare and identify distributions of interest. These metrics and methods are presented as a

  4. TEMPERATURE HETEROGENEITY OF TRAVELLING FIRE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON COMPOSITE STEEL-CONCRETE FLOOR

    Kamila Horová

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to follow modern trends in contemporary building architecture, which is moving off the limits of current fire design models, assumption of homogeneous temperature conditions used for structural fire analysis needs to be revised. In this paper fire dynamics of travelling fire is investigated experimentally by conducting fire test in two-storey experimental building. To evaluate the impact of travelling fire on the mechanical behaviour of a structure, the spatial and temporal evolution of the gas temperature calculated in NIST code FDS, which was validated to experimental measurements, is applied to the composite floor of dimensions 9.0 m by 9.0 m. Mechanical behaviour of the composite slab highly affected by regions of high temperatures and areas with only elevated temperatures is solved in code Vulcan. To highlight the severity of spreading fire causing non-uniform temperature conditions, which after-effects differ from traditional methods, a comparison of both methods is introduced. The calculation of mechanical behaviour of the composite floor is repeated in a series of three different thermal loading cases. Results of all cases are then compared in terms of vertical displacement and axial force in several positions of the composite floor.

  5. Method of improving heterogeneous oil reservoir polymer flooding effect by positively-charged gel profile control

    Zhao, Ling; Xia, Huifen

    2018-01-01

    The project of polymer flooding has achieved great success in Daqing oilfield, and the main oil reservoir recovery can be improved by more than 15%. But, for some strong oil reservoir heterogeneity carrying out polymer flooding, polymer solution will be inefficient and invalid loop problem in the high permeability layer, then cause the larger polymer volume, and a significant reduction in the polymer flooding efficiency. Aiming at this problem, it is studied the method that improves heterogeneous oil reservoir polymer flooding effect by positively-charged gel profile control. The research results show that the polymer physical and chemical reaction of positively-charged gel with the residual polymer in high permeability layer can generate three-dimensional network of polymer, plugging high permeable layer, and increase injection pressure gradient, then improve the effect of polymer flooding development. Under the condition of the same dosage, positively-charged gel profile control can improve the polymer flooding recovery factor by 2.3∼3.8 percentage points. Under the condition of the same polymer flooding recovery factor increase value, after positively-charged gel profile control, it can reduce the polymer volume by 50 %. Applying mechanism of positively-charged gel profile control technology is feasible, cost savings, simple construction, and no environmental pollution, therefore has good application prospect.

  6. Effects of the burnable poison heterogeneity on the long term control of excess of reactivity

    Talamo, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    According to the different geometry shape, the theory of black burnable particles predicts that the evolution of the poison macroscopic absorption cross section is exponentially, quadratic or linear when the burnable poison is displaced in homogeneous distribution, microspheres or needlecylinders heterogeneous distributions, respectively. In the present studies, we took advantage of the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code MCB to verify the black burnable particles theory on the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor fuelled by military plutonium at the year the fuel reaches the equilibrium composition; we investigated 8 different burnable poisons, B, Cd, Er, Eu, Gd, Dy, Hf and Sm, in three different geometry configurations and we have found that the numerical results qualitatively match the theory predictions when burnable poisons are disposed in small particles

  7. Effects of the burnable poison heterogeneity on the long term control of excess of reactivity

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@neutron.kth.se

    2006-06-15

    According to the different geometry shape, the theory of black burnable particles predicts that the evolution of the poison macroscopic absorption cross section is exponentially, quadratic or linear when the burnable poison is displaced in homogeneous distribution, microspheres or needlecylinders heterogeneous distributions, respectively. In the present studies, we took advantage of the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code MCB to verify the black burnable particles theory on the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor fuelled by military plutonium at the year the fuel reaches the equilibrium composition; we investigated 8 different burnable poisons, B, Cd, Er, Eu, Gd, Dy, Hf and Sm, in three different geometry configurations and we have found that the numerical results qualitatively match the theory predictions when burnable poisons are disposed in small particles.

  8. Effects of the duration and inorganic nitrogen composition of a nutrient-rich patch on soil exploration by the roots of Lolium perenne in a heterogeneous environment.

    Nakamura, Ryoji; Kachi, N; Suzuki, J-I

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the growth of and soil exploration by Lolium perenne under a heterogeneous environment before its roots reached a nutrient-rich patch. Temporal changes in the distribution of inorganic nitrogen, i.e., NO(3)(-)-N and NH(4)(+)-N, in the heterogeneous environment during the experimental period were also examined. The results showed that roots randomly explored soil, irrespective of the patchy distribution of inorganic nitrogen and differences in the chemical composition of inorganic nitrogen distribution between heterogeneous and homogeneous environments. We have also elucidated the potential effects of patch duration and inorganic nitrogen distribution on soil exploration by roots and thus on plant growth.

  9. An empirical analysis of the importance of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity when estimating the income-mortality gradient

    Adriaan Kalwij

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Statistical theory predicts that failing to control for unobserved heterogeneity in a Gompertz mortality risk model attenuates the estimated income-mortality gradient toward zero. Objective: I assess the empirical importance of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity in a Gompertz mortality risk model when estimating the income-mortality gradient. The analysis is carried out using individual-level administrative data from the Netherlands over the period 1996-2012. Methods: I estimate a Gompertz mortality risk model in which unobserved heterogeneity has a gamma distribution and left-truncation of life durations is explicitly taken into account. Results: I find that, despite a strong and significant presence of unobserved heterogeneity in both the male and female samples, failure to control for unobserved heterogeneity yields only a small and insignificant attenuation bias in the negative income-mortality gradient. Conclusions: The main finding, a small and insignificant attenuation bias in the negative income-mortality gradient when failing to control for unobserved heterogeneity, is positive news for the many empirical studies, whose estimations of the income-mortality gradient ignore unobserved heterogeneity.

  10. Serological markers suggest heterogeneity of effectiveness of malaria control interventions on Bioko Island, equatorial Guinea.

    Jackie Cook

    Full Text Available In order to control and eliminate malaria, areas of on-going transmission need to be identified and targeted for malaria control interventions. Immediately following intense interventions, malaria transmission can become more heterogeneous if interventions are more successful in some areas than others. Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, has been subject to comprehensive malaria control interventions since 2004. This has resulted in substantial reductions in the parasite burden, although this drop has not been uniform across the island.In 2008, filter paper blood samples were collected from 7387 people in a cross-sectional study incorporating 18 sentinel sites across Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. Antibodies were measured to P. falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1 by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Age-specific seropositivity rates were used to estimate seroconversion rates (SCR. Analysis indicated there had been at least a 60% decline in SCR in four out of five regions on the island. Changes in SCR showed a high degree of congruence with changes in parasite rate (PR and with regional reductions in all cause child mortality. The mean age adjusted concentration of anti-AMA-1 antibodies was mapped to identify areas where individual antibody responses were higher than expected. This approach confirmed the North West of the island as a major focus of continuing infection and an area where control interventions need to be concentrated or re-evaluated.Both SCR and PR revealed heterogeneity in malaria transmission and demonstrated the variable effectiveness of malaria control measures. This work confirms the utility of serological analysis as an adjunct measure for monitoring transmission. Age-specific seroprevalence based evidence of changes in transmission over time will be of particular value when no baseline data are available. Importantly, SCR data provide additional evidence to link malaria control activities to contemporaneous

  11. Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot: The roles of relative humidity and surface composition of soot in surface sulfate formation

    Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong

    2017-03-01

    The conversion of SO2 to sulfates on the surface of soot is still poorly understood. Soot samples with different fractions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and oxygen-containing groups were prepared by combusting n-hexane under well-controlled conditions. The heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot was investigated using in situ attenuated total internal reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, ion chromatography (IC) and a flow tube reactor at the ambient pressure and relative humidity (RH). Water promoted SO2 adsorption and sulfate formation at the RH range from 6% to 70%, while exceeded water condensed on soot was unfavorable for sulfate formation due to inhibition of SO2 adsorption when RH was higher than 80%. The surface composition of soot, which was governed by combustion conditions, also played an important role in the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot. This effect was found to greatly depend on RH. At low RH of 6%, soot with the highest fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.162 exhibited a maximum uptake capacity for SO2 because it contained a large amount of aromatic Csbnd H groups, which acted as active sites for SO2 adsorption. At RH of 54%, soot produced with a fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.134 showed the highest reactivity toward SO2 because it contained appropriate amounts of aromatic Csbnd H groups and oxygen-containing groups, subsequently leading to the optimal surface concentrations of both SO2 and water. These results suggest that variation in the surface composition of soot from different sources and/or resulting from chemical aging in the atmosphere likely affects the conversion of SO2 to sulfates.

  12. Heterogeneity within the frontoparietal control network and its relationship to the default and dorsal attention networks.

    Dixon, Matthew L; De La Vega, Alejandro; Mills, Caitlin; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica; Spreng, R Nathan; Cole, Michael W; Christoff, Kalina

    2018-02-13

    The frontoparietal control network (FPCN) plays a central role in executive control. It has been predominantly viewed as a unitary domain general system. Here, we examined patterns of FPCN functional connectivity (FC) across multiple conditions of varying cognitive demands, to test for FPCN heterogeneity. We identified two distinct subsystems within the FPCN based on hierarchical clustering and machine learning classification analyses of within-FPCN FC patterns. These two FPCN subsystems exhibited distinct patterns of FC with the default network (DN) and the dorsal attention network (DAN). FPCN A exhibited stronger connectivity with the DN than the DAN, whereas FPCN B exhibited the opposite pattern. This twofold FPCN differentiation was observed across four independent datasets, across nine different conditions (rest and eight tasks), at the level of individual-participant data, as well as in meta-analytic coactivation patterns. Notably, the extent of FPCN differentiation varied across conditions, suggesting flexible adaptation to task demands. Finally, we used meta-analytic tools to identify several functional domains associated with the DN and DAN that differentially predict activation in the FPCN subsystems. These findings reveal a flexible and heterogeneous FPCN organization that may in part emerge from separable DN and DAN processing streams. We propose that FPCN A may be preferentially involved in the regulation of introspective processes, whereas FPCN B may be preferentially involved in the regulation of visuospatial perceptual attention.

  13. A Heterogeneous Multi-core Architecture with a Hardware Kernel for Control Systems

    Li, Gang; Guan, Wei; Sierszecki, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Rapid industrialisation has resulted in a demand for improved embedded control systems with features such as predictability, high processing performance and low power consumption. Software kernel implementation on a single processor is becoming more difficult to satisfy those constraints. This pa......Rapid industrialisation has resulted in a demand for improved embedded control systems with features such as predictability, high processing performance and low power consumption. Software kernel implementation on a single processor is becoming more difficult to satisfy those constraints......). Second, a heterogeneous multi-core architecture is investigated, focusing on its performance in relation to hard real-time constraints and predictable behavior. Third, the hardware implementation of HARTEX is designated to support the heterogeneous multi-core architecture. This hardware kernel has...... several advantages over a similar kernel implemented in software: higher-speed processing capability, parallel computation, and separation between the kernel itself and the applications being run. A microbenchmark has been used to compare the hardware kernel with the software kernel, and compare...

  14. Effect of compositional heterogeneity on dissolution of non-ideal LNAPL mixtures

    Vasudevan, M.; Johnston, C. D.; Bastow, T. P.; Lekmine, G.; Rayner, J. L.; Nambi, I. M.; Suresh Kumar, G.; Ravi Krishna, R.; Davis, G. B.

    2016-11-01

    The extent of dissolution of petroleum hydrocarbon fuels into groundwater depends greatly on fuel composition. Petroleum fuels can consist of thousands of compounds creating different interactions within the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), thereby affecting the relative dissolution of the components and hence a groundwater plume's composition over long periods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the variability in the effective solubilities and activity coefficients for common constituents of gasoline fuels (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene) (BTX) in matrices with an extreme range of molar volumes and chemical affinities. Four synthetic mixtures were investigated comprising BTX with the bulk of the NAPL mixtures made up of either, ethylbenzene (an aromatic like BTX with similar molar volume); 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (an aromatic with a greater molar volume); n-hexane (an aliphatic with a low molar volume); and n-decane (an aliphatic with a high molar volume). Equilibrium solubility values for the constituents were under-predicted by Raoult's law by up to 30% (higher experimental concentrations) for the mixture with n-hexane as a filler and over-predicted by up to 12% (lower experimental concentrations) for the aromatic mixtures with ethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene as fillers. Application of PP-LFER (poly-parameter linear free energy relationship) model for non-ideal mixtures also resulted in poor correlation between experimentally measured and predicted concentrations, indicating that differences in chemical affinities can be the major cause of deviation from ideal behavior. Synthetic mixtures were compared with the dissolution behavior of fresh and naturally weathered unleaded gasoline. The presence of lighter aliphatic components in the gasoline had a profound effect on estimating effective solubility due to chemical affinity differences (estimated at 0.0055 per percentage increase in the molar proportion of aliphatic) as

  15. High porosity harzburgite and dunite channels for the transport of compositionally heterogeneous melts in the mantle: II. Geochemical consequences

    Liang, Y.; Schiemenz, A.; Xia, Y.; Parmentier, E.

    2009-12-01

    In a companion numerical study [1], we explored the spatial distribution of high porosity harzburgite and dunite channels produced by reactive dissolution of orthopyroxene (opx) in an upwelling mantle column and identified a number of new features. In this study, we examine the geochemical consequences of channelized melt flow under the settings outlined in [1] with special attention to the transport of compositionally heterogeneous melts and their interactions with the surrounding peridotite matrix during melt migration in the mantle. Time-dependent transport equations for a trace element in the interstitial melt and solids that include advection, dispersion, and melt-rock reaction were solved in a 2-D upwelling column using the high-order numerical methods outlined in [1]. The melt and solid velocities were taken from the steady state or quasi-steady state solutions of [1]. In terms of trace element fractionation, the simulation domain can be divided into 4 distinct regions: (a) high porosity harzburgite channel, overlain by; (b) high porosity dunite channel; (c) low porosity compacting boundary layer surrounding the melt channels; and (d) inter-channel regions outside (c). In the limit of local chemical equilibrium, melting in region (d) is equivalent to batch melting, whereas melting and melt extraction in (c) is more close to fractional melting with the melt suction rate first increase from the bottom of the melting column to a maximum near the bottom of the dunite channel and then decrease upward in the compacting boundary layer. The melt composition in the high porosity harzburgite channel is similar to that produced by high-degree batch melting (up to opx exhaustion), whereas the melt composition in the dunite is a weighted average of the ultra-depleted melt from the harzburgite channel below, the expelled melt from the compacting boundary layer, and melt produced by opx dissolution along the sidewalls of the dunite channel. Compaction within the dunite

  16. Recent Advances in the Composition and Heterogeneity of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Proteome

    Chun Pong eLee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are important organelles for providing the ATP and carbon skeletons required to sustain cell growth. While these organelles also participate in other key metabolic functions across species, they have a specialized role in plants of optimizing photosynthesis through participating in photorespiration. It is therefore critical to map the protein composition of mitochondria in plants to gain a better understanding of their regulation and define the uniqueness of their metabolic networks. To date, less than 30% of the predicted number of mitochondrial proteins has been verified experimentally by proteomics and/or GFP localization studies. In this mini-review, we will provide an overview of the advances in mitochondrial proteomics in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana over the past five years. The ultimate goal of mapping the mitochondrial proteome in Arabidopsis is to discover novel mitochondrial components that are critical during development in plants as well as genes involved in developmental abnormalities, such as those implicated in mitochondrial-linked cytoplasmic male sterility.

  17. Heterogenic control groups in randomized, controlled, analgesic trials of total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Karlsen, Anders P; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B

    2018-03-01

    Postoperative analgesic interventions are often tested adjunct to basic non-opioid analgesics in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Consequently, treatment in control groups, and possible assay sensitivity, differs between trials. We hypothesized that postoperative opioid requirements and pain intensities vary between different control groups in analgesic trials. Control groups from RCTs investigating analgesic interventions after total hip and knee arthroplasty were categorized based on standardized basic analgesic treatment. Morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively, and resting pain scores at 6 and 24 hours for subgroups of basic treatments, were compared with ANOVA. In an additional analysis, we compared pain and opioid requirements in trials where a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) was administered as an intervention with trial where NSAID was administered in a control group. We included 171 RCTs employing 28 different control groups with large variability in pain scores and opioid requirements. Four types of control groups (comprising 78 trials) were eligible for subgroup comparisons. These subgroups received "opioid" alone, "NSAID + opioid", "acetaminophen + opioid", or "NSAID + acetaminophen + opioid", respectively. Morphine consumption and pain scores varied substantially between these groups, with no consistent superior efficacy in any subgroup. Additionally, trials administering NSAID as an intervention demonstrated lower pain scores and opioid requirements than trials where NSAID was administered in a control group. Analgesic treatment in RCT control groups varies considerably. Control groups receiving various combinations of opioid, NSAID and acetaminophen did not differ consistently in pain and opioid requirements. Pain and opioid requirements were lower in trials administering NSAID as an intervention compared with trials administering NSAID in a control group.

  18. Implementing Controlled Composition to Improve Vocabulary Mastery of EFL Students

    Juriah

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study was to know how (1) Controlled composition teaching techniques implemented by the English teacher at SDN 027 Samarinda to improve vocabulary mastery, and (2) Controlled composition teaching techniques improves vocabulary mastery of the sixth grade students of SDN 027 Samarinda. This research used a Classroom Action…

  19. Bird Community Composition in a Shaded Coffee Agro-ecological Matrix in Puebla, Mexico: The Effects of Landscape Heterogeneity at Multiple Spatial Scales

    Leyequien, E.; Boer, de W.F.; Toledo, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the importance of habitat heterogeneity on the avian community composition, and investigated the scale at which species abundances respond to habitat variables. The study was conducted within a diverse landscape matrix of a shaded coffee region in Mexico. To detect at which

  20. Facile spray-coating process for the fabrication of tunable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces with heterogeneous chemical compositions used for selective transportation of microdroplets with different volumes.

    Li, Jian; Jing, Zhijiao; Zha, Fei; Yang, Yaoxia; Wang, Qingtao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-06-11

    In this paper, tunable adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces have been fabricated successfully by spraying ZnO nanoparticle (NP) suspensions onto desired substrates. We regulate the spray-coating process by changing the mass percentage of hydrophobic ZnO NPs (which were achieved by modifying hydrophilic ZnO NPs with stearic acid) in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic ZnO NP mixtures to control heterogeneous chemical composition of the ZnO surfaces. Thus, the water adhesion on the same superhydrophobic ZnO surface could be effectively tuned by controlling the surface chemical composition without altering the surface morphology. Compared with the conventional tunable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces, on which there were only three different water sliding angle values: lower than 10°, 90° (the water droplet is firmly pinned on the surface at any tilted angles), and the value between the two ones, the water adhesion on the superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces has been tuned effectively, on which the sliding angle is controlled from 2 ± 1° to 9 ± 1°, 21 ± 2°, 39 ± 3°, and 90°. Accordingly, the adhesive force can be adjusted from extremely low (∼2.5 μN) to very high (∼111.6 μN). On the basis of the different adhesive forces of the tunable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces, the selective transportation of microdroplets with different volumes was achieved, which has never been reported before. In addition, we demonstrated a proof of selective transportation of microdroplets with different volumes for application in the droplet-based microreactors via our tunable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces for the quantitative detection of AgNO3 and NaOH. The results reported herein realize the selective transportation of microdroplets with different volumes and we believe that this method would potentially be used in many important applications, such as selective water droplet transportation, biomolecular quantitative detection and droplet-based biodetection.

  1. Pierre Gy's sampling theory and sampling practice heterogeneity, sampling correctness, and statistical process control

    Pitard, Francis F

    1993-01-01

    Pierre Gy's Sampling Theory and Sampling Practice, Second Edition is a concise, step-by-step guide for process variability management and methods. Updated and expanded, this new edition provides a comprehensive study of heterogeneity, covering the basic principles of sampling theory and its various applications. It presents many practical examples to allow readers to select appropriate sampling protocols and assess the validity of sampling protocols from others. The variability of dynamic process streams using variography is discussed to help bridge sampling theory with statistical process control. Many descriptions of good sampling devices, as well as descriptions of poor ones, are featured to educate readers on what to look for when purchasing sampling systems. The book uses its accessible, tutorial style to focus on professional selection and use of methods. The book will be a valuable guide for mineral processing engineers; metallurgists; geologists; miners; chemists; environmental scientists; and practit...

  2. HEP - A semaphore-synchronized multiprocessor with central control. [Heterogeneous Element Processor

    Gilliland, M. C.; Smith, B. J.; Calvert, W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the design concept of the Heterogeneous Element Processor (HEP), a system tailored to the special needs of scientific simulation. In order to achieve high-speed computation required by simulation, HEP features a hierarchy of processes executing in parallel on a number of processors, with synchronization being largely accomplished by hardware. A full-empty-reserve scheme of synchronization is realized by zero-one-valued hardware semaphores. A typical system has, besides the control computer and the scheduler, an algebraic module, a memory module, a first-in first-out (FIFO) module, an integrator module, and an I/O module. The architecture of the scheduler and the algebraic module is examined in detail.

  3. Using Natural Language to Enable Mission Managers to Control Multiple Heterogeneous UAVs

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Puig-Navarro, Javier; Mehdi, S. Bilal; Mcquarry, A. Kyle

    2016-01-01

    The availability of highly capable, yet relatively cheap, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is opening up new areas of use for hobbyists and for commercial activities. This research is developing methods beyond classical control-stick pilot inputs, to allow operators to manage complex missions without in-depth vehicle expertise. These missions may entail several heterogeneous UAVs flying coordinated patterns or flying multiple trajectories deconflicted in time or space to predefined locations. This paper describes the functionality and preliminary usability measures of an interface that allows an operator to define a mission using speech inputs. With a defined and simple vocabulary, operators can input the vast majority of mission parameters using simple, intuitive voice commands. Although the operator interface is simple, it is based upon autonomous algorithms that allow the mission to proceed with minimal input from the operator. This paper also describes these underlying algorithms that allow an operator to manage several UAVs.

  4. SDN Controlled mmWave Massive MIMO Hybrid Precoding for 5G Heterogeneous Mobile Systems

    Na Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 5G mobile network, millimeter wave (mmWave and heterogeneous networks (Hetnets are significant techniques to sustain coverage and spectral efficiency. In this paper, we utilize the hybrid precoding to overcome hardware constraints on the analog-only beamforming in mmWave systems. Particularly, we identify the complicated antenna coordination and vast spatial domain information as the outstanding challenges in mmWave Hetnets. In our work, we employ software defined network (SDN to accomplish radio resource management (RRM and achieve flexible spacial coordination in mmWave Hetnets. In our proposed scheme, SDN controller is responsible for collecting the user channel state information (CSI and applying hybrid precoding based on the calculated null-space of victim users. Simulation results show that our design can effectively reduce the interference to victim users and support high quality of service.

  5. Using Financial Management Techniqueswith in Public Sector Organizations, Does Result Control Matter? A Heterogeneous Choice Approach

    Jan WYNEN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a principal-agent framework and multi-country survey data of over 400 public sec-tor organizations, this article examines the effect of result control on the use of fnancial manage-ment techniques in public sector organizations. In order to avoid invalid conclusions, we test for heteroskedasticity and model residual vari-ance using a heterogeneous choice model. This model yields important insights into the effect of result control that would be overlooked in a mis-specifed ordered logit model. Our fndings reveal that result control matters, although size and pri-mary task of the organization also prove to be determinants of the use of fnancial management techniques. Within the context of the continuous attempts being made to improve public sector performance, policy makers should thus devel-op different strategies for different (individual agencies, while relying on a strong ex-post result control, when they want to stimulate the use of fnancial management techniques.

  6. Artificial Leg Design and Control Research of a Biped Robot with Heterogeneous Legs Based on PID Control Algorithm

    Hualong Xie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A biped robot with heterogeneous legs (BRHL is proposed to provide an ideal test-bed for intelligent bionic legs (IBL. To make artificial leg gait better suited to a human, a four-bar mechanism is used as its knee joint, and a pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM is used as its driving source. The static mathematical model of PAM is established and the mechanical model of a single degree of freedom of a knee joint driven by PAM is analyzed. A control simulation of an artificial leg based on PID control algorithm is carried out and the simulation results indicate that the artificial leg can simulate precisely a normal human walking gait.

  7. Lead Isotope Compositions of Acid Residues from Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for Heterogeneous Shergottite Source Reservoirs

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions and trace element abundances. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible- element-enriched reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there is ongoing debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former requires the ancient Martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires isolation of a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and trace element concentration analyses of sequential acid-leaching fractions (leachates and the final residues) from the geochemically depleted olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint. The results suggest that the Tissint magma is not isotopically uniform and sampled at least two geochemical source reservoirs, implying that either crustal assimilation or magma mixing would have played a role in the Tissint petrogenesis.

  8. Effect of Heterogeneity in Coal Ash Chemical Composition on the Onset of Conditions Favorable for Agglomeration in Fluid Beds

    Aditi B. Khadilkar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ash agglomeration issues that arise due to the sticking of slag-wetted, colliding particles have been creating operational difficulties and monetary losses for the fluidized bed combustion (FBC industry. Difficulties have been experienced in the detection of slag-liquid at the low operating temperatures in fluidized bed combustors (FBCs and predicting the agglomeration behavior of fuel. This study aims to study the effect of heterogeneity in ash composition on the detection of slag-liquid in FBCs. It quantifies the slag-liquid amounts at the particle-level, under oxidizing environments, by dividing the bulk fuel into density classes. FactSage™ thermodynamic simulations of each of the particle classes, along with experimental validation of the trends with thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA and high temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD were performed. The results obtained can be used to estimate the stickiness of particles in the development of ash agglomeration models based on particle collisions. The study of these particle classes shows that particle classes with specific minerals can form low temperature eutectics and lead to onset of slag-liquid formation at temperatures below those predicted by bulk analysis alone. Comparison of the differences in slag-liquid formation tendencies under reducing and oxidizing environments is also presented.

  9. Imparting magnetic dipole heterogeneity to internalized iron oxide nanoparticles for microorganism swarm control

    Kim, Paul Seung Soo, E-mail: psk25@drexel.edu [Drexel University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States); Becker, Aaron, E-mail: aaron.becker@childrens.harvard.edu [Harvard University, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (United States); Ou, Yan, E-mail: ouy2@rpi.edu; Julius, Anak Agung, E-mail: agung@rpi.edu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (United States); Kim, Min Jun, E-mail: mkim@coe.drexel.edu [Drexel University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single cell eukaryote that can be modified to respond to magnetic fields, a response called magnetotaxis. Naturally, this microorganism cannot respond to magnetic fields, but after modification using iron oxide nanoparticles, cells are magnetized and exhibit a constant magnetic dipole strength. In experiments, a rotating field is applied to cells using a two-dimensional approximate Helmholtz coil system. Using rotating magnetic fields, we characterize discrete cells’ swarm swimming which is affected by several factors. The behavior of the cells under these fields is explained in detail. After the field is removed, relatively straight swimming is observed. We also generate increased heterogeneity within a population of cells to improve controllability of a swarm, which is explored in a cell model. By exploiting this straight swimming behavior, we propose a method to control discrete cells utilizing a single global magnetic input. Successful implementation of this swarm control method would enable teams of microrobots to perform a variety of in vitro microscale tasks impossible for single microrobots, such as pushing objects or simultaneous micromanipulation of discrete entities.

  10. Imparting magnetic dipole heterogeneity to internalized iron oxide nanoparticles for microorganism swarm control

    Kim, Paul Seung Soo; Becker, Aaron; Ou, Yan; Julius, Anak Agung; Kim, Min Jun

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single cell eukaryote that can be modified to respond to magnetic fields, a response called magnetotaxis. Naturally, this microorganism cannot respond to magnetic fields, but after modification using iron oxide nanoparticles, cells are magnetized and exhibit a constant magnetic dipole strength. In experiments, a rotating field is applied to cells using a two-dimensional approximate Helmholtz coil system. Using rotating magnetic fields, we characterize discrete cells’ swarm swimming which is affected by several factors. The behavior of the cells under these fields is explained in detail. After the field is removed, relatively straight swimming is observed. We also generate increased heterogeneity within a population of cells to improve controllability of a swarm, which is explored in a cell model. By exploiting this straight swimming behavior, we propose a method to control discrete cells utilizing a single global magnetic input. Successful implementation of this swarm control method would enable teams of microrobots to perform a variety of in vitro microscale tasks impossible for single microrobots, such as pushing objects or simultaneous micromanipulation of discrete entities

  11. The optimal dynamic immunization under a controlled heterogeneous node-based SIRS model

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Draief, Moez; Yang, Xiaofan

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic immunizations, under which the state of the propagation network of electronic viruses can be changed by adjusting the control measures, are regarded as an alternative to static immunizations. This paper addresses the optimal dynamical immunization under the widely accepted SIRS assumption. First, based on a controlled heterogeneous node-based SIRS model, an optimal control problem capturing the optimal dynamical immunization is formulated. Second, the existence of an optimal dynamical immunization scheme is shown, and the corresponding optimality system is derived. Next, some numerical examples are given to show that an optimal immunization strategy can be worked out by numerically solving the optimality system, from which it is found that the network topology has a complex impact on the optimal immunization strategy. Finally, the difference between a payoff and the minimum payoff is estimated in terms of the deviation of the corresponding immunization strategy from the optimal immunization strategy. The proposed optimal immunization scheme is justified, because it can achieve a low level of infections at a low cost.

  12. Compositional evolution of particle-phase reaction products and water in the heterogeneous OH oxidation of model aqueous organic aerosols

    M. M. Chim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds present at or near the surface of aqueous droplets can be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase OH radicals, which alter the molecular distribution of the reaction products within the droplet. A change in aerosol composition affects the hygroscopicity and leads to a concomitant response in the equilibrium amount of particle-phase water. The variation in the aerosol water content affects the aerosol size and physicochemical properties, which in turn governs the oxidation kinetics and chemistry. To attain better knowledge of the compositional evolution of aqueous organic droplets during oxidation, this work investigates the heterogeneous OH-radical-initiated oxidation of aqueous methylsuccinic acid (C5H8O4 droplets, a model compound for small branched dicarboxylic acids found in atmospheric aerosols, at a high relative humidity of 85 % through experimental and modeling approaches. Aerosol mass spectra measured by a soft atmospheric pressure ionization source (Direct Analysis in Real Time, DART coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer reveal two major products: a five carbon atom (C5 hydroxyl functionalization product (C5H8O5 and a C4 fragmentation product (C4H6O3. These two products likely originate from the formation and subsequent reactions (intermolecular hydrogen abstraction and carbon–carbon bond scission of tertiary alkoxy radicals resulting from the OH abstraction occurring at the methyl-substituted carbon site. Based on the identification of the reaction products, a kinetic model of oxidation (a two-product model coupled with the Aerosol Inorganic–Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC model is built to simulate the size and compositional changes of aqueous methylsuccinic acid droplets during oxidation. Model results show that at the maximum OH exposure, the droplets become slightly more hygroscopic after oxidation, as the mass fraction of water is predicted to increase from

  13. Modular design of artificial tissue homeostasis: robust control through synthetic cellular heterogeneity.

    Miles Miller

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of β-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for 'synthetic cellular heterogeneity' that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism, demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a 'phenotypic sensitivity analysis' method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in

  14. Modular design of artificial tissue homeostasis: robust control through synthetic cellular heterogeneity.

    Miller, Miles; Hafner, Marc; Sontag, Eduardo; Davidsohn, Noah; Subramanian, Sairam; Purnick, Priscilla E M; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Weiss, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of β-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation) are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for 'synthetic cellular heterogeneity' that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism), demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a 'phenotypic sensitivity analysis' method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in isolation, and

  15. Spatial processes decouple management from objectives in a heterogeneous landscape: predator control as a case study.

    Mahoney, Peter J; Young, Julie K; Hersey, Kent R; Larsen, Randy T; McMillan, Brock R; Stoner, David C

    2018-04-01

    Predator control is often implemented with the intent of disrupting top-down regulation in sensitive prey populations. However, ambiguity surrounding the efficacy of predator management, as well as the strength of top-down effects of predators in general, is often exacerbated by the spatially implicit analytical approaches used in assessing data with explicit spatial structure. Here, we highlight the importance of considering spatial context in the case of a predator control study in south-central Utah. We assessed the spatial match between aerial removal risk in coyotes (Canis latrans) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) resource selection during parturition using a spatially explicit, multi-level Bayesian model. With our model, we were able to evaluate spatial congruence between management action (i.e., coyote removal) and objective (i.e., parturient deer site selection) at two distinct scales: the level of the management unit and the individual coyote removal. In the case of the former, our results indicated substantial spatial heterogeneity in expected congruence between removal risk and parturient deer site selection across large areas, and is a reflection of logistical constraints acting on the management strategy and differences in space use between the two species. At the level of the individual removal, we demonstrated that the potential management benefits of a removed coyote were highly variable across all individuals removed and in many cases, spatially distinct from parturient deer resource selection. Our methods and results provide a means of evaluating where we might anticipate an impact of predator control, while emphasizing the need to weight individual removals based on spatial proximity to management objectives in any assessment of large-scale predator control. Although we highlight the importance of spatial context in assessments of predator control strategy, we believe our methods are readily generalizable in any management or large

  16. Safe protocols for generating power pulses with heterogeneous populations of thermostatically controlled loads

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Kundu, Soumya; Backhaus, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Algorithms to produce useful load response from a heterogeneous group of TCLs. ► Generation of sharp power pulses without initiating any unwanted oscillation. ► Open-loop methods, not requiring any detailed system modeling. ► One-way, utility-to-consumer, communication. ► Potential use in secondary frequency regulation, generation-load balancing, etc. - Abstract: We explore methods to use thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs), such as water heaters and air conditioners, to provide ancillary services by assisting in balancing generation and load. We show that by adding simple imbedded instructions and a small amount of memory to temperature controllers of TCLs, it is possible to design open-loop control algorithms capable of creating short-term pulses of demand response without unwanted power oscillations associated with temporary synchronization of the TCL dynamics. By moving a small amount of intelligence to each of the end point TCL devices, we are able to leverage our knowledge of the time dynamics of TCLs to shape the demand response pulses for different power system applications. A significant benefit of our open-loop method is the reduction from two-way to one-way broadcast communication which also eliminates many basic consumer privacy issues. In this work, we focus on developing the algorithms to generate a set of fundamental pulse shapes that can subsequently be used to create demand response with arbitrary profiles. Demand response control methods, such as the one developed here, open the door to fast, nonperturbative control of large aggregations of TCLs

  17. Mapping Drought Sensitivity of Ecosystem Functioning in Mountainous Watersheds: Spatial Heterogeneity and Geological-Geomorphological Control

    Wainwright, H. M.; Steefel, C. F.; Williams, K. H.; Hubbard, S. S.; Enquist, B. J.; Steltzer, H.; Sarah, T.

    2016-12-01

    Mountainous watersheds in the Upper Colorado River Basin play a critical role in supplying water and nutrients to western North America. Ecosystem functioning in those regions - including plant dynamics and biogeochemical cycling - is known to be limited by water availability. Under the climate change, early snowmelt and increasing temperature are expected to intensify the drought conditions in early growing seasons. Although the impact of early-season drought has been documented in plot-scale experiments, ascertaining its significance in mountainous watersheds is challenging given the highly heterogeneous nature of the systems with complex terrain and diverse plant functional types (PFTs). The objectives of this study are (1) to map the regions where the plant dynamics are relatively more sensitive to drought conditions based on historical satellite and climate data, and (2) to identify the environmental controls (e.g., geomorphology, elevation, geology, snow and PFT) on drought sensitivity. We characterize the spatial heterogeneity of drought sensitivity in four watersheds (a 15 x 15 km domain) near the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Colorado, USA. Following previous plot-scale studies, we first define the drought sensitivity based on annual peak NDVI (Landsat 5) and climatic datasets. Non-parametric tree-based machine learning methods are used to identify the significant environmental controls, using high-resolution LiDAR digital elevation map and peak snow-water-equivalent distribution from NASA airborne snow observatory. Results show that the drought sensitivity is negatively correlated with elevation, suggesting increased water limitations in lower elevation (less snow, higher temperature). The drought sensitivity is more spatially variable in shallow-rooted plant types, affected by local hydrological conditions. We also found geomorphological and geological controls, such as high sensitivity in the steep well-drained glacial moraine regions. Our

  18. On an integro-differential model for pest control in a heterogeneous environment.

    Rodríguez, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Insect pests pose a major threat to a balanced ecology as it can threaten local species as well as spread human diseases; thus, making the study of pest control extremely important. In practice, the sterile insect release method (SIRM), where a sterile population is introduced into the wild population with the aim of significantly reducing the growth of the population, has been a popular technique used to control pest invasions. In this work we introduce an integro-differential equation to model the propagation of pests in a heterogeneous environment, where this environment is divided into three regions. In one region SIRM is not used making this environment conducive to propagation of the insects. A second region is the eradication zone where there is an intense release of sterile insects, leading to decay of the population in this region. In the final region we explore two scenarios. In the first case, there is a small release of sterile insects and we prove that if the eradication zone is sufficiently large the pests will not invade. In the second case, when SIRM is not used at all in this region we show that invasions always occur regardless of the size of the eradication zone. Finally, we consider the limiting equation of the integro-differential equation and prove that in this case there is a critical length of the eradication zone which separates propagation from obstruction. Moreover, we provide some upper and lower bound for the critical length.

  19. ALLIANCE: An architecture for fault tolerant, cooperative control of heterogeneous mobile robots

    Parker, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control in robot missions involving loosely coupled, largely independent tasks. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, the author describes in detail experimental results of an implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative box pushing demonstration. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes in the capabilities of the robot team.

  20. A Reinforcement Sensor Embedded Vertical Handoff Controller for Vehicular Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    Lin Ma

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular communication platforms that provide real-time access to wireless networks have drawn more and more attention in recent years. IEEE 802.11p is the main radio access technology that supports communication for high mobility terminals, however, due to its limited coverage, IEEE 802.11p is usually deployed by coupling with cellular networks to achieve seamless mobility. In a heterogeneous cellular/802.11p network, vehicular communication is characterized by its short time span in association with a wireless local area network (WLAN. Moreover, for the media access control (MAC scheme used for WLAN, the network throughput dramatically decreases with increasing user quantity. In response to these compelling problems, we propose a reinforcement sensor (RFS embedded vertical handoff control strategy to support mobility management. The RFS has online learning capability and can provide optimal handoff decisions in an adaptive fashion without prior knowledge. The algorithm integrates considerations including vehicular mobility, traffic load, handoff latency, and network status. Simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can adaptively adjust the handoff strategy, allowing users to stay connected to the best network. Furthermore, the algorithm can ensure that RSUs are adequate, thereby guaranteeing a high quality user experience.

  1. Composite Gauss-Legendre Quadrature with Error Control

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe composite Gauss-Legendre quadrature for determining definite integrals, including a means of controlling the approximation error. We compare the form and performance of the algorithm with standard Newton-Cotes quadrature. (Contains 1 table.)

  2. Heterogeneity of carotenoid content and composition in LH2 of the purple sulphur bacterium Allochromatium minutissimum grown under carotenoid-biosynthesis inhibition.

    Makhneva, Zoya; Bolshakov, Maksim; Moskalenko, Andrey

    2008-01-01

    The effects brought about by growing Allochromatium (Alc.) minutissimum in the presence of different concentrations of the carotenoid (Car) biosynthetic inhibitor diphenylamine (DPA) have been investigated. A decrease of Car content (from approximately 70% to >5%) in the membranes was accompanied by an increase of the percentage of (immature) Cars with reduced numbers of conjugated C=C bonds (from neurosporene to phytoene). Based on the obtained results and the analysis of literature data, the conclusion is reached that accumulation of phytoene during inhibition did not occur. Surprisingly, DPA inhibited phytoene synthase instead of phytoene desaturase as generally assumed. The distribution of Cars in peripheral antenna (LH2) complexes and their effect on the stability of LH2 has been investigated using absorption spectroscopy and HPLC analysis. Heterogeneity of Car composition and contents in the LH2 pool is revealed. The Car contents in LH2 varied widely from control levels to complete absence. According to common view, the assembly of LH2 occurs only in the presence of Cars. Here, we show that the LH2 can be assembled without any Cars. The presence of Cars, however, is important for structural stability of LH2 complexes.

  3. Changing cluster composition in cluster randomised controlled trials: design and analysis considerations

    2014-01-01

    Background There are many methodological challenges in the conduct and analysis of cluster randomised controlled trials, but one that has received little attention is that of post-randomisation changes to cluster composition. To illustrate this, we focus on the issue of cluster merging, considering the impact on the design, analysis and interpretation of trial outcomes. Methods We explored the effects of merging clusters on study power using standard methods of power calculation. We assessed the potential impacts on study findings of both homogeneous cluster merges (involving clusters randomised to the same arm of a trial) and heterogeneous merges (involving clusters randomised to different arms of a trial) by simulation. To determine the impact on bias and precision of treatment effect estimates, we applied standard methods of analysis to different populations under analysis. Results Cluster merging produced a systematic reduction in study power. This effect depended on the number of merges and was most pronounced when variability in cluster size was at its greatest. Simulations demonstrate that the impact on analysis was minimal when cluster merges were homogeneous, with impact on study power being balanced by a change in observed intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC). We found a decrease in study power when cluster merges were heterogeneous, and the estimate of treatment effect was attenuated. Conclusions Examples of cluster merges found in previously published reports of cluster randomised trials were typically homogeneous rather than heterogeneous. Simulations demonstrated that trial findings in such cases would be unbiased. However, simulations also showed that any heterogeneous cluster merges would introduce bias that would be hard to quantify, as well as having negative impacts on the precision of estimates obtained. Further methodological development is warranted to better determine how to analyse such trials appropriately. Interim recommendations

  4. Multivariate analysis of the heterogeneous geochemical processes controlling arsenic enrichment in a shallow groundwater system.

    Huang, Shuangbing; Liu, Changrong; Wang, Yanxin; Zhan, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of various geochemical processes on arsenic enrichment in a high-arsenic aquifer at Jianghan Plain in Central China were investigated using multivariate models developed from combined adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and multiple linear regression (MLR). The results indicated that the optimum variable group for the AFNIS model consisted of bicarbonate, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, manganese, fluorescence index, pH, and siderite saturation. These data suggest that reductive dissolution of iron/manganese oxides, phosphate-competitive adsorption, pH-dependent desorption, and siderite precipitation could integrally affect arsenic concentration. Analysis of the MLR models indicated that reductive dissolution of iron(III) was primarily responsible for arsenic mobilization in groundwaters with low arsenic concentration. By contrast, for groundwaters with high arsenic concentration (i.e., > 170 μg/L), reductive dissolution of iron oxides approached a dynamic equilibrium. The desorption effects from phosphate-competitive adsorption and the increase in pH exhibited arsenic enrichment superior to that caused by iron(III) reductive dissolution as the groundwater chemistry evolved. The inhibition effect of siderite precipitation on arsenic mobilization was expected to exist in groundwater that was highly saturated with siderite. The results suggest an evolutionary dominance of specific geochemical process over other factors controlling arsenic concentration, which presented a heterogeneous distribution in aquifers. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A, to view the supplemental file.

  5. An event-triggered control approach for the leader-tracking problem with heterogeneous agents

    Garcia, Eloy; Cao, Yongcan; Casbeer, David W.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents an event-triggered control and communication framework for the cooperative leader-tracking problem with communication constraints. Continuous communication among agents is not assumed in this work and decentralised event-based strategies are proposed for agents with heterogeneous linear dynamics. Also, the leader dynamics are unknown and only intermittent measurements of its states are obtained by a subset of the followers. The event-based method not only represents a way to restrict communication among agents, but it also provides a decentralised scheme for scheduling information broadcasts. Notably, each agent is able to determine its own broadcasting instants independently of any other agent in the network. In an extension, the case where transmission of information is affected by time-varying communication delays is addressed. Finally, positive lower-bounds on the inter-event time intervals are obtained in order to show that Zeno behaviour does not exist and, therefore, continuous exchange of information is never needed in this framework.

  6. Microstructural Control via Copious Nucleation Manipulated by In Situ Formed Nucleants: Large-Sized and Ductile Metallic Glass Composites.

    Song, Wenli; Wu, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiongjun; Chen, Houwen; Guo, Zhenxi; Lu, Zhaoping

    2016-10-01

    A novel strategy to control the precipitation behavior of the austenitic phase, and to obtain large-sized, transformation-induced, plasticity-reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites, with good tensile properties, is proposed. By inducing heterogeneous nucleation of the transformable reinforcement via potent nucleants formed in situ, the characteristics of the austenitic phase are well manipulated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. New IoT proximity service based heterogeneous RFID readers collision control

    Jose Ignacio Tamayo Segarra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Internet of Things’ (IoT’s first wave started with tracking services for better inventory management mainly using radio frequency identification (RFID technology. Later on, monitoring services became one of the major interests, including sensing technologies, and then more actuation for remote control-type of IoT applications such as smart homes, smart cities and Industry 4.0. In this paper, the authors focus on the RFID technology impairment. They propose to take advantage of the mature IoT technologies that offer native service discovery such as blutooth or LTE D2D ProSe or Wifi Direct. Using the automatic service discovery in the new framework will make heterogeneous readers aware of the presence of other readers and this will be used by the proposed distributed algorithm to better control the multiple RFID reader interference problem. The author clearly considers emerging Industry 4.0 use case, where RFID technology is of major interest for both identification and tracking. To enhance the RFID tag reading performance, collisions in the RFID frequency should be minimized with reader-to-reader coordination protocols. In this paper, the author proposes a simple distributed reader anti-collision protocol named DiSim that makes use of proximity services of IoT network and is compliant with the current RFID standards. The author evaluates the efficiency of the proposal via simulation. Design/methodology/approach – In this paper, the author proposes a simple distributed reader anti-collision protocol named DiSim that makes use of proximity services of IoT network and is compliant with the current RFID standards. The author evaluates the efficiency of the proposal via simulation to study its behavior in very dense and heterogeneous RFID environments. Specifically, the author explores the coexistence of powerful static readers and small mobile readers, comparing the proposal with a standard ETSI CSMA method. The proposal reduces

  8. Defining and Controlling the Heterogeneity of a Cluster: the Wrekavoc Tool

    Canon , Louis-Claude; Dubuisson , Olivier; Gustedt , Jens; Jeannot , Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The experimental validation and the testing of solutions that are designed for heterogeneous environments is challenging. We introduce Wrekavoc as an accurate tool for this purpose: it runs unmodified applications on emulated multisite heterogeneous platforms. Its principal technique consists in downgrading the performance of the platform characteristics in a prescribed way. The platform characteristics include the compute nodes themselves (CPU and memory) and the inte...

  9. Loss Performance Modeling for Hierarchical Heterogeneous Wireless Networks With Speed-Sensitive Call Admission Control

    Huang, Qian; Huang, Yue-Cai; Ko, King-Tim

    2011-01-01

    . This approach avoids unnecessary and frequent handoff between cells and reduces signaling overheads. An approximation model with guaranteed accuracy and low computational complexity is presented for the loss performance of multiservice traffic. The accuracy of numerical results is validated by comparing......A hierarchical overlay structure is an alternative solution that integrates existing and future heterogeneous wireless networks to provide subscribers with better mobile broadband services. Traffic loss performance in such integrated heterogeneous networks is necessary for an operator's network...

  10. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta Forests.

    Anne C S McIntosh

    Full Text Available Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR of the forest floor microbial community environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide

  11. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests.

    McIntosh, Anne C S; Macdonald, S Ellen; Quideau, Sylvie A

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover) and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR) of the forest floor microbial community) environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis) showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover) and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs) properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide novel insights

  12. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests

    McIntosh, Anne C. S.; Macdonald, S. Ellen; Quideau, Sylvie A.

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover) and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR) of the forest floor microbial community) environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis) showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover) and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs) properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide novel insights

  13. Hot rolled composite billet for nuclear control rods

    Miller, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a composite plate shaped billet, useful in the fabrication of nuclear control rods, which comprises a core of stainless steel containing about 2 percent boron 10, a thin coating of zirconia on the surfaces of said core, and said zirconia coating being completely encased in a jacket of mild steel, said composite having been hot rolled between about 1075 0 and about 1165 0 C. 1 claim, 8 figures

  14. Controllable Synthesis of Lindqvist Alkoxopolyoxovanadate Clusters as Heterogeneous Catalysts for Sulfoxidation of Sulfides.

    Li, Ji-Kun; Dong, Jing; Wei, Chuan-Ping; Yang, Song; Chi, Ying-Nan; Xu, Yan-Qing; Hu, Chang-Wen

    2017-05-15

    Six alkoxohexavanadate-based Cu- or Co-POVs [Cu(dpa)(acac)(H 2 O)] 2 [V 6 O 13 (OMe) 6 ] (1), [Cu(phen)(acac)(MeOH)] 2 [V 6 O 13 (OMe) 6 ] (2), [Co(dpa)(acac) 2 ] 2 [V 6 O 13 (OMe) 6 ]·2MeOH (3), [Co(phen)(acac) 2 ] 2 [V 6 O 13 (OMe) 6 ] (4), [Cu(dpa)(acac)] 2 [V IV 2 V V 4 O 12 (OMe) 7 ] (5), and [Cu(dpa)(acac)(MeOH)] 2 [V IV 2 V V 4 O 11 (OMe) 8 ] (6) (POV = polyoxovanadate; dpa = 2,2'-dipyridine amine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; acac = acetylacetone anion) have been synthesized by controlling the reaction conditions and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, element analyses, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In compounds 1-4 and 6, Cu or Co complexes and alkoxohexavanadate anions are assembled through electrostatic interactions. Differently, in compound 5, seven-methoxo-substituted Lindqvist-type [V 6 O 12 (OMe) 7 ] 2- are bridged to Cu complex via terminal O atoms by coordination bonds. All compounds 1-6 exhibit excellent heterogeneous catalytic performance in oxidative desulfurization and CEES ((2-chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant) abatement with H 2 O 2 as oxidant. Among them, the catalytic activity of 6 [conv. of DBT (dibenzothiophene) up to 100% in 6 h; conv. of CEES reached 100% and selectivity of CEESO ((2-chloroethyl) ethyl sulfoxide) up to 85% after 4 h] outperforms others and can be reused without losing its activity.

  15. Sea spray aerosol chemical composition: elemental and molecular mimics for laboratory studies of heterogeneous and multiphase reactions.

    Bertram, Timothy H; Cochran, Richard E; Grassian, Vicki H; Stone, Elizabeth A

    2018-04-03

    Sea spray aerosol particles (SSA), formed through wave breaking at the ocean surface, contribute to natural aerosol particle concentrations in remote regions of Earth's atmosphere, and alter the direct and indirect effects of aerosol particles on Earth's radiation budget. In addition, sea spray aerosol serves as suspended surface area that can catalyze trace gas reactions. It has been shown repeatedly that sea spray aerosol is heavily enriched in organic material compared to the surface ocean. The selective enrichment of organic material complicates the selection of representative molecular mimics of SSA for laboratory or computational studies. In this review, we first provide a short introduction to SSA formation processes and discuss chemical transformations of SSA that occur in polluted coastal regions and remote pristine air. We then focus on existing literature of the chemical composition of nascent SSA generated in controlled laboratory experiments and field investigations. We combine the evidence on the chemical properties of nascent SSA with literature measurements of SSA water uptake to assess SSA molecular composition and liquid water content. Efforts to speciate SSA organic material into molecular classes and specific molecules have led to the identification of saccharides, alkanes, free fatty acids, anionic surfactants, dicarboxylic acids, amino acids, proteinaceous matter, and other large macromolecules. However to date, less than 25% of the organic mass of nascent SSA has been quantified at a molecular level. As discussed here, quantitative measurements of size resolved elemental ratios, combined with determinations of water uptake properties, provides unique insight on the concentration of ions within SSA as a function of particle size, pointing to a controlling role for relative humidity and the hygroscopicity of SSA organic material at small particle diameters.

  16. Implementing Controlled Composition to Improve Vocabulary Mastery of EFL Students

    Juriah Juriah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study was to know how (1 Controlled composition teaching techniques implemented by the English teacher at SDN 027 Samarinda to improve vocabulary mastery, and (2 Controlled composition teaching techniques improves vocabulary mastery of the sixth grade students of SDN 027 Samarinda. This research used a Classroom Action Research (CAR as the research design. The subject of the research is the sixth grade students in the 2013/2014 academic year that consists of 43 students. The instruments employed in this study were observation checklist, field note, and vocabulary test. The result of the research showed that in cycle 1 the students’ achievement did not fulfill the minimal criteria of success. However the result of the cycle 1 was better than the preliminary study. The criteria of success did not fulfill in cycle one, some enhancement of the implementation of Controlled Composition were made in cycle two in the form of: Instruct the students bring dictionary, give more examples English sentences, guide the students find the mining of words in the dictionary and write a paragraph, more motivate the students and preparing a media/ picture .Meanwhile the students ’achievement in cycle two showed that fulfilled the criteria of success. Based on the findings and discussion, the conclusions : Firstly, Controlled composition was implemented well by the teacher of SDN 027 Samarinda. Controlled composition was implemented and gave impacts in: (a increasing the students’ vocabulary mastery significantly, (b making the students able to spell the vocabularies, (c making the students understand the meaning English words, and (d making the students able to pronounce English words quite good. Secondly, Controlled composition improved the students’ vocabulary mastery; it was only 20.9% of the students who achieved the English passing grade in the preliminary study, but then 81.39% of the students achieved the English passing grade in

  17. Compositional control of continuously graded anode functional layer

    McCoppin, J.; Barney, I.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Miller, R.; Reitz, T.; Young, D.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) are fabricated with linear-compositionally graded anode functional layers (CGAFL) using a computer-controlled compound aerosol deposition (CCAD) system. Cells with different CGAFL thicknesses (30 um and 50 um) are prepared with a continuous compositionally graded interface deposited between the electrolyte and anode support current collecting regions. The compositional profile was characterized using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic mapping. An analytical model of the compound aerosol deposition was developed. The model predicted compositional profiles for both samples that closely matched the measured profiles, suggesting that aerosol-based deposition methods are capable of creating functional gradation on length scales suitable for solid oxide fuel cell structures. The electrochemical performances of the two cells are analyzed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  18. Fracture mechanisms and fracture control in composite structures

    Kim, Wone-Chul

    Four basic failure modes--delamination, delamination buckling of composite sandwich panels, first-ply failure in cross-ply laminates, and compression failure--are analyzed using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and the J-integral method. Structural failures, including those at the micromechanical level, are investigated with the aid of the models developed, and the critical strains for crack propagation for each mode are obtained. In the structural fracture analyses area, the fracture control schemes for delamination in a composite rib stiffener and delamination buckling in composite sandwich panels subjected to in-plane compression are determined. The critical fracture strains were predicted with the aid of LEFM for delamination and the J-integral method for delamination buckling. The use of toughened matrix systems has been recommended for improved damage tolerant design for delamination crack propagation. An experimental study was conducted to determine the onset of delamination buckling in composite sandwich panel containing flaws. The critical fracture loads computed using the proposed theoretical model and a numerical computational scheme closely followed the experimental measurements made on sandwich panel specimens of graphite/epoxy faceskins and aluminum honeycomb core with varying faceskin thicknesses and core sizes. Micromechanical models of fracture in composites are explored to predict transverse cracking of cross-ply laminates and compression fracture of unidirectional composites. A modified shear lag model which takes into account the important role of interlaminar shear zones between the 0 degree and 90 degree piles in cross-ply laminate is proposed and criteria for transverse cracking have been developed. For compressive failure of unidirectional composites, pre-existing defects play an important role. Using anisotropic elasticity, the stress state around a defect under a remotely applied compressive load is obtained. The experimentally

  19. Activity-dependent control of NMDA receptor subunit composition at hippocampal mossy fibre synapses.

    Carta, Mario; Srikumar, Bettadapura N; Gorlewicz, Adam; Rebola, Nelson; Mulle, Christophe

    2018-02-15

    CA3 pyramidal cells display input-specific differences in the subunit composition of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Although at low density, GluN2B contributes significantly to NMDAR-mediated EPSCs at mossy fibre synapses. Long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDARs triggers a modification in the subunit composition of synaptic NMDARs by insertion of GluN2B. GluN2B subunits are essential for the expression of LTP of NMDARs at mossy fibre synapses. Single neurons express NMDA receptors (NMDARs) with distinct subunit composition and biophysical properties that can be segregated in an input-specific manner. The dynamic control of the heterogeneous distribution of synaptic NMDARs is crucial to control input-dependent synaptic integration and plasticity. In hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells from mice of both sexes, we found that mossy fibre (MF) synapses display a markedly lower proportion of GluN2B-containing NMDARs than associative/commissural synapses. The mechanism involved in such heterogeneous distribution of GluN2B subunits is not known. Here we show that long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDARs, which is selectively expressed at MF-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, triggers a modification in the subunit composition of synaptic NMDARs by insertion of GluN2B. This activity-dependent recruitment of GluN2B at mature MF-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses contrasts with the removal of GluN2B subunits at other glutamatergic synapses during development and in response to activity. Furthermore, although expressed at low levels, GluN2B is necessary for the expression of LTP of NMDARs at MF-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Altogether, we reveal a previously unknown activity-dependent regulation and function of GluN2B subunits that may contribute to the heterogeneous plasticity induction rules in CA3 pyramidal cells. © 2017 Centre Nationnal de la Recherche Scientifique. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  20. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease: consequences for the elimination of canine rabies

    Ferguson, Elaine A.; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah; Consunji, Ramona; Deray, Raffy; Friar, John; Haydon, Daniel T.; Jimenez, Joji; Pancipane, Marlon; Townsend, Sunny E.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the factors influencing vaccination campaign effectiveness is vital in designing efficient disease elimination programmes. We investigated the importance of spatial heterogeneity in vaccination coverage and human-mediated dog movements for the elimination of endemic canine rabies by mass dog vaccination in Region VI of the Philippines (Western Visayas). Household survey data was used to parameterise a spatially-explicit rabies transmission model with realistic dog movement and vaccination coverage scenarios, assuming a basic reproduction number for rabies drawn from the literature. This showed that heterogeneous vaccination reduces elimination prospects relative to homogeneous vaccination at the same overall level. Had the three vaccination campaigns completed in Region VI in 2010-2012 been homogeneous, they would have eliminated rabies with high probability. However, given the observed heterogeneity, three further campaigns may be required to achieve elimination with probability 0.95. We recommend that heterogeneity be reduced in future campaigns through targeted efforts in low coverage areas, even at the expense of reduced coverage in previously high coverage areas. Reported human-mediated dog movements did not reduce elimination probability, so expending limited resources on restricting dog movements is unnecessary in this endemic setting. Enhanced surveillance will be necessary post-elimination, however, given the reintroduction risk from long-distance dog movements.

  1. Small-scale spatial heterogeneity of ecosystem properties, microbial community composition and microbial activities in a temperate mountain forest soil

    Štursová, Martina; Bárta, J.; Šantrůčková, H.; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 12 (2016), fiw185 ISSN 0168-6496 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0751; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-08916S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : spatial heterogeneity * litter * soil Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2016

  2. Effects of compositional heterogeneity and nanoporosity of raw and treated biomass-generated soot on adsorption and absorption of organic contaminants

    Chen Baoliang; Huang Wenhai

    2011-01-01

    A biomass-generated soot was sequentially treated by HCl-HF solution, organic solvent, and oxidative acid to remove ash, extractable native organic matter (EOM), and amorphous carbon. The compositional heterogeneity and nano-structure of the untreated and treated soot samples were characterized by elemental analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, BET-N 2 surface area, and electron microscopic analysis. Sorption properties of polar and nonpolar organic pollutants onto the soot samples were compared, and individual contributions of adsorption and absorption were quantified. The sorption isotherms for raw sample were practically linear, while were nonlinear for the pretreated-soot. The removal of EOM enhanced adsorption and reduced absorption, indicating that EOM served as a partitioning phase and simultaneously masked the adsorptive sites. By drastic-oxidation, the outer amorphous carbon and the inner disordered core of the soot particles were completely removed, and a fullerene-like nanoporous structure (aromatic shell) was created, which promoted additional π-π interaction between phenanthrene and the soot. - Graphical abstract: The dual sorptive nature of the biomass-generated soot, i.e., the adsorptive effect of the carbonized soot fraction and the partition effect of the amorphous soot component. Research highlights: → The biomass-generated soot owns the heterogeneous compositions and nano-structures. → The soot exhibits the dual sorptive nature, i.e., adsorption and absorption. → Removal of the amorphous component weakens absorption, but strengthens adsorption. → The exposed adsorptive sites with highly aromatic nature promotes π-π interaction. → The dual sorptive nature of the soot depends on the various soot components. - The compositional heterogeneity and nano-structure play a regulating role in the adsorption and absorption of organic contaminants with the untreated and treated soot samples.

  3. Magnetic control of heterogeneous ice nucleation with nanophase magnetite: Biophysical and agricultural implications.

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Horikawa, Masamoto; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Golash, Harry N

    2018-05-22

    In supercooled water, ice nucleation is a stochastic process that requires ∼250-300 molecules to transiently achieve structural ordering before an embryonic seed crystal can nucleate. This happens most easily on crystalline surfaces, in a process termed heterogeneous nucleation; without such surfaces, water droplets will supercool to below -30 °C before eventually freezing homogeneously. A variety of fundamental processes depends on heterogeneous ice nucleation, ranging from desert-blown dust inducing precipitation in clouds to frost resistance in plants. Recent experiments have shown that crystals of nanophase magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) are powerful nucleation sites for this heterogeneous crystallization of ice, comparable to other materials like silver iodide and some cryobacterial peptides. In natural materials containing magnetite, its ferromagnetism offers the possibility that magneto-mechanical motion induced by external oscillating magnetic fields could act to disrupt the water-crystal interface, inhibiting the heterogeneous nucleation process in subfreezing water and promoting supercooling. For this to act, the magneto-mechanical rotation of the particles should be higher than the magnitude of Brownian motions. We report here that 10-Hz precessing magnetic fields, at strengths of 1 mT and above, on ∼50-nm magnetite crystals dispersed in ultrapure water, meet these criteria and do indeed produce highly significant supercooling. Using these rotating magnetic fields, we were able to elicit supercooling in two representative plant and animal tissues (celery and bovine muscle), both of which have detectable, natural levels of ferromagnetic material. Tailoring magnetic oscillations for the magnetite particle size distribution in different tissues could maximize this supercooling effect. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  4. Tumor-specific chromosome mis-segregation controls cancer plasticity by maintaining tumor heterogeneity.

    Yuanjie Hu

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy with chromosome instability is a cancer hallmark. We studied chromosome 7 (Chr7 copy number variation (CNV in gliomas and in primary cultures derived from them. We found tumor heterogeneity with cells having Chr7-CNV commonly occurs in gliomas, with a higher percentage of cells in high-grade gliomas carrying more than 2 copies of Chr7, as compared to low-grade gliomas. Interestingly, all Chr7-aneuploid cell types in the parental culture of established glioma cell lines reappeared in single-cell-derived subcultures. We then characterized the biology of three syngeneic glioma cultures dominated by different Chr7-aneuploid cell types. We found phenotypic divergence for cells following Chr7 mis-segregation, which benefited overall tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Mathematical modeling suggested the involvement of chromosome instability and interactions among cell subpopulations in restoring the optimal equilibrium of tumor cell types. Both our experimental data and mathematical modeling demonstrated that the complexity of tumor heterogeneity could be enhanced by the existence of chromosomes with structural abnormality, in addition to their mis-segregations. Overall, our findings show, for the first time, the involvement of chromosome instability in maintaining tumor heterogeneity, which underlies the enhanced growth, persistence and treatment resistance of cancers.

  5. Significant impacts of heterogeneous reactions on the chemical composition and mixing state of dust particles: A case study during dust events over northern China

    Wang, Zhe; Pan, Xiaole; Uno, Itsushi; Li, Jie; Wang, Zifa; Chen, Xueshun; Fu, Pingqing; Yang, Ting; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Shigekazu

    2017-06-01

    The impact of heterogeneous reactions on the chemical components and mixing state of dust particles are investigated by observations and an air quality model over northern China between March 27, 2015 and April 2, 2015. Synergetic observations were conducted using a polarization optical particle counter (POPC), a depolarized two-wavelength Lidar and filter samples in Beijing. During this period, dust plume passed through Beijing on March 28, and flew back on March 29 because of synoptic weather changes. Mineral dust mixed with anthropogenic pollutants was simulated using the Nested Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (NAQPMS) to examine the role of heterogeneous processes on the dust. A comparison of observations shows that the NAQPMS successfully reproduces the time series of the vertical profile, particulate matter concentration, and chemical components of fine mode (diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) and coarse mode (2.5 μm mixed with dust particles. The significant alterations of the chemical composition and mixing state of particles due to heterogeneous reactions are important for the direct and indirect climate effects of dust and anthropogenic aerosols.

  6. Consecutive five-year analysis of paternal and maternal gene flow and contributions of gametic heterogeneities to overall genetic composition of dispersed seeds of Pinus densiflora (Pinaceae).

    Iwaizumi, Masakazu G; Takahashi, Makoto; Isoda, Keiya; Austerlitz, Frédéric

    2013-09-01

    Genetic variability in monoecious woody plant populations results from the assemblage of individuals issued from asymmetrical male and female reproductive functions, produced during spatially and temporarily heterogeneous reproductive and dispersal events. Here we investigated the dispersal patterns and levels of genetic diversity and differentiation of both paternal and maternal gametes in a natural population of Pinus densiflora at the multiple-year scale as long as five consecutive years. • We analyzed the paternity and maternity for 1576 seeds and 454 candidate adult trees using nuclear DNA polymorphisms of diploid biparental embryos and haploid maternal megagametophytes at eight microsatellite loci. • Despite the low levels of genetic differentiation among gamete groups, a two-way AMOVA analysis showed that the parental origin (paternal vs. maternal gametes), the year of gamete production and their interaction had significant effects on the genetic composition of the seeds. While maternal gamete groups showed a significant FST value across the 5 years, this was not true for their paternal counterparts. Within the population, we found that the relative reproductive contributions of the paternal vs. the maternal parent differed among adult trees, the maternal contributions showing a larger year-to-year fluctuation. • The overall genetic variability of dispersed seeds appeared to result from two sources of heterogeneity: the difference between paternal and maternal patterns of reproduction and gamete dispersal and year-to-year heterogeneity of reproduction of adult trees, especially in their maternal reproduction.

  7. Piezoelectric composite morphing control surfaces for unmanned aerial vehicles

    Ohanian, Osgar J., III; Karni, Etan D.; Olien, Chris C.; Gustafson, Eric A.; Kochersberger, Kevin B.; Gelhausen, Paul A.; Brown, Bridget L.

    2011-04-01

    The authors have explored the use of morphing control surfaces to replace traditional servo-actuated control surfaces in UAV applications. The morphing actuation is accomplished using Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators in a bimorph configuration to deflect the aft section of a control surface cross section. The resulting camber change produces forces and moments for vehicle control. The flexible piezoelectric actuators are damage tolerant and provide excellent bandwidth. The large amplitude morphing deflections attained in bench-top experiments demonstrate the potential for excellent control authority. Aerodynamic performance calculations using experimentally measured morphed geometries indicate changes in sectional lift coefficients that are superior to a servo-actuated hinged flap airfoil. This morphing flight control actuation technology could eliminate the need for servos and mechanical linkages in small UAVs and thereby increase reliability and reduce drag.

  8. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  9. Controlled swelling and adsorption properties of polyacrylate/montmorillonite composites

    Natkanski, Piotr [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Kustrowski, Piotr, E-mail: kustrows@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Bialas, Anna; Piwowarska, Zofia [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Michalik, Marek [Institute of Geological Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Oleandry 2a, 30-063 Krakow (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    A series of novel polyacrylate/montmorillonite composites was synthesized by in situ polymerization in aqueous slurry of clay. Dissociated (obtained by adding ammonium or sodium hydroxide) and undissociated forms of acrylic acid were used as monomers in the hydrogel synthesis. The structure and composition of the samples were studied by powder X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance infra-red Fourier transform spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. It has been found that the kind of monomer influences strongly the location of a polymer chain in the formed composite. Complete intercalation of hydrogel into the interlayer space of montmorillonite was observed for sodium polyacrylate, whereas polyacrylic acid and ammonium polyacrylate mainly occupied the outer surface of the clay. The position of hydrogel determined the swelling and adsorption properties of the studied composites. The important factor influencing the kinetics of Fe(III) cation adsorption was pH. The analysis of adsorption isotherms allowed to propose the mechanism of Fe(III) cation adsorption. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyacrylate hydrogels can be introduced into the interlayers of clay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The position of hydrogel in the composite depends on the polymer type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonium polyacrylate places outside the clay, sodium one is intercalated into it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swelling and adsorption capacities can be controlled by the polymer position. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High adsorption efficiency in Fe(III) removal was observed.

  10. Novel hybrid coatings with controlled wettability by composite nanoparticle aggregation

    Hritcu, Doina, E-mail: dhritcu@ch.tuiasi.ro; Dodi, Gianina; Iordache, Mirabela L.; Draganescu, Dan; Sava, Elena; Popa, Marcel I.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Magnetite-grafted chitosan composite nanoparticles were synthesized. • The particles are able to assemble under the influence of a silane derivative. • Thin films containing composites, chitosan and hydrolyzed silane were optimized. • The novel hybrid coatings show hierarchical roughness and high wetting angle. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to evaluate novel hybrid materials as potential candidates for producing coatings with hierarchical roughness and controlled wetting behaviour. Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles obtained by co-precipitation were embedded in matrices synthesized by radical graft co-polymerization of butyl acrylate (BA), butyl methacrylate (BMA), hexyl acrylate (HA) or styrene (ST) with ethylene glycol di-methacrylate (EGDMA) onto previously modified chitosan bearing surface vinyl groups. The resulting composite particles were characterized regarding their average size, composition and magnetic properties. Hybrid thin films containing suspension of composite particles in ethanol and pre-hydrolysed hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTS) as a coupling/crosslinking agent were deposited by spin coating or spraying. The films were cured by heating and subsequently characterized regarding their morphology (scanning electron microscopy), contact angle with water and adhesion to substrate (scratch test). The structure-property relationship is discussed.

  11. Rational design of 3D inverse opal heterogeneous composite microspheres as excellent visible-light-induced NO2 sensors at room temperature.

    Wang, Tianshuang; Yu, Qi; Zhang, Sufang; Kou, Xueying; Sun, Peng; Lu, Geyu

    2018-03-08

    The lower gas sensitivity, humidity dependence of the gas sensing properties, and long recovery times of room-temperature gas sensors severely limit their applications. Herein, to address these issues, a series of 3D inverse opal (IO) In 2 O 3 -ZnO heterogeneous composite microspheres (HCMs) are fabricated by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) employing self-assembled sulfonated polystyrene (S-PS) spheres as a sacrificial template. The 3D IO In 2 O 3 -ZnO HCMs possess highly ordered 3D inverse opal structures and bimodal (meso-scale and macro-scale) pores, which can provide large accessible surface areas and rapid mass transfer, resulting in enhanced gas sensing characteristics. Furthermore, the 3D IO architecture and n-n heterojunctions can extend the photoabsorption range to the visible light area, effectively prolonging the lifetimes of photo-generated charge carriers, and can increase separation of visible light-generated charges. As a result, the as-prepared 3D IO In 2 O 3 -ZnO HCMs deliver excellent NO 2 sensing performance under visible light irradiation at room temperature, such as high sensitivity (R gas /R air = 54.3 to 5 ppm NO 2 ), low detection limit (250 ppb), fast recovery time (188 s), excellent selectivity and humidity independence. These enhanced photo-electronic gas sensing properties are attributed to the combination of highly ordered 3D IO microspheres and In 2 O 3 -ZnO heterogeneous composites.

  12. Clinical and biochemical heterogeneity between patients with glycogen storage disease type IA: the added value of CUSUM for metabolic control.

    Peeks, Fabian; Steunenberg, Thomas A H; de Boer, Foekje; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Williams, Monique; Burghard, Rob; Rajas, Fabienne; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Weinstein, David A; Derks, Terry G J

    2017-09-01

    To study heterogeneity between patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia), a rare inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Descriptive retrospective study of longitudinal clinical and biochemical data and long-term complications in 20 GSD Ia patients. We included 11 patients with homozygous G6PC mutations and siblings from four families carrying identical G6PC genotypes. To display subtle variations for repeated triglyceride measurements with respect to time for individual patients, CUSUM-analysis graphs were constructed. Patients with different homozygous G6PC mutations showed important differences in height, BMI, and biochemical parameters (i.e., lactate, uric acid, triglyceride, and cholesterol concentrations). Furthermore, CUSUM-analysis predicts and displays subtle changes in longitudinal blood triglyceride concentrations. Siblings in families also displayed important differences in biochemical parameters (i.e., lactate, uric acid, triglycerides, and cholesterol concentrations) and long-term complications (i.e., liver adenomas, nephropathy, and osteopenia/osteoporosis). Differences between GSD Ia patients reflect large clinical and biochemical heterogeneity. Heterogeneity between GSD Ia patients with homozygous G6PC mutations indicate an important role of the G6PC genotype/mutations. Differences between affected siblings suggest an additional role (genetic and/or environmental) of modifying factors defining the GSD Ia phenotype. CUSUM-analysis can facilitate single-patient monitoring of metabolic control and future application of this method may improve precision medicine for patients both with GSD and remaining inherited metabolic diseases.

  13. Two-component spin-coated Ag/CNT composite films based on a silver heterogeneous nucleation mechanism adhesion-enhanced by mechanical interlocking and chemical grafting

    Zhang, Yang; Kang, Zhixin; Bessho, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a new method for the synthesis of silver carbon nanotube (Ag/CNT) composite films as conductive connection units for flexible electronic devices is presented. This method is about a two-component solution process by spin coating with an after-treatment annealing process. In this method, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) act as the core of silver heterogeneous nucleation, which can be observed and analyzed by a field-emission scanning electron microscope. With the effects of mechanical interlocking, chemical grafting, and annealing, the interfacial adhesive strength between films and PET sheets was enhanced to 12 N cm-1. The tensile strength of the Ag/CNT composite films was observed to increase by 38% by adding 5 g l-1 MWCNTs. In the four-probe method, the resistivity of Ag/CNT-5 declined by 78.2% compared with pristine Ag films. The anti-fatigue performance of the Ag/CNT composite films was monitored by cyclic bending deformation and the results revealed that the growth rate of electrical resistance during the deformation was obviously retarded. As for industrial application, this method provides an efficient low-cost way to prepare Ag/CNT composite films and can be further applied to other coating systems.

  14. Constitutive modeling and control of 1D smart composite structures

    Briggs, Jonathan P.; Ostrowski, James P.; Ponte-Castaneda, Pedro

    1998-07-01

    Homogenization techniques for determining effective properties of composite materials may provide advantages for control of stiffness and strain in systems using hysteretic smart actuators embedded in a soft matrix. In this paper, a homogenized model of a 1D composite structure comprised of shape memory alloys and a rubber-like matrix is presented. With proportional and proportional/integral feedback, using current as the input state and global strain as an error state, implementation scenarios include the use of tractions on the boundaries and a nonlinear constitutive law for the matrix. The result is a simple model which captures the nonlinear behavior of the smart composite material system and is amenable to experiments with various control paradigms. The success of this approach in the context of the 1D model suggests that the homogenization method may prove useful in investigating control of more general smart structures. Applications of such materials could include active rehabilitation aids, e.g. wrist braces, as well as swimming/undulating robots, or adaptive molds for manufacturing processes.

  15. Reversible Compositional Control of Oxide Surfaces by Electrochemical Potentials

    Mutoro, Eva

    2012-01-05

    Perovskite oxides can exhibit a wide range of interesting characteristics such as being catalytically active and electronically/ionically conducting, and thus, they have been used in a number of solid-state devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and sensors. As the surface compositions of perovskites can greatly influence the catalytic properties, knowing and controlling their surface compositions is crucial to enhance device performance. In this study, we demonstrate that the surface strontium (Sr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations of perovskite-based thin films can be controlled reversibly at elevated temperatures by applying small electrical potential biases. The surface compositional changes of La 0.8Sr 0.2CoO 3-δ (LSC 113), (La 0.5Sr 0.5) 2CoO 4±δ (LSC 214), and LSC 214-decorated LSC 113 films (LSC 113/214) were investigated in situ by utilizing synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), where the largest changes of surface Sr were found for the LSC 113/214 surface. These findings offer the potential of reversibly controlling the surface functionality of perovskites. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Active Piezoelectric Vibration Control of Subscale Composite Fan Blades

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Min, James B.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are investigating new technologies supporting the development of lighter, quieter, and more efficient fans for turbomachinery applications. High performance fan blades designed to achieve such goals will be subjected to higher levels of aerodynamic excitations which could lead to more serious and complex vibration problems. Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing engine blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. To investigate this idea, spin testing was performed on two General Electric Aviation (GE) subscale composite fan blades in the NASA GRC Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. The first bending mode (1B) was targeted for vibration control. Because these subscale blades are very thin, the piezoelectric material was surface-mounted on the blades. Three thin piezoelectric patches were applied to each blade two actuator patches and one small sensor patch. These flexible macro-fiber-composite patches were placed in a location of high resonant strain for the 1B mode. The blades were tested up to 5000 rpm, with patches used as sensors, as excitation for the blade, and as part of open- and closed-loop vibration control. Results show that with a single actuator patch, active vibration control causes the damping ratio to increase from a baseline of 0.3% critical damping to about 1.0% damping at 0 RPM. As the rotor speed approaches 5000 RPM, the actively controlled blade damping ratio decreases to about 0.5% damping. This occurs primarily because of centrifugal blade stiffening, and can be observed by the decrease in the generalized electromechanical coupling with rotor speed.

  17. Experimental studies on active vibration control of a smart composite beam using a PID controller

    Jovanović, Miroslav M; Lukić, Nebojša S; Ilić, Slobodan S; Simonović, Aleksandar M; Zorić, Nemanja D; Stupar, Slobodan N

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental verification of the active vibration control of a smart cantilever composite beam using a PID controller. In order to prevent negative occurrences in the derivative and integral terms in a PID controller, first-order low-pass filters are implemented in the derivative action and in the feedback of the integral action. The proposed application setup consists of a composite cantilever beam with a fiber-reinforced piezoelectric actuator and strain gage sensors. The beam is modeled using a finite element method based on third-order shear deformation theory. The experiment considers vibration control under periodic excitation and an initial static deflection. A control algorithm was implemented on a PIC32MX440F256H microcontroller. Experimental results corresponding to the proposed PID controller are compared with corresponding results using proportional (P) control, proportional–integral (PI) control and proportional–derivative (PD) control. Experimental results indicate that the proposed PID controller provides 8.93% more damping compared to a PD controller, 14.41% more damping compared to a PI controller and 19.04% more damping compared to a P controller in the case of vibration under periodic excitation. In the case of free vibration control, the proposed PID controller shows better performance (settling time 1.2 s) compared to the PD controller (settling time 1.5 s) and PI controller (settling time 2.5 s). (paper)

  18. Fault roughness and strength heterogeneity control earthquake size and stress drop

    Zielke, Olaf

    2017-01-13

    An earthquake\\'s stress drop is related to the frictional breakdown during sliding and constitutes a fundamental quantity of the rupture process. High-speed laboratory friction experiments that emulate the rupture process imply stress drop values that greatly exceed those commonly reported for natural earthquakes. We hypothesize that this stress drop discrepancy is due to fault-surface roughness and strength heterogeneity: an earthquake\\'s moment release and its recurrence probability depend not only on stress drop and rupture dimension but also on the geometric roughness of the ruptured fault and the location of failing strength asperities along it. Using large-scale numerical simulations for earthquake ruptures under varying roughness and strength conditions, we verify our hypothesis, showing that smoother faults may generate larger earthquakes than rougher faults under identical tectonic loading conditions. We further discuss the potential impact of fault roughness on earthquake recurrence probability. This finding provides important information, also for seismic hazard analysis.

  19. Heterogeneous impact of smoking on major salivary gland cancer according to histopathological subtype: A case-control study.

    Sawabe, Michi; Ito, Hidemi; Takahara, Taishi; Oze, Isao; Kawakita, Daisuke; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Murakami, Shingo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2018-01-01

    Major salivary gland cancers (M-SGCs) are rare, and have distinct heterogeneous histopathological subtypes. To the authors' knowledge, no consistent evidence of an association between cigarette smoking and the risk of M-SGCs has appeared to date. Furthermore, evidence of potential heterogeneity in the impact of smoking on histopathological subtypes is scarce, despite the fact that the histopathological subtypes of M-SGC exhibit different genetic features. The authors conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between smoking and M-SGC by histopathological subtype. Cases were 81 patients with M-SGCs and the controls were 810 age-matched and sex-matched first-visit outpatients without cancer treated at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital from 1988 to 2005. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were assessed by conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for potential confounders. Smoking was found to be associated with a significantly increased risk of M-SGC overall, with an OR of 3.45 (95% CI, 1.58-7.51; P =.001) for heavy smokers compared with never-smokers. A significant dose-response relationship was observed (P for trend, .001). When stratified by histological subtype, no obvious impact of smoking was observed among patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC). In contrast, smoking demonstrated a significantly increased risk of M-SGCs other than MEC, with an OR of 5.15 (95% CI, 2.06-12.87; Psmoking on risk between MEC and M-SGCs other than MEC (P for heterogeneity, .052). The results of the current study demonstrate a significant positive association between cigarette smoking and the risk of M-SGC overall. However, the impact of smoking appeared to be limited to M-SGCs other than MEC. Cancer 2018;124:118-24. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Composites Similarity Analysis Method Based on Knowledge Set in Composites Quality Control

    Li Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Composites similarity analysis is an important link of composites review, it can not only to declare composites review rechecking, still help composites applicants promptly have the research content relevant progress and avoid duplication. This paper mainly studies the composites similarity model in composites review. With the actual experience of composites management, based on the author’s knowledge set theory, paper analyzes deeply knowledge set representation of composites knowledge, impr...

  1. One-step fabrication of heterogeneous conducting polymers-coated graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes composite films for high-performance supercapacitors

    Zhou, Haihan; Han, Gaoyi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CPs-GO/CNTs ternary composites have been prepared via one-step electrodeposition. • The composites show a GO supported CPs-coated CNTs ternary hybrid microstructure. • The capacitive nature of CPs-GO is promoted significantly by introducing CNTs. • CPs-GO/CNTs electrodes show high areal capacitance and excellent cycle stability. - Abstract: Composite films of heterogeneous conducting polymers-coated graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes (CPs-GO/CNTs; CPs, PPy and PEDOT) have been fabricated via one-step electrochemical co-deposition. Scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy characterizations indicate that the as-prepared CPs-GO/CNTs composites show a GO supported CPs-coated CNTs ternary hybrid microstructure. The electrochemical measurements including cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests manifest that the capacitive performances of CPs-GO electrodes are obviously promoted as the introduction of CNTs, and the PEDOT-GO/CNTs electrodes exhibit the more significantly improved electrochemical performances as the more CNTs introduced. Furthermore, the as-prepared PPy-GO/CNTs and PEDOT-GO/CNTs ternary composites achieve a high areal specific capacitance (142.2 mF cm −2 and 99.0 mF cm −2 at 1.0 mA cm −2 , respectively), together with superior rate capability, and excellent cycle stability (maintain 97.3% and 99.2% of initial capacitance for 5000 cycles, respectively), which are essential for their applications in high-performance supercapacitor electrodes.

  2. Magnetically separable photocatalytic composite gamma-Fe(2)O(3)@TiO(2) synthesized by heterogeneous precipitation

    Tyrpekl, Václav; Vejpravová, J.P.; Roca, A.G.; Murafa, Nataliya; Szatmáry, Lórant; Nižňanský, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 257, č. 11 (2011), s. 4844-4848 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041; GA AV ČR KAN400100653 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : nano composite * oxides * magnetic properties * transmission electron microscopy * X-ray powder diffraction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.103, year: 2011

  3. Eye-based Direct Interaction for Environmental Control in Heterogeneous Smart Environments

    Corno, Fulvio; Gale, Alastair; Majaranta, Päivi; Räihä, Kari-Jouko

    environmental control is the control, operation, and monitoring of an environment via intermediary technology such as a computer. Typically this means control of a domestic home.Within the scope of COGAIN, this environmental control concerns the control of the personal environment of a person (with or without a disability). This defines environmental control as the control of a home or domestic setting and those objects that are within that setting. Thus, we may say that environmental control systems enable anyone to operate a wide range of domestic appliances and other vital functions in the home by remote control. In recent years the problem of self-sufficiency for older people and people with a disability has attracted increasing attention and resources. The search for new solutions that can guarantee greater autonomy and a better quality of life has begun to exploit easily available state-of-the-art technology. Personal environmental control can be considered to be a comprehensive and effective aid, adaptable to the functional possibilities of the user and to their desired actions.

  4. Central composite design approach towards optimization of flamboyant pods derived steam activated carbon for its use as heterogeneous catalyst in transesterification of Hevea brasiliensis oil

    Dhawane, Sumit H.; Kumar, Tarkeshwar; Halder, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated carbon was prepared from novel precursor flamboyant pods (Delonix regia). • Activation process was optimized using central composite design approach. • Prepared activated carbon at optimized condition was used as support for KOH. • Carbon based heterogeneous catalyst was used in transesterification of HBO. • Effect of catalyst loading and alcohol ratio on biodiesel yield was studied. - Abstract: The present investigation emphasises the preparation of carbon based KOH impregnated heterogeneous catalyst from flamboyant pods (Delonix regia) for the production of biodiesel from novel feedstock Hevea brasiliensis oil (HBO). Initially, carbonized char was physically activated by superheated steam and the process was optimized to study the effects of activation time and temperature by central composite design approach (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM). Activated carbon was impregnated with KOH at four different ratios. Biodiesel production process was carried out at constant temperature 60 °C, reaction time 1 h, and 5 g of carbon based catalyst at varying quantities of catalyst loading (0.5, 2, 3.5, 5 wt%) and methanol to oil ratio (5:1–20:1). The influence of parameters on the biodiesel yield at varied condition was studied. Maximum yield of 89.3% was obtained at methanol to oil ratio 15:1 and catalyst loading 3.5 wt% and corresponding yield at same process parameters was observed to be 88.7% implying the significant activity of catalyst in reutilization. Produced biodiesel was characterized following ASTM standards. The experimental analysis confirmed that the carbonaceous catalyst developed from flamboyant pods under optimized condition is capable of transesterifying HBO into biodiesel

  5. Optimization of control strategies for epidemics in heterogeneous populations with symmetric and asymmetric transmission

    Ndeffo Mbah , Martial L.; Gilligan , Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There is growing interest in incorporating economic factors into epidemiological models in order to identify optimal strategies for disease control when resources are limited. In this paper we consider how to optimize the control of a pathogen that is capable of infecting multiple hosts with different rates of transmission within and between species. Our objective is to find control strategies that maximize the discounted number of healthy individuals. We consider two clas...

  6. Automatic Generation of Supervisory Control System Software Using Graph Composition

    Nakata, Hideo; Sano, Tatsuro; Kojima, Taizo; Seo, Kazuo; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yasuaki

    This paper describes the automatic generation of system descriptions for SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems. The proposed method produces various types of data and programs for SCADA systems from equipment definitions using conversion rules. At first, this method makes directed graphs, which represent connections between the equipment, from equipment definitions. System descriptions are generated using the conversion rules, by analyzing these directed graphs, and finding the groups of equipment that involve similar operations. This method can make the conversion rules multi levels by using the composition of graphs, and can reduce the number of rules. The developer can define and manage these rules efficiently.

  7. Numerical study of compositional compressible degenerate two-phase flow in saturated–unsaturated heterogeneous porous media

    Saad, Ali S.; Saad, Bilal Mohammed; Saad, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    We study the convergence of a combined finite volume-nonconforming finite element scheme on general meshes for a partially miscible two-phase flow model in anisotropic porous media. This model includes capillary effects and exchange between the phases. The diffusion term, which can be anisotropic and heterogeneous, is discretized by piecewise linear nonconforming triangular finite elements. The other terms are discretized by means of a cell-centered finite volume scheme on a dual mesh. The relative permeability of each phase is decentered according to the sign of the velocity at the dual interface. The convergence of the scheme is proved thanks to an estimate on the two pressures which allows to show estimates on the discrete time and compactness results in the case of degenerate relative permeabilities. A key point in the scheme is to use particular averaging formula for the dissolution function arising in the diffusion term. We show also a simulation of hydrogen production in nuclear waste management. Numerical results are obtained by in-house numerical code. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Numerical study of compositional compressible degenerate two-phase flow in saturated–unsaturated heterogeneous porous media

    Saad, Ali S.

    2016-01-02

    We study the convergence of a combined finite volume-nonconforming finite element scheme on general meshes for a partially miscible two-phase flow model in anisotropic porous media. This model includes capillary effects and exchange between the phases. The diffusion term, which can be anisotropic and heterogeneous, is discretized by piecewise linear nonconforming triangular finite elements. The other terms are discretized by means of a cell-centered finite volume scheme on a dual mesh. The relative permeability of each phase is decentered according to the sign of the velocity at the dual interface. The convergence of the scheme is proved thanks to an estimate on the two pressures which allows to show estimates on the discrete time and compactness results in the case of degenerate relative permeabilities. A key point in the scheme is to use particular averaging formula for the dissolution function arising in the diffusion term. We show also a simulation of hydrogen production in nuclear waste management. Numerical results are obtained by in-house numerical code. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Heterogenous Oxygen Isotopic Composition of a Complex Wark-Lovering Rim and the Margin of a Refractory Inclusion from Leoville

    Simon, J. I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2014-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims [1] surrounding many refractory inclusions represent marker events in the early evolution of the Solar System in which many inclusions were exposed to changes in pressure [2], temperature [3], and isotopic reservoirs [4-7]. The effects of these events can be complex, not only producing mineralogical variability of WL rims [2], but also leading to mineralogical [8-10] and isotopic [7, 11, 12] changes within inclusion interiors. Extreme oxygen isotopic heterogeneity measured in CAIs has been explained by mixing between distinct oxygen gas reservoirs in the nebula [13]. Some WL rims contain relatively simple mineral layering and/or are isotopically homogeneous [14, 15]. As part of a larger effort to document and understand the modifications observed in some CAIs, an inclusion (L6) with a complex WL rim from Leoville, a member of the reduced CV3 subgroup was studied. Initial study of the textures and mineral chemistry was presented by [16]. Here we present NanoSIMS oxygen isotopic measurements to complement these petrologic observations.

  10. Neutron radiography of aircraft composite flight control surfaces

    Lewis, W.J.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Chalovich, T.R.; Francescone, O.

    2001-01-01

    A small (20 kWth), safe, pool-type nuclear research reactor called the SLOWPOKE-2 is located at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC). The reactor was originally installed for teaching, training, research and semi-routine analysis, specifically, neutron activation analysis. It was envisioned that the neutrons from the SLOWPOKE-2 could also be used for neutron radiography, and so a research program was initiated to develop this technology. Over a period of approximately 15 years, and through a series of successive modifications, a neutron radiography system (NRS) was developed. Once completed, several applications of the technology have been demonstrated, including the nondestructive examination of the composite flight control surfaces from the Canadian Air Force's primary jet fighter, the CF18 Hornet aircraft. An initial trial was setup to investigate the flight control surfaces of 3 aircraft, to determine the parameters for a final licensed system, and to compare the results to other nondestructive methods. Over 500 neutron radiographs were made for these first 3 aircraft, and moisture and corrosion were discovered in the honeycomb structure and hydration was found in the composite and adhesive layers. In comparison with other NDT methods, neutron radiography was the only method that could detect the small areas of corrosion and moisture entrapment. However, before examining an additional 7 aircraft, the recommended modifications to the NRS were undertaken. These modifications were necessary to accommodate the larger flight control surfaces safely by incorporating flexible conformable shielding. As well, to expedite inspections so that all flight control surfaces from one aircraft could be completed in less than two weeks, there was a need to decrease the exposure time by both faster film/conversion screen combinations and by incorporating the capability of near realtime, digital radioscopy. Finally, as there are no inspection specific image quality

  11. Inter-eNB Flow Control for Heterogeneous Networks with Dual Connectivity

    Wang, Hua; Rosa, Claudio; Pedersen, Klaus I.

    2015-01-01

    the gain provided by DC, an efficient flow control of data between the involved macro and small cell eNBs is proposed. It is demonstrated how proper configuration of the proposed flow control algorithm offers efficient trade-offs between reducing the probability that one of the eNBs involved in the DC runs...

  12. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  13. Fabrication of slag-glass composite with controlled porosity

    Ranko Adziski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and performance of porous ceramics made from waste materials were investigated. Slag from thermal electrical plant Kakanj (Bosnia and Herzegovina with defined granulations: (0.500÷0.250 mm; (0.250÷0.125 mm; (0.125÷0.063 mm; (0.063÷0.045 mm and 20/10 wt.% of the waste TV screen glass with a granulation <0.063 mm were used for obtaining slag-glass composites with controlled porosity. The one produced from the slag powder fraction (0.125÷0.063 mm and 20 wt.% TV screen glass, sintered at 950°C/2h, was considered as the optimal. This system possesses open porosity of 26.8±1.0%, and interconnected pores with the size of 250–400 μm. The values of E-modulus and bending strength of this composite were 10.6±0.6 GPa and 45.7±0.7 MPa, respectively. The coefficient of thermal expansion was 8.47·10-6/°C. The mass loss in 0.1M HCl solution after 30 days was 1.2 wt.%. The permeability and the form coefficient of the porous composite were K0=0.12 Da and C0=4.53·105 m-1, respectively. The porous composite shows great potential to be used as filters, diffusers for water aeration, dust collectors, acoustic absorbers, etc.

  14. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Imaging of Femoral Neck Bone: Reduced Heterogeneity of Mineral-to-Matrix and Carbonate-to-Phosphate and more Variable Crystallinity in Treatment-Naïve Fracture Cases compared to Fracture-Free Controls

    Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Reeve, Jonathan; Boskey, Adele L.

    2012-01-01

    After age 60 hip fracture risk strongly increases, but only a fifth of this increase is attributable to reduced mineral density (BMD, measured clinically). Changes in bone quality, specifically bone composition as measured by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI), also contribute to fracture risk. Here, FTIRI was applied to study the femoral neck and provide spatially derived information on its mineral and matrix properties in age-matched fractured and non-fractured bones. Whole femoral neck cross sections, divided into quadrants along the neck’s axis, from 10 women with hip fracture and 10 cadaveric controls were studied using FTIRI and micro-computed Tomography. Although 3-dimensional micro-CT bone mineral densities were similar, the mineral-to-matrix ratio was reduced in the cases of hip fracture, confirming previous reports. New findings were that the FTIRI microscopic variation (heterogeneity) of the mineral-to-matrix ratio was substantially reduced in the fracture group as was the heterogeneity of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Conversely, the heterogeneity of crystallinity was increased. Increased variation of crystallinity was statistically associated with reduced variation of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Anatomical variation in these properties between the different femoral neck quadrants was reduced in the fracture group compared to controls. While our treatment-naïve patients had reduced rather than increased bending resistance, these changes in heterogeneity associated with hip fracture are in another way comparable to the effects of experimental bisphosphonate therapy, which decreases heterogeneity and other indicators of bone’s toughness as a material. PMID:22865771

  15. Fourier transform infrared imaging of femoral neck bone: reduced heterogeneity of mineral-to-matrix and carbonate-to-phosphate and more variable crystallinity in treatment-naive fracture cases compared with fracture-free controls.

    Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Reeve, Jonathan; Boskey, Adele L

    2013-01-01

    After the age of 60 years, hip fracture risk strongly increases, but only a fifth of this increase is attributable to reduced bone mineral density (BMD, measured clinically). Changes in bone quality, specifically bone composition as measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI), also contribute to fracture risk. Here, FTIRI was applied to study the femoral neck and provide spatially derived information on its mineral and matrix properties in age-matched fractured and nonfractured bones. Whole femoral neck cross sections, divided into quadrants along the neck's axis, from 10 women with hip fracture and 10 cadaveric controls were studied using FTIRI and micro-computed tomography. Although 3-dimensional micro-CT bone mineral densities were similar, the mineral-to-matrix ratio was reduced in the cases of hip fracture, confirming previous reports. New findings were that the FTIRI microscopic variation (heterogeneity) of the mineral-to-matrix ratio was substantially reduced in the fracture group as was the heterogeneity of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Conversely, the heterogeneity of crystallinity was increased. Increased variation of crystallinity was statistically associated with reduced variation of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Anatomical variation in these properties between the different femoral neck quadrants was reduced in the fracture group compared with controls. Although our treatment-naive patients had reduced rather than increased bending resistance, these changes in heterogeneity associated with hip fracture are in another way comparable to the effects of experimental bisphosphonate therapy, which decreases heterogeneity and other indicators of bone's toughness as a material. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Optimum parameters in a model for tumour control probability, including interpatient heterogeneity: evaluation of the log-normal distribution

    Keall, P J; Webb, S

    2007-01-01

    The heterogeneity of human tumour radiation response is well known. Researchers have used the normal distribution to describe interpatient tumour radiosensitivity. However, many natural phenomena show a log-normal distribution. Log-normal distributions are common when mean values are low, variances are large and values cannot be negative. These conditions apply to radiosensitivity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the log-normal distribution to predict clinical tumour control probability (TCP) data and to compare the results with the homogeneous (δ-function with single α-value) and normal distributions. The clinically derived TCP data for four tumour types-melanoma, breast, squamous cell carcinoma and nodes-were used to fit the TCP models. Three forms of interpatient tumour radiosensitivity were considered: the log-normal, normal and δ-function. The free parameters in the models were the radiosensitivity mean, standard deviation and clonogenic cell density. The evaluation metric was the deviance of the maximum likelihood estimation of the fit of the TCP calculated using the predicted parameters to the clinical data. We conclude that (1) the log-normal and normal distributions of interpatient tumour radiosensitivity heterogeneity more closely describe clinical TCP data than a single radiosensitivity value and (2) the log-normal distribution has some theoretical and practical advantages over the normal distribution. Further work is needed to test these models on higher quality clinical outcome datasets

  17. A Heterogeneous Multi-core Architecture with a Hardware Kernel for Control Systems

    Li, Gang; Guan, Wei; Sierszecki, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Rapid industrialisation has resulted in a demand for improved embedded control systems with features such as predictability, high processing performance and low power consumption. Software kernel implementation on a single processor is becoming more difficult to satisfy those constraints....... This paper presents a multi-core architecture incorporating a hardware kernel on FPGAs, intended for high performance applications in control engineering domain. First, the hardware kernel is investigated on the basis of a component-based real-time kernel HARTEX (Hard Real-Time Executive for Control Systems...

  18. Spatial Variation in Bird Community Composition in Relation to Topographic Gradient and Forest Heterogeneity in a Central Amazonian Rainforest

    Renato Cintra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of landscape features and forest structure on the avian community at the Reserva Florestal Adolpho Ducke near Manaus, in the Brazilian Amazon. We sampled the landscape and forest in 72 50 × 50 m plots systematically distributed in the reserve, covering an area of 6,400 ha. The avifauna was sampled using mist nets and acoustic surveys near the plots. We found no significant relationships between landscape features and forest components in the plots and the number of bird species and individuals sampled. Results of Principal Coordinate Analyses, however, showed that bird species composition changes along a topographic gradient (plateau-slope-valley, and also in relation to leaf litter depth and distance to forest streams. We also found compositional differences in the avian community on the eastern and western water basins that compose the reserve. Our results suggest that although most bird species occur throughout the reserve, many species track differences in the landscape and the forest structure.

  19. The effect of morphology and surface composition on radiation resistance of heterogeneous material CdS-PbS

    Malyar, I. V., E-mail: imalyar@yandex.ru; Stetsyura, S. V., E-mail: stetsyurasv@info.sgu.ru [Chernyshevsky Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    As a result of a complex study of the heterophase photosensitive material CdS-PbS by the methods of scanning electron microscopy and Auger spectrometry, it has been found that the radiation resistance of this material depends on the morphology and phase composition at its surface. It is shown that, as the temperature of annealing is increased, aggregations with predominant content of PbS grow; simultaneously, the composition of these aggregations varies as a consequence of the reaction of substitution of sulfur atoms with oxygen atoms. The latter of the aforementioned processes brings about a decrease in the radiation resistance of the heterophase photosensitive material CdS-PbS, which is accounted for by a decrease in the gettering due to appearance of an intermediate oxidized layer between PbS and CdS. An increase in the sizes and number of spherical aggregations at the surface, which consist of crystallites with predominant content of PbS, brings about an increase in the radiation resistance.

  20. Control of DWPF [Defense Waste Processing Facility] melter feed composition

    Edwards, R.E. Jr.; Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility will be used to immobilize Savannah River Site high-level waste into a stable borosilicate glass for disposal in a geologic repository. Proper control of the melter feed composition in this facility is essential to the production of glass which meets product durability constraints dictated by repository regulations and facility processing constraints dictated by melter design. A technique has been developed which utilizes glass property models to determine acceptable processing regions based on the multiple constraints imposed on the glass product and to display these regions graphically. This system along with the batch simulation of the process is being used to form the basis for the statistical process control system for the facility. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Active vibration control based on piezoelectric smart composite

    Gao, Le; Lu, Qingqing; Fei, Fan; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju

    2013-01-01

    An aircraft’s vertical fin may experience dramatic buffet loads in high angle of attack flight conditions, and these buffet loads would cause huge vibration and dynamic stress on the vertical fin structure. To reduce the dynamic vibration of the vertical fin structure, macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators were used in this paper. The drive moment equations and sensing voltage equations of the MFC actuators were developed. Finite element analysis models based on three kinds of models of simplified vertical fin structures with surface-bonded MFC actuators were established in ABAQUS. The equivalent damping ratio of the structure was employed in finite element analysis, in order to measure the effectiveness of vibration control. Further, an open-loop test for the active vibration control system of the vertical fin with MFC actuators was designed and developed. The experimental results validated the effectiveness of the MFC actuators as well as the developed methodology. (paper)

  2. Data Description Exchange Services for Heterogeneous Vehicle and Spaceport Control and Monitor Systems, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CCT has designed and prototyped, as part of the Phase-1 SBIR, a generic platform independent software capability for exchange of semantic control and monitoring...

  3. Controllable helical deformations on printed anisotropic composite soft actuators

    Wang, Dong; Li, Ling; Serjouei, Ahmad; Dong, Longteng; Weeger, Oliver; Gu, Guoying; Ge, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Helical shapes are ubiquitous in both nature and engineering. However, the development of soft actuators and robots that mimic helical motions has been hindered primarily due to the lack of efficient modeling approaches that take into account the material anisotropy and the directional change of the external loading point. In this work, we present a theoretical framework for modeling controllable helical deformations of cable-driven, anisotropic, soft composite actuators. The framework is based on the minimum potential energy method, and its model predictions are validated by experiments, where the microarchitectures of the soft composite actuators can be precisely defined by 3D printing. We use the developed framework to investigate the effects of material and geometric parameters on helical deformations. The results show that material stiffness, volume fraction, layer thickness, and fiber orientation can be used to control the helical deformation of a soft actuator. In particular, we found that a critical fiber orientation angle exists at which the twist of the actuator changes the direction. Thus, this work can be of great importance for the design and fabrication of soft actuators with tailored deformation behavior.

  4. Heterogeneous coarsening of Pb phase and the effect of Cu addition on it in a nanophase composite of Al-10 wt%Pb alloy prepared by mechanical alloying

    Zhu, M.; Liu, X.; Wu, Z.F.; Ouyang, L.Z.; Zeng, M.Q.

    2009-01-01

    A nanophase composite of Al-10 wt%Pb alloy was prepared by mechanical alloying. The coarsening behavior of Pb phase in the composite during heating process was investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nanoindentation test. The present work shows that the Pb phase grew substantially and had two different size distributions when the heating temperature was above 823 K. The different size distributions of Pb phase were owing to different grain size ranges of Al matrix in different regions, which led to the different growth rates of the Pb phase in those regions. It has been proposed that the different size ranges of Al grain appeared upon heating were originated from a statistical size distribution of Al grains in the as-milled powder. With the addition of a small amount of Cu, the heterogeneous growth of Pb phase can be suppressed, and the coarsening of Pb phase shows two distinct rates. This indicates that the coarsening is mainly governed by grain boundary diffusion and lattice diffusion of Al matrix in the initial stage and the later one, respectively

  5. Transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and confocal raman microscopic analysis of ultrastructural and compositional heterogeneity of Cornus alba L. wood cell wall.

    Ma, Jianfeng; Ji, Zhe; Zhou, Xia; Zhang, Zhiheng; Xu, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy can be used to characterize ultrastructural and compositional heterogeneity of plant cell walls. In this study, TEM observations revealed the ultrastructural characterization of Cornus alba L. fiber, vessel, axial parenchyma, ray parenchyma, and pit membrane between cells, notably with the ray parenchyma consisting of two well-defined layers. Fluorescence microscopy evidenced that cell corner middle lamella was more lignified than adjacent compound middle lamella and secondary wall with variation in lignification level from cell to cell. In situ Raman images showed that the inhomogeneity in cell wall components (cellulose and lignin) among different cells and within morphologically distinct cell wall layers. As the significant precursors of lignin biosynthesis, the pattern of coniferyl alcohol and aldehyde (joint abbreviation Lignin-CAA for both structures) distribution in fiber cell wall was also identified by Raman images, with higher concentration occurring in the fiber secondary wall where there was the highest cellulose concentration. Moreover, noteworthy was the observation that higher concentration of lignin and very minor amounts of cellulose were visualized in the pit membrane areas. These complementary microanalytical methods provide more accurate and complete information with regard to ultrastructural and compositional characterization of plant cell walls.

  6. Dc microgrid stabilization through fuzzy control of interleaved, heterogeneous storage elements

    Smith, Robert David

    As microgrid power systems gain prevalence and renewable energy comprises greater and greater portions of distributed generation, energy storage becomes important to offset the higher variance of renewable energy sources and maximize their usefulness. One of the emerging techniques is to utilize a combination of lead-acid batteries and ultracapacitors to provide both short and long-term stabilization to microgrid systems. The different energy and power characteristics of batteries and ultracapacitors imply that they ought to be utilized in different ways. Traditional linear controls can use these energy storage systems to stabilize a power grid, but cannot effect more complex interactions. This research explores a fuzzy logic approach to microgrid stabilization. The ability of a fuzzy logic controller to regulate a dc bus in the presence of source and load fluctuations, in a manner comparable to traditional linear control systems, is explored and demonstrated. Furthermore, the expanded capabilities (such as storage balancing, self-protection, and battery optimization) of a fuzzy logic system over a traditional linear control system are shown. System simulation results are presented and validated through hardware-based experiments. These experiments confirm the capabilities of the fuzzy logic control system to regulate bus voltage, balance storage elements, optimize battery usage, and effect self-protection.

  7. Volatile composition of microinclusions in diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, Canada: Implications for chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle

    Burgess, Ray; Cartigny, Pierre; Harrison, Darrell; Hobson, Emily; Harris, Jeff

    2009-03-01

    In order to better investigate the compositions and the origins of fluids associated with diamond growth, we have carried-out combined noble gas (He and Ar), C and N isotope, K, Ca and halogen (Cl, Br, I) determinations on fragments of individual microinclusion-bearing diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, North West Territories, Canada. The fluid concentrations of halogens and noble gases in Panda diamonds are enriched by several orders of magnitude over typical upper mantle abundances. However, noble gas, C and N isotopic ratios ( 3He/ 4He = 4-6 Ra, 40Ar/ 36Ar = 20,000-30,000, δ 13C = -4.5‰ to -6.9‰ and δ 15N = -1.2‰ to -8.8‰) are within the worldwide range determined for fibrous diamonds and similar to the mid ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source value. The high 36Ar content of the diamonds (>1 × 10 -9 cm 3/g) is at least an order of magnitude higher than any previously reported mantle sample and enables the 36Ar content of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle to be estimated at ˜0.6 × 10 -12 cm 3/g, again similar to estimates for the MORB source. Three fluid types distinguished on the basis of Ca-K-Cl compositions are consistent with carbonatitic, silicic and saline end-members identified in previous studies of diamonds from worldwide sources. These fluid end-members also have distinct halogen ratios (Br/Cl and I/Cl). The role of subducted seawater-derived halogens, originally invoked to explain some of the halogen ratio variations in diamonds, is not considered an essential component in the formation of the fluids. In contrast, it is considered that large halogen fractionation of a primitive mantle ratio occurs during fluid-melt partitioning in forming silicic fluids, and during separation of an immiscible saline fluid.

  8. Adaptive Monitoring and Control Architectures for Power Distribution Grids over Heterogeneous ICT Networks

    Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Hägerling, Christian; Kurtz, Fabian M.

    2014-01-01

    The expected growth in distributed generation will significantly affect the operation and control of today’s distribution grids. Being confronted with short time power variations of distributed generations, the assurance of a reliable service (grid stability, avoidance of energy losses) and the q......The expected growth in distributed generation will significantly affect the operation and control of today’s distribution grids. Being confronted with short time power variations of distributed generations, the assurance of a reliable service (grid stability, avoidance of energy losses...... to the reliability due to the stochastic behaviour found in such networks. Therefore, key concepts are presented in this paper targeting the support of proper smart grid control in these network environments. An overview on the required Information and Communication Technology (ICT) architecture and its...

  9. A Coral Reef Algorithm Based on Learning Automata for the Coverage Control Problem of Heterogeneous Directional Sensor Networks.

    Li, Ming; Miao, Chunyan; Leung, Cyril

    2015-12-04

    Coverage control is one of the most fundamental issues in directional sensor networks. In this paper, the coverage optimization problem in a directional sensor network is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem. It takes into account the coverage rate of the network, the number of working sensor nodes and the connectivity of the network. The coverage problem considered in this paper is characterized by the geographical irregularity of the sensed events and heterogeneity of the sensor nodes in terms of sensing radius, field of angle and communication radius. To solve this multi-objective problem, we introduce a learning automata-based coral reef algorithm for adaptive parameter selection and use a novel Tchebycheff decomposition method to decompose the multi-objective problem into a single-objective problem. Simulation results show the consistent superiority of the proposed algorithm over alternative approaches.

  10. Heterogeneous asymmetric recombinase polymerase amplification (haRPA) for rapid hygiene control of large-volume water samples.

    Elsäßer, Dennis; Ho, Johannes; Niessner, Reinhard; Tiehm, Andreas; Seidel, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Hygiene of drinking water is periodically controlled by cultivation and enumeration of indicator bacteria. Rapid and comprehensive measurements of emerging pathogens are of increasing interest to improve drinking water safety. In this study, the feasibility to detect bacteriophage PhiX174 as a potential indicator for virus contamination in large volumes of water is demonstrated. Three consecutive concentration methods (continuous ultrafiltration, monolithic adsorption filtration, and centrifugal ultrafiltration) were combined to concentrate phages stepwise from 1250 L drinking water into 1 mL. Heterogeneous asymmetric recombinase polymerase amplification (haRPA) is applied as rapid detection method. Field measurements were conducted to test the developed system for hygiene online monitoring under realistic conditions. We could show that this system allows the detection of artificial contaminations of bacteriophage PhiX174 in drinking water pipelines. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucose uptake heterogeneity of the leg muscles is similar between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls during walking.

    Kindred, John H; Ketelhut, Nathaniel B; Rudroff, Thorsten

    2015-02-01

    Difficulties in ambulation are one of the main problems reported by patients with multiple sclerosis. A previous study by our research group showed increased recruitment of muscle groups during walking, but the influence of skeletal muscle properties, such as muscle fiber activity, has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this investigation was to use the novel method of calculating glucose uptake heterogeneity in the leg muscles of patients with multiple sclerosis and compare these results to healthy controls. Eight patients with multiple sclerosis (4 men) and 8 healthy controls (4 men) performed 15 min of treadmill walking at a comfortable self-selected speed following muscle strength tests. Participants were injected with ≈ 8 mCi of [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose during walking after which positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging was performed. No differences in muscle strength were detected between multiple sclerosis and control groups (P>0.27). Within the multiple sclerosis, group differences in muscle volume existed between the stronger and weaker legs in the vastus lateralis, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus (Pmuscle group or individual muscle of the legs (P>0.16, P≥0.05). Patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls showed similar muscle fiber activity during walking. Interpretations of these results, with respect to our previous study, suggest that walking difficulties in patients with multiple sclerosis may be more associated with altered central nervous system motor patterns rather than alterations in skeletal muscle properties. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Mixing-controlled uncertainty in long-term predictions of acid rock drainage from heterogeneous waste-rock piles

    Pedretti, D.; Beckie, R. D.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of drainage from waste-rock piles at mine sites is difficult to predict because of a number of uncertainties including heterogeneous reactive mineral content, distribution of minerals, weathering rates and physical flow properties. In this presentation, we examine the effects of mixing on drainage chemistry over timescales of 100s of years. We use a 1-D streamtube conceptualization of flow in waste rocks and multicomponent reactive transport modeling. We simplify the reactive system to consist of acid-producing sulfide minerals and acid-neutralizing carbonate minerals and secondary sulfate and iron oxide minerals. We create multiple realizations of waste-rock piles with distinct distributions of reactive minerals along each flow path and examine the uncertainty of drainage geochemistry through time. The limited mixing of streamtubes that is characteristic of the vertical unsaturated flow in many waste-rock piles, allows individual flowpaths to sustain acid or neutral conditions to the base of the pile, where the streamtubes mix. Consequently, mixing and the acidity/alkalinity balance of the streamtube waters, and not the overall acid- and base-producing mineral contents, control the instantaneous discharge chemistry. Our results show that the limited mixing implied by preferential flow and the heterogeneous distribution of mineral contents lead to large uncertainty in drainage chemistry over short and medium time scales. However, over longer timescales when one of either the acid-producing or neutralizing primary phases is depleted, the drainage chemistry becomes less controlled by mixing and in turn less uncertain. A correct understanding of the temporal variability of uncertainty is key to make informed long-term decisions in mining settings regarding the management of waste material.

  13. The heterogeneous impact of a successful tobacco control campaign: a case study of Mauritius.

    Ross, Hana; Moussa, Leelmanee; Harris, Tom; Ajodhea, Rajive

    2018-01-01

    Mauritius has one of the highest smoking prevalences in Africa, contributing to its high burden of non-communicable diseases. Mauritius implemented a series of tobacco control measures from 2009 to 2012, including tobacco tax increases. There is evidence that these policies reduced tobacco consumption, but it is not clear what impact they had across different socioeconomic groups. The impact of tobacco control measures on different income groups was analysed by contrasting household tobacco expenditures reported in 2006-2007 and 2012 household expenditure surveys. We employed the seemingly unrelated regression model to assess the impact of tobacco use on other household expenditures and calculated Gini coefficients to assess tobacco expenditure inequality. From 2006 to 2012, excise taxes and retail cigarette prices increased by 40.6% and 15.3% in real terms, respectively. These increases were accompanied by numerous non-price tobacco control measures. The share of tobacco-consuming households declined from 35.7% to 29.3%, with the largest relative drop among low-income households. The Gini coefficient of household tobacco expenditures increased by 10.4% due to decreased spending by low-income households. Low-income households demonstrated the largest fall in their tobacco budget shares, and the impact of tobacco consumption on poverty decreased by 26.2%. Households that continued purchasing tobacco reduced their expenditures on transportation, communication, health, and education. These results suggest that tobacco control policies, including sizeable tax increases, were progressive in their impact. We conclude that tobacco use increases poverty and inequality, but stronger tobacco control policies can mitigate the impact of tobacco use on impoverishment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Body composition in patients with schizophrenia: Comparison with healthy controls

    Sugawara Norio

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a relationship between obesity and schizophrenia has been reported. Although fat- mass and fat free mass have been shown to be more predictive of health risk than body mass index, there are limited findings about body composition among patients suffering from schizophrenia. The aim of this study is to compare the body composition of schizophrenia patients with that of healthy subjects in Japan. Methods We recruited patients (n = 204, aged 41.3 ± 13.8 (mean ± SD years old with the DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia who were admitted to psychiatric hospital using a cross-sectional design. Subjects' anthropometric measurements including weight, height, body mass index (BMI, and medications were also collected. Body fat, percent (% body fat, fat- free mass, muscle mass, and body water were measured using the bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA method. Comparative analysis was performed with schizophrenic subjects and 204 healthy control individuals. Results In a multiple regression model with age, body mass index, and dose in chlorpromazine equivalents, schizophrenia was a significantly linked with more body fat, higher % body fat, lower fat- free mass, lower muscle mass, and lower body water among males. In females, schizophrenia had a significant association with lower % body fat, higher fat- free mass, higher muscle mass, and higher body water. Conclusions Our data demonstrate gender differences with regard to changes in body composition in association with schizophrenia. These results indicate that intervention programs designed to fight obesity among schizophrenic patients should be individualized according to gender.

  15. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control

    Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-07-31

    This final report to the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for DE-EE0000210 covers the period from October 1, 2009 to July 31, 2013. Under this project, DOE awarded UConn about $1,248,242 to conduct the research and development on a new class of 3D composite nanostructure based catalysts for lean NOx emission control. Much of the material presented here has already been submitted to DOE/NETL in quarterly technical reports. In this project, through a scalable solution process, we have successfully fabricated a new class of catalytic reactors, i.e., the composite nanostructure array (nano-array) based catalytic converters. These nanocatalysts, distinct from traditional powder washcoat based catalytic converters, directly integrate monolithic substrates together with nanostructures with well-defined size and shape during the scalable hydrothermal process. The new monolithic nanocatalysts are demonstrated to be able to save raw materials including Pt-group metals and support metal oxides by an order of magnitude, while perform well at various oxidation (e.g., CO oxidation and NO oxidation) and reduction reactions (H{sub 2} reduction of NOx) involved in the lean NOx emissions. The size, shape and arrangement of the composite nanostructures within the monolithic substrates are found to be the key in enabling the drastically reduced materials usage while maintaining the good catalytic reactivity in the enabled devices. The further understanding of the reaction kinetics associated with the unique mass transport and surface chemistry behind is needed for further optimizing the design and fabrication of good nanostructure array based catalytic converters. On the other hand, the high temperature stability, hydrothermal aging stability, as well as S-poisoning resistance have been investigated in this project on the nanocatalysts, which revealed promising results toward good chemical and mechanical robustness, as well as S

  16. Implementing Cooperative Behavior & Control Using Open Source Technology Across Heterogeneous Vehicles

    2015-03-26

    cooperative control algorithms used for multiple SUAS to perform surveillance using equal angular spacing from the ground target [16]. The algorithm...allows each SUAS in the surveillance mission to loiter around a target at an equal angular spacing from one another on the same loiter path. This...Planner has included. For instance, Mission Planner has the ability to run Python scripts. Python is a programming language like Java . With the

  17. Investigating the composition of organic aerosol resulting from cyclohexene ozonolysis: low molecular weight and heterogeneous reaction products

    J. F. Hamilton

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of organic aerosol formed from the gas phase ozonolysis of cyclohexene has been investigated in a smog chamber experiment. Comprehensive gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometric detection was used to determine that dicarboxylic acids and corresponding cyclic anhydrides dominated the small gas phase reaction products found in aerosol sampled during the first hour after initial aerosol formation. Structural analysis of larger more polar molecules was performed using liquid chromatography with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. This indicated that the majority of identified organic mass was in dimer form, built up from combinations of the most abundant small acid molecules, with frequent indication of the inclusion of adipic acid. Trimers and tetramers potentially formed via similar acid combinations were also observed in lower abundances. Tandem mass spectral data indicated dimers with either acid anhydride or ester functionalities as the linkage between monomers. High-resolution mass spectrometry identified the molecular formulae of the most abundant dimer species to be C10H16O6, C11H18O6, C10H14O8 and C11H16O8 and could be used in some cases to reduce uncertainty in exact chemical structure determination by tandem MS.

  18. Heterogeneous body composition trajectories in infancy are associated with blood pressure in childhood: A latent class analysis

    Wibaek, Rasmus; Kæstel, Pernille; Girma, Tsinuel

    to identify infants with distinct fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) trajectories from 0-6 months of age and examined associations with BP at 4 years of age. Material and methods: Air displacement plethysmography was used to measure body composition monthly from birth to 6 months of age in 364 Ethiopian...... infants. BP was assessed at 4 years of age. Data driven latent class trajectory models were used to establish distinct FM and FFM trajectories, and multiple linear regression to examine their associations with BP at 4 years of age adjusted for sex, weight and length at birth, 3 and 6 months of age....... Results: We identified four distinct FM and two distinct FFM growth trajectories (figure 1). Overall mean (SD) systolic BP (SBP) was 87.4 (6.8) mmHg and diastolic BP (DBP) was 52.9 (8.3) mmHg at 4 years of age. Compared to the "High intermediate FM" reference group, infants in the "Accelerated FM" group...

  19. Factors controlling stable isotope composition of European precipitation

    Rozanski, K.; Sonntag, C.; Muennich, K.O.

    1982-01-01

    The seasonal and spatial variations of stable isotope ratios in present day European precipitation are simulated with a simple multibox model of the mean west-east horizontal transport of the atmospheric water vapour across the European continent. Isotope fractionation during the formation of precipitation leads to an increasing depletion of heavy isotopes in the residual air moisture as it moves towards the centre of the continent. This isotopic depletion is partly compensated, particularly in summer, by evapotranspiration, which is assumed to transfer soil water into the atmosphere without isotope fractionation. The model estimates are based on horizontal water vapour flux data, varying seasonally between 88 and 130 kg m -1 s -1 for the Atlantic coast region, and on the monthly precipitation, evapotranspiration and surface air temperature data available for various locations in Europe. Both continental and seasonal temperature effects observed in the stable isotope composition of European precipitation are fairly well reproduced by the model. The calculations show that the isotopic composition of local precipitation is primarily controlled by regional scale processes, i.e. by the water vapour transport patterns into the continent, and by the average precipitation-evapotranspiration history of the air masses precipitating at a given place. Local parameters such as the surface and/or cloud base temperature or the amount of precipitation modify the isotope ratios only slightly. Implications of the model predictions for the interpretation of stable isotope ratios in earlier periods as they are preserved in ice cores and in groundwater are also discussed. (Auth.)

  20. Fabrication of magnetic carbon composites from peanut shells and its application as a heterogeneous Fenton catalyst in removal of methylene blue

    Zhou, Lincheng, E-mail: zhoulc@lzu.edu.cn; Ma, Junjun; Zhang, He; Shao, Yanming; Li, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Peanut shell magnetic carbon (PMC) were fabricated by carbonized the mixture of peanut shells and (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}Fe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}. The obtained PMC exhibit high efficiency in catalysis oxidation methylene blue with the help of K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} and it can be easily separated from aqueous by external magnetic field. Meanwhile, the catalyst can be reused for seven times almost without decreased of activity. - Highlights: • Novel peanut shell magnetic carbon (PMC) catalysts were successfully synthesized. • PMC exhibited superior activity as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst. • A high efficient Fenton-like system was set up for removal MB. • PMC posed excellent catalysis oxidation quality, stability and good reusability. - Abstract: Magnetic carbons were prepared from agricultural waste peanut shells and Ferric ammonium oxalate via a simple impregnation and carbonization process. The obtained composites were characterized by element analysis, MÖssbauer spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area method, respectively. The magnetic carbon material was used as catalyst of heterogeneous Fenton reaction to remove methylene blue with the help of persulfate in waste water. The results indicated that both the removal rate and removal efficiency of this catalytic system are very excellent. The degradation efficiency was best (90% within 30 min) using initial concentrations of 0.5 g L{sup −1} persulfate and 40 mg L{sup −1} methylene blue. The removal mechanism was investigated by LC-MS. The catalyst retained its activity after seven reuses, indicating its good stability and reusability. It is inexpensive because it consists mainly of agricultural waste. Its porosity contributed to its high activity, which was achieved without any additional activation process. These indicating that the catalyst is

  1. Control and design of volumetric composition in pultruded hybrid fibre composites

    Madsen, Bo; Hashemi, Fariborz; Tahir, Paridah

    2016-01-01

    composition (i.e. volume fractions of fibres, matrix and porosity) in hybrid fibre composites. The model is based on a constant local fibre volume fraction criterion. Good agreement is found between model predictions and experimental data of pultruded hybrid kenaf/glass fibre composites with variable hybrid...... fibre weight mixing ratios. To demonstrate the suitability of the model, simulations are performed for four different cases of volumetric composition in hybrid kenaf/glass composites....

  2. Heterogenous treatment of water gaps and control rods in core calculations

    Lindahl, S.Oe.

    1984-08-01

    The conventional fuel assembly homogenization process introduces errors in the gross power distribution of the order of 10%. A method to mitigate the homogenization error is proposed. The gaps in between the fuel pin domains, containing water, control rod blades, fuel channel shroud, etc, are described by their transmission and reflection properties while the fuel pin regions are represented by conventional, homogenized cross sections. A nodal equation, incorporating the gap transmission and reflection functions, is set up in a general form. By numerical testing on 2D core problems it is shown that the explicit gap treatment is capable of reducing the homogenization error by an order of magnitude. (author)

  3. The Effect of Photon Source on Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Oxidation of Ethanol by a Silica-Titania Composite

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Mazyck, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to distinguish the effect of photon flux (i.e., photons per unit time reaching a surface) from that of photon energy (i.e., wavelength) of a photon source on the silica-titania composite (STC)-catalyzed degradation of ethanol in the gas phase. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale annular reactor packed with STC pellets and irradiated with either a UV-A fluorescent black light blue lamp ((gamma)max=365 nm) at its maximum light intensity or a UV-C germicidal lamp ((gamma)max=254 nm) at three levels of light intensity. The STC-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol was found to follow zero-order kinetics with respect to CO2 production, regardless of the photon source. Increased photon flux led to increased EtOH removal, mineralization, and oxidation rate accompanied by lower intermediate concentration in the effluent. The oxidation rate was higher in the reactor irradiated by UV-C than by UV-A (38.4 vs. 31.9 nM/s) at the same photon flux, with similar trends for mineralization (53.9 vs. 43.4%) and reaction quantum efficiency (i.e., photonic efficiency, 63.3 vs. 50.1 nmol CO2 (mu)mol/photons). UV-C irradiation also led to decreased intermediate concentration in the effluent . compared to UV-A irradiation. These results demonstrated that STC-catalyzed oxidation is enhanced by both increased photon flux and photon energy.

  4. Direct surface analysis coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals heterogeneous composition of the cuticle of Hibiscus trionum petals.

    Giorio, Chiara; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J; Skelton, Paul C; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-10-06

    Plant cuticle, which is the outermost layer covering the aerial parts of all plants including petals and leaves, can present a wide range of patterns that, combined with cell shape, can generate unique physical, mechanical, or optical properties. For example, arrays of regularly spaced nanoridges have been found on the dark (anthocyanin-rich) portion at the base of the petals of Hibiscus trionum. Those ridges act as a diffraction grating, producing an iridescent effect. Because the surface of the distal white region of the petals is smooth and noniridescent, a selective chemical characterization of the surface of the petals on different portions (i.e., ridged vs smooth) is needed to understand whether distinct cuticular patterns correlate with distinct chemical compositions of the cuticle. In the present study, a rapid screening method has been developed for the direct surface analysis of Hibiscus trionum petals using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry. The optimized method was used to characterize a wide range of plant metabolites and cuticle monomers on the upper (adaxial) surface of the petals on both the white/smooth and anthocyanic/ridged regions, and on the lower (abaxial) surface, which is entirely smooth. The main components detected on the surface of the petals are low-molecular-weight organic acids, sugars, and flavonoids. The ridged portion on the upper surface of the petal is enriched in long-chain fatty acids, which are constituents of the wax fraction of the cuticle. These compounds were not detected on the white/smooth region of the upper petal surface or on the smooth lower surface.

  5. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    Kovalovs, A; Barkanov, E; Gluhihs, S [Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga Technical University, 16/20 Azenes Str., Riga, LV-1048 (Latvia)

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  6. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    Kovalovs, A; Barkanov, E; Gluhihs, S

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures

  7. Design of Active Queue Management for Robust Control on Access Router for Heterogeneous Networks

    Åhlund Christer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet architecture is a packet switching technology that allows dynamic sharing of bandwidth among different flows with in an IP network. Packets are stored and forwarded from one node to the next until reaching their destination. Major issues in this integration are congestion control and how to meet different quality of service requirements associated with various services. In other words streaming media quality degrades with increased packet delay and jitter caused by network congestion. To mitigate the impact of network congestion, various techniques have been used to improve multimedia quality and one of those techniques is Active Queue Management (AQM. Access routers require a buffer to hold packets during times of congestion. A large buffer can absorb the bursty arrivals, and this tends to increase the link utilizations but results in higher queuing delays. Traffic burstiness has a considerable negative impact on network performance. AQM is now considered an effective congestion control mechanism for enhancing transport protocol performance over wireless links. In order to have good link utilization, it is necessary for queues to adapt to varying traffic loads. This paper considers a particular scheme which is called Adaptive AQM (AAQM and studies its performance in the presence of feedback delays and its ability to maintain a small queue length as well as its robustness in the presence of traffic burstiness. The paper also presents a method based on the well-known Markov Modulated Poisson Process (MPP to capture traffic burstiness and buffer occupancy. To demonstrate the generality of the presented method, an analytic model is described and verified by extensive simulations of different adaptive AQM algorithms. The analysis and simulations show that AAQM outperforms the other AQMs with respect to responsiveness and robustness.

  8. Quantitative assay for the colonization ability of heterogeneous bacteria on controlled nanopillar structures

    Jin, Lin; Guo, Wen; Zhang, Yali; Xue, Peihong; Gao, Hainan; Zhao, Ming; Zheng, Chen; Han, Dong

    2015-01-01

    The colonization ability of bacteria on biomaterial surfaces is influenced by the morphology of the bacteria and the nanotopography of the biomaterial. However, interactions between the bacterial morphology and nanotopography of biomaterials have not yet been completely elucidated. In this article, we quantitatively characterized the bacterial morphology to illuminate the integrated effects of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanopillar arrays on the colonization of bacteria cells with different shapes. Our results demonstrated that the interaction between interpillar spacing and the diameter of the bacterial cells impacted the number of bacterial cells that adhered to different PET substrates. The interpillar spacing of nanopillar arrays promotes bacterial adhesion in a definite range (<50 nm). However, further increasing the interpillar spacing inhibited the adhesion of bacteria to the nanopillar arrays. Moreover, the interpillar spacing also influenced the morphologies of adherent bacterial cells on the PET nanopillar arrays, which consequently facilitated bacterial adhesion to the nanopillar arrays. Our findings enhance the understanding of interactions between controlled nanotopography and bacterial colonization and provide an appropriate parameter for the design of antibacterial materials with nanotopography. (paper)

  9. Antifouling composites with self-adaptive controlled release based on an active compound intercalated into layered double hydroxides

    Yang, Miaosen; Gu, Lianghua; Yang, Bin; Wang, Li; Sun, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jiyong; Zhang, Jinwei; Hou, Jian; Lin, Cunguo

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports a novel method to prepare the antifouling composites with properties of self-adaptive controlled release (defined as control the release rate autonomously and adaptively according to the change of environmental conditions) by intercalation of sodium paeonolsilate (PAS) into MgAl and ZnAl layered double hydroxide (LDH) with the molar ratio (M2+/M3+) of 2:1 and 3:1, respectively. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirm the intercalation of PAS into the galleries of LDH. The controlled release behavior triggered by temperature for the PAS-LDH composites has been investigated, and the results show that the release rate of all PAS-LDH composites increases as the increase of temperature. However, the MgAl-PAS-LDH composites (Mg2Al-PAS-LDH and Mg3Al-PAS-LDH) exhibit the increased release rate of 0.21 ppm/°C from 15 to 30 °C in 3.5% NaCl solution, more than three times of the ZnAl-PAS-LDH composites (0.06 ppm/°C), owing to the confined microenvironment influenced by metal types in LDH layers. In addition, a possible diffusion-controlled process with surface diffusion, bulk diffusion and heterogeneous flat surface diffusion has been revealed via fitting four kinetic equations. Moreover, to verify the practical application of the PAS-LDH composites, a model coating denoted as Mg2Al-PAS-LDH coating was fabricated. The release result displays that the release rate increases or decreases as temperature altered at 15 and 25 °C alternately, indicating its self-adaptive controlled release behavior with temperature. Moreover, the superior resistance to the settlement of Ulva spores at 15 and 25 °C was observed for the Mg2Al-PAS-LDH coating, as a result of the controllable release of antifoulant. Therefore, this work provides a facile and effective method for the fabrication of antifouling composites with self-adaptive controlled release behavior in response to temperature, which can be used to prolong

  10. A Cross-Entropy-Based Admission Control Optimization Approach for Heterogeneous Virtual Machine Placement in Public Clouds

    Li Pan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtualization technologies make it possible for cloud providers to consolidate multiple IaaS provisions into a single server in the form of virtual machines (VMs. Additionally, in order to fulfill the divergent service requirements from multiple users, a cloud provider needs to offer several types of VM instances, which are associated with varying configurations and performance, as well as different prices. In such a heterogeneous virtual machine placement process, one significant problem faced by a cloud provider is how to optimally accept and place multiple VM service requests into its cloud data centers to achieve revenue maximization. To address this issue, in this paper, we first formulate such a revenue maximization problem during VM admission control as a multiple-dimensional knapsack problem, which is known to be NP-hard to solve. Then, we propose to use a cross-entropy-based optimization approach to address this revenue maximization problem, by obtaining a near-optimal eligible set for the provider to accept into its data centers, from the waiting VM service requests in the system. Finally, through extensive experiments and measurements in a simulated environment with the settings of VM instance classes derived from real-world cloud systems, we show that our proposed cross-entropy-based admission control optimization algorithm is efficient and effective in maximizing cloud providers’ revenue in a public cloud computing environment.

  11. Advances in methods of commercial FBR core characteristics analyses. Investigations of a treatment of the double-heterogeneity and a method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections

    Sugino, Kazuteru [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Iwai, Takehiko

    1998-07-01

    A standard data base for FBR core nuclear design is under development in order to improve the accuracy of FBR design calculation. As a part of the development, we investigated an improved treatment of double-heterogeneity and a method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections in a commercial reactor geometry, for the betterment of the analytical accuracy of commercial FBR core characteristics. As an improvement in the treatment of double-heterogeneity, we derived a new method (the direct method) and compared both this and conventional methods with continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations. In addition, we investigated the applicability of the reaction rate ratio preservation method as a advanced method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections. The present studies gave the following information: (1) An improved treatment of double-heterogeneity: for criticality the conventional method showed good agreement with Monte-Carlo result within one sigma standard deviation; the direct method was consistent with conventional one. Preliminary evaluation of effects in core characteristics other than criticality showed that the effect of sodium void reactivity (coolant reactivity) due to the double-heterogeneity was large. (2) An advanced method to calculate homogenize control rod cross sections: for control rod worths the reaction rate ratio preservation method agreed with those produced by the calculations with the control rod heterogeneity included in the core geometry; in Monju control rod worth analysis, the present method overestimated control rod worths by 1 to 2% compared with the conventional method, but these differences were caused by more accurate model in the present method and it is considered that this method is more reliable than the conventional one. These two methods investigated in this study can be directly applied to core characteristics other than criticality or control rod worth. Thus it is concluded that these methods will

  12. Topography and malaria transmission heterogeneity in western Kenya highlands: prospects for focal vector control

    Ndenga Bryson A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent resurgence of malaria in the highlands of Western Kenya has called for a more comprehensive understanding of the previously neglected complex highland vector ecology. Besides other drivers of malaria epidemiology, topography is likely to have a major effect on spatial vector and parasite distribution. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of topography on malaria spatial vector distribution and parasite prevalence. Methodology Indoor resting adult malaria vectors and blood parasites were collected in three villages along a 4 km transect originating from the valley bottom and ending at the hilltop for 13 months. Members of the Anopheles gambiae complex were identified by PCR. Blood parasites were collected from children 6–13 years old and densities categorized by site of home location and age of the children. Results Ninety eight percent (98% of An. gambiae s.s. and (99% Anopheles funestus were collected in houses located at the edge of the valley bottom, whereas 1% of An. gambiae s.s. were collected at mid hill and at the hilltop respectively. No An. funestus were collected at the hilltop. Malaria prevalence was 68% at the valley bottom, 40.2% at mid hill and 26.7% at the hilltop. Children aged six years and living at the edge of the valley bottom had an annual geometric mean number of 66.1 trophozoites for every 200 white blood cells, while those living at mid-hill had a mean of 84.8, and those living at hilltop had 199.5 trophozoites. Conclusion Malaria transmission in this area is mainly confined to the valley bottom. Effective vector control could be targeted at the foci. However, the few vectors observed at mid-hill maintained a relatively high prevalence rate. The higher variability in blood parasite densities and their low correlation with age in children living at the hilltop suggests a lower stability of transmission than at the mid-hill and valley bottom.

  13. Using WRF-Chem to investigate the impact of night time nitrate radical chemistry and N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry on the chemical composition of the UK troposphere.

    Archer-Nicholls, S.; Lowe, D.; Utembe, S.; McFiggans, G.

    2012-04-01

    It is believed that NO3 is the primary oxidant at night time, significantly impacting ozone formation, rain acidification and the formation and transformation of aerosols, particularly through the formation of the ammonium nitrate particulate (Allan et. al., 2000). However, many of the basic chemical processes controlling the formation and removal of NO3, in particular, the N2O5 heterogeneous reactions, are often not represented in models, although general parameterisations have been developed (c.f. Bertram & Thornton, 2009). The ROle of Night time chemistry in controlling the Oxidising Capacity of the atmOsphere (RONOCO) campaign is a project being funded by NERC and being carried out by a collaboration of UK Universities. It aims to better understand the role of the NO3 radical on the chemistry of the night time atmosphere, its oxidation capacity and thus its overall effects on the composition of the troposphere. The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is a state of the art regional climate model with fully coupled online air quality and meteorological components allowing for better resolution of aerosol and gas-phase chemistry (Grell et. al., 2005). It has been extended to include the Common Representative Intermediates scheme (CRIv2-R5) (Watson et. al., 2008), a reduced chemical scheme designed to simulate the atmospheric degradation of 220 species of hydrocarbons and VOCs. The MOSAIC aerosol scheme (Zaveri et. al., 2008), has been extended to include a reduced complexity condensed organic phase consisting of 13 semi-volatile and 2 involatile species (Topping et. al., 2012), as well as the N2O5 heterogeneous reaction scheme of Bertram & Thornton (2009). We aim to use WRF-Chem to compare the oxidation capacity of nighttime NO3 chemistry with that of daytime OH chemistry. The model was run using two nested grids: a 15km resolution domain over western Europe, containing a 5km resolution domain over the UK. The RONOCO campaign consisted

  14. Controlling coupled bending-twisting vibrations of anisotropic composite wing

    Ryabov, Victor; Yartsev, Boris

    2018-05-01

    The paper discusses the possibility to control coupled bending-twisting vibrations of anisotropic composite wing by means of the monoclinic structures in the reinforcement of the plating. Decomposing the potential straining energy and kinetic energy of natural vibration modes into interacting and non-interacting parts, it became possible to introduce the two coefficients that integrally consider the effect of geometry and reinforcement structure upon the dynamic response parameters of the wing. The first of these coefficients describes the elastic coupling of the natural vibration modes, the second coefficient describes the inertial one. The paper describes the numerical studies showing how the orientation of considerably anisotropic CRP layers in the plating affects natural frequencies, loss factors, coefficients of elastic and inertial coupling for several lower tones of natural bending-twisting vibrations of the wing. Besides, for each vibration mode, partial values of the above mentioned dynamic response parameters were determined by means of the relationships for orthotropic structures where instead of "free" shearing modulus in the reinforcement plant, "pure" shearing modulus is used. Joint analysis of the obtained results has shown that each pair of bending-twisting vibration modes has its orientation angle ranges of the reinforcing layers where the inertial coupling caused by asymmetry of the cross-section profile with respect to the main axes of inertia decreases, down to the complete extinction, due to the generation of the elastic coupling in the plating material. These ranges are characterized by the two main features: 1) the difference in the natural frequencies of the investigated pair of bending-twisting vibration modes is the minimum and 2) natural frequencies of bending-twisting vibrations belong to a stretch restricted by corresponding partial natural frequencies of the investigated pair of vibration modes. This result is of practical importance

  15. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals that individual low-light LH2 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6. have a heterogeneous polypeptide composition.

    Brotosudarmo, Tatas H P; Kunz, Ralf; Böhm, Paul; Gardiner, Alastair T; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2009-09-02

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris belongs to the group of purple bacteria that have the ability to produce LH2 complexes with unusual absorption spectra when they are grown at low-light intensity. This ability is often related to the presence of multiple genes encoding the antenna apoproteins. Here we report, for the first time to our knowledge, direct evidence that individual low-light LH2 complexes have a heterogeneous alphabeta-apoprotein composition that modulates the site energies of Bchl a molecules, producing absorption bands at 800, 820, and 850 nm. The arrangement of the Bchl a molecules in the "tightly coupled ring" can be modeled by nine alphabeta-Bchls dimers, such that the Bchls bound to six alphabeta-pairs have B820-like site energies and the remaining Bchl a molecules have B850-like site energies. Furthermore, the experimental data can only be satisfactorily modeled when these six alphabeta-pairs with B820 Bchl a molecules are distributed such that the symmetry of the assembly is reduced to C(3). It is also clear from the measured single-molecule spectra that the energies of the electronically excited states in the mixed B820/850 ring are mainly influenced by diagonal disorder.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?

    Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

    2013-11-30

    This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques

  17. Effects of medium-chain triglycerides on weight loss and body composition: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Mumme, Karen; Stonehouse, Welma

    2015-02-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) may result in negative energy balance and weight loss through increased energy expenditure and lipid oxidation. However, results from human intervention studies investigating the weight reducing potential of MCTs, have been mixed. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of MCTs, specifically C8:0 and C10:0, to long-chain triglycerides (LCTs) on weight loss and body composition in adults. Changes in blood lipid levels were secondary outcomes. Randomized controlled trials >3 weeks' duration conducted in healthy adults were identified searching Web of Knowledge, Discover, PubMed, Scopus, New Zealand Science, and Cochrane CENTRAL until March 2014 with no language restriction. Identified trials were assessed for bias. Mean differences were pooled and analyzed using inverse variance models with fixed effects. Heterogeneity between studies was calculated using I(2) statistic. An I(2)>50% or P<0.10 indicated heterogeneity. Thirteen trials (n=749) were identified. Compared with LCTs, MCTs decreased body weight (-0.51 kg [95% CI-0.80 to -0.23 kg]; P<0.001; I(2)=35%); waist circumference (-1.46 cm [95% CI -2.04 to -0.87 cm]; P<0.001; I(2)=0%), hip circumference (-0.79 cm [95% CI -1.27 to -0.30 cm]; P=0.002; I(2)=0%), total body fat (standard mean difference -0.39 [95% CI -0.57 to -0.22]; P<0.001; I(2)=0%), total subcutaneous fat (standard mean difference -0.46 [95% CI -0.64 to -0.27]; P<0.001; I(2)=20%), and visceral fat (standard mean difference -0.55 [95% CI -0.75 to -0.34]; P<0.001; I(2)=0%). No differences were seen in blood lipid levels. Many trials lacked sufficient information for a complete quality assessment, and commercial bias was detected. Although heterogeneity was absent, study designs varied with regard to duration, dose, and control of energy intake. Replacement of LCTs with MCTs in the diet could potentially induce modest reductions in body weight and composition

  18. Controllable synthesis of molybdenum tungsten disulfide alloy for vertically composition-controlled multilayer

    Song, Jeong-Gyu; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Su Jeong; Sim, Sangwan; Lee, Chang Wan; Choi, Taejin; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Youngjun; Lee, Zonghoon; Myoung, Jae-Min; Dussarrat, Christian; Lansalot-Matras, Clement; Park, Jusang; Choi, Hyunyong; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-01

    The effective synthesis of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides alloy is essential for successful application in electronic and optical devices based on a tunable band gap. Here we show a synthesis process for Mo1−xWxS2 alloy using sulfurization of super-cycle atomic layer deposition Mo1−xWxOy. Various spectroscopic and microscopic results indicate that the synthesized Mo1−xWxS2 alloys have complete mixing of Mo and W atoms and tunable band gap by systematically controlled composition and layer number. Based on this, we synthesize a vertically composition-controlled (VCC) Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer using five continuous super-cycles with different cycle ratios for each super-cycle. Angle-resolved X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer results reveal that a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer has different vertical composition and broadband light absorption with strong interlayer coupling within a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer. Further, we demonstrate that a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer photodetector generates three to four times greater photocurrent than MoS2- and WS2-based devices, owing to the broadband light absorption. PMID:26204328

  19. Heterogeneity of environments associated with transmission of visceral leishmaniasis in South-Eastern France and implication for control strategies.

    Benoit Faucher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum is currently spreading into new foci across Europe. Leishmania infantum transmission in the Old World was reported to be strongly associated with a few specific environments. Environmental changes due to global warming or human activity were therefore incriminated in the spread of the disease. However, comprehensive studies were lacking to reliably identify all the environments at risk and thereby optimize monitoring and control strategy. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We exhaustively collected 328 cases of autochthonous visceral leishmaniasis from 1993 to 2009 in South-Eastern France. Leishmaniasis incidence decreased from 31 yearly cases between 1993 and 1997 to 12 yearly cases between 2005 and 2009 mostly because Leishmania/HIV coinfection were less frequent. No spread of human visceral leishmaniasis was observed in the studied region. Two major foci were identified, associated with opposite environments: whereas one involved semi-rural hillside environments partly made of mixed forests, the other involved urban and peri-urban areas in and around the region main town, Marseille. The two neighboring foci were related to differing environments despite similar vectors (P. perniciosus, canine reservoir, parasite (L. infantum zymodeme MON-1, and human host. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This unprecedented collection of cases highlighted the occurrence of protracted urban transmission of L. infantum in France, a worrisome finding as the disease is currently spreading in other areas around the Mediterranean. These results complete previous studies about more widespread canine leishmaniasis or human asymptomatic carriage. This first application of systematic geostatistical methods to European human visceral leishmaniasis demonstrated an unsuspected heterogeneity of environments associated with the transmission of the disease. These findings modify the current view of leishmaniasis epidemiology. They

  20. Heterogeneity of environments associated with transmission of visceral leishmaniasis in South-Eastern France and implication for control strategies.

    Faucher, Benoit; Gaudart, Jean; Faraut, Francoise; Pomares, Christelle; Mary, Charles; Marty, Pierre; Piarroux, Renaud

    2012-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum is currently spreading into new foci across Europe. Leishmania infantum transmission in the Old World was reported to be strongly associated with a few specific environments. Environmental changes due to global warming or human activity were therefore incriminated in the spread of the disease. However, comprehensive studies were lacking to reliably identify all the environments at risk and thereby optimize monitoring and control strategy. We exhaustively collected 328 cases of autochthonous visceral leishmaniasis from 1993 to 2009 in South-Eastern France. Leishmaniasis incidence decreased from 31 yearly cases between 1993 and 1997 to 12 yearly cases between 2005 and 2009 mostly because Leishmania/HIV coinfection were less frequent. No spread of human visceral leishmaniasis was observed in the studied region. Two major foci were identified, associated with opposite environments: whereas one involved semi-rural hillside environments partly made of mixed forests, the other involved urban and peri-urban areas in and around the region main town, Marseille. The two neighboring foci were related to differing environments despite similar vectors (P. perniciosus), canine reservoir, parasite (L. infantum zymodeme MON-1), and human host. This unprecedented collection of cases highlighted the occurrence of protracted urban transmission of L. infantum in France, a worrisome finding as the disease is currently spreading in other areas around the Mediterranean. These results complete previous studies about more widespread canine leishmaniasis or human asymptomatic carriage. This first application of systematic geostatistical methods to European human visceral leishmaniasis demonstrated an unsuspected heterogeneity of environments associated with the transmission of the disease. These findings modify the current view of leishmaniasis epidemiology. They notably stress the need for locally defined control strategies and extensive

  1. EKF composition estimation and GMC control of a reactive distillation column

    Tintavon, Sirivimon; Kittisupakorn, Paisan

    2017-08-01

    This research work proposes an extended Kalman filter (EKF) estimator to give estimates of product composition and a generic model controller (GMC) to control the temperature of a reactive distillation column (RDC). One of major difficulties to control the RDC is large time delays of product composition measurement. Therefore, the estimates of the product composition are needed and determined based on available and reliable measured tray temperature via the extended Kalman Filter (EKF). With these estimates, the GMC controller is applied to control the RDC's temperature. The performance of the EKF estimator under the GMC control is evaluated in various disturbances and set point change.

  2. Carbon-carbon composite and copper-composite bond damages for high flux component controlled fusion

    Chevet, G.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma facing components constitute the first wall in contact with plasma in fusion machines such as Tore Supra and ITER. These components have to sustain high heat flux and consequently elevated temperatures. They are made up of an armour material, the carbon-carbon composite, a heat sink structure material, the copper chromium zirconium, and a material, the OFHC copper, which is used as a compliant layer between the carbon-carbon composite and the copper chromium zirconium. Using different materials leads to the apparition of strong residual stresses during manufacturing, because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the materials, and compromises the lasting operation of fusion machines as damage which appeared during manufacturing may propagate. The objective of this study is to understand the damage mechanisms of the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond under solicitations that plasma facing components may suffer during their life. The mechanical behaviours of carbon-carbon composite and composite-copper bond were studied in order to define the most suitable models to describe these behaviours. With these models, thermomechanical calculations were performed on plasma facing components with the finite element code Cast3M. The manufacturing of the components induces high stresses which damage the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond. The damage propagates during the cooling down to room temperature and not under heat flux. Alternative geometries for the plasma facing components were studied to reduce damage. The relation between the damage of the carbon-carbon composite and its thermal conductivity was also demonstrated. (author) [fr

  3. Selective control of reformed composition of n-heptane via plasma chemistry

    Manoj Kumar Reddy, P.; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for reforming n-heptane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor to show detailed chemical composition in the products and to propose a potential method to control the product

  4. Composites

    Kasen, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the roles of composite laminates and aggregates in cryogenic technology. Filamentary-reinforced composites are emphasized because they are the most widely used composite materials. Topics considered include composite systems and terminology, design and fabrication, composite failure, high-pressure reinforced plastic laminates, low-pressure reinforced plastics, reinforced metals, selectively reinforced structures, the effect of cryogenic temperatures, woven-fabric and random-mat composites, uniaxial fiber-reinforced composites, composite joints in cryogenic structures, joining techniques at room temperature, radiation effects, testing laminates at cryogenic temperatures, static and cyclic tensile testing, static and cyclic compression testing, interlaminar shear testing, secondary property tests, and concrete aggregates. It is suggested that cryogenic composite technology would benefit from the development of a fracture mechanics model for predicting the fitness-for-purpose of polymer-matrix composite structures

  5. Modeling of composite synthesis in conditions of controlled thermal explosion

    Kukta, Yaroslav; Knyazeva, Anna

    2017-12-01

    The paper proposes the model for the titanium-based composite synthesis from powders of titanium and carbon of non-stoichiometric composition. The model takes into account the mixture heating from chamber walls, the dependence of liquidus and solidus temperatures on the composition of reacting mixture and the formation of possible irreversible phases. The reaction retardation by the reaction product is taken into consideration in kinetic laws. As an example, the results of temperature and conversion level calculation are presented for the system Ti-C with the summary reaction for different temperatures of chamber walls heating. It was revealed that the reaction retardation being the reaction product can be the cause of incomplete conversion in the thermal explosion conditions. Non-stoichiometric composition leads to the conditions of degenerated mode when some additional heating is necessary to complete the reaction.

  6. Heterogeneous reactors

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. Design and Simulation to Composite PI Controller on the Stratospheric Airship

    Kangwen Sun; Ming Zhu; Bojin Qi; Xiaoming Chen

    2014-01-01

    In view of the stratospheric airship application requirements on energy storage and management system, based on the topology of DC/DC converter main circuit, the composite PI controller is designed to realize respective control with the Boost mode and Buck mode. Furthermore, limit stop integration method is proposed to achieve a buck-boost complex DC/DC converter boost with effective switching buck. Then, with the MATLAB Control System Toolbox design model, the composite PI controller design ...

  8. The product composition control system at Savannah River: Statistical process control algorithm

    Brown, K.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be used to immobilize the approximately 130 million liters of high-level nuclear waste currently stored at the site in 51 carbon steel tanks. Waste handling operations separate this waste into highly radioactive insoluble sludge and precipitate and less radioactive water soluble salts. In DWPF, precipitate (PHA) is blended with insoluble sludge and ground glass frit to produce melter feed slurry which is continuously fed to the DWPF melter. The melter produces a molten borosilicate glass which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in an geologic repository. Described here is the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) process control algorithm. The PCCS is the amalgam of computer hardware and software intended to ensure that the melt will be processable and that the glass wasteform produced will be acceptable. Within PCCS, the Statistical Process Control (SPC) Algorithm is the means which guides control of the DWPF process. The SPC Algorithm is necessary to control the multivariate DWPF process in the face of uncertainties arising from the process, its feeds, sampling, modeling, and measurement systems. This article describes the functions performed by the SPC Algorithm, characterization of DWPF prior to making product, accounting for prediction uncertainty, accounting for measurement uncertainty, monitoring a SME batch, incorporating process information, and advantages of the algorithm. 9 refs., 6 figs

  9. Mishap risk control for advanced aerospace/composite materials

    Olson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Although advanced aerospace materials and advanced composites provide outstanding performance, they also present several unique post-mishap environmental, safety, and health concerns. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on some of the unique hazards and concerns associated with these materials when damaged by fire, explosion, or high-energy impact. Additionally, recommended procedures and precautions are addressed as they pertain to all phases of a composite aircraft mishap response, including fire-fighting, investigation, recovery, clean-up, and guidelines are general in nature and not application-specific. The goal of this project is to provide factual and realistic information which can be used to develop consistent and effective procedures and policies to minimize the potential environmental, safety, and health impacts of a composite aircraft mishap response effort.

  10. Do goethite surfaces really control the transport and retention of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in chemically heterogeneous porous media?

    Transport and retention behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was studied in mixtures of negatively charged quartz sand (QS) and positively charged goethite-coated sand (GQS) to assess the role of chemical heterogeneity. The linear equilibrium sorption model provided a good description o...

  11. Design And Planning Of E- Learning EnvironmentE-Education System On Heterogeneous Wireless Network Control System

    ThandarOo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this research is to provide a more efficient and effective communication method between teacher and student with the use of heterogeneous network. Moreover the effective use of heterogeneous network can be emphasized. The system of e-education can develop utilizing wireless network.The e-Education system can help students to communicate with their teacher more easily and effectively using a heterogeneous wireless network system. In this wireless network system students who are blind or dumb will also be able to communicate and learn from the teacher as normal students can do. All the devices or laptops will be connected on wireless LAN. Even when the teacher is not around he will be able to help his students with their study or give instructions easily by using the mobile phone to send text or voice signal. When the teacher sends information to the dumb student it will be converted into sign language for the student to be able to understand. When the dumb student sends the information to the teacher it will be converted into text for the teacher to understand. For the blind student text instructions from the teacher will be converted into audio signal using text-to-speech conversion.Thus the performance of heterogeneous wireless network model can evaluate by using Robust Optimization Method. Therefore the e-Education systems performance improves by evaluating Robust Optimization Method.

  12. Composition

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  13. Composition

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  14. Methods and compositions for controlling gene expression by RNA processing

    Doudna, Jennifer A.; Qi, Lei S.; Haurwitz, Rachel E.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2017-08-29

    The present disclosure provides nucleic acids encoding an RNA recognition sequence positioned proximal to an insertion site for the insertion of a sequence of interest; and host cells genetically modified with the nucleic acids. The present disclosure also provides methods of modifying the activity of a target RNA, and kits and compositions for carrying out the methods.

  15. Heterogeneous distribution of pelagic sediments incoming the Japan Trench possibly controlling slip propagation on shallow plate boundary fault

    Yamaguchi, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Fukuchi, R.; Kurano, H.; Ikehara, K.; Kanamatsu, T.; Arai, K.; Usami, K.; Ashi, J.

    2017-12-01

    Catastrophic tsunami of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake was triggered by large coseismic slip reached to the Japan Trench axis (e.g. Fujiwara et al., 2011, Science; Kodaira et al., 2012, Nature Geoscience). Results of the IODP Expedition 343 (JFAST) suggest that small friction of smectite-rich pelagic clay caused slip propagation on shallow plate boundary fault (Ujiie et al., 2013, Science; Kameda et al., 2015, Geology; Moore et al., 2015, Geosphere). On the other hand, JAMSTEC high-resolution seismic profiles show that incoming sediments have large heterogeneities in thicknesses, and two areas of extremely thin sediments on the Pacific Plate (thickness less than 100 m) were found at around 39°N (Nakamura et al., AGU 2017, this session). To reconcile whether the smectite-rich pelagic clay even exists in these areas, we sampled surface sediments during the R/V Shinsei Maru KS-15-3 cruise. Seven piston cores were retrieved from seaward trench slope, horst, graben, and graben edge. Core lithologies are mainly diatomaceous ooze/clay including tephra layers, not resemble to pelagic clays discovered in JFAST. Ages of tephra layers were estimated by correlating mineral assemblages and refractive indices of volcanic glasses to Japanese widespread tephras. Averaged sedimentation rates of seaward trench slope, horst, graben, and graben edge are estimated to be 25-30, 6.5-20, 45, 0.9 cm/kyr, respectively. These sedimentation rates imply that sediments on seaward trench slope and horst have been deposited in the last 160-500 kyr, suggesting that entire pelagic sediments, including smectite-rich pelagic clay, have been removed by some reasons in the last 0.5 million years. Possible reason for such modification of sediment is near-trench igneous activity known as petit-spot volcanism (Hirano et al., 2006, Science). The lack of smectite-rich pelagic clay near 39°N of the Japan Trench is consistent with results of tsunami inversions proposing shallow large coseismic slip propagated

  16. Heterogeneous Gossip

    Frey, Davide; Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Koldehofe, Boris; Mogensen, Martin; Monod, Maxime; Quéma, Vivien

    Gossip-based information dissemination protocols are considered easy to deploy, scalable and resilient to network dynamics. Load-balancing is inherent in these protocols as the dissemination work is evenly spread among all nodes. Yet, large-scale distributed systems are usually heterogeneous with respect to network capabilities such as bandwidth. In practice, a blind load-balancing strategy might significantly hamper the performance of the gossip dissemination.

  17. Parameters Controlling Sediment Composition of Modern and Pleistocene Jamaican Reefs

    Boss, Stephen K.

    1985-01-01

    Recent carbonate sediments from Jamaican north coast fringing reefs display variation in constituent composition, texture, and mineralogy related to their location on the reef. Samples were collected along lines which traversed the back reef and fore reef (0.5m to 70m). The sediment is dominated by highly comminuted coral fragments, plates of the calcareous green alga, Halimeda, coralline algae, and the encrusting Foraminifera, Homotrema rubrum, with lesser amounts of other taxonomic group...

  18. Does body composition differ between fibromyalgia patients and controls? the al-Ándalus project.

    Segura-Jimenez, Victor; Aparicio, Virginia A; Alvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculata C; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Tornero-Quinones, Inmaculada; Delgado-Fernandez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    To characterise the anthropometric and body composition profile of a sample of fibromyalgia women and men from southern Spain and compare them with non-fibromyalgia controls. The cross-sectional study comprised 566 (51.9 ± 8.3 years) fibromyalgia women vs. 249 (49.3 ± 9.9 years) control women; and 24 (47.0 ± 8.4 years) fibromyalgia men vs. 56 (49.7 ± 11.5 years) control men. Body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness were assessed by means of a bioelectric impedanciometer and the 6-minute walk test, respectively. All body composition para-meters (except muscle mass) differed between fibromyalgia and control women (all, pbody composition was no longer different between the women study groups. No differences in body composition were observed between fibromyalgia and control men (all, p>0.05). Weight status differed between women groups, with 11% lower normal-weight and 17% higher obesity prevalence for the fibromyalgia women group (pfibromyalgia women and 79% of the fibromyalgia men were overweight-obese. Sixty-one percent of the control women and 83% of the control men were overweight-obese. Obesity is a greater common condition among fibromyalgia women compared to their counterparts from southern Spain, which might be explained by lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness in fibromyalgia. However, fibromyalgia and control men do not differ on either body composition or weight status, in spite of the lower cardiorespiratory fitness found in the fibromyalgia men group.

  19. What controls the isotopic composition of Greenland surface snow?

    H. C. Steen-Larsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Water stable isotopes in Greenland ice core data provide key paleoclimatic information, and have been compared with precipitation isotopic composition simulated by isotopically enabled atmospheric models. However, post-depositional processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, monitoring of the isotopic composition (δ18O, δD of near-surface water vapor, precipitation and samples of the top (0.5 cm snow surface has been conducted during two summers (2011–2012 at NEEM, NW Greenland. The samples also include a subset of 17O-excess measurements over 4 days, and the measurements span the 2012 Greenland heat wave. Our observations are consistent with calculations assuming isotopic equilibrium between surface snow and water vapor. We observe a strong correlation between near-surface vapor δ18O and air temperature (0.85 ± 0.11‰ °C−1 (R = 0.76 for 2012. The correlation with air temperature is not observed in precipitation data or surface snow data. Deuterium excess (d-excess is strongly anti-correlated with δ18O with a stronger slope for vapor than for precipitation and snow surface data. During nine 1–5-day periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and near-surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated using the CROCUS snow model that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or deposition. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in near-surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic variations and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in near

  20. Controlling Interdiffusion, Interfacial Composition, and Adhesion in Polymer Solar Cells

    Dupont, Stephanie R.; Voroshazi, Eszter; Nordlund, Dennis; Vandewal, Koen; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. NEXAFS spectroscopy is used to precisely quantify the interfacial composition and P3HT chain orientation at the weak P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS interface. An increase of P3HT:PCBM and PEDOT:PSS interdiffusion with post electrode deposition annealing time and temperature is found to be the underlying mechanism for effectively improving the interlayer adhesion, which is essential for the commercial realization of organic photovoltaic devices.

  1. Controlling Interdiffusion, Interfacial Composition, and Adhesion in Polymer Solar Cells

    Dupont, Stephanie R.

    2014-07-10

    © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. NEXAFS spectroscopy is used to precisely quantify the interfacial composition and P3HT chain orientation at the weak P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS interface. An increase of P3HT:PCBM and PEDOT:PSS interdiffusion with post electrode deposition annealing time and temperature is found to be the underlying mechanism for effectively improving the interlayer adhesion, which is essential for the commercial realization of organic photovoltaic devices.

  2. Quality control and in-service inspection technology for hybrid-composite girder bridges.

    2014-08-01

    This report describes efforts to develop quality control tools and in-service inspection technologies for the fabrication and construction of Hybrid Composite Beams (HCBs). HCBs are a new bridge technology currently being evaluated by the Missouri De...

  3. Development of certified reference material of mineral composition of natural water designed to control of turbidity measurement accuracy

    Liudmila I. Gorjaeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The results of development of a certified reference material (CRM of mineral composition of natural water are presented. A solution prepared from the material of the CRM specimen imitates mineral composition of natural surface water. The certified values are mass fractions of nitrate ions, chloride ions, fluoride ions, and total iron and turbidity according to formazine scale. Materials and methods. The certified values of mass concentrations of the components were determined using calculated experimental evaluation procedure;the certified turbidity value was determinedusing the certified turbidimetric method. Results. The relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2 of the certified turbidity values does not exceed 5 %, the same value for mass concentrationsis not more than 3.5 %. Relative standard uncertainty from heterogeneity does not exceed 1.0 %. The shelf life of the developed CRM is set to 3 years. Discussion and conclusion. Developed CRM was registered in the State Register of CRM's as GSO 10815-2016. The CRM is designed to control the accuracy of results of the certified characteristics measurements, including proficiency testing of laboratories using interlaboratory comparative tests. The CRM can be used for validation of measurement procedures.

  4. Biomimetic mineral-organic composite scaffolds with controlled internal architecture.

    Manjubala, I; Woesz, Alexander; Pilz, Christine; Rumpler, Monika; Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Roschger, Paul; Stampfl, Juergen; Fratzl, Peter

    2005-12-01

    Bone and cartilage generation by three-dimensional scaffolds is one of the promising techniques in tissue engineering. One approach is to generate histologically and functionally normal tissue by delivering healthy cells in biocompatible scaffolds. These scaffolds provide the necessary support for cells to proliferate and maintain their differentiated function, and their architecture defines the ultimate shape. Rapid prototyping (RP) is a technology by which a complex 3-dimensional (3D) structure can be produced indirectly from computer aided design (CAD). The present study aims at developing a 3D organic-inorganic composite scaffold with defined internal architecture by a RP method utilizing a 3D printer to produce wax molds. The composite scaffolds consisting of chitosan and hydroxyapatite were prepared using soluble wax molds. The behaviour and response of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells on the scaffolds was studied. During a culture period of two and three weeks, cell proliferation and in-growth were observed by phase contrast light microscopy, histological staining and electron microscopy. The Giemsa and Gömöri staining of the cells cultured on scaffolds showed that the cells proliferated not only on the surface, but also filled the micro pores of the scaffolds and produced extracellular matrix within the pores. The electron micrographs showed that the cells covering the surface of the struts were flattened and grew from the periphery into the middle region of the pores.

  5. Characterization of hybrid microparticles/Montmorillonite composite with raspberry-like morphology for Atorvastatin controlled release.

    García-Guzmán, Perla; Medina-Torres, Luis; Calderas, Fausto; Bernad-Bernad, María Josefa; Gracia-Mora, Jesús; Mena, Baltasar; Manero, Octavio

    2018-07-01

    In this work, we prepared a novel composite based on hybrid gelatin carriers and montmorillonite clay (MMT) to analyze its viability as controlled drug delivery system. The objective of this research involves the characterization of composites formed by structured lipid-gelatin micro-particles (MP) and MMT clay. This analysis included the evaluation of the composite according to its rheological properties, morphology (SEM), particle size, XRD, FT-IR, and in vitro drug release. The effect of pH in the properties of the composite is evaluated. A novel raspberry-like or armor MP/MMT clay composite is reported, in which the pH has an important effect on the final structure of the composite for ad-hoc drug delivery systems. For pH values below the isoelectric point, we obtained defined morphologies with entrapment efficiencies up to 67%. The pH level controls the MP/MMT composite release mechanism, restringing drug release in the stomach-like environment. Intended for oral administration, these results evidence that the MP/MMT composite represents an attractive alternative for intestinal-colonic controlled drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fuel composition effect on cathode airflow control in fuel cell gas turbine hybrid systems

    Zhou, Nana; Zaccaria, Valentina; Tucker, David

    2018-04-01

    Cathode airflow regulation is considered an effective means for thermal management in solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine (SOFC-GT) hybrid system. However, performance and controllability are observed to vary significantly with different fuel compositions. Because a complete system characterization with any possible fuel composition is not feasible, the need arises for robust controllers. The sufficiency of robust control is dictated by the effective change of operating state given the new composition used. It is possible that controller response could become unstable without a change in the gains from one state to the other. In this paper, cathode airflow transients are analyzed in a SOFC-GT system using syngas as fuel composition, comparing with previous work which used humidified hydrogen. Transfer functions are developed to map the relationship between the airflow bypass and several key variables. The impact of fuel composition on system control is quantified by evaluating the difference between gains and poles in transfer functions. Significant variations in the gains and the poles, more than 20% in most cases, are found in turbine rotational speed and cathode airflow. The results of this work provide a guideline for the development of future control strategies to face fuel composition changes.

  7. Compositional and isotopic heterogeneities in the Neo-Tethyan upper mantle recorded by coexisting Al-rich and Cr-rich chromitites in the Purang peridotite massif, SW Tibet (China)

    Xiong, Fahui; Yang, Jingsui; Xu, Xiangzhen; Kapsiotis, Argyrios; Hao, Xiaolin; Liu, Zhao

    2018-06-01

    The Purang harzburgite massif in SW Tibet (China) hosts abundant chrome ore deposits. Ores consist of 20 to >95% modal chromian spinel (Cr-spinel) with mylonitic fabric in imbricate shaped pods. The composition of Cr-spinel in these ores ranges from Al-rich [Cr#Sp or Cr/(Cr + Al) × 100 = 47.60-57.56] to Cr-rich (Cr#Sp: 62.55-79.57). Bulk platinum-group element (PGE) contents of chromitites are also highly variable ranging from 17.5 ppb to ∼2.5 ppm. Both metallurgical and refractory chromitites show a general enrichment in the IPGE (Os, Ir and Ru) with respect to the PPGE (Rh, Pt and Pd), resulting mostly in right-sloping primitive mantle (PM)-normalized PGE profiles. The platinum-group mineral (PGM) assemblages of both chromitite types are dominated by heterogeneously distributed, euhedral Os-bearing laurite inclusions in Cr-spinel. The Purang chromitites have quite inhomogeneous 187Os/188Os ratios (0.12289-0.13194) that are within the range of those reported for mantle-hosted chromitites from other peridotite massifs. Geochemical calculations demonstrate that the parental melts of high-Cr chromitites were boninitic, whereas those of high-Al chromitites had an arc-type tholeiitic affinity. Chromite crystallization was most likely stimulated by changes in magma compositions due to melt-peridotite interaction, leading to the establishment of a heterogeneous physicochemical environment during the early crystallization of the PGM. The highly variable PGE contents, inhomogeneous Os-isotopic compositions and varying Cr#Sp ratios of these chromitites imply a polygenetic origin for them from spatially distinct melt inputs. The generally low γOs values (different sections of a heterogeneously depleted mantle source region. These melts were most likely produced in the mantle wedge above a downgoing lithospheric slab.

  8. Composition

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all....... Please DOWNLOAD them to see/hear them in full length! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You may for non-commercial purposes use and distribute it, performance instructions as well as specially designated recordings, as long as the author is mentioned. Please see http...

  9. Composite Control of the n–link Chained Mechanical Systems

    Zikmund, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 5 (2008), s. 664-684 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0186 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : nonlinear systems * exact linearization * underactuated mechanical systems Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.281, year: 2008

  10. Characterisation of polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers with controllable four-monomer composition.

    Dai, Yu; Lambert, Lynette; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jurg

    2008-03-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymers comprising the four monomers 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV), 3-hydroxy-2-methylvalerate (3HMV) and 3-hydroxy-2-methylbutyrate (3HMB) were generated using the recently discovered Defluviicoccus vanus-related glycogen accumulating organisms (DvGAOs) under anaerobic conditions without applying any nutrient limitations. The composition could be manipulated in a defined range by modifying the ratio of propionate and acetate provided in the feed stream. The PHAs produced were characterised as random copolymers (from propionate alone) or a mixture of random copolymers (from mixture of propionate and acetate) through microstructure analysis using 13C NMR spectroscopy. The sequence distribution of all eight comonomer pairs in the carbonyl region of 3HB and 3HV was identified and assigned with confidence utilising two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) spectroscopy. Weight average molecular weights were in the range 390-560 kg/mol. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces showed that the melting temperature (Tm) varied between 70 and 161 degrees C and glass transition temperature (Tg) ranged from -8 to 0 degrees C. The incorporation of considerable amounts of 3HMV and 3HMB monomer units introduced additional "defects" into the PHBV copolymer structure and hence greatly lowered the crystallinity. The data indicate the potential of these four-monomer PHAs to be employed for practical applications, considering their favourable properties and the cost-effective production process using a mixed culture and simple carbon sources.

  11. Control of feedwater composition of BWR power plant

    Sturla, P.; D'Anna, A.; Borgese, D.

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion behaviour of fuel element cladding, cycle structural materials and dose rate increase are relevant to physico-chemical characteristics of process coolants and to adopted operational conditions. A careful control of cycle chemistry, during loading and shutdown periods, is necessary to verify material choices, the polishing system and chemistry specifications. For this purpose ENEL carried out some preliminary experimental tests employing continuous control system and samples for specific analytical determinations. The cycle points checked during about two months were: main condensate; condensate after polishing system; outlet of low pressure heathers; final feedwater; inlet and outlet of clean-up system; drains to condenser. The physico-chemical analysis were related to corrosion product levels (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co) and water chemistry (pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen etc.). The preliminary results allow to express some considerations about sampling procedures, detection limits and reliability of analytical employed methods. The acquisition data time and some morphological oxide pictures are also showed. (author)

  12. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Frenkel, Svetlana; Kirzhner, Valery; Korol, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS) analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers) in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM) allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  13. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Svetlana Frenkel

    Full Text Available Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  14. Insitu measurement and control of processing properties of composite resins in a production tool

    Kranbuehl, D.; Hoff, M.; Haverty, P.; Loos, A.; Freeman, T.

    1988-01-01

    An in situ measuring technique for use in automated composite processing and quality control is discussed. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors are used to measure processing parameters at four ply positions inside a thick section 192-ply graphite-epoxy composite during cure in an 8 x 4 in. autoclave. Viscosity measurements obtained using the sensors are compared with the viscosities calculated using the Loos-Springer cure process model. Good overall agreement is obtained. In a subsequent autoclave run, the output from the four sensors was used to control the autoclave temperature. Using the 'closed loop' sensor controlled autoclave temperature resulted in a more uniform and more rapid cure cycle.

  15. Evaporation monitoring and composition control of alloy systems with widely differing vapor pressures

    Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Braun, D.G.; Haynam, C.; McClelland, M.A.; Meier, T.

    1994-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing sensors and controls to improve and extend electron beam materials processing technology to alloy systems with constituents of widely varying vapor pressure. The approach under development involves using tunable lasers to measure the density and composition of the vapor plume. A laser based vaporizer control system for vaporization of a uranium-iron alloy has been previously demonstrated in multi-hundred hour, high rate vaporization experiments at LLNL. This paper reviews the design and performance of the uranium vaporization sensor and control system and discusses the extension of the technology to monitoring of uranium vaporization. Data is presented from an experiment in which titanium wire was fed into a molten niobium pool. Laser data is compared to deposited film composition and film cross sections. Finally, the potential for using this technique for composition control in melting applications is discussed

  16. Control of free-edge interlaminar stresses in composite laminates using piezoelectric actuators

    Huang, Bin; Soo Kim, Heung

    2014-01-01

    The control of free-edge interlaminar stresses in laminated composite structures using a stress function-based approach is proposed. The assumed stress fields satisfy pointwise traction and free boundary conditions at surfaces. Governing equations are derived using the principle of complementary virtual work. A general eigenvalue solution procedure was adopted to obtain accurate stress states of the laminated composite structure. The results obtained from the proposed method were compared with those obtained by three-dimensional finite element analyses. It was found that interlaminar stresses generated by mechanical loadings could be significantly reduced by applying proper electric fields to piezoelectric actuators, which were surface bonded or embedded in composite laminates. Locations of piezoelectric actuators also influenced the distributions of interlaminar stresses. The results provided that piezoelectric actuators have potential in the application to actively control interlaminar stresses in composite laminates. (paper)

  17. Geospatial variation of grapevine water status, soil water availability, grape composition and sensory characteristics in a spatially heterogeneous premium wine grape vineyard

    Smart, D. R.; Cosby Hess, S.; Plant, R.; Feihn, O.; Heymann, H.; Ebeler, S.

    2014-11-01

    L ≤ -15.0 bars) and subjected to analysis of variance. Significant separation emerged for vines categorized as non-stressed versus stressed at véraison, which correlated to the areas described as producing higher and lower quality fruit. This report does not advocate the use of stress levels herein reported. The vineyard was planted to a vigorous, deep rooted rootstock (V. rupestris cv. St. George), and from years of management is known to be able to withstand stress levels of the magnitude we observed. Nonetheless, the results may suggest there is not a linear relationship between physiological water stress and grape sensory characteristics, but rather the presence of an inflection point controlling grape composition as well as physiological development.

  18. Hybrid Testing of Composite Structures with Single-Axis Control

    Waldbjørn, Jacob Paamand; Høgh, Jacob Herold; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Correlation (DIC) is therefore implemented for displacement control of the experimental setup. The hybrid testing setup was verified on a multicomponent structure consisting of a beam loaded in three point bending and a numerical structure of a frame. Furthermore, the stability of the hybrid testing loop......Hybrid testing is a substructuring technique where a structure is emulated by modelling a part of it in a numerical model while testing the remainder experimentally. Previous research in hybrid testing has been performed on multi-component structures e.g. damping fixtures, however in this paper...... a hybrid testing platform is introduced for single-component hybrid testing. In this case, the boundary between the numerical model and experimental setup is defined by multiple Degrees-Of-Freedoms (DOFs) which highly complicate the transferring of response between the two substructures. Digital Image...

  19. Active vibration control of smart hull structure using piezoelectric composite actuators

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Choi, Seung-Bok; Lee, Chul-Hee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, active vibration control performance of the smart hull structure with macro-fiber composite (MFC) is evaluated. MFC is an advanced piezoelectric composite which has great flexibility and increased actuating performance compared to a monolithic piezoelectric ceramic patch. The governing equations of motion of the hull structure with MFC actuators are derived based on the classical Donnell–Mushtari shell theory. The actuating model for the interaction between hull structure and MFC is included in the governing equations. Subsequently, modal characteristics are investigated and compared with the results obtained from experiment. The governing equations of the vibration control system are then established and expressed in the state space form. A linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control algorithm is designed in order to effectively and actively control the imposed vibration. The controller is experimentally realized and vibration control performances are evaluated

  20. Launch vehicle flight control augmentation using smart materials and advanced composites (CDDF Project 93-05)

    Barret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a rich heritage of launch vehicles that have used aerodynamic surfaces for flight stability such as the Saturn vehicles and flight control such as on the Redstone. Recently, due to aft center-of-gravity locations on launch vehicles currently being studied, the need has arisen for the vehicle control augmentation that is provided by these flight controls. Aerodynamic flight control can also reduce engine gimbaling requirements, provide actuator failure protection, enhance crew safety, and increase vehicle reliability, and payload capability. In the Saturn era, NASA went to the Moon with 300 sq ft of aerodynamic surfaces on the Saturn V. Since those days, the wealth of smart materials and advanced composites that have been developed allow for the design of very lightweight, strong, and innovative launch vehicle flight control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the advanced composites and smart materials that are directly applicable to launch vehicle control surfaces.

  1. Assessment of heterogeneity between European Populations: a Baltic and Danish replication case-control study of SNPs from a recent European ulcerative colitis genome wide association study.

    Andersen, Vibeke; Ernst, Anja; Sventoraityte, Jurgita; Kupcinskas, Limas; Jacobsen, Bent A; Krarup, Henrik B; Vogel, Ulla; Jonaitis, Laimas; Denapiene, Goda; Kiudelis, Gediminas; Balschun, Tobias; Franke, Andre

    2011-10-13

    Differences in the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease between different European countries and ethnicities have previously been reported. In the present study, we wanted to assess the role of 11 newly identified UC risk variants, derived from a recent European UC genome wide association study (GWAS) (Franke et al., 2010), for 1) association with UC in the Nordic countries, 2) for population heterogeneity between the Nordic countries and the rest of Europe, and, 3) eventually, to drive some of the previous findings towards overall genome-wide significance. Eleven SNPs were replicated in a Danish sample consisting of 560 UC patients and 796 controls and nine missing SNPs of the German GWAS study were successfully genotyped in the Baltic sample comprising 441 UC cases and 1156 controls. The independent replication data was then jointly analysed with the original data and systematic comparisons of the findings between ethnicities were made. Pearson's χ2, Breslow-Day (BD) and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH) tests were used for association analyses and heterogeneity testing. The rs5771069 (IL17REL) SNP was not associated with UC in the Danish panel. The rs5771069 (IL17REL) SNP was significantly associated with UC in the combined Baltic, Danish and Norwegian UC study sample driven by the Norwegian panel (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.79-0.98, P = 0.02). No association was found between rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7) and UC (OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.95-1.52, P = 0.10) or between UC and all other remaining SNPs. We had 94% chance of detecting an association for rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7) in the combined replication sample, whereas the power were 55% or lower for the remaining SNPs.Statistically significant PBD was found for OR heterogeneity between the combined Baltic, Danish, and Norwegian panel versus the combined German, British, Belgian, and Greek panel (rs7520292 (P = 0.001), rs12518307 (P = 0.007), and rs2395609 (TCP11) (P = 0.01), respectively).No SNP reached genome

  2. Assessment of heterogeneity between European Populations: a Baltic and Danish replication case-control study of SNPs from a recent European ulcerative colitis genome wide association study

    Jonaitis Laimas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease between different European countries and ethnicities have previously been reported. In the present study, we wanted to assess the role of 11 newly identified UC risk variants, derived from a recent European UC genome wide association study (GWAS (Franke et al., 2010, for 1 association with UC in the Nordic countries, 2 for population heterogeneity between the Nordic countries and the rest of Europe, and, 3 eventually, to drive some of the previous findings towards overall genome-wide significance. Methods Eleven SNPs were replicated in a Danish sample consisting of 560 UC patients and 796 controls and nine missing SNPs of the German GWAS study were successfully genotyped in the Baltic sample comprising 441 UC cases and 1156 controls. The independent replication data was then jointly analysed with the original data and systematic comparisons of the findings between ethnicities were made. Pearson's χ2, Breslow-Day (BD and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH tests were used for association analyses and heterogeneity testing. Results The rs5771069 (IL17REL SNP was not associated with UC in the Danish panel. The rs5771069 (IL17REL SNP was significantly associated with UC in the combined Baltic, Danish and Norwegian UC study sample driven by the Norwegian panel (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.79-0.98, P = 0.02. No association was found between rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7 and UC (OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.95-1.52, P = 0.10 or between UC and all other remaining SNPs. We had 94% chance of detecting an association for rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7 in the combined replication sample, whereas the power were 55% or lower for the remaining SNPs. Statistically significant PBD was found for OR heterogeneity between the combined Baltic, Danish, and Norwegian panel versus the combined German, British, Belgian, and Greek panel (rs7520292 (P = 0.001, rs12518307 (P = 0.007, and rs2395609 (TCP11 (P = 0

  3. Sol-gel Derived Warfarin - Silica Composites for Controlled Drug Release.

    Dolinina, Ekaterina S; Parfenyuk, Elena V

    2017-01-01

    Warfarin, commonly used anticoagulant in clinic, has serious shortcomings due to its unsatisfactory pharmacodynamics. One of the efficient ways for the improvement of pharmacological and consumer properties of drugs is the development of optimal drug delivery systems. The aim of this work is to synthesize novel warfarin - silica composites and to study in vitro the drug release kinetics to obtain the composites with controlled release. The composites of warfarin with unmodified (UMS) and mercaptopropyl modified silica (MPMS) were synthesized by sol-gel method. The composite formation was confirmed by FTIR spectra. The concentrations of warfarin released to media with pH 1.6, 6.8 and 7.4 were measured using UV spectroscopy. The drug release profiles from the solid composites were described by a series of kinetic models which includes zero order kinetics, first order kinetics, the modified Korsmeyer-Peppas model and Hixson-Crowell model. The synthesized sol-gel composites have different kinetic behavior in the studied media. In contrast to the warfarin composite with unmodified silica, the drug release from the composite with mercaptopropyl modified silica follows zero order kinetics for 24 h irrespective to the release medium pH due to mixed mechanism (duffusion + degradation and/or disintegration of silica matrix). The obtained results showed that warfarin - silica sol-gel composites have a potential application for the development of novel oral formulation of the drug with controlled delivery. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Composition-controlled optical properties of colloidal CdSe quantum dots

    Ayele, Delele Worku; Su, Wei-Nien; Chou, Hung-Lung; Pan, Chun-Jern; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The surface of CdSe QDs are modified with cadmium followed by selenium. • The optical properties of CdSe QDs can be controlled by manipulating the composition. • Surface compositional change affects the surface defects or traps and recombination. • The surface trapping state can be controlled by tuning the surface composition. • A change in composition shows a change in the carrier life time. - Abstract: A strategy with respect to band gap engineering by controlling the composition of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) is reported. After the CdSe QDs are prepared, their compositions can be effectively manipulated from 1:1 (Cd:Se) CdSe QDs to Cd-rich and then to Se-rich QDs. To obtain Cd-rich CdSe QDs, Cd was deposited on equimolar CdSe QDs. Further deposition of Se on Cd-rich CdSe QDs produced Se-rich CdSe QDs. The compositions (Cd:Se) of the as-prepared CdSe quantum dots were acquired by Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). By changing the composition, the overall optical properties of the CdSe QDs can be manipulated. It was found that as the composition of the QDs changes from 1:1 (Cd:Se) CdSe to Cd-rich and then Se-rich CdSe, the band gap decreases along with a red shift of UV–vis absorption edges and photoluminescence (PL) peaks. The quantum yield also decreases with surface composition from 1:1 (Cd:Se) CdSe QDs to Cd-rich and then to Se-rich, largely due to the changes in the surface state. Because of the involvement of the surface defect or trapping state, the carrier life time increased from the 1:1 (Cd:Se) CdSe QDs to the Cd-rich to the Se-rich CdSe QDs. We have shown that the optical properties of CdSe QDs can be controlled by manipulating the composition of the surface atoms. This strategy can potentially be extended to other semiconductor nanocrystals to modify their properties

  5. Composition-controlled optical properties of colloidal CdSe quantum dots

    Ayele, Delele Worku [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar (Ethiopia); Su, Wei-Nien, E-mail: wsu@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chou, Hung-Lung [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Pan, Chun-Jern [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Bing-Joe, E-mail: bjh@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The surface of CdSe QDs are modified with cadmium followed by selenium. • The optical properties of CdSe QDs can be controlled by manipulating the composition. • Surface compositional change affects the surface defects or traps and recombination. • The surface trapping state can be controlled by tuning the surface composition. • A change in composition shows a change in the carrier life time. - Abstract: A strategy with respect to band gap engineering by controlling the composition of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) is reported. After the CdSe QDs are prepared, their compositions can be effectively manipulated from 1:1 (Cd:Se) CdSe QDs to Cd-rich and then to Se-rich QDs. To obtain Cd-rich CdSe QDs, Cd was deposited on equimolar CdSe QDs. Further deposition of Se on Cd-rich CdSe QDs produced Se-rich CdSe QDs. The compositions (Cd:Se) of the as-prepared CdSe quantum dots were acquired by Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). By changing the composition, the overall optical properties of the CdSe QDs can be manipulated. It was found that as the composition of the QDs changes from 1:1 (Cd:Se) CdSe to Cd-rich and then Se-rich CdSe, the band gap decreases along with a red shift of UV–vis absorption edges and photoluminescence (PL) peaks. The quantum yield also decreases with surface composition from 1:1 (Cd:Se) CdSe QDs to Cd-rich and then to Se-rich, largely due to the changes in the surface state. Because of the involvement of the surface defect or trapping state, the carrier life time increased from the 1:1 (Cd:Se) CdSe QDs to the Cd-rich to the Se-rich CdSe QDs. We have shown that the optical properties of CdSe QDs can be controlled by manipulating the composition of the surface atoms. This strategy can potentially be extended to other semiconductor nanocrystals to modify their properties.

  6. Differences in the dose-volume metrics with heterogeneity correction status and its influence on local control in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    Ueki, Nami; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shibuya, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose-volume metrics under different heterogeneity corrections and the factors associated with local recurrence (LR) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-three patients who underwent SBRT for pathologically proven stage I NSCLC were reviewed retrospectively. The prescribed dose was 48 Gy in four fractions at the isocenter (IC) under heterogeneity correction with the Batho power law (BPL). The clinical plans were recalculated with Eclipse (Varian) for the same monitor units under the BPL and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and with no heterogeneity correction (NC). The dose at the IC, dose that covers 95% of the volume (D95), minimum dose (Min), and mean dose (Mean) of the planning target volume (PTV) were compared under each algorithm and between patients with local lesion control (LC) and LR. The IC doses under NC were significantly lower than those under the BPL and AAA. Under the BPL, the mean PTV D95, Min and Mean were 8.0, 9.4 and 7.4% higher than those under the AAA, and 9.6, 9.2 and 4.6% higher than those under NC, respectively. Under the AAA, all dose-volumetric parameters were significantly lower in T1a patients than in those with T1b and T2a. With a median follow-up of 35.9 months, LR occurred in 18 patients. Between the LC and LR groups, no significant differences were observed for any of the metrics. Even after stratification according to T-stage, no significant difference was observed between LC and LR. (author)

  7. X-ray fluorescence control of chemical composition of cast iron

    Prekina, I.M.; Rozova, O.F.; Loran, A.V.; Teplitskaya, G.A.; Smagunova, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    A method of x-ray fluorescence analysis developed for analytical set (KRF-18 diffractometer/DVK-3 computer) is used to control cast iron composition. A quantitative evaluation of errors attributed to the violation of conditions of cast iron sampling from the flow and to the quality of preparing samples for XFA is obtained. It is shown that the main component of the integral experimental error is attributed to nonuniformity of chemical composition of cast iron. Metrological studies show that reproductibility, convergence, accuracy, and sensitivity of the method match the requirements characteristic of the control process. 4 refs.; 2 tabs

  8. Strategy for product composition control in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    Bryan, M.F.; Piepel, G.F.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will immobilize transuranic and high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The major objective of the Process/Product Model Development (PPMD) cost account of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory HWVP Technology Development (PHTD) Project is the development of a system for guiding control of feed slurry composition (which affects glass properties) and for checking and documenting product quality. This document lays out the broad structure of HWVP's product composition control system, discusses five major algorithms and technical issues relevant to this system, and sketches the path of development and testing

  9. Fractional-order positive position feedback compensator for active vibration control of a smart composite plate

    Marinangeli, L.; Alijani, F.; HosseinNia, S. Hassan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, Active Vibration Control (AVC) of a rectangular carbon fibre composite plate with free edges is presented. The plate is subjected to out-of-plane excitation by a modal vibration exciter and controlled by Macro Fibre Composite (MFC) transducers. Vibration measurements are performed by using a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) system. A fractional-order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) compensator is proposed, implemented and compared to the standard integer-order PPF. MFC actuator and sensor are positioned on the plate based on maximal modal strain criterion, so as to control the second natural mode of the plate. Both integer and fractional-order PPF allowed for the effective control of the second mode of vibration. However, the newly proposed fractional-order controller is found to be more efficient in achieving the same performance with less actuation voltage. Moreover, it shows promising performance in reducing spillover effect due to uncontrolled modes.

  10. Influence of Basalt Mesh Induced Increase of Heterogeneity of Cement Composites with Dispersed Fibers on Its Resistance under Near-Field Blast

    Zíma, J.; Foglar, M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes the influence of multiple basalt meshes in the cement composite specimens on the damage induced by near-field blast. Experimental measurements performed in the Boletice military area in 2014 and 2015 are evaluated by numerical simulations. The evaluation of the results is mainly focused on the stress propagation in the cement composite with dispersed fibers, the propagation of the overpressure caused by the blast and velocity of the ejected parts from the specimen. The influence of the presence and position of the basalt meshes in the specimen on its damage induced by delamination is also examined.

  11. Periodically-modulated inhibition of living pacemaker neurons--III. The heterogeneity of the postsynaptic spike trains, and how control parameters affect it.

    Segundo, J P; Vibert, J F; Stiber, M

    1998-11-01

    Codings involving spike trains at synapses with inhibitory postsynaptic potentials on pacemakers were examined in crayfish stretch receptor organs by modulating presynaptic instantaneous rates periodically (triangles or sines; frequencies, slopes and depths under, respectively, 5.0 Hz, 40.0/s/s and 25.0/s). Timings were described by interspike and cross-intervals ("phases"); patterns (dispersions, sequences) and forms (timing classes) were identified using pooled graphs (instant along the cycle when a spike occurs vs preceding interval) and return maps (plots of successive intervals). A remarkable heterogeneity of postsynaptic intervals and phases characterizes each modulation. All cycles separate into the same portions: each contains a particular form and switches abruptly to the next. Forms differ in irregularity and predictability: they are (see text) "p:q alternations", "intermittent", "phase walk-throughs", "messy erratic" and "messy stammering". Postsynaptic cycles are asymmetric (hysteresis). This contrasts with the presynaptic homogeneity, smoothness and symmetry. All control parameters are, individually and jointly, strongly influential. Presynaptic slopes, say, act through a postsynaptic sensitivity to their magnitude and sign; when increasing, hysteresis augments and forms change or disappear. Appropriate noise attenuates between-train contrasts, providing modulations are under 0.5 Hz. Postsynaptic natural intervals impose critical time bases, separating presynaptic intervals (around, above or below them) with dissimilar consequences. Coding rules are numerous and have restricted domains; generalizations are misleading. Modulation-driven forms are trendy pacemaker-driven forms. However, dissimilarities, slight when patterns are almost pacemaker, increase as inhibition departs from pacemaker and incorporate unpredictable features. Physiological significance-(1) Pacemaker-driven forms, simple and ubiquitous, appear to be elementary building blocks of

  12. Ochratoxin A in raisins and currants: basic extraction procedure used in two small marketing surveys of the occurrence and control of the heterogeneity of the toxins in samples.

    Möller, T E; Nyberg, M

    2003-11-01

    A basic extraction procedure for analysis of ochratoxin A (OTA) in currants and raisins is described, as well as the occurrence of OTA and a control of heterogeneity of the toxin in samples bought for two small marketing surveys 1999/2000 and 2001/02. Most samples in the surveys were divided into two subsamples that were individually prepared as slurries and analysed separately. The limit of quantification for the method was estimated as 0.1 microg kg(-1) and recoveries of 85, 90 and 115% were achieved in recovery experiments at 10, 5 and 0.1 microg kg(-1), respectively. Of all 118 subsamples analysed in the surveys, 96 (84%) contained ochratoxin A at levels above the quantification level and five samples (4%) contained more than the European Community legislation of 10 microg kg(-1). The OTA concentrations found in the first survey were in the range Big differences were often achieved between individual subsamples of the original sample, which indicate a wide heterogeneous distribution of the toxin. Data from the repeatability test as well as recovery experiments from the same slurries showed that preparation of slurries as described here seemed to give a homogeneous and representative sample. The extraction with the basic sodium bicarbonate-methanol mixture used in the surveys gave similar or somewhat higher OTA values on some samples tested in a comparison with a weak phosphoric acid water-methanol extraction mixture.

  13. Composition and redox control of waste glasses: Recommendation for process control limit

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    An electrochemical series of redox couples, originally developed for Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 131 (SRL-131) as a reference composition, has been extended to two other alkali borosilicate compositions that are candidate glasses for nuclear waste immobilization. Since no dramatic differences were ascertained in the redox chemistry of selected multivalent elements in SRL-131 versus that in Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 165 (SRL-165) and in West Valley glass number-sign 205 (WV-205), the comprehensive electrochemical series can readily be applied to a range of nuclear waste glass compositions. In order to alleviate potential problems with foaming and precipitation of insolubles during the processing of the nuclear waste in these glass melts, the [Fe 2+ ]/[Fe 3+ ] ratio of the melt should be between 0.1 and 0.5. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy control of ionic polymer metal composite actuators

    Thinh, Nguyen Truong; Yang, Young-Soo; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2009-01-01

    An adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller was newly designed to overcome the degradation of the actuation performance of ionic polymer metal composite actuators that show highly nonlinear responses such as a straightening-back problem under a step excitation. An adaptive control algorithm with the merits of fuzzy logic and neural networks was applied for controlling the tip displacement of the ionic polymer metal composite actuators. The reference and actual displacements and the change of the error with the electrical inputs were recorded to generate the training data. These data were used for training the adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller to find the membership functions in the fuzzy control algorithm. Software simulation and real-time experiments were conducted by using the Simulink and dSPACE environments. Present results show that the current adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller can be successfully applied to the reliable control of the ionic polymer metal composite actuator for which the performance degrades under long-time actuation

  15. Composite Intelligent Learning Control of Strict-Feedback Systems With Disturbance.

    Xu, Bin; Sun, Fuchun

    2018-02-01

    This paper addresses the dynamic surface control of uncertain nonlinear systems on the basis of composite intelligent learning and disturbance observer in presence of unknown system nonlinearity and time-varying disturbance. The serial-parallel estimation model with intelligent approximation and disturbance estimation is built to obtain the prediction error and in this way the composite law for weights updating is constructed. The nonlinear disturbance observer is developed using intelligent approximation information while the disturbance estimation is guaranteed to converge to a bounded compact set. The highlight is that different from previous work directly toward asymptotic stability, the transparency of the intelligent approximation and disturbance estimation is included in the control scheme. The uniformly ultimate boundedness stability is analyzed via Lyapunov method. Through simulation verification, the composite intelligent learning with disturbance observer can efficiently estimate the effect caused by system nonlinearity and disturbance while the proposed approach obtains better performance with higher accuracy.

  16. Changes in the composition of brain interstitial ions control the sleep-wake cycle

    Ding, Fengfei; O'Donnell, John; Xu, Qiwu

    2016-01-01

    , and [H+]e as well as the extracellular volume. Local cortical activity of sleeping mice could be readily converted to the stereotypical electroencephalography pattern of wakefulness by simply imposing a change in the extracellular ion composition. Thus, extracellular ions control the state...

  17. Spectral composition of light and growing of plants in controlled environments

    Tikhomirov, A.A. [Institute of Biophysics, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The curve of the action spectrum of photosynthesis is examined under the controlled influence of light that involves av 3-5 minutes irradiation with one specific spectral flux. Different curves were obtained for spectral affectivity of green leaf photosynthesis when plants have had long duration adaptation to lamps of different spectral composition and PAR intensity. The author suggests that the illumination of plants in natural conditions does not have to be copied for growing plants in controlled environments.

  18. Isotopic composition of late neogene K-Na alkaline basalts of eastern Kamchatka: indicators of the heterogeneity of the Mantle magma sources

    Volynets, O.N.; Karpenko, S.F.; Kehj, R.U.; Gorring, M.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic composition of Sr, O, Nd, and Pb was determined in K-Na alkaline gabbroids and basaltoids that formed in eastern Kamchatka during Middle Miocene (gabbroids of the sub volcanic complex) and Late Miocene (basaltoids of the volcanic complex) time, before the origin of the Eastern Kamchatka Volcanic Belt. Isotopic data provide further evidence that the sources of the late Cenozoic volcanics of the within-plate and island-arc geochemical types were different

  19. Mantle heterogeneity in northeastern Africa: evidence from Nd isotopic compositions and hygromagmaphile element geochemistry of basaltic rocks from the Gulf of Tadjoura and southern Red Sea regions

    Barrat, J.A.; Jahn, B.M.; Auvray, B.; Hamdi, H.; Joron, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Basaltic rocks from the Gulf of Tadjoura and southern Red Sea regions have been analysed for their Nd isotopic compositions and major and trace element concentrations. The wide variation in isotopic and geochemical compositions of the basaltic rocks is best explained by the mixing phenomenon involving a variety of mantle source components. To test the mixing hypothesis, a combined use of Nd isotopes and hygromagmaphile elemental ratios is proven very powerful. Three reservoirs have been identified as minimum components in their petrogenesis: (1) DMM (depleted MORB mantle), a mantle source depleted in light rare earth elements (LREE), which is the principal component of the N-MORB type basalts of this region; (2) REC (Ramad enriched component), equivalent to the hot-spot type of source detected in the south of Red Sea; (3) TEC (Tadjoura enriched component), a rather unique component located in the region of Tadjoura Gulf; it is characterised by a relative depletion in Rb, K, Th and U in a primitive mantle- or chondrite-normalised incompatible element pattern; this component could have been produced by mantle metasomatism of an originally depleted mantle. Mixing in various proportions of the above components is considered to be the principal mechanism for the formation of basalts with such diverse isotopic and trace element compositions. (orig.)

  20. Assisted heterogeneous multinucleation and bubble growth in semicrystalline ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer/expanded graphite nanocomposite foams: Control of morphology and viscoelastic properties

    O. Yousefzade

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite foams of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA reinforced by expanded graphite (EG were prepared using supercritical nitrogen in batch foaming process. Effects of EG particle size, crosslinking of EVA chains and foaming temperature on the cell morphology and foam viscoelastic properties were investigated. EG sheet surface interestingly provide multiple heterogeneous nucleation sites for bubbles. This role is considerably intensified by incorporating lower loadings of EG with higher aspect ratio. The amorphous and non-crosslinked domains of EVA matrix constitute denser bubble areas. Higher void fraction and more uniform cell structure is achieved for non-crosslinked EVA/EG nanocomposites foamed at higher temperatures. With regard to the structural variation, the void fraction of foam samples decreases with increasing the EG content. Storage and loss moduli were analyzed to study the viscoelastic properties of nanocomposite foams. Surprisingly, the foaming process of EVA results in a drastic reduction in loss and storage moduli regardless of whether the thermoplastic matrix contains EG nanofiller or not. For the EVA/EG foams with the same composition, the nanocomposite having higher void fraction shows relatively lower loss modulus and more restricted molecular movements. The study findings have verified that the dynamics of polymer chains varies after foaming EVA matrix in the presence of EG.

  1. Environmental controls on the elemental composition of a Southern Hemisphere strain of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    Feng, Yuanyuan; Roleda, Michael Y.; Armstrong, Evelyn; Law, Cliff S.; Boyd, Philip W.; Hurd, Catriona L.

    2018-01-01

    A series of semi-continuous incubation experiments were conducted with the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi strain NIWA1108 (Southern Ocean isolate) to examine the effects of five environmental drivers (nitrate and phosphate concentrations, irradiance, temperature, and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)) on both the physiological rates and elemental composition of the coccolithophore. Here, we report the alteration of the elemental composition of E. huxleyi in response to the changes in these environmental drivers. A series of dose-response curves for the cellular elemental composition of E. huxleyi were fitted for each of the five drivers across an environmentally representative gradient. The importance of each driver in regulating the elemental composition of E. huxleyi was ranked using a semi-quantitative approach. The percentage variations in elemental composition arising from the change in each driver between present-day and model-projected conditions for the year 2100 were calculated. Temperature was the most important driver controlling both cellular particulate organic and inorganic carbon content, whereas nutrient concentrations were the most important regulator of cellular particulate nitrogen and phosphorus of E. huxleyi. In contrast, elevated pCO2 had the greatest influence on cellular particulate inorganic carbon to organic carbon ratio, resulting in a decrease in the ratio. Our results indicate that the different environmental drivers play specific roles in regulating the elemental composition of E. huxleyi with wide-reaching implications for coccolithophore-related marine biogeochemical cycles, as a consequence of the regulation of E. huxleyi physiological processes.

  2. FY98 Final Report Initial Interfacial Chemical Control for Enhancement of Composite Material Strength; TOPICAL

    GE Fryxell; KL Alford; KL Simmons; RD Voise; WD Samuels

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) sponsored this research project to support the development of new self-assembled monolayer fiber coatings. These coatings can greatly increase the bond strength between the fiber and the resin matrix of a composite material. Composite ammunition components molded from such materials will exhibit higher strength than current materials, and will provide a major improvement in the performance of composites in military applications. Use of composite materials in military applications is desirable because of the lighter weight of the materials and their high strengths. The FY97 project investigated initial interfacial chemical control for enhancement of composite material strength. The core of the project was to modify the covalent interface of glass fibers (or other reinforcing fibers) to induce strong, uniform, defect-free adhesion between the fibers' surfaces and the polymer matrix. Installing a self-assembled monolayer tailored to the specific matrix resin accomplished this. Simply, the self-assembled monolayer modifies the fiber to make it appear to have the same chemical composition as the resin matrix. The self-assembled monolayer creates a receptive, hydrophobic interface that the thermoset resin (or polymer precursors) would wet more effectively, leading to a higher contact surface area and more efficient adhesion. The FY97 work phase demonstrated that it is possible to increase the adhesive strength, as well as increase the heat deflection temperature through the use of self-assembled monolayer

  3. Vibration and Damping Analysis of Composite Fiber Reinforced Wind Blade with Viscoelastic Damping Control

    Tai-Hong Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials are increasingly used in wind blade because of their superior mechanical properties such as high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratio. This paper presents vibration and damping analysis of fiberreinforced composite wind turbine blade with viscoelastic damping treatment. The finite element method based on full layerwise displacement theory was employed to analyze the damping, natural frequency, and modal loss factor of composite shell structure. The lamination angle was considered in mathematical modeling. The curved geometry, transverse shear, and normal strains were exactly considered in present layerwise shell model, which can depict the zig-zag in-plane and out-of-plane displacements. The frequency response functions of curved composite shell structure and wind blade were calculated. The results show that the damping ratio of viscoelastic layer is found to be very sensitive to determination of magnitude of composite structures. The frequency response functions with variety of thickness of damping layer were investigated. Moreover, the natural frequency, modal loss factor, and mode shapes of composite fiber reinforced wind blade with viscoelastic damping control were calculated.

  4. Experimental verification of displacement control on integrated ionic polymer-metal composite actuators with stochastic on/off controller

    Kimura, Keishiro; Kamamichi, Norihiro

    2017-04-01

    An ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuator is one of polymer-based soft actuators. It is produced by chemically plating gold or platinum on both surface of a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane which is known as an ion-exchange membrane. It is able to be activated by a simple driving circuit and generate a large deformation under a low applied voltage (0.5-3 V). However, individual difference and characteristics changes from environmental conditions should be considered for realizing a stable or precise control. To solve these problems, we applied a stochastic ON/OFF controller to an integrated IPMC actuator with parallel connections. The controller consists of a central controller and distributed controllers. The central controller broadcasts a control signal such as an error signal to distributed controllers uniformly. The distributed controllers switch the ON/OFF states based on the broadcasted signal stochastically. The central controller dose not measure the states of each IPMC actuator, and the control signals is calculated by using the output signal of the integrated actuator and reference signal. The validity of the applied method was investigated through numerical simulations and experiments.

  5. Composite Scaffold of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) and Interfacial Polyelectrolyte Complexation Fibers for Controlled Biomolecule Delivery

    Cutiongco, Marie Francene A.; Choo, Royden K. T.; Shen, Nathaniel J. X.; Chua, Bryan M. X.; Sju, Ervi; Choo, Amanda W. L.; Le Visage, Catherine; Yim, Evelyn K. F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled delivery of hydrophilic proteins is an important therapeutic strategy. However, widely used methods for protein delivery suffer from low incorporation efficiency and loss of bioactivity. The versatile interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) fibers have the capacity for precise spatiotemporal release and protection of protein, growth factor, and cell bioactivity. Yet its weak mechanical properties limit its application and translation into a viable clinical solution. To overcome this limitation, IPC fibers can be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds such as the biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA). Therefore, we explored the use of a composite scaffold of PVA and IPC fibers for controlled biomolecule release. We first observed that the permeability of biomolecules through PVA films were dependent on molecular weight. Next, IPC fibers were incorporated in between layers of PVA to produce PVA–IPC composite scaffolds with different IPC fiber orientation. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent mechanical properties and efficient biomolecule incorporation. The rate of biomolecule release from PVA–IPC composite grafts exhibited dependence on molecular weight, with lysozyme showing near-linear release for 1 month. Angiogenic factors were also incorporated into the PVA–IPC grafts, as a potential biomedical application of the composite graft. While vascular endothelial growth factor only showed a maximum cumulative release of 3%, the smaller PEGylated-QK peptide showed maximum release of 33%. Notably, the released angiogenic biomolecules induced endothelial cell activity thus indicating retention of bioactivity. We also observed lack of significant macrophage response against PVA–IPC grafts in a rabbit model. Showing permeability, mechanical strength, precise temporal growth factor release, and bioinertness, PVA–IPC fibers composite scaffolds are excellent scaffolds for controlled biomolecule delivery in soft tissue

  6. Composite scaffold of poly(vinyl alcohol) and interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation fibers for controlled biomolecule delivery.

    Cutiongco, Marie Francene A; Choo, Royden K T; Shen, Nathaniel J X; Chua, Bryan M X; Sju, Ervi; Choo, Amanda W L; Le Visage, Catherine; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2015-01-01

    Controlled delivery of hydrophilic proteins is an important therapeutic strategy. However, widely used methods for protein delivery suffer from low incorporation efficiency and loss of bioactivity. The versatile interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) fibers have the capacity for precise spatiotemporal release and protection of protein, growth factor, and cell bioactivity. Yet its weak mechanical properties limit its application and translation into a viable clinical solution. To overcome this limitation, IPC fibers can be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds such as the biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA). Therefore, we explored the use of a composite scaffold of PVA and IPC fibers for controlled biomolecule release. We first observed that the permeability of biomolecules through PVA films were dependent on molecular weight. Next, IPC fibers were incorporated in between layers of PVA to produce PVA-IPC composite scaffolds with different IPC fiber orientation. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent mechanical properties and efficient biomolecule incorporation. The rate of biomolecule release from PVA-IPC composite grafts exhibited dependence on molecular weight, with lysozyme showing near-linear release for 1 month. Angiogenic factors were also incorporated into the PVA-IPC grafts, as a potential biomedical application of the composite graft. While vascular endothelial growth factor only showed a maximum cumulative release of 3%, the smaller PEGylated-QK peptide showed maximum release of 33%. Notably, the released angiogenic biomolecules induced endothelial cell activity thus indicating retention of bioactivity. We also observed lack of significant macrophage response against PVA-IPC grafts in a rabbit model. Showing permeability, mechanical strength, precise temporal growth factor release, and bioinertness, PVA-IPC fibers composite scaffolds are excellent scaffolds for controlled biomolecule delivery in soft tissue engineering.

  7. Industrial waste as a source for fabrication of composite ceramics-glass with a controlled porosity

    Adziski R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallurgical slag with granulation (-0.125+0.063mm and 20 wt% waste TV glass were used for obtaining a glass ceramic composite with a controlled porosity. This material obtained by sintering at 950oC/2h possessed thermal stability, integral porosity of 43.6% and E-modulus and bending strength of 12 GPa and 39 MPa, respectively. The composite was characterized with a permeability of 0.47 Da and generation of air bubbles with size of 1-4 mm in a water medium.

  8. Conceptualizing a tool to optimize therapy based on dynamic heterogeneity

    Liao, David; Estévez-Salmerón, Luis; Tlsty, Thea D

    2012-01-01

    Complex biological systems often display a randomness paralleled in processes studied in fundamental physics. This simple stochasticity emerges owing to the complexity of the system and underlies a fundamental aspect of biology called phenotypic stochasticity. Ongoing stochastic fluctuations in phenotype at the single-unit level can contribute to two emergent population phenotypes. Phenotypic stochasticity not only generates heterogeneity within a cell population, but also allows reversible transitions back and forth between multiple states. This phenotypic interconversion tends to restore a population to a previous composition after that population has been depleted of specific members. We call this tendency homeostatic heterogeneity. These concepts of dynamic heterogeneity can be applied to populations composed of molecules, cells, individuals, etc. Here we discuss the concept that phenotypic stochasticity both underlies the generation of heterogeneity within a cell population and can be used to control population composition, contributing, in particular, to both the ongoing emergence of drug resistance and an opportunity for depleting drug-resistant cells. Using notions of both ‘large’ and ‘small’ numbers of biomolecular components, we rationalize our use of Markov processes to model the generation and eradication of drug-resistant cells. Using these insights, we have developed a graphical tool, called a metronomogram, that we propose will allow us to optimize dosing frequencies and total course durations for clinical benefit. (paper)

  9. Composite control for raymond mill based on model predictive control and disturbance observer

    Dan Niu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the raymond mill grinding process, precise control of operating load is vital for the high product quality. However, strong external disturbances, such as variations of ore size and ore hardness, usually cause great performance degradation. It is not easy to control the current of raymond mill constant. Several control strategies have been proposed. However, most of them (such as proportional–integral–derivative and model predictive control reject disturbances just through feedback regulation, which may lead to poor control performance in the presence of strong disturbances. For improving disturbance rejection, a control method based on model predictive control and disturbance observer is put forward in this article. The scheme employs disturbance observer as feedforward compensation and model predictive control controller as feedback regulation. The test results illustrate that compared with model predictive control method, the proposed disturbance observer–model predictive control method can obtain significant superiority in disturbance rejection, such as shorter settling time and smaller peak overshoot under strong disturbances.

  10. Diclofenac degradation by heterogeneous photocatalysis with Fe3O4/Ti x O y /activated carbon fiber composite synthesized by ultrasound irradiation

    Moreno-Valencia, E. I.; Paredes-Carrera, S. P.; Sánchez-Ochoa, J. C.; Flores-Valle, S. O.; Avendaño-Gómez, J. R.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a photocatalytic system to degrade diclofenac was developed using a composite Fe3O4/Ti x O y on an activated carbon fiber. Diclofenac is widely used as an anti-inflammatory compound worldwide and it is constantly being added as waste in the environment (Heberer 2002 J. Hydrol. 266 175-89), exceeding the permissible maximum concentration in the wastewater (GEO-3 2002 Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente; Golet et al 2003 Environ. Sci. Technol. 37 3243-9 Oviedo et al 2010 Environ. Toxicol. Pharmacol. 29 9-43 Le-Minh et al 2010 Water Res. 44 4295-323 Legrini et al 1993 Chem. Rev. 1093 671-98). The composite was synthesized by sol-gel technique with and without ultrasound irradiation (Singh and Nakate 2014 J. Nanopart. 2014 326747). The solids were deposited by ultrasound irradiation on active carbon fiber in order to optimize the diclofenac degradation. The solids were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen physisorption (BET), and scanning electron microscopy with EDS microanalysis (SEM-EDS). The crystal size was calculated with the Debye-Scherrer equation, and the band gap values by the diffuse reflectance method. The evaluation process was studied by UV-vis spectroscopy (Rizzoa et al 2009 Water Res. 43 979-88). It was found that in this synthesis method (ultrasound), textural properties such as porosity, specific surface area and morphology depend on the ultrasound irradiation. The proposed system, Fe3O4/titanium oxide hydrate showed better degradation profile than TiO2 anatase phase; the increase of diclofenac degradation was attributed to the textural properties of the composite, it avoids the filtering process since the separation can be achieved by magnetizing and/or decantation.

  11. Heterogeneous Ag-TiO2-SiO2 composite materials as novel catalytic systems for selective epoxidation of cyclohexene by H2O2.

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available TiO2-SiO2 composites were synthesized using cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB as the structure directing template. Self-assembly hexadecyltrimethyl- ammonium bromide TiO2-SiO2/(CTAB were soaked into silver nitrate (AgNO3 aqueous solution. The Ag-TiO2-SiO2(Ag-TS composite were prepared via a precipitation of AgBr in soaking process and its decomposition at calcination stage. Structural characterization of the materials was carried out by various techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis. Characterization results revealed that Ag particles were incorporated into hierarchical TiO2-SiO2 without significantly affecting the structures of the supports. Further heating-treatment at 723 K was more favorable for enhancing the stability of the Ag-TS composite. The cyclohexene oxide was the major product in the epoxidation using H2O2 as the oxidant over the Ag-TS catalysts. Besides, the optimum catalytic activity and stability of Ag-TS catalysts were obtained under operational conditions of calcined at 723 K for 2 h, reaction time of 120 min, reaction temperature of 353 K, catalyst amount of 80 mg, aqueous H2O2 (30 wt.% as oxidant and chloroform as solvent. High catalytic activity with conversion rate up to 99.2% of cyclohexene oxide could be obtainable in water-bathing. The catalyst was found to be stable and could be reused three times without significant loss of catalytic activity under the optimized reaction conditions.

  12. A study of heterogeneous systems which retard the processes of motor oil aging. VI. The effect of the composition of the oil medium on its electric conductivity

    Zhdanov, V V; Ashkinazi, L A; Chkalov, V A; Filanovskiy, B K; Grilikhes, M S; Nikolayenko, A V; Poray-Koshits, A B; Ravdel, A A

    1982-01-01

    A method of contact conductometry is used to study the effect of the composition of an oil medium on its electric conductivity and the factors to which this parameter is the most sensitive was determined. It is shown that the electric conductivity is a sensitive parameter, which reacts to a change in the water content in the oil, the length of operation in an internal combustion engine, to the volume of additives in the base oil and to the acid and base properties of the oil medium.

  13. Mesoporous Silica Supported Au Nanoparticles with Controlled Size as Efficient Heterogeneous Catalyst for Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Au catalysts with different sizes were synthesized and employed on amine group functionalized ordered mesoporous silica solid supports as catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of various alcohols. The mesoporous silica of MCM-41 supported Au nanoparticles (Au-1 exhibited the smallest particle size at ~1.8 nm with superior catalytic activities owing to the confinement effect of the mesoporous channels. Au-1 catalyst is also very stable and reusable under aerobic condition. Therefore, this presented work would obviously provide us a platform for synthesizing more size-controlled metal catalysts to improve the catalytic performances.

  14. Controlled Pesticide Release from Porous Composite Hydrogels Based on Lignin and Polyacrylic Acid

    Yajie Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the controlled release of pesticides, a novel composite porous hydrogel (LBPAA was prepared based on lignin and polyacrylic acid for use as the support frame of a pore structure for water delivery. The LBPAA was analyzed to determine its water-swelling and slow release properties. The controlled release properties of LBPAA were evaluated through experiments in relation to the cumulative release of pesticides, with particular emphasis on environmental effects and release models. The porous LBPAA hydrogel showed improved properties compared to polyacrylic acid, and could therefore be considered an efficient material for application in controlled release systems in agriculture.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic Fe/CNTs composites with controllable Fe nanoparticle concentration

    Zhao Fan; Duan Hongyan; Wang Weigao; Wang Jun

    2012-01-01

    Fe/CNTs composites, with different concentrations of Fe nanoparticles (NPs) on carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces, were successfully fabricated via a facile solvothermal method. The lengths of CNTs are up to 10 μm and the mean diameter of the Fe nanoparticles is about 25 nm. The structures, composition and magnetic properties of the Fe/CNTs were characterized by XRD, FTIR, FE-SEM, TEM and PPMS. We found that the concentrations of Fe nanoparticles depositing on the CNTs could be controlled by adjusting the initial mass ratio of ferrocene to CNTs. The Fe/CNTs composites display good ferromagnetic properties at room temperature, with a saturation magnetization of 125 emu/g-Fe and a coercivity of 276 Oe. The Curie temperature of the sample is about 1038 K, slightly lower than that (1043 K) of the bulk iron.

  16. Operational control of large-sized polymer composite units of U-profile circular beam type by X-ray method

    Kavalerov, B. V.; Anoshkin, A. N.; Osokin, V. M.; Tretyakov, A. A.; Potrakhov, N. N.; Bessonov, V. B.; Obodovskiy, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    The advantages of using the method of microfocus radiography in the non-destructive testing of aviation products are considered in the paper, using the example of a circular beam of a U-shaped profile made of polymer composite materials. The basic types of characteristic defects of parts arising in such a type are described both in the process of their manufacture and in the process of their exploitation, namely interlayer delaminations, pores and folds. Peculiarities of obtaining pseudo-volumetric images, which allow to increase the informativity about the structure of the object of control, as well as to identify the arising heterogeneities are given. A model of a robotic system is described that makes it possible to realize a small or multi-angle survey scheme, and, in particular, to carry out tomographic studies.

  17. Body Composition and Ectopic Lipid Changes With Biochemical Control of Acromegaly.

    Bredella, Miriam A; Schorr, Melanie; Dichtel, Laura E; Gerweck, Anu V; Young, Brian J; Woodmansee, Whitney W; Swearingen, Brooke; Miller, Karen K

    2017-11-01

    Acromegaly is characterized by growth hormone (GH) and insulinlike growth factor-1 (IGF-1) hypersecretion, and GH and IGF-1 play important roles in regulating body composition and glucose homeostasis. The purpose of our study was to investigate body composition including ectopic lipids, measures of glucose homeostasis, and gonadal steroids in patients with active acromegaly compared with age-, body mass index (BMI)-, and sex-matched controls and to determine changes in these parameters after biochemical control of acromegaly. Cross-sectional study of 20 patients with active acromegaly and 20 healthy matched controls. Prospective study of 16 patients before and after biochemical control of acromegaly. Body composition including ectopic lipids by magnetic resonance imaging/proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy; measures of glucose homeostasis by an oral glucose tolerance test; gonadal steroids. Patients with active acromegaly had lower mean intrahepatic lipid (IHL) and higher mean fasting insulin and insulin area under the curve (AUC) values than controls. Men with acromegaly had lower mean total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, and estradiol values than male controls. After therapy, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, fasting insulin level, and insulin AUC decreased despite an increase in IHL and abdominal and thigh adipose tissues and a decrease in muscle mass. Patients with acromegaly were characterized by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia but lower IHL compared with age-, BMI-, and sex-matched healthy controls. Biochemical control of acromegaly improved insulin resistance but led to a less favorable anthropometric phenotype with increased IHL and abdominal adiposity and decreased muscle mass. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  18. Diesel/CNG Mixture Autoignition Control Using Fuel Composition and Injection Gap

    Firmansyah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Combustion phasing is the main obstacle to the development of controlled auto-ignition based (CAI engines to achieve low emissions and low fuel consumption operation. Fuel combinations with substantial differences in reactivity, such as diesel/compressed natural gas (CNG, show desirable combustion outputs and demonstrate great possibility in controlling the combustion. This paper discusses a control method for diesel/CNG mixture combustion with a variation of fuel composition and fuel stratification levels. The experiments were carried out in a constant volume combustion chamber with both fuels directly injected into the chamber. The mixture composition was varied from 0 to 100% CNG/diesel at lambda 1 while the fuel stratification level was controlled by the injection phasing between the two fuels, with gaps between injections ranging from 0 to 20 ms. The results demonstrated the suppressing effect of CNG on the diesel combustion, especially at the early combustion stages. However, CNG significantly enhanced the combustion performance of the diesel in the later stages. Injection gaps, on the other hand, showed particular behavior depending on mixture composition. Injection gaps show less effect on combustion phasing but a significant effect on the combustion output for higher diesel percentage (≥70%, while it is contradictive for lower diesel percentage (<70%.

  19. Polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibres containing conjugated levofloxacin-chitosan for controlled drug release

    Jalvandi, Javid; White, Max; Gao, Yuan; Truong, Yen Bach; Padhye, Rajiv; Kyratzis, Ilias Louis

    2017-01-01

    A range of biodegradable drug-nanofibres composite mats have been reported as drug delivery systems. However, their main disadvantage is the rapid release of the drug immediately after application. This paper reports an improved system based on the incorporation of drug conjugated-chitosan into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers. The results showed that controlled release of levofloxacin (LVF) could be achieved by covalently binding LVF to low molecular weight chitosan (CS) via a cleavable amide bond and then blending the conjugated CS with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibres prior to electrospinning. PVA/LVF and PVA-CS/LVF nanofibres were fabricated as controls. The conjugated CS-LVF was characterized by FTIR, DSC, TGA and 1 H NMR. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the blended CS-PVA nanofibres had a reduced fibre diameter compared to the controls. Drug release profiles showed that burst release was decreased from 90% in the control PVA/LVF electrospun mats to 27% in the PVA/conjugated CS-LVF mats after 8 h in phosphate buffer at 37 °C. This slower release is due to the cleavable bond between LVF and CS that slowly hydrolysed over time at neutral pH. The results indicate that conjugation of the drug to the polymer backbone is an effective way of minimizing burst release behaviour and achieving sustained release of the drug, LVF. - Highlights: • A novel drug delivery system for controlled release of drug was designed. • Composite PVA/conjugated CS-LVF nanofibres was fabricated by electrospinning. • Conjugated chitosan and composite nanofibres were characterized by various techniques. • Release profiles of drug were significantly improved in composite nanofibres containing drug conjugated chitosan.

  20. Polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibres containing conjugated levofloxacin-chitosan for controlled drug release

    Jalvandi, Javid, E-mail: Javid.jlv@gmail.com [CSIRO, Manufacturing Flagship, Bayview Ave, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); School of Fashion and Textiles, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University, 25 Dawson Street, Brunswick, Victoria 3056 (Australia); White, Max, E-mail: tamrak@bigpond.com [School of Fashion and Textiles, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University, 25 Dawson Street, Brunswick, Victoria 3056 (Australia); Gao, Yuan, E-mail: Yuan.Gao@csiro.au [CSIRO, Manufacturing Flagship, Bayview Ave, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Truong, Yen Bach, E-mail: Yen.truong@csiro.au [CSIRO, Manufacturing Flagship, Bayview Ave, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Padhye, Rajiv, E-mail: rajiv.padhye@rmit.edu.au [School of Fashion and Textiles, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University, 25 Dawson Street, Brunswick, Victoria 3056 (Australia); Kyratzis, Ilias Louis, E-mail: Louis.kyratzis@csiro.au [CSIRO, Manufacturing Flagship, Bayview Ave, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2017-04-01

    A range of biodegradable drug-nanofibres composite mats have been reported as drug delivery systems. However, their main disadvantage is the rapid release of the drug immediately after application. This paper reports an improved system based on the incorporation of drug conjugated-chitosan into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers. The results showed that controlled release of levofloxacin (LVF) could be achieved by covalently binding LVF to low molecular weight chitosan (CS) via a cleavable amide bond and then blending the conjugated CS with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibres prior to electrospinning. PVA/LVF and PVA-CS/LVF nanofibres were fabricated as controls. The conjugated CS-LVF was characterized by FTIR, DSC, TGA and {sup 1}H NMR. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the blended CS-PVA nanofibres had a reduced fibre diameter compared to the controls. Drug release profiles showed that burst release was decreased from 90% in the control PVA/LVF electrospun mats to 27% in the PVA/conjugated CS-LVF mats after 8 h in phosphate buffer at 37 °C. This slower release is due to the cleavable bond between LVF and CS that slowly hydrolysed over time at neutral pH. The results indicate that conjugation of the drug to the polymer backbone is an effective way of minimizing burst release behaviour and achieving sustained release of the drug, LVF. - Highlights: • A novel drug delivery system for controlled release of drug was designed. • Composite PVA/conjugated CS-LVF nanofibres was fabricated by electrospinning. • Conjugated chitosan and composite nanofibres were characterized by various techniques. • Release profiles of drug were significantly improved in composite nanofibres containing drug conjugated chitosan.

  1. Transesterification of rapeseed oil for biodiesel production in trickle-bed reactors packed with heterogeneous Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalyst.

    Meng, Yong-Lu; Tian, Song-Jiang; Li, Shu-Fen; Wang, Bo-Yang; Zhang, Min-Hua

    2013-05-01

    A conventional trickle bed reactor and its modified type both packed with Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalysts were studied for biodiesel production by transesterification of rapeseed oil and methanol. The effects of the methanol usage and oil flow rate on the FAME yield were investigated under the normal pressure and methanol boiling state. The oil flow rate had a significant effect on the FAME yield for the both reactors. The modified trickle bed reactor kept over 94.5% FAME yield under 0.6 mL/min oil flow rate and 91 mL catalyst bed volume, showing a much higher conversion and operational stability than the conventional type. With the modified trickle bed reactor, both transesterification and methanol separation could be performed simultaneously, and glycerin and methyl esters were separated additionally by gravity separation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Compositionally heterogeneous podiform chromitite in the Shetland Ophiolite Complex (Scotland): Implications for chromitite petrogenesis and late-stage alteration in the upper mantle portion of a supra-subduction zone ophiolite

    Derbyshire, E. J.; O'Driscoll, B.; Lenaz, D.; Gertisser, R.; Kronz, A.

    2013-03-01

    The mantle sequence of the ~ 492 Ma Shetland Ophiolite Complex (SOC; Scotland) contains abundant compositionally heterogeneous podiform chromitite bodies enclosed in elongate dunite lenses in the vicinity of the petrological Moho. Chromitite petrogenesis and late-stage alteration events recorded in these seams are examined here using petrography, mineral chemistry and crystal structural data. The resistant nature of Cr-spinel to serpentinisation and other late-stage alteration means that primary igneous compositions are preserved in unaltered crystal cores. Chromitite mineralogy and texture from five sampled localities at The Viels, Hagdale, Harold's Grave, Nikka Vord and Cliff reveal significant inter-pod chemical heterogeneity. The Cr-spinel mineral chemistry is consistent with supra-subduction zone melt extraction from the SOC peridotites. The occurrence of chromitite seams in the centres of the dunite lenses combined with variable Cr-spinel compositions at different chromitite seam localities supports a model of chromitite formation from spatially (and temporally?) fluctuating amounts of melt-rock interaction through channelised and/or porous melt flow. Pervasive serpentinisation of the SOC has led to the almost complete replacement of the primary (mantle) silicate mineral assemblages with serpentine (lizardite with minor chrysotile and antigorite). Magmatic sulphide (e.g., pentlandite) in dunite and chromitite is locally converted to reduced Ni-sulphide varieties (e.g., heazlewoodite and millerite). A post-serpentinisation (prograde) oxidisation event is recorded in the extensively altered Cliff chromitite seams in the west of the studied area, where chromitite Cr-spinel is extensively altered to ferritchromit. The ferritchromit may comprise > 50% of the volume of the Cliff Cr-spinels and contain appreciable quantities of 1-2 μm inclusions of sperrylite (PtAs2) and Ni-arsenide, signifying the coeval formation of these minerals with ferritchromit at

  3. Controlling parental feeding practices and child body composition in ethnically and economically diverse preschool children.

    Wehrly, Sarah E; Bonilla, Chantal; Perez, Marisol; Liew, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Controlling parental feeding practices may be associated with childhood overweight, because coercive or intrusive feeding practices may negatively impact children's development of self-regulation of eating. This study examined pressuring or forcing a child (healthy or unhealthy foods) and restricting child from unhealthy or snack foods as two types of controlling feeding practices that explain unique variances in measures of child body composition (BMI, percent body fat, and parental perception of child weight). In an ethnically and economically diverse sample of 243 children aged 4-6years old and their biological parents (89% biological mothers, 8% biological fathers, and 3% step or grand-parent), descriptive statistics indicate ethnic and family income differences in measures of feeding practices and child body composition. Additionally, the two "objective" indices of body composition (BMI and percent body fat) were related to low pressure to eat, whereas the "subjective" index (perceived child weight) was related to restriction. Regression analyses accounting for ethnic and family income influences indicate that pressure to eat and restriction both explained unique variances in the two "objective" indices of body composition, whereas only restriction explained variance in perceived child weight. Findings have implications for helping parents learn about feeding practices that promote children's self-regulation of eating that simultaneously serves as an obesity prevention strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Developing a Distributed Consensus-Based Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control System for Heterogeneous Vehicles with Predecessor Following Topology

    Ziran Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Connected and automated vehicle (CAV has become an increasingly popular topic recently. As an application, Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC systems are of high interest, allowing CAVs to communicate with each other and coordinating their maneuvers to form platoons, where one vehicle follows another with a constant velocity and/or time headway. In this study, we propose a novel CACC system, where distributed consensus algorithm and protocol are designed for platoon formation, merging maneuvers, and splitting maneuvers. Predecessor following information flow topology is adopted for the system, where each vehicle only communicates with its following vehicle to reach consensus of the whole platoon, making the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V communication fast and accurate. Moreover, different from most studies assuming the type and dynamics of all the vehicles in a platoon to be homogenous, we take into account the length, location of GPS antenna on vehicle, and braking performance of different vehicles. A simulation study has been conducted under scenarios including normal platoon formation, platoon restoration from disturbances, and merging and splitting maneuvers. We have also carried out a sensitivity analysis on the distributed consensus algorithm, investigating the effect of the damping gain on convergence rate, driving comfort, and driving safety of the system.

  5. DYNAMIC SIMULATION AND COMPOSITION CONTROL IN A 10 L MIXING TANK

    Yulius Deddy Hermawan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The open loop experiment of composition dynamic in a 10 L mixing tank has been successfully done inlaboratory. A 10 L tank was designed for mixing of water (as a stream-1 and salt solution (as astream-2 with salt concentration, c2 constant. An electric stirrer was employed to obtain uniformcomposition in tank. In order to keep the liquid volume constant, the system was designed overflow. Inthis work, 2 composition control configurations have been proposed; they are Alternative-1 andAlternative-2. For Alternative-1, the volumetric-rate of stream-1 was chosen as a manipulatedvariable, while the volumetric-rate of stream-2 was chosen as a manipulated variable for Alternative-2. The composition control parameters for both alternatives have been tuned experimentally. Thevolumetric-rate of manipulated variable was changed based on step function. The outlet stream’scomposition response (c3 to a change in the input volumetric-rate has been investigated. Thisexperiment gave Proportional Integral Derivative (PID control parameters. The gain controllers Kc[cm6/(gr.sec] for Alternative-1 and Alternative-2 are -34200 and 40459 respectively. Integral timeconstant ( tI and Derivative time constant (tD for both alternatives are the same, i.e. tI = 16 second,and tD = 4 second. Furthermore, closed loop dynamic simulation using computer programming wasalso done to evaluate the resulted tuning parameters. The developed mathematical model ofcomposition control system in a mixing tank was solved numerically. Such mathematical model wasrigorously examined in Scilab software environment. The results showed that closed loop responses inPID control were faster than those in P and PI controls.

  6. Frequency-weighted feedforward control for dynamic compensation in ionic polymer–metal composite actuators

    Shan, Yingfeng; Leang, Kam K

    2009-01-01

    Ionic polymer–metal composites (IPMCs) are innovative materials that offer combined sensing and actuating ability in lightweight and flexible package. IPMCs have been exploited in robotics and a wide variety of biomedical devices, for example, as sensors for teleoperation, as actuators for positioning in active endoscopy, as fins for propelling aquatic robots, and as an injector for drug delivery. In the actuation mode, one of the main challenges is precise position control. In particular, IPMC actuators exhibit relaxation behavior and nonlinearities; and at relatively high operating frequencies dynamic effects limit accuracy and positioning bandwidth. A frequency-weighted feedforward controller is designed to account for the IPMC's structural dynamics to enable fast positioning. The control method is applied to a custom-made Nafion-based IPMC actuator. The controller takes into account the magnitude of the control input to avoid generating excessively large voltages which can damage the IPMC actuator. To account for unmodeled effects not captured by the dynamics model, a feedback controller is integrated with the feedforward controller. Experimental results show a significant improvement in the tracking performance when feedforward control is used. For instance, the feedforward controller shows over 75% reduction in the tracking error compared to the case without feedforward compensation. Finally, the integrated feedforward and feedback control system reduces the tracking error to less than 10% for tracking an 18-Hz triangle-like trajectory. Some of the advantages of feedforward control as well as its limitations are also discussed

  7. Analysis of radially heterogeneous ZPPR-13A benchmark for investigating the spatial dependence of the calculated-to-experiment ratio for control rod worths

    Mahalakshmi, B.; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    1993-01-01

    Investigation were performed on the ZPPR-13A critical assembly to determine the cause of the radial variation of the calculated-to-experimental (C/E) ratio for control rod worth in large heterogeneous cores. The effects of errors in cross section, mesh size, group condensation, transport, and modeling were studied by studied by using two- and three-dimensional diffusion calculations and three-dimensional transport calculations. In that process, the cross-section set and the calculation scheme that are being used for fast reactor design in India have been revalidated. The cross-section set was found to yield satisfactory results. Three-dimensional calculations with adjusted and unadjusted cross sections confirmed that the error in cross sections was largely responsible for the radial dependence of the C/E ratios. The contributions from group condensation and mesh size errors were < 2%, and from modeling errors and transport correction, < 1%. The effect of these errors is insignificant when compared with the effect of the cross-section error. The analysis also showed that even without the adjustment in diffusion coefficient suggested in earlier studies, a satisfactory prediction is found, at least for this benchmark. The diffusion-to-transport correction for control rod worth was found to be -7%

  8. Long-term flow/chemistry feedback in a porous medium with heterogenous permeability: Kinetic control of dissolution and precipitation

    Bolton, E.W.; Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of dissolution and precipitation is of central importance to understanding the long-term evolution of fluid flows in crustal environments, with implications for problems as diverse as nuclear waste disposal and crustal evolution. The authors examine the dynamics of such evolution for several geologically relevant permeability distributions (models for en-echelon cracks, an isolated sloping fractured zone, and two sloping high-permeability zones that are close enough together to interact). Although the focus is on a simple quartz matrix system, generic features emerge from this study that can aid in the broader goal of understanding the long-term feedback between flow and chemistry, where dissolution and precipitation is under kinetic control. Examples of thermal convection in a porous medium with spatially variable permeability reveal features of central importance to water-rock interaction. After a transient phase, an accelerated rate of change of porosity may be used with care to decrease computational time, as an alternative to the quasi-stationary state approximation (Lichtner, 1988). Kinetic effects produce features not expected by traditional assumptions made on the basis of equilibrium, for example, that cooling fluids are oversaturated and heating fluids are undersaturated with respect to silicic acid equilibrium. Indeed, the authors observe regions of downwelling oversaturated fluid experiencing heating and regions of upwelling, yet cooling, undersaturated fluid. When oscillatory convection is present, the amplitudes of oscillation generally increase with time in near-surface environments, whereas amplitudes tend to decrease over long times near the heated lower boundary. The authors examine the scaling behavior of characteristic length scales, of terms in the solute equation, and of the typical deviation from equilibrium, each as a function of the kinetic rate parameters

  9. Heterogeneous chromatin target model

    Watanabe, Makoto

    1996-01-01

    The higher order structure of the entangled chromatin fibers in a chromosome plays a key role in molecular control mechanism involved in chromosome mutation due to ionizing radiations or chemical mutagens. The condensed superstructure of chromatin is not so rigid and regular as has been postulated in general. We have proposed a rheological explanation for the flexible network system ('chromatin network') that consists of the fluctuating assembly of nucleosome clusters linked with supertwisting DNA in a chromatin fiber ('Supertwisting Particulate Model'). We have proposed a 'Heterosensitive Target Model' for cellular radiosensitivity that is a modification of 'Heterogeneous Target Model'. The heterogeneity of chromatin target is derived from the highly condensed organization of chromatin segments consist of unstable and fragile sites in the fluctuating assembly of nucleosome clusters, namely 'supranucleosomal particles' or 'superbeads'. The models have been principally supported by our electron microscopic experiments employing 'surface - spreading whole - mount technique' since 1967. However, some deformation and artifacts in the chromatin structure are inevitable with these electron microscopic procedures. On the contrary, the 'atomic force microscope (AFM)' can be operated in liquid as well as in the air. A living specimen can be examined without any preparative procedures. Micromanipulation of the isolated chromosome is also possible by the precise positional control of a cantilever on the nanometer scale. The living human chromosomes were submerged in a solution of culture medium and observed by AFM using a liquid immersion cell. The surface - spreading whole - mount technique was applicable for this observation. The particulate chromatin segments of nucleosome clusters were clearly observed within mitotic human chromosomes in a living hydrated condition. These findings support the heterogeneity of chromatin target in a living cell. (J.P.N.)

  10. An integration time adaptive control method for atmospheric composition detection of occultation

    Ding, Lin; Hou, Shuai; Yu, Fei; Liu, Cheng; Li, Chao; Zhe, Lin

    2018-01-01

    When sun is used as the light source for atmospheric composition detection, it is necessary to image sun for accurate identification and stable tracking. In the course of 180 second of the occultation, the magnitude of sun light intensity through the atmosphere changes greatly. It is nearly 1100 times illumination change between the maximum atmospheric and the minimum atmospheric. And the process of light change is so severe that 2.9 times per second of light change can be reached. Therefore, it is difficult to control the integration time of sun image camera. In this paper, a novel adaptive integration time control method for occultation is presented. In this method, with the distribution of gray value in the image as the reference variable, and the concepts of speed integral PID control, the integration time adaptive control problem of high frequency imaging. The large dynamic range integration time automatic control in the occultation can be achieved.

  11. Chaos synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems using composite nonlinear feedback based integral sliding mode control.

    Mobayen, Saleh

    2018-06-01

    This paper proposes a combination of composite nonlinear feedback and integral sliding mode techniques for fast and accurate chaos synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems with Lipschitz nonlinear functions, time-varying delays and disturbances. The composite nonlinear feedback method allows accurate following of the master chaotic system and the integral sliding mode control provides invariance property which rejects the perturbations and preserves the stability of the closed-loop system. Based on the Lyapunov- Krasovskii stability theory and linear matrix inequalities, a novel sufficient condition is offered for the chaos synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems. This method not only guarantees the robustness against perturbations and time-delays, but also eliminates reaching phase and avoids chattering problem. Simulation results demonstrate that the suggested procedure leads to a great control performance. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Composite Sliding Mode Control for a Free-Floating Space Rigid-Flexible Coupling Manipulator System

    Congqing, Wang; Pengfei, Wu; Xin, Zhou; Xiwu, Pei

    2013-01-01

    The flexible space manipulator is a highly nonlinear and coupled dynamic system. This paper proposes a novel composite sliding mode control to deal with the vibration suppression and trajectory tracking of a free-floating space rigid-flexible coupling manipulator with a rigid payload. First, the dynamic equations of this system are established by using Lagrange and assumed mode methods and in the meantime this dynamic modelling allows consideration of the modelling errors, the external distur...

  13. Deflection Control in Composite Building by Using Belt Truss and Outriggers Systems

    S. Fawzia; T. Fatima

    2010-01-01

    The design of high-rise building is more often dictated by its serviceability rather than strength. Structural Engineers are always striving to overcome challenge of controlling lateral deflection and storey drifts as well as self weight of structure imposed on foundation. One of the most effective techniques is the use of outrigger and belt truss system in Composite structures that can astutely solve the above two issues in High-rise constructions. This paper investig...

  14. Composite bonded magnets with controlled anisotropy directions prepared by viscous deformation technique

    Yamashita, Fumitoshi; Kawamura, Kiyomi; Okada, Yukihiro; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ogushi, Masaki; Nakano, Masaki; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi

    2007-01-01

    When a radially anisotropic rare earth bonded magnet for a rotor with a high (BH) max value is magnetized multi-polarly, its flux distributes rectangularly and increases a cogging torque. In order to overcome this difficulty, we newly developed highly dense Sm 2 Fe 17 N 3 and Nd 2 Fe 14 B-based composite bonded magnets with continuously controlled anisotropy directions by using a viscous deformation technique

  15. Great heterogeneity of commercial fruit juices to induce endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated porcine coronary arteries: role of the phenolic content and composition.

    Auger, Cyril; Pollet, Brigitte; Arnold, Cécile; Marx, Céline; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2015-01-01

    Since polyphenol-rich products such as red wine, grape juice, and grape extracts have been shown to induce potent endothelium-dependent relaxations, we have evaluated whether commercial fruit juices such as those from berries are also able to induce endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated coronary arteries and, if so, to determine whether this effect is related to their phenolic content. Among the 51 fruit juices tested, 2/12 grape juices, 3/7 blackcurrant juices, 4/5 cranberry juices, 1/6 apple juices, 0/5 orange juices, 2/6 red fruit and berry juices, 3/6 blends of red fruit juices, and 0/4 non-red fruit juices were able to induce relaxations achieving more than 50% at a volume of 1%. The active fruit juices had phenolic contents ranging from 0.31 to 1.86 g GAE/L, which were similar to those of most of the less active juices with the exception of one active grape juice (2.14 g GAE/L) and one active blend of red fruit juices (3.48 g GAE/L). Altogether, these findings indicate that very few commercial fruit juices have the ability to induce potent endothelium-dependent relaxations, and that this effect is not related to their quantitative phenolic content, but rather to their qualitative phenolic composition.

  16. Environmental controls on the elemental composition of a Southern Hemisphere strain of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    Y. Feng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of semi-continuous incubation experiments were conducted with the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi strain NIWA1108 (Southern Ocean isolate to examine the effects of five environmental drivers (nitrate and phosphate concentrations, irradiance, temperature, and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 on both the physiological rates and elemental composition of the coccolithophore. Here, we report the alteration of the elemental composition of E. huxleyi in response to the changes in these environmental drivers. A series of dose–response curves for the cellular elemental composition of E. huxleyi were fitted for each of the five drivers across an environmentally representative gradient. The importance of each driver in regulating the elemental composition of E. huxleyi was ranked using a semi-quantitative approach. The percentage variations in elemental composition arising from the change in each driver between present-day and model-projected conditions for the year 2100 were calculated. Temperature was the most important driver controlling both cellular particulate organic and inorganic carbon content, whereas nutrient concentrations were the most important regulator of cellular particulate nitrogen and phosphorus of E. huxleyi. In contrast, elevated pCO2 had the greatest influence on cellular particulate inorganic carbon to organic carbon ratio, resulting in a decrease in the ratio. Our results indicate that the different environmental drivers play specific roles in regulating the elemental composition of E. huxleyi with wide-reaching implications for coccolithophore-related marine biogeochemical cycles, as a consequence of the regulation of E. huxleyi physiological processes.

  17. Chemical composition and heterogeneous reactivity of soot generated in the combustion of diesel and GTL (Gas-to-Liquid) fuels and amorphous carbon Printex U with NO2 and CF3COOH gases

    Tapia, A.; Salgado, S.; Martín, P.; Villanueva, F.; García-Contreras, R.; Cabañas, B.

    2018-03-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and trifluoroacetic acid (CF3COOH) with soot produced by diesel and GTL (gas-to-liquid) fuels were investigated using a Knudsen flow reactor with mass spectrometry as a detection system for gas phase species. Soot was generated with a 4 cylinder diesel engine working under steady-state like urban operation mode. Heterogeneous reaction of the mentioned gases with a commercial carbon, Printex U, used as reference, was also analyzed. The initial and the steady-state uptake coefficients, γ0 and γss, respectively, were measured indicating that GTL soot reacts faster than diesel soot and Printex U carbon for NO2 gas reactant. According to the number of reacted molecules on the surface, Printex U soot presents more reducing sites than diesel and GTL soot. Initial uptake coefficients for GTL and diesel soot for the reaction with CF3COOH gas reactant are very similar and no clear conclusions can be obtained related to the initial reactivity. The number of reacted molecules calculated for CF3COOH reactions shows values two orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding to NO2 reactions, indicating a greater presence of basic functionalities in the soot surfaces. More information of the surface composition has been obtained using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) before and after the reaction of soot samples with gas reactants. As conclusion, the interface of diesel and GTL soot before reaction mainly consists of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-compounds as well as ether functionalities. After reaction with gas reactant, it was observed that PAHs and nitro-compounds remain on the soot surface and new spectral bands such as carbonyl groups (carboxylic acids, aldehydes, esters and ketones) are observed. Physical properties of soot from both fuels studied such as BET surface isotherm and SEM analysis were also developed and related to the observed reactivity.

  18. Design and Simulation to Composite PI Controller on the Stratospheric Airship

    Kangwen Sun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In view of the stratospheric airship application requirements on energy storage and management system, based on the topology of DC/DC converter main circuit, the composite PI controller is designed to realize respective control with the Boost mode and Buck mode. Furthermore, limit stop integration method is proposed to achieve a buck-boost complex DC/DC converter boost with effective switching buck. Then, with the MATLAB Control System Toolbox design model, the composite PI controller design and a simulation is accomplished. According to the simulation model, the structure and parameters of the controller to the system can be easily adjusted. Finally, by using the average large-signal switching mathematical model to create sub-circuit in place of the actual circuit model, the whole circuit model of the DC/DC converter is constructed with MATLAB, and then, from the analysis of simulation results, it’s proved that the method can shorten the simulation time and obtain better convergence of the target.

  19. Neural adaptive control for vibration suppression in composite fin-tip of aircraft.

    Suresh, S; Kannan, N; Sundararajan, N; Saratchandran, P

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we present a neural adaptive control scheme for active vibration suppression of a composite aircraft fin tip. The mathematical model of a composite aircraft fin tip is derived using the finite element approach. The finite element model is updated experimentally to reflect the natural frequencies and mode shapes very accurately. Piezo-electric actuators and sensors are placed at optimal locations such that the vibration suppression is a maximum. Model-reference direct adaptive neural network control scheme is proposed to force the vibration level within the minimum acceptable limit. In this scheme, Gaussian neural network with linear filters is used to approximate the inverse dynamics of the system and the parameters of the neural controller are estimated using Lyapunov based update law. In order to reduce the computational burden, which is critical for real-time applications, the number of hidden neurons is also estimated in the proposed scheme. The global asymptotic stability of the overall system is ensured using the principles of Lyapunov approach. Simulation studies are carried-out using sinusoidal force functions of varying frequency. Experimental results show that the proposed neural adaptive control scheme is capable of providing significant vibration suppression in the multiple bending modes of interest. The performance of the proposed scheme is better than the H(infinity) control scheme.

  20. Heterogeneity of elemental composition and natural abundance of stables isotopes of C and N in soils and leaves of mangroves at their southernmost West Atlantic range.

    Tognella, M M P; Soares, M L G; Cuevas, E; Medina, E

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove communities were selected in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, near their southernmost limit of distribution, to study mineral nutrient relation in soils and plants. Communities included three true mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia germinans, and two associated species, the fern Acrostichum danaeifolium, and the grass Spartina densiflora. The sites included communities in the lower Río Tavares near Florianopolis city, Sonho beach near Palhoça city, and the Santo Antonio lagoon. These sites included a full range of mangroves under humid climate where winter temperatures, instead of salinity, may be the main factor regulating their productive capacity and species composition. Soil salinity was determined by the concentration of soluble Na, and soil C and N were linearly correlated indicating their association in organic matter. Tavares site showed higher specific conductivity, and concentrations of Na and Mg in the soil layer below 40 cm depth, indicating larger influence of marine water. Isotopic signature of C increased with soil depth suggesting that microorganisms decomposing organic matter are releasing 13C depleted CO2. Nitrogen isotopic signature decreased with soil depth, indicating enrichment in 15N possibly as a result of denitrification in the upper soil layers. Mineral elements in leaf tissues showed A. schaueriana with higher concentrations of N, P, Na, K, Cu, Zn, and Na/Ca ratio. Spartina densiflora was characterized by the lowest N and K concentrations, and the highest concentrations of Al and Fe. Rhizophora mangle and L. racemosa had the highest Ca concentrations. Carbon isotopic signatures identified S. densiflora as a C4 plant, and A. schaueriana as the mangrove species occupying comparatively more water stressed microsites than the rest. Leaf nitrogen isotopic signatures were positive, in correspondence with the soil values. The results support the hypothesis that sites sampled were comparatively

  1. The preparation of dental glass-ceramic composites with controlled fraction of leucite crystals

    Martina Mrázová

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is dealing with synthesis of leucite powder, which can be used for the preparation of dental glassceramic composites by subsequent thermal treatment. Newly developed procedure is based on preparation of dental raw material as a mixture of two separate compounds: the crystalline leucite powder prepared at relatively low temperature and a commercial matrix powder.Hydrothermal synthesis of tetragonal leucite particles (KAlSi2O6 with the average size of about 3 μm was developed in our laboratory. The leucite dental raw material was prepared by mixing of 20 wt.% of synthetic tetragonal leucite with commercial matrix. Dental composites were prepared from the dental raw material by uniaxial pressing and firing up to 960°C. Dilatometric measurements confirmed that the coefficient of thermal expansion increased by 32% when 20 wt.% of the tetragonal leucite was added into the basic matrix. In addition, it was showed that the synthesized leucite powder was suitable for the preparation of leucite composites with controlled coefficient of thermal expansion. High value of the thermal expansion coefficient enables application of prepared composite in metal-ceramics restorations.

  2. Biogeochemical interactions control a temporal succession in the elemental composition of marine communities

    Martiny, Adam C.; Talarmin, Agathe Anne Gaelle; Mouginot, Cé line; Lee, Jeanette A.; Huang, Jeremy S.; Gellene, Alyssa G.; Caron, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed clear regional differences in the particulate organic matter composition and stoichiometry of plankton communities. In contrast, less is known about potential mechanisms and patterns of temporal changes in the elemental composition of marine systems. Here, we monitored weekly changes in environmental conditions, phytoplankton abundances, and particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentrations over a 3-yr period. We found that variation in the particulate organic matter (POM) concentrations and ratios were related to seasonal oscillations of environmental conditions and phytoplankton abundances. Periods with low temperature, high nutrient concentrations and a dominance of large phytoplankton corresponded to low C : N : P and vice-versa for warmer periods during the summer and fall. In addition to seasonal changes, we observed a multiyear increase in POM C : P and N : P that might be associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Finally, there was substantial short-term variability in all factors but similar linkages between environmental variability and elemental composition as observed on seasonal and interannual time-scales. Using a feed-forward neural network, we could explain a large part of the variation in POM concentrations and ratios based on changes in environmental conditions and phytoplankton abundances. The apparent links across all time-scales between changes in physics, chemistry, phytoplankton, and POM concentrations and ratios suggest we have identified key controls of the elemental composition of marine communities in this region.

  3. Preparation of Size-Controlled Silver Nanoparticles and Chitin-Based Composites and Their Antimicrobial Activities

    Vinh Quang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for the preparation of size-controlled spherical silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs was reported for their generation by autoclaving a mixture of silver-containing glass powder and glucose. The particle size is regulated by the glucose concentration, with concentrations of 0.25, 1.0, and 4.0 wt% glucose providing small (3.48±1.83 nm in diameter, medium (6.53±1.78 nm, and large (12.9±2.5 nm particles, respectively. In this study, Ag NP/chitin composites were synthesized by mixing each of these three Ag NP suspensions with a <5% deacetylated (DAc chitin powder (pH 7.0 at room temperature. The Ag NPs were homogenously dispersed and stably adsorbed onto the chitin. The Ag NP/chitin composites were obtained as yellow or brown powders. Approximately 5, 15, and 20 μg of the small, medium, and large Ag NPs, respectively, were estimated to maximally adsorb onto 1 mg of chitin. The bactericidal and antifungal activities of the Ag NP/chitin composites increased as the amount of Ag NPs in the chitin increased. Furthermore, smaller Ag NPs (per weight in the chitin composites provided higher bactericidal and anti-fungal activities.

  4. Biogeochemical interactions control a temporal succession in the elemental composition of marine communities

    Martiny, Adam C.

    2015-11-23

    Recent studies have revealed clear regional differences in the particulate organic matter composition and stoichiometry of plankton communities. In contrast, less is known about potential mechanisms and patterns of temporal changes in the elemental composition of marine systems. Here, we monitored weekly changes in environmental conditions, phytoplankton abundances, and particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentrations over a 3-yr period. We found that variation in the particulate organic matter (POM) concentrations and ratios were related to seasonal oscillations of environmental conditions and phytoplankton abundances. Periods with low temperature, high nutrient concentrations and a dominance of large phytoplankton corresponded to low C : N : P and vice-versa for warmer periods during the summer and fall. In addition to seasonal changes, we observed a multiyear increase in POM C : P and N : P that might be associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Finally, there was substantial short-term variability in all factors but similar linkages between environmental variability and elemental composition as observed on seasonal and interannual time-scales. Using a feed-forward neural network, we could explain a large part of the variation in POM concentrations and ratios based on changes in environmental conditions and phytoplankton abundances. The apparent links across all time-scales between changes in physics, chemistry, phytoplankton, and POM concentrations and ratios suggest we have identified key controls of the elemental composition of marine communities in this region.

  5. Characterization and control of the fiber-matrix interface in ceramic matrix composites

    Lowden, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced SiC composites fabricated by thermal-gradient forced-flow chemical-vapor infiltration (FCVI) have exhibited both composite (toughened) and brittle behavior during mechanical property evaluation. Detailed analysis of the fiber-matrix interface revealed that a silica layer on the surface of Nicalon Si-C-O fibers tightly bonds the fiber to the matrix. The strongly bonded fiber and matrix, combined with the reduction in the strength of the fibers that occurs during processing, resulted in the observed brittle behavior. The mechanical behavior of Nicalon/SiC composites has been improved by applying thin coatings (silicon carbide, boron, boron nitride, molybdenum, carbon) to the fibers, prior to densification, to control the interfacial bond. Varying degrees of bonding have been achieved with different coating materials and film thicknesses. Fiber-matrix bond strengths have been quantitatively evaluated using an indentation method and a simple tensile test. The effects of bonding and friction on the mechanical behavior of this composite system have been investigated. 167 refs., 59 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Body composition differences between adults with multiple sclerosis and BMI-matched controls without MS.

    Wingo, Brooks C; Young, Hui-Ju; Motl, Robert W

    2018-04-01

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have many health conditions related to overweight and obesity, but little is known about how body composition among those with MS compares to those without MS at the same weight. To compare differences in whole body and regional body composition between persons with and without MS matched for sex and body mass index (BMI). Persons with MS (n = 51) and non-MS controls (n = 51) matched for sex and BMI. Total mass, lean mass, fat mass, and percent body fat (%BF) of total body and arm, leg, and trunk segments were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Men with MS had significantly less whole body lean mass (mean difference: 9933.5 ± 3123.1 g, p MS counterparts. Further, men with MS had significantly lower lean mass in the arm (p = 0.02) and leg (p MS. Men with MS had significantly higher %BF in all three regions (p MS. There were no differences between women with and without MS. We observed significant differences in whole body and regional body composition between BMI-matched men with and without MS. Additional research is needed to further explore differences in body composition, adipose distribution, and the impact of these differences on the health and function of men with MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagenetic and compositional controls of wettability in siliceous sedimentary rocks, Monterey Formation, California

    Hill, Kristina M.

    Modified imbibition tests were performed on 69 subsurface samples from Monterey Formation reservoirs in the San Joaquin Valley to measure wettability variation as a result of composition and silica phase change. Contact angle tests were also performed on 6 chert samples from outcrop and 3 nearly pure mineral samples. Understanding wettability is important because it is a key factor in reservoir fluid distribution and movement, and its significance rises as porosity and permeability decrease and fluid interactions with reservoir grain surface area increase. Although the low permeability siliceous reservoirs of the Monterey Formation are economically important and prolific, a greater understanding of factors that alter their wettability will help better develop them. Imbibition results revealed a strong trend of decreased wettability to oil with increased detrital content in opal-CT phase samples. Opal-A phase samples exhibited less wettability to oil than both opal-CT and quartz phase samples of similar detrital content. Subsurface reservoir samples from 3 oil fields were crushed to eliminate the effect of capillary pressure and cleansed of hydrocarbons to eliminate wettability alterations by asphaltene, then pressed into discs of controlled density. Powder discs were tested for wettability by dispensing a controlled volume of water and motor oil onto the surface and measuring the time required for each fluid to imbibe into the sample. The syringe and software of a CAM101 tensiometer were used to control the amount of fluid dispensed onto each sample, and imbibition completion times were determined by high-speed photography for water drops; oil drop imbibition was significantly slower and imbibition was timed and determined visually. Contact angle of water and oil drops on polished chert and mineral sample surfaces was determined by image analysis and the Young-Laplace equation. Oil imbibition was significantly slower with increased detrital composition and faster

  8. Using Length of Stay to Control for Unobserved Heterogeneity When Estimating Treatment Effect on Hospital Costs with Observational Data: Issues of Reliability, Robustness, and Usefulness.

    May, Peter; Garrido, Melissa M; Cassel, J Brian; Morrison, R Sean; Normand, Charles

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of treatment effect estimates when length of stay (LOS) is used to control for unobserved heterogeneity when estimating treatment effect on cost of hospital admission with observational data. We used data from a prospective cohort study on the impact of palliative care consultation teams (PCCTs) on direct cost of hospital care. Adult patients with an advanced cancer diagnosis admitted to five large medical and cancer centers in the United States between 2007 and 2011 were eligible for this study. Costs were modeled using generalized linear models with a gamma distribution and a log link. We compared variability in estimates of PCCT impact on hospitalization costs when LOS was used as a covariate, as a sample parameter, and as an outcome denominator. We used propensity scores to account for patient characteristics associated with both PCCT use and total direct hospitalization costs. We analyzed data from hospital cost databases, medical records, and questionnaires. Our propensity score weighted sample included 969 patients who were discharged alive. In analyses of hospitalization costs, treatment effect estimates are highly sensitive to methods that control for LOS, complicating interpretation. Both the magnitude and significance of results varied widely with the method of controlling for LOS. When we incorporated intervention timing into our analyses, results were robust to LOS-controls. Treatment effect estimates using LOS-controls are not only suboptimal in terms of reliability (given concerns over endogeneity and bias) and usefulness (given the need to validate the cost-effectiveness of an intervention using overall resource use for a sample defined at baseline) but also in terms of robustness (results depend on the approach taken, and there is little evidence to guide this choice). To derive results that minimize endogeneity concerns and maximize external validity, investigators should match and analyze treatment and comparison arms

  9. Heterogeneity of elemental composition and natural abundance of stables isotopes of C and N in soils and leaves of mangroves at their southernmost West Atlantic range

    M. M. P. Tognella

    Full Text Available Abstract Mangrove communities were selected in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, near their southernmost limit of distribution, to study mineral nutrient relation in soils and plants. Communities included three true mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia germinans, and two associated species, the fern Acrostichum danaeifolium, and the grass Spartina densiflora. The sites included communities in the lower Río Tavares near Florianopolis city, Sonho beach near Palhoça city, and the Santo Antonio lagoon. These sites included a full range of mangroves under humid climate where winter temperatures, instead of salinity, may be the main factor regulating their productive capacity and species composition. Soil salinity was determined by the concentration of soluble Na, and soil C and N were linearly correlated indicating their association in organic matter. Tavares site showed higher specific conductivity, and concentrations of Na and Mg in the soil layer below 40 cm depth, indicating larger influence of marine water. Isotopic signature of C increased with soil depth suggesting that microorganisms decomposing organic matter are releasing 13C depleted CO2. Nitrogen isotopic signature decreased with soil depth, indicating enrichment in 15N possibly as a result of denitrification in the upper soil layers. Mineral elements in leaf tissues showed A. schaueriana with higher concentrations of N, P, Na, K, Cu, Zn, and Na/Ca ratio. Spartina densiflora was characterized by the lowest N and K concentrations, and the highest concentrations of Al and Fe. Rhizophora mangle and L. racemosa had the highest Ca concentrations. Carbon isotopic signatures identified S. densiflora as a C4 plant, and A. schaueriana as the mangrove species occupying comparatively more water stressed microsites than the rest. Leaf nitrogen isotopic signatures were positive, in correspondence with the soil values. The results support the hypothesis that

  10. Control of waveguide properties by tuning femtosecond laser induced compositional changes

    Hoyo, Jesús; Fernandez, Toney Teddy del; Siegel, Jan; Solis, Javier; Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto; Sotillo, Belén; Fernández, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    Local compositional changes induced by high repetition rate fs-laser irradiation can be used to produce high performance optical waveguides in phosphate-based glasses. The waveguide refractive index contrast is determined by the local concentration of La, which can be changed by the action of the writing laser pulses. In this work, we have investigated the degree of control that can be exerted using this waveguide writing mechanism over the cross-section of the guiding region, and the local refractive index and compositional changes induced. These variables can be smoothly controlled via processing parameters using the slit shaping technique with moderate Numerical Aperture (NA 0.68) writing optics. The combined use of X-ray microanalysis and near field refractive index profilometry evidences a neat linear correlation between local La content and refractive index increase over a broad Δn interval (>3 × 10 −2 ). This result further confirms the feasibility of generating efficient, integrated optics elements via spatially selective modification of the glass composition.

  11. Control of waveguide properties by tuning femtosecond laser induced compositional changes

    Hoyo, Jesús; Fernandez, Toney Teddy del; Siegel, Jan; Solis, Javier, E-mail: j.solis@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto [Instituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sotillo, Belén; Fernández, Paloma [Depto. de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Físicas, Univ. Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-29

    Local compositional changes induced by high repetition rate fs-laser irradiation can be used to produce high performance optical waveguides in phosphate-based glasses. The waveguide refractive index contrast is determined by the local concentration of La, which can be changed by the action of the writing laser pulses. In this work, we have investigated the degree of control that can be exerted using this waveguide writing mechanism over the cross-section of the guiding region, and the local refractive index and compositional changes induced. These variables can be smoothly controlled via processing parameters using the slit shaping technique with moderate Numerical Aperture (NA 0.68) writing optics. The combined use of X-ray microanalysis and near field refractive index profilometry evidences a neat linear correlation between local La content and refractive index increase over a broad Δn interval (>3 × 10{sup −2}). This result further confirms the feasibility of generating efficient, integrated optics elements via spatially selective modification of the glass composition.

  12. Control of particle size by feed composition in the nanolatexes produced via monomer-starved semicontinuous emulsion copolymerization.

    Sajjadi, Shahriar

    2015-05-01

    Conventional batch and semicontinuous emulsion copolymerizations often produce large particles whose size cannot be easily correlated with the comonomer feed compositions, and are to some degree susceptible to composition drift. In contrast, we found that copolymer nanolatexes made via semicontinuous monomer-starved emulsion copolymerizations are featured with an average nanoparticle size being controlled by the feed composition, a high conversion achieved, and a high degree of particle composition uniformity. This was achieved because the rate of particle growth, during nucleation, was controlled by the rate of comonomer addition, and the copolymer composition, surfactant parking area on the particles, and nucleation efficiency determined by the comonomer feed composition. Two model systems, methyl methacrylate/styrene and vinyl acetate/butyl acrylate, with significant differences in water solubility were studied. Monomers were added to the aqueous solution of sodium dodecylsulfate and potassium persulfate at a low rate to achieve high instantaneous conversions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Three-dimensional static shape control analysis of composite plates using distributed piezoelectric actuators

    Shaik Dawood, M S I; Iannucci, L; Greenhalgh, E S

    2008-01-01

    In this work, based on a linear piezoelectric constitutive model, a three-dimensional finite element code using an eight-node brick element that includes the anisotropic and coupled field effects of piezoelectric actuators has been developed for the static shape control analysis of fibre reinforced composite laminates. The code was used to study voltage sensing and actuation capabilities of piezoelectric actuators on composite laminates. The required input voltages to the actuators in order to achieve a specified structural shape were determined using a weighted shape control method. The code was validated using two test cases obtained from the literature. The results were found to show good correlation for voltage actuation. However, since determining input voltages to achieve the desired structural shape is a type of inverse problem, there are no explicit solutions and hence the results obtained from the present model were not similar to those reported in the literature. The second validation also suggests that the anisotropic and coupled field effects of the piezoelectric actuators cannot be neglected as this has been shown to underestimate the required control voltages. The effects of different lamination angles, boundary conditions, plate length-to-thickness ratios and actuator dimensions on the control voltages have also been reported

  14. Active wing design with integrated flight control using piezoelectric macro fiber composites

    Paradies, Rolf; Ciresa, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Piezoelectric macro fiber composites (MFCs) have been implemented as actuators into an active composite wing. The goal of the project was the design of a wing for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a thin profile and integrated roll control with piezoelectric elements. The design and its optimization were based on a fully coupled structural fluid dynamics model that implemented constraints from available materials and manufacturing. A scaled prototype wing was manufactured. The design model was validated with static and preliminary dynamic tests of the prototype wing. The qualitative agreement between the numerical model and experiments was good. Dynamic tests were also performed on a sandwich wing of the same size with conventional aileron control for comparison. Even though the roll moment generated by the active wing was lower, it proved sufficient for the intended roll control of the UAV. The active wing with piezoelectric flight control constitutes one of the first examples where such a design has been optimized and the numerical model has been validated in experiments

  15. Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions

    Luther, Joseph Matthew; Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-07-06

    Size- and shape-controlled nanocrystal growth is intensely researched for applications including electro-optic, catalytic, and medical devices. Chemical transformations such as cation exchange overcome the limitation of traditional colloidal synthesis, where the nanocrystal shape often reflects the inherent symmetry of the underlying lattice. Here we show that nanocrystals, with established synthetic protocols for high monodispersity, can be templates for independent composition control. Specifically, controlled interconversion between wurtzite CdS, chalcocite Cu2S, and rock salt PbS occurs while preserving the anisotropic dimensions unique to the as-synthesized materials. Sequential exchange reactions between the three sulfide compositions are driven by the disparate solubilites of the metal ion exchange pair in specific coordinating molecules. Starting with CdS, highly anisotropic PbS nanorods are created, which serve as an important material for studying strong 2-dimensional quantum confinement, as well as for optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, interesting nanoheterostructures of CdS|PbS are obtained by precise control over ion insertion and removal.

  16. Physical and Human Controls on the Carbon Composition of Organic Matter in Tropical Rivers: An Integrated Analysis of Landscape Properties and River Isotopic Composition

    Ballester, M. V.R.; Victoria, R. L.; Krusche, A. V. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Piracicaba (Brazil); Bernardes, M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Neill, C.; Deegan, L. [Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Richey, J. E. [University of Washington, Seatle, WA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We applied an integrated analysis of landscape properties including soil properties, land cover and riverine isotopic composition. To evaluate physical and human controls on the carbon composition of organic matter in tropical rivers, we applied an integrated analysis of landscape properties including soil properties, land cover and riverine isotopic composition. Our main objective was to establish the relationship between basin attributes and forms, fluxes and composition of dissolved and particulate organic matter in river channels. A physical template was developed as a GIS-based comprehensive tool to support the understanding of the biogeochemistry of the surface waters of two tropical rivers: the Ji-Parana (Western Amazonia) and the Piracicaba (southeastern of Brazil). For each river we divided the basin into drainage units, organized according to river network morphology and degree of land use impact. Each sector corresponded to a sampling point where river isotopic composition was analysed. River sites and basin characteristics were calculated using datasets compiled as layers in ArcGis Geographical Information System and ERDAS-IMAGINE (Image Processing) software. Each delineated drainage area was individually characterized in terms of topography, soils, river network and land use. Carbon stable isotopic composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) was determined at several sites along the main tributaries and small streams. The effects of land use on fluvial carbon composition were quantified by a linear regression analysis, relating basin cover and river isotopic composition. The results showed that relatively recent land cover changes have already had an impact on the composition of the riverine DOM and POM, indicating that, as in natural ecosystems, vegetation plays a key role in the composition of riverine organic matter in agricultural ecosystems. (author)

  17. Media ion composition controls regulatory and virulence response of Salmonella in spaceflight.

    James W Wilson

    Full Text Available The spaceflight environment is relevant to conditions encountered by pathogens during the course of infection and induces novel changes in microbial pathogenesis not observed using conventional methods. It is unclear how microbial cells sense spaceflight-associated changes to their growth environment and orchestrate corresponding changes in molecular and physiological phenotypes relevant to the infection process. Here we report that spaceflight-induced increases in Salmonella virulence are regulated by media ion composition, and that phosphate ion is sufficient to alter related pathogenesis responses in a spaceflight analogue model. Using whole genome microarray and proteomic analyses from two independent Space Shuttle missions, we identified evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways in Salmonella that respond to spaceflight under all media compositions tested. Identification of conserved regulatory paradigms opens new avenues to control microbial responses during the infection process and holds promise to provide an improved understanding of human health and disease on Earth.

  18. Preparation and hygrothermal properties of composite phase change humidity control materials

    Chen, Zhi; Qin, Menghao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new kind of phase change humidity control material (PCHCM) was prepared. • The PCHCM can moderate both the indoor temperature and humidity. • The silicon dioxide shell can improve the thermal properties of the composite. • The PCM microcapsules can improve the moisture buffer ability of the composite. • The CPCM/vesuvianite composite has a better hygrothermal performance than pure hygroscopic material. - Abstract: A novel phase change humidity control material (PCHCM) was prepared by using PCM microcapsules and different hygroscopic porous materials. The PCHCM composite can regulate the indoor hygrothermal environment by absorbing or releasing both heat and moisture. The PCM microcapsules were synthesized with methyl triethoxysilane by the sol–gel method. The vesuvianite, sepiolite and zeolite were used as hygroscopic materials. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to measure the morphology profiles of the microcapsules and PCHCM. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to determine the thermal properties and thermal stability. Both the moisture transfer coefficient and moisture buffer value (MBV) of different PCHCMs were measured by the improved cup method. The DSC results showed that the SiO 2 shell can reduce the super-cooling degree of PCM. The super-cooling degrees of microcapsules and PCHCM are lower than that of the pure PCM. The onset temperature of thermal degradation of the microcapsules and PCHCMs is higher than that of pure PCM. Both the moisture transfer coefficient and MBV of PCHCMs are higher than that of the pure hygroscopic materials. The results indicated the PCHCMs have better thermal properties and moisture buffer ability.

  19. Lithospheric controls on magma composition along Earth's longest continental hotspot track.

    Davies, D R; Rawlinson, N; Iaffaldano, G; Campbell, I H

    2015-09-24

    Hotspots are anomalous regions of volcanism at Earth's surface that show no obvious association with tectonic plate boundaries. Classic examples include the Hawaiian-Emperor chain and the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain province. The majority are believed to form as Earth's tectonic plates move over long-lived mantle plumes: buoyant upwellings that bring hot material from Earth's deep mantle to its surface. It has long been recognized that lithospheric thickness limits the rise height of plumes and, thereby, their minimum melting pressure. It should, therefore, have a controlling influence on the geochemistry of plume-related magmas, although unambiguous evidence of this has, so far, been lacking. Here we integrate observational constraints from surface geology, geochronology, plate-motion reconstructions, geochemistry and seismology to ascertain plume melting depths beneath Earth's longest continental hotspot track, a 2,000-kilometre-long track in eastern Australia that displays a record of volcanic activity between 33 and 9 million years ago, which we call the Cosgrove track. Our analyses highlight a strong correlation between lithospheric thickness and magma composition along this track, with: (1) standard basaltic compositions in regions where lithospheric thickness is less than 110 kilometres; (2) volcanic gaps in regions where lithospheric thickness exceeds 150 kilometres; and (3) low-volume, leucitite-bearing volcanism in regions of intermediate lithospheric thickness. Trace-element concentrations from samples along this track support the notion that these compositional variations result from different degrees of partial melting, which is controlled by the thickness of overlying lithosphere. Our results place the first observational constraints on the sub-continental melting depth of mantle plumes and provide direct evidence that lithospheric thickness has a dominant influence on the volume and chemical composition of plume-derived magmas.

  20. Factors that control the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in an anoxic marine sediment

    Alperin, M. J.; Blair, Neal E.; Albert, D. B.; Hoehler, T. M.; Martens, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in anoxic marine sediment is controlled by four factors: (1) the pathway of methane formation, (2) the isotopic composition of the methanogenic precursors, (3) the isotope fractionation factors for methane production, and (4) the isotope fractionation associated with methane oxidation. The importance of each factor was evaluated by monitoring stable carbon isotope ratios in methane produced by a sediment microcosm. Methane did not accumulate during the initial 42-day period when sediment contained sulfate, indicating little methane production from 'noncompetitive' substrates. Following sulfate depletion, methane accumulation proceeded in three distinct phases. First, CO2 reduction was the dominant methanogenic pathway and the isotopic composition of the methane produced ranged from -80 to -94 per thousand. The acetate concentration increased during this phase, suggesting that acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria were unable to keep pace with acetate production. Second, acetate fermentation became the dominant methanogenic pathway as bacteria responded to elevated acetate concentrations. The methane produced during this phase was progressively enriched in C-13, reaching a maximum delta(C-13) value of -42 per thousand. Third, the acetate pool experienced a precipitous decline from greater than 5 mM to less than 20 micro-M and methane production was again dominated by CO2 reduction. The delta(C-13) of methane produced during this final phase ranged from -46 to -58 per thousand. Methane oxidation concurrent with methane production was detected throughout the period of methane accumulation, at rates equivalent to 1 to 8 percent of the gross methane production rate. Thus methane oxidation was too slow to have significantly modified the isotopic signature of methane. A comparison of microcosm and field data suggests that similar microbial interactions may control seasonal variability in the isotopic composition of methane

  1. Giant calcite concretions in aeolian dune sandstones; sedimentological and architectural controls on diagenetic heterogeneity, mid-Cretaceous Iberian Desert System, Spain

    Arribas, M.E.; Rodríguez-López, J.P.; Meléndez, N.; Soria, A.R.; de Boer, P.L.

    2012-01-01

    Aeoliandunesandstones of the Iberian erg system (Cretaceous, Spain) host giantcalciteconcretions that constitute heterogeneities of diagenetic origin within a potential aeolian reservoir. The giantcalciteconcretions developed in large-scale aeoliandune foresets, at the transition between aeoliandune

  2. Changes in bone mineral density and body composition during pregnancy and postpartum. A controlled cohort study

    Liendgaard, Ulla Kristine Møller; við Streym, Susanna; Mosekilde, Leif

    2012-01-01

    In a controlled cohort study, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 153 women pre-pregnancy; during pregnancy; and 0.5, 4, 9, and 19 months postpartum. Seventy-five age-matched controls, without pregnancy plans, were followed in parallel. Pregnancy and breastfeeding cause a reversible bone...... in fat mass differed according to breastfeeding status with a slower decline in women who continued breastfeeding. Calcium and vitamin D intake was not associated with BMD changes. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy and breastfeeding cause a reversible bone loss. At 19 months postpartum, BMD has returned to pre-pregnancy...... loss, which, initially, is most pronounced at trabecular sites but also involves cortical sites during prolonged breastfeeding. INTRODUCTION: Conflicting results have been reported on effects of pregnancy and breastfeeding on BMD and body composition (BC). In a controlled cohort study, we elucidate...

  3. Composite materials pipings: selection of basic materials and manufacturing process, quality control during manufacture

    Pays, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present a summary of the knowledge acquired at the R and D on resins used as composite matrix, the resistance to hydrolysis and mechanical strength of pipings made from these materials, and on quality control during manufacture. The initial targets concerning the material selection, industrial manufacturing and quality control procedures are presented. The paper describes the results obtained concerning the investigation of the damage produced by hydrolysis in polyesters, vinyl esters and epoxides, the influence of temperature, reinforcement and the mechanical characterization of the tubing manufacturing. The performances of the nondestructive testings (radiography, ultrasonic controls, differential interferometry and infrared thermography) used are also reported. The paper ends with a further research and testings programme. (author)

  4. Factor VIIa response to a fat-rich meal does not depend on fatty acid composition: A randomized controlled trial

    Mennen, L.; Maat, M. de; Meijer, G.; Zock, P.; Grobbee, D.; Kok, F.; Kluft, C.; Schouten, E.

    1998-01-01

    A fat-rich meal increases activated factor VII (FVIIa), but it is not clear whether this increase depends on the fatty acid composition of the meal. Therefore, we studied the FVIIa response to fat-rich meals with different fatty acid composition in a randomized controlled crossover trial and

  5. Soft sensor based composition estimation and controller design for an ideal reactive distillation column.

    Vijaya Raghavan, S R; Radhakrishnan, T K; Srinivasan, K

    2011-01-01

    In this research work, the authors have presented the design and implementation of a recurrent neural network (RNN) based inferential state estimation scheme for an ideal reactive distillation column. Decentralized PI controllers are designed and implemented. The reactive distillation process is controlled by controlling the composition which has been estimated from the available temperature measurements using a type of RNN called Time Delayed Neural Network (TDNN). The performance of the RNN based state estimation scheme under both open loop and closed loop have been compared with a standard Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and a Feed forward Neural Network (FNN). The online training/correction has been done for both RNN and FNN schemes for every ten minutes whenever new un-trained measurements are available from a conventional composition analyzer. The performance of RNN shows better state estimation capability as compared to other state estimation schemes in terms of qualitative and quantitative performance indices. Copyright © 2010 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Composite adaptive control of belt polishing force for aero-engine blade

    Zhsao, Pengbing; Shi, Yaoyao

    2013-09-01

    The existing methods for blade polishing mainly focus on robot polishing and manual grinding. Due to the difficulty in high-precision control of the polishing force, the blade surface precision is very low in robot polishing, in particular, quality of the inlet and exhaust edges can not satisfy the processing requirements. Manual grinding has low efficiency, high labor intensity and unstable processing quality, moreover, the polished surface is vulnerable to burn, and the surface precision and integrity are difficult to ensure. In order to further improve the profile accuracy and surface quality, a pneumatic flexible polishing force-exerting mechanism is designed and a dual-mode switching composite adaptive control(DSCAC) strategy is proposed, which combines Bang-Bang control and model reference adaptive control based on fuzzy neural network(MRACFNN) together. By the mode decision-making mechanism, Bang-Bang control is used to track the control command signal quickly when the actual polishing force is far away from the target value, and MRACFNN is utilized in smaller error ranges to improve the system robustness and control precision. Based on the mathematical model of the force-exerting mechanism, simulation analysis is implemented on DSCAC. Simulation results show that the output polishing force can better track the given signal. Finally, the blade polishing experiments are carried out on the designed polishing equipment. Experimental results show that DSCAC can effectively mitigate the influence of gas compressibility, valve dead-time effect, valve nonlinear flow, cylinder friction, measurement noise and other interference on the control precision of polishing force, which has high control precision, strong robustness, strong anti-interference ability and other advantages compared with MRACFNN. The proposed research achieves high-precision control of the polishing force, effectively improves the blade machining precision and surface consistency, and

  7. A Nanostructured Composites Thermal Switch Controls Internal and External Short Circuit in Lithium Ion Batteries

    McDonald, Robert C.; VanBlarcom, Shelly L.; Kwasnik, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses a thin layer of composite material, made from nano scale particles of nickel and Teflon, placed within a battery cell as a layer within the anode and/or the cathode. There it conducts electrons at room temperature, then switches to an insulator at an elevated temperature to prevent thermal runaway caused by internal short circuits. The material layer controls excess currents from metal-to-metal or metal-to-carbon shorts that might result from cell crush or a manufacturing defect

  8. Variations in isotopic compositions of chlorine in evaporation-controlled salt lake brines of Qaidam Basin, China

    Xiao, Ying-kai; Liu, Wei-guo; Zhou, Y.M.; Wang, Yun-hui; Shirodkar, P.V.

    The variations in the isotopic compositions of chlorine in evaporation-controlled saline lake brines were determined by using an improved procedure for precise measurement of chlorine isotopes based on Cs sub(2) Cl sup(+) ion by thermal ionization...

  9. Technical note: Late Pliocene age control and composite depths at ODP Site 982, revisited

    N. Khélifi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocean Drilling Program (ODP Site 982 provided a key sediment section at Rockall Plateau for reconstructing northeast Atlantic paleoceanography and monitoring benthic δ18O stratigraphy over the late Pliocene to Quaternary onset of major Northern Hemisphere glaciation. A renewed hole-specific inspection of magnetostratigraphic reversals and the addition of epibenthic δ18O records for short Pliocene sections in holes 982A, B, and C, crossing core breaks in the δ18O record published for Hole 982B, now imply a major revision of composite core depths. After tuning to the orbitally tuned reference record LR04, the new composite δ18O record results in a hiatus, where the Kaena magnetic subchron might have been lost, and in a significant age reduction for all proxy records by 130 to 20 ky over the time span 3.2–2.7 million years ago (Ma. Our study demonstrates the general significance of reliable composite-depth scales and δ18O stratigraphies in ODP sediment records for generating ocean-wide correlations in paleoceanography. The new concept of age control makes the late Pliocene trends in SST (sea surface temperature and atmospheric pCO2 at Site 982 more consistent with various paleoclimate trends published from elsewhere in the North Atlantic.

  10. Shrinkage Characteristics of Experimental Polymer Containing Composites under Controlled Light Curing Modes

    Alain Pefferkorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of polymethylmethacrylate polymer of different molecular weight at the aerosil/ethyleneglycol- or 1,3 butanediol-dimethacrylate interfaces was determined to provide microstructured networks. Their structural characteristics were determined to be controlled by the amount of polymer initially supplied to the system. The sediment (the settled phase characteristics, determined as a function of the polymer concentration and the rate of the polymerization shrinkage determined for composite resins, obtained by extrusion of the sediment after centrifugation, were found to be correlated. The specific role of the adsorbed polymer was found to be differently perturbed with the supplementary supply of dimethacrylate based monomer additives. Particularly, the bisphenol A dimethacrylate that generated crystals within the sediment was found to impede the shrinkage along the crystal lateral faces and strongly limit the shrinkage along its basal faces. Addition of ethyleneglycol- or polyethylene-glycoldimethacrylate monomers was determined to modify the sedimentation characteristics of the aerosil suspension and the shrinkage properties of the composites. Finally, the effects of stepwise light curing methods with prolonged lighting-off periods were investigated and found to modify the development and the final values of the composite shrinkage.

  11. Controlled fabrication and tunable photoluminescence properties of Mn2+ doped graphene–ZnO composite

    Luan, Xinglong; Zhang, Yihe; Tong, Wangshu; Shang, Jiwu; An, Qi; Huang, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene–ZnO composites were synthesized by a mixed solvothermal method. • ZnO quantum dots are distributed uniformly on the graphene sheets. • A possible hypothesis is raised for the influence of graphene oxide on the nucleation of ZnO. • Mn 2+ doped graphene–ZnO composites were fabricated and the emission spectra can be tuned by doping. - Abstract: Graphene–ZnO composites (G–ZnO) with controlled morphology and photoluminescence property were synthesized by a mixed solvothermal method. Mixed solvent were composed by dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectra were used to characterize G–ZnO. Graphene as a substrate can help the distribution and the dispersity of ZnO, and a possible model of the interaction between graphene oxide and ZnO particles is proposed. At the same time, graphene also reduce the size of ZnO particles to about 5 nm. Furthermore, Mn 2+ ions dopes G–ZnO successfully by the mixed solvothermal synthesis and the doping of Mn 2+ makes G–ZnO shift red from 465 nm to 548 nm and 554 nm in the emission spectrum. The changes of the emission spectrum by the adding of Mn 2+ make G–ZnO have tunable photoluminescence spectrum which is desirable for practical applications

  12. Thermal properties of heterogeneous fuels

    Staicu, D.; Beauvy, M.

    1998-01-01

    Fresh or irradiated nuclear fuels are composites or solid solutions more or less heterogeneous, and their thermal conductivities are strongly dependent on the microstructure. The effective thermal conductivities of these heterogeneous solids must be determined for the modelling of the behaviour under irradiation. Different methods (analytical or numerical) published in the literature can be used for the calculation of this effective thermal conductivity. They are analysed and discussed, but finally only few of them are really useful because the assumptions selected are often not compatible with the complex microstructures observed in the fuels. Numerical calculations of the effective thermal conductivity of various fuels based on the microstructure information provided in our laboratory by optical microscopy or electron micro-probe analysis images, have been done for the validation of these methods. The conditions necessary for accurate results on effective thermal conductivity through these numerical calculations are discussed. (author)

  13. Quantifying Heterogeneities in Soil Cover and Weathering in the Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains, Montana: Implications for Glacial Legacies and their Morphologic Control on Soil Formation

    Benjaram, S. S.; Dixon, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    To what extent is chemical weathering governed by a landscape's topography? Quantifying chemical weathering in both steep rocky landscapes and soil-mantled landscapes requires describing heterogeneity in soil and rock cover at local and landscape scales. Two neighboring mountain ranges in the northern Rockies of western Montana, USA, provide an ideal natural laboratory in which to investigate the relationship between soil chemical weathering, persistence of soil cover, and topography. We focus our work in the previously glaciated Bitterroot Mountains, which consist of steep, rock-dominated hillslopes, and the neighboring unglaciated Sapphire Mountains, which display convex, soil-mantled hillslopes. Soil thickness measurements, soil and rock geochemistry, and digital terrain analysis reveal that soils in the rock-dominated Bitterroot Mountains are only slightly less weathered than those in the Sapphire Mountains. However, these differences are magnified when adjusted for rock fragments at a local scale and bedrock cover at a landscape scale, using our newly developed metric, the rock-adjusted chemical depletion fraction (RACDF) and rock-adjusted mass transfer coefficient (RA τ). The Bitterroots overall are 30% less weathered than the Sapphires despite higher mean annual precipitation in the former, with an average rock-adjusted CDF of 0.38 in the postglacial Bitterroots catchment and 0.61 in the nonglacial Sapphire catchment, suggesting that 38% of rock mass is lost in the conversion to soil in the Bitterroots, whereas 61% of rock mass is lost in the nonglaciated Sapphires. Because the previously glaciated Bitterroots are less weathered despite being wetter, we conclude that the glacial history of this landscape exerts more influence on soil chemical weathering than does modern climate. However, while previous studies have correlated weathering intensity with topographic parameters such as slope gradient, we find little topographic indication of specific controls

  14. An individual-based model of the evolution of pesticide resistance in heterogeneous environments: control of Meligethes aeneus population in oilseed rape crops.

    Stratonovitch, Pierre; Elias, Jan; Denholm, Ian; Slater, Russell; Semenov, Mikhail A

    2014-01-01

    Preventing a pest population from damaging an agricultural crop and, at the same time, preventing the development of pesticide resistance is a major challenge in crop protection. Understanding how farming practices and environmental factors interact with pest characteristics to influence the spread of resistance is a difficult and complex task. It is extremely challenging to investigate such interactions experimentally at realistic spatial and temporal scales. Mathematical modelling and computer simulation have, therefore, been used to analyse resistance evolution and to evaluate potential resistance management tactics. Of the many modelling approaches available, individual-based modelling of a pest population offers most flexibility to include and analyse numerous factors and their interactions. Here, a pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus) population was modelled as an aggregate of individual insects inhabiting a spatially heterogeneous landscape. The development of the pest and host crop (oilseed rape) was driven by climatic variables. The agricultural land of the landscape was managed by farmers applying a specific rotation and crop protection strategy. The evolution of a single resistance allele to the pyrethroid lambda cyhalothrin was analysed for different combinations of crop management practices and for a recessive, intermediate and dominant resistance allele. While the spread of a recessive resistance allele was severely constrained, intermediate or dominant resistance alleles showed a similar response to the management regime imposed. Calendar treatments applied irrespective of pest density accelerated the development of resistance compared to ones applied in response to prescribed pest density thresholds. A greater proportion of spring-sown oilseed rape was also found to increase the speed of resistance as it increased the period of insecticide exposure. Our study demonstrates the flexibility and power of an individual-based model to simulate how farming

  15. An individual-based model of the evolution of pesticide resistance in heterogeneous environments: control of Meligethes aeneus population in oilseed rape crops.

    Pierre Stratonovitch

    Full Text Available Preventing a pest population from damaging an agricultural crop and, at the same time, preventing the development of pesticide resistance is a major challenge in crop protection. Understanding how farming practices and environmental factors interact with pest characteristics to influence the spread of resistance is a difficult and complex task. It is extremely challenging to investigate such interactions experimentally at realistic spatial and temporal scales. Mathematical modelling and computer simulation have, therefore, been used to analyse resistance evolution and to evaluate potential resistance management tactics. Of the many modelling approaches available, individual-based modelling of a pest population offers most flexibility to include and analyse numerous factors and their interactions. Here, a pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus population was modelled as an aggregate of individual insects inhabiting a spatially heterogeneous landscape. The development of the pest and host crop (oilseed rape was driven by climatic variables. The agricultural land of the landscape was managed by farmers applying a specific rotation and crop protection strategy. The evolution of a single resistance allele to the pyrethroid lambda cyhalothrin was analysed for different combinations of crop management practices and for a recessive, intermediate and dominant resistance allele. While the spread of a recessive resistance allele was severely constrained, intermediate or dominant resistance alleles showed a similar response to the management regime imposed. Calendar treatments applied irrespective of pest density accelerated the development of resistance compared to ones applied in response to prescribed pest density thresholds. A greater proportion of spring-sown oilseed rape was also found to increase the speed of resistance as it increased the period of insecticide exposure. Our study demonstrates the flexibility and power of an individual-based model to

  16. Effects of glycemic control on saliva flow rates and protein composition in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Dodds, M W; Dodds, A P

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether improvements in the level of diabetic control in a group of subjects with poorly controlled non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus influence salivary output and composition. Repeated whole unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva samples were collected from diabetic patients attending an outpatient diabetes education program and a matched nondiabetic control group. Saliva was analyzed for flow rates, parotid protein concentration and composition, and amylase activity. Subjective responses to questions about salivary hypofunction were tested. There were no significant differences in whole unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates or stimulated parotid protein concentration and composition between diabetics and the control group. Amylase activity was higher in diabetics and decreased with improved glycemic control. Subjects reporting taste alterations had higher mean blood glucose levels than subjects with normal taste sensation. Poorly controlled non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus has no influence on saliva output, although amylase activity may be elevated, and there may be taste alterations.

  17. Preparation and controlled release of mesoporous MCM-41/propranolol hydrochloride composite drug.

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou

    2013-01-01

    This article used MCM-41 as a carrier for the assembly of propranolol hydrochloride by the impregnation method. By means of chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and low-temperature N(2) adsorption-desorption at 77 K, the characterization was made for the prepared materials. The propranolol hydrochloride guest assembly capacity was 316.20 ± 0.31 mg/g (drug/MCM-41). Powder XRD test results indicated that during the process of incorporation, the frameworks of the MCM-41 were not destroyed and the crystalline degrees of the host-guest nanocomposite materials prepared still remained highly ordered. Characterization by SEM and TEM showed that the composite material presented spherical particle and the average particle size of composite material was 186 nm. FT-IR spectra showed that the MCM-41 framework existed well in the (MCM-41)-propranolol hydrochloride composite. Low-temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption results at 77 K showed that the guest partially occupied the channels of the molecular sieves. Results of the release of the prepared composite drug in simulated body fluid indicated that the drug can release up to 32 h and its maximum released amount was 99.20 ± 0.11%. In the simulated gastric juice release pattern of drug, the maximum time for the drug release was discovered to be 6 h and the maximum cumulative released amount of propranolol hydrochloride was 45.13 ± 0.23%. The drug sustained-release time was 10 h in simulated intestinal fluid and the maximum cumulative released amount was 62.05 ± 0.13%. The prepared MCM-41 is a well-controlled drug delivery carrier.

  18. Enhanced photocatalytic properties of ZnO/reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) composites with controllable morphology and composition

    Zhao, Yanting, E-mail: 928221565@qq.com; Liu, Lin, E-mail: llspzjnu@163.com; Cui, Tingting, E-mail: wuleiwangyou@163.com; Tong, Guoxiu, E-mail: tonggx@zjnu.cn; Wu, Wenhua, E-mail: tongwu@zjnu.cn

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • An easy one-step low-temperature chemical etching route for ZnO NR/rGO composites. • Modulation over the ZnO morphology and content in ZnO NR/rGO composites. • Investigating shape and content-dependent optical and photocatalytic properties. • Revealing the enhancement mechanism of optical and photocatalytic properties. - Abstract: ZnO with various morphologies and contents was used to decorate reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets via an easy one-step low-temperature chemical etching route to improve photocatalytic properties. The ZnO shape and content in ZnO/rGO composites were adjusted by changing aging time, heating mode, and rGO mass added. Shape and content-dependent optical and photocatalytic properties are observed in ZnO/rGO composites. A moderate amount of ZnO nanorings (NRs) decorated with rGO can significantly improve the light absorption and photo-luminescence emission because of plasmonic resonant absorption and plasmonic nanoantenna radiation, respectively. ZnO NR/rGO composites with a moderate ZnO content of 29.54 wt.% exhibit the optimum photocatalytic activity with a 0.025 min{sup −1} apparent rate constant, which is significantly higher than those of pure rGO (0.0085 min{sup −1}) and ZnO NRs (0.018 min{sup −1}). The improved performance is ascribed to the synergistic effect of enhanced adsorption capacity, plasmonic light absorption, plasmonic nanoantenna radiation, and the prolonged lifetime of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Our findings not only offer insights into the plasmon enhanced optical and photocatalytic properties of ZnO NR/rGO composites but also suggest the possibility of fabricating ZnO NR/rGO photocatalyst with enhanced performance.

  19. Transfers in heterogeneous environments; Transferts en milieux heterogenes

    Flesselles, J M [Saint-Gobain Recherche, 93 - Aubervilliers (France); Gouesbet, G; Mees, L; Roze, C; Girasole, Th; Grehan, G [Laboratoire d' Electromagnetisme et Systemes Particulaires (LESP), UMR CNRS 6614, CORIA. Universite de Rouen et INSA de Rouen, 76 - Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Goyheneche, J M; Vignoles, G; Coindreau, O [Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux (LCTS), UMR 5801, 33 - Pessac (France); Moyne, Ch [LEMTA (UMR 7563) CNRS-INPL-UHP, 54 - Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Coussy, O [Institut Navier - ENPC, 77 - Marne-la-Vallee (France); Lassabatere, Th [Electricite de France Les Renardieres, Dept. Materiaux Mecanique des Composants, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France); Tadrist, L [IUSTI - UMR 6595, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the articles and transparencies of the invited talks given at the 2004 French congress of thermal engineering about transfers in heterogeneous environment. Content: transfer phenomena in industrial glass furnaces; simple and multiple scattering diagnosis by femto-second pulsed laser: application to particulate diagnoses; thermal modeling of thermo-structural composites; hybrid mixtures theory, average volumic measurement, periodical or stochastic homogenization: advance in scale change processes; thermo-hydro-chemical-mechanical coupling in porous medium: application to young concrete structures and to clay barriers of disposal facilities; transfers and flows in fluidization: recent advances and future challenges. (J.S.)

  20. Original sound compositions reduce anxiety in emergency department patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    Weiland, Tracey J; Jelinek, George A; Macarow, Keely E; Samartzis, Philip; Brown, David M; Grierson, Elizabeth M; Winter, Craig

    2011-12-19

    To determine whether emergency department (ED) patients' self-rated levels of anxiety are affected by exposure to purpose-designed music or sound compositions with and without the audio frequencies of embedded binaural beat. Randomised controlled trial in an ED between 1 February 2010 and 14 April 2010 among a convenience sample of adult patients who were rated as category 3 on the Australasian Triage Scale. All interventions involved listening to soundtracks of 20 minutes' duration that were purpose-designed by composers and sound-recording artists. Participants were allocated at random to one of five groups: headphones and iPod only, no soundtrack (control group); reconstructed ambient noise simulating an ED but free of clear verbalisations; electroacoustic musical composition; composed non-musical soundtracks derived from audio field recordings obtained from natural and constructed settings; sound composition of audio field recordings with embedded binaural beat. All soundtracks were presented on an iPod through headphones. Patients and researchers were blinded to allocation until interventions were administered. State-trait anxiety was self-assessed before the intervention and state anxiety was self-assessed again 20 minutes after the provision of the soundtrack. Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Of 291 patients assessed for eligibility, 170 patients completed the pre-intervention anxiety self-assessment and 169 completed the post-intervention assessment. Significant decreases (all P beats (43; 37) when compared with those allocated to receive simulated ED ambient noise (40; 41) or headphones only (44; 44). In moderately anxious ED patients, state anxiety was reduced by 10%-15% following exposure to purpose-designed sound interventions. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN 12608000444381.

  1. Synchronizing Spatiotemporal Chaos via a Composite Disturbance Observer-Based Sliding Mode Control

    Congyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sliding mode control schemes are investigated to synchronize two spatiotemporal chaotic systems, which are two arrays of a large number of coupled chaotic oscillators. Firstly, sliding mode manifolds with the desired performance are designed. The asymptotic convergence to the origin of the synchronization errors is also proved. However, the terms from parameter fluctuations in equivalent controls are usually impossible to be measured directly. So we regard them as lumped disturbances, but, for practical application, it is difficult to obtain the upper bound of lumped disturbances in advance which often results in a conservative sliding mode control law with large control effort, causing a large amount of chattering. To reduce the chattering and improve the performance of the system, a disturbance observer is designed to estimate the lumped disturbances. A composite synchronization controller that consists of a sliding mode feedback part and a feedforward compensation part based on disturbance observer is developed. The numerical simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  2. Controllable synthesis and characterization of Fe3O4/Au composite nanoparticles

    Xing, Yan; Jin, Yan-Yan; Si, Jian-Chao; Peng, Ming-Li; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Ya-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fe 3 O 4 /Au composite nanoparticles (GoldMag NPs) have received considerable attention because of their advantageous properties arisen from both individual Au and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. Many efforts have been devoted to the synthesis of these composite nanoparticles. Herein, GoldMag NPs were reported to be synthesized by two-step method. Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and modified by the citric acid, and then citric acid-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were used as seeds in sodium citrate solution to reduce the HAuCl 4 . The size of obtained nanoparticles was geared from 25 to 300 nm by controlling the concentration of reactants. The GoldMag NPs were characterized by UV–vis spectrometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The GoldMag NPs showed good superparamagnetism at room temperature and were well dispersed in water with surface plasmon resonance absorption peak varied from 538 nm to 570 nm. - Highlights: • A low cost, simple manipulation and nontoxic approach was designed for preparation of magnetic Fe 3 O 4 /Au (GoldMag NPs) nanocomposites. • The size of GoldMag NPs could be controlled from 25 to 300 nm by varying the concentration of reactants. • GoldMag NPs possessed good magnetic response, high dispersion, and good stability

  3. Investigation of actuator debonding effects on active control in smart composite laminates

    Bin Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical study of active vibration control of smart composite laminates in the presence of actuator debonding failures. A comparison between the smart composite laminates with healthy actuator and various partially debonded actuator cases is performed to investigate the debonding effects on the vibration suppression. The improved layerwise theory with Heaviside’s unit step function is adopted to model the displacement field with actuator debonding failure. The higher order electric potential field is adopted to describe the potential variation through the thickness. The finite element method–based formulations are derived using the plate element, taking into consideration the electro-mechanical coupling effect. The reduced-order model is represented by the state-space form and further for the vibration suppression using a simple constant gain velocity feedback control strategy. For the purpose of demonstration, a 16-layer cross-ply substrate laminate ([0/90]4s is employed for the numerical study. The results show that the actuator debonding affects the closed-loop frequencies, active damping ratios, and efficiency of vibration suppression.

  4. Interactive effects of chemical and biological controls on food-web composition in saline prairie lakes.

    Cooper, Ryan N; Wissel, Björn

    2012-11-27

    Salinity is restricting habitatability for many biota in prairie lakes due to limited physiological abilities to cope with increasing osmotic stress. Yet, it remains unclear how salinity effects vary among major taxonomic groups and what role other environmental parameters play in shaping food-web composition. To answer these questions, we sampled fish, zooplankton and littoral macroinvertebrates in 20 prairie lakes (Saskatchewan, Canada) characterized by large gradients in water chemistry and lake morphometry. We showed that salinity thresholds differed among major taxonomic groups, as most fishes were absent above salinities of 2 g L-1, while littoral macroinvertebrates were ubiquitous. Zooplankton occurred over the whole salinity range, but changed taxonomic composition as salinity increased. Subsequently, the complexity of fish community (diversity) was associated with large changes in invertebrate communities. The directional changes in invertebrate communities to smaller taxa indicated that complex fish assemblages resulted in higher predation pressure. Most likely, as the complexity of fish community decreased, controls of invertebrate assemblages shifted from predation to competition and ultimately to productivity in hypersaline lakes. Surprisingly, invertebrate predators did not thrive in the absence of fishes in these systems. Furthermore, the here identified salinity threshold for fishes was too low to be a result of osmotic stress. Hence, winterkill was likely an important factor eliminating fishes in low salinity lakes that had high productivity and shallow water depth. Ultimately, while salinity was crucial, intricate combinations of chemical and biological mechanisms also played a major role in controlling the assemblages of major taxonomic groups in prairie lakes.

  5. Selective control of reformed composition of n-heptane via plasma chemistry

    Manoj Kumar Reddy, P.

    2016-08-23

    This paper presents experimental results for reforming n-heptane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor to show detailed chemical composition in the products and to propose a potential method to control the product composition. Reformed products of n-heptane and water mixture in an inert Ar feed could be identified as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygenates, and various hydrocarbons, having a wide range of carbon numbers. To selectively increase production of short-chain hydrocarbons, Ar was replaced by CH4. An increased pool of methyl radicals, via plasma chemistry of CH4, might facilitate to stabilize intermediate alkyls (R) into RCH3, which successfully increased short-chain hydrocarbon concentration. When CO2 was supplied instead of Ar (to provide enriched OH and O radicals), significantly higher oxygenate concentrations were obtained through the stabilization of alkyls as ROH (alcohol), and RC([Formula presented])R′ (ketone). The use of methane and carbon dioxide as feed to tailor the products of plasma-assisted reforming of n-heptane with methyl (CH3), or O radicals, is successfully demonstrated in the presence of water vapor. Detailed product analysis, such as product selection, rates and energy efficiency using a gas chromatograph and a gas chromatography mass spectrometer, will be elaborated upon. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  6. Control of a flexible beam actuated by macro-fiber composite patches: I. Modeling and feedforward trajectory control

    Schröck, Johannes; Meurer, Thomas; Kugi, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers a systematic approach for motion planning and feedforward control design for a flexible cantilever actuated by piezoelectric macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches. For accurate feedforward tracking control, special attention has to be paid to the inherent nonlinear hysteresis and creep behavior of these actuators. In order to account for these effects an appropriate compensator is applied which allows us to perform the tracking controller design on the basis of a linear infinite-dimensional model. A detailed analysis of the nonlinear actuator behavior as well as the compensator design and the overall experimental validation is presented in the companion paper (Schröck et al 2011 Smart Mater. Struct. 20 015016). The governing equations of motion of the hysteresis and creep compensated cantilever are determined by means of the extended Hamilton's principle. This allows us to consider the influence of the bonded patch actuators on the mechanical properties of the underlying beam structure in a straightforward manner and results in a model with spatially varying system parameters. For the solution of the motion planning and feedforward control problem a flatness-based methodology is proposed. In a first step, the infinite-dimensional system of the MFC-actuated flexible cantilever is approximated by a finite-dimensional model, where all system variables, i.e. the states, input and output, can be parameterized in terms of a so-called flat output. In a second step, it is shown by numerical simulations that these parameterizations converge with increasing system order of the finite-dimensional model such that the feedforward control input can be directly calculated in order to realize prescribed output trajectories

  7. Controlled surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films for preferential protein adsorption.

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Zhuang, Hao; Schlemper, Christoph; Wesner, Daniel; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Wenjun; Jiang, Xin

    2014-02-04

    Diamond and SiC both process extraordinary biocompatible, electronic, and chemical properties. A combination of diamond and SiC may lead to highly stable materials, e.g., for implants or biosensors with excellent sensing properties. Here we report on the controllable surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films and its effect on protein adsorption. For systematic and high-throughput investigations, novel diamond/β-SiC composite films with gradient composition have been synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the diamond/β-SiC ratio of the composite films shows a continuous change from pure diamond to β-SiC over a length of ∼ 10 mm on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was employed to unveil the surface termination of chemically oxidized and hydrogen treated surfaces. The surface chemistry of the composite films was found to depend on diamond/β-SiC ratio and the surface treatment. As observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, albumin and fibrinogen were preferentially adsorbed from buffer: after surface oxidation, the proteins preferred to adsorb on diamond rather than on β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of proteins adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. By contrast, for hydrogen-treated surfaces, the proteins preferentially adsorbed on β-SiC, leading to a decreasing amount of albumin adsorbed on the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The mechanism of preferential protein adsorption is discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding of the water self-association network to OH-terminated surfaces and the change of the polar surface energy component, which was determined according to the van Oss method. These results suggest that the diamond/β-SiC gradient film can be a promising material for biomedical applications which

  8. Effect of controlled exercise on middle gluteal muscle fibre composition in Thoroughbred foals.

    Eto, D; Yamano, S; Kasashima, Y; Sugiura, T; Nasu, T; Tokuriki, M; Miyata, H

    2003-11-01

    Most racehorses are trained regularly from about age 18 months; therefore, little information is available on the effect of training in Thoroughbred foals. Well-controlled exercise could improve muscle potential ability for endurance running. Thoroughbred foals at age 2 months were separated into control and training (treadmill exercise) groups and samples obtained from the middle gluteal muscle at 2 and 12 months post partum. Muscle fibre compositions were determined by histochemical and electrophoretical techniques and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity was analysed in each fibre type. All fibre types were hypertrophied with growth and type I and IIA fibres were significantly larger in the training than the control group at age 12 months. A significant increase of SDH activity was found in type IIX muscle fibres in the training group. Training in young Thoroughbred horses can facilitate muscle fibre hypertrophy and increase the oxidative capacity of type IIX fibres, which could potentially enhance stamina at high speeds. To apply this result to practical training, further studies are needed to determine more effective and safe intensities of controlled exercise.

  9. Analysis of an emergency diesel generator control system by compositional model checking. MODSAFE 2010 work report

    Lahtinen, J.; Bjoerkman, K.; Valkonen, J.; Frits, J.; Niemelae, I.

    2010-12-01

    Digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems containing programmable logic controllers are challenging to verify. They enable complicated control functions and the state spaces (number of distinct values of inputs, outputs and internal memory) of the designs easily become too large for comprehensive manual inspection. Model checking is a formal method that can be used for verifying that systems have been correctly designed. A number of efficient model checking systems are available which provide analysis tools that are able to determine automatically whether a given state machine model satisfies the desired safety properties. The practical case analysed in this research project is called an 'emergency diesel generator control system' and its purpose is to provide reserve power to critical devices and computers that must be available without interruption. This report describes 1) the development of a compositional approach for checking the models in large system designs, 2) the development of a modular model checking approach for modelling function block diagrams with the Uppaal model checker and 3) the experience of utilising the new modelling approaches in practice. (orig.)

  10. Nonlinear saturation controller for vibration supersession of a nonlinear composite beam

    Hamed, Y. S. [Menofia University, Menouf (Egypt); Amer, Y. A. [Zagazig University, Zagazig (Egypt)

    2014-08-15

    In this paper, a study for nonlinear saturation controller (NSC) is presented that used to suppress the vibration amplitude of a structural dynamic model simulating nonlinear composite beam at simultaneous sub-harmonic and internal resonance excitation. The absorber exploits the saturation phenomenon that is known to occur in dynamical systems with quadratic non-linearities of the feedback gain and a two-to-one internal resonance. The analytical solution for the system and the nonlinear saturation controller are obtained using method of multiple time scales perturbation up to the second order approximation. All possible resonance cases were extracted at this approximation order and studied numerically. The stability of the system at the worst resonance case (Ω = 2ω{sub s} and ω{sub s} =2ω{sub C}) is investigated using both frequency response equations and phase-plane trajectories. The effects of different parameters on the system and the controller are studied numerically. The effect of some types of controller on the system is investigated numerically. The simulation results are achieved using Matlab and Maple programs.

  11. Modeling and control of a self-sensing polymer metal composite actuator

    Nam, Doan Ngoc Chi; Ahn, Kyoung Kwan

    2014-01-01

    An ion polymer metal composite (IPMC) is an electro-active polymer (EAP) that bends in response to a small applied electrical field as a result of mobility of cations in the polymer network and vice versa. One drawback in the use of an IPMC is the sensing problem for such a small size actuator. The aim of this paper is to develop a physical model for a self-sensing IPMC actuator and to verify its applicability for practical position control. Firstly, ion dynamics inside a polymer membrane is investigated with an asymmetric solution in the presence of distributed surface resistance. Based on this analysis, a modified equivalent circuit and a simple configuration to realize the self-sensing IPMC actuator are proposed. Mathematical modelling and experimental evaluation indicate that the bending curvature can be obtained accurately using several feedback voltage signals along with the IPMC length. Finally, the controllability of the developed self-sensing IPMC actuator is investigated using a robust position control. Experimental results prove that the self-sensing characteristics can be applied in engineering control problems to provide a more convenient sensing method for IPMC actuating systems. (paper)

  12. Composition and Morphology Control of Metal Dichalcogenides via Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic and Nanoelectronic Applications

    Samad, Leith L. J.

    The body of work reviewed here encompasses a variety of metal dichalcogenides all synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for solar and electronics applications. The first reported phase-pure CVD synthesis of iron pyrite thin films is presented with detailed structural and electrochemical analysis. The phase-pure thin film and improved crystal growth on a metallic backing material represents one of the best options for potential solar applications using iron pyrite. Large tin-sulfur-selenide solid solution plates with tunable bandgaps were also synthesized via CVD as single-crystals with a thin film geometry. Solid solution tin-sulfur-selenide plates were demonstrated to be a new material for solar cells with the first observed solar conversion efficiencies up to 3.1%. Finally, a low temperature molybdenum disulfide vertical heterostructure CVD synthesis with layered controlled growth was achieved with preferential growth enabled by Van der Waals epitaxy. Through recognition of additional reaction parameters, a fully regulated CVD synthesis enabled the controlled growth of 1-6 molybdenum disulfide monolayers for nanoelectronic applications. The improvements in synthesis and materials presented here were all enabled by the control afforded by CVD such that advances in phase purity, growth, and composition control of several metal dichalcogenides were achieved. Further work will be able to take full advantage of these advances for future solar and electronics technologies.

  13. Controlled water deficit during ripening affects proanthocyanidin synthesis, concentration and composition in Cabernet Sauvignon grape skins.

    Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Talaverano, M Inmaculada; Villalobos-González, Luis; Ribalta-Pizarro, Camila; Pastenes, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The influence of controlled water deficit on the phenolic composition and gene expression of VvLAR2, VvMYBPA1, VvMYBPA2 and VvMYB4a in Cabernet Sauvignon grape skins throughout ripening was investigated. The assay was carried out on own-rooted Vitis vinifera plants cv. Cabernet Sauvignon in a commercial vineyard from veraison until commercial harvest. Three irrigation regimes were used from veraison until harvest with the following treatments: T1: 3.6 mm day -1 ; T2: 1.8 mm day -1 and T3: 0.3 mm day -1 . The content of total phenols and total anthocyanins in grape skins increased during ripening, but water deficit did not produce differences among treatments in the total anthocyanin concentration. Proanthocyanidins (PAs) decreased throughout ripening, although approximately 25 days after veraison (DAV), their content slightly increased. This effect was more pronounced in the most restrictive treatment (T3). A similar pattern was observed in the transcript abundance of VvLAR2, VvMYBPA1 and VvMYB4a. PAs separation revealed differences in concentration but not in the proportion among fractions among the irrigation treatments. Additionally, controlled water deficit increased the mean degree of polymerization and the flavan-3-ol polymeric concentration in grape skins throughout ripening but with no effects on the extent of PAs galloylation. Our results suggest that the water status of Cabernet Sauvignon grapevines affects the gene expression for proteins involved in the synthesis of PAs, increasing their concentration and also their composition, with further evidence for the efficacy of a convenient, controlled water deficit strategy for grapevine cultivation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Environmental controls on phytoplankton community composition in the Thames plume, U.K.

    Weston, Keith; Greenwood, Naomi; Fernand, Liam; Pearce, David J.; Sivyer, David B.

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate controls on the phytoplankton community composition and biogeochemistry of the estuarine plume zone of the River Thames, U.K. using an instrumented moored buoy for in situ measurements and preserved sample collection, and laboratory-based measurements from samples collected at the same site. Instrumentation on the moored buoy enabled high frequency measurements of a suite of environmental variables including in situ chlorophyll, water-column integrated irradiance, macronutrients throughout an annual cycle for 2001 e.g. nitrate and silicate, and phytoplankton biomass and species composition. The Thames plume region acts as a conduit for fluvial nutrients into the wider southern North Sea with typical winter concentrations of 45 μM nitrate, 17 μM silicate and 2 μM phosphate measured. The spring bloom resulted from water-column integrated irradiance increasing above 60 W h m - 2 d - 1 and was initially dominated by a diatom bloom mainly composed of Nitzschia sp. and Odontella sinesis. The spring bloom then switched after ˜ 30 days to become dominated by the flagellate Phaeocystis reaching a maximum chlorophyll concentration of 37.8 μg L - 1 . During the spring bloom there were high numbers of the heterotrophic dinoflagellates Gyrodinium spirale and Katodinium glaucum that potentially grazed the phytoplankton bloom. This diatom-flagellate switch was predicted to be due to a combination of further increasing water-column integrated irradiance > 100 W h m - 2 d - 1 and/or silicate reaching potentially limiting concentrations (nutrient and phytoplankton processing and transport to the southern North Sea. The use of a combination of moorings and ship-based sampling was essential in understanding the factors influencing nutrient transport, phytoplankton biomass and species composition in this shelf sea plume region.

  15. Effects of active video games on body composition: a randomized controlled trial.

    Maddison, Ralph; Foley, Louise; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jiang, Yannan; Jull, Andrew; Prapavessis, Harry; Hohepa, Maea; Rodgers, Anthony

    2011-07-01

    Sedentary activities such as video gaming are independently associated with obesity. Active video games, in which players physically interact with images on screen, may help increase physical activity and improve body composition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of active video games over a 6-mo period on weight, body composition, physical activity, and physical fitness. We conducted a 2-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial in Auckland, New Zealand. A total of 322 overweight and obese children aged 10-14 y, who were current users of sedentary video games, were randomly assigned at a 1:1 ratio to receive either an active video game upgrade package (intervention, n = 160) or to have no change (control group, n = 162). The primary outcome was the change from baseline in body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). Secondary outcomes were changes in percentage body fat, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, video game play, and food snacking. At 24 wk, the treatment effect on BMI (-0.24; 95% CI: -0.44, -0.05; P = 0.02) favored the intervention group. The change (±SE) in BMI from baseline increased in the control group (0.34 ± 0.08) but remained the same in the intervention group (0.09 ± 0.08). There was also evidence of a reduction in body fat in the intervention group (-0.83%; 95% CI: -1.54%, -0.12%; P = 0.02). The change in daily time spent playing active video games at 24 wk increased (10.03 min; 95% CI: 6.26, 13.81 min; P video games (-9.39 min; 95% CI: -19.38, 0.59 min; P = 0.06). An active video game intervention has a small but definite effect on BMI and body composition in overweight and obese children. This trial was registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry at http://www.anzctr.org.au/ as ACTRN12607000632493.

  16. Heterogeneous treatment in the variational nodal method

    Fanning, T.H.

    1995-01-01

    The variational nodal transport method is reduced to its diffusion form and generalized for the treatment of heterogeneous nodes while maintaining nodal balances. Adapting variational methods to heterogeneous nodes requires the ability to integrate over a node with discontinuous cross sections. In this work, integrals are evaluated using composite gaussian quadrature rules, which permit accurate integration while minimizing computing time. Allowing structure within a nodal solution scheme avoids some of the necessity of cross section homogenization, and more accurately defines the intra-nodal flux shape. Ideally, any desired heterogeneity can be constructed within the node; but in reality, the finite set of basis functions limits the practical resolution to which fine detail can be defined within the node. Preliminary comparison tests show that the heterogeneous variational nodal method provides satisfactory results even if some improvements are needed for very difficult, configurations

  17. Biosynthesis of Inorganic Nanoparticles: A Fresh Look at the Control of Shape, Size and Composition

    Si Amar Dahoumane

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Several methodologies have been devised for the design of nanomaterials. The “Holy Grail” for materials scientists is the cost-effective, eco-friendly synthesis of nanomaterials with controlled sizes, shapes and compositions, as these features confer to the as-produced nanocrystals unique properties making them appropriate candidates for valuable bio-applications. The present review summarizes published data regarding the production of nanomaterials with special features via sustainable methodologies based on the utilization of natural bioresources. The richness of the latter, the diversity of the routes adopted and the tuned experimental parameters have led to the fabrication of nanomaterials belonging to different chemical families with appropriate compositions and displaying interesting sizes and shapes. It is expected that these outstanding findings will encourage researchers and attract newcomers to continue and extend the exploration of possibilities offered by nature and the design of innovative and safer methodologies towards the synthesis of unique nanomaterials, possessing desired features and exhibiting valuable properties that can be exploited in a profusion of fields.

  18. Redox control of electric melters with complex feed compositions. Part I: analytical methods and models

    Bickford, D.F.; Diemer, R.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The redox state of glass from electric melters with complex feed compositions is determined by balance between gases above the melt, and transition metals and organic compounds in the feed. Part I discusses experimental and computational methods of relating flowrates and other melter operating conditions to the redox state of glass, and composition of the melter offgas. Computerized thermodynamic computational methods are useful in predicting the sequence and products of redox reactions and in assessing individual process variations. Melter redox state can be predicted by combining monitoring of melter operating conditions, redox measurement of fused melter feed samples, and periodic redox measurement of product. Mossbauer spectroscopy, and other methods which measure Fe(II)/Fe(III) in glass, can be used to measure melter redox state. Part II develops preliminary operating limits for the vitrification of High-Level Radioactive Waste. Limits on reducing potential to preclude the accumulation of combustible gases, accumulation of sulfides and selenides, and degradation of melter components are the most critical. Problems associated with excessively oxidizing conditions, such as glass foaming and potential ruthenium volatility, are controlled when sufficient formic acid is added to adjust melter feed rheology

  19. Facile and controllable preparation of glucose biosensor based on Prussian blue nanoparticles hybrid composites.

    Li, Lei; Sheng, Qinglin; Zheng, Jianbin; Zhang, Hongfang

    2008-11-01

    A glucose biosensor based on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) protected Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs)-polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid composites was fabricated by electrochemical method. A novel route for PBNPs preparation was applied in the fabrication with the help of PVP, and from scanning electron microscope images, Prussian blue particles on the electrode were found nanoscaled. The biosensor exhibits fast current response (<6 s) and a linearity in the range from 6.7x10(-6) to 1.9x10(-3) M with a high sensitivity of 6.28 microA mM(-1) and a detection limit of 6x10(-7) M (S/N=3) for the detection of glucose. The apparent activation energy of enzyme-catalyzed reaction and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant are 23.9 kJ mol(-1) and 1.9 mM respectively, which suggests a high affinity of the enzyme-substrate. This easy and controllable construction method of glucose biosensor combines the characteristics of the components of the hybrid composites, which favors the fast and sensitive detection of glucose with improved analytical capabilities. In addition, the biosensor was examined in human serum samples for glucose determination with a recovery between 95.0 and 104.5%.

  20. A scaleable integrated sensing and control system for NDE, monitoring, and control of medium to very large composite smart structures

    Jones, Jerry; Rhoades, Valerie; Arner, Radford; Clem, Timothy; Cuneo, Adam

    2007-04-01

    NDE measurements, monitoring, and control of smart and adaptive composite structures requires that the central knowledge system have an awareness of the entire structure. Achieving this goal necessitates the implementation of an integrated network of significant numbers of sensors. Additionally, in order to temporally coordinate the data from specially distributed sensors, the data must be time relevant. Early adoption precludes development of sensor technology specifically for this application, instead it will depend on the ability to utilize legacy systems. Partially supported by the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Advanced Technology Development Program (NIST-ATP), a scalable integrated system has been developed to implement monitoring of structural integrity and the control of adaptive/intelligent structures. The project, called SHIELD (Structural Health Identification and Electronic Life Determination), was jointly undertaken by: Caterpillar, N.A. Tech., Motorola, and Microstrain. SHIELD is capable of operation with composite structures, metallic structures, or hybrid structures. SHIELD consists of a real-time processing core on a Motorola MPC5200 using a C language based real-time operating system (RTOS). The RTOS kernel was customized to include a virtual backplane which makes the system completely scalable. This architecture provides for multiple processes to be operating simultaneously. They may be embedded as multiple threads on the core hardware or as separate independent processors connected to the core using a software driver called a NAT-Network Integrator (NATNI). NATNI's can be created for any communications application. In it's current embodiment, NATNI's have been created for CAN bus, TCP/IP (Ethernet) - both wired and 802.11 b and g, and serial communications using RS485 and RS232. Since SHIELD uses standard C language, it is easy to port any monitoring or control algorithm, thus providing for legacy

  1. Composition and dosage of a multipartite enhancer cluster control developmental expression of Ihh (Indian hedgehog).

    Will, Anja J; Cova, Giulia; Osterwalder, Marco; Chan, Wing-Lee; Wittler, Lars; Brieske, Norbert; Heinrich, Verena; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Vingron, Martin; Klopocki, Eva; Visel, Axel; Lupiáñez, Darío G; Mundlos, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) often include noncoding sequences and putative enhancers, but how these rearrangements induce disease is poorly understood. Here we investigate CNVs involving the regulatory landscape of IHH (encoding Indian hedgehog), which cause multiple, highly localized phenotypes including craniosynostosis and synpolydactyly. We show through transgenic reporter and genome-editing studies in mice that Ihh is regulated by a constellation of at least nine enhancers with individual tissue specificities in the digit anlagen, growth plates, skull sutures and fingertips. Consecutive deletions, resulting in growth defects of the skull and long bones, showed that these enhancers function in an additive manner. Duplications, in contrast, caused not only dose-dependent upregulation but also misexpression of Ihh, leading to abnormal phalanges, fusion of sutures and syndactyly. Thus, precise spatiotemporal control of developmental gene expression is achieved by complex multipartite enhancer ensembles. Alterations in the composition of such clusters can result in gene misexpression and disease.

  2. Surface modification and particles size distribution control in nano-CdS/polystyrene composite film

    Min Zhirong; Ming Qiuzhang; Hai Chunliang; Han Minzeng

    2003-01-01

    Preparation of nano-CdS particles with surface thiol modification by microemulsion method and their influences on the particle size distribution in highly filled polystyrene-based composites were studied. The modified nano-CdS was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), light absorption and emission measurements to reveal the morphologies of the surface modifier, which are consistent with the surface molecules packing calculation. The morphologies of the surface modifier exerted a great influence not only on the optical performance of the particles themselves, but also on the size distribution of the particle in polystyrene matrix. A monolayer coverage with tightly packed thiol molecules was believed to be most effective in promoting a uniform particle size distribution and eliminating the surface defects that cause radiationless recombination. Control of the particles size distribution in polystyrene can be attained by adjusting surface coverage status of the thiol molecules based on the strong interaction between the surface modifier and the matrix

  3. Outsourcing neural active control to passive composite mechanics: a tissue engineered cyborg ray

    Gazzola, Mattia; Park, Sung Jin; Park, Kyung Soo; Park, Shirley; di Santo, Valentina; Deisseroth, Karl; Lauder, George V.; Mahadevan, L.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-11-01

    Translating the blueprint that stingrays and skates provide, we create a cyborg swimming ray capable of orchestrating adaptive maneuvering and phototactic navigation. The impossibility of replicating the neural system of batoids fish is bypassed by outsourcing algorithmic functionalities to the body composite mechanics, hence casting the active control problem into a design, passive one. We present a first step in engineering multilevel "brain-body-flow" systems that couple sensory information to motor coordination and movement, leading to behavior. This work paves the way for the development of autonomous and adaptive artificial creatures able to process multiple sensory inputs and produce complex behaviors in distributed systems and may represent a path toward soft-robotic "embodied cognition".

  4. Quantitative measurements of in-cylinder gas composition in a controlled auto-ignition combustion engine

    Zhao, H.; Zhang, S.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most effective means to achieve controlled auto-ignition (CAI) combustion in a gasoline engine is by the residual gas trapping method. The amount of residual gas and mixture composition have significant effects on the subsequent combustion process and engine emissions. In order to obtain quantitative measurements of in-cylinder residual gas concentration and air/fuel ratio, a spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) system has been developed recently. The optimized optical SRS setups are presented and discussed. The temperature effect on the SRS measurement is considered and a method has been developed to correct for the overestimated values due to the temperature effect. Simultaneous measurements of O2, H2O, CO2 and fuel were obtained throughout the intake, compression, combustion and expansion strokes. It shows that the SRS can provide valuable data on this process in a CAI combustion engine.

  5. Quantitative measurements of in-cylinder gas composition in a controlled auto-ignition combustion engine

    Zhao, H; Zhang, S

    2008-01-01

    One of the most effective means to achieve controlled auto-ignition (CAI) combustion in a gasoline engine is by the residual gas trapping method. The amount of residual gas and mixture composition have significant effects on the subsequent combustion process and engine emissions. In order to obtain quantitative measurements of in-cylinder residual gas concentration and air/fuel ratio, a spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) system has been developed recently. The optimized optical SRS setups are presented and discussed. The temperature effect on the SRS measurement is considered and a method has been developed to correct for the overestimated values due to the temperature effect. Simultaneous measurements of O 2 , H 2 O, CO 2 and fuel were obtained throughout the intake, compression, combustion and expansion strokes. It shows that the SRS can provide valuable data on this process in a CAI combustion engine

  6. Composite microsphere-functionalized scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules in tissue engineering

    Laura Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current tissue engineering strategies focus on restoring damaged tissue architectures using biologically active scaffolds. The ideal scaffold would mimic the extracellular matrix of any tissue of interest, promoting cell proliferation and de novo extracellular matrix deposition. A plethora of techniques have been evaluated to engineer scaffolds for the controlled and targeted release of bioactive molecules to provide a functional structure for tissue growth and remodeling, as well as enhance recruitment and proliferation of autologous cells within the implant. Recently, novel approaches using small molecules, instead of growth factors, have been exploited to regulate tissue regeneration. The use of small synthetic molecules could be very advantageous because of their stability, tunability, and low cost. Herein, we propose a chitosan–gelatin scaffold functionalized with composite microspheres consisting of mesoporous silicon microparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid for the controlled release of sphingosine-1-phospate, a small molecule of interest. We characterized the platform with scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy. Finally, the biocompatibility of this multiscale system was analyzed by culturing human mesenchymal stem cells onto the scaffold. The presented strategy establishes the basis of a versatile scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules and for culturing mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine applications.

  7. Failure Detection of Composites with Control System Corrective Response in Drone System Applications

    Mark Bowkett

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a novel method for the detection of damage in carbon composites as used in drone frames. When damage is detected a further novel corrective response is initiated in the quadcopter flight controller to switch from a four-arm control system to a three-arm control system. This is made possible as a symmetrical frame is utilized, which allows for a balanced weight distribution between both the undamaged quadcopter and the fallback tri-copter layout. The resulting work allows for continued flight where this was not previously possible. Further developing work includes improved flight stability with the aid of an underslung load model. This is beneficial to the quadcopter as a damaged arm attached to the main body by the motor wires behaves as an underslung load. The underslung load works are also transferable in a dual master and slave drone system where the master drone transports a smaller slave drone by a tether, which acts as an underslung load.

  8. Body image and body composition: comparisons of young male elite soccer players and controls.

    Arroyo, Marta; Gonzalez-de-Suso, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Celia; Ansotegui, Laura; Rocandio, Ana M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate body composition and body image (perception and satisfaction) in a group of young elite soccer players and to compare the data with those of a control group (age and BMI matched). Participants were 56 volunteer males whose mean age and BMI were 19.6 (SD 1.3) years and 23.3 (SD 1.1) kg/m2, respectively. Results showed that soccer players have a higher lean mass and lower fat mass than controls. Moreover, body perception (difference between current and actual image) was more accurate in controls than in soccer players, and the results suggest a tendency for soccer players to aspire to have more muscle mass and body fat. Soccer players perceived an ideal image with significantly higher body-fat percentage than their current and actual images. There were no body-dissatisfaction differences between groups, however. Although the results are necessarily limited by the small sample size, the findings should be of interest to coaches of young elite soccer teams.

  9. Inspection of CF188 composite flight control surfaces with neutron radiography

    Lewis, W.J.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Mullin, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    At the Royal Military College of Canada's SLOWPOKE-2 Facility, a neutron radiography facility has been designed and installed using a small (20kWth), pool-type research reactor called the SLOWPOKE-2 (Safe Low Power c(K)ritical Experiment) as the neutron source. Since then, the research has continued along two fronts: developing applications and improving the quality of the neutron beam. The most interesting applications investigated to date has been the inspection of various metal ceramic composites and the inspection of the composite flight control surfaces of some of the CF188 Hornet aircraft. As part of the determination of the integrity of the aircraft, it was decided to inspect an aircraft with the highest flight house using both X- and neutron radiography. The neutron radiography and, to a lesser extent, X-radiography inspections completed at McClellan AFB revealed 93 anomalies. After returning to Canada, the component with the greatest structural significance, namely the right hand rudder from the vertical stabilizer, was removed from the aircraft and put through a rigorous program of numerous NDT inspections, including X-radiography (film and real-time), eddy current, ultrasonics (through transmission and pitch-catch), infrared thermography, and neutron radiography. Therefore, of all the techniques investigated, only through transmission ultrasonics and neutron radiography were able to identify large areas of hydration. However, only neutron radiography could identify the small areas of moisture and hydration. Given the structural significance of the flight control surfaces in modern fighter aircraft, even the smallest amounts of hydration could potentially lead to catastrophic results

  10. Comparison of body composition between professional sportswomen and apparently healthy age- and sex-matched controls

    Raman K Marwaha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In view of the relationship between physical activity and nutrition on body composition, we assessed lean and fat mass and BMC (total and regional in professional Indian sportswomen and compared it with apparently healthy age- and sex-matched females. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 104 sportswomen and an equal number of age-matched normal healthy females (controls. They were evaluated for anthropometry and body composition (fat, lean mass, and bone mineral content (BMC by DXA. Results: Mean age (19.1 ± 1.3 vs. 19.4 ± 1.5 years and body mass index (21.34 ± 3.02 vs. 21.26 ± 4.05 kg/m 2 were comparable in both groups. Sportswomen had higher intake of energy, macronutrients, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Total lean mass (33.67 ± 3.49 vs. 31.14 ± 3.52 kg, P < 0.0001, appendicular skeletal muscle index (5.84 ± 0.57 vs. 5.46 ± 0.63 kg/m 2 ; P < 0.0001 and BMC (2.27 ± 0.32 vs. 2.13 ± 0.34 kg, P < 0.002 was significantly higher and percentage fat mass was significantly lower (33.1 ± 7.5 vs. 37.0 ± 8.3; P < 0.0001 among sportswomen when compared to controls. Conclusions: Indian sportswomen have a higher total and regional lean mass, BMC, and lower percentage fat mass when compared with healthy females. Physical activity, energy, protein and calcium intake were positively associated with lean mass and BMC.

  11. Heterogeneous network architectures

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2006-01-01

    is flexibility. This thesis investigates such heterogeneous network architectures and how to make them flexible. A survey of algorithms for network design is presented, and it is described how using heuristics can increase the speed. A hierarchical, MPLS based network architecture is described......Future networks will be heterogeneous! Due to the sheer size of networks (e.g., the Internet) upgrades cannot be instantaneous and thus heterogeneity appears. This means that instead of trying to find the olution, networks hould be designed as being heterogeneous. One of the key equirements here...... and it is discussed that it is advantageous to heterogeneous networks and illustrated by a number of examples. Modeling and simulation is a well-known way of doing performance evaluation. An approach to event-driven simulation of communication networks is presented and mixed complexity modeling, which can simplify...

  12. Heterogeneous inflation expectations and learning

    Madeira, Carlos; Zafar, Basit

    2012-01-01

    Using the panel component of the Michigan Survey of Consumers, we estimate a learning model of inflation expectations, allowing for heterogeneous use of both private information and lifetime inflation experience. “Life-experience inflation” has a significant impact on individual expectations, but only for one-year-ahead inflation. Public information is substantially more relevant for longer-horizon expectations. Even controlling for life-experience inflation and public information, idiosyncra...

  13. Effect of various infection-control methods for light-cure units on the cure of composite resins.

    Chong, S L; Lam, Y K; Lee, F K; Ramalingam, L; Yeo, A C; Lim, C C

    1998-01-01

    This study (1) compared the curing-light intensity with various barrier infection-control methods used to prevent cross contamination, (2) compared the Knoop hardness value of cured composite resin when various barrier control methods were used, and (3) correlated the hardness of the composite resin with the light-intensity output when different infection-control methods were used. The light-cure unit tips were covered with barriers, such as cellophane wrap, plastic gloves, Steri-shields, and finger cots. The control group had no barrier. Composite resins were then cured for each of the five groups, and their Knoop hardness values recorded. The results showed that there was significant statistical difference in the light-intensity output among the five groups. However, there was no significant statistical difference in the Knoop hardness values among any of the groups. There was also no correlation between the Knoop hardness value of the composite resin with the light-intensity output and the different infection-control methods. Therefore, any of the five infection-control methods could be used as barriers for preventing cross-contamination of the light-cure unit tip, for the light-intensity output for all five groups exceeded the recommended value of 300 W/m2. However, to allow a greater margin of error in clinical situations, the authors recommend that the plastic glove or the cellophane wrap be used to wrap the light-cure tip, since these barriers allowed the highest light-intensity output.

  14. Relationship of Tree Stand Heterogeneity and Forest Naturalness

    BARTHA, Dénes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate if compositional (tree species richness andstructural (vertical structure, age-structure, patterns of canopy closure heterogeneity of the canopylayer is related to individual naturalness criteria and to overall forest naturalness at the stand scale. Thenaturalness values of the assessed criteria (tree species composition, tree stand structure, speciescomposition and structure of shrub layer and forest floor vegetation, dead wood, effects of game, sitecharacteristics showed similar behaviour when groups of stands with different heterogeneity werecompared, regardless of the studied aspect of canopy heterogeneity. The greatest difference was foundfor criteria describing the canopy layer. Composition and structure of canopy layer, dead wood andtotal naturalness of the stand differed significantly among the stand groups showing consistentlyhigher values from homogeneous to the most heterogeneous group. Naturalness of the compositionand structure of the shrub layer is slightly but significantly higher in stands with heterogeneous canopylayer. Regarding other criteria, significant differences were found only between the homogeneous andthe most heterogeneous groups, while groups with intermediate level of heterogeneity did not differsignificantly from one extreme. However, the criterion describing effects of game got lowernaturalness values in more heterogeneous stands. Naturalness of site characteristics did not differsignificantly among the groups except for when stands were grouped based on pattern of canopyclosure. From the practical viewpoint it is shown that purposeful forestry operations affecting thecanopy layer cause changes in compositional and structural characteristics of other layers as well as inoverall stand scale forest naturalness.

  15. Controllable synthesis of palladium nanocubes/reduced graphene oxide composites and their enhanced electrocatalytic performance

    Zhang, Yuting; Huang, Qiwei; Chang, Gang; Zhang, Zaoli; Xia, Tiantian; Shu, Honghui; He, Yunbin

    2015-04-01

    Homogeneous distribution of cube-shaped Pd nanocrystals on the surface of reduced graphene oxide is obtained via a facile one-step method by employing AA and KBr as the reductant and capping agent, respectively. The experimental factors affecting the morphology and structure of Pd nanoparticles have been systematically investigated to explore the formation mechanism of Pd nanocubes (PdNCs). It is revealed that PdNCs enclosed by active {100} facets with an average side length of 15 nm were successfully synthesized on the surface of reduced graphene oxide. KBr plays the role for facet selection by surface passivation and AA controls the reduction speed of Pd precursors, both of which govern the morphology changes of palladium nanoparticles. In the further electrochemical evaluations, the Pd nanocubes/reduced graphene oxide composites show better electrocatalytic activity and stability towards the electro-oxidation of ethanol than both reduced graphene oxide supported Pd nanoparticles and free-standing PdNCs. It could be attributed to the high electrocatalytic activity of the dominated active {100} crystal facets of Pd nanocubes and the enhanced electron transfer of graphene. The developed approach provide a versatile way for shape-controlled preparation of noble metal nanoparticles, which can work as novel electrocatalysts in the application of direct alcohols fuel cells.

  16. Nuclear hormone receptor NHR-49 controls fat consumption and fatty acid composition in C. elegans.

    Marc R Van Gilst

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs, such as liver X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, precisely control energy metabolism. Consequently, these receptors are important targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases, including diabetes and obesity. A thorough understanding of NHR fat regulatory networks has been limited, however, by a lack of genetically tractable experimental systems. Here we show that deletion of the Caenorhabditis elegans NHR gene nhr-49 yielded worms with elevated fat content and shortened life span. Employing a quantitative RT-PCR screen, we found that nhr-49 influenced the expression of 13 genes involved in energy metabolism. Indeed, nhr-49 served as a key regulator of fat usage, modulating pathways that control the consumption of fat and maintain a normal balance of fatty acid saturation. We found that the two phenotypes of the nhr-49 knockout were linked to distinct pathways and were separable: The high-fat phenotype was due to reduced expression of enzymes in fatty acid beta-oxidation, and the shortened adult life span resulted from impaired expression of a stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Despite its sequence relationship with the mammalian hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 receptor, the biological activities of nhr-49 were most similar to those of the mammalian PPARs, implying an evolutionarily conserved role for NHRs in modulating fat consumption and composition. Our findings in C. elegans provide novel insights into how NHR regulatory networks are coordinated to govern fat metabolism.

  17. Nuclear hormone receptor NHR-49 controls fat consumption and fatty acid composition in C. elegans.

    Van Gilst, Marc R; Hadjivassiliou, Haralambos; Jolly, Amber; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2005-02-01

    Mammalian nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs), such as liver X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), precisely control energy metabolism. Consequently, these receptors are important targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases, including diabetes and obesity. A thorough understanding of NHR fat regulatory networks has been limited, however, by a lack of genetically tractable experimental systems. Here we show that deletion of the Caenorhabditis elegans NHR gene nhr-49 yielded worms with elevated fat content and shortened life span. Employing a quantitative RT-PCR screen, we found that nhr-49 influenced the expression of 13 genes involved in energy metabolism. Indeed, nhr-49 served as a key regulator of fat usage, modulating pathways that control the consumption of fat and maintain a normal balance of fatty acid saturation. We found that the two phenotypes of the nhr-49 knockout were linked to distinct pathways and were separable: The high-fat phenotype was due to reduced expression of enzymes in fatty acid beta-oxidation, and the shortened adult life span resulted from impaired expression of a stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Despite its sequence relationship with the mammalian hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 receptor, the biological activities of nhr-49 were most similar to those of the mammalian PPARs, implying an evolutionarily conserved role for NHRs in modulating fat consumption and composition. Our findings in C. elegans provide novel insights into how NHR regulatory networks are coordinated to govern fat metabolism.

  18. Preparation of ring-shaped composite bonded magnets with continuously controlled anisotropy distribution for internal space

    Yamashita, F; Yamada, O; Ohya, S; Kobayashi, O; Nakano, M; Fukunaga, H

    2010-01-01

    We have already reported an advanced method for producing a radially-anisotropic rare earth composite bonded magnet with continuously controlled direction of anisotropy. The magnet has been applied to an inner rotor as a practical usage. In this study, the outstanding preparation method was adopted into the preparation of a magnet applied for an outer rotor. An optimized condition of extrusion and compaction at an elevated temperature could be obtained. In addition, a low pressure configuration to the ring-shaped magnet from plural preformed magnets was carried out, which had specific distribution of magnetic anisotropy for internal space for a small motor, by using self recoverability based on the viscous deformation without an alignment field. No deterioration of magnetic properties was detected through the process even if those magnets were miniaturized. Resultantly, the (BH) max of a ring-shaped magnet with the continuously controlled direction of magnetic anisotropy attained the value of 186 kJ/m 3 , and we obtained sine-wave magnetic anisotropy distribution, even if those magnets were miniaturized.

  19. Remote control air sampling and fast chemical analysis of the composition

    Kukuczka, A; Golisz, T

    1981-01-01

    In 1979 the Central mine rescue station in Bytom (Poland) developed and introduced into use a new method of remote control air and gas (from fires) sampling and swift chemical analysis of the samples' composition. The device in this method includes: a probe (situated beyond the fire detector directly in the control zone), thick-walled elastic hose, direr, piston pump, rotameter, chromatograph and minicomputer. The basic technical data included in the set: the capacity of the pump 8 1/min, 2.5 kg mass. run on 12 V current (built at the Main Mining Affairs Inst. in Poland); the chromatograph is VARIAN 1420-10 (USA produced),the working gas is helium (balloon volume 40 1), feed--alternating 220V, capacity--1.5 kW, time for measuring gas from fires-- 15 to 20 min (as apposed to the 1.5h spent before when the SRC device was being used) at an accuracy of /sup + -/ 0.05% (volume); the chromatograph works with a mini-computer (model CDS-111C) with a 20 kg mass.and a size of 16 x 46 x 56 cm. As tests in Moszczenica coal mines, where a fire in 504/2 occurred, showed (the chromatograph was located 750m from the probe for burning gases), the method proved to be a good one although the VARIAN 1420-10 was insufficiently reliable and the VARIAN-1400-AEROGRAF proved to be better.

  20. Controllable dielectric and electrical performance of polymer composites with novel core/shell-structured conductive particles through biomimetic method

    Yang, Dan; Tian, Ming; Wang, Wencai; Li, Dongdong; Li, Runyuan; Liu, Haoliang; Zhang, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Conductive core/shell-structured particles were synthesized by biomimetic method. ► These particles with silica/poly(dopamine)/silver core and poly(dopamine) shell. ► Dielectric composites were prepared with resulted particles and silicone elastomer. ► The dielectric properties of the composites can be controlled by shell thickness. ► This biomimetic method is simple, nontoxic, efficient and easy to control. - Abstract: Novel silica/poly(dopamine)/silver (from inner to outer) (denoted as SiO 2 /PDA/Ag) conductive micro-particles were first synthesized by biomimetic poly(dopamine) coating. These micro-particles were then coated with a poly(dopamine) layer to form core/shell-structured particles, with silica/poly(dopamine)/silver core and poly(dopamine) shell (denoted as SiO 2 /PDA/Ag/PDA). This multilayer core/shell micro-particles were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope. Polymer composites were then prepared by mechanical blending of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and the core/shell-structured particles. It was found that the silver layer and the poly(dopamine) shell had good adhesion with substrate and they kept intact even under violent shearing stress during mechanical mixing. The effect of the thickness of outermost poly(dopamine) shell as well as the loading amount of this filler on the dielectric and electrical properties of the composites was further studied. The results showed that the dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and conductivity of the composites decreased with increasing shell thickness (10–53 nm) at the same loading level. And the maximal dielectric constant of composites was achieved in the composites filled with SiO 2 /PDA/Ag/PDA (with 10–15 nm PDA shell) particles, which was much larger than that of the composite filled with SiO 2 /PDA/Ag particles without insulative PDA shell. At the same time, the composites can change

  1. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  2. Controlled drug release from a novel injectable biodegradable microsphere/scaffold composite based on poly(propylene fumarate).

    Kempen, Diederik H R; Lu, Lichun; Kim, Choll; Zhu, Xun; Dhert, Wouter J A; Currier, Bradford L; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    The ideal biomaterial for the repair of bone defects is expected to have good mechanical properties, be fabricated easily into a desired shape, support cell attachment, allow controlled release of bioactive factors to induce bone formation, and biodegrade into nontoxic products to permit natural bone formation and remodeling. The synthetic polymer poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) holds great promise as such a biomaterial. In previous work we developed poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PPF microspheres for the controlled delivery of bioactive molecules. This study presents an approach to incorporate these microspheres into an injectable, porous PPF scaffold. Model drug Texas red dextran (TRD) was encapsulated into biodegradable PLGA and PPF microspheres at 2 microg/mg microsphere. Five porous composite formulations were fabricated via a gas foaming technique by combining the injectable PPF paste with the PLGA or PPF microspheres at 100 or 250 mg microsphere per composite formulation, or a control aqueous TRD solution (200 microg per composite). All scaffolds had an interconnected pore network with an average porosity of 64.8 +/- 3.6%. The presence of microspheres in the composite scaffolds was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The composite scaffolds exhibited a sustained release of the model drug for at least 28 days and had minimal burst release during the initial phase of release, as compared to drug release from microspheres alone. The compressive moduli of the scaffolds were between 2.4 and 26.2 MPa after fabrication, and between 14.9 and 62.8 MPa after 28 days in PBS. The scaffolds containing PPF microspheres exhibited a significantly higher initial compressive modulus than those containing PLGA microspheres. Increasing the amount of microspheres in the composites was found to significantly decrease the initial compressive modulus. The novel injectable PPF-based microsphere/scaffold composites developed in this study

  3. THE APPLICATION OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS IN MODERN AVIATION AND CONTROL OF ITS CONDITION DURING DESIGN SERVICE GOAL

    A. V. Zibitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article has a purpose to give a brief review of usage of composite materials in the structure of modern civil aircraft. The current condition of civil aviation was analyzed, serious problems were determined and possible achievements in the future were discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of composite materials were analyzed, non-destructive methods of control were reviewed and the necessity to design new method, which allows to control the integrity of structure in real time during design service goal of the aircraft (the concept of “clever material” was shown.

  4. A Game-Theoretic Approach to Information-Flow Control via Protocol Composition

    Mário S. Alvim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the inference attacks studied in Quantitative Information Flow (QIF, the attacker typically tries to interfere with the system in the attempt to increase its leakage of secret information. The defender, on the other hand, typically tries to decrease leakage by introducing some controlled noise. This noise introduction can be modeled as a type of protocol composition, i.e., a probabilistic choice among different protocols, and its effect on the amount of leakage depends heavily on whether or not this choice is visible to the attacker. In this work, we consider operators for modeling visible and hidden choice in protocol composition, and we study their algebraic properties. We then formalize the interplay between defender and attacker in a game-theoretic framework adapted to the specific issues of QIF, where the payoff is information leakage. We consider various kinds of leakage games, depending on whether players act simultaneously or sequentially, and on whether or not the choices of the defender are visible to the attacker. In the case of sequential games, the choice of the second player is generally a function of the choice of the first player, and his/her probabilistic choice can be either over the possible functions (mixed strategy or it can be on the result of the function (behavioral strategy. We show that when the attacker moves first in a sequential game with a hidden choice, then behavioral strategies are more advantageous for the defender than mixed strategies. This contrasts with the standard game theory, where the two types of strategies are equivalent. Finally, we establish a hierarchy of these games in terms of their information leakage and provide methods for finding optimal strategies (at the points of equilibrium for both attacker and defender in the various cases.

  5. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics in shape- and composition-controlled gold–silver bimetallic nanostructures

    Zarick, Holly F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Talbert, Eric M. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Puretzky, Alexander A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Geohegan, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bardhan, Rizia [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have examined the ultrafast dynamics of shape- and composition-controlled bimetallic Au/Ag core/shell nanostructures with transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) as a function of Ag layer thickness (0–15 nm) and pump excitation fluence (50–500 nJ/pulse). Our synthesis approach generated both bimetallic nanocubes and nanopyramids with distinct dipolar plasmon resonances and plasmon dephasing behavior at the resonance. Lifetimes obtained from TAS at low powers (50 nJ/pulse) demonstrated minimal dependence on the Ag layer thickness, whereas at high power (500 nJ/pulse) a rise in electron–phonon coupling lifetime (τ1) was observed with increasing Ag shell thickness for both nanocubes and nanopyramids. This is attributable to the stronger absorption of the 400 nm pump pulse with higher Ag content, which induced higher electron temperatures. The phonon–phonon scattering lifetime (τ2) also rises with increasing Ag layer, contributed both by the increasing size of the Au/Ag nanostructures as well as by surface chemistry effects. Further, we observed that even the thinnest, 2 nm, Ag shell strongly impacts both τ1 and τ2 at high power despite minimal change in overall size, indicating that the nanostructure composition also strongly impacts the thermalization temperature following absorption of 400 nm light. We also observed a shape-dependent trend at high power, where τ2 increased for the nanopyramids with increasing Ag shell thickness and nanostructure size, but bimetallic nanocubes demonstrated an unexpected decrease in τ2 for the thickest, 15 nm, Ag shell. This was attributed to the larger number of corners and edges in the nanocubes relative to the nanopyramids.

  6. Unc-51 controls active zone density and protein composition by downregulating ERK signaling.

    Wairkar, Yogesh P; Toda, Hirofumi; Mochizuki, Hiroaki; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Diantonio, Aaron

    2009-01-14

    Efficient synaptic transmission requires the apposition of neurotransmitter release sites opposite clusters of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Transmitter is released at active zones, which are composed of a large complex of proteins necessary for synaptic development and function. Many active zone proteins have been identified, but little is known of the mechanisms that ensure that each active zone receives the proper complement of proteins. Here we use a genetic analysis in Drosophila to demonstrate that the serine threonine kinase Unc-51 acts in the presynaptic motoneuron to regulate the localization of the active zone protein Bruchpilot opposite to glutamate receptors at each synapse. In the absence of Unc-51, many glutamate receptor clusters are unapposed to Bruchpilot, and ultrastructural analysis demonstrates that fewer active zones contain dense body T-bars. In addition to the presence of these aberrant synapses, there is also a decrease in the density of all synapses. This decrease in synaptic density and abnormal active zone composition is associated with impaired evoked transmitter release. Mechanistically, Unc-51 inhibits the activity of the MAP kinase ERK to promote synaptic development. In the unc-51 mutant, increased ERK activity leads to the decrease in synaptic density and the absence of Bruchpilot from many synapses. Hence, activated ERK negatively regulates synapse formation, resulting in either the absence of active zones or the formation of active zones without their proper complement of proteins. The Unc-51-dependent inhibition of ERK activity provides a potential mechanism for synapse-specific control of active zone protein composition and release probability.

  7. Ultra-Precision Measurement and Control of Angle Motion in Piezo-Based Platforms Using Strain Gauge Sensors and a Robust Composite Controller

    Liu, Lei; Bai, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Da-Li; Wu, Zhi-Gang

    2013-01-01

    The measurement and control strategy of a piezo-based platform by using strain gauge sensors (SGS) and a robust composite controller is investigated in this paper. First, the experimental setup is constructed by using a piezo-based platform, SGS sensors, an AD5435 platform and two voltage amplifiers. Then, the measurement strategy to measure the tip/tilt angles accurately in the order of sub-μrad is presented. A comprehensive composite control strategy design to enhance the tracking accuracy with a novel driving principle is also proposed. Finally, an experiment is presented to validate the measurement and control strategy. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed measurement and control strategy provides accurate angle motion with a root mean square (RMS) error of 0.21 μrad, which is approximately equal to the noise level. PMID:23860316

  8. Ultra-Precision Measurement and Control of Angle Motion in Piezo-Based Platforms Using Strain Gauge Sensors and a Robust Composite Controller

    Zhi-Gang Wu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The measurement and control strategy of a piezo-based platform by using strain gauge sensors (SGS and a robust composite controller is investigated in this paper. First, the experimental setup is constructed by using a piezo-based platform, SGS sensors, an AD5435 platform and two voltage amplifiers. Then, the measurement strategy to measure the tip/tilt angles accurately in the order of sub-μrad is presented. A comprehensive composite control strategy design to enhance the tracking accuracy with a novel driving principle is also proposed. Finally, an experiment is presented to validate the measurement and control strategy. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed measurement and control strategy provides accurate angle motion with a root mean square (RMS error of 0.21 μrad, which is approximately equal to the noise level.

  9. Sustainable pest regulation in agricultural landscapes: a review on landscape composition, biodiversity and natural pest control.

    Bianchi, F J J A; Booij, C J H; Tscharntke, T

    2006-07-22

    Agricultural intensification has resulted in a simplification of agricultural landscapes by the expansion of agricultural land, enlargement of field size and removal of non-crop habitat. These changes are considered to be an important cause of the rapid decline in farmland biodiversity, with the remaining biodiversity concentrated in field edges and non-crop habitats. The simplification of landscape composition and the decline of biodiversity may affect the functioning of natural pest control because non-crop habitats provide requisites for a broad spectrum of natural enemies, and the exchange of natural enemies between crop and non-crop habitats is likely to be diminished in landscapes dominated by arable cropland. In this review, we test the hypothesis that natural pest control is enhanced in complex patchy landscapes with a high proportion of non-crop habitats as compared to simple large-scale landscapes with little associated non-crop habitat. In 74% and 45% of the studies reviewed, respectively, natural enemy populations were higher and pest pressure lower in complex landscapes versus simple landscapes. Landscape-driven pest suppression may result in lower crop injury, although this has rarely been documented. Enhanced natural enemy activity was associated with herbaceous habitats in 80% of the cases (e.g. fallows, field margins), and somewhat less often with wooded habitats (71%) and landscape patchiness (70%). The similar contributions of these landscape factors suggest that all are equally important in enhancing natural enemy populations. We conclude that diversified landscapes hold most potential for the conservation of biodiversity and sustaining the pest control function.

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis of layer-controlled MoS_2/graphene composite aerogels for lithium-ion battery anode materials

    Zhao, Bing; Wang, Zhixuan; Gao, Yang; Chen, Lu; Lu, Mengna; Jiao, Zheng; Jiang, Yong; Ding, Yuanzhang; Cheng, Lingli

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Layer-controlled MoS_2/GA composites are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal route. • Few-layer (5–15 layers) MoS_2 nanosheets are decorated on the surface of GNS homogeneously and tightly. • The growth mechanism of the lay-controlled MoS_2/GA composites is proposed. • The composite delivers high specific capacity of 1085.0 mAh g"−"1 at 0.1 A g"−"1. - Abstract: Layer-controlled MoS_2/graphene aerogels (MoS_2/GA) composites are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal route, in which few-layer (5–15 layers) MoS_2 nanosheets with high crystalline are decorated on the surface of graphene nanosheets homogeneously and tightly. The number of the MoS_2 layers can be easily controlled through adjusting the amount of molybdenum source in the reaction system. Moreover, the growth mechanism of the lay-controlled MoS_2/GA composites is proposed. The three-dimensional MoS_2/GA with macroporous micro-structure not only shortens the transportation length of electrons and ions, but also restrains the re-stacking of MoS_2 effectively, stabilizing the electrode structure during repeated charging/discharging processes. Electrochemical tests demonstrate that this few-layer MoS_2/GA composite exhibits a high reversible capacity of 1085.0 mAh g"−"1 at current density of 100 mA g"−"1, as well as extraordinarily high cycling stability and rate capability.

  11. New type of chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin composite membrane for gallic acid encapsulation and controlled release.

    Paun, Gabriela; Neagu, Elena; Tache, Andreia; Radu, G L

    2014-01-01

    A new type of chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin composite membrane have been developed for the encapsulation and controlled release of gallic acid. The morphology of the composite membrane was investigated by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), whereas swelling gallic acid and release properties were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy. The release behavior with pH changes was also explored. The composite membrane based on chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin with gallic acid included showed improved antioxidant capacities compared to plain chitosan membrane. The information obtained in this study will facilitate the design and preparation of composite membrane based on chitosan and could open a wide range of applications, particularly its use as an antioxidant in food, food packaging, biomedical (biodegradable soft porous scaffolds for enhance the surrounding tissue regeneration), pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries.

  12. An integrated control strategy for the composite braking system of an electric vehicle with independently driven axles

    Sun, Fengchun; Liu, Wei; He, Hongwen; Guo, Hongqiang

    2016-08-01

    For an electric vehicle with independently driven axles, an integrated braking control strategy was proposed to coordinate the regenerative braking and the hydraulic braking. The integrated strategy includes three modes, namely the hybrid composite mode, the parallel composite mode and the pure hydraulic mode. For the hybrid composite mode and the parallel composite mode, the coefficients of distributing the braking force between the hydraulic braking and the two motors' regenerative braking were optimised offline, and the response surfaces related to the driving state parameters were established. Meanwhile, the six-sigma method was applied to deal with the uncertainty problems for reliability. Additionally, the pure hydraulic mode is activated to ensure the braking safety and stability when the predictive failure of the response surfaces occurs. Experimental results under given braking conditions showed that the braking requirements could be well met with high braking stability and energy regeneration rate, and the reliability of the braking strategy was guaranteed on general braking conditions.

  13. Neurobiological heterogeneity in ADHD

    de Zeeuw, P.

    2011-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a highly heterogeneous disorder clinically. Symptoms take many forms, from subtle but pervasive attention problems or dreaminess up to disruptive and unpredictable behavior. Interestingly, early neuroscientific work on ADHD assumed either a

  14. Heterogeneous Calculation of {epsilon}

    Jonsson, Alf

    1961-02-15

    A heterogeneous method of calculating the fast fission factor given by Naudet has been applied to the Carlvik - Pershagen definition of {epsilon}. An exact calculation of the collision probabilities is included in the programme developed for the Ferranti - Mercury computer.

  15. Heterogeneous Calculation of ε

    Jonsson, Alf

    1961-02-01

    A heterogeneous method of calculating the fast fission factor given by Naudet has been applied to the Carlvik - Pershagen definition of ε. An exact calculation of the collision probabilities is included in the programme developed for the Ferranti - Mercury computer

  16. Evidence of oxygen content heterogeneity in TSMTG YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}/Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} composites by micro-Raman spectrometry

    Delorme, F. [Laboratoire CRISMAT, UMR CNRS 6508, ISMRA, Boulevard du Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)], E-mail: f.delorme@brgm.fr; Bardeau, J.-F. [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense, Faculte des Sciences, Universite du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 09 (France); Harnois, C. [Laboratoire CRISMAT, UMR CNRS 6508, ISMRA, Boulevard du Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France); Monot-Laffez, I. [Laboratoire LEMA, CNRS FRE-2077- CEA-LRC M01 - IUT de Blois, 3 Place Jean Jaures, CS2903, 41029 Blois (France)

    2008-03-01

    The homogeneity of the oxygen content of TSMTG-YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}/Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} composites has been investigated by micro-Raman spectrometry. The Y123 compound has been found to be very sensitive to the laser power, but a laser power of 0.04 mW has been shown to not to be harmful for the samples, even after 2 h of irradiation. Raman spectra have shown that the oxygen content of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}/Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} ceramics is not homogeneous at the micrometer scale. In addition, no monotonic decrease of the oxygen content is observed from the periphery to the core of the sample, confirming that the oxygen uptake is not strictly controlled by a diffusion process.

  17. HETEROGENEOUS INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY

    2017-08-24

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0168 HETEROGENEOUS INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY Dr. Burhan Bayraktaroglu Devices for Sensing Branch Aerospace Components & Subsystems...Final September 1, 2016 – May 1, 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HETEROGENEOUS INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A...provide a structure for this review. The history and the current status of integration technologies in each category are examined and product examples are

  18. Green's Function and Stress Fields in Stochastic Heterogeneous Continua

    Negi, Vineet

    Many engineering materials used today are heterogenous in composition e.g. Composites - Polymer Matrix Composites, Metal Matrix Composites. Even, conventional engineering materials - metals, plastics, alloys etc. - may develop heterogeneities, like inclusions and residual stresses, during the manufacturing process. Moreover, these materials may also have intrinsic heterogeneities at a nanoscale in the form of grain boundaries in metals, crystallinity in amorphous polymers etc. While, the homogenized constitutive models for these materials may be satisfactory at a macroscale, recent studies of phenomena like fatigue failure, void nucleation, size-dependent brittle-ductile transition in polymeric nanofibers reveal a major play of micro/nanoscale physics in these phenomena. At this scale, heterogeneities in a material may no longer be ignored. Thus, this demands a study into the effects of various material heterogeneities. In this work, spatial heterogeneities in two material properties - elastic modulus and yield stress - have been investigated separately. The heterogeneity in the elastic modulus is studied in the context of Green's function. The Stochastic Finite Element method is adopted to get the mean statistics of the Green's function defined on a stochastic heterogeneous 2D infinite space. A study of the elastic-plastic transition in a domain having stochastic heterogenous yield stress was done using Mont-Carlo methods. The statistics for various stress and strain fields during the transition were obtained. Further, the effects of size of the domain and the strain-hardening rate on the stress fields during the heterogeneous elastic-plastic transition were investigated. Finally, a case is made for the role of the heterogenous elastic-plastic transition in damage nucleation and growth.

  19. The effects of free-living interval-walking training on glycemic control, body composition, and physical fitness in type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Karstoft, Kristian; Winding, Kamilla; Knudsen, Sine H; Nielsen, Jens S; Thomsen, Carsten; Pedersen, Bente K; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of free-living walking training in type 2 diabetic patients and to investigate the effects of interval-walking training versus continuous-walking training upon physical fitness, body composition, and glycemic control. Subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomized to a control (n = 8), continuous-walking (n = 12), or interval-walking group (n = 12). Training groups were prescribed five sessions per week (60 min/session) and were controlled with an accelerometer and a heart-rate monitor. Continuous walkers performed all training at moderate intensity, whereas interval walkers alternated 3-min repetitions at low and high intensity. Before and after the 4-month intervention, the following variables were measured: VO(2)max, body composition, and glycemic control (fasting glucose, HbA(1c), oral glucose tolerance test, and continuous glucose monitoring [CGM]). Training adherence was high (89 ± 4%), and training energy expenditure and mean intensity were comparable. VO(2)max increased 16.1 ± 3.7% in the interval-walking group (P Body mass and adiposity (fat mass and visceral fat) decreased in the interval-walking group only (P interval-walking group. The continuous walkers showed no changes in glycemic control. Free-living walking training is feasible in type 2 diabetic patients. Continuous walking offsets the deterioration in glycemia seen in the control group, and interval walking is superior to energy expenditure-matched continuous walking for improving physical fitness, body composition, and glycemic control.

  20. The Synthesis of Wavelength-Controlled CdTe/Hydroxyapatite Composites and Their Fluorescence Enhancement by Bovine Serum Albumin

    Li Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last ten years, quantum dots modified by biological materials have made it possible to study biochemical processes by means of biomedical imaging. This thesis introduced how the fluorescence CdTe quantum dots/hydroxyapatite composites were synthesized and how their structure, morphology, and fluorescence property were characterized by using TEM, XRD, EDS, UV-vis absorption spectra, and fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence spectra indicated the superb photometric characteristics of CdTe/HA composites. We also found that refluxing temperature and time had prominent effects on fluorescence wavelength and intensity of CdTe/HA composites, so the fluorescence emission wavelength of CdTe/HA composites could be controlled. In addition, the effect of BSA on the fluorescence properties of CdTe/HA composites was studied. The fluorescent emission intensity of CdTe/HA composites was enhanced directly with increasing concentrations of BSA; meanwhile, the fluorescence emission intensity of BSA dramatically decreased, which indicated that a Förster nonradiative energy transfer process occurred through the formation of chemical bonds between BSA and CdTe/HA composites. And the two-dimensional correlation (2D COS was used to analyze the BSA solution before and after the reaction, which indicated that CdTe/HA composites have bound to a site at the surface of the molecule in the first subdomain IA. We also found that there was a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity enhancement (F/F0 of CdTe/HA composites and the concentration of the bovine serum albumin, which might become a method for quantitative analysis of BSA in a real sample.

  1. Colloidal strategies for controlling the morphology, composition, and crystal structure of inorganic nanoparticles

    Hodges, James M.

    Emerging applications and fundamental studies require nanomaterials with increasingly sophisticated architectures that have precise composition, morphology, and crystal structure. Colloidal nanochemistry has emerged as one of the most effective methods for generating high quality, monodisperse nanoparticles with diverse structural features and highly complex geometries. These wet-chemical approaches offer an array of synthetic levers that can be used to tailor nanoparticles for targeted applications, and deliver solution-dispersible solids that are easily integrated onto device architectures. Additionally, colloidal nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for constructing periodic superlattices and multicomponent hybrid nanoparticles, which offer unique properties that can support next-generation technologies. As the applications for colloidal nanoparticles continue to expand, the architectural and compositional requirements for these materials are becoming increasingly rigid. Conventional colloidal methods are effective for generating diverse nanoparticle systems, but rely on complex nucleation and growth processes, which are often poorly understood and difficult to control in dynamic reaction environments. For these reasons, there are a number of high profile nanoparticle targets that remain out of reach. Accordingly, new approaches are needed that can circumvent these synthetic bottlenecks and narrow the growing disconnect between nano-design and synthetic capability. In this dissertation, I present several colloidal strategies for engineering synthetically challenging nanomaterials using multistep reaction sequences that, in many ways, parallel the total-synthesis framework that organic chemists use to access complex molecules. A variety of approaches are discussed, including nanoscale ion exchange transformations and seeded-growth protocol for constructing multicomponent hybrid nanoparticles. First, I demonstrate that solution-mediated anion and cation

  2. Controlling Factors of the Stable Isotope Composition in the Precipitation of Islamabad, Pakistan

    Shakir Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant temporal variations in δ18O and deuterium isotopes were found in the rainfall water of Islamabad, Pakistan, over a 15-year period (1992–2006. The data were obtained from the International Atomic Energy Agency/Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (IAEA/GNIP database, and statistical correlations were investigated. In particular, this study provides the first detailed analysis of GNIP data for Islamabad. Both dry (1999-2000 and wet years (1994, 1997, and 2000 were chosen to investigate the correlations between precipitation amount, vapor flux, and temperature. We observed obvious differences between the dry and wet years and among seasons as well. Long-term features in the isotope composition agreed with the global meteorological water line, whereas short-term values followed rainfall amounts; that is, a total of 72% of the precipitation’s isotopic signature was dependent on the rainfall amount, and temperature controlled 73% of the isotopic features during October to May. The lower d-excess values were attributed to conditions during the spring season and a secondary evaporation boost during dry years; precipitation originating from the Mediterranean Sea showed high d-excess values. Overall, the results of this study contribute to the understanding of precipitation variations and their association with water vapor transport over Islamabad, Pakistan.

  3. Redox Control of Aphid Resistance through Altered Cell Wall Composition and Nutritional Quality.

    Rasool, Brwa; McGowan, Jack; Pastok, Daria; Marcus, Sue E; Morris, Jenny A; Verrall, Susan R; Hedley, Peter E; Hancock, Robert D; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms underpinning plant perception of phloem-feeding insects, particularly aphids, remain poorly characterized. Therefore, the role of apoplastic redox state in controlling aphid infestation was explored using transgenic tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum ) plants that have either high (PAO) or low (TAO) ascorbate oxidase (AO) activities relative to the wild type. Only a small number of leaf transcripts and metabolites were changed in response to genotype, and cell wall composition was largely unaffected. Aphid fecundity was decreased significantly in TAO plants compared with other lines. Leaf sugar levels were increased and maximum extractable AO activities were decreased in response to aphids in all genotypes. Transcripts encoding the Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog F, signaling components involved in ethylene and other hormone-mediated pathways, photosynthetic electron transport components, sugar, amino acid, and cell wall metabolism, were increased significantly in the TAO plants in response to aphid perception relative to other lines. The levels of galactosylated xyloglucan were decreased significantly in response to aphid feeding in all the lines, the effect being the least in the TAO plants. Similarly, all lines exhibited increases in tightly bound (1→4)-β-galactan. Taken together, these findings identify AO-dependent mechanisms that limit aphid infestation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Study on the control of the compositions and properties of a biodegradable polyester elastomer

    Liu Quanyong; Weng Jingyi; Zhang Liqun [Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tan Tianwei, E-mail: liu_quanyong@126.co, E-mail: zhanglq@mail.buct.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Bioprocess of Beijing, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Biodegradable polyester elastomers are widely reported to be applied in varied biomedical fields. In this paper, we attempt to investigate how both the thermal-curing time and molar ratio of the monomers affect the final compositions and properties of the novel poly(glycerol-sebacate-citrate) (PGSC) elastomers. First, PGSC elastomers are obtained after the thermal curing of the moldable mixtures consisting of citric acid and poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS) prepolymers synthesized in the lab. Then further studies show that, on the one hand, the control of longer thermal-curing time results in elastomers with less sol, lower swelling degree, slower degradation, greater mechanical strength and higher glass transition temperature and, on the other hand, the crosslink with more citric acid is advantageous to greatly improving their mechanical strength and glass transition temperatures, simultaneously decreasing their sol contents, swelling degrees and degradation rates. The PGSC elastomers show thermosetting properties, certain strength, mass losses lower than 20% after 4-week degradation and durative water absorption during degradation. Thus they might be potentially used as degradable bio-coatings, varied soft biomedical membranes and drug delivery matrices.

  5. Impact of yogurt on appetite control, energy balance, and body composition.

    Tremblay, Angelo; Doyon, Caroline; Sanchez, Marina

    2015-08-01

    Recent data support the idea that regular yogurt consumption promotes body weight stability. The simplest explanation is that regular consumption of healthful foods such as yogurt results in decreased intake of less healthful foods containing high amounts of fat and/or sugar. There is also evidence to suggest that the high calcium and protein contents of yogurt and other dairy foods influence appetite and energy intake. The existence of a calcium-specific appetite control mechanism has been proposed. Milk proteins differ in terms of absorption rate and post-absorptive responses, which can influence their satiating properties. Studies in humans have shown that consumption of milk and yogurt increases the circulating concentration of the anorectic peptides glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and peptide YY (PYY). The food matrix can also affect appetite and satiety. Yogurt is a fermented milk that contains bacteria that enrich the microbiota of the host. It appears that lean vs obese humans differ in the composition of their gut microbiota. The available relevant literature suggests that yogurt is a food that facilitates the regulation of energy balance. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Controlling thermal deformation by using composite materials having variable fiber volume fraction

    Bouremana, M.; Tounsi, A.; Kaci, A.; Mechab, I.

    2009-01-01

    In application, many thin structural components such as beams, plates and shells experience a through-thickness temperature variation. This temperature variation can produce both an in-plane expansion and an out-of-plane (bending) curvature. Given that these thin components interact with or connect to other components, we often wish to minimize the thermal deformation or match the thermal deformation of another component. This is accomplished by using a composite whose fibers have a negative axial thermal expansion coefficient. By varying the fiber volume fraction within a symmetric laminated beam to create a functionally graded material (FGM), certain thermal deformations can be controlled or tailored. Specifically, a beam can be designed which does not curve under a steady-state through-thickness temperature variation. Continuous gradation of the fiber volume fraction in the FGM layer is modelled in the form of a mth power polynomial of the coordinate axis in thickness direction of the beam. The beam results are independent of the actual temperature values, within the limitations of steady-state heat transfer and constant material properties. The influence of volume fiber fraction distributions are studied to match or eliminate an in-plane expansion coefficient, or to match a desired axial stiffness. Combining two fiber types to create a hybrid FGM can offer desirable increase in axial and bending stiffness while still retaining the useful thermal deformation behavior.

  7. One-step controllable fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces with special composite structure on zinc substrates.

    Ning, Tao; Xu, Wenguo; Lu, Shixiang

    2011-09-01

    Stable superhydrophobic platinum surfaces have been effectively fabricated on the zinc substrates through one-step replacement deposition process without further modification or any other post-treatment procedures. The fabrication process was controllable, which could be testified by various morphologies and hydrophobic properties of different prepared samples. By conducting SEM and water CA analysis, the effects of reaction conditions on the surface morphology and hydrophobicity of the resulting surfaces were carefully studied. The results show that the optimum condition of superhydrophobic surface fabrication depends largely on the positioning of zinc plate and the concentrations of reactants. When the zinc plate was placed vertically and the concentration of PtCl(4) solution was 5 mmol/L, the zinc substrate would be covered by a novel and interesting composite structure. The structure was composed by microscale hexagonal cavities, densely packed nanoparticles layer and top micro- and nanoscale flower-like structures, which exhibit great surface roughness and porosity contributing to the superhydrophobicity. The maximal CA value of about 171° was obtained under the same reaction condition. The XRD, XPS and EDX results indicate that crystallite pure platinum nanoparticles were aggregated on the zinc substrates in accordance with a free deposition way. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Composite multi-modal vibration control for a stiffened plate using non-collocated acceleration sensor and piezoelectric actuator

    Li, Shengquan; Li, Juan; Mo, Yueping; Zhao, Rong

    2014-01-01

    A novel active method for multi-mode vibration control of an all-clamped stiffened plate (ACSP) is proposed in this paper, using the extended-state-observer (ESO) approach based on non-collocated acceleration sensors and piezoelectric actuators. Considering the estimated capacity of ESO for system state variables, output superposition and control coupling of other modes, external excitation, and model uncertainties simultaneously, a composite control method, i.e., the ESO based vibration control scheme, is employed to ensure the lumped disturbances and uncertainty rejection of the closed-loop system. The phenomenon of phase hysteresis and time delay, caused by non-collocated sensor/actuator pairs, degrades the performance of the control system, even inducing instability. To solve this problem, a simple proportional differential (PD) controller and acceleration feed-forward with an output predictor design produce the control law for each vibration mode. The modal frequencies, phase hysteresis loops and phase lag values due to non-collocated placement of the acceleration sensor and piezoelectric patch actuator are experimentally obtained, and the phase lag is compensated by using the Smith Predictor technology. In order to improve the vibration control performance, the chaos optimization method based on logistic mapping is employed to auto-tune the parameters of the feedback channel. The experimental control system for the ACSP is tested using the dSPACE real-time simulation platform. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed composite active control algorithm is an effective approach for suppressing multi-modal vibrations. (paper)

  9. Nano-Particle Control of Void Formation and Expansion in Polymeric and Composite Systems

    Seferis, James C

    2006-01-01

    The research focused on carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites with varying dispersions of montmorillonite and nanoprosity, processed with either prepreg or Vacuum Resin Transfer Mold (VARTM) technologies...

  10. Team locus-of-control composition, leadership structure, information acquisition, and financial performance: A business simulation study

    Boone, Christophe; Van Olffen, W; van Witteloostuijn, A

    2005-01-01

    We argue that team information acquisition mediates the effect of the relationship of team locus-of-control composition and leadership structure on team financial performance in a decision-making context. Hypotheses were tested on 44 teams participating in an elaborate and lengthy international

  11. The ribosomal protein Rpl22 controls ribosome composition by directly repressing expression of its own paralog, Rpl22l1.

    Monique N O'Leary

    Full Text Available Most yeast ribosomal protein genes are duplicated and their characterization has led to hypotheses regarding the existence of specialized ribosomes with different subunit composition or specifically-tailored functions. In yeast, ribosomal protein genes are generally duplicated and evidence has emerged that paralogs might have specific roles. Unlike yeast, most mammalian ribosomal proteins are thought to be encoded by a single gene copy, raising the possibility that heterogenous populations of ribosomes are unique to yeast. Here, we examine the roles of the mammalian Rpl22, finding that Rpl22(-/- mice have only subtle phenotypes with no significant translation defects. We find that in the Rpl22(-/- mouse there is a compensatory increase in Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1 expression and incorporation into ribosomes. Consistent with the hypothesis that either ribosomal protein can support translation, knockdown of Rpl22l1 impairs growth of cells lacking Rpl22. Mechanistically, Rpl22 regulates Rpl22l1 directly by binding to an internal hairpin structure and repressing its expression. We propose that ribosome specificity may exist in mammals, providing evidence that one ribosomal protein can influence composition of the ribosome by regulating its own paralog.

  12. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    Han, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a heterogeneous gas core reactor (HGCR) concept suggest that this potential power reactor offers distinct advantages over other existing or conceptual reactor power plants. One of the most favorable features of the HGCR is the flexibility of the power producing system which allows it to be efficiently designed to conform to a desired optimum condition without major conceptual changes. The arrangement of bundles of moderator/coolant channels in a fissionable gas or mixture of gases makes a truly heterogeneous nuclear reactor core. It is this full heterogeneity for a gas-fueled reactor core which accounts for the novelty of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and leads to noted significant advantages over previous gas core systems with respect to neutron and fuel economy, power density, and heat transfer characteristics. The purpose of this work is to provide an insight into the design, operating characteristics, and safety of a heterogeneous gas core reactor system. The studies consist mainly of neutronic, energetic and kinetic analyses of the power producing and conversion systems as a preliminary assessment of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and basic design. The results of the conducted research indicate a high potential for the heterogeneous gas core reactor system as an electrical power generating unit (either large or small), with an overall efficiency as high as 40 to 45%. The HGCR system is found to be stable and safe, under the conditions imposed upon the analyses conducted in this work, due to the inherent safety of ann expanding gaseous fuel and the intrinsic feedback effects of the gas and water coolant

  13. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. For continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the, clinical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects. of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration

  14. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage (typically 80%) of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. Alternatively, for continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the classical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration

  15. Controllable synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic properties of Cu2O/Cu31S16 composites

    Liu, Xueqin; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Facile sonochemical route. ► The content of Cu 31 S 16 in the Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 can be easily controlled. ► Structure and optical properties of Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 were discussed. ► Enhanced photocatalytic property of Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 . ► Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 core/shell structures were more stable than single Cu 2 O particles. -- Abstract: The controlled synthesis of Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 microcomposites with hierarchical structures had been prepared via a convenient sonochemical route. Ultrasonic irradiation of a mixture of Cu 2 O and (NH 2 ) 2 CS in an aqueous medium yielded Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 composites. The content of Cu 31 S 16 in the Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 can be easily controlled by adjusting the synthesis time. The Cu 31 S 16 layer not only protected and stabilized Cu 2 O particles, but also prohibited the recombination of photogenerated electrons–holes pair between Cu 31 S 16 and Cu 2 O. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra, ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to characterize the products. Photocatalytic performance of the Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 hierarchical structures was evaluated by measuring the decomposition rate of methyl orange solution under natural light. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the preparation and photocatalytic activity of Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 microcomposite. Additionally, the Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 core/shell structures were more stable than single Cu 2 O particles during photocatalytic process since the photocatalytic activity of the second reused architecture sample was much higher than that of pure Cu 2 O. The Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 microcomposites may be a good promising candidate for wastewater treatment.

  16. Holographic control of information and dynamical topology change for composite open quantum systems

    Aref'eva, I. Ya.; Volovich, I. V.; Inozemcev, O. V.

    2017-12-01

    We analyze how the compositeness of a system affects the characteristic time of equilibration. We study the dynamics of open composite quantum systems strongly coupled to the environment after a quantum perturbation accompanied by nonequilibrium heating. We use a holographic description of the evolution of entanglement entropy. The nonsmooth character of the evolution with holographic entanglement is a general feature of composite systems, which demonstrate a dynamical change of topology in the bulk space and a jumplike velocity change of entanglement entropy propagation. Moreover, the number of jumps depends on the system configuration and especially on the number of composite parts. The evolution of the mutual information of two composite systems inherits these jumps. We present a detailed study of the mutual information for two subsystems with one of them being bipartite. We find five qualitatively different types of behavior of the mutual information dynamics and indicate the corresponding regions of the system parameters.

  17. Application of ARCON96 in NPP control room habitability assessment and its comparison with composite wake model

    Fang Sheng; Li Hong; Fang Dong

    2012-01-01

    ARCON96 is the current NRC-recommended atmospheric dispersion model that may be used to estimate atmospheric relative concentration in assessing the habitability of a NPP control room during design basis radiological events. Based on meteorological data from a NPP site in China, the atmospheric relative concentration was calculated and analyzed using ARCON96, and then compared with calculations by the composite wake model. Results demonstrated that ARCON96 is feasible for atmospheric relative concentration estimation and its estimate is more conservative than the composite wake model. (authors)

  18. Ion association at discretely-charged dielectric interfaces: Giant charge inversion [Dielectric response controlled ion association at physically heterogeneous surfaces: Giant charge reversal

    Wang, Zhi -Yong [Chongqing Univ. of Technology, Chongqing (China); Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Wu, Jianzhong [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Giant charge reversal has been identified for the first time by Monte Carlo simulation for a discretely charged surface in contact with a trivalent electrolyte solution. It takes place regardless of the surface charge density under study and the monovalent salt. In stark contrast to earlier predictions based on the 2-dimensional Wigner crystal model to describe strong correlation of counterions at the macroion surface, we find that giant charge reversal reflects an intricate interplay of ionic volume effects, electrostatic correlations, surface charge heterogeneity, and the dielectric response of the confined fluids. While the novel phenomenon is yet to be confirmed with experiment, the simulation results appear in excellent agreement with a wide range of existing observations in the subregime of charge inversion. Lastly, our findings may have far-reaching implications to understanding complex electrochemical phenomena entailing ionic fluids under dielectric confinements.

  19. Assessment of heterogeneity between European Populations: a Baltic and Danish replication case-control study of SNPs from a recent European ulcerative colitis genome wide association study

    Andersen, Vibeke; Ernst, Anja; Sventoraityte, Jurgita

    2011-01-01

    the combined Baltic, Danish, and Norwegian panel versus the combined German, British, Belgian, and Greek panel (rs7520292 (P = 0.001), rs12518307 (P = 0.007), and rs2395609 (TCP11) (P = 0.01), respectively). No SNP reached genome-wide significance in the combined analyses of all the panels. Conclusions......Background: Differences in the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease between different European countries and ethnicities have previously been reported. In the present study, we wanted to assess the role of 11 newly identified UC risk variants, derived from a recent European UC genome...... wide association study (GWAS) (Franke et al., 2010), for 1) association with UC in the Nordic countries, 2) for population heterogeneity between the Nordic countries and the rest of Europe, and, 3) eventually, to drive some of the previous findings towards overall genome-wide significance. Methods...

  20. Specification of phase 3 benchmark (Hex-Z heterogeneous and burnup calculation)

    Kim, Y.I.

    2002-01-01

    During the second RCM of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects the following items were identified as important. Heterogeneity will affect absolute core reactivity. Rod worths could be considerably reduced by heterogeneity effects depending on their detailed design. Heterogeneity effects will affect the resonance self-shielding in the treatment of fuel Doppler, steel Doppler and sodium density effects. However, it was considered more important to concentrate on the sodium density effect in order to reduce the calculational effort required. It was also recognized that burnup effects will have an influence on fuel Doppler and sodium worths. A benchmark for the assessment of heterogeneity effect for Phase 3 was defined. It is to be performed for the Hex-Z model of the reactor only. No calculations will be performed for the R-Z model. For comparison with heterogeneous evaluations, the control rod worth will be calculated at the beginning of the equilibrium cycle, based on the homogeneous model. The definitions of rod raised and rod inserted for SHR are given, using the composition numbers

  1. 'Pragmatic randomized controlled trial of individually prescribed exercise versus usual care in a heterogeneous cancer survivor population': a feasibility study PEACH trial: prescribed exercise after chemotherapy.

    Walsh, Julie M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many cancer survivors suffer a range of physical and psychological symptoms which may persist for months or years after cessation of treatment. Despite the known benefits of exercise and its potential to address many of the adverse effects of treatment, the role of exercise as well as optimum duration, frequency, and intensity in this population has yet to be fully elucidated. Many cancer rehabilitation programmes presented in the literature are very long and have tight eligibility criteria which make them non-applicable to the majority of cancer survivors. This paper presents the protocol of a novel 8-week intervention which aims to increase fitness, and address other physical symptoms in a heterogeneous cancer survivor population. METHODS\\/DESIGN: The aim is to recruit 64 cancer survivors 2-6 months after completion of chemotherapy, usually adjuvant, with curative intent. Subjects will be recruited through oncology clinics in a single institution and randomised to usual care or an exercise intervention. The exercise intervention consists of two specifically tailored supervised moderate intensity aerobic exercise sessions weekly over 8-weeks. All participants will be assessed at baseline (0 weeks), at the end of the intervention (8 weeks), and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure is fitness, and secondary patient-related outcome measures include fatigue, quality of life, and morphological outcomes. A further secondary outcome is process evaluation including adherence to and compliance with the exercise program. DISCUSSION: This study will provide valuable information about the physical outcomes of this 8-week supervised aerobic programme. Additionally, process information and economic evaluation will inform the feasibility of implementing this program in a heterogeneous population post cessation of chemotherapy.

  2. Control of a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process for improved composition and thickness precision in compound semiconductors

    Gaffney, Monique Suzanne

    1998-11-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is a process used to manufacture electronic and optoelectronic devices that has traditionally lacked real-time growth monitoring and control. Controlling the growth rate and composition using the existing sensors, as well as advanced monitoring systems developed in-house, is shown to improve device quality. Specific MOCVD growth objectives are transformed into controller performance goals. Group III bubbler concentration variations, which perturb both growth rate and composition precision, are identified to be the primary disturbances. First a feed forward control system was investigated, which used an ultrasonic concentration monitor, located upstream in the process. This control strategy resulted in improved regulation of the gallium delivery rate by cancelling the sensed gallium bubbler concentration disturbances via the injection mass flow controller. The controller performance is investigated by growing GaInAs/InP superlattices. Results of growths performed under normal operating conditions and also under large perturbations include X-ray diffraction from the samples as well as real-time sensor signal data. High quality superlattices that display up to eight orders of satellite peaks are obtained under the feed forward compensation scheme, demonstrating improved layer-to-layer reproducibility of thickness and composition. The success of the feed forward control demonstration led to the development of a more complex downstream feedback control system. An ultraviolet absorption monitor was fabricated and retrofitted as a feedback control signal. A control-oriented model of the downstream process was developed for the feedback controller synthesis. Although challenged with both the photolysis and multi-gas detection issues common to UV absorption monitors, closed loop control with the UV sensor was performed and proved to be an effective method of disturbance rejection. An InP/GaInAs test structure was grown under

  3. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  4. Factors controlling the compositional variations among the marine and non-marine black shales from Egypt

    Baioumy, Hassan M. [Central Metallurgical R and D Institute, PO Box 87 Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Ismael, Ismael S. [Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Suez (Egypt)

    2010-07-01

    Non-marine (Jurassic) and marine (Cretaceous) black shales from Egypt were subjected to mineralogical and geochemical analyses to examine the controlling factors of their compositional variations. Non-marine black shales are composed of kaolinite and quartz with traces of gypsum, illite, calcite, feldspars, and dolomite, while marine black shales from the Red Sea area are composed of smectite, kaolinite, quartz, calcite, and dolomite with traces of feldspars. Abu Tartur marine black shales are composed of smectite and quartz with traces of feldspars and gypsum. Non-marine black shales show considerably higher Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr contents and Th/Yb ratios compared to the marine black shales. On the other hand, marine black shales show considerably higher Cr, V, and Zn contents with positive correlations between these elements and organic carbon (C{sub org.}){sub .} Red Sea black shales have higher Ni/Co, V/Cr, and U/Al ratios. Chondrite normalized values of the medium and heavy rare earth elements (MREEs and HREEs, respectively) are higher in the non-marine black shales compared to the marine black shales. Pyrite from non-marine black shales is characterized by high positive {delta}{sup 34}S isotope values (average of + 9.3 permille). Pyrite from Red Sea black shales has low negative {delta}{sup 34}S values (average of -16.7 permille), pyrite from black shales of the lower member of the Duwi Formation has positive {delta}{sup 34}S values (average of 5.8 permille), while pyrite from marine black shales of the middle member has negative {delta}{sup 34}S values (average of -0.83 permille). Source area composition, weathering conditions, depositional environments, and type of organic matter are considered to be the probable controlling factors of these variations. The more felsic constituents in the source area of non-marine black shales is responsible for the relatively high Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr contents and Th/Yb ratio. Relatively high kaolinite contents and Chemical

  5. How soil organic matter composition controls hexachlorobenzene-soil-interactions: adsorption isotherms and quantum chemical modeling.

    Ahmed, Ashour A; Kühn, Oliver; Aziz, Saadullah G; Hilal, Rifaat H; Leinweber, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soilsoilsoil+3 HWEsoil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HCB adsorption. To obtain a molecular level understanding, a test set has been developed on the basis of elemental analysis which comprises 32 representative soil constituents. The calculated binding energy for HCB with each representative system shows that HCB binds to SOM stronger than to soil minerals. For SOM, HCB binds to alkylated aromatic, phenols, lignin monomers, and hydrophobic aliphatic compounds stronger than to polar aliphatic compounds confirming the above adsorption isotherms. Moreover, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of the binding energy with independent physical properties of the test set systems for the first time indicated that the polarizability, the partial charge on the carbon atoms, and the molar volume are the most important properties controlling HCB-SOM interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Climatic and physiological controls on the stable isotope composition of modern and ancient Cupressaceae

    Zinniker, D.; Tipple, B.; Pagani, M.

    2007-12-01

    Unique and abundant secondary metabolites found in waxes and resins of the Callitroid, Cupressoid, and Taxodioid clades of the Cupressaceae family can be identified and quantified in complex mixtures of sedimentary organic compounds. This unusual feature makes it possible to study relatively simple (taxon-specific) isotope systems back in time across the broad array of environments in which these conifers are found. Work on these systems can potentially provide both robust paleoenvironmental proxies (i.e. for source water δD and growing season relative humidity) and quantitative probes into the ecophysiology of these plants in modern and ancient environments. Our research focuses on three genera representing environmental end-members of Cupressaceae - Juniperus, Thuja, and Chamaecyparis - (1) across geographic and environmental gradients in the field, and (2) in specific Holocene and late Pleistocene environmental records. The latter research focuses on peat cores from New England and Oregon and fossil packrat middens from the southwestern United States. Modern transects highlight the sensitivity of Cupressaceae to climatic variables. These include both variables during growth (relative humidity, soil moisture, etc.) and variables affecting seasonal and diurnal growth rates (temperature, winter precipitation, insolation, microhabitat, etc.). Work on ancient records has demonstrated the sensitivity of these unique taxon-specific archives to both subtle and dramatic climate shifts during the Pleistocene and Holocene. This work will result in an improved understanding of climatic and physiological controls on the stable isotopic composition of modern and ancient Cupressaceae - and by extension, other arborescent gymnosperms and C3 plants - providing a framework for understanding more complexly sourced organic inputs to sediments, coals, and petroleum prior to the advent of C4 plants. This research also has direct implications for stratigraphic stable isotope studies

  7. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  8. Cancer heterogeneity and imaging.

    O'Connor, James P B

    2017-04-01

    There is interest in identifying and quantifying tumor heterogeneity at the genomic, tissue pathology and clinical imaging scales, as this may help better understand tumor biology and may yield useful biomarkers for guiding therapy-based decision making. This review focuses on the role and value of using x-ray, CT, MRI and PET based imaging methods that identify, measure and map tumor heterogeneity. In particular we highlight the potential value of these techniques and the key challenges required to validate and qualify these biomarkers for clinical use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Engineering Microbial Metabolite Dynamics and Heterogeneity.

    Schmitz, Alexander C; Hartline, Christopher J; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2017-10-01

    As yields for biological chemical production in microorganisms approach their theoretical maximum, metabolic engineering requires new tools, and approaches for improvements beyond what traditional strategies can achieve. Engineering metabolite dynamics and metabolite heterogeneity is necessary to achieve further improvements in product titers, productivities, and yields. Metabolite dynamics, the ensemble change in metabolite concentration over time, arise from the need for microbes to adapt their metabolism in response to the extracellular environment and are important for controlling growth and productivity in industrial fermentations. Metabolite heterogeneity, the cell-to-cell variation in a metabolite concentration in an isoclonal population, has a significant impact on ensemble productivity. Recent advances in single cell analysis enable a more complete understanding of the processes driving metabolite heterogeneity and reveal metabolic engineering targets. The authors present an overview of the mechanistic origins of metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity, why they are important, their potential effects in chemical production processes, and tools and strategies for engineering metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity. The authors emphasize that the ability to control metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity will bring new avenues of engineering to increase productivity of microbial strains. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Silver-containing polymer composition used in spacecraft and semiconductor optoelectronics control systems

    Ivanov, A. A., E-mail: alexchemtsu@rambler.ru; Tuev, V. I., E-mail: tvi-retem@main.tusur.ru [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The copolymer of the vinyl chloride-maleic anhydride and silver nano- and microparticle (70 wt %) composition is offered as a conductive adhesive for fixing various chips on the dielectric substrate. The wiring volume resistivity is up to 3.1×10{sup −8} Ohm×m. The adhesive strength of the silver-containing polymer composition (70% of Ag) applied under a shear on the dielectric substrate is 106 N/mm{sup 2}. Adhesive layers obtained from these substances have a high thermal conductivity up to λ = 199.93 W/m×K that depends on the amount of Ag in the polymer composition.

  11. Scaling Effects of Cr(VI) Reduction Kinetics. The Role of Geochemical Heterogeneity

    Wang, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Li, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The natural subsurface is highly heterogeneous with minerals distributed in different spatial patterns. Fundamental understanding of how mineral spatial distribution patterns regulate sorption process is important for predicting the transport and fate of chemicals. Existing studies about the sorption was carried out in well-mixed batch reactors or uniformly packed columns, with few data available on the effects of spatial heterogeneities. As a result, there is a lack of data and understanding on how spatial heterogeneities control sorption processes. In this project, we aim to understand and develop modeling capabilities to predict the sorption of Cr(VI), an omnipresent contaminant in natural systems due to its natural occurrence and industrial utilization. We systematically examine the role of spatial patterns of illite, a common clay, in determining the extent of transport limitation and scaling effects associated with Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Our results showed that the sorbed mass and rates can differ by an order of magnitude due to of the illite spatial heterogeneities and transport limitation. With constraints from data, we also developed the capabilities of modeling Cr(VI) in heterogeneous media. The developed model is then utilized to understand the general principles that govern the relationship between sorption and connectivity, a key measure of the spatial pattern characteristics. This correlation can be used to estimate Cr(VI) sorption characteristics in heterogeneous porous media. Insights gained here bridge gaps between laboratory and field application in hydrogeology and geochemical field, and advance predictive understanding of reactive transport processes in the natural heterogeneous subsurface. We believe that these findings will be of interest to a large number of environmental geochemists and engineers, hydrogeologists, and those interested in contaminant fate and transport

  12. Probing Mantle Heterogeneity Across Spatial Scales

    Hariharan, A.; Moulik, P.; Lekic, V.

    2017-12-01

    Inferences of mantle heterogeneity in terms of temperature, composition, grain size, melt and crystal structure may vary across local, regional and global scales. Probing these scale-dependent effects require quantitative comparisons and reconciliation of tomographic models that vary in their regional scope, parameterization, regularization and observational constraints. While a range of techniques like radial correlation functions and spherical harmonic analyses have revealed global features like the dominance of long-wavelength variations in mantle heterogeneity, they have limited applicability for specific regions of interest like subduction zones and continental cratons. Moreover, issues like discrepant 1-D reference Earth models and related baseline corrections have impeded the reconciliation of heterogeneity between various regional and global models. We implement a new wavelet-based approach that allows for structure to be filtered simultaneously in both the spectral and spatial domain, allowing us to characterize heterogeneity on a range of scales and in different geographical regions. Our algorithm extends a recent method that expanded lateral variations into the wavelet domain constructed on a cubed sphere. The isolation of reference velocities in the wavelet scaling function facilitates comparisons between models constructed with arbitrary 1-D reference Earth models. The wavelet transformation allows us to quantify the scale-dependent consistency between tomographic models in a region of interest and investigate the fits to data afforded by heterogeneity at various dominant wavelengths. We find substantial and spatially varying differences in the spectrum of heterogeneity between two representative global Vp models constructed using different data and methodologies. Applying the orthonormality of the wavelet expansion, we isolate detailed variations in velocity from models and evaluate additional fits to data afforded by adding such complexities to long

  13. Salivary Secretion and Composition in Malaria: A Case-control Study

    olayemitoyin

    However, presence of oral symptoms in these individuals may not be attributed to the reduced salivary ... the oral cavity and salivary composition and secretion. Assessment of ..... microbiota in children with acute otitis media. Clin. Microbiol.

  14. Composition of entomopathogenic fungus and method of production and application for insect control

    Microsclerotia of entomopathogenic fungi including Metarhizium and Lecanicillium species are produced using various production methods such as liquid culture fermentation. These microsclerotia can be dried with various agronomic carriers to produce viable, microsclerotia-containing compositions with...

  15. Polyamide–thallium selenide composite materials via temperature and pH controlled adsorption–diffusion method

    Ivanauskas, Remigijus; Samardokas, Linas [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu str. 19, Kaunas LT-50254 (Lithuania); Mikolajunas, Marius; Virzonis, Darius [Department of Technology, Kaunas University of Technology, Panevezys Faculty, Daukanto 12, 35212 Panevezys (Lithuania); Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Single phase polyamide–thallium selenide hybrid functional materials were synthesized for solar energy conversion. - Highlights: • Thallium selenide–polyamide composite materials surfaces synthesized. • Mixed phase composition confirmed by XRD. • Increased temperature resulted in a denser surface packing. • Urbach energies correlated with AFM showing decreased structural disorder. • Annealing in N{sub 2} at 100 °C yielded a single TlSe phase. - Abstract: Composite materials based on III–VI elements are promising in designing efficient photoelectronic devices, such as thin film organic–inorganic solar cells. In this work, TlSe composite materials were synthesized on a model polymer polyamide using temperature and pH controlled adsorption–diffusion method via (a) selenization followed by (b) the exposure to the group III metal (Tl) salt solution and their surface morphological, chemical and crystalline phase information was determined with particular focus on their corresponding structure–optical property relationship. XRD analysis yielded a complex crystalline phase distribution which correlated well with the optical and surface morphological properties measured. pH 11.3 and 80 °C yielded well defined, low structural disorder composite material surface. After annealing in N{sub 2} at 100 °C, polycrystalline PA-Tl{sub x}Se{sub y} composite materials yielded a single TlSe phase due to the enhanced diffusion and reaction of thallium ions into the polymer. The method described here can be used to synthesize variety of binary III–VI compounds diffused into the polymer at relatively low temperatures and low overall cost, thus providing for a flexible synthesis route for novel composite solar energy harvesting materials.

  16. Polyamide–thallium selenide composite materials via temperature and pH controlled adsorption–diffusion method

    Ivanauskas, Remigijus; Samardokas, Linas; Mikolajunas, Marius; Virzonis, Darius; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Single phase polyamide–thallium selenide hybrid functional materials were synthesized for solar energy conversion. - Highlights: • Thallium selenide–polyamide composite materials surfaces synthesized. • Mixed phase composition confirmed by XRD. • Increased temperature resulted in a denser surface packing. • Urbach energies correlated with AFM showing decreased structural disorder. • Annealing in N 2 at 100 °C yielded a single TlSe phase. - Abstract: Composite materials based on III–VI elements are promising in designing efficient photoelectronic devices, such as thin film organic–inorganic solar cells. In this work, TlSe composite materials were synthesized on a model polymer polyamide using temperature and pH controlled adsorption–diffusion method via (a) selenization followed by (b) the exposure to the group III metal (Tl) salt solution and their surface morphological, chemical and crystalline phase information was determined with particular focus on their corresponding structure–optical property relationship. XRD analysis yielded a complex crystalline phase distribution which correlated well with the optical and surface morphological properties measured. pH 11.3 and 80 °C yielded well defined, low structural disorder composite material surface. After annealing in N 2 at 100 °C, polycrystalline PA-Tl x Se y composite materials yielded a single TlSe phase due to the enhanced diffusion and reaction of thallium ions into the polymer. The method described here can be used to synthesize variety of binary III–VI compounds diffused into the polymer at relatively low temperatures and low overall cost, thus providing for a flexible synthesis route for novel composite solar energy harvesting materials

  17. Graphene nanoplate-MnO2 composites for supercapacitors: a controllable oxidation approach

    Huang, Huajie; Wang, Xin

    2011-08-01

    Graphene nanoplate-MnO2 composites have been synthesized by oxidising part of the carbon atoms in the framework of graphene nanoplates at ambient temperature. The composites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). It was found that the oxidation extent of the carbon atoms in the graphene framework in these composites was dependent on the reaction time, which also influenced their microstructure, morphology and electrochemical properties. Compared with MnO2 nanolamellas, the nanocomposite prepared with a reaction time of 3 h reveals better electrochemical properties as a supercapacitor electrode material.Graphene nanoplate-MnO2 composites have been synthesized by oxidising part of the carbon atoms in the framework of graphene nanoplates at ambient temperature. The composites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). It was found that the oxidation extent of the carbon atoms in the graphene framework in these composites was dependent on the reaction time, which also influenced their microstructure, morphology and electrochemical properties. Compared with MnO2 nanolamellas, the nanocomposite prepared with a reaction time of 3 h reveals better electrochemical properties as a supercapacitor electrode material. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1, AFM image (5 μm × 5 μm) of graphene nanoplate-MnO2 composite obtained at 3 h; Fig. S2, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm of graphene nanoplate-MnO2 composite obtained at 3 h. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10229j

  18. The use of stable isotope compositions of selected elements in food origin control

    Wierzchnicki, R.

    2002-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios have been used widely for authentication of foodstuffs especially for detection of added water and sugar in fruit juices and wines. Hydrogen and oxygen composition are particularly interesting probes for geographical origin and authenticity identification. Carbon and nitrogen composition of fruits contains the finger-print of their metabolism and growing condition. Exemplary data are presented which demonstrated the usefulness of the Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) methods for authenticating wines and fruits (juice and pulp). (author)

  19. Preliminary design study of advanced composite blade and hub and nonmechanical control system for the tilt-rotor aircraft. Volume 2: Project planning data

    1980-01-01

    Project planning data for a rotor and control system procurement and testing program for modifications to the XV-15 tilt-rotor research demonstrator aircraft is presented. The design, fabrication, and installation of advanced composite blades compatible with the existing hub, an advanced composite hub, and a nonmechanical control system are required.

  20. Controlling the alloy composition of PtNi nanocrystals using solid-state dewetting of bilayer films

    Seo, Okkyun; Oh, Se An; Lee, Ji Yeon; Ha, Sung Soo; Kim, Jae Myung; Choi, Jung Won; Kim, Jin-Woo [Department of Physics and Photon Science & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyon Chol [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju 61542 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Do Young, E-mail: dynoh@gist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Photon Science & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that solid-state dewetting of bilayer films is an effective way for obtaining bimetallic alloy nanocrystals of controlled composition. When a Pt–Ni bilayer film were annealed near 700 °C, Pt and Ni atoms inter-diffused to form a PtNi bimetallic alloy film. Upon annealing at higher temperatures, the bilayer films transformed into <111> oriented PtNi alloy nanocrystals in small-rhombicuboctahedron shape through solid-state dewetting process. The Pt content of the nanocrystals and the alloy films, estimated by applying the Vegard's law to the relaxed lattice constant, was closely related to the thickness of each layer in the as-grown bilayer films which can be readily controlled during bilayer deposition. - Highlights: • Composition control of PtNi nanoparticles using solid state dewetting is proposed. • PtNi alloy composition was controlled by thickness ratio of Pt–Ni bilayer films. • PtNi alloy nanocrystals were obtained in small-rhombicuboctahedron shape.

  1. Phase selection controlled by sodium ions in the synthesis of FAU/LTA composite zeolite

    Linyan Hu, Sujuan Xie, Qingxia Wang, Shenglin Liu and Longya Xu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeolite faujasite (FAU, Linde type A (LTA and FAU/LTA composite have been synthesized using tetramethylammonium cation (TMA + as template, by adjusting only the concentration of Na + ions in the initial solution (1.00 Al2 O3 4.36 SiO2 : 2.39 (TMA2 O : β Na2 O : 249.00H2 O. Na + ions alter the phase composition of the product more than TMA+ or OH− ions. When Na2 O concentration [Na2 O] increases from 0.024 to 0.168, the product gradually changes from pure FAU to pure LTA via the formation of FAU/LTA composite with increasing LTA fraction. Interestingly, the induction periods of FAU and LTA in the FAU/LTA composite zeolite ([Na2 O] is 0.072 are both 13 h, quite different from the induction periods of their individual pure phases—45 h for FAU and 4 h for LTA. During the crystallization, the LTA/(FAU + LTA fraction in the composite zeolite decreases in a nearly linear fashion. Scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis indicate some difference between the properties of the FAU/LTA composite zeolite and of the mechanical mixture.

  2. Plasma deposited composite coatings to control biological response of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells

    Keremidarska, M.; Radeva, E.; Eleršič, K.; Iglič, A.; Pramatarova, L.; Krasteva, N.

    2014-12-01

    The successful osseointegration of a bone implant is greatly dependent on its ability to support cellular adhesion and functions. Deposition of thin composite coatings onto the implant surface is a promising approach to improve interactions with cells without compromising implant bulk properties. In this work, we have developed composite coatings, based on hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) and detonation nanodiamond (DND) particles and have studied adhesion, growth and function of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. PPHMDS/DND composites are of interest for orthopedics because they combine superior mechanical properties and good biocompatibility of DND with high adherence of HMDS to different substrata including glass, metals and plastics. We have used two approaches of the implementation of DND particles into a polymer matrix: pre-mixture of both components followed by plasma polymerization and layer-by-layer deposition of HMDS and DND particles and found that the deposition approach affects significantly the surface properties of the resulting layers and cell behaviour. The composite, prepared by subsequent deposition of monomer and DND particles was hydrophilic, with a rougher surface and MG-63 cells demonstrated better spreading, growth and function compared to the other composite which was hydrophobic with a smooth surface similarly to unmodified polymer. Thus, by varying the deposition approach, different PPHMDS/DND composite coatings, enhancing or inhibiting osteoblast adhesion and functions, can be obtained. In addition, the effect of fibronectin pre-adsorption was studied and was found to increase greatly MG-63 cell spreading.

  3. Heterogeneity and Networks

    Goyal, S.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter shows that networks can have large and differentiated effects on behavior and then argues that social and economic pressures facilitate the formation of heterogenous networks. Thus networks can play an important role in understanding the wide diversity in human behaviour and in economic outcomes.

  4. Heterogeneous Computing in Economics

    Dziubinski, M.P.; Grassi, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the potential of heterogeneous computing in solving dynamic equilibrium models in economics. We illustrate the power and simplicity of C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism (C++ AMP) recently introduced by Microsoft. Starting from the same exercise as Aldrich et al. (J Econ Dyn...

  5. Heterogeneity of Dutch rainfall

    Witter, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rainfall data for the Netherlands have been used in this study to investigate aspects of heterogeneity of rainfall, in particular local differences in rainfall levels, time trends in rainfall, and local differences in rainfall trend. The possible effect of urbanization and industrialization on the

  6. in Heterogeneous Media

    Saeed Balouchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractured reservoirs contain about 85 and 90 percent of oil and gas resources respectively in Iran. A comprehensive study and investigation of fractures as the main factor affecting fluid flow or perhaps barrier seems necessary for reservoir development studies. High degrees of heterogeneity and sparseness of data have incapacitated conventional deterministic methods in fracture network modeling. Recently, simulated annealing (SA has been applied to generate stochastic realizations of spatially correlated fracture networks by assuming that the elastic energy of fractures follows Boltzmann distribution. Although SA honors local variability, the objective function of geometrical fracture modeling is defined for homogeneous conditions. In this study, after the introduction of SA and the derivation of the energy function, a novel technique is presented to adjust the model with highly heterogeneous data for a fractured field from the southwest of Iran. To this end, the regular object-based model is combined with a grid-based technique to cover the heterogeneity of reservoir properties. The original SA algorithm is also modified by being constrained in different directions and weighting the energy function to make it appropriate for heterogeneous conditions. The simulation results of the presented approach are in good agreement with the observed field data.

  7. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  8. Why does heterogeneity matter?

    K.B. Pierce

    2007-01-01

    This is a review of the book "Ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes" published in 2005. The authors are G. Lovett, C. Jones, M.G. Turner, and K.C. Weathers. It was published by Springer, New York. The book is a synthesis of the 10th Gary conference held at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York, in 2003.

  9. Heterogeneity and option pricing

    Benninga, Simon; Mayshar, Joram

    2000-01-01

    An economy with agents having constant yet heterogeneous degrees of relative risk aversion prices assets as though there were a single decreasing relative risk aversion pricing representative agent. The pricing kernel has fat tails and option prices do not conform to the Black-Scholes formula.

  10. Facile morphology-controlled synthesis of nickel-coated graphite core-shell particles for excellent conducting performance of polymer-matrix composites and enhanced catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Bian, Juan; Lan, Fang; Wang, Yilong; Ren, Ke; Zhao, Suling; Li, Wei; Chen, Zhihong; Li, Jiangyu; Guan, Jianguo

    2018-04-01

    We have developed a novel seed-mediated growth method to fabricate nickel-coated graphite composite particles (GP@Ni-CPs) with controllable shell morphology by simply adjusting the concentration of sodium hydroxide ([NaOH]). The fabrication of two kinds of typical GP@Ni-CPs includes adsorption of Ni2+ via electrostatic attraction, sufficient heterogeneous nucleation of Ni atoms by an in situ reduction, and shell-controlled growth by regulating the kinetics of electroless Ni plating in turn. High [NaOH] results in fast kinetics of electroless plating, which causes heterogeneous nuclei to grow isotropically. After fast and uniform growth of Ni nuclei, GP@Ni-CPs with dense shells can be achieved. The first typical GP@Ni-CPs exhibit denser shells, smaller diameters and higher conductivities than the available commercial ones, indicating their important applications in the conducting of polymer-matrix composites. On the other hand, low [NaOH] favors slow kinetics. Thus, the reduction rate of Ni2+ slows down to a relatively low level so that electroless plating is dominated thermodynamically instead of kinetically, leading to an anisotropic crystalline growth of nuclei and finally to the formation of GP@Ni-CPs with nanoneedle-like shells. The second typical samples can effectively catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol into p-aminophenol with NaBH4 in comparison with commercial GP@Ni-CPs and RANEY® Ni, owing to the strong charge accumulation effect of needle-like Ni shells. This work proposes a model system for fundamental investigations and has important applications in the fields of electronic interconnection and catalysis.

  11. Superhydrophilic Thin-Film Composite Forward Osmosis Membranes for Organic Fouling Control: Fouling Behavior and Antifouling Mechanisms

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    2012-10-16

    This study investigates the fouling behavior and fouling resistance of superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes functionalized with surface-tailored nanoparticles. Fouling experiments in both forward osmosis and reverse osmosis modes are performed with three model organic foulants: alginate, bovine serum albumin, and Suwannee river natural organic matter. A solution comprising monovalent and divalent salts is employed to simulate the solution chemistry of typical wastewater effluents. Reduced fouling is consistently observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to control thin-film composite polyamide membranes, in both reverse and forward osmosis modes. The fouling resistance and cleaning efficiency of the functionalized membranes is particularly outstanding in forward osmosis mode where the driving force for water flux is an osmotic pressure difference. To understand the mechanism of fouling, the intermolecular interactions between the foulants and the membrane surface are analyzed by direct force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Lower adhesion forces are observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to the control thin-film composite polyamide membranes. The magnitude and distribution of adhesion forces for the different membrane surfaces suggest that the antifouling properties of the superhydrophilic membranes originate from the barrier provided by the tightly bound hydration layer at their surface, as well as from the neutralization of the native carboxyl groups of thin-film composite polyamide membranes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes for organic fouling control: fouling behavior and antifouling mechanisms.

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Kang, Yan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-10-16

    This study investigates the fouling behavior and fouling resistance of superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes functionalized with surface-tailored nanoparticles. Fouling experiments in both forward osmosis and reverse osmosis modes are performed with three model organic foulants: alginate, bovine serum albumin, and Suwannee river natural organic matter. A solution comprising monovalent and divalent salts is employed to simulate the solution chemistry of typical wastewater effluents. Reduced fouling is consistently observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to control thin-film composite polyamide membranes, in both reverse and forward osmosis modes. The fouling resistance and cleaning efficiency of the functionalized membranes is particularly outstanding in forward osmosis mode where the driving force for water flux is an osmotic pressure difference. To understand the mechanism of fouling, the intermolecular interactions between the foulants and the membrane surface are analyzed by direct force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Lower adhesion forces are observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to the control thin-film composite polyamide membranes. The magnitude and distribution of adhesion forces for the different membrane surfaces suggest that the antifouling properties of the superhydrophilic membranes originate from the barrier provided by the tightly bound hydration layer at their surface, as well as from the neutralization of the native carboxyl groups of thin-film composite polyamide membranes.

  13. Intelligent Controller for a Compact Wide-Band Compositional Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Yiu, P.; Keymeulen, D.; Berisford, D. F.; Hand, K. P.; Carlson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the design and integration of an intelligent controller for CIRIS (Compositional InfraRed Interferometric Spectrometer) on a stand-alone field programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture. CIRIS is a novel take on traditional Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) and replaces linearly moving mirrors (characteristic of Michelson interferometers) with a constant-velocity rotating refractor to variably phase shift and alter the path length of incoming light. This design eliminates the need for periodically accelerating/decelerating mirrors inherent to canonical Michelson designs and allows for a compact and robust device that is intrinsically radiation-hard, making it ideal for spaceborne measurements in the near-IR to thermal-IR band (2-12 μm) on planetary exploration missions. A traditional Michelson FTS passes a monochromatic light source (incident light from the sample) through a system of refractors/mirrors followed by a mirror moving linearly in the plane of the incident light. This process selectively blocks certain wavelengths and permits measurement of the sample's absorption rates as a function of the wavelengths blocked to produce an 'inteferogram.' This is subsequently processed using a Fourier transform to obtain the sample's spectrum and ascertain the sample's composition. With our prototype CIRIS instrument in development at Design and Prototype Inc. and NASA-JPL, we propose the use of a rotating refractor spinning at a constant velocity to variably phase shift incident light to the detector as an alternative to a linearly moving mirror. This design eliminates sensitivity to vibrations, minimizing path length and non-linear errors due to minor perturbations to the system, in addition to facilitating compact design critical to meeting the strict volume requirements of spacecraft. Further, this is done without sacrificing spectral resolution or throughput when compared to Michelson or diffractive designs. While Michelson designs

  14. Heterogeneity of critical systems as the main factor determining their radiostability

    Gudkov, I.N.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that meristem can be considered as a convenient object for investigating regularities in the propagation kinetics of cells of critical systems and mechanisms of its regulation. Critical organs are rather perfect heterogeneous systems of automatic control where processes of their propagation and functional activity occur under strict control of spectral regulation systems to provide permanent composition and amount of cells. These systems influence purposeful cell alterations when they pass separate stages of the cell cycle. They provide the formation of funds of reserve cells and reliability of functioning of these highely sensitive organism tissues

  15. Heterogeneous Materials I and Heterogeneous Materials II

    Knowles, K M

    2004-01-01

    In these two volumes the author provides a comprehensive survey of the various mathematically-based models used in the research literature to predict the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of hetereogeneous materials, i.e., materials containing two or more phases such as fibre-reinforced polymers, cast iron and porous ceramic kiln furniture. Volume I covers linear properties such as linear dielectric constant, effective electrical conductivity and elastic moduli, while Volume II covers nonlinear properties, fracture and atomistic and multiscale modelling. Where appropriate, particular attention is paid to the use of fractal geometry and percolation theory in describing the structure and properties of these materials. The books are advanced level texts reflecting the research interests of the author which will be of significant interest to research scientists working at the forefront of the areas covered by the books. Others working more generally in the field of materials science interested in comparing predictions of properties with experimental results may well find the mathematical level quite daunting initially, as it is apparent that the author assumes a level of mathematics consistent with that taught in final year undergraduate and graduate theoretical physics courses. However, for such readers it is well worth persevering because of the in-depth coverage to which the various models are subjected, and also because of the extensive reference lists at the back of both volumes which direct readers to the various source references in the scientific literature. Thus, for the wider materials science scientific community the two volumes will be a valuable library resource. While I would have liked to see more comparison with experimental data on both ideal and 'real' heterogeneous materials than is provided by the author and a discussion of how to model strong nonlinear current--voltage behaviour in systems such as zinc oxide varistors, my overall

  16. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Grass, Michael Edward [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  17. A Complex Network Theory Approach for the Spatial Distribution of Fire Breaks in Heterogeneous Forest Landscapes for the Control of Wildland Fires.

    Russo, Lucia; Russo, Paola; Siettos, Constantinos I

    2016-01-01

    Based on complex network theory, we propose a computational methodology which addresses the spatial distribution of fuel breaks for the inhibition of the spread of wildland fires on heterogeneous landscapes. This is a two-level approach where the dynamics of fire spread are modeled as a random Markov field process on a directed network whose edge weights are determined by a Cellular Automata model that integrates detailed GIS, landscape and meteorological data. Within this framework, the spatial distribution of fuel breaks is reduced to the problem of finding network nodes (small land patches) which favour fire propagation. Here, this is accomplished by exploiting network centrality statistics. We illustrate the proposed approach through (a) an artificial forest of randomly distributed density of vegetation, and (b) a real-world case concerning the island of Rhodes in Greece whose major part of its forest was burned in 2008. Simulation results show that the proposed methodology outperforms the benchmark/conventional policy of fuel reduction as this can be realized by selective harvesting and/or prescribed burning based on the density and flammability of vegetation. Interestingly, our approach reveals that patches with sparse density of vegetation may act as hubs for the spread of the fire.

  18. A Complex Network Theory Approach for the Spatial Distribution of Fire Breaks in Heterogeneous Forest Landscapes for the Control of Wildland Fires.

    Lucia Russo

    Full Text Available Based on complex network theory, we propose a computational methodology which addresses the spatial distribution of fuel breaks for the inhibition of the spread of wildland fires on heterogeneous landscapes. This is a two-level approach where the dynamics of fire spread are modeled as a random Markov field process on a directed network whose edge weights are determined by a Cellular Automata model that integrates detailed GIS, landscape and meteorological data. Within this framework, the spatial distribution of fuel breaks is reduced to the problem of finding network nodes (small land patches which favour fire propagation. Here, this is accomplished by exploiting network centrality statistics. We illustrate the proposed approach through (a an artificial forest of randomly distributed density of vegetation, and (b a real-world case concerning the island of Rhodes in Greece whose major part of its forest was burned in 2008. Simulation results show that the proposed methodology outperforms the benchmark/conventional policy of fuel reduction as this can be realized by selective harvesting and/or prescribed burning based on the density and flammability of vegetation. Interestingly, our approach reveals that patches with sparse density of vegetation may act as hubs for the spread of the fire.

  19. Composition control of low-volatile solids through chemical vapor transport reactions. III. The example of gallium monoselenide: Control of the polytypic structure, non-stoichiometry and properties

    Zavrazhnov, A.; Naumov, A.; Sidey, V.; Pervov, V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This work is devoted to the composition control of solids with selective CVT method. ► Phase identity and non-stoichiometry of solids (GaSe, etc.) depend on CVT-temperatures. ► The interrelation between the properties of GaSe and CVT conditions is also found. ► For iodide transporting system the diagram of phase stability of solids is adjusted. ► High temperatures and Se-rich non-stoichiometry are necessary for γ-GaSe stability. - Abstract: By means of particular examples, the present work demonstrates the possibility of directed delicate non-destructive control of structure, composition and properties of inorganic solids using the method of selective chemical vapor transport (SCVT). Gallium monoselenide GaSe is the main model object. Additional, though less detailed, explanation is given by the example of gallium monosulfide GaS. Experimental evidences on the possibility of the control of polytypic structure, non-stoichiometry and properties of gallium monoselenide were obtained in non-isothermal variant of selective chemical vapor transport which has non-destructive character. Diagnostics of the phase (polytypic) composition and non-stoichiometry of GaSe was performed with the use of X-ray diffractometry as well as with the use of cathode luminescence spectra. It was experimentally found that there exists a connection of non-stoichiometry and the properties of gallium selenides with the determining conditions of selective chemical vapor transport: temperature of controlled sample (T 2 ) and the difference of temperatures between the hot and cold zones (ΔT). It is shown that the phase diagram of Ga–Se system needs to be partially revised near the composition of Ga 1 Se 1 . The reason for such revision is the fact that two polytypes (ε-GaSe and γ-GaSe) exist on this phase diagram as independent phases.

  20. Phylogenomics Controlling for Base Compositional Bias Reveals a Single Origin of Eusociality in Corbiculate Bees.

    Romiguier, Jonathan; Cameron, Sydney A; Woodard, S Hollis; Fischman, Brielle J; Keller, Laurent; Praz, Christophe J

    2016-03-01

    As increasingly large molecular data sets are collected for phylogenomics, the conflicting phylogenetic signal among gene trees poses challenges to resolve some difficult nodes of the Tree of Life. Among these nodes, the phylogenetic position of the honey bees (Apini) within the corbiculate bee group remains controversial, despite its considerable importance for understanding the emergence and maintenance of eusociality. Here, we show that this controversy stems in part from pervasive phylogenetic conflicts among GC-rich gene trees. GC-rich genes typically have a high nucleotidic heterogeneity among species, which can induce topological conflicts among gene trees. When retaining only the most GC-homogeneous genes or using a nonhomogeneous model of sequence evolution, our analyses reveal a monophyletic group of the three lineages with a eusocial lifestyle (honey bees, bumble bees, and stingless bees). These phylogenetic relationships strongly suggest a single origin of eusociality in the corbiculate bees, with no reversal to solitary living in this group. To accurately reconstruct other important evolutionary steps across the Tree of Life, we suggest removing GC-rich and GC-heterogeneous genes from large phylogenomic data sets. Interpreted as a consequence of genome-wide variations in recombination rates, this GC effect can affect all taxa featuring GC-biased gene conversion, which is common in eukaryotes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Monodisperse gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles and their composition-controlled catalysis in formic acid dehydrogenation under mild conditions.

    Metin, Önder; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2013-02-07

    Monodisperse 4 nm AuPd alloy nanoparticles with controlled composition were synthesized by co-reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(III) hydrate and palladium(II) acetylacetonate with a borane-morpholine complex in oleylamine. These NPs showed high activity (TOF = 230 h(-1)) and stability in catalyzing formic acid dehydrogenation and hydrogen production in water at 50 °C without any additives.

  2. Characterization of phospholipid composition and its control in the plasma membrane of developing soybean root

    Whitman, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The phospholipid composition of plasma membrane enriched fractions from developing soybean root and several mechanisms which may regulate it have been examined. Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from meristematic and mature sections of four-day-old dark grown soybean roots (Glycine max [L.] Merr. Cult. Wells II). Analysis of lipid extracts revealed two major phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Minor phospholipid classes were phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylgylcerol and diphosphatidylgylcerol. Phospholipid composition was similar at each developmental stage. Fatty acids of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were 16:0, 18:0, 18:2, and 18:3. Fatty acid composition varied with both phospholipid class and the developmental stage of the root. The degradation of phosphatidylcholine by endogenous phospholipase D during membrane isolation indicated that this enzyme might be involved in phospholipid turnover within the membrane. Phospholipase D activity was heat labile and increasing the pH of the enzyme assay from 5.3 to 7.8 resulted in 90% inhibition of activity. The turnover of fatty acids within the phospholipids of the plasma membrane was studied. Mature root sections were incubated with [1- 14 C] acetate, 1 mM Na acetate and 50 μg/ml chloramphenicol. Membrane lipid extracts analyzed for phospholipid class and acyl chain composition revealed that the long incubation times did not alter the phospholipid composition of the plasma membrane enriched fraction

  3. Analytical control of HTSC chemical composition of Y-Ba-Cu-O system

    Rojzenblat, E.M.; Kuchkina, E.D.; Bondarenko, S.K.; Ivanova, K.P.; Prisedskij, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for determining the cation composition and oxygen nonstoichiometry of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+δ superconductors are developed. Barium is determined in the form of BaSO 4 by the gravimetric method. Yttrium is determined using complexometry at pH=5.5 with a xylenol orange indicator in the presence of unithiol. Copper is determined using iodometry. Depending on conditions of analysis, it provides to determine both the total copper content in the sample and its oxygen nonstoichiometry. The method for determining the composition and structure of the studied ceramics according to the analysis of gas evolution from specimens during their dissolution in acids is described. The method of X-ray fluorescence analysis of ceramics cation composition is developed as well

  4. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly......, 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 6 CeramX mono +-only restorations. The main reasons for failure were tooth fracture (6) and secondary caries (4). The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was for the bulk-filled-1.1% and for the resin composite-only restorations 1.3% (p = 0...

  5. Carboxymethyl starch/montmorillonite composite microparticles: Properties and controlled release of isoproturon.

    Wilpiszewska, Katarzyna; Spychaj, Tadeusz; Paździoch, Waldemar

    2016-01-20

    Preparation of novel high substituted carboxymethyl starch-based microparticles containing sodium montmorillonite (MMT) by crosslinking with Al(3+) was described. For preparing nanocomposite granules carboxymethyl starch (CMS) from native potato starch as well as CMS from amylopectin has been used. The hydrophilic CMS/MMT composite systems were used for herbicide, i.e. isoproturon encapsulation (ca. 75% encapsulation efficiency). The herbicide release rate from CMS/MMT composites in water was significantly reduced when compared to commercial isoproturon: 95% released after ca. 700 h and ca. 24h, respectively. Leaching in soil from composite systems was relatively slower than release in water. After a series of eight irrigations leached about 10% of isoproturon loaded. The CMS/MMT carriers could reduce the potential leaching of herbicide and beneficially reduce pollution of the environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Importance of the inverted control in measuring holistic face processing with the composite effect and part-whole effect.

    Elinor eMcKone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Holistic coding for faces is shown in several illusions that demonstrate integration of the percept across the entire face. The illusions occur upright but, crucially, not inverted. Converting the illusions into experimental tasks that measure their strength – and thus index degree of holistic coding – is often considered straightforward yet in fact relies on a hidden assumption, namely that there is no contribution to the experimental measure from secondary cognitive factors. For the composite effect, a relevant secondary factor is size of the "spotlight" of visuospatial attention. The composite task assumes this spotlight can be easily restricted to the target half (e.g., top half of the compound face stimulus. Yet, if this assumption were not true then a large spotlight, in the absence of holistic perception, could produce a false composite effect, present even for inverted faces and contributing partially to the score for upright faces. We review evidence that various factors can influence spotlight size: race/culture (Asians often prefer a more global distribution of attention than Caucasians; sex (females can be more global; appearance of the join or gap between face halves; and location of the eyes, which typically attract attention. Results from 5 experiments then show inverted faces can sometimes produce large false composite effects, and imply that whether this happens or not depends on complex interactions between causal factors. We also report, for both identity and expression, that only top-half-face targets (containing eyes produce valid composite measures. A sixth experiment demonstrates an example of a false inverted part-whole effect, where encoding-specificity is the secondary cognitive factor. We conclude the inverted face control should be tested in all composite and part-whole studies, and an effect for upright faces should be interpreted as a pure measure of holistic processing only when the experimental design produces

  7. Importance of the Inverted Control in Measuring Holistic Face Processing with the Composite Effect and Part-Whole Effect

    McKone, Elinor; Davies, Anne Aimola; Darke, Hayley; Crookes, Kate; Wickramariyaratne, Tushara; Zappia, Stephanie; Fiorentini, Chiara; Favelle, Simone; Broughton, Mary; Fernando, Dinusha

    2013-01-01

    Holistic coding for faces is shown in several illusions that demonstrate integration of the percept across the entire face. The illusions occur upright but, crucially, not inverted. Converting the illusions into experimental tasks that measure their strength – and thus index degree of holistic coding – is often considered straightforward yet in fact relies on a hidden assumption, namely that there is no contribution to the experimental measure from secondary cognitive factors. For the composite effect, a relevant secondary factor is size of the “spotlight” of visuospatial attention. The composite task assumes this spotlight can be easily restricted to the target half (e.g., top-half) of the compound face stimulus. Yet, if this assumption were not true then a large spotlight, in the absence of holistic perception, could produce a false composite effect, present even for inverted faces and contributing partially to the score for upright faces. We review evidence that various factors can influence spotlight size: race/culture (Asians often prefer a more global distribution of attention than Caucasians); sex (females can be more global); appearance of the join or gap between face halves; and location of the eyes, which typically attract attention. Results from five experiments then show inverted faces can sometimes produce large false composite effects, and imply that whether this happens or not depends on complex interactions between causal factors. We also report, for both identity and expression, that only top-half face targets (containing eyes) produce valid composite measures. A sixth experiment demonstrates an example of a false inverted part-whole effect, where encoding-specificity is the secondary cognitive factor. We conclude the inverted face control should be tested in all composite and part-whole studies, and an effect for upright faces should be interpreted as a pure measure of holistic processing only when the experimental design produces no

  8. Effects of Control Mode and R-Ratio on the Fatigue Behavior of a Metal Matrix Composite

    2005-01-01

    Composite Because of their high specific stiffness and strength at elevated temperatures, continuously reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC's) are under consideration for a future generation of aeropropulsion systems. Since components in aeropropulsion systems experience substantial cyclic thermal and mechanical loads, the fatigue behavior of MMC's is of great interest. Almost without exception, previous investigations of the fatigue behavior of MMC's have been conducted in a tension-tension, load-controlled mode. This has been due to the fact that available material is typically less than 2.5-mm thick and, therefore, unable to withstand high compressive loads without buckling. Since one possible use of MMC's is in aircraft skins, this type of testing mode may be appropriate. However, unlike aircraft skins, most engine components are thick. In addition, the transient thermal gradients experienced in an aircraft engine will impose tension-compression loading on engine components, requiring designers to understand how the MMC will behave under fully reversed loading conditions. The increased thickness of the MMC may also affect the fatigue life. Traditionally, low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests on MMC's have been performed in load control. For monolithic alloys, low-cycle fatigue tests are more typically performed in strain control. Two reasons justify this choice: (1) the critical volume from which cracks initiate and grow is generally small and elastically constrained by the larger surrounding volume of material, and (2) load-controlled, low-cycle fatigue tests of monolithics invariably lead to unconstrained ratcheting and localized necking--an undesired material response because the failure mechanism is far more severe than, and unrelated to, the fatigue mechanism being studied. It is unknown if this is the proper approach to composite testing. However, there is a lack of strain-controlled data on which to base any decisions. Consequently, this study addresses the

  9. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells.

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L; Lu, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-25

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH) 2 D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP