WorldWideScience

Sample records for composite structural components

  1. Optimization of composite wood structural components : processing and design choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore L. Laufenberg

    1985-01-01

    Decreasing size and quality of the world's forest resources are responsible for interest in producing composite wood structural components. Process and design optimization methods are offered in this paper. Processing concepts for wood composite structural products are reviewed to illustrate manufacturing boundaries and areas of high potential. Structural...

  2. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  3. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H. W.; Kurth, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed to develop composite load spectra (CLS) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) using probabilistic methods. The three methods were implemented to be the engine system influence model. RASCAL was chosen to be the principal method as most component load models were implemented with the method. Validation of RASCAL was performed. High accuracy comparable to the Monte Carlo method can be obtained if a large enough bin size is used. Generic probabilistic models were developed and implemented for load calculations using the probabilistic methods discussed above. Each engine mission, either a real fighter or a test, has three mission phases: the engine start transient phase, the steady state phase, and the engine cut off transient phase. Power level and engine operating inlet conditions change during a mission. The load calculation module provides the steady-state and quasi-steady state calculation procedures with duty-cycle-data option. The quasi-steady state procedure is for engine transient phase calculations. In addition, a few generic probabilistic load models were also developed for specific conditions. These include the fixed transient spike model, the poison arrival transient spike model, and the rare event model. These generic probabilistic load models provide sufficient latitude for simulating loads with specific conditions. For SSME components, turbine blades, transfer ducts, LOX post, and the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) discharge duct were selected for application of the CLS program. They include static pressure loads and dynamic pressure loads for all four components, centrifugal force for the turbine blade, temperatures of thermal loads for all four components, and structural vibration loads for the ducts and LOX posts.

  4. Development of HVOF Sprayed Erosion/Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Composite Structural Components in Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.; Ivosevic, M.; Twardowski, T. E.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Sutter, James K.; Kim, D. Y.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are being studied and developed as methods of enabling lightweight composites to be used more extensively as structural components in propulsion applications in order to reduce costs and improve efficiency through weight reductions. The primary goal of this work is the development of functionally graded material [FGM] polymer/metal matrix composite coatings to provide improved erosion/oxidation resistance to polyimide-based polymer matrix composite [PMC] substrates. The goal is to grade the coating composition from pure polyimide, similar to the PMC substrate matrix on one side, to 100 % WC-Co on the other. Both step-wise and continuous gradation of the loading of the WC-Co reinforcing phase are being investigated. Details of the coating parameter development will be presented, specifically the high velocity oxy-fuel [HVOF] combustion spraying of pure PMR-11 matrix material and layers of various composition PMR-II/WC-Co blends onto steel and PMR-15 composite substrates. Results of the HVOF process optimization, microstructural characterization, and analysis will be presented. The sprayed coatings were evaluated using standard metallographic techniques - optical and scanning electron microscopy [SEM]. An SEM + electron dispersive spectroscopy [EDS] technique has also been used to confirm retention of the PMR-II component. Results of peel/butt adhesion testing to determine adhesion will also be presented.

  5. Building Block Approach' for Structural Analysis of Thermoplastic Composite Components for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carello, M.; Amirth, N.; Airale, A. G.; Monti, M.; Romeo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Advanced thermoplastic prepreg composite materials stand out with regard to their ability to allow complex designs with high specific strength and stiffness. This makes them an excellent choice for lightweight automotive components to reduce mass and increase fuel efficiency, while maintaining the functionality of traditional thermosetting prepreg (and mechanical characteristics) and with a production cycle time and recyclability suited to mass production manufacturing. Currently, the aerospace and automotive sectors struggle to carry out accurate Finite Elements (FE) component analyses and in some cases are unable to validate the obtained results. In this study, structural Finite Elements Analysis (FEA) has been done on a thermoplastic fiber reinforced component designed and manufactured through an integrated injection molding process, which consists in thermoforming the prepreg laminate and overmolding the other parts. This process is usually referred to as hybrid molding, and has the provision to reinforce the zones subjected to additional stresses with thermoformed themoplastic prepreg as required and overmolded with a shortfiber thermoplastic resin in single process. This paper aims to establish an accurate predictive model on a rational basis and an innovative methodology for the structural analysis of thermoplastic composite components by comparison with the experimental tests results.

  6. Variability and component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Storm (Tijs)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn component-based product populations, feature models have to be described at the component level to be able to benefit from a product family approach. As a consequence, composition of components becomes very complex. We describe how component-level variability can be managed in the

  7. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gobbato, Maurizio [UCSD; Conte, Joel [UCSD; Kosmatke, John [UCSD; Oliver, Joseph A [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  8. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 3: Major component development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, L. L.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations, performed to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites, are reported. Aluminum-boron-epoxy and titanium-boron-epoxy were used in the design and manufacture of three major structural components. The components were representative of subsonic aircraft fuselage and window belt panels and supersonic aircraft compression panels. Both unidirectional and multidirectional reinforcement concepts were employed. Blade penetration, axial compression, and inplane shear tests were conducted. Composite reinforced structural components designed to realistic airframe structural criteria demonstrated the potential for significant weight savings while maintaining strength, stability, and damage containment properties of all metal components designed to meet the same criteria.

  9. Aerothermo-Structural Analysis of Low Cost Composite Nozzle/Inlet Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, Kuwigai; Challa, Preeli; Sree, Dave; Reddy, D.

    1999-01-01

    This research is a cooperative effort among the Turbomachinery and Propulsion Division of NASA Glenn, CCMR of NC A&T State University, and the Tuskegee University. The NC A&T is the lead center and Tuskegee University is the participating institution. Objectives of the research were to develop an integrated aerodynamic, thermal and structural analysis code for design of aircraft engine components, such as, nozzles and inlets made of textile composites; conduct design studies on typical inlets for hypersonic transportation vehicles and setup standards test examples and finally manufacture a scaled down composite inlet. These objectives are accomplished through the following seven tasks: (1) identify the relevant public domain codes for all three types of analysis; (2) evaluate the codes for the accuracy of results and computational efficiency; (3) develop aero-thermal and thermal structural mapping algorithms; (4) integrate all the codes into one single code; (5) write a graphical user interface to improve the user friendliness of the code; (6) conduct test studies for rocket based combined-cycle engine inlet; and finally (7) fabricate a demonstration inlet model using textile preform composites. Tasks one, two and six are being pursued. Selected and evaluated NPARC for flow field analysis, CSTEM for in-depth thermal analysis of inlets and nozzles and FRAC3D for stress analysis. These codes have been independently verified for accuracy and performance. In addition, graphical user interface based on micromechanics analysis for laminated as well as textile composites was developed. Demonstration of this code will be made at the conference. A rocket based combined cycle engine was selected for test studies. Flow field analysis of various inlet geometries were studied. Integration of codes is being continued. The codes developed are being applied to a candidate example of trailblazer engine proposed for space transportation. A successful development of the code will

  10. Automated Design and Analysis Tool for CLV/CEV Composite and Metallic Structural Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation of the proposed effort is a unique automated process for the analysis, design, and sizing of CLV/CEV composite and metallic structures. This developed...

  11. Residual thermal stress control in composite reinforced metal structures. [by mechanical loading of metal component prior to bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced composite materials, composed of boron or graphite fibers and a supporting matrix, make significant structural efficiency improvements available to aircraft and aerospace designers. Residual stress induced during bonding of composite reinforcement to metal structural elements can be reduced or eliminated through suitable modification to the manufacturing processes. The most successful method employed during this program used a steel tool capable of mechanically loading the metal component in compression prior to the adhesive bonding cycle. Compression loading combined with heating to 350 F during the bond cycle can result in creep deformation in aluminum components. The magnitude of the deformation increases with increasing stress level during exposure to 350 F.

  12. A single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC algorithm for impact localization on complex composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Qiu, Lei; Zhong, Yongteng

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of composite materials on aircraft structures has attracted much attention for impact monitoring as a kind of structural health monitoring (SHM) method. Multiple signal classification (MUSIC)-based monitoring technology is a promising method because of its directional scanning ability and easy arrangement of the sensor array. However, for applications on real complex structures, some challenges still exist. The impact-induced elastic waves usually exhibit a wide-band performance, giving rise to the difficulty in obtaining the phase velocity directly. In addition, composite structures usually have obvious anisotropy, and the complex structural style of real aircrafts further enhances this performance, which greatly reduces the localization precision of the MUSIC-based method. To improve the MUSIC-based impact monitoring method, this paper first analyzes and demonstrates the influence of measurement precision of the phase velocity on the localization results of the MUSIC impact localization method. In order to improve the accuracy of the phase velocity measurement, a single frequency component extraction method is presented. Additionally, a single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC (SFCBR-MUSIC) algorithm is proposed to reduce the localization error caused by the anisotropy of the complex composite structure. The proposed method is verified on a real composite aircraft wing box, which has T-stiffeners and screw holes. Three typical categories of 41 impacts are monitored. Experimental results show that the SFCBR-MUSIC algorithm can localize impact on complex composite structures with an obviously improved accuracy. (paper)

  13. A single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC algorithm for impact localization on complex composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Qiu, Lei; Zhong, Yongteng

    2015-10-01

    The growing use of composite materials on aircraft structures has attracted much attention for impact monitoring as a kind of structural health monitoring (SHM) method. Multiple signal classification (MUSIC)-based monitoring technology is a promising method because of its directional scanning ability and easy arrangement of the sensor array. However, for applications on real complex structures, some challenges still exist. The impact-induced elastic waves usually exhibit a wide-band performance, giving rise to the difficulty in obtaining the phase velocity directly. In addition, composite structures usually have obvious anisotropy, and the complex structural style of real aircrafts further enhances this performance, which greatly reduces the localization precision of the MUSIC-based method. To improve the MUSIC-based impact monitoring method, this paper first analyzes and demonstrates the influence of measurement precision of the phase velocity on the localization results of the MUSIC impact localization method. In order to improve the accuracy of the phase velocity measurement, a single frequency component extraction method is presented. Additionally, a single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC (SFCBR-MUSIC) algorithm is proposed to reduce the localization error caused by the anisotropy of the complex composite structure. The proposed method is verified on a real composite aircraft wing box, which has T-stiffeners and screw holes. Three typical categories of 41 impacts are monitored. Experimental results show that the SFCBR-MUSIC algorithm can localize impact on complex composite structures with an obviously improved accuracy.

  14. Structure, phase analysis and component composition of multilayer films depositing in T-10 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Khimchenko, L.N.; Kolbasov, B.N.; Vukolov, K.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    The structure and composition of the deuterocarbon films, formed on the internal surfaces of the T-10 tokamak vacuum chamber and on the stainless steel mirror-specimens positioned inside the T-10 tokamak upper stub pipe during the experimental campaigns in spring-summer of 2002 and autumn of 2003, are compared. Before the 2003 experimental campaign the ring diaphragm made of MPG-8 graphite was removed from the tokamak and MPG-8 graphite in the movable limiter was replaced by RGT-91 graphite. All the films have a multilayer structure. In the 2002 campaign all the films had homogeneous layer structure and smooth surface without any signs of physical sputtering. The films formed on the chamber walls in both campaigns were 'soft' and had reddish-brown colour. The average atomic D/C ratio in these films during 2002 campaign was of 0.66. The 'soft' film formation was caused by the plasma-wall interaction during the vacuum chamber conditioning under deuterium discharges. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that these films have amorphous structure and contain from 4 to 10 % fullerene-like substance with lattice constant in the range of 1.2-1.4 nm. Mirror surfaces could be screened during chamber conditioning and exposed to plasma only during working discharges. The films on mirrors were thinner than those on the vacuum chamber walls and, as a rule, semitransparent. The films deposited on the mirror surface, exposed to plasma only during working discharges, in 2002 were 'hard' with D/C = 0.26. Two crystalline phases with interplanar spacings of 0.359 and 0.304 nm at the Bragg angles 2θ of 24.8 and 28.8 deg respectively were revealed in a diffractogram of these films. In the 2003 campaign both types of films (formed on vacuum chamber walls and deposited on mirror specimens) were 'soft' with D/C ratio of 0.57 and 1.55 respectively. Deuterium concentration in the films is determined by the temperature of film formation - <370 K on mirror specimens and ∼520 K

  15. Unblockable Compositions of Software Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Ruzhen; Faber, Johannes; Liu, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    . To this end, we develop an algorithm to compute the unblockable interaction behavior, called the interface model of a component, from its execution model. Based on this model, we introduce composition operators for the components and prove important compositionality results, showing the conditions under which......We present a new automata-based interface model describing the interaction behavior of software components. Contrary to earlier component- or interface-based approaches, the interface model we propose specifies all the non-blockable interaction behaviors of a component with any environment...

  16. Use of SiCf/SiC ceramic composites as structure material of a fusion reactor toroid internal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, G.

    2001-01-01

    The use of low neutron-induced activation structural materials seems necessary in order to improve safety in future fusion power reactors. Among them, SiC f /SiC composites appear as a very promising solution because of their low activation characteristics coupled with excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures. With the main objective of evaluating the limit of present-day composites, a tritium breeding blanket using SiC f /SiC as structural material (the TAURO blanket) has been developed in the last years by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). The purpose of this thesis was to modify the available design tools (computer codes, design criteria), normally used for the analyses of metallic structures, in order to better take into account the mechanical behaviour of SiC f /SiC. Alter a preliminary improvement of the calculation methods, two main topics of study could be identified: the modelling of the mechanical behaviour of the composite and the assessment of appropriate design criteria. The different behavioural models available in literature were analysed in order to find the one that was the best suited to the specific problems met in the field of fusion power. The selected model was then implemented in the finite elements code CASTEM 2000 used within the CEA for the thermo-mechanical analyses of the TAURO blanket. For the design of the blanket, we proposed a new resistance criterion whose main advantage, with respect to the other examined, lies in the easiness of identification. The suggested solutions were then applied in the design studies of the TAURO blanket. We then could show that the use of appropriate calculation methodologies is necessary in order to achieve a correct design of the blanket and a more realistic estimate of the limits of present day composites. The obtained results can also be extended to all nuclear components making use of SiC f /SiC structures. (author) [fr

  17. Minimal-Sensing, Passive Force Identification Techniques for a Composite Structural Missile Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Stites

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring systems are often limited to the use of one sensor due to cost, complexity, and weight restrictions. Therefore, there is a need to develop load and damage identification techniques that utilize only one sensor. Two passive force estimation techniques are investigated in this work. The techniques focus on either the shape or the amplitude of the magnitude of the applied force in the frequency domain. Both techniques iteratively reduce an underdetermined set of equations of motion into many overdetermined systems of equations to solve for the force estimates. The techniques are shown to locate and quantify impulsive impacts with over 97% accuracy and non-impulsive impacts with at least 87% accuracy. A filament-wound rocket motor casing is used as a test structure. Impacts not acting at a specific input degree of freedom are also accurately located depending on the distance away from the modeled input degrees of freedom, and damaging impact forces are quantified by making assumptions about the impulsive nature of the applied force.

  18. An effect of humid climate on micro structure and chemical component of natural composite (Boehmeria nivea-Albizia falcata) based wind turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsono, S.; Purwanto; Sudarsono, Johny W.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, wind turbine blade NACA 4415 is fabricated from natural composite of Boehmeria nivea and Albizia falcate. The composite fabrication method used is hand lay up method. The aim of the work is to investigate an effect of humid climate of coastal area on micro structure and chemical composition of composite material of the blade. The wind turbine is tested at Pantai Baru, Bantul, Yogyakarta for 5.5 months. The micro structure scanning is performed with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and material component is measured with Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). The samples are tested before and after the use within 5.5 month at the location. The results show that composite material inexperienced interface degradation and insignificant change of micro structure. From EDS test, it is observed that Na filtration reduces C and increases O in composite material after 5.5 months.

  19. Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt, Howard M. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    To monitor in-flight damage and reduce life-cycle costs associated with CFRP composite aircraft, an autonomous built-in structural health monitoring (SHM) system is preferred over conventional maintenance routines and schedules. This thesis investigates the use of ultrasonic guided waves and piezoelectric transducers for the identification and localization of damage/defects occurring within critical components of CFRP composite aircraft wings, mainly the wing skin-to-spar joints. The guided wave approach for structural diagnostics was demonstrated by the dual application of active and passive monitoring techniques. For active interrogation, the guided wave propagation problem was initially studied numerically by a semi-analytical finite element method, which accounts for viscoelastic damping, in order to identify ideal mode-frequency combinations sensitive to damage occurring within CFRP bonded joints. Active guided wave tests across three representative wing skin-to-spar joints at ambient temperature were then conducted using attached Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) transducers. Results from these experiments demonstrate the importance of intelligent feature extraction for improving the sensitivity to damage. To address the widely neglected effects of temperature on guided wave base damage identification, analytical and experimental analyses were performed to characterize the influence of temperature on guided wave signal features. In addition, statistically-robust detection of simulated damage in a CFRP bonded joint was successfully achieved under changing temperature conditions through a dimensionally-low, multivariate statistical outlier analysis. The response of piezoceramic patches and MFC transducers to ultrasonic Rayleigh and Lamb wave fields was analytically derived and experimentally validated. This theory is useful for designing sensors which possess optimal sensitivity toward a given mode-frequency combination or for predicting the frequency dependent

  20. Component nuclear containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harstead, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The invention described is intended for use primarily as a nuclear containment structure. Such structures are required to surround the nuclear steam supply system and to contain the effects of breaks in the nuclear steam supply system, or i.e. loss of coolant accidents. Nuclear containment structures are required to withstand internal pressure and temperatures which result from loss of coolant accidents, and to provide for radiation shielding during operation and during the loss of coolant accident, as well as to resist all other applied loads, such as earthquakes. The nuclear containment structure described herein is a composite nuclear containment structure, and is one which structurally combines two previous systems; namely, a steel vessel, and a lined concrete structure. The steel vessel provides strength to resist internal pressure and accommodate temperature increases, the lined concrete structure provides resistance to internal pressure by having a liner which will prevent leakage, and which is in contact with the concrete structure which provides the strength to resist the pressure

  1. Infographics as a Mnemonic structure: Analysis of the informative and identity components of infographic online compositions in Iberic newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Túñez-López, M. (Miguel); Nogueira, A.G. (Ana Gabriela)

    2017-01-01

    Infographics as a transdisciplinary component that permits to objectify depth that amplifies and potentiates time and space, is the proper structure for the reading characteristics of Net Generation and outputs the dynamic skills of visual intelligence, creating mnemonic frameworks. This article analyses the use of its Informative content, and its appliance to the qualities of Online Information (accurate, timely, complete and concise), its components of Identity (periodicity, animation, stat...

  2. Quasi-Static Single-Component Hybrid Simulation of a Composite Structure with Multi-Axis Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, J.; Waldbjørn, J.; Wittrup-Schmidt, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a quasi-static hybrid simulation performed on a single component structure. Hybrid simulation is a substructural technique, where a structure is divided into two sections: a numerical section of the main structure and a physical experiment of the remainder. In previous cases...... to evaluate the validity of the method, the results are compared to a test of the emulated structure – referred to here as the reference test. It was found that the error introduced by compliance in the load train was significant. Digital image correlation was for this reason implemented in the hybrid...

  3. Control component structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    This invention provides a control component structure comprising: a spider having a plurality of arms, at least one spider bore formed in said plurality of arms, said spider bore including an enlarged recess and a small recess with an upright truncated conical section forming a transition from the enlarged recess to the small recess, and a burnable poison rod including a tube terminating in transverse end, a plug with a chamfered end that leads into a cylindrical portion, said cylindrical portion of the plug snugly fitting within the tube and terminating in a radially protruding shoulder which engages the transverse end of the tube to which it is welded, and a stem protruding in the longitudinal direction from the central portion of the shoulder having a longitudinal stem bore extending through about half of the length of the stem, at least part of the stem which defines the stem bore being fixed within the truncated conical section, the enlarged recess and the small recess of the spider by outward deformation of that part of the stem in order to releasably attach the rod to the spider, said stem being adapted to substantially reshape itself by movement of the rod in a longitudinal direction with respect to the spider bore, while maintaining the structural integrity of the poison rod and maintaining the structural integrity of the spider

  4. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  5. Two-component end mills with multilayer composite nano-structured coatings as a viable alternative to monolithic carbide end mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereschaka, Alexey; Mokritskii, Boris; Mokritskaya, Elena; Sharipov, Oleg; Oganyan, Maksim

    2018-03-01

    The paper deals with the challenges of the application of two-component end mills, which represent a combination of a carbide cutting part and a shank made of cheaper structural material. The calculations of strains and deformations of composite mills were carried out in comparison with solid carbide mills, with the use of the finite element method. The study also involved the comparative analysis of accuracy parameters of machining with monolithic mills and two-component mills with various shank materials. As a result of the conducted cutting tests in milling aluminum alloy with monolithic and two-component end mills with specially developed multilayer composite nano-structured coatings, it has been found that the use of such coatings can reduce strains and, correspondingly, deformations, which can improve the accuracy of machining. Thus, the application of two-component end mills with multilayer composite nano-structured coatings can provide a reduction in the cost of machining while maintaining or even improving the tool life and machining accuracy parameters.

  6. Component Composition Using Feature Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Michael; Klose, Karl; Mitschke, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    In general, components provide and require services and two components are bound if the first component provides a service required by the second component. However, certain variability in services - w.r.t. how and which functionality is provided or required - cannot be described using standard i...

  7. Structure and mechanical properties of composites of poly(6-hexanelactam) combining solid tribological additives and reinforcing components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horský, J.; Kolařík, Jan; Fambri, L.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 4 (2004), s. 5249-5260 ISSN 1438-7492 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : anionic poly merization * composites * mechanical properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.452, year: 2004

  8. Verifying the correct composition of distributed components: Formalisation and Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Henrio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article provides formal definitions characterizing well-formed composition of components in order to guarantee their safe deployment and execution. Our work focuses on the structural aspects of component composition; it puts together most of the concepts common to many component models, but never formalized as a whole. Our formalization characterizes correct component architectures made of functional and non-functional aspects, both structured as component assemblies. Interceptor chains can be used for a safe and controlled interaction between the two aspects. Our well-formed components guarantee a set of properties ensuring that the deployed component system has a correct architecture and can run safely. Finally, those definitions constitute the formal basis for our Eclipse-based environment for the development and specification of component-based applications.

  9. Multifunctional Structural Composite Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Conference held in Dallas, Texas on 6-9 November 2006. We are developing structural polymeric composites that both carry structural loads and store...structural polymeric composites that both carry structural loads and store electrochemical energy. These multifunctional batteries could replace inert...solid-state goal, and is compatible with our PEO -based resin electrolytes . The metal substrate provides structural support while acting as a

  10. Multifunctional Composite Structure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is developing a Composite Sandwich Habitable Pressurized Structure for deep space travel. Permeability, radiation, & micrometeoroids and orbital...

  11. Preliminary study on nano- and micro-composite sol-gel based alumina coatings on structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, Peng; Kasada, Ryuta

    2011-01-01

    In order to protect the structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors from liquid metal corrosion, Al 2 O 3 nano- and micro-composite coatings were developed using an improved sol-gel process, which includes dipping specimens in a sol-gel solution dispersed with fine α-Al 2 O 3 powders prepared by mechanical milling. Accelerated corrosion tests were conducted on coated specimens in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic at 500 o C under dynamic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that the coatings are composed of α-Al 2 O 3 and they are about 10 μm thick. After the corrosion tests, no spallation occurred on the coatings, and neither Pb nor Bi penetrated into the coatings, which indicates that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance to lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion. The nano-structured composite particles integrated into the coatings play an important role in achieving such superior lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion resistance.

  12. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  13. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  14. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  15. Carbon-carbon composite and copper-composite bond damages for high flux component controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma facing components constitute the first wall in contact with plasma in fusion machines such as Tore Supra and ITER. These components have to sustain high heat flux and consequently elevated temperatures. They are made up of an armour material, the carbon-carbon composite, a heat sink structure material, the copper chromium zirconium, and a material, the OFHC copper, which is used as a compliant layer between the carbon-carbon composite and the copper chromium zirconium. Using different materials leads to the apparition of strong residual stresses during manufacturing, because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the materials, and compromises the lasting operation of fusion machines as damage which appeared during manufacturing may propagate. The objective of this study is to understand the damage mechanisms of the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond under solicitations that plasma facing components may suffer during their life. The mechanical behaviours of carbon-carbon composite and composite-copper bond were studied in order to define the most suitable models to describe these behaviours. With these models, thermomechanical calculations were performed on plasma facing components with the finite element code Cast3M. The manufacturing of the components induces high stresses which damage the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond. The damage propagates during the cooling down to room temperature and not under heat flux. Alternative geometries for the plasma facing components were studied to reduce damage. The relation between the damage of the carbon-carbon composite and its thermal conductivity was also demonstrated. (author) [fr

  16. Optimization of structures and components

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Rojas, Pablo Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Written by an international group of active researchers in the field, this volume presents innovative formulations and applied procedures for sensitivity analysis and structural design optimization. Eight chapters discuss subjects ranging from recent developments in the determination and application of topological gradients, to the use of evolutionary algorithms and meta-models to solve practical engineering problems. With such a comprehensive set of contributions, the book is a valuable source of information for graduate students and researchers entering or working in the matter.

  17. Radiation curable adhesive compositions and composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, W.

    1984-01-01

    This disclosure relates to novel adhesive compositions and composite structures utilizing the same, wherein said adhesive compositions contain an elastomer, a chemically compatible ethylenically unsaturated monomer, a tackifier, an adhesion promoter, and optionally, pigments, fillers, thickeners and flow control agents which are converted from the liquid to the solid state by exposure to high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam. A particularly useful application for such adhesive compositions comprises the assembly of certain composite structures or laminates consisting of, for example, a fiber flocked rubber sheet and a metal base with the adhesive fulfilling the multiple functions of adhering the flocked fiber to the rubber sheet as well as adhering the rubber sheet to the metal base. Optionally, the rubber sheet itself may also be cured at the same time as the adhesive composition with all operations being carried out at ambient temperatures and in the presence of air, with exposure of said assembly to selected dosages of high energy ionizing radiation. These adhesive compositions contain no solvents thereby almost eliminating air pollution or solvent toxicity problems, and offer substantial savings in energy and labor as they are capable of curing in very short time periods without the use of external heat which might damage the substrate

  18. Component-based event composition modeling for CPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhonghai; Chu, Yanan

    2017-06-01

    In order to combine event-drive model with component-based architecture design, this paper proposes a component-based event composition model to realize CPS’s event processing. Firstly, the formal representations of component and attribute-oriented event are defined. Every component is consisted of subcomponents and the corresponding event sets. The attribute “type” is added to attribute-oriented event definition so as to describe the responsiveness to the component. Secondly, component-based event composition model is constructed. Concept lattice-based event algebra system is built to describe the relations between events, and the rules for drawing Hasse diagram are discussed. Thirdly, as there are redundancies among composite events, two simplification methods are proposed. Finally, the communication-based train control system is simulated to verify the event composition model. Results show that the event composition model we have constructed can be applied to express composite events correctly and effectively.

  19. Composite materials for aircraft structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, A. A; Dutton, Stuart; Kelly, Donald

    2004-01-01

    ... materials for aircraft structures / Alan Baker, Stuart Dutton, and Donald Kelly- 2nd ed. p. cm. - (Education series) Rev. ed. of: Composite materials for aircraft structures / edited by B. C. Hos...

  20. Flexible Multibody Systems Models Using Composite Materials Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, Maria Augusta; Ambr'osio, Jorge A. C.; Leal, Rog'erio Pereira

    2004-01-01

    The use of a multibody methodology to describe the large motion of complex systems that experience structural deformations enables to represent the complete system motion, the relative kinematics between the components involved, the deformation of the structural members and the inertia coupling between the large rigid body motion and the system elastodynamics. In this work, the flexible multibody dynamics formulations of complex models are extended to include elastic components made of composite materials, which may be laminated and anisotropic. The deformation of any structural member must be elastic and linear, when described in a coordinate frame fixed to one or more material points of its domain, regardless of the complexity of its geometry. To achieve the proposed flexible multibody formulation, a finite element model for each flexible body is used. For the beam composite material elements, the sections properties are found using an asymptotic procedure that involves a two-dimensional finite element analysis of their cross-section. The equations of motion of the flexible multibody system are solved using an augmented Lagrangian formulation and the accelerations and velocities are integrated in time using a multi-step multi-order integration algorithm based on the Gear method

  1. Composition comprising lignin and antidi arrheal component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising lignin and at least one compound selected from the group consisting of bromelain, papain, tannin, carvacrol, thymol, alliin, allicin, fenugreek seed, egg, poppy, poppy seeds, humic acid, roots, kaolin, catechu, cellulase, flavonoid...

  2. Integrating electrostatic adhesion to composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2015-04-01

    Additional functionality within load bearing components holds potential for adding value to a structure, design or product. We consider the adaptation of an established technology, electrostatic adhesion or electroadhesion, for application in glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials. Electroadhesion uses high potential difference (~2-3 kV) between co-planar electrodes to generate temporary holding forces to both electrically conductive and nonconductive contact surfaces. Using a combination of established fabrication techniques, electroadhesive elements are co-cured within a composite host structure during manufacture. This provides an almost symbiotic relationship between the electroadhesive and the composite structure, with the electroadhesive providing an additional functionality, whilst the epoxy matrix material of the composite acts as a dielectric for the high voltage electrodes of the device. Silicone rubber coated devices have been shown to offer high shear load (85kPa) capability for GFRP components held together using this technique. Through careful control of the connection interface, we consider the incorporation of these devices within complete composite structures for additional functionality. The ability to vary the internal connectivity of structural elements could allow for incremental changes in connectivity between discrete sub-structures, potentially introducing variable stiffness to the global structure.

  3. Composite desiccant structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraioli, Anthony V.; Schertz, William W.

    1987-01-01

    A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  4. Software for Testing Electroactive Structural Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Robert W.; Fox, Robert L.; Dimery, Archie D.; Bryant, Robert G.; Shams, Qamar

    2003-01-01

    A computer program generates a graphical user interface that, in combination with its other features, facilitates the acquisition and preprocessing of experimental data on the strain response, hysteresis, and power consumption of a multilayer composite-material structural component containing one or more built-in sensor(s) and/or actuator(s) based on piezoelectric materials. This program runs in conjunction with Lab-VIEW software in a computer-controlled instrumentation system. For a test, a specimen is instrumented with appliedvoltage and current sensors and with strain gauges. Once the computational connection to the test setup has been made via the LabVIEW software, this program causes the test instrumentation to step through specified configurations. If the user is satisfied with the test results as displayed by the software, the user activates an icon on a front-panel display, causing the raw current, voltage, and strain data to be digitized and saved. The data are also put into a spreadsheet and can be plotted on a graph. Graphical displays are saved in an image file for future reference. The program also computes and displays the power and the phase angle between voltage and current.

  5. Joining porous components to solid metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1972-01-01

    Process for joining porous metal material to solid metal structure without cracking or blockage of porous component is described. Procedures of electron beam welding and electroforming are discussed. Illustration of microstructure resulting from process is included.

  6. Chapter 4. Monitoring vegetation composition and structure as habitat attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. DeMeo; Mary M. Manning; Mary M. Rowland; Christina D. Vojta; Kevin S. McKelvey; C. Kenneth Brewer; Rebecca S.H. Kennedy; Paul A. Maus; Bethany Schulz; James A. Westfall; Timothy J. Mersmann

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation composition and structure are key components of wildlife habitat (Mc- Comb et al. 2010, Morrison et al. 2006) and are, therefore, essential components of all wildlife habitat monitoring. The objectives of this chapter are to describe common habitat attributes derived from vegetation composition and structure and to provide guidance for obtaining and using...

  7. Mechanical Model Development for Composite Structural Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Santiago, Diana; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel composite structural supercapacitor concepts have recently been developed as a means both to store electrical charge and to provide modest mechanical load carrying capability. Double-layer composite supercapacitors are often fabricated by impregnating a woven carbon fiber fabric, which serves as the electrodes, with a structural polymer electrolyte. Polypropylene or a glass fabric is often used as the separator material. Recent research has been primarily limited to evaluating these composites experimentally. In this study, mechanical models based on the Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells (MSGMC) were developed and used to calculate the shear and tensile properties and response of two composite structural supercapacitors from the literature. The modeling approach was first validated against traditional composite laminate data. MSGMC models for composite supercapacitors were developed, and accurate elastic shear/tensile properties were obtained. It is envisioned that further development of the models presented in this work will facilitate the design of composite components for aerospace and automotive applications and can be used to screen candidate constituent materials for inclusion in future composite structural supercapacitor concepts.

  8. Precision Composite Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-15

    processing of truss elements, e.g., using coating or multilayer insulation, can achieve certain success in alleviating thermal distortion problems...myViewport.setValues(displayedObject=hexpart) myViewport.partDisplay.setValues(renderStyle=SHADED) print’Part created from Extrusion ...strength of multilayered composites under a plane-stress state. Compos Sci Technol 1998;58(7):1209-1223. [D.219]. Zinoviev PA, Lebedeva OV, Tairova

  9. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  10. Deformation Characteristics of Composite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theddeus T. AKANO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The composites provide design flexibility because many of them can be moulded into complex shapes. The carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy composites exhibit excellent fatigue tolerance and high specific strength and stiffness which have led to numerous advanced applications ranging from the military and civil aircraft structures to the consumer products. However, the modelling of the beams undergoing the arbitrarily large displacements and rotations, but small strains, is a common problem in the application of these engineering composite systems. This paper presents a nonlinear finite element model which is able to estimate the deformations of the fibre-reinforced epoxy composite beams. The governing equations are based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory (EBBT with a von Kármán type of kinematic nonlinearity. The anisotropic elasticity is employed for the material model of the composite material. Moreover, the characterization of the mechanical properties of the composite material is achieved through a tensile test, while a simple laboratory experiment is used to validate the model. The results reveal that the composite fibre orientation, the type of applied load and boundary condition, affect the deformation characteristics of the composite structures. The nonlinearity is an important factor that should be taken into consideration in the analysis of the fibre-reinforced epoxy composites.

  11. Welding of structural components and vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    'Welding of structural components and vessels' was chosen as the guiding topic for the 17th special conference in Munich so that current problems of this important area of application for welding engineering could be discussed in detail. The following topics were in the focus of the discussions: developments in steel, steel production and steel processing, reports on the practical application of welding in the manufacture of containers and pipes, quality assurance, product liability, safety considerations regarding creep-stressed components, problems of welding in large structures. 7 of the total number of 12 contributions were recorded separately for the data base ENERGY. (orig./MM) [de

  12. A channel-based coordination model for component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Arbab (Farhad)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we present $P epsilon omega$, a paradigm for composition of software components based on the notion of mobile channels. $P repsilon omega$ is a channel-based exogenous coordination model wherein complex coordinators, called {em connectors are compositionally built out of

  13. Development of composite aircraft components in INCDT COMOTI, Bucharest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca VOICU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the recent research activities within INCDT COMOTI, in the composite materials field. The author makes a short introduction of this field and presents an example of application developed within the composite materials laboratory from INCDT COMOTI, targeting the aeronautic field. The aircraft component is a stator blade made of CFRP composites, integrating new active noise reduction technologies and manufactured by means of the autoclave technology.

  14. Residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents methodologies for residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components using linear elastic and nonlinear fracture mechanics principles. The effect of cohesive forces due to aggregate bridging has been represented mathematically by employing tension softening models. Various tension ...

  15. Composite materials for cryogenic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the composition, mechanical properties and capabilities of various types of composite materials for cryogenic structures. Attention is given to high-pressure plastic laminates, low-pressure plastic laminates, metal-matrix laminates, and aggregates (low-temperature concretes). The ability of these materials to match the strength and modulus of stainless steels suggests that their usage will substantially increase as alloying elements become scarce and more expensive

  16. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: j.h.you@ipp.mpg.de

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated.

  17. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, J.-H.

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated

  18. Potential emissions savings of lightweight composite aircraft components evaluated through life cycle assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA of structural aircraft materials has been utilised to assess and compare the total emissions produced during manufacturing, use and disposal of aerospace materials and their selected components. First, a comparison of aluminium, GLARE and carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP plates was performed to investigate the potential of lightweight composites in reducing aviation emissions. Subsequently, a case study is presented on a tubular component for which more accurate manufacturing data were directly available. A structural steel tube was replaced with a composite tubular component. The analysis has shown that once the composite material is used as a component in the aircraft, there is a cumulative saving of aircraft fuel and emissions, in particular from CFRP structures. The environmental analysis included the long-term use predictions for CFRPs, involving detailed raw materials production, use and operation, and disposal scenarios.

  19. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorygo, Oleg; Mikutski, Vitali; Marukovich, Alexander; Sadykov, Vladislav; Usoltsev, Vladimir; Mezentseva, Natalia; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Bobrenok, Oleg

    2011-06-01

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  20. Composite Crew Module: Primary Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to design, build, and test a full-scale crew module primary structure, using carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based composite materials. The overall goal of the Composite Crew Module project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project's baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. This report discusses the project management aspects of the project including team organization, decision making, independent technical reviews, and cost and schedule management approach.

  1. Commercial transport aircraft composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The role that analysis plays in the development, production, and substantiation of aircraft structures is discussed. The types, elements, and applications of failure that are used and needed; the current application of analysis methods to commercial aircraft advanced composite structures, along with a projection of future needs; and some personal thoughts on analysis development goals and the elements of an approach to analysis development are discussed.

  2. Optimization of Laminated Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Søren Randrup

    allows for a higher degree of tailoring of the resulting material. To enable better utilization of the composite materials, optimum design procedures can be used to assist the engineer. This PhD thesis is focused on developing numerical methods for optimization of laminated composite structures....... The first part of the thesis is intended as an aid to read the included papers. Initially the field of research is introduced and the performed research is motivated. Secondly, the state-of-the-art is reviewed. The review includes parameterizations of the constitutive properties, linear and geometrically...... of the contributions of the PhD project are included in the second part of the thesis. Paper A presents a framework for free material optimization where commercially available finite element analysis software is used as analysis tool. Robust buckling optimization of laminated composite structures by including...

  3. Modeling accelerator structures and RF components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K., Ng, C.K.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1993-03-01

    Computer modeling has become an integral part of the design and analysis of accelerator structures RF components. Sophisticated 3D codes, powerful workstations and timely theory support all contributed to this development. We will describe our modeling experience with these resources and discuss their impact on ongoing work at SLAC. Specific examples from R ampersand D on a future linear collide and a proposed e + e - storage ring will be included

  4. THE COMPOSITE COMPONENT PROPERTY RELATIONSHIP OF PLASTIC FILMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship of certain properties of composite plastic films to the properties of the plastic films comprising their structure was studied. It...was ascertained that tensile, tearing strength, puncture resistance and moisture vapor transmission rates of composite films can be closely

  5. Decomposing demographic change into direct vs. compositional components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W.; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    We present and prove a formula for decomposing change in a population average into two components. One component captures the effect of direct change in the characteristic of interest, and the other captures the effect of compositional change. The decomposition is applied to time derivatives of a...... is also presented. Other examples concern global life expectancy and the growth rate of the population of the world.......We present and prove a formula for decomposing change in a population average into two components. One component captures the effect of direct change in the characteristic of interest, and the other captures the effect of compositional change. The decomposition is applied to time derivatives...... of averages over age and over subpopulations. Examples include decomposition of the change over time in the average age at childbearing and in the general fertility rate for China, Denmark and Mexico. A decomposition of the change over time in the crude death rate in Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands...

  6. Mechanical and materials engineering of modern structure and component design

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on mechanical and materials engineering as applied to the design of modern engineering materials and components. The contributions cover the classical fields of mechanical, civil and materials engineering, as well as bioengineering and advanced materials processing and optimization. The materials and structures discussed can be categorized into modern steels, aluminium and titanium alloys, polymers/composite materials, biological and natural materials, material hybrids and modern nano-based materials. Analytical modelling, numerical simulation, state-of-the-art design tools and advanced experimental techniques are applied to characterize the materials’ performance and to design and optimize structures in different fields of engineering applications.

  7. Composite structure made of concrete and timber

    OpenAIRE

    Kozjan, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Thesis work is dealing with behavior of composite structure made of concrete and timber. First the scope of the document is introduced following by description of the problem and explaining the purpose and goals. Continuing of the document is presented composite structure concrete-timber. The composite material is described, composite structure is represent, stated are reasons of coupling concrete and timber and the typical connection in composite structure are represented. Thesis describes c...

  8. Seismic fragility analysis for NPP structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casciati, F.; Faravelli, L.

    1984-01-01

    Relationship between probability of failure and seismic intensity (fragility curves) summarize the results of the vulnerability analysis of a NPP structural component. The appropriate operative procedures for the evaluation of these fragility curves are discussed. The paper illustrates a general purpose computer code which includes two different probabilistic models for two different levels of sophistication in the fragility analysis. Attention is then focussed (i) on the mechanical aspects associated with the local strength estimation (ii) on the simulation of suitable artificial ground motions and (iii) on the definition of an appropriate measure of the seismic intensity. (Author) [pt

  9. Thermal Inspection of Composite Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  10. Quantitative characterization of the carbon/carbon composites components based on video of polarized light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yixian; Qi, Lehua; Song, Yongshan; Chao, Xujiang

    2017-06-01

    The components of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have significant influence on the thermal and mechanical properties, so a quantitative characterization of component is necessary to study the microstructure of C/C composites, and further to improve the macroscopic properties of C/C composites. Considering the extinction crosses of the pyrocarbon matrix have significant moving features, the polarized light microscope (PLM) video is used to characterize C/C composites quantitatively because it contains sufficiently dynamic and structure information. Then the optical flow method is introduced to compute the optical flow field between the adjacent frames, and segment the components of C/C composites from PLM image by image processing. Meanwhile the matrix with different textures is re-segmented by the length difference of motion vectors, and then the component fraction of each component and extinction angle of pyrocarbon matrix are calculated directly. Finally, the C/C composites are successfully characterized from three aspects of carbon fiber, pyrocarbon, and pores by a series of image processing operators based on PLM video, and the errors of component fractions are less than 15%. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Durability of commercial aircraft and helicopter composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, H.B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of advanced composite technology during the past decade is discussed. Both secondary and primary components fabricated with boron, graphite, and Kevlar composites are evaluated. Included are spoilers, rudders, and fairings on commercial transports, boron/epoxy reinforced wing structure on C-130 military transports, and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on commercial helicopters. The development of composite structures resulted in advances in design and manufacturing technology for secondary and primary composite structures for commercial transports. Design concepts and inspection and maintenance results for the components in service are reported. The flight, outdoor ground, and controlled laboratory environmental effects on composites were also determined. Effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, aircraft fuels and fluids, and sustained tensile stress are included. Critical parameters affecting the long term durability of composite materials are identified

  12. Impact source localisation in aerospace composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Mario Emanuele; Ciampa, Francesco; Boccardi, Salvatore; Meo, Michele

    2017-12-01

    The most commonly encountered type of damage in aircraft composite structures is caused by low-velocity impacts due to foreign objects such as hail stones, tool drops and bird strikes. Often these events can cause severe internal material damage that is difficult to detect and may lead to a significant reduction of the structure’s strength and fatigue life. For this reason there is an urgent need to develop structural health monitoring systems able to localise low-velocity impacts in both metallic and composite components as they occur. This article proposes a novel monitoring system for impact localisation in aluminium and composite structures, which is able to determine the impact location in real-time without a-priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the material. This method relies on an optimal configuration of receiving sensors, which allows linearization of well-known nonlinear systems of equations for the estimation of the impact location. The proposed algorithm is based on the time of arrival identification of the elastic waves generated by the impact source using the Akaike Information Criterion. The proposed approach was demonstrated successfully on both isotropic and orthotropic materials by using a network of closely spaced surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers. The results obtained show the validity of the proposed algorithm, since the impact sources were detected with a high level of accuracy. The proposed impact detection system overcomes current limitations of other methods and can be retrofitted easily on existing aerospace structures allowing timely detection of an impact event.

  13. StructuralComponents : A software system for conceptual structural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Weerd, B.; Rolvink, A.; Coenders, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual design is the starting point of the design process. The conceptual design stage comprises the formation of several ideas or design concepts to meet the imposed constraints. StructuralComponents is a software application that attempts to provide the designing engineer with a suitable set

  14. Multifunctional structural energy storage composite supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshova, Natasha; Qian, Hui; Houllé, Matthieu; Steinke, Joachim H G; Kucernak, Anthony R J; Fontana, Quentin P V; Greenhalgh, Emile S; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the challenge of producing multifunctional composites that can simultaneously carry mechanical loads whilst storing (and delivering) electrical energy. The embodiment is a structural supercapacitor built around laminated structural carbon fibre (CF) fabrics. Each cell consists of two modified structural CF fabric electrodes, separated by a structural glass fibre fabric or polymer membrane, infused with a multifunctional polymeric electrolyte. Rather than using conventional activated carbon fibres, structural carbon fibres were treated to produce a mechanically robust, high surface area material, using a variety of methods, including direct etching, carbon nanotube sizing, and carbon nanotube in situ growth. One of the most promising approaches is to integrate a porous bicontinuous monolithic carbon aerogel (CAG) throughout the matrix. This nanostructured matrix both provides a dramatic increase in active surface area of the electrodes, and has the potential to address mechanical issues associated with matrix-dominated failures. The effect of the initial reaction mixture composition is assessed for both the CAG modified carbon fibre electrodes and resulting devices. A low temperature CAG modification of carbon fibres was evaluated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to enhance the electrochemical performance. For the multifunctional structural electrolyte, simple crosslinked gels have been replaced with bicontinuous structural epoxy-ionic liquid hybrids that offer a much better balance between the conflicting demands of rigidity and molecular motion. The formation of both aerogel precursors and the multifunctional electrolyte are described, including the influence of key components, and the defining characteristics of the products. Working structural supercapacitor composite prototypes have been produced and characterised electrochemically. The effect of introducing the necessary multifunctional resin on the mechanical properties has

  15. Functionally Graded Metal-Metal Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Craig A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods and devices are disclosed for creating a multiple alloy composite structure by forming a three-dimensional arrangement of a first alloy composition in which the three-dimensional arrangement has a substantially open and continuous porosity. The three-dimensional arrangement of the first alloy composition is infused with at least a second alloy composition, where the second alloy composition comprises a shape memory alloy. The three-dimensional arrangement is consolidated into a fully dense solid structure, and the original shape of the second alloy composition is set for reversible transformation. Strain is applied to the fully dense solid structure, which is treated with heat so that the shape memory alloy composition becomes memory activated to recover the original shape. An interwoven composite of the first alloy composition and the memory-activated second alloy composition is thereby formed in the multiple alloy composite structure.

  16. Composites as structural materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactors, materials are used under extreme conditions of temperature, stress, irradiation, and chemical environment. The absence of adequate materials will seriously impede the development of fusion reactors and might ultimately be one of the major difficulties. Some of the current materials problems can be solved by proper design features. For others, the solution will have to rely on materials development. A parallel and balanced effort between the research in plasma physics and fusion-related technology and in materials research is, therefore, the best strategy to ultimately achieve economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable fusion. The essential steps in developing composites for structural components of fusion reactors include optimization of mechanical properties followed by testing under fusion-reactor-relevant conditions. In optimizing the mechanical behavior of composite materials, a wealth of experience can be drawn from the research on ceramic matrix and metal matrix composite materials sponsored by the Department of Defense. The particular aspects of this research relevant to fusion materials development are methodology of the composite materials design and studies of new processing routes to develop composite materials with specific properties. Most notable examples are the synthesis of fibers, coatings, and ceramic materials in their final shapes form polymeric precursors and the infiltration of fibrous preforms by molten metals

  17. Decommissioning of underground structures, systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A large number of operational and shut down nuclear installations have underground systems, structures and components such as pipes, tanks or vaults. This practice of incorporating such features into the design of nuclear facilities has been in use for an extended period of time during which decommissioning was not perceived as a serious issue and was rarely considered in plant design and construction. Underground features can present formidable decontamination and/or dismantling issues, and these are addressed in this report. Decommissioning issues include, among others, difficulty of access, the possible need for remotely operated technologies, leakage of the contents and the resulting contamination of foundations and soil, as well as issues such as problematic radiological characterization. Although to date there have been more than 40 IAEA publications on decommissioning, none of them has ever addressed this subject. Although cases of decommissioning of such facilities have been described in the technical literature, no systematic treatment of relevant decommissioning strategies and technologies is currently available. It was perhaps assumed that generic decontamination and dismantling approaches would also be adequate for these 'difficult' facilities. This may be only partly true due to a number of unique physical, layout and radiological characteristics. With growing experience in the decommissioning field, it is timely to address this subject in a systematic and comprehensive fashion. Practical guidance is given in this report on relevant decommissioning strategies and technologies for underground features of facilities. Also described are alternative design and construction approaches that could facilitate a smoother path forward through the decommissioning process. The objective of this report is to highlight important points in the decommissioning of underground systems, structures or components for policy makers, operators, waste managers and other

  18. A Component-based Programming Model for Composite, Distributed Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidson, Thomas M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The nature of scientific programming is evolving to larger, composite applications that are composed of smaller element applications. These composite applications are more frequently being targeted for distributed, heterogeneous networks of computers. They are most likely programmed by a group of developers. Software component technology and computational frameworks are being proposed and developed to meet the programming requirements of these new applications. Historically, programming systems have had a hard time being accepted by the scientific programming community. In this paper, a programming model is outlined that attempts to organize the software component concepts and fundamental programming entities into programming abstractions that will be better understood by the application developers. The programming model is designed to support computational frameworks that manage many of the tedious programming details, but also that allow sufficient programmer control to design an accurate, high-performance application.

  19. Tungsten-microdiamond composites for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livramento, V.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.; Mardolcar, U.; Mateus, R.; Hanada, K.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, E.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten is considered as one of promising candidate materials for plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors due to its resistance to sputtering and high melting point. High thermal conductivity is also a prerequisite for plasma facing components under the unique service environment of fusion reactor characterised by the massive heat load, especially in the divertor area. The feasibility of mechanical alloying of nanodiamond and tungsten, and the consolidation of the composite powders with Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was previously demonstrated. In the present research we report on the use of microdiamond instead of nanodiamond in such composites. Microdiamond is more favourable than nanodiamond in view of phonon transport performance leading to better thermal conductivity. However, there is a trade off between densification and thermal conductivity as the SPS temperature increases tungsten carbide formation from microdiamond is accelerated inevitably while the consolidation density would rise.

  20. Hybrid Simulation of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Jacob Herold

    Hybrid simulation is a substructural method combining a numerical simulation with a physical experiment. A structure is thereby simulated under the assumption that a substructure’s response is well known and easily modelled while a given substructure is studied more accurately in a physical...... of freedom. In this dissertation the main focus is to develop hybrid simulation for composite structures e.g. wind turbine blades where the boundary between the numerical model and the physical experiment is continues i.e. in principal infinite amount of degrees of freedom. This highly complicates...... the transfer system and the control and monitoring techniques in the shared boundary is therefore a key issue in this type of hybrid simulation. During the research, hybrid simulation platforms have been programmed capable of running on different time scales with advanced control and monitoring techniques...

  1. Simultaneous inference of a binary composite endpoint and its components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Große Ruse, Mareile; Ritz, Christian; Hothorn, Ludwig A.

    2017-01-01

    Binary composite endpoints offer some advantages as a way to succinctly combine evidence from a number of related binary endpoints recorded in the same clinical trial into a single outcome. However, as some concerns about the clinical relevance as well as the interpretation of such composite...... endpoints have been raised, it is recommended to evaluate the composite endpoint jointly with the involved components. We propose an approach for carrying out simultaneous inference based on separate model fits for each endpoint, yet controlling the family-wise type I error rate asymptotically. The key idea......). The method is compared to the gatekeeping approach and results are provided in the Supplementary Material. In two data examples we show how the procedure may be adapted to handle local significance levels specified through a priori given weights....

  2. Understanding aerospace composite components' supply chain carbon emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Mang Hann; Smyth, Beatrice M.; Murphy, Adrian; Butterfield, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines a large structural component and its supply chain. The component is representative of that used in the production of civil transport aircraft and is manufactured from carbon fibre epoxy resin prepreg, using traditional hand layup and autoclave cure. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to predict the component’s production carbon emissions. The results determine the distribution of carbon emissions within the supply chain, identifying the dominant production processes as ca...

  3. Design and analysis of composite structures with applications to aerospace structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kassapoglou, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Design and Analysis of Composite Structures enables graduate students and engineers to generate meaningful and robust designs of complex composite structures. Combining analysis and design methods for structural components, the book begins with simple topics such as skins and stiffeners and progresses through to entire components of fuselages and wings. Starting with basic mathematical derivation followed by simplifications used in real-world design, Design and Analysis of Composite Structures presents the level of accuracy and range of applicability of each method. Examples taken from ac

  4. Structural Health Monitoring: Numerical Damage Predictor for Composite Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lannamann, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    .... Wide use of composites is found in aircraft, armored vehicles, ships and civil structures This present research demonstrates the ability to numerically detect damage in a composite sandwich structure...

  5. Extraction of Independent Structural Images for Principal Component Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Gavrilov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermography is a powerful tool for non-destructive testing of a wide range of materials. Thermography has a number of approaches differing in both experiment setup and the way the collected data are processed. Among such approaches is the Principal Component Thermography (PCT method, which is based on the statistical processing of raw thermal images collected by thermal camera. The processed images (principal components or empirical orthogonal functions form an orthonormal basis, and often look like a superposition of all possible structural features found in the object under inspection—i.e., surface heating non-uniformity, internal defects and material structure. At the same time, from practical point of view it is desirable to have images representing independent structural features. The work presented in this paper proposes an approach for separation of independent image patterns (archetypes from a set of principal component images. The approach is demonstrated in the application of inspection of composite materials as well as the non-invasive analysis of works of art.

  6. Vibration based structural health monitoring of composite skin-stiffener structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooijevaar, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials combine a high strength and stiffness with a relatively low density. These materials can, however, exhibit complex types of damage, like transverse cracks and delaminations. These damage scenarios can severely influence the structural performance of a component. Periodic

  7. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites for advanced plasma facing components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Neu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Fusion Roadmap foresees water cooled plasma facing components in a first DEMO design in order to provide enough margin for the cooling capacity and to only moderately extrapolate the technology which was developed and tested for ITER. In order to make best use of the water cooling concept copper (Cu and copper-chromium-zirconium alloy (CuCrZr are envisaged as heat sink whereas as armour tungsten (W based materials will be used. Combining both materials in a high heat flux component asks for an increase of their operational range towards higher temperature in case of Cu/CuCrZr and lower temperatures for W. A remedy for both issues- brittleness of W and degrading strength of CuCrZr- could be the use of W fibres (Wf in W and Cu based composites. Fibre preforms could be manufactured with industrially viable textile techniques. Flat textiles with a combination of 150/70 µm W wires have been chosen for layered deposition of tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten (Wf/W samples and tubular multi-layered braidings with W wire thickness of 50 µm were produced as a preform for tungsten-fibre reinforced copper (Wf /Cu tubes. Cu melt infiltration was performed together with an industrial partner resulting in sample tubes without any blowholes. Property estimation by mean field homogenisation predicts strongly enhanced strength of the Wf/CuCrZr composite compared to its pure CuCrZr counterpart. Wf /W composites show very high toughness and damage tolerance even at room temperature. Cyclic load tests reveal that the extrinsic toughening mechanisms counteracting the crack growth are active and stable. FEM simulations of the Wf/W composite suggest that the influence of fibre debonding, which is an integral part of the toughening mechanisms, and reduced thermal conductivity of the fibre due to the necessary interlayers do not strongly influence the thermal properties of future components.

  8. Composite Payload Fairing Structural Architecture Assessment and Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Yount, Bryan C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the structural architecture assessments conducted and a recommendation for an affordable high performance composite structural concept to use on the next generation heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS). The Structural Concepts Element of the Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) project and its follow on the Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials (LSSM) project was tasked with evaluating a number of composite construction technologies for specific Ares V components: the Payload Shroud, the Interstage, and the Core Stage Intertank. Team studies strived to address the structural challenges, risks and needs for each of these vehicle components. Leveraging off of this work, the subsequent Composites for Exploration (CoEx) effort is focused on providing a composite structural concept to support the Payload Fairing for SLS. This paper documents the evaluation and down selection of composite construction technologies and evolution to the SLS Payload Fairing. Development of the evaluation criteria (also referred to as Figures of Merit or FOMs), their relative importance, and association to vehicle requirements are presented. A summary of the evaluation results, and a recommendation of the composite concept to baseline in the Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project is presented. The recommendation for the SLS Fairing is a Honeycomb Sandwich architecture based primarily on affordability and performance with two promising alternatives, Hat stiffened and Fiber Reinforced Foam (FRF) identified for eventual program block upgrade.

  9. Recognizing genes and other components of genomic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Myers, E. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Stormo, G.D. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology)

    1991-01-01

    The Aspen Center for Physics (ACP) sponsored a three-week workshop, with 26 scientists participating, from 28 May to 15 June, 1990. The workshop, entitled Recognizing Genes and Other Components of Genomic Structure, focussed on discussion of current needs and future strategies for developing the ability to identify and predict the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians. No participant stayed for less than one week, and most attended for two or three weeks. Computers, software, and databases were available for use as electronic blackboards'' and as the basis for collaborative exploration of ideas being discussed and developed at the workshop. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Carbon composites in space vehicle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent developments in the technology of carbon or graphite filaments now provide the designer with greatly improved materials offering high specific strength and modulus. Besides these advantages are properties which are distinctly useful for space applications and which provide feasibility for missions not obtainable by other means. Current applications include major and secondary structures of communications satellites. A number of R & D projects are exploring carbon-fiber application to rocket engine motor cases, advanced antenna systems, and space shuttle components. Future system studies are being made, based on the successful application of carbon fibers for orbiting space telescope assemblies, orbital transfer vehicles, and very large deployable energy generation systems. Continued technology development is needed in analysis, material standards, and advanced structural concepts to exploit the full potential of carbon filaments in composite materials.

  11. Structure, composition and mechanical properties of the silk fibres of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The silk egg case and orb web of spiders are elaborate structures that are assembled from a number of components. We analysed the structure, the amino acid and fibre compositions, and the tensile properties of the silk fibres of the egg case of Nephila clavata. SEM shows that the outer and inner covers of the egg case ...

  12. Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopcak, T., E-mail: tsopcak@imr.saske.sk [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Medvecky, L.; Giretova, M.; Stulajterova, R.; Durisin, J. [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Girman, V. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P. J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Faberova, M. [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2016-07-15

    The composite cement mixtures were prepared by mixing brushite (B) with, the amorphous hydrated calcium silicate phosphate (CSPH) or annealed calcium silicate phosphate (CSP composed of Si-saturated hydroxyapatite, wollastonite and silica) phases and water as liquid component. The contents of the silicate-phosphate phase in composites were 10.30 and 50 wt%. The significant effect of both the Ca/P ratio and different solubility of calcium silicate phosphate component in starting cement systems on setting time and phase composition of the final composite cements was demonstrated. The compressive strength of the set cements increased with the filler addition and the highest value (~ 48 MPa) exhibited the 50CSP/B cement composite. The final setting times of the composite cements decreased with the CSPH addition from about 25 to 17 min in 50CSHP/B and setting time of CSP/B composites was around 30 min. The higher content of silica in cements caused the precipitation of fine hydroxyapatite particles in the form of nanoneedles or thin plates perpendicularly oriented to sample surface. The analysis of in vitro cement cytotoxicity demonstrated the strong reduction in cytotoxicity of 10CSPH/B composite with time of cultivation (a low cytotoxicity after 9 days of culture) contrary to cements with higher calcium silicate-phosphate content. These results were attributed to the different surface topography of composite substrates and possible stimulation of cell proliferation by the slow continuously release of ions from 10CSPH/B cement. - Highlights: • Ca/P ratio and solubility of calcium silicate-phosphate components affect the self-setting properties of cements. • Strong relationship between the composite in vitro cytotoxicity and surface microtopography was demonstrated. • Plate-like morphology of coarser particles allowed cells to better adhere and proliferate as compared with nanoneedles.

  13. Multiscale Multifunctional Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells. Global fracture is enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads. The old reference denotes that nothing has been added to this comprehensive report since then.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composite Combustor Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiangang G.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Stephan, Robert R.; Barnett, Terry R.; Ojard, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    Combustor liners fabricated from a SiC/SiC composite (silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix) were nondestructively interrogated before and after combustion rig testing by x-ray, ultrasonic, and thermographic techniques. In addition, mechanical test results were obtained from witness coupons, representing the as-manufactured liners, and from coupons machined from the components after combustion exposure. Thermography indications correlated with reduced material properties obtained after rig testing. The thermography indications in the SiC/SiC liners were delaminations and damaged fiber tows, as determined through microstructural examinations.

  15. Multifunctional Composite Nanofibers for Smart Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    translated to the composite nanofibrous structures in the form of nonwovens and yarns? (3) Can these functional composite fibers be integrated into...nanoparticles were co- electrospun into nonwoven mat and over meter long yarn. The SEM and TEM image in Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...functional composite nanofiber structures (yarn and nonwoven ) characterized we explored the feasibility of integrating these functional composite fibers into

  16. Fire resistance of structural composite lumber products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2006-01-01

    Use of structural composite lumber products is increasing. In applications requiring a fire resistance rating, calculation procedures are used to obtain the fire resistance rating of exposed structural wood products. A critical factor in the calculation procedures is char rate for ASTM E 119 fire exposure. In this study, we tested 14 structural composite lumber...

  17. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components: Final report on Phases 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, W.A.; Halverson, H.; Carter, R.H.; Miraj, N.; Reifsnider, K.L. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1998-01-15

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The research program of the Materials Response Group at Virginia Tech addresses the need for reliable and durable structural ceramic composites to perform in high temperature environments. The research effort provides an experimental and analytical basis for the transition from properties of materials to performance of actual component structures. Phases 1 and 2 of the present program focused on the development of test capabilities, initial studies of component mechanical response under various conditions and the development of a life prediction methodology. These efforts have been described in previous reports. This report summarizes the major tasks completed under Phases 3 and 4 of the project. Overall, the authors have made significant progress in a broad spectrum of tasks in this program. Their efforts have encompassed component evaluation, assessment of new SiC-based composites with improved high-temperature potential, development of oxide coating materials for SiC, and the extension and development of new models for predicting the durability of composite components under specific operating conditions for various CMC applications. Each of these areas of work is an important area for achieving the ultimate goal of usable SiC-based composites in high-temperature corrosive environments typical of fossil energy applications.

  18. Modelling the Crash Response of Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A.; Kohlgrüber, D.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes recent progress on the materials modelling and numerical simulation of the dynamic crash response of fibre reinforced composite structures. The work is based on the application of explicit finite element analysis codes to composite aircraft structures and structural elements under low velocity impact conditions (up to 15 m/s). Structures studied are designed to absorb crash energy and reduce seat deceleration pulses in aircraft subfloor structures, and consist of an aircra...

  19. Inside-Out Manufacturing of Composite Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tooling for the manufacture of large structures from composite materials often costs much more than individual parts, rendering the processes unattractive for...

  20. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Edmund R; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2015-10-28

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10,000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. A basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.

  1. Uncertainty Quantification in Experimental Structural Dynamics Identification of Composite Material Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, Marcin; Peeters, Bart; Kahsin, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace and wind energy structures are extensively using components made of composite materials. Since these structures are subjected to dynamic environments with time-varying loading conditions, it is important to model their dynamic behavior and validate these models by means of vibration...... for uncertainty evaluation in experimentally estimated models. Investigated structures are plates, fuselage panels and helicopter main rotor blades as they represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled structures made of composite materials. To evaluate...

  2. Structure-property relationships in eutectic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The preparation of a composite material of eutectic composition directly from the molten state is investigated. The manufacture of eutectic composites by unidirectional solidification is reviewed, and it is shown how two-phase composite structures of given relative volume fraction can be produced with a range of particle sizes. Crystallographic relationships and the thermal stability of interfaces in controlled eutectic structures are examined, the mechanical behavior of aligned eutectic microstructures is discussed, and characteristics of eutectic composites having mechanical properties of engineering significance are evaluated. Specific properties of the Ni-Nb eutectic alloy are reviewed to demonstrate the effect of structure control (through directional solidification) on the mechanical response of a eutectic composite. It is noted that unidirectionally solidified eutectic composites possess highly aligned and thermally stable microstructures and also exhibit excellent combinations of strength and ductility to very high temperature levels.

  3. Theoretical assessment of different ultrasonic configurations for defects detection in composite components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappatos, Vassilios; Asfis, Georgios; Salonitis, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that structures’ safety is crucial and of great importance. Part of their maintenance procedure is structural inspection, which is currently performed with the aid of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) techniques, aiming to detect structural defects in damaged or flawed components...... and prevent a catastrophic failure by substituting or repairing them. The objective of this work is the theoretical assessment of different ultrasonic configurations that could maximize delamination defect detection in composite components. Modeling study was performed using simulation software, where...... physical models representative of laminated Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites, consisting of a variety of artificial delamination defect modes (different sizes and depth), were numerically tested. Different ultrasonic configurations on both the positioning and the firing of the probe...

  4. Carbon fiber composites application in ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Akiba, M.; Nakamura, K.; Bonal, J.P.; Pacher, H.D.; Roedig, M.; Vieider, G.; Wu, C.H.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites (CFCs) are one of the candidate armour materials for the plasma facing components of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). For the present reference design, CFC has been selected as armour for the divertor target near the plasma strike point mainly because of unique resistance to high normal and off-normal heat loads. It does not melt under disruptions and might have higher erosion lifetime in comparison with other possible armour materials. Issues related to CFC application in ITER are described in this paper. They include erosion lifetime, tritium codeposition with eroded material and possible methods for the removal of the codeposited layers, neutron irradiation effect, development of joining technologies with heat sink materials, and thermomechanical performance. The status of the development of new advanced CFCs for ITER application is also described. Finally, the remaining R and D needs are critically discussed. (orig.)

  5. Carbon fiber composites application in ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Akiba, M.; Bonal, J. P.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Nakamura, K.; Pacher, H. D.; Rödig, M.; Vieider, G.; Wu, C. H.

    1998-10-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are one of the candidate armour materials for the plasma facing components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the present reference design, CFC has been selected as armour for the divertor target near the plasma strike point mainly because of unique resistance to high normal and off-normal heat loads. It does not melt under disruptions and might have higher erosion lifetime in comparison with other possible armour materials. Issues related to CFC application in ITER are described in this paper. They include erosion lifetime, tritium codeposition with eroded material and possible methods for the removal of the codeposited layers, neutron irradiation effect, development of joining technologies with heat sink materials, and thermomechanical performance. The status of the development of new advanced CFCs for ITER application is also described. Finally, the remaining R&D needs are critically discussed.

  6. Deployable Composite Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking innovative structure technologies that will advance expandable modules for orbital and surface based habitats. These secondary structures must...

  7. Factor structure underlying components of allostatic load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M McCaffery

    Full Text Available Allostatic load is a commonly used metric of health risk based on the hypothesis that recurrent exposure to environmental demands (e.g., stress engenders a progressive dysregulation of multiple physiological systems. Prominent indicators of response to environmental challenges, such as stress-related hormones, sympatho-vagal balance, or inflammatory cytokines, comprise primary allostatic mediators. Secondary mediators reflect ensuing biological alterations that accumulate over time and confer risk for clinical disease but overlap substantially with a second metric of health risk, the metabolic syndrome. Whether allostatic load mediators covary and thus warrant treatment as a unitary construct remains to be established and, in particular, the relation of allostatic load parameters to the metabolic syndrome requires elucidation. Here, we employ confirmatory factor analysis to test: 1 whether a single common factor underlies variation in physiological systems associated with allostatic load; and 2 whether allostatic load parameters continue to load on a single common factor if a second factor representing the metabolic syndrome is also modeled. Participants were 645 adults from Allegheny County, PA (30-54 years old, 82% non-Hispanic white, 52% female who were free of confounding medications. Model fitting supported a single, second-order factor underlying variance in the allostatic load components available in this study (metabolic, inflammatory and vagal measures. Further, this common factor reflecting covariation among allostatic load components persisted when a latent factor representing metabolic syndrome facets was conjointly modeled. Overall, this study provides novel evidence that the modeled allostatic load components do share common variance as hypothesized. Moreover, the common variance suggests the existence of statistical coherence above and beyond that attributable to the metabolic syndrome.

  8. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond (Purdue); Doug Adams (Purdue)

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  9. Patterning of Structurally Anisotropic Composite Hydrogel Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Elisabeth; Alizadehgiashi, Moien; Campbell, Melissa; Khuu, Nancy; Albulescu, Alexandra; De France, Kevin; Ratkov, Dimitrije; Li, Yunfeng; Hoare, Todd; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2018-04-09

    Compositional and structural patterns play a crucial role in the function of many biological tissues. In the present work, for nanofibrillar hydrogels formed by chemically cross-linked cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and gelatin, we report a microextrusion-based 3D printing method to generate structurally anisotropic hydrogel sheets with CNCs aligned in the direction of extrusion. We prepared hydrogels with a uniform composition, as well as hydrogels with two different types of compositional gradients. In the first type of gradient hydrogel, the composition of the sheet varied parallel to the direction of CNC alignment. In the second hydrogel type, the composition of the sheet changed orthogonally to the direction of CNC alignment. The hydrogels exhibited gradients in structure, mechanical properties, and permeability, all governed by the compositional patterns, as well as cytocompatibility. These hydrogels have promising applications for both fundamental research and for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  10. Thermomechanics of composite structures under high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrienko, Yu I

    2016-01-01

    This pioneering book presents new models for the thermomechanical behavior of composite materials and structures taking into account internal physico-chemical transformations such as thermodecomposition, sublimation and melting at high temperatures (up to 3000 K). It is of great importance for the design of new thermostable materials and for the investigation of reliability and fire safety of composite structures. It also supports the investigation of interaction of composites with laser irradiation and the design of heat-shield systems. Structural methods are presented for calculating the effective mechanical and thermal properties of matrices, fibres and unidirectional, reinforced by dispersed particles and textile composites, in terms of properties of their constituent phases. Useful calculation methods are developed for characteristics such as the rate of thermomechanical erosion of composites under high-speed flow and the heat deformation of composites with account of chemical shrinkage. The author expan...

  11. Optimisation of component performance via structuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyk Verena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological and economic reasons are forcing industry to improve efficiency and to save energy and resources by reducing product weight. In current product designs often insufficient geometric stiffness of the part prohibits exploiting the full potential of weight reduction offered by modern materials. Ideally adapting the geometry to the load profile by implementing appropriate structures often allows a wall thickness and weight reduction and improves the acoustic properties. To enable a target-oriented design, structures manufactured by working media and working energy based forming technologies were analysed.

  12. Adaptive, tolerant and efficient composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Martin; Sinapius, Michael (eds.) [German Aerospace Center DLR, Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems

    2013-07-01

    Polymer composites offer the possibility for functional integration since the material is produced simultaneously with the product. The efficiency of composite structures raises through functional integration. The specific production processes of composites offer the possibility to improve and to integrate more functions thus making the structure more valuable. Passive functions can be improved by combination of different materials from nano to macro scale, i.e. strength, toughness, bearing strength, compression after impact properties or production tolerances. Active functions can be realized by smart materials, i.e. morphing, active vibration control, active structure acoustic control or structure health monitoring. The basis is a comprehensive understanding of materials, simulation, design methods, production technologies and adaptronics. These disciplines together deliver advanced lightweight solutions for applications ranging from mechanical engineering to vehicles, airframe and space structures along the complete process chain. The book provides basics as well as inspiring ideas for engineers working in the field of adaptive, tolerant and robust composite structures.

  13. Structure analysis, fatigue testing, and lifetime prediction of composite steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolkin, Yu. V.; Chekalkin, A. A.; Babushkin, A. V.

    1998-05-01

    Composite steels prepared by technology of powder metallurgy are widely used as low cost parts with good resistance to wear, fracture, and corrosion. The development of powder composite steels is directly related to strength under vibration, fatigue stabilizing, and accurate lifetime prediction for actual composite topology. The fatigue behavior of powder steels was studied by experimental and numerical methods of composite mechanics and materials sciences. The chemical composition of composite steel is a pure iron powder as the base material and a handful of carbon, chromium, nickel, or phosphorus powders. The powder multi-component mixture is compacted by cold isostatic pressing to a rectangular form. The compactants are sintered in protective atmosphere. The microscale examination of the composite structure included an METAM-RV-21 metallographic optic microscope with a high-resolution ScanNexIIc scanner and an image processing package on the PC platform. The phase composition of powder steels has complex disordered topology with irregular ferrite/austenite grains, iron carbide inclusions, and pores. The microstructure images are treated according to the theory of stochastic processes as ergodic probability functions; statistical moments and a structural covariance function of the composite steels are given. The microscale stress-strain state of the composite steel is analyzed by finite element methods. The stiffness matrix of the composite steel is also presented together with stiffness matrices of ferrite/austenite grains, iron carbide inclusions, and pores as zero matrices. Endurance limits of the microstructural components are described by the Basquin or Coffin-Manson laws, respectively, as high and low cycle fatigue; cumulative microdamage in loading with a variable amplitude is taken from the Palmgren-Miner rule. Planar specimens were tested by console bending. Symmetric fatigue cycling was performed at a stable frequency of 20 Hz with endurance limits up

  14. Base isolation strategies for structures and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, Veto; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-08-01

    In the present report the effect of laminated rubber bearing (LRB) system on the dynamic response of the structure was studied. A LRB system was designed and tested in the laboratory for its dynamic characteristics. Finite element analysis was also performed and based on this analysis, isolator for PHWR nuclear power plant was designed. Analysis of the building was performed with and without isolator. Comparison of responses was made in terms of frequencies, accelerations and displacements and floor response spectra. (author)

  15. Mechanical components: fabrication of major reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, S.

    1985-01-01

    The paper examines the validity of criticisms of quality assurance of mechanical plant and welded products within major reactor structures, taking into account experience gained on the AGR's. Various constructive recommendations are made aimed at furthering the objectives of quality assurance in the nuclear industry and making it more cost-effective. Current levels of quality related costs in the fabrication industry are provided as a basis for discussion. (U.K.)

  16. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  17. Forming of shape memory composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    tomography. Final shape memory composite panels were mechanically tested by three point bending before and after a shape memory step. This step consisted of a compression to reduce the panel thickness up to 60%. At the end of the bending test the panel shape was recovered by heating and a new memory step...... was performed with a higher thickness reduction. Memory steps were performed at room temperature and 120 °C so as to test the foam core in the glassy and rubbery state, respectively. Shape memory tests revealed the ability of the shape memory composite structures to recover the initial shape also after severe......A new forming procedure was developed to produce shape memory composite structures having structural composite skins over a shape memory polymer core. Core material was obtained by solid state foaming of an epoxy polyester resin with remarkably shape memory properties. The composite skin consisted...

  18. Surface composition of biomedical components by ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Baxter, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    Materials used for replacement body parts must satisfy a number of requirements such as biocompatibility and mechanical ability to handle the task with regard to strength, wear and durability. When using a CVD coated carbon fibre reinforced carbon ball, the surface must be ion implanted with uniform dose of nitrogen ions in order to make it wear resistant. The mechanism by which the wear resistance is improved is one of radiation damage and the required dose of about 10 16 cm -2 can have a tolerance of about 20%. To implant a spherical surface requires manipulation of the sample within the beam and control system (either computer or manually operated) to enable uniform dose all the way from polar to equatorial regions on the surface. A manipulator has been designed and built for this purpose. In order to establish whether the dose is uniform, nuclear reaction analysis using the reaction 14 N(d,α) 12 C is an ideal method of profiling. By taking measurements at a number of points on the surface, the uniformity of nitrogen dose can be ascertained. It is concluded that both Rutherford Backscattering and Nuclear Reaction Analysis can be used for rapid analysis of surface composition of carbon based materials used for replacement body components. 2 refs., 2 figs

  19. Design and Processing of Structural Composite Batteries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, E. L; Baechle, D. M; Xu, K; Carter, R. H; Snyder, J. F; Wetzel, E. D

    2007-01-01

    ...) 2007 Symposium and Exhibition held in Baltimore, MD, on 3-7 June 2007. Multifunctional structural composites are being developed to simultaneously bear mechanical loads and store electrochemical energy...

  20. Structural evolution of chitosan–palygorskite composites and removal of aqueous lead by composite beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusmin, Ruhaida; Sarkar, Binoy; Liu, Yanju; McClure, Stuart; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile preparation of chitosan–palygorskite composite beads demonstrated. • Components’ mass ratio impacted structural characteristics of composites. • Mechanism of composite formation and structure of composite beads proposed. • Composite beads adsorbed significantly greater amount of Pb than pristine materials. • In-depth investigation done on Pb adsorption mechanisms. - Abstract: This paper investigates the structural evolution of chitosan–palygorskite (CP) composites in relation to variable mass ratios of their individual components. The composite beads’ performance in lead (Pb) adsorption from aqueous solution was also examined. The composite beads were prepared through direct dispersion of chitosan and palygorskite at 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 mass ratios (CP1, CP2 and C2P, respectively). Analyses by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the dependence of the composites’ structural characteristics on their composition mass ratio. The chitosan–palygorskite composite beads exhibited a better Pb adsorption performance than the pristine materials (201.5, 154.5, 147.1, 27.7 and 9.3 mg g −1 for CP1, C2P, CP2, chitosan and palygorskite, respectively). Adsorption of Pb by CP1 and CP2 followed Freundlich isothermal model, while C2P fitted to Langmuir model. Kinetic studies showed that adsorption by all the composites fitted to the pseudo-second order model with pore diffusion also acting as a major rate governing step. The surface properties and specific interaction between chitosan and palygorskite in the composites were the most critical factors that influenced their capabilities in removing toxic metals from water.

  1. Structural evolution of chitosan–palygorskite composites and removal of aqueous lead by composite beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusmin, Ruhaida, E-mail: ruhaida.rusmin@mymail.unisa.edu.au [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Negeri Sembilan, Kuala Pilah 72000 (Malaysia); Sarkar, Binoy, E-mail: binoy.sarkar@unisa.edu.au [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC CARE – Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia); Liu, Yanju [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC CARE – Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia); McClure, Stuart [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: Ravi.Naidu@newcastle.edu.au [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC CARE – Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile preparation of chitosan–palygorskite composite beads demonstrated. • Components’ mass ratio impacted structural characteristics of composites. • Mechanism of composite formation and structure of composite beads proposed. • Composite beads adsorbed significantly greater amount of Pb than pristine materials. • In-depth investigation done on Pb adsorption mechanisms. - Abstract: This paper investigates the structural evolution of chitosan–palygorskite (CP) composites in relation to variable mass ratios of their individual components. The composite beads’ performance in lead (Pb) adsorption from aqueous solution was also examined. The composite beads were prepared through direct dispersion of chitosan and palygorskite at 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 mass ratios (CP1, CP2 and C2P, respectively). Analyses by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the dependence of the composites’ structural characteristics on their composition mass ratio. The chitosan–palygorskite composite beads exhibited a better Pb adsorption performance than the pristine materials (201.5, 154.5, 147.1, 27.7 and 9.3 mg g{sup −1} for CP1, C2P, CP2, chitosan and palygorskite, respectively). Adsorption of Pb by CP1 and CP2 followed Freundlich isothermal model, while C2P fitted to Langmuir model. Kinetic studies showed that adsorption by all the composites fitted to the pseudo-second order model with pore diffusion also acting as a major rate governing step. The surface properties and specific interaction between chitosan and palygorskite in the composites were the most critical factors that influenced their capabilities in removing toxic metals from water.

  2. Deployable Composite Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking innovative structure technologies that will advance expandable exploration space modules and surface based habitats. To address this need CTD has...

  3. High Thermal Conductivity Composite Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bootle, John

    1999-01-01

    ... applications and space based radiators. The advantage of this material compared to competing materials that it can be used to fabricate high strength, high thermal conductivity, relatively thin structures less than 0.050" thick...

  4. Anisotropic magnetism in field-structured composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, James E.; Venturini, Eugene; Odinek, Judy; Anderson, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic field-structured composites (FSCs) are made by structuring magnetic particle suspensions in uniaxial or biaxial (e.g., rotating) magnetic fields, while polymerizing the suspending resin. A uniaxial field produces chainlike particle structures, and a biaxial field produces sheetlike particle structures. In either case, these anisotropic structures affect the measured magnetic hysteresis loops, with the magnetic remanence and susceptibility increased significantly along the axis of the structuring field, and decreased slightly orthogonal to the structuring field, relative to the unstructured particle composite. The coercivity is essentially unaffected by structuring. We present data for FSCs of magnetically soft particles, and demonstrate that the altered magnetism can be accounted for by considering the large local fields that occur in FSCs. FSCs of magnetically hard particles show unexpectedly large anisotropies in the remanence, and this is due to the local field effects in combination with the large crystalline anisotropy of this material. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Structural investigation of a new composite process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Philippe; Becker, Eric; Bigot, Régis; Kaïci, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    This work presents a study done on a new patented forming process, created to produce massive composite parts used for structural applications in automotive and aeronautics industries. The study presented in this paper deals with an experimental setup, used to characterize thick composite cylinders. The author presents the characterization of these cylinders and a new analysis method, in order to understand the consolidation steps of the composite in this forming process. The structural health of the part is illustrated by the analysis of the intra-bundle and inter-bundle porosities, by micrographs characterizations.

  6. Structural and functional characterization of barium zirconium titanate / epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto González Garcia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric behavior of composite materials (barium zirconium titanate / epoxy system was analyzed as a function of ceramic concentration. Structure and morphologic behavior of the composites was investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analyses. Composites were prepared by mixing the components and pouring them into suitable moulds. It was demonstrated that the amount of inorganic phase affects the morphology of the presented composites. XRD revealed the presence of a single phase while Raman scattering confirmed structural transitions as a function of ceramic concentration. Changes in the ceramic concentration affected Raman modes and the distribution of particles along into in epoxy matrix. Dielectric permittivity and dielectric losses were influenced by filler concentration.

  7. Thermal inspection of a composite fuselage section using a fixed eigenvector principal component analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Bolduc, Sean; Harman, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    A composite fuselage aircraft forward section was inspected with flash thermography. The fuselage section is 24 feet long and approximately 8 feet in diameter. The structure is primarily configured with a composite sandwich structure of carbon fiber face sheets with a Nomex® honeycomb core. The outer surface area was inspected. The thermal data consisted of 477 data sets totaling in size of over 227 Gigabytes. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to process the data sets for substructure and defect detection. A fixed eigenvector approach using a global covariance matrix was used and compared to a varying eigenvector approach. The fixed eigenvector approach was demonstrated to be a practical analysis method for the detection and interpretation of various defects such as paint thickness variation, possible water intrusion damage, and delamination damage. In addition, inspection considerations are discussed including coordinate system layout, manipulation of the fuselage section, and the manual scanning technique used for full coverage.

  8. Thermal Inspection of a Composite Fuselage Section Using a Fixed Eigenvector Principal Component Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Bolduc, Sean; Harman, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    A composite fuselage aircraft forward section was inspected with flash thermography. The fuselage section is 24 feet long and approximately 8 feet in diameter. The structure is primarily configured with a composite sandwich structure of carbon fiber face sheets with a Nomex(Trademark) honeycomb core. The outer surface area was inspected. The thermal data consisted of 477 data sets totaling in size of over 227 Gigabytes. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to process the data sets for substructure and defect detection. A fixed eigenvector approach using a global covariance matrix was used and compared to a varying eigenvector approach. The fixed eigenvector approach was demonstrated to be a practical analysis method for the detection and interpretation of various defects such as paint thickness variation, possible water intrusion damage, and delamination damage. In addition, inspection considerations are discussed including coordinate system layout, manipulation of the fuselage section, and the manual scanning technique used for full coverage.

  9. Impact damages modeling in laminated composite structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreculj Dragan D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminated composites have an important application in modern engineering structures. They are characterized by extraordinary properties, such as: high strength and stiffness and lightweight. Nevertheless, a serious obstacle to more widespread use of those materials is their sensitivity to the impact loads. Impacts cause initiation and development of certain types of damages. Failures that occur in laminated composite structures can be intralaminar and interlaminar. To date it was developed a lot of simulation models for impact damages analysis in laminates. Those models can replace real and expensive testing in laminated structures with a certain accuracy. By using specialized software the damage parameters and distributions can be determined (at certain conditions on laminate structures. With performing numerical simulation of impact on composite laminates there are corresponding results valid for the analysis of these structures.

  10. Adaptive, tolerant and efficient composite structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sinapius, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Polymer composites offer the possibility for functional integration since the material is produced simultaneously with the product. The efficiency of composite structures raises through functional integration. The specific production processes of composites offer the possibility to improve and to integrate more functions thus making the structure more valuable. Passive functions can be improved by combination of different materials from nano to macro scale, i.e. strength, toughness, bearing strength, compression after impact properties or production tolerances.  Active functions can be realized by smart materials, i.e. morphing, active vibration control, active structure acoustic control or structure health monitoring. The basis is a comprehensive understanding of materials, simulation, design methods, production technologies and adaptronics. These disciplines together deliver advanced lightweight solutions for applications ranging from mechanical engineering to vehicles, airframe and space structures along ...

  11. Safety classification of nuclear power plant systems, structures and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Safety Classification principles used for the systems, structures and components of a nuclear power plant are detailed in the guide. For classification, the nuclear power plant is divided into structural and operational units called systems. Every structure and component under control is included into some system. The Safety Classes are 1, 2 and 3 and the Class EYT (non-nuclear). Instructions how to assign each system, structure and component to an appropriate safety class are given in the guide. The guide applies to new nuclear power plants and to the safety classification of systems, structures and components designed for the refitting of old nuclear power plants. The classification principles and procedures applying to the classification document are also given

  12. Net-Shape Tailored Fabrics For Complex Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed novel looms used to make fabric preforms for complex structural elements, both stiffening elements and skin, from continuous fiber-reinforced composite material. Components of looms include custom reed and differential fabric takeup system. Structural parts made best explained by reference to curved "I" cross-section frame. Technology not limited to these fiber orientations or geometry; fiber angles, frame radius of curvature, frame height, and flange width changed along length of structure. Weaving technology equally applicable to structural skins, such as wing of fuselage skins.

  13. Composition, structure and chemistry of interstellar dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Allamandola, L.J.

    1986-09-01

    The observational constraints on the composition of the interstellar dust are analyzed. The dust in the diffuse interstellar medium consists of a mixture of stardust (amorphous silicates, amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and graphite) and interstellar medium dust (organic refractory material). Stardust seems to dominate in the local diffuse interstellar medium. Inside molecular clouds, however, icy grain mantles are also important. The structural differences between crystalline and amorphous materials, which lead to differences in the optical properties, are discussed. The astrophysical consequences are briefly examined. The physical principles of grain surface chemistry are discussed and applied to the formation of molecular hydrogen and icy grain mantles inside dense molecular clouds. Transformation of these icy grain mantles into the organic refractory dust component observed in the diffuse interstellar medium requires ultraviolet sources inside molecular clouds as well as radical diffusion promoted by transient heating of the mantle. The latter process also returns a considerable fraction of the molecules in the grain mantle to the gas phase

  14. Lithographically defined microporous carbon-composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-12-06

    A microporous carbon scaffold is produced by lithographically patterning a carbon-containing photoresist, followed by pyrolysis of the developed resist structure. Prior to exposure, the photoresist is loaded with a nanoparticulate material. After pyrolysis, the nanonparticulate material is dispersed in, and intimately mixed with, the carbonaceous material of the scaffold, thereby yielding a carbon composite structure.

  15. Quantitative NDE of Composite Structures at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Howell, Patricia A.; Johnston, Patrick H.; Burke, Eric R.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Seebo, Jeffery P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable the use and certification of composites in aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). The rapid, in situ characterization of a wide range of the composite materials and structures has become a critical concern for the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over a long time. The quantitative characterization of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking are of particular interest. The research approaches of NASA's Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods, infrared thermography and x-ray computed tomography techniques. The use of simulation tools for optimizing and developing these methods is also an active area of research. This paper will focus on current research activities related to large area NDE for rapidly characterizing aerospace composites.

  16. Structural assessment of aerospace components using image processing algorithms and Finite Element models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatelos, Dimtrios; Kappatos, Vassilios

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – This paper presents the development of an advanced structural assessment approach for aerospace components (metallic and composites). This work focuses on developing an automatic image processing methodology based on Non Destructive Testing (NDT) data and numerical models, for predicting...... the residual strength of these components. Design/methodology/approach – An image processing algorithm, based on the threshold method, has been developed to process and quantify the geometric characteristics of damages. Then, a parametric Finite Element (FE) model of the damaged component is developed based...... on the inputs acquired from the image processing algorithm. The analysis of the metallic structures is employing the Extended FE Method (XFEM), while for the composite structures the Cohesive Zone Model (CZM) technique with Progressive Damage Modelling (PDM) is used. Findings – The numerical analyses...

  17. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  18. Ownership Structure, Board Composition and Investment Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Johan; Palmberg, Johanna; Wiberg, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the relation between ownership structure, board composition and firm performance is explored. A panel of Swedish listed firms is used to investigate how board composition affects firm performance. Board heterogeneity is measured as board size, age and gender diversity. The results show that Swedish board of directors have become more diversified in terms of gender. Also, fewer firms have the CEO on the board which can be interpreted as a sign of increased independency. The regre...

  19. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-27

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  20. Composite Structure Optimization with Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    In the frame of optimization studies in CNES launcher directorate structure, thermic and material department, the need of an optimization tool based on metaheuristic and finite element models for composite structural dimensioning was underlined.Indeed, composite structures need complex optimization methodologies in order to be really compared to metallic structures with regard to mass, static strength and stiffness constraints (metallic structures using optimization methods better known).After some bibliography research, the use of a genetic algorithm coupled with design of experiment to generate the initial population was chosen. Academic functions were used to validate the optimization process and then it was applied to an industrial study aiming to optimize an interstage skirt with regard to its mass, stiffness and stability (global buckling).

  1. Impact Testing and Simulation of Composite Airframe Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center on composite airframe structural components of increasing complexity to evaluate their energy absorption behavior when subjected to impact loading. A second objective was to assess the capabilities of predicting the dynamic response of composite airframe structures, including damage initiation and progression, using a state-of-the-art nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. The test specimens were extracted from a previously tested composite prototype fuselage section developed and manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation under the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). Laminate characterization testing was conducted in tension and compression. In addition, dynamic impact tests were performed on several components, including I-beams, T-sections, and cruciform sections. Finally, tests were conducted on two full-scale components including a subfloor section and a framed fuselage section. These tests included a modal vibration and longitudinal impact test of the subfloor section and a quasi-static, modal vibration, and vertical drop test of the framed fuselage section. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from instrumentation such as accelerometers and strain gages and from full-field photogrammetry.

  2. Silver Matrix Composites - Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase compositions of composite materials determine their performance as well as physical and mechanical properties. Depending on the type of applied matrix and the kind, amount and morphology of the matrix reinforcement, it is possible to shape the material properties so that they meet specific operational requirements. In the paper, results of investigations on silver alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles are presented. The investigations enabled evaluation of hardness, tribological and mechanical properties as well as the structure of produced materials. The matrix of composite material was an alloy of silver and aluminium, magnesium and silicon. As the reinforcing phase, 20-60 μm ceramic particles (SiC, SiO2, Al2O3 and Cs were applied. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase in the composites was 10%. The composites were produced using the liquid phase (casting technology, followed by plastic work (the KOBO method. The mechanical and tribological properties were analysed for plastic work-subjected composites. The mechanical properties were assessed based on a static tensile and hardness tests. The tribological properties were investigated under dry sliding conditions. The analysis of results led to determination of effects of the composite production technology on their performance. Moreover, a relationship between the type of reinforcing phase and the mechanical and tribological properties was established.

  3. Effects of abrasive and fiber components in medium on wear of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Ogura, Hideo

    2008-09-01

    Effects of abrasive and fiber components in a medium on the wear behavior of composite resins were evaluated. Calcium diphosphate and methyl cellulose were included in the medium as abrasive and fiber components respectively. A range of 0, 4, or 8% abrasive- or fiber-containing media were applied on a composite resin specimen during a simulated occlusal wear test. Four composite resins, Clearfil AP-X, Z100 Restorative, SOLARE P, and SOLIDEX F, were tested to evaluate the effects of these components in the medium. Presence of abrasive material in the medium increased the wear of composite resins significantly, but its effect differed among the composite resins. Presence of fiber material in the medium significantly decreased the wear of two composite resins, whereas the other two composites showed no significant differences. Nonetheless, presence of fiber in the medium generally tended to prevent the wear of composite resins.

  4. Nanostructured Shape Memory Alloys: Adaptive Composite Materials and Components

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crone, Wendy C; Ellis, Arthur B; Perepezko, John H

    2007-01-01

    .... Both SMA-polymer and SMA-metal composites were created, as well as new fabrication strategies for producing NiTi and CuAlNi shape memory alloy particles with refined size which still display shape...

  5. Structure and content of competitive group compositions in sports aerobics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Moshenska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to make the analysis of modern competitive group compositions in sports aerobics. Material & Methods: pedagogical, sociological and methods of mathematical statistics were used. 10 coaches took part in the experimental part; analysis of protocols and video records of competitions of the aged category of children of 9–11 years old, who perform in the nomination of triplets and quintuples (group exercises, is carried out. Results: the content of competitive compositions and the allocated indicators are studied which defined it. Conclusions: the basic structural elements, which characterize competitive compositions, are allocated. Their components, quantity and time of performance are defined. It is established that variety of aerobic contents, spaces, and means of registration, musical compliance and logicality of creation of the whole competitive composition at high quality of performance characterizes teams – winners.

  6. Nanostructured Shape Memory Alloys: Adaptive Composite Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    fracture behavior. Similar loading conditions for multilayer material have been reported in the literature for both composite materials and geologic...8 5. Bordeaux F., Yavari, R. Multiple Necking and Deformation Behavior of Multilayer Composites Prepared by Cold Rolling. Zeitschrift f’r Metallkunde...Stiffness Greater Than Diamond. Science 315: 620-622, 2007 13. ASTM D 1238-01, Standard Method for Melt Flow Rates of Thermoplastics by Extrusion Plastometer

  7. Advanced SiC/SiC Ceramic Composites For Gas-Turbine Engine Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.; Easler, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing a variety of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composite (ASC) systems that allow these materials to operate for hundreds of hours under stress in air at temperatures approaching 2700 F. These SiC/SiC composite systems are lightweight (approximately 30% metal density) and, in comparison to monolithic ceramics and carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, are able to reliably retain their structural properties for long times under aggressive gas-turbine engine environments. The key for the ASC systems is related first to the NASA development of the Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber, which displays higher thermal stability than any other SiC- based ceramic fibers and possesses an in-situ grown BN surface layer for higher environmental durability. This fiber is simply derived from Sylramic Sic fiber type that is currently produced at ATK COI Ceramics (COIC). Further capability is then derived by using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and/or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) to form a Sic-based matrix with high creep and rupture resistance as well as high thermal conductivity. The objectives of this study were (1) to optimize the constituents and processing parameters for a Sylramic-iBN fiber reinforced ceramic composite system in which the Sic-based matrix is formed at COIC almost entirely by PIP (full PIP approach), (2) to evaluate the properties of this system in comparison to other 2700 F Sylramic-iBN systems in which the matrix is formed by full CVI and CVI + PIP, and (3) to examine the pros and cons of the full PIP approach for fabricating hot-section engine components. A key goal is the development of a composite system with low porosity, thereby providing high modulus, high matrix cracking strength, high interlaminar strength, and high thermal conductivity, a major property requirement for engine components that will experience high thermal gradients during service. Other key composite property goals are demonstration at

  8. Analysis of composite wing structures with a morphing leading edge

    OpenAIRE

    Morishima, Ryoko

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges for the civil aviation industry is the reduction of its environmental impact. Over the past years, improvements in performance efficiency have been achieved by simplifying the design of the structural components and using composite materials to reduce the overall weight. These approaches however, are not sufficient to meet the current demanding requirements set for a „greener‟ aircraft. Significant changes in drag reduction and fuel consumption can be obtained by...

  9. Protein structure similarity from principle component correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou James

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to rapid expansion of protein structure databases in recent years, methods of structure comparison are becoming increasingly effective and important in revealing novel information on functional properties of proteins and their roles in the grand scheme of evolutionary biology. Currently, the structural similarity between two proteins is measured by the root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD in their best-superimposed atomic coordinates. RMSD is the golden rule of measuring structural similarity when the structures are nearly identical; it, however, fails to detect the higher order topological similarities in proteins evolved into different shapes. We propose new algorithms for extracting geometrical invariants of proteins that can be effectively used to identify homologous protein structures or topologies in order to quantify both close and remote structural similarities. Results We measure structural similarity between proteins by correlating the principle components of their secondary structure interaction matrix. In our approach, the Principle Component Correlation (PCC analysis, a symmetric interaction matrix for a protein structure is constructed with relationship parameters between secondary elements that can take the form of distance, orientation, or other relevant structural invariants. When using a distance-based construction in the presence or absence of encoded N to C terminal sense, there are strong correlations between the principle components of interaction matrices of structurally or topologically similar proteins. Conclusion The PCC method is extensively tested for protein structures that belong to the same topological class but are significantly different by RMSD measure. The PCC analysis can also differentiate proteins having similar shapes but different topological arrangements. Additionally, we demonstrate that when using two independently defined interaction matrices, comparison of their maximum

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Inspection of Composite Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures are widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Flash thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Flash thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are discussed. Limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. In addition to flash thermography, X-ray computed tomography is used. The aluminum honeycomb core provides excellent X-ray contrast compared to the composite face sheet. The X-ray CT technique was used to detect impact damage, core crushing, and skin to core disbonds. Additionally, the X-ray CT technique is used to validate the thermography results.

  11. Flexible Nanocellulose - Nanoparticle Composites: Structures and Properties

    OpenAIRE

    UTHPALA MANAVI GARUSINGHE

    2018-01-01

    Nanocellulose is biodegradable and renewable and has many attractive properties of technological interest. Therefore, nanocellulose can be converted into thin films, which is used in wide range of applications. However, the property range achievable with nanocellulose by itself still has limitations. This thesis focuses on the production of nanocellulose-inorganic nanoparticle composites to combine the advantage associated with both individual components together to extend the range of proper...

  12. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  13. Composite structural armor for combat vehicle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, William E., III; Alesi, A. L.; Parsons, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Several projects that have demonstrated the advantages of using thick composite armor technology for structural applications in armored combat vehicles are discussed. The first involved composite cargo doors for the Marine Corps LVTP-7 amphibious landing vehicle. Another was a demonstration composite turret that offered a weight reduction of 15.5 percent. The advantages of this composite armor compared to metallic armors used for combat vehicle hull and turret applications are reduced weight at equal ballistic protection; reduced back armor spall; excellent corrosion resistance; reduced production costs by parts consolidation; and inherent thermal and acoustic insulative properties. Based on the encouraging results of these past programs, the Demonstration Composite Hull Program was started in September 1986. To demonstrate this composite armor technology, the Army's newest infantry fighting vehicle, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV), was selected as a model. A composite infantry fighting vehicle, designated the CIFV for this program, has been designed and fabricated and is currently undergoing a 6000 mile field endurance test. The CIFV demonstration vehicle uses the BFV engine, transmission, suspension, track and other equipment.

  14. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  15. Structural Design of Ares V Interstage Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, David W.; Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Martin, Robert A.; Johnson, Theodore F.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary and detailed design studies were performed to mature composite structural design concepts for the Ares V Interstage structure as a part of NASA s Advanced Composite Technologies Project. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich and hat-stiffened composite panel structural concepts were considered. The structural design and analysis studies were performed using HyperSizer design sizing software and MSC Nastran finite element analysis software. System-level design trade studies were carried out to predict weight and margins of safety for composite honeycomb-core sandwich and composite hat-stiffened skin design concepts. Details of both preliminary and detailed design studies are presented in the paper. For the range of loads and geometry considered in this work, the hat-stiffened designs were found to be approximately 11-16 percent lighter than the sandwich designs. A down-select process was used to choose the most favorable structural concept based on a set of figures of merit, and the honeycomb sandwich design was selected as the best concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost.

  16. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  17. Structure, composition, and condition of overstory trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel A. Yaussy; Todd F. Hutchinson; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    2003-01-01

    The structure, composition, and condition of overstory trees in the four study areas prior to prescribed fire treatments are summarized. Stand initiation dates were similar among the study areas (ca. 1885), and coincided with the decline of the charcoal iron industry in southern Ohio. Tree basal area averaged 26.8m²/ha and was not significantly different among...

  18. Species composition, Plant Community structure and Natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    objective of this work was to study the vegetation structure, composition and Natural ... Vegetation classification was performed using PC - ORD for windows version 5.0. Five communities were recognized. Results showed that a total of 157 plant ..... Vegetation types and forest fire management in Ethiopia In: MOA & GTZ.

  19. Vegetation composition and structure influences bird species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two gradients of increasing vegetation structural heterogeneity were most important in influencing bird community composition and had positive effects on species diversity and the presence of most of the species assessed: (1) increasing closed cover due to woody plant density, which also had positive effects on species ...

  20. Lightning Protection for Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, G. O.

    1985-01-01

    Lightning protection system consisting of two layers of aluminum foil separated by layer of dielectric material protects graphite/epoxy composite structures on aircraft. Protective layer is secondarily applied lightning protection system, prime advantage of which is nullification of thermal and right angle effect of lightning arc attachment to graphite/epoxy laminate.

  1. Timber rivets in structural composite lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald W. Wolfe; Marshall Begel; Bruce Craig

    2004-01-01

    Timber rivet connections, originally developed for use with glulam construction, may be a viable option for use with structural composite lumber (SCL) products. Tests were conducted on small samples to assess the performance and predictability of timber rivet connections in parallel strand lumber (PSL) and laminated strand lumber (LSL). The test joint configurations...

  2. Issues of structure formation of multi-component construction materials

    OpenAIRE

    Sidorenko Yulia; Korenkova Sofia; Guryanov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Growing volumes of construction result in the rising demand for high-quality wall materials and products, growing relevance of availability of resource and raw-material base of natural and industrial products for the construction industry. Structural, physical and mechanical qualities of these products can be improved through systematical selection of compositions based on natural and raw materials, including nano-scale products. The goal of this paper is to provide rationale for structure fo...

  3. Vibration based structural health monitoring of a composite plate with stiffeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, Richard; Ooijevaar, T.H.; Warnet, Laurent; de Boer, Andries; Akkerman, Remko; Sas, P

    2010-01-01

    A vibration based damage identification algorithm is implemented to assess the damage of a thin-walled composite structure. The structure analysed is a skin with stiffeners, as frequently applied in aircraft components. Both experimental and numerical studies on a single composite skin--stiffener

  4. Non-structural Components influencing Hospital Disaster Preparedness in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsuddin, N. M.; Takim, R.; Nawawi, A. H.; Rosman, M. R.; SyedAlwee, S. N. A.

    2018-04-01

    Hospital disaster preparedness refers to measures taken by the hospital’s stakeholders to prepare, reduce the effects of disaster and ensure effective coordination during incident response. Among the measures, non-structural components (i.e., medical laboratory equipment & supplies; architectural; critical lifeline; external; updated building document; and equipment & furnishing) are critical towards hospital disaster preparedness. Nevertheless, over the past few years these components are badly affected due to various types of disasters. Hence, the objective of this paper is to investigate the non-structural components influencing hospital’s disaster preparedness. Cross-sectional survey was conducted among thirty-one (31) Malaysian hospital’s employees. A total of 6 main constructs with 107 non-structural components were analysed and ranked by using SPSS and Relative Importance Index (RII). The results revealed that 6 main constructs (i.e. medical laboratory equipment & supplies; architectural; critical lifeline; external; updated building document; and equipment & furnishing) are rated as ‘very critical’ by the respondents. Among others, availability of medical laboratory equipment and supplies for diagnostic and equipment was ranked first. The results could serve as indicators for the public hospitals to improve its disaster preparedness in terms of planning, organising, knowledge training, equipment, exercising, evaluating and corrective actions through non-structural components.

  5. Scene structure in the saturation component of color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Bruce A.; Strickland, Robin N.

    1996-04-01

    A tenet of a new class of color image enhancement algorithms involves the observation that the saturation component of color images often contains what appears to be valid image structure depicting the underlying scene. In this work we present the findings of a study of the structural correspondence between the saturation and luminance components of a large database of color images. Various statistical relationships are identified. The correspondence of edges at different scales in the sense of Marr's theory of vision is also observed. Several new color image enhancement algorithms which exploit these unique characteristics are described.

  6. Identification of Optimal Preventive Maintenance Decisions for Composite Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laks, P.; Verhagen, W.J.C.; Gherman, B.; Porumbel, I.

    2018-01-01

    This research proposes a decision support tool which identifies cost-optimal maintenance decisions for a given planning period. Simultaneously, the reliability state of the component is kept at or below a given reliability threshold: a failure limit policy applies. The tool is developed to support

  7. Ceramic Composite Mechanical Fastener System for High-Temperature Structural Assemblies, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hot structures fabricated from ceramic composite materials are an attractive design option for components of future high-speed aircraft, re-entry vehicles and...

  8. Polycaprolactone/starch composite: Fabrication, structure, properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Akbari Ghavimi, Soheila; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-07-01

    Interests in the use of biodegradable polymers as biomaterials have grown. Among the different polymeric composites currently available, the blend of starch and polycaprolactone (PCL) has received the most attention since the 1980s. Novamont is the first company that manufactured a PCL/starch (SPCL) composite under the trademark Mater-Bi®. The properties of PCL (a synthetic, hydrophobic, flexible, expensive polymer with a low degradation rate) and starch (a natural, hydrophilic, stiff, abundant polymer with a high degradation rate) blends are interesting because of the composite components have completely different structures and characteristics. PCL can adjust humidity sensitivity of starch as a biomaterial; while starch can enhance the low biodegradation rate of PCL. Thus, by appropriate blending, SPCL can overcome important limitations of both PCL and starch components and promote controllable behavior in terms of mechanical properties and degradation which make it suitable for many biomedical applications. This article reviewed the different fabrication and modification methods of the SPCL composite; different properties such as structural, physical, and chemical as well as degradation behavior; and different applications as biomaterials. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dynamic Failure of Composite and Sandwich Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Abrate, Serge; Rajapakse, Yapa D S

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad view of the current state of the art regarding the dynamic response of composite and sandwich structures subjected to impacts and explosions. Each chapter combines a thorough assessment of the literature with original contributions made by the authors.  The first section deals with fluid-structure interactions in marine structures.  The first chapter focuses on hull slamming and particularly cases in which the deformation of the structure affects the motion of the fluid during the water entry of flexible hulls. Chapter 2 presents an extensive series of tests underwater and in the air to determine the effects of explosions on composite and sandwich structures.  Full-scale structures were subjected to significant explosive charges, and such results are extremely rare in the open literature.  Chapter 3 describes a simple geometrical theory of diffraction for describing the interaction of an underwater blast wave with submerged structures. The second section addresses the problem of...

  10. Structure learning by pruning in independent component analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    We discuss pruning as a means of structure learning in independent component analysis (ICA). Learning the structure is attractive in both signal processing and in analysis of abstract data, where it can assist model interpretation, generalizability and reduce computation. We derive the relevant...... based methods and Bayesian methods, for both small and large samples. The Bayesian information criterion (BIC) seems to outperform both AIC and test sets as tools for determining the optimal dimensionality....

  11. Fiber reinforced polymer composites for bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra CANTORIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in construction materials technology have led to the emergence of new materials with special properties, aiming at safety, economy and functionality of bridges structures. A class of structural materials which was originally developed many years ago, but recently caught the attention of engineers involved in the construction of bridges is fiber reinforced polymer composites. This paper provides an overview of fiber reinforced polymer composites used in bridge structures including types, properties, applications and future trends. The results of this study have revealed that this class of materials presents outstanding properties such as high specific strength, high fatigue and environmental resistance, lightweight, stiffness, magnetic transparency, highly cost-effective, and quick assembly, but in the same time high initial costs, lack of data on long-term field performance, low fire resistance. Fiber reinforced polymer composites were widely used in construction of different bridge structures such as: deck and tower, I-beams, tendons, cable stands and proved to be materials for future in this field.

  12. Production defects in marine composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2007-01-01

    Composite structures are often used when there is a requirement for low weight. Then a key aspect is to be able to take full advantage of the material and utilise it to its limits. To do this it is important to achieve as low a variability as possible in the manufacture of such structures......, and to have a good understanding of the way in which production defects and imperfections influence the structural performance, so that adequate levels of structural safety and reliability can be achieved without having to apply excessively large factors of safety. A review is made of the types of defects...... that arise in the relevant production processes, of their causes and the means that can be used to reduce or eliminate them, and of models that enable the effects of defects and imperfections on structural performance to be predicted....

  13. Structure and composition of giant planet interiors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    In the simplest model of a Jovian planet atmosphere, the atmospheric abundances are identical to the bulk interior abundances, except as modified by atmospheric condensation processes. This model is now known to be generally inadequate, on the basis of comparisons between detailed atmospheric composition measurements and (less-detailed) determinations of interior composition. The latter are primarily deduced by integrating high-pressure equations of state of plausible constituents to obtain interior models which satisfy observational constraints such as mass, radius, gravitational moments, luminosity and age. This chapter reviews the status of discrepancies between such determinations of interior and atmospheric composition, and reviews possible explanations via interior processes such as hydrogen-helium immiscibility and phase transitions in major constituents. We discuss the proposed structure of the core, mantle and deep atmosphere for each of the four giant planets

  14. Holmium polysulfide crystals: Structure, shape and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaya, S.V.; Vasilyeva, I.G.; Naumov, D.Yu.; Podberezskaya, N.V.

    2006-01-01

    The variety of morphology, chemical composition and density of holmium polysulfide crystals grown from the flux in different as well as in the same experiments is observed. It was found that the crystals of different habits have the monoclinic structure, P2 1 /m, a=10.95, b=11.45, c=10.97A, β=91.3 o , as already known, and identical composition HoS 1.837 . All the crystals are twinned by the plane (101-bar ). It is shown that the diversity of crystal compositions and density values are due to the constitution of the flux in a crystal and displacement of a crystal in the growth zone. The formation of non-equilibrium growth forms is discussed

  15. Issues of structure formation of multi-component construction materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorenko Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing volumes of construction result in the rising demand for high-quality wall materials and products, growing relevance of availability of resource and raw-material base of natural and industrial products for the construction industry. Structural, physical and mechanical qualities of these products can be improved through systematical selection of compositions based on natural and raw materials, including nano-scale products. The goal of this paper is to provide rationale for structure formation mechanisms of multicomponent materials (silica-lime, silicate, cement materials, with the possibility of using nano-scale products in their production. The primary mechanism of directed structure formation at the interface boundaries of binders are nano- and ultra-disperse particles with high absorption and adhesion properties, which are primarily intended to strengthen the contact area (one of the key structural units of multicomponent binders. The knowledge of genesis, chemical, mineralogical, and phase compositions, as well as specific features of formation of nano-technological raw materials, enables optimization of construction product properties. Using the small-angle neutron scattering method, we identified granulometric and surface properties of a series of nano-technological products (binary and sludge and materials where such products are used, which enabled us to design optimal mixture compositions and parameters of pressing operations.

  16. An interrelation of physical working capacity and body component composition indicators of amateur athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Gorenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: determine the features of the body component composition and the level of physical performance, as well as the structure of the correlation between these indicators in amateur athletes. Material & Methods: in conditions of the test with physical load with stepwise increasing power in the 71-st physically active person, the reaction of the cardio-respiratory system to physical activity. The body component composition was determined by the bioelectrical impedance method. Result: in amateur athletes, the relative VO2max and power ratings are positively correlated with the relative body water content and have a negative relationship with age, body weight, body mass index, fat content. Oxygen pulse with a high degree of probability positively correlated with body weight, body mass index, metabolic rate, fat-free mass, water content and predictable muscle mass in all body segments. Conclusion: Conducted studies indicate a sufficient level of aerobic capacity, overall performance, the efficiency of the cardiac cycle, the functioning of the О2-transport system and skeletal muscles ability to absorb oxygen from the amateur athletes, and excess fat tissue negatively affects physical performance, overall endurance and achieving high sports results in sports on the endurance.

  17. Flight service evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component on commercial transport aircraft. Phase 1: Engineering development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ary, A.; Axtell, C.; Fogg, L.; Jackson, A.; James, A. M.; Mosesian, B.; Vanderwier, J.; Vanhamersveld, J.

    1976-01-01

    The empennage component selected for this program is the vertical fin box of the L-1011 aircraft. The box structure extends from the fuselage production joint to the tip rib and includes the front and rear spars. Various design options were evaluated to arrive at a configuration which would offer the highest potential for satisfying program objectives. The preferred configuration selected consists of a hat-stiffened cover with molded integrally stiffened spars, aluminum trussed composite ribs, and composite miniwich web ribs with integrally molded caps. Material screening tests were performed to select an advanced composite material system for the Advanced Composite Vertical Fin (ACFV) that would meet the program requirements from the standpoint of quality, reproducibility, and cost. Preliminary weight and cost analysis were made, targets established, and tracking plans developed. These include FAA certification, ancillary test program, quality control, and structural integrity control plans.

  18. Vine vigor components and its variability - relationship to wine composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Magali; Tittmann, Susanne; Stoll, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    It was pointed out that a high spatial variability for canopy size and yield would exist within a vineyard but a high temporal stability over the years was observed. Furthermore, a greater variability in grape phenolics than in sugars and pH was detected within a vineyard. But the link between remote sensing indices and quality parameters of grapes is still unclear. Indeed, though in red grape varieties anthocyanins content was spatially negatively correlated to vigor parameters, it seemed that yield, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Plant Cell Density (PCD) indices were poorly correlated. Moreover, the link to quality parameters of wines remains uncertain. It was shown that more vigorous vines would lead to wines with less tannins while anthocyanins in wines would be highest when the vines were balanced but the question is if vine size or architecture, yield or nitrogen assimilation would play major contribution to those differences. The general scope of our project was to provide further knowledge on the relationship between vigor parameters and wine composition and relate these to the information gained by remote sensing. Variability in a 0.15 ha vineyard of Pinot noir planted in 2003 and grafted on SO4 rootstock at Geisenheim (Germany) was followed. Vine vigor was assessed manually for each of the 400 vines (cane number, pruning weight, trunk diameter) together with yield parameters (number of bunches per vine, crop yield). Leaf composition was assessed with a hand-held optical sensor (Multiplex3® [Mx3] (Force-A, Orsay, France) based on chlorophyll fluorescence screening providing information on leaf chlorophyll (SFR_G) and nitrogen (NBI_G) content. A micro-scale winemaking of single vines with a 3 factorial design on yield (L low, M middle, H high), SFRG (L, M, H) and canopy size (pruning weight, trunk diameter) (L, M, H) was performed for 2013 and 2014 to completely reflect variability. Wine tannin concentration represented the highest

  19. Structure and Properties of LENRA/ Silica Composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahathir Mohamed; Dahlan Mohd

    2010-01-01

    The sol-gel reaction using tetra ethoxysilane (TEOS) was conducted for modified natural rubber (NR) matrix to obtain in situ generated NR/ silica composite. The present of acrylate group in the modified NR chain turns the composite into radiation-curable. The maximum amount of silica generated in the matrix was 50 p hr by weight. During the sol-gel process the inorganic mineral was deposited in the rubber matrix forming hydrogen bonding between organic and inorganic phases. The composites obtained were characterized by various techniques including thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectrometry to study their molecular structure. The increase in mechanical properties was observed for low silica contents ( 30 p hr) where more silica were generated, agglomerations were observed at the expense of the mechanical properties. From the DMTA data, it shows an increase of the interaction between the rubber and silica phases up to 30 p hr TEOS. Structure and morphology of the heterogeneous system were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The average particle sizes of between 150 nm to 300 nm were achieved for the composites that contain less than 20 p hr of TEOS. (author)

  20. Composite entire functions with no unbounded Fatou components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand P.

    2007-11-01

    Let be the set of all entire functions f such that for given [epsilon]>0,logL(r,f)>(1-[epsilon])logM(r,f) for all r outside a set of logarithmic density zero. Let where is the set of all transcendental entire functions f such that . If h=fN[circle, open]fN-1[circle, open]...[circle, open]f1 where (i=1,...,N), then it is shown that h has no unbounded Fatou component.

  1. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites for advanced plasma facing components

    OpenAIRE

    Neu, R.; Riesch, J.; Müller, A.v.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J.W.; Gietl, H.; Höschen, T.; Li, M.; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    The European Fusion Roadmap foresees water cooled plasma facing components in a first DEMO design in order to provide enough margin for the cooling capacity and to only moderately extrapolate the technology which was developed and tested for ITER. In order to make best use of the water cooling concept copper (Cu) and copper-chromium-zirconium alloy (CuCrZr) are envisaged as heat sink whereas as armour tungsten (W) based materials will be used. Combining both materials in a high heat flux comp...

  2. Analysis of urinary stone components by x-ray coherent scatter: characterizing composition beyond laboratory x-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Melanie T M; Batchelar, Deidre L; Velupillai, Sujeevan; Denstedt, John D; Cunningham, Ian A

    2005-01-01

    Monoenergetic x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis is an established standard for the assessment of urinary stone composition. The inherent low energy of x-rays used (8 keV), however, restricts penetration depth and imposes a requirement for small powdered samples. A technique capable of producing detailed information regarding component structural arrangements in calculi non-destructively would provide clearer insights into causes of formation and subsequent growth and allow the selection of more appropriate courses of therapy. We describe a new method based on the detection of coherent scatter (CS) in stone components using polyenergetic x-rays (70 kVp) from diagnostic equipment. While the higher energy allows the analysis of intact calculi, the polyenergetic source causes an angular broadening of measured CS patterns. We show that it is possible to relate the polyenergetic (CS) and monoenergetic (XRD) measurements through a superposition integral of the monoenergetic XRD cross-section with a function representative of the polyenergetic spectrum used in CS. Experimentally acquired diffractometry cross-sections of the seven major urinary stone components were subjected to this operation, revealing good agreement of diffraction features with CS. Therefore, our CS analysis is sensitive to stone component structure, similar to conventional XRD analysis. This indicates that CS analysis can be used as a basis to classify urinary calculi by composition. The potential of identifying stone components non-destructively was demonstrated from a tomographic CS analysis of a stone-mimicking phantom. Tomographic composition maps were generated from CS patterns, showing the structural arrangement of multiple stone components within the phantom. CS analysis has the ability to detect components in the presence of many others. The ability to perform CS measurements in intact calculi would allow for the identification of stone structures critical to patient metaprophylaxis

  3. Automatic capability to store and retrieve component data and to calculate structural integrity of these components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnis, C.J.; Toor, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    In structural analysis, assimilation of material, geometry, and service history input parameters is very cumbersome. Quite often with changing service history and revised material properties and geometry, an analysis has to be repeated. To overcome the above mentioned difficulties, a computer program was developed to provide the capability to establish a computerized library of all material, geometry, and service history parameters for components. The program also has the capability to calculate the structural integrity based on the Arrhenius type equations, including the probability calculations. This unique combination of computerized input information storage and automated analysis procedure assures consistency, efficiency, and accuracy when the hardware integrity has to be reassessed

  4. OOA composite structures applicable in railway industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusnáková Soňa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite sandwich structures offers several advantages over conventional structural materials such as lightweight, high bending and torsional stiffness, superior thermal insulation and excellent acoustic damping. In the aerospace industry, sandwich composites are commonly manufactured using the autoclave process which is associated with high operating cost. Out-of-autoclave (OOA manufacturing has been shown to be capable of producing low cost and high performance composites. In this paper we present results of experimental testing of various sandwich materials according various standards and actual requirements in transport industry. We compared the different types of surface and paint systems, because these layers are the most important in contact with the surrounding environment and load conditions. In the experimental measurements were used various materials. For the core of the sandwich structure were selected aluminium honeycomb, aramid honeycomb and PET (Polyethylene terephthalate foam core. Support layers were chosen two kinds of predimpregnated materials. The conditions of measurements were requirements for strength and rigidity, safety - flame resistance and reflectivity resistance. The samples were tested at the 3 - point bending test according to standard EN ISO 178, by modified test to determine the force required to rapture threaded insert, by test of reflectivity according to UIC CODE 844-4 R and according to standard EN 45545-2 fire protection of railway vehicles.

  5. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  6. Crystal structure of the RNA component of bacterial ribonuclease P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Swinger, Kerren K.; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.; Pan, Tao; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (UC)

    2010-03-08

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is produced as a precursor molecule that needs to be processed at its 3' and 5' ends. Ribonuclease P is the sole endonuclease responsible for processing the 5' end of tRNA by cleaving the precursor and leading to tRNA maturation. It was one of the first catalytic RNA molecules identified and consists of a single RNA component in all organisms and only one protein component in bacteria. It is a true multi-turnover ribozyme and one of only two ribozymes (the other being the ribosome) that are conserved in all kingdoms of life. Here we show the crystal structure at 3.85 {angstrom} resolution of the RNA component of Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease P. The entire RNA catalytic component is revealed, as well as the arrangement of the two structural domains. The structure shows the general architecture of the RNA molecule, the inter- and intra-domain interactions, the location of the universally conserved regions, the regions involved in pre-tRNA recognition and the location of the active site. A model with bound tRNA is in agreement with all existing data and suggests the general basis for RNA-RNA recognition by this ribozyme.

  7. Probabilistic Remaining Useful Life Prediction of Composite Aircraft Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Assessment Network (PFDAN) toolkit for Abaqus will be developed for probabilistic life management of a laminated composite structure...

  8. Structural evaluation of safety class components to natural phenomena loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the efforts completed at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to qualify structurally a number of existing safety class components in the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex. Design, fabrication, and installation of the facility occurred in the 1950s and 1960s and were based on the Uniform Building Code criteria for wind and earthquake loads. Recently the buildings were qualified to site-specific wind and seismic hazards. The methodology employed to qualify seismically the safety class components is discussed

  9. METHODS OF THE APPROXIMATE ESTIMATIONS OF FATIGUE DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE AIRFRAME COMPONENT TYPICAL ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Strizhius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods of the approximate estimations of fatigue durability of composite airframe component typical elements which can be recommended for application at the stage of outline designing of the airplane are generated and presented.

  10. Probabilistic approaches to life prediction of nuclear plant structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villain, B.; Pitner, P.; Procaccia, H.

    1996-01-01

    In the last decade there has been an increasing interest at EDF in developing and applying probabilistic methods for a variety of purposes. In the field of structural integrity and reliability they are used to evaluate the effect of deterioration due to aging mechanisms, mainly on major passive structural components such as steam generators, pressure vessels and piping in nuclear plants. Because there can be numerous uncertainties involved in a assessment of the performance of these structural components, probabilistic methods. The benefits of a probabilistic approach are the clear treatment of uncertainly and the possibility to perform sensitivity studies from which it is possible to identify and quantify the effect of key factors and mitigative actions. They thus provide information to support effective decisions to optimize In-Service Inspection planning and maintenance strategies and for realistic lifetime prediction or reassessment. The purpose of the paper is to discuss and illustrate the methods available at EDF for probabilistic component life prediction. This includes a presentation of software tools in classical, Bayesian and structural reliability, and an application on two case studies (steam generator tube bundle, reactor pressure vessel). (authors)

  11. Probabilistic approaches to life prediction of nuclear plant structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villain, B.; Pitner, P.; Procaccia, H.

    1996-01-01

    In the last decade there has been an increasing interest at EDF in developing and applying probabilistic methods for a variety of purposes. In the field of structural integrity and reliability they are used to evaluate the effect of deterioration due to aging mechanisms, mainly on major passive structural components such as steam generators, pressure vessels and piping in nuclear plants. Because there can be numerous uncertainties involved in an assessment of the performance of these structural components, probabilistic methods provide an attractive alternative or supplement to more conventional deterministic methods. The benefits of a probabilistic approach are the clear treatment of uncertainty and the possibility to perform sensitivity studies from which it is possible to identify and quantify the effect of key factors and mitigative actions. They thus provide information to support effective decisions to optimize In-Service Inspection planning and maintenance strategies and for realistic lifetime prediction or reassessment. The purpose of the paper is to discuss and illustrate the methods available at EDF for probabilistic component life prediction. This includes a presentation of software tools in classical, Bayesian and structural reliability, and an application on two case studies (steam generator tube bundle, reactor pressure vessel)

  12. Monitoring of Structural Integrity of Composite Structures by Embedded Optical Fiber Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    Real time monitoring of the mechanical integrity and stresses on key aerospace composite structures like aircraft wings, walls of pressure vessels and fuel tanks or any other structurally extended components and panels as in space telescopes is very important to NASA. Future military and commercial aircraft as well as NASA space systems such as Space Based Radar and International Space Station will incorporate a monitoring system to sense any degradation to the structure. In the extreme flight conditions of an aerospace vehicle it might be desirable to measure the strain every ten centimeters and thus fully map out the strain field of a composite component. A series of missions and vehicle health management requirements call for these measurements. At the moment thousands of people support a few vehicle launches per year. This number can be significantly reduced by implementing intelligent vehicles with integral nervous systems (smart structures). This would require maintenance to be performed only as needed. Military and commercial aircrafts have an equally compelling case. Maintenance yearly costs are currently reaching astronomical heights. Monitoring techniques are therefore required that allow for maintenance to be performed only when needed. This would allow improved safety by insuring that necessary tasks are performed while reducing costs by eliminating procedures that are costly and not needed. The advantages fiber optical sensors have over conventional electro-mechanical systems like strain gauges have been widely extolled in the research literature. These advantages include their small size, low weight, immunity to electrical resistance, corrosion resistance, compatibility with composite materials and process conditions, and multiplexing capabilities. One fiber optic device which is suitable for distributed sensing is the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). Researchers at NASA MSFC are currently developing techniques for using FBGs for monitoring the integrity of

  13. Annual variation of yield and chemical composition of volatile components of Siparuna guianensis Aublet

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, Carla Maria Abido; Silva, Luiz Everson da; Maciel, Eduardo Nunes; Franceschini, Elton; Sousa Jr., Paulo Teixeira de; Dall'Oglio, Evandro Luiz; Coelho, Maria de Fátima Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the volatile composition obtained by hidrodistillation of fresh leaves of Siparuna guianensis Aublet collected from Cuiabá (MT), Brazil. The composition of DCM extract of hydrolate was determined by GC-MS analysis and the results showed that the specie present a range of components according to their phenology and period of the leaves were collects. The highest volatile components yield was obtained during the reproductive period and the principal compound was the siparuno...

  14. Structural CNT Composites Part II: Assessment of CNT Yarns as Reinforcement for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one-dimensional nanomaterials with outstanding electrical and thermal conductivities and mechanical properties. This combination of properties offers routes to enable lightweight structural aerospace components. Recent advances in the manufacturing of CNTs have made bulk forms such as yarns, tapes and sheets available in commercial quantities to permit the evaluation of these materials for aerospace use, where the superior tensile properties of CNT composites can be exploited in tension dominated applications such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To investigate their utility in this application, aluminum rings were overwrapped with thermoset/CNT yarn composite and their mechanical properties measured. CNT composite overwrap characteristics such as processing method, CNT/resin ratio, and applied tension during CNT yarn winding were varied to determine their effects on the mechanical performance of the CNT composite overwrapped Al rings (CCOARs). Mechanical properties of the CCOARs were measured under static and cyclic loads at room, elevated, and cryogenic temperatures to evaluate their mechanical performance relative to bare Al rings. At room temperature, the breaking load of CCOARs with a 10.8% additional weight due to the CNT yarn/thermoset overwrap increased by over 200% compared to the bare Al ring. The quality of the wound CNT composites was also investigated using x-ray computed tomography.

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation and Health Monitoring of Adhesively Bonded Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, William Walker

    As the growth of fiber reinforced composite materials continues in many industries, structural designers will have to look to new methods of joining components. In order to take full advantage of composite materials, such as increased stiffness, decreased weight, tailored material properties and increased fatigue life, mechanical fasteners will need to be replaced by adhesive bonding or welding, when possible. Mechanical fasteners require the drilling of holes, which damages the laminate and becomes the source of further fatigue damage. Also, an increase in laminate thickness or inclusion of other features is required for the material to withstand the bearing stress needed to preload fasteners. Adhesives transfer the load over a large area, do not require additional machining operations, provide increased stiffness through the joint, provide corrosion protection when joining dissimilar materials, and provide vibrational damping. Additionally, the repair of composite structures, which will become a major concern in the near future, will require the use of adhesive bonding for thermoset composites. In order for adhesives to be used to join primary aerospace structures they must meet certification requirements, which includes proof that the joint can withstand the required ultimate load without structural failure. For most components, nondestructive inspection is used to find critical flaws, which is combined with fracture mechanics to ensure that the structure can meet the requirements. This process works for some of the adhesive flaws, but other critical defects are not easily detected. Weak interface bonding is particularly challenging. This type of defect results in an interphase zone that may be only a dozen microns in thickness. Traditional bulk wave ultrasonic techniques cannot easily distinguish this zone from the interface between adherend and adhesive. This work considers two approaches to help solve this problem. Guided elastic wave propagation along

  16. Major structural components in freshwater dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Buuan; Baer, Andrew; Alaee, Mehran; Lefebvre, Brent; Moser, Arvin; Williams, Antony; Simpson, André J

    2007-12-15

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains a complex array of chemical components that are intimately linked to many environmental processes, including the global carbon cycle, and the fate and transport of chemical pollutants. Despite its importance, fundamental aspects, such as the structural components in DOM remain elusive, due in part to the molecular complexity of the material. Here, we utilize multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to demonstrate the major structural components in Lake Ontario DOM. These include carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM), heteropolysaccharides, and aromatic compounds, which are consistent with components recently identified in marine dissolved organic matter. In addition, long-range proton-carbon correlations are obtained for DOM, which support the existence of material derived from linear terpenoids (MDLT). It is tentatively suggested that the bulk of freshwater dissolved organic matter is aliphatic in nature, with CRAM derived from cyclic terpenoids, and MDLT derived from linear terpenoids. This is in agreement with previous reports which indicate terpenoids as major precursors of DOM. At this time it is not clear in Lake Ontario whether these precursors are of terrestrial or aquatic origin or whether transformations proceed via biological and/ or photochemical processes.

  17. Chemical composition of components comprising bast tissue in flax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, W H; Akin, D E

    2001-05-01

    Components from the bast region of flax (Linum usitatissium) were removed by hand from seed flax and fiber flax and analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Stems soaked in water were separated by hand into an outer layer, which consisted of epidermis with cuticle and parenchyma cells, and fiber bundles. Each of the two fractions were evaluated for chemical markers that could be used to predict the degree of retting and possibly fiber quality. The outer layer was subsequently treated with a mixed enzyme preparation to remove the carbohydrate portion, thus providing another fraction consisting primarily of cuticle. Four main constituent groups were investigated: dihydroxy fatty acids, long-chain fatty acids and alcohols, sterols, and aromatics. Long-chain fatty acids and alcohols located in the outer layer accounted for 80-92% of the total found in both fractions. Aromatics and sterols in the outer layer accounted for 29--72 and 27--67%, respectively, of the total and do not appear to be a reliable marker for the degree of retting. The best markers for retting were the dihydroxy fatty acids, of which 98--99% were accounted for in the outer layer. The main dihydroxy fatty acids were a mixture of 8,16- and 9,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acids and represented 87--89% of the total dihydroxy fatty acids measured. As a constituent of cuticle, this compound may serve as an excellent marker for indicating the degree of retting as well as a possible marker for fiber quality because this compound is almost always exclusively associated with the outer layer and not the fiber.

  18. Structure Learning by Pruning in Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Andreas; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    We discuss pruning as a means of structure learning in independent component analysis. Sparse models are attractive in both signal processing and in analysis of abstract data, they can assist model interpretation, generalizability and reduce computation. We derive the relevant saliency expressions...... methods, for both small and large samples. The Bayesian information criterion (BIC) seems to outperform both AIC and test sets as tools for determining the optimal degree of sparsity....

  19. Seismic fragility analysis of structural components for HFBR facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a summary of recently completed seismic fragility analyses of the HFBR facilities. Based on a detailed review of past PRA studies, various refinements were made regarding the strength and ductility evaluation of structural components. Available laboratory test data were analysed to evaluate the formulations used to predict the ultimate strength and deformation capacities of steel, reinforced concrete and masonry structures. The biasness and uncertainties were evaluated within the framework of the fragility evaluation methods widely accepted in the nuclear industry. A few examples of fragility calculations are also included to illustrate the use of the presented formulations

  20. Structural ECM components in the premetastatic and metastatic niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høye, Anette M; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of the extracellular matrix (ECM) components that are important for creating structural changes in the premetastatic and metastatic niche. The successful arrival and survival of cancer cells that have left the primary tumor and colonized distant sites...... depends on the new microenvironment they encounter. The primary tumor itself releases factors into the circulation that travel to distant organs and then initiate structural changes, both non-enzymatic and enzymatic, to create a favorable niche for the disseminating tumor cells. Therapeutic strategies...

  1. An automatic chip structure optical inspection system for electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhichao; Xue, Bindang; Liang, Jiyuan; Wang, Ke; Chen, Junzhang; Liu, Yunhe

    2018-01-01

    An automatic chip structure inspection system based on machine vision is presented to ensure the reliability of electronic components. It consists of four major modules, including a metallographic microscope, a Gigabit Ethernet high-resolution camera, a control system and a high performance computer. An auto-focusing technique is presented to solve the problem that the chip surface is not on the same focusing surface under the high magnification of the microscope. A panoramic high-resolution image stitching algorithm is adopted to deal with the contradiction between resolution and field of view, caused by different sizes of electronic components. In addition, we establish a database to storage and callback appropriate parameters to ensure the consistency of chip images of electronic components with the same model. We use image change detection technology to realize the detection of chip images of electronic components. The system can achieve high-resolution imaging for chips of electronic components with various sizes, and clearly imaging for the surface of chip with different horizontal and standardized imaging for ones with the same model, and can recognize chip defects.

  2. A structured overview of simultaneous component based data integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Werf Mariët J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data integration is currently one of the main challenges in the biomedical sciences. Often different pieces of information are gathered on the same set of entities (e.g., tissues, culture samples, biomolecules with the different pieces stemming, for example, from different measurement techniques. This implies that more and more data appear that consist of two or more data arrays that have a shared mode. An integrative analysis of such coupled data should be based on a simultaneous analysis of all data arrays. In this respect, the family of simultaneous component methods (e.g., SUM-PCA, unrestricted PCovR, MFA, STATIS, and SCA-P is a natural choice. Yet, different simultaneous component methods may lead to quite different results. Results We offer a structured overview of simultaneous component methods that frames them in a principal components setting such that both the common core of the methods and the specific elements with regard to which they differ are highlighted. An overview of principles is given that may guide the data analyst in choosing an appropriate simultaneous component method. Several theoretical and practical issues are illustrated with an empirical example on metabolomics data for Escherichia coli as obtained with different analytical chemical measurement methods. Conclusion Of the aspects in which the simultaneous component methods differ, pre-processing and weighting are consequential. Especially, the type of weighting of the different matrices is essential for simultaneous component analysis. These types are shown to be linked to different specifications of the idea of a fair integration of the different coupled arrays.

  3. Multifunctional Composites for Future Energy Storage in Aerospace Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Julian Adam

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctionalization of fiber-reinforced composites, especially by adding energy storage capabilities, is a promising approach to realize lightweight structural energy storages for future transport vehicles. Compared to conventional energy storage systems, energy density can be increased by reducing parasitic masses of non-energy-storing components and by benefitting from the composite meso- and microarchitectures. In this paper, the most relevant existing approaches towards multifunctional energy storages are reviewed and subdivided into five groups by distinguishing their degree of integration and their scale of multifunctionalization. By introducing a modified range equation for battery-powered electric aircrafts, possible range extensions enabled by multifunctionalization are estimated. Furthermore, general and aerospace specific potentials of multifunctional energy storages are discussed. Representing an intermediate degree of structural integration, experimental results for a multifunctional energy-storing glass fiber-reinforced composite based on the ceramic electrolyte Li1.4Al0.4Ti1.6(PO43 are presented. Cyclic voltammetry tests are used to characterize the double-layer behavior combined with galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements for capacitance calculation. The capacitance is observed to be unchanged after 1500 charge–discharge cycles revealing a promising potential for future applications. Furthermore, the mechanical properties are assessed by means of four-point bending and tensile tests. Additionally, the influence of mechanical loads on the electrical properties is also investigated, demonstrating the storage stability of the composites.

  4. Structural and Compositional Transformations of Biomass Chars during Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Steibel, Markus; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    In this work the physical and chemical transformations of biomass chars during fast pyrolysis, considered as a 2nd stage of combustion, has been investigated. Seven biomasses containing different amount of ash and organic components were reacted at up to 1673 K with high heating rates in a wire......-mesh reactor and the resulting chars were retrieved. In order to obtain information on the structural and compositional transformations of the biomass chars, samples were subjected to elemental analysis, scanning electron microcopy with EDX and Raman spectrometry. The results show that there are significant...

  5. Wood-based composite materials : panel products, glued-laminated timber, structural composite lumber, and wood-nonwood composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Stark; Zhiyong Cai; Charles Carll

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the general types and composition of wood-based composite products and the materials and processes used to manufacture them. It describes conventional wood-based composite panels and structural composite materials intended for general construction, interior use, or both. This chapter also describes wood–nonwood composites. Mechanical...

  6. Computer-aided design of antenna structures and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses computer-aided design procedures for antenna reflector structures and related components. The primary design aid is a computer program that establishes cross sectional sizes of the structural members by an optimality criterion. Alternative types of deflection-dependent objectives can be selected for designs subject to constraints on structure weight. The computer program has a special-purpose formulation to design structures of the type frequently used for antenna construction. These structures, in common with many in other areas of application, are represented by analytical models that employ only the three translational degrees of freedom at each node. The special-purpose construction of the program, however, permits coding and data management simplifications that provide advantages in problem size and execution speed. Size and speed are essentially governed by the requirements of structural analysis and are relatively unaffected by the added requirements of design. Computation times to execute several design/analysis cycles are comparable to the times required by general-purpose programs for a single analysis cycle. Examples in the paper illustrate effective design improvement for structures with several thousand degrees of freedom and within reasonable computing times.

  7. Structural Evolution of Three-Component Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanoreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng-Cheng; Du, Jingshan S; Meckes, Brian; Huang, Liliang; Xie, Zhuang; Hedrick, James L; Dravid, Vinayak P; Mirkin, Chad A

    2017-07-26

    Recent developments in scanning probe block copolymer lithography (SPBCL) enable the confinement of multiple metal precursors in a polymer nanoreactor and their subsequent transformation into a single multimetallic heterostructured nanoparticle through thermal annealing. However, the process by which multimetallic nanoparticles form in SPBCL-patterned nanoreactors remains unclear. Here, we utilize the combination of PEO-b-P2VP and Au, Ag, and Cu salts as a model three-component system to investigate this process. The data suggest that the formation of single-component Au, Ag, or Cu nanoparticles within polymer nanoreactors consists of two stages: (I) nucleation, growth, and coarsening of the particles to yield a single particle in each reactor; (II) continued particle growth by depletion of the remaining precursor in the reactor until the particle reaches a stable size. Also, different aggregation rates are observed for single-component particle formation (Au > Ag > Cu). This behavior is also observed for two-component systems, where nucleation sites have greater Au content than the other metals. This information can be used to trap nanoparticles with kinetic structures. High-temperature treatment ultimately facilitates the structural evolution of the kinetic particle into a particle with a fixed structure. Therefore, with multicomponent systems, a third stage that involves elemental redistribution within the particle must be part of the description of the synthetic process. This work not only provides a glimpse at the mechanism underlying multicomponent nanoparticle formation in SPBCL-generated nanoreactors but also illustrates, for the first time, the utility of SPBCL as a platform for controlling the architectural evolution of multimetallic nanoparticles in general.

  8. The maintenance optimization of structural components in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryla, P.; Ardorino, F.; Aufort, P.; Jacquot, J.P.; Magne, L.; Pitner, P.; Verite, B.; Villain, B.; Monnier, B.

    1997-10-01

    An optimization process, called 'OMF-Structures', is developed by Electricite de France (EDF) in order to extend the current 'OMF' Reliability Centered Maintenance to piping structural components. The Auxiliary Feedwater System of a 900 MW French nuclear plant has been studied in order to lay the foundations of the method. This paper presents the currently proposed principles of the process. The principles of the OMF-Structures process include 'Risk-Based Inspection' concepts within an RCM process. Two main phases are identified: The purpose of the first phase is to select the risk-significant failure modes and associated elements. This phase consists of two major steps: potential consequences evaluation and reliability performance evaluation. The second phase consists of the definition of preventive maintenance programs for piping elements that are associated with risk-significant failure modes. (author)

  9. Fabrication processes of C/Sic composites for high temperature components in energy systems and investigation of their oxidation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hakim, E.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced ceramic matrix composite are promising candidate materials for high temperature applications such as structural components in energy systems, fusion reactors and advanced gas turbine engines. C/C composites has low oxidation resistance at temperatures above 500degree. To overcome this low oxidation resistance a coating should be applied. Tenax HTA 5131 carbon fibres impregnated with phenolic resin and reinforced silicon carbide were modified by the addition of a coating layer of boron oxide, (suspended in Dyansil-40) for improving anti-oxidation properties of the composites.The oxidation behavior of carbon-silicon carbide composites coated with B 2 O 3 , as an protective layer former, in dry air has been studied in the temperature range 800- 1000 degree for 8 hrs and 16 hrs. The results show that the oxidation rates of the uncoated composites samples are higher than those of the coated composites. The uncoated samples exhibit the highest oxidation rate during the initial stages of oxidation. The composite coated with B 2 O 3 had a significantly improved oxidation resistance due to the formation of a barrier layer for oxygen diffusion. This improvement in the oxidation resistance is attributed to the blocking of the active sites for oxygen diffusion. The oxidation resistance of the coated composite is highly improved; the weight loss percentage of casted samples is 4.5-16% after 16-hrs oxidation in air while the weight loss of uncoated samples is about 60%. The results are supported by scanning electron microscopy

  10. Mechanism Design and Testing of a Self-Deploying Structure Using Flexible Composite Tape Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footdale, Joseph N.; Murphey, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed mechanical design of a novel deployable support structure that positions and tensions a membrane optic for space imagining applications is presented. This is a complex three-dimensional deployment using freely deploying rollable composite tape spring booms that become load bearing structural members at full deployment. The deployment tests successfully demonstrate a new architecture based on rolled and freely deployed composite tape spring members that achieve simultaneous deployment without mechanical synchronization. Proper design of the flexible component mounting interface and constraint systems, which were critical in achieving a functioning unit, are described. These flexible composite components have much potential for advancing the state of the art in deployable structures, but have yet to be widely adopted. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and advantages of implementing flexible composite components, including the design details on how to integrate with required traditional mechanisms.

  11. Vertical Distribution of Structural Components in Corn Stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. F. Johnson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, corn (Zea mays L. stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg−1, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ−1, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha−1, but it would be only 1000 L ha−1 if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  12. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jane M. F. Johnson; Douglas L. Karlen; Garold L. Gresham; Keri B. Cantrell; David W. Archer; Brian J. Wienhold; Gary E. Varvel; David A. Laird; John Baker; Tyson E. Ochsner; Jeff M. Novak; Ardell D. Halvorson; Francisco Arriaga; David T. Lightle; Amber Hoover; Rachel Emerson; Nancy W. Barbour

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  13. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  14. Analysis methods for structure reliability of piping components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimpfke, T.; Grebner, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    In the frame of the German reactor safety research program of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWA) GRS has started to develop an analysis code named PROST (PRObabilistic STructure analysis) for estimating the leak and break probabilities of piping systems in nuclear power plants. The long-term objective of this development is to provide failure probabilities of passive components for probabilistic safety analysis of nuclear power plants. Up to now the code can be used for calculating fatigue problems. The paper mentions the main capabilities and theoretical background of the present PROST development and presents some of the results of a benchmark analysis in the frame of the European project NURBIM (Nuclear Risk Based Inspection Methodologies for Passive Components). (orig.)

  15. Design and structural calculation of nuclear power plant mechanical components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, J.A.R. do

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical components of a nuclear power plant must show high quality and safety due to the presence of radioactivity. Besides the perfect functioning during the rigid operating conditions, some postulated loadings are foreseen, like earthquake and loss of coolant accidents, which must be also considered in the design. In this paper, it is intended to describe the design and structural calculations concept and development, the interactions with the piping and civil designs, as well as their influences in the licensing process with the authorities. (Author) [pt

  16. Study on the structure of pitch-polymer compositions by fluorescence microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Makomaski, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the results of studies on the evaluation of colloidal structure of coal-tar pitch compositions with selected waste polymers by fluorescence microscope. For pitch-polymer compositions containing 10?50?wt% waste polymer, softening point, coking value and content of components insoluble in toluene and quinoline were carried out. The results indicate that pitch-polymer compositions can be treated as microheterogeneous systems, colloidal and biphase, generally exhibiting uniform disp...

  17. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  18. Magnons in one-dimensional k-component Fibonacci structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, C. H., E-mail: carloshocosta@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Vasconcelos, M. S. [Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil)

    2014-05-07

    We have studied the magnon transmission through of one-dimensional magnonic k-component Fibonacci structures, where k different materials are arranged in accordance with the following substitution rule: S{sub n}{sup (k)}=S{sub n−1}{sup (k)}S{sub n−k}{sup (k)} (n≥k=0,1,2,…), where S{sub n}{sup (k)} is the nth stage of the sequence. The calculations were carried out in exchange dominated regime within the framework of the Heisenberg model and taking into account the RPA approximation. We have considered multilayers composed of simple cubic spin-S Heisenberg ferromagnets, and, by using the powerful transfer-matrix method, the spin wave transmission is obtained. It is demonstrated that the transmission coefficient has a rich and interesting magnonic pass- and stop-bands structures, which depends on the frequency of magnons and the k values.

  19. Simulation approaches to probabilistic structural design at the component level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancampiano, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, structural failure of large nuclear components is viewed as a random process with a low probability of occurrence. Therefore, a statistical interpretation of probability does not apply and statistical inferences cannot be made due to the sparcity of actual structural failure data. In such cases, analytical estimates of the failure probabilities may be obtained from stress-strength interference theory. Since the majority of real design applications are complex, numerical methods are required to obtain solutions. Monte Carlo simulation appears to be the best general numerical approach. However, meaningful applications of simulation methods suggest research activities in three categories: methods development, failure mode models development, and statistical data models development. (Auth.)

  20. Chemical composition of Galla chinensis extract and the effect of its main component(s) on the prevention of enamel demineralization in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.L.; Liu, M.D.; Li, J.Y.; Zhou, X.D.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the chemical composition of Galla chinensis extract (GCE) by several analysis techniques and to compare the efficacy of GCE and its main component(s) in inhibition of enamel demineralization, for the development of future anticaries agents, main organic composition of GCE was

  1. Structural Sizing of the EDIN0620 Body Components Using the APAS Structural Synthesis Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    The use of a structural synthesis computer program to design components for a heavy lift launch vehicle is defined. A loads program was used to determine the vehicle shears, bending moments, and axial loads at two design loading conditions. A comparison was made between results from the structures program and the results of a weight estimating program which used historical data in determining component weights.

  2. Statistical techniques for the identification of reactor component structural vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1975-01-01

    The identification, on-line and in near real-time, of the vibration frequencies, modes and amplitudes of selected key reactor structural components and the visual monitoring of these phenomena by nuclear power plant operating staff will serve to further the safety and control philosophy of nuclear systems and lead to design optimisation. The School of Nuclear Engineering has developed a data acquisition system for vibration detection and identification. The system is interfaced with the HIFAR research reactor of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. The reactor serves to simulate noise and vibrational phenomena which might be pertinent in power reactor situations. The data acquisition system consists of a small computer interfaced with a digital correlator and a Fourier transform unit. An incremental tape recorder is utilised as a backing store and as a means of communication with other computers. A small analogue computer and an analogue statistical analyzer can be used in the pre and post computational analysis of signals which are received from neutron and gamma detectors, thermocouples, accelerometers, hydrophones and strain gauges. Investigations carried out to date include a study of the role of local and global pressure fields due to turbulence in coolant flow and pump impeller induced perturbations on (a) control absorbers, (B) fuel element and (c) coolant external circuit and core tank structure component vibrations. (Auth.)

  3. Structural Components of Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Craig H.; Kandel, Eric R.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    Consolidation of implicit memory in the invertebrate Aplysia and explicit memory in the mammalian hippocampus are associated with remodeling and growth of preexisting synapses and the formation of new synapses. Here, we compare and contrast structural components of the synaptic plasticity that underlies these two distinct forms of memory. In both cases, the structural changes involve time-dependent processes. Thus, some modifications are transient and may contribute to early formative stages of long-term memory, whereas others are more stable, longer lasting, and likely to confer persistence to memory storage. In addition, we explore the possibility that trans-synaptic signaling mechanisms governing de novo synapse formation during development can be reused in the adult for the purposes of structural synaptic plasticity and memory storage. Finally, we discuss how these mechanisms set in motion structural rearrangements that prepare a synapse to strengthen the same memory and, perhaps, to allow it to take part in other memories as a basis for understanding how their anatomical representation results in the enhanced expression and storage of memories in the brain. PMID:26134321

  4. A principal components approach to parent-to-newborn body composition associations in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Veena, Sargoor R; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Wills, Andrew K; Hill, Jacqueline C; Fall, Caroline HD

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Size at birth is influenced by environmental factors, like maternal nutrition and parity, and by genes. Birth weight is a composite measure, encompassing bone, fat and lean mass. These may have different determinants. The main purpose of this paper was to use anthropometry and principal components analysis (PCA) to describe maternal and newborn body composition, and associations between them, in an Indian population. We also compared maternal and paternal measurements (bod...

  5. Methodology for repeated load analysis of composite structures with embedded magnetic microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Semrád

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article processes issue of strength of cyclically loaded composite structures with the possibility of contactless stress measuring inside a material. For this purpose a contactless tensile stress sensor using improved induction principle based on the magnetic microwires embedded in the composite structure has been developed. The methodology based on the E-N approach was applied for the analysis of the repeated load of the wing hinge connection, including finite element method (FEM fatigue strength analysis. The results proved that composites in comparison with the metal structures offer significant weight reduction of the small aircraft construction, whereas the required strength, stability and lifetime of the components are remained.

  6. The importance of the biomimetic composites components for recreating the optical properties and molecular composition of intact dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredin, P. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Gushchin, M. S.; Ippolitov, Y. A.; Prutskij, T.

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate whether it is possible to obtain biomimetic materials recreating the luminescent properties and molecular composition of intact dental tissues. Biomimetic materials were produced and their properties compared with native dental tissues. In addition, the overall contribution of the organic and non-organic components in the photoluminescence band was investigated. The results showed that it is possible to develop biomimetic materials with similar molecular composition and optical properties to native dental tissues for the early identification of dental caries.

  7. Evaluation of metal matrix composite to replace spheroidal graphite iron for a critical component, steering knuckle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayarangan, S.; Rajamanickam, N.; Sivananth, V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A FE model is developed to study the suitability of MMC for steering knuckle. ► Structural analysis of steering knuckle is carried out for 12 load cases. ► The cross section of the critical region is optimized using genetic algorithm. ► The life of the MMC (Al-10 wt.% TiC) knuckle is compared before and after optimization. ► MMC material could replace SG iron for automotive steering knuckle. -- Abstract: Steering knuckle is considered as one of the critical component in automotive suspension system. It is subjected to time varying loads during its service life, leading to fatigue failure. Therefore, its design is an important aspect in the product development cycle. Currently, spheroidal graphite (SG) iron is widely used to manufacture steering knuckle in the commercial automobile sector. It has been observed from the knuckle manufacturers that advanced materials and weight reduction are the real need for the current automobile industry. Due to their high strength to weight ratio, Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have the potential to meet the demanded design requirements of the automotive industry, compared to conventional materials. In this work, an aluminum alloy reinforced with titanium carbide particulate is suggested as an alternate material in place of existing SG iron. Structural analysis of steering knuckle made of alternate material Al-10 wt.% TiC was performed using commercial code ANSYS. The results of steering knuckle made of MMC (Al-10 wt.% TiC) were compared with that of aluminum alloy and SG iron steering knuckles for its performance based on real time load cases. It is found from this analysis, the knuckle strut region has maximum stress and deflection during its life time. The critical strut region cross section area of knuckle was analyzed and geometrically optimized for minimum bending stress and deflection using genetic algorithm available in MatLab. Since, the knuckle experiences time varying loads, fatigue analysis also

  8. X-Aerogels for Structural Components and High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Future NASA missions and space explorations rely on the use of materials that are strong ultra lightweight and able to withstand extreme temperatures. Aerogels are low density (0.01-0.5 g/cu cm) high porosity materials that contain a glass like structure formed through standard sol-gel chemistry. As a result of these structural properties, aerogels are excellent thermal insulators and are able to withstand temperatures in excess of l,000 C. The open structure of aerogels, however, renders these materials extremely fragile (fracturing at stress forces less than 0.5 N/sq cm). The goal of NASA Glenn Research Center is to increase the strength of these materials by templating polymers and metals onto the surface of an aerogel network facilitating the use of this material for practical applications such as structural components of space vehicles used in exploration. The work this past year focused on two areas; (1) the research and development of new templated aerogels materials and (2) process development for future manufacturing of structural components. Research and development occurred on the production and characterization of new templating materials onto the standard silica aerogel. Materials examined included polymers such as polyimides, fluorinated isocyanates and epoxies, and, metals such as silver, gold and platinum. The final properties indicated that the density of the material formed using an isocyanate is around 0.50 g/cc with a strength greater than that of steel and has low thermal conductivity. The process used to construct these materials is extremely time consuming and labor intensive. One aspect of the project involved investigating the feasibility of shortening the process time by preparing the aerogels in the templating solvent. Traditionally the polymerization used THF as the solvent and after several washes to remove any residual monomers and water, the solvent around the aerogels was changed to acetonitrile for the templating step. This process

  9. Design and development of conformal antenna composite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zonghong; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Li, Xiang

    2017-09-01

    In the manufacturing process of the common smart skin antenna, the adhesive covered on the radiating elements of the antenna led to severe deviation of the resonant frequency, which degraded the electromagnetic performance of the antenna. In this paper, a new component called package cover was adopted to prevent the adhesive from covering on the radiating elements of the microstrip antenna array. The package cover and the microstrip antenna array were bonded together as packaged antenna which was then embedded into the composite sandwich structure to develop a new structure called conformal antenna composite structure (CACS). The geometric parameters of the microstrip antenna array and the CACS were optimized by the commercial software CST microwave studio. According to the optimal results, the microstrip antenna array and the CACS were manufactured and tested. The experimental and numerical results of electromagnetic performance showed that the resonant frequency of the CACS was close to that of the microstrip antenna array (with error less than 1%) and the CACS had a higher gain (about 2 dB) than the microstrip antenna array. The package system would increase the electromagnetic radiating energy at the design frequency nearly 66%. The numerical model generated by CST microwave studio in this study could successfully predict the electromagnetic performance of the microstrip antenna array and the CACS with relatively good accuracy. The mechanical analysis results showed that the CACS had better flexural property than the composite sandwich structure without the embedment of packaged antenna. The comparison of the electromagnetic performance for the CACS and the MECSSA showed that the package system was useful and effective.

  10. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  11. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus

    2006-06-01

    different clad components. Measurement of cladding residual stresses in a decommissioned reactor pressure vessel head, which was exposed to service conditions (pressure test, temperature, neutron irradiation, etc.), and the results from the cladding in a cut-out-piece, which did not experience any service or test pressure, basically showed similar profiles. Considering the low scatter and the reproducible data, the hole-drilling technique is recommended in measurement of the peak of the cladding residual stresses. The profile and magnitude of the cladding residual stresses depend mainly upon cladding composition, cladding thickness, clad component geometry and clad component temperature. The peak of the cladding residual stresses is actually about 2-3 mm under the surface of the clad layer, and values in the range of 150 and 500 MPa are reported. Fracture assessments on different clad components at different loading conditions reveal that fracture assessments based on LEFM and ASME Kk curve lead to unrealistic conservative results, and the cladding residual stresses are of importance for surface crack behaviour, especially under cold loads. The NESC projects have shown that the Master Curve methodology can give good predictions of the conducted experiments. It is reasonable to assume a peak value of cladding residual stresses in the whole clad layer to be equal to the yield strength of the cladding material (around 300 MPa) at room temperature. Providing that the clad component has received PWHT, it can be assumed no residual stresses in the underlying base material. For the nuclear pressure vessel, it is also reasonable to assume that the cladding stress free temperature is at the operation temperature of the vessel (around 300 deg C). It has been shown that the cladding residual stresses have negligible influence on subclad crack behaviour in clad components (receiving PWHT). It has also been shown that the crack growth for subclad cracks would be towards the base

  12. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    measurement of different clad components. Measurement of cladding residual stresses in a decommissioned reactor pressure vessel head, which was exposed to service conditions (pressure test, temperature, neutron irradiation, etc.), and the results from the cladding in a cut-out-piece, which did not experience any service or test pressure, basically showed similar profiles. Considering the low scatter and the reproducible data, the hole-drilling technique is recommended in measurement of the peak of the cladding residual stresses. The profile and magnitude of the cladding residual stresses depend mainly upon cladding composition, cladding thickness, clad component geometry and clad component temperature. The peak of the cladding residual stresses is actually about 2-3 mm under the surface of the clad layer, and values in the range of 150 and 500 MPa are reported. Fracture assessments on different clad components at different loading conditions reveal that fracture assessments based on LEFM and ASME Kk curve lead to unrealistic conservative results, and the cladding residual stresses are of importance for surface crack behaviour, especially under cold loads. The NESC projects have shown that the Master Curve methodology can give good predictions of the conducted experiments. It is reasonable to assume a peak value of cladding residual stresses in the whole clad layer to be equal to the yield strength of the cladding material (around 300 MPa) at room temperature. Providing that the clad component has received PWHT, it can be assumed no residual stresses in the underlying base material. For the nuclear pressure vessel, it is also reasonable to assume that the cladding stress free temperature is at the operation temperature of the vessel (around 300 deg C). It has been shown that the cladding residual stresses have negligible influence on subclad crack behaviour in clad components (receiving PWHT). It has also been shown that the crack growth for subclad cracks would be towards the

  13. Macroscopic structural coherence in two-component superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Yam, Y.

    1991-01-01

    In two-component theory pairing arises from localized negative-U states and mobility arises from extended single particle states. A small hybridization of localized and extended states enables mobility and pairing to provide a high Tc. RPA analysis of the ''normal'' state implies uncondensed charged pairs carry current, while long lived single particle excitations are neutral electron-hole hybrids. At Tc pairs condense and single particle states undergo Cooper pairing. In the superconducting state pair-pair excitations exist in the BCS-like fermionic gap. Signatures of this theory range from distintive Tc, Δ, H c , ξ, conductance anomalies in sound and bulk modulii at Tc, linear temperature dependence of normal state resistivity, 2e charge carriers in the normal state, linear voltage dependence in normal-state-tunneling conductance, and finite zero-bias conductance in superconducting state tunneling. Quantitative comparisons with superconducting properties of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 were presented. A distinctive signature is the prediction of dynamical structural correlations which are local above Tc and macroscopic below Tc. Experiments provide direct evidence for such dynamical correlations: neutron diffraction ''thermal ovals'', channeling experiment cross section changes as a function of temperature near Tc, pair-distribution-function neutron diffraction including inelastic and elastic scattering showing direct evidence for dynamic correlations which change at Tc, and EXAFS showing a large dynamical displacement of oxygen atoms tunneling between sites separated by 0.13A. In two-component theory strong lattice coupling is consistent with low isotope shifts since tunneling occurs by a virtual Franck-Condon transition. Predictions for the dynamical structure factor are presented. (orig.)

  14. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, +/-60deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  15. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, plus or minus 60 deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  16. Structure of Al-CF composites obtained by infiltration methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dolata-Grosz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the composites obtained in infiltration processes 2D and 3D carbon preform by liquid Al alloy have been presented in thispaper. An aluminum alloy with silicon and manganese AlSi9Mn (trimal 37-TR37 was applied in the researches. As the reinforcementused carbon perform prepared with various protective barriers such as the nickel coating, the coating of silicon carbide and pyrolyticcarbon coating. Carbon preforms was prepared at the Institute for Lightweight Structures and Polymer Technology (ILK TU Dresden andat the Institute of Technology and Ceramic Systems (Fraunhofer-IKTS. The process of infiltration of carbon perform by liquid aluminiumalloy was carried out using a pressure-vacuum infiltration on the Degussa press and gas-pressure infiltration (GPI in an autoclavedesigned and built at the Department of Materials Technology at the Silesian University of Technology. The obtained composites werecharacterized by a regular shape, with no surface casting defects. The best connection of components was observed in AlSi9Mn/Cf(Nicomposite, obtained by gas-pressure infiltration method (GPI. On metallographic specimens, good interface between fibres and thealuminium matrix were observed. The obtained research results justify the application of nickel coatings on the fibres. During the failurecrack propagated across fiber. There was no presence of aluminum carbide on the fiber-matrix. It can be assumed that the composite willbe characterized by the good mechanical properties. However, this requires further experimental verification planned in the next stage of research, in the project realized within the DFG program: "3D textile reinforced aluminium matrix composites for complex loadingsituations in lightweight automobile and machine parts".

  17. Composite Structure Optimization using a Homogenized Material Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hozić, Dženan

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of bre-reinforced composite materials in the manufacturing of high performance structures is primarily driven by their superior strength-toweight ratio when compared to traditional metallic alloys. This provides the ability to design and manufacture lighter structures with improved mechanical properties. However, the specic manufacturing process of composite structures, along with the orthotropic material properties exhibited by bre-reinforced composite materials, result in...

  18. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eberle, Cliff C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pastore, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sudbury, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartman, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  19. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  20. Predictive Modeling of Complex Contoured Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The existing HDWLT (pictured) contoured composite structure design, its analyses and manufacturing tools, will be used to validate key analyses inputs through...

  1. Application of sandwich honeycomb carbon/glass fiber-honeycomb composite in the floor component of electric car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmaji, I. C.; Wijang, W. R.; Andri, S.; Bambang, K.; Teguh, T.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays composite is a superior material used in automotive component due to its outstanding mechanical behavior. The sandwich polypropylene honeycomb core with carbon/glass fiber composite skin (SHCG) as based material in a floor component of electric car application is investigated in the present research. In sandwich structure form, it can absorb noise better compare with the conventional material [1]. Also in present paper, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of SHCG as based material for floor component of the electric car is analyzed. The composite sandwich is contained with a layer uniform carbon fiber and mixing non-uniform carbon-glass fiber in upper and lower skin. Between skins of SHCG are core polypropylene honeycomb that it have good flexibility to form following dies profile. The variables of volume fraction ratio of carbon/glass fiber in SHCG skin are 20/80%, 30/70%, and 50/50%. The specimen of SHCG is tested using the universal testing machine by three points bending method refers to ASTM C393 and ASTM C365. The cross point between tensile strength to the volume fraction the mixing carbon/glass line and ratio cost line are the searched material with good mechanical performance and reasonable cost. The point is 30/70 volume fraction of carbon/glass fiber. The result of the testing experiment is become input properties of model structure sandwich in FEA simulation. FEA simulation approach is conducted to find critical strength and factor of complex safety geometry against varied distributed passenger loads of a floor component the electric car. The passenger loads variable are 80, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 kg.

  2. Time Domain Diffraction by Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Frongillo, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Time domain (TD) diffraction problems are receiving great attention because of the widespread use of ultra wide band (UWB) communication and radar systems. It is commonly accepted that, due to the large bandwidth of the UWB signals, the analysis of the wave propagation mechanisms in the TD framework is preferable to the frequency domain (FD) data processing. Furthermore, the analysis of transient scattering phenomena is also of importance for predicting the effects of electromagnetic pulses on civil structures. Diffraction in the TD framework represents a challenging problem and numerical discretization techniques can be used to support research and industry activities. Unfortunately, these methods become rapidly intractable when considering excitation pulses with high frequency content. This contribution deals with the TD diffraction phenomenon related to composite structures containing a dielectric wedge with arbitrary apex angle when illuminated by a plane wave. The approach is the same used in [1]-[3]. The transient diffracted field originated by an arbitrary function plane wave is evaluated via a convolution integral involving the TD diffraction coefficients, which are determined in closed form starting from the knowledge of the corresponding FD counterparts. In particular, the inverse Laplace transform is applied to the FD Uniform Asymptotic Physical Optics (FD-UAPO) diffraction coefficients available for the internal region of the structure and the surrounding space. For each observation domain, the FD-UAPO expressions are obtained by considering electric and magnetic equivalent PO surface currents located on the interfaces. The surface radiation integrals using these sources is assumed as starting point and manipulated for obtaining integrals able to be solved by means of the Steepest Descent Method and the Multiplicative Method. [1] G. Gennarelli and G. Riccio, "Time domain diffraction by a right-angled penetrable wedge," IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., Vol

  3. Piezoelectric and mechanical properties of structured PZT-epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, N.K.; Ende, D.A. van den; Lafont, U.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Structured lead zirconium titanate (PZT)-epoxy composites are prepared by dielectrophoresis. The piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites as a function of PZT volume fraction are investigated and compared with the corresponding unstructured composites. The effect of poling voltage

  4. Piezoelectric and mechanical properties of structured PZT–epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnamkuzhakkal James, N.; Van den Ende, D.; Lafont, U.; Van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Structured lead zirconium titanate (PZT)–epoxy composites are prepared by dielectrophoresis. The piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites as a function of PZT volume fraction are investigated and compared with the corresponding unstructured composites. The effect of poling voltage

  5. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departament of Materials Engineering - Rd. Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905, São Carlos-SP (Brazil); Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario, E-mail: bretas@ufscar.br [Université de Strasbourg, ECPM-LIPHT - 25 rue Becquerel, 67087, Strasbourg (France)

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  6. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth

  7. Structural characterization and lipid composition of acquired cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Sørensen, Jens A

    2012-01-01

    noninvasive structural and lipid compositional study of acquired cholesteatoma and control human skin using multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-related techniques and high-performance thin-layer chromatography. RESULTS: The structural arrangement of the cholesteatoma is morphologically invariant...

  8. Characteristics of AFB interfaces of dissimilar crystal composites as components for solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. C.; Meissner, O. R.; Meissner, H. E.

    2005-06-01

    Adhesive-free bonded (AFB®) composite crystals have proven to be useful components in diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL). The combination of a lasing medium of higher index of refraction with laser-inactive cladding layers of lower index results in light- or wave-guided slab architectures. The cladding layers also serve to provide mechanical support, thermal uniformity and a heat sink during laser operation. Therefore, the optical and mechanical properties of these components are of interest for the design of DPSSL, especially at high laser fluencies and output power. We report on process parameters and material attributes that result in stress-free AFB® composites that are resistant to thermally induced failure. Formation of stress-free and durable bonds between two dissimilar materials requires heat-treatment of composites to a temperature high enough to ensure durable bonds and low enough to prevent forming of permanent chemical bonds. The onset temperature for forming permanent bonds at the interface sets the upper limit for heat treatment. This limiting temperature is dependent on the chemical composition, crystallographic orientation, and surface characteristics. We have determined the upper temperature limits for forming stress-free bonds between YAG and sapphire, YAG and GGG, YAG and spinel, spinel and sapphire, spinel and GGG, and sapphire and GGG composites. We also deduce the relative magnitude of thermal expansion coefficients amongst the respective single crystals as αGGG > αsapp_c > αspinel > αYAG > αsapp_a from interferometric analysis.

  9. A principal components approach to parent-to-newborn body composition associations in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Jacqueline C

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Size at birth is influenced by environmental factors, like maternal nutrition and parity, and by genes. Birth weight is a composite measure, encompassing bone, fat and lean mass. These may have different determinants. The main purpose of this paper was to use anthropometry and principal components analysis (PCA to describe maternal and newborn body composition, and associations between them, in an Indian population. We also compared maternal and paternal measurements (body mass index (BMI and height as predictors of newborn body composition. Methods Weight, height, head and mid-arm circumferences, skinfold thicknesses and external pelvic diameters were measured at 30 ± 2 weeks gestation in 571 pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India. Paternal height and weight were also measured. At birth, detailed neonatal anthropometry was performed. Unrotated and varimax rotated PCA was applied to the maternal and neonatal measurements. Results Rotated PCA reduced maternal measurements to 4 independent components (fat, pelvis, height and muscle and neonatal measurements to 3 components (trunk+head, fat, and leg length. An SD increase in maternal fat was associated with a 0.16 SD increase (β in neonatal fat (p Conclusion Principal components analysis is a useful method to describe neonatal body composition and its determinants. Newborn adiposity is related to maternal nutritional status and parity, while newborn length is genetically determined. Further research is needed to understand mechanisms linking maternal pelvic size to fetal growth and the determinants and implications of the components (trunk v leg length of fetal skeletal growth.

  10. Hybrid Composite Structures : Multifunctionality through Metal Fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, T.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of fibre reinforced polymer composites into the wings and fuselages of the newest aircraft are changing the design and manufacturing approach. Composites provide greater freedom to designers who want to improve aircraft performance in an affordable way. In this quest, researchers

  11. Micromechanical models for textile structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrey, Ramesh V.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop micromechanical models for predicting the stiffness and strength properties of textile composite materials. Two models are presented to predict the homogeneous elastic constants and coefficients of thermal expansion of a textile composite. The first model is based on rigorous finite element analysis of the textile composite unit-cell. Periodic boundary conditions are enforced between opposite faces of the unit-cell to simulate deformations accurately. The second model implements the selective averaging method (SAM), which is based on a judicious combination of stiffness and compliance averaging. For thin textile composites, both models can predict the plate stiffness coefficients and plate thermal coefficients. The finite element procedure is extended to compute the thermal residual microstresses, and to estimate the initial failure envelope for textile composites.

  12. Design and Testing of Braided Composite Fan Case Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Braley, Michael S.; Arnold, William a.; Dorer, James D.; Watson, William R/.

    2009-01-01

    Triaxial braid composite materials are beginning to be used in fan cases for commercial gas turbine engines. The primary benefit for the use of composite materials is reduced weight and the associated reduction in fuel consumption. However, there are also cost benefits in some applications. This paper presents a description of the braided composite materials and discusses aspects of the braiding process that can be utilized for efficient fabrication of composite cases. The paper also presents an approach that was developed for evaluating the braided composite materials and composite fan cases in a ballistic impact laboratory. Impact of composite panels with a soft projectile is used for materials evaluation. Impact of composite fan cases with fan blades or blade-like projectiles is used to evaluate containment capability. A post-impact structural load test is used to evaluate the capability of the impacted fan case to survive dynamic loads during engine spool down. Validation of these new test methods is demonstrated by comparison with results of engine blade-out tests.

  13. Recent NASA progress in composites. [application to spacecraft and aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldenfels, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The application of composites in aerospace vehicle structures is reviewed. Research and technology program results and specific applications to space vehicles, aircraft engines, and aircraft and helicopter structures are discussed in detail. Particular emphasis is given to flight service evaluation programs that are or will be accumulating substantial experience with secondary and primary structural components on military and commercial aircraft to increase confidence in their use.

  14. Structural Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Carbopol Polymeric Composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Structural Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Carbopol. Polymeric Composites .... prepare a sample for analysis, a glass slide was clipped to the ... shows, both polymeric composite types showed similar diffraction patterns. Structure identification in a diffractogram is usually based on the position of peaks and their relative intensities.

  15. Floristic Composition and Structure of Yegof Mountain Forest, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Floristic Composition and Structure of Yegof Mountain Forest, South Wollo, Ethiopia. S Mohammed, B Abraha. Abstract. In this study, Floristic composition, diversity, population structure and regeneration status of woody plant species of Yegof Forest in South Wollo Zone, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia were analyzed.

  16. Multilevel design optimization of composite structures with blended laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seresta, O.

    2007-01-01

    This research work deals with the design and optimization of a large composite structure. In design of large structural systems, it is customary to divide the problem into many smaller independent/semi-independent local design problems. The use of composite necessitates the inclusion of ply angles

  17. Fabrication of carbon film composites for high-strength structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiswerk, P. R.; Lippman, M.

    1972-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties of fiber composite materials consisting of carbon films are described. Application of carbon film structural composites for constructing microwave filters or optical instruments is proposed. Applications in aerospace and architectural structures for high strength and low density properties are discussed.

  18. Fabrication, polarization, and characterization of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate a new carbon fiber reinforced composite structure with integrated sensing capabilities. In this composite structure, the typical matrix material used for carbon fiber reinforced composites is replaced with the thermoplastic polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF). Since PVDF has piezoelectric properties, it enables the structure to be used for integrated load sensing. In addition, the electrical conductivity property of the carbon fabric is harnessed to form the electrodes of the integrated sensor. In order to prevent the carbon fiber electrodes from shorting to each other, a thin Kevlar fabric layer is placed between the two carbon fiber electrode layers as a dielectric. The optimal polarization parameters were determined using a design of experiments approach. Once polarized, the samples were then used in compression and tensile tests to determine the effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. The degree of polarization of the PVDF material was determined by relating the effective d 33 coefficient of the composite to the achieved d 33 of the PVDF component of the composite using a closed form expression. Using this approach, it was shown that optimal polarization of the composite material results in a PVDF component d 33 of 3.2 pC N −1 . Moreover, the Young’s modulus of the composite structure has been characterized. (paper)

  19. Tutorial for Collecting and Processing Images of Composite Structures to Determine the Fiber Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite structures have become more common in aerospace components due to their light weight and structural efficiency. In general, the strength and stiffness of a composite structure are directly related to the fiber volume fraction, which is defined as the fraction of fiber volume to total volume of the composite. The most common method to measure the fiber volume fraction is acid digestion, which is a useful method when the total weight of the composite, the fiber weight, and the total weight can easily be obtained. However, acid digestion is a destructive test, so the material will no longer be available for additional characterization. Acid digestion can also be difficult to machine out specific components of a composite structure with complex geometries. These disadvantages of acid digestion led the author to develop a method to calculate the fiber volume fraction. The developed method uses optical microscopy to calculate the fiber area fraction based on images of the cross section of the composite. The fiber area fraction and fiber volume fraction are understood to be the same, based on the assumption that the shape and size of the fibers are consistent in the depth of the composite. This tutorial explains the developed method for optically determining fiber area fraction performed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  20. Echelle Spectroscopy of Algol and the Chemical Composition of its Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovski, K.; Kolbas, V.; Southworth, J.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new observational project to study the prototypical semidetached binary system, Algol. Over 80 high-resolution and high-S/N spectra were secured in 2006 and 2007 with FIES at the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma. All three components were successfully detected by the method of spectral disentangling, which yields the individual spectra of the three stars and also high-accuracy spectroscopic elements for both the inner and outer orbits. Our next step is to study the chemical composition of the components in detail, in particular the close eclipsing system which is in the stage after mass reversal.

  1. Structural and failure mechanics of sandwich composites

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, LA; Carlsson, Leif A

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on important deformation and failure modes of sandwich structures, this volume describes the mechanics behind fracture processes. The text also reviews test methods developed for the cr, structural integrity, and failure mechanisms of sandwich structures.

  2. Molecular manipulation of solid state structure: influences of organic components on vanadium oxide architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagrman, Pamela J.; Finn, Robert C.; Zubieta, Jon

    2001-11-01

    Among the inorganic materials enjoying widespread contemporary interest, the metal oxide based solid phases occupy a prominent position by virtue of their applications to catalysis, sorption, molecular electronics, energy storage, optical materials and ceramics. The diversity of properties associated with these materials reflects the chemical composition, which allows variations in covalency, geometry and oxidation states, and the crystalline architecture, which may provide different pore structures, coordination sites, or juxtapositions of functional groups. Despite such fundamental and practical significance, the design of the structure of such materials remains a challenge in solid state chemistry. While organic materials have been synthesized which self-assemble into ordered arrays at low temperature and which exhibit molecular recognition and biomimetic activity, the ability to synthesize inorganic materials by rational design remains elusive. Small, soluble molecular building blocks with well-defined reaction chemistries which allow their low-temperature assembly into crystalline solid state inorganic materials are not well known. However, the existence of naturally occurring, structurally complex minerals establishes that hydrothermal synthesis can provide a low temperature pathway to produce open-framework and layered metastable structures utilizing inorganic starting materials. Thus, hydrothermal conditions have been used to prepare microporous tetrahedral framework solids that are capable of shape-selective absorption, like zeolites and aluminophosphates, and more recently in the preparation of complex solid arrays of the M/O/PO 3-4 and M/O/RPO 2-3 systems (M=V and Mo). The hydrothermal technique may be combined with the introduction of organic components which may act as charge compensating groups, space-filling units, structure directing agents, templates, tethers between functional groups, or conventional ligands in the preparation of inorganic

  3. Cytotoxicity of dental composite components and mercury compounds in pulmonary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehe, K; Reichl, F X; Durner, J; Walther, U; Hickel, R; Forth, W

    2001-02-01

    The cytotoxic potentials of the dental composite components triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and 2-hydroxy-ethylmethacrylate (HEMA) as well as mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) were investigated. Proliferating A549 and L2 cell monolayers were cultured in the absence or presence of composite components or mercurials. Twenty-four hours later the tetrazolium salt XTT (sodium 3'-[1-phenyl-aminocarbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulphonic acid) was added. Formazan formation was quantified using a microtiter plate reader. EC50 values were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. EC50 values were in A549 cells (mean values +/- standard deviation; n = 12; micromol/l); HEMA 8854+/-1882; TEGDMA 1821+/-529; HgCl2 41+/-7 and MeHgCl 27+/-3. EC50 values in L2 cells were: HEMA 191+/-28; TEGDMA 112+/-16; HgCl2 25+/-6 and MeHgCl 8+/-6. All tested substances induced a dose-dependent loss of viability in A549 and L2 cells after 24 h. The EC50 values of both mercurials were significantly (p < 0.05) lower compared to the values of both composite components. TEGDMA was about 5-fold (A549 cells) and about 2-fold (L2 cells) more toxic compared to HEMA. It is to be assumed that the risk of lung cell damage by dental composite components is even more unlikely.

  4. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA airworthiness certification for ceramic matrix composite components in civil aircraft systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonczy Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs are being designed and developed for engine and exhaust components in commercial aviation, because they offer higher temperature capabilities, weight savings, and improved durability compared to metals. The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA issues and enforces regulations and minimum standards covering the safe manufacture, operation, and maintenance of civil aircraft. As new materials, these ceramic composite components will have to meet the certification regulations of the FAA for “airworthiness”. The FAA certification process is defined in the Federal Aviation Regulations (Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, FAA policy statements, orders, advisory circulars, technical standard orders, and FAA airworthiness directives. These regulations and documents provide the fundamental requirements and guidelines for design, testing, manufacture, quality assurance, registration, operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair of aircraft systems and parts. For metallic parts in aircraft, the FAA certification and compliance process is well-established for type and airworthiness certification, using ASTM and SAE standards, the MMPDS data handbook, and FAA advisory circulars. In a similar manner for polymer matrix composites (PMC, the PMC industry and the FAA have jointly developed and are refining parallel guidelines for polymer matrix composites (PMCs, using guidance in FAA circulars and the CMH-17 PMC handbook. These documents discuss design methods and codes, material testing, property data development, life/durability assessment, production processes, QA procedures, inspection methods, operational limits, and repairs for PMCs. For ceramic composites, the FAA and the CMC and aerospace community are working together (primarily through the CMH-17 CMC handbook to define and codify key design, production, and regulatory issues that have to be addressed in the certification of CMC components in

  5. Lightweight, Composite Cryogenic Tank Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm has developed and qualified strong, all-composite LOX tanks for launch vehicles. Our new 42-inch diameter tank design weighs 486 lbs and burst without...

  6. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  7. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Chirtsov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was divided into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  8. The Compositional Structure of the Asteroid Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMeo, F. E.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Walsh, K. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Binzel, R. P.

    The past decade has brought major improvements in large-scale asteroid discovery and characterization, with over half a million known asteroids, more than 100,000 of which have some measurement of physical characterization. This explosion of data has allowed us to create a new global picture of the main asteroid belt. Put in context with meteorite measurements and dynamical models, a new and more complete picture of solar system evolution has emerged. The question has changed from "What was the original compositional gradient of the asteroid belt?" to "What was the original compositional gradient of small bodies across the entire solar system?" No longer is the leading theory that two belts of planetesimals are primordial, but instead those belts were formed and sculpted through evolutionary processes after solar system formation. This chapter reviews the advancements on the fronts of asteroid compositional characterization, meteorite measurements, and dynamical theories in the context of the heliocentric distribution of asteroid compositions seen in the main belt today. This chapter also reviews the major outstanding questions relating to asteroid compositions and distributions and summarizes the progress and current state of understanding of these questions to form the big picture of the formation and evolution of asteroids in the main belt. Finally, we briefly review the relevance of asteroids and their compositions in their greater context within our solar system and beyond.

  9. Sandwich Structured Composites for Aeronautics: Methods of Manufacturing Affecting Some Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Krzyżak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich panels are composites which consist of two thin laminate outer skins and lightweight (e.g., honeycomb thick core structure. Owing to the core structure, such composites are distinguished by stiffness. Despite the thickness of the core, sandwich composites are light and have a relatively high flexural strength. These composites have a spatial structure, which affects good thermal insulator properties. Sandwich panels are used in aeronautics, road vehicles, ships, and civil engineering. The mechanical properties of these composites are directly dependent on the properties of sandwich components and method of manufacturing. The paper presents some aspects of technology and its influence on mechanical properties of sandwich structure polymer composites. The sandwiches described in the paper were made by three different methods: hand lay-up, press method, and autoclave use. The samples of sandwiches were tested for failure caused by impact load. Sandwiches prepared in the same way were used for structural analysis of adhesive layer between panels and core. The results of research showed that the method of manufacturing, more precisely the pressure while forming sandwich panels, influences some mechanical properties of sandwich structured polymer composites such as flexural strength, impact strength, and compressive strength.

  10. Chaotic Advection in Multi-component Melts for the Manufacture of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbrunnen, David

    2011-10-01

    Several forces arise when different liquids are placed into contact. The relative importance of these forces depends on the sizes and shapes of liquid domains and also on molecular characteristics of the liquids. When the liquids are agitated and in the absence of interdiffusion, a composite structure results that is defined by the spatial extent and size of each liquid domain in the presence of the other. Shaking a bottle with about equal parts of water and oil gives a structure that resembles a household sponge, for example. If the oil volume is much smaller than the water volume, oil droplets result instead. In polymer blends and composites, the structure can have feature sizes at the micron scale or smaller. Little has been known about the variety of structural types that can be formed because current information is based on mixing machinery that intrinsically restricts structural outcomes. This shortcoming has important consequences because physical properties of composite materials obtained by solidifying the structured liquids depend appreciably on structure characteristics. A recent approach to overcome this shortcoming makes use of chaotic advection to establish conditions that organize liquid domains into numerous thin layers. A multi-layer construction undergoes morphological changes in situ. Progressive structure development arises, whereby a specific structure leads in sequence to a morphologically different structure. A new manufacturing technology has resulted which allows control of the internal structure in extruded plastic materials. Micro- and nanostructured materials have been obtained. On-line process control allows rapid optimization of physical properties. In this presentation, the underlying physics will be described, examples of novel materials and their applications will be shown, and research opportunities will be highlighted.

  11. Dual energy CT inspection of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite combined with metal components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Vavrik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the inspection of carbon fibre reinforced plastic composites (CFRP combined with metal components. It is well known that the high absorption of metallic parts degrades the quality of radiographic measurements (contrast and causes typical metal artefacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT reconstruction. It will be shown that these problems can be successfully solved utilizing the dual energy CT method (DECT, which is typically used for the material decomposition of complex objects. In other words, DECT can help differentiate object components with a similar overall attenuation or visualise low attenuation components that are next to high attenuation ones. The application of DECT to analyse honeycomb sandwich panels and CFRP parts joined with metal fasteners will be presented in the article.

  12. Progress in composite structure and space construction systems technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodle, J. B.; Jenkins, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of deployable and fabricated composite trusses for large space structures by NASA and private industry is reviewed. Composite materials technology is discussed with a view toward fabrication processes and the characteristics of finished truss beams. Advances in roll-forming open section caps from graphite-composite strip material and new ultrasonic welding techniques are outlined. Vacuum- and gravity-effect test results show that the ultrasonic welding of graphite-thermoplastic materials in space is feasible. The structural characteristics of a prototype truss segment are presented. A new deployable graphite-composite truss with high packaging density for broad application to large space platforms is described.

  13. Annotating the structure and components of a nanoparticle formulation using computable string expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dennis G; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Chappell, Alan R; Baker, Nathan A

    2012-12-31

    Nanoparticle formulations that are being developed and tested for various medical applications are typically multi-component systems that vary in their structure, chemical composition, and function. It is difficult to compare and understand the differences between the structural and chemical descriptions of hundreds and thousands of nanoparticle formulations found in text documents. We have developed a string nomenclature to create computable string expressions that identify and enumerate the different high-level types of material parts of a nanoparticle formulation and represent the spatial order of their connectivity to each other. The string expressions are intended to be used as IDs, along with terms that describe a nanoparticle formulation and its material parts, in data sharing documents and nanomaterial research databases. The strings can be parsed and represented as a directed acyclic graph. The nodes of the graph can be used to display the string ID, name and other text descriptions of the nanoparticle formulation or its material part, while the edges represent the connectivity between the material parts with respect to the whole nanoparticle formulation. The different patterns in the string expressions can be searched for and used to compare the structure and chemical components of different nanoparticle formulations. The proposed string nomenclature is extensible and can be applied along with ontology terms to annotate the complete description of nanoparticles formulations.

  14. Structural materials requirements for in-vessel components of fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, B. van der

    2000-01-01

    The economic production of fusion energy is determined by principal choices such as using magnetic plasma confinement or generating inertial fusion energy. The first generation power plants will use deuterium and tritium mixtures as fuel, producing large amounts of highly energetic neutrons resulting in radiation damage in materials. In the far future the advanced fuels, 3 He or 11 B, determine power plant designs with less radiation damage than in the first generation. The first generation power plants design must anticipate radiation damage. Solid sacrificing armour or liquid layers could limit component replacements costs to economic levels. There is more than radiation damage resistance to determine the successful application of structural materials. High endurance against cyclic loading is a prominent requirement, both for magnetic and inertial fusion energy power plants. For high efficiency and compactness of the plant, elevated temperature behaviour should be attractive. Safety and environmental requirements demand that materials have low activation potential and little toxic effects under both normal and accident conditions. The long-term contenders for fusion power plant components near the plasma are materials in the range from innovative steels, such as reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, to highly advanced ceramic composites based on silicon carbide, and chromium alloys. The steels follow an evolutionary path to basic plant efficiencies. The competition on the energy market in the middle of the next century might necessitate the riskier but more rewarding development of SiCSiC composites or chromium alloys

  15. No Longer the Outlier: Updating the Air Component Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    COCOM) with a highly competent air component that is capable of con- ducting and supporting air, space, and cyberspace operations within its assigned...standardized framework and test bed for new concepts.1 Building on the AOC history and current framework, the air component is a single entity made of...AFIs increasing the potential for gaps and seams in the C2 of air, space, and cyberspace operations. Combatant Commander C-NAF Commander AOC/CC A2A1

  16. Composite materials application on FORMOSAT-5 remote sensing instrument structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chueh Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite material has been widely applied in space vehicle structures due to its light weight and designed stiffness modulus. Some special mechanical properties that cannot be changed in general metal materials, such as low CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion and directional material stiffness can be artificially adjusted in composite materials to meet the user’s requirements. Space-qualified Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP composite materials are applied In the FORMOSAT-5 Remote Sensing (RSI structure because of its light weight and low CTE characteristics. The RSI structural elements include the primary mirror supporting plate, secondary mirror supporting ring, and supporting frame. These elements are designed, manufactured, and verified using composite materials to meet specifications. The structure manufacturing process, detailed material properties, and CFRP structural element validation methods are introduced in this paper.

  17. Compton imaging tomography for nondestructive evaluation of large multilayer aircraft components and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Volodymyr; Grubsky, Victor; Zahiri, Feraidoon

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel NDT/NDE tool for non-contact, single-sided 3D inspection of aerospace components, based on Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) technique, which is applicable to large, non-uniform, and/or multilayer structures made of composites or lightweight metals. CIT is based on the registration of Compton-scattered X-rays, and permits the reconstruction of the full 3D (tomographic) image of the inspected objects. Unlike conventional computerized tomography (CT), CIT requires only single-sided access to objects, and therefore can be applied to large structures without their disassembly. The developed tool provides accurate detection, identification, and precise 3D localizations and measurements of any possible internal and surface defects (corrosions, cracks, voids, delaminations, porosity, and inclusions), and also disbonds, core and skin defects, and intrusion of foreign fluids (e.g., fresh and salt water, oil) inside of honeycomb sandwich structures. The NDE capabilities of the system were successfully demonstrated on various aerospace structure samples provided by several major aerospace companies. Such a CIT-based tool can detect and localize individual internal defects with dimensions about 1-2 mm3, and honeycomb disbond defects less than 6 mm by 6 mm area with the variations in the thickness of the adhesive by 100 m. Current maximum scanning speed of aircraft/spacecraft structures is about 5-8 min/ft2 (50-80 min/m2).

  18. Structure and Properties of High Symmetry Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-27

    In Part I of this study, 3-D fiber architectures were classified according to the method of manufacture, symmetry and geometric isotopy . It was...concluded that a classification scheme based on geometric isotopy provides the most efficient and useful method for the modelling of the 3-D composite

  19. Diamond structures grown from polymer composite nanofibers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Potocký, Štěpán; Kromka, Alexander; Babchenko, Oleg; Rezek, Bohuslav; Martinová, L.; Pokorný, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2013), s. 519-521 ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0910; GA ČR GAP205/12/0908 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chemical vapour deposition * composite polymer * nanocrystalline diamond * nanofiber sheet * SEM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  20. Species composition, Plant Community structure and Natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Floristic composition and environmental factors characterizing coffee forests in southwest Ethiopia. Forest. Ecology and Management, 255: 2138-2150. Tadesse Woldemariam. 2003. Vegetation of the Yayu forest in Southwest Ethiopia: Impacts of human use and Implications for In situ conservation of Wild Coffea arabica L.

  1. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-06

    Sebald [3] used extrusion methods to produce fibers with a platinum core surrounded by a PNN-PZT/polymer binder which was fired to leave a platinum/PNN... multilayered inclusions. However, the model’s capability to estimate the electroelastic properties of the multiphase piezoelectric composites is yet

  2. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    thickness from ~500nm to 20mm •Other perovskite compositions can be synthesized 2q Henry A Sodano – AFOSR Mech. of Multifunctional and...films Henry A Sodano – AFOSR Mech. of Multifunctional and Microsystems Review – July 31, 2012 ZnO Growth on Carbon Fibers • Solution based growth

  3. Bi-Metallic Composite Structures With Designed Internal Residual Stress Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) have a unique ability to recover small amounts of plastic strain through a temperature induced phase change. For these materials, mechanical displacement can be accomplished by heating the structure to induce a phase change, through which some of the plastic strain previously introduced to the structure can be reversed. This paper introduces a concept whereby an SMA phase is incorporated into a conventional alloy matrix in a co-continuous reticulated arrangement forming a bi-metallic composite structure. Through memory activation of the mechanically constrained SMA phase, a controlled residual stress field is developed in the interior of the structure. The presented experimental data show that the memory activation of the SMA composite component significantly changes the residual stress distribution in the overall structure. Designing the structural arrangement of the two phases to produce a controlled residual stress field could be used to create structures that have much improved durability and damage tolerance properties.

  4. Cyanate ester-nanoparticle composites as multifunctional structural capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leon, J. Eliseo

    An important goal of engineering is to increase the energy density of electrical energy storage devices used to deliver power onboard mobile platforms. Equally important is the goal to reduce the overall mass of the vehicles transporting these devices to achieve increased fuel and cost efficiency. One approach to meeting both these objectives is to develop multifunctional systems that serve as both energy storage and load bearing structural devices. Multifunctional devices consist of constituents that individually perform a subset of the overall desired functions. However, the synergy achieved by the combination of each constituent's characteristics allows for system-level benefits that cannot be achieved by simply optimizing the separate subsystems. We investigated multifunctional systems consisting of light weight polymer matrix and high dielectric constant fillers to achieve these objectives. The monomer of bisphenol E cyanate ester exhibited excellent processing ability because of its low room temperature viscosity. Additionally, the fully cured thermoset demonstrated excellent thermal stability, specific strength and stiffness. Fillers, including multi-walled carbon nanotubes, nanometer scale barium titanate and nanometer scale calcium copper titanate, offer high dielectric constants that raised the effective dielectric constant of the polymer matrix composite. The combination of high epsilon'and high dielectric strength produce high energy density components exhibiting increased electrical energy storage. Mechanical (load bearing) improvements of the PMCs were attributed to covalently bonded nanometer and micrometer sized filler particles, as well as the continuous glass fiber, integrated into the resin systems which increased the structural characteristics of the cured composites. Breakdown voltage tests and dynamic mechanical analysis were employed to demonstrate that precise combinations of these constituents, under the proper processing conditions, can

  5. Characterization of adhesive from oysters: A structural and compositional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Erik

    The inability for man-made adhesives to set in wet or humid environments is an ongoing challenging the design of biomedical and marine adhesive materials. However, we see that nature has already overcome this challenge. Mussels, barnacles, oysters and sandcastle worms all have unique mechanisms by which they attach themselves to surfaces. By understanding what evolution has already spent millions of years perfecting, we can design novel adhesive materials inspired by nature's elegant designs. The well-studied mussel is currently the standard for design of marine inspired biomimetic polymers. In the work presented here, we aim to provide new insights into the adhesive produced by the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Unlike the mussel, which produces thread-like plaques comprised of DOPA containing-protein, the oyster secretes an organic-inorganic hybrid adhesive as it settles and grows onto a surface. This form of adhesion renders the oyster to be permanently fixed in place. Over time, hundreds of thousands of oyster grow and agglomerate to form extensive reef structures. These reefs are not only essential to survival of the oyster, but are also vital to intertidal ecosystems. While the shell of the oyster has been extensively studied, curiously, only a few conflicting insights have been made into the nature of the adhesive and contact zone between shell and substrate, and even lesfs information has been ascertained on organic and inorganic composition. In this work, we provide microscopy and histochemical studies to characterize the structure and composition of the adhesive, using oyster in the adult and juvenile stages of life. Preliminary work on extracting and characterizing organic components through collaborative help with solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and proteomics are also detailed here. We aim to provide a full, comprehensive characterization of oyster adhesive so that in the future, we may apply what we learn to the design of new materials.

  6. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  7. the use and integration of Tekla Structures components for steel connections' calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Starešinič, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this graduation thesis is the development of Tekla Structures integrated Excel Macro files, which allow for design of steel connections: moment connection with end plate, pinned connection with fin plate and bracing connection. After building a model of a steel structures and appliying components for steel connections in Tekla Structures, a user can export component data from Tekla Structures to Excel Macro using a ComponentVariableImporter tool. Excel Macro ...

  8. A principal components approach to parent-to-newborn body composition associations in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veena, Sargoor R; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Wills, Andrew K; Hill, Jacqueline C; Fall, Caroline Hd

    2009-02-24

    Size at birth is influenced by environmental factors, like maternal nutrition and parity, and by genes. Birth weight is a composite measure, encompassing bone, fat and lean mass. These may have different determinants. The main purpose of this paper was to use anthropometry and principal components analysis (PCA) to describe maternal and newborn body composition, and associations between them, in an Indian population. We also compared maternal and paternal measurements (body mass index (BMI) and height) as predictors of newborn body composition. Weight, height, head and mid-arm circumferences, skinfold thicknesses and external pelvic diameters were measured at 30 +/- 2 weeks gestation in 571 pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India. Paternal height and weight were also measured. At birth, detailed neonatal anthropometry was performed. Unrotated and varimax rotated PCA was applied to the maternal and neonatal measurements. Rotated PCA reduced maternal measurements to 4 independent components (fat, pelvis, height and muscle) and neonatal measurements to 3 components (trunk+head, fat, and leg length). An SD increase in maternal fat was associated with a 0.16 SD increase (beta) in neonatal fat (p maternal parity, newborn sex and socio-economic status). Maternal pelvis, height and (for male babies) muscle predicted neonatal trunk+head (beta = 0. 09 SD; p = 0.017, beta = 0.12 SD; p = 0.006 and beta = 0.27 SD; p maternal BMI predicted neonatal fat (beta = 0.20 SD; p neonatal trunk+head (beta = 0.15 SD; p = 0.001). Both maternal (beta = 0.12 SD; p = 0.002) and paternal height (beta = 0.09 SD; p = 0.030) predicted neonatal trunk+head but the associations became weak and statistically non-significant in multivariate analysis. Only paternal height predicted neonatal leg length (beta = 0.15 SD; p = 0.003). Principal components analysis is a useful method to describe neonatal body composition and its determinants. Newborn

  9. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  10. Abstract behavior types : a foundation model for components and their composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Arbab (Farhad)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe notion of Abstract Data Type (ADT) has served as a foundation model for structured and object oriented programming for some thirty years. The current trend in software engineering toward component based systems requires a foundation model as well. The most basic inherent property of

  11. The component structure of conformal supergravity invariants in six dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butter, Daniel; Novak, Joseph; Tartaglino-Mazzucchelli, Gabriele

    2017-05-01

    In the recent paper arXiv:1606.02921, the two invariant actions for 6D N=(1,0) conformal supergravity were constructed in superspace, corresponding to the supersymmetrization of C 3 and C□ C. In this paper, we provide the translation from superspace to the component formulation of superconformal tensor calculus, and we give the full component actions of these two invariants. As a second application, we build the component form for the supersymmetric F□ F action coupled to conformal supergravity. Exploiting the fact that the N=(2,0) Weyl multiplet has a consistent truncation to N=(1,0), we then verify that there is indeed only a single N=(2,0) conformal supergravity invariant and reconstruct most of its bosonic terms by uplifting a certain linear combination of N=(1,0) invariants.

  12. Structural Composites with Intrinsic Multifunctionality, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a multifunctional, structural material for applications in terrestrial and space-based platforms used for instrumentation in earth observation is...

  13. Structural Composites with Intrinsic Multifunctionality, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of multifunctional, structural materials for applications in terrestrial and space-based platforms is proposed. The principle innovation is the...

  14. Woody species composition and structure of Gurra Farda forest

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *

    2008-03-02

    Mar 2, 2008 ... Therefore, Woody species composition and structure of Gurra Farda forest was studied from November 2005 to September 2006. ... land use systems such as coffee and tea plantations at present, threatens the few ... woody species composition of the forest and to documents its status that gives baseline ...

  15. Progressive failure analysis of fibrous composite materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahei-El-din, Yehia A.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description is given of the modifications implemented in the PAFAC finite element program for the simulation of progressive failure in fibrous composite materials and structures. Details of the memory allocation, input data, and the new subroutines are given. Also, built-in failure criteria for homogeneous and fibrous composite materials are described.

  16. Structure and properties of compositions based on petroleum sulfonic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutorskii, I.A.; Sultanova, A.S.; Belkina, E.V.; Fomin, A.G. [Lomonosov Academy of Fine Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    Colloidal characteristics of compositions based on petroleum sulfonic acids were studied. Neutralized heavy oil residue exhibits surface-active properties and contains an ultradisperse filler. Analysis of the compositions by size-exclusion-chromatography shows deep structural changes in the heavy acid residue upon neutralization with calcium carbonate.

  17. Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites: Structure and property effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation tokamak reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require high thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composites and other materials, such as beryllium, to protect their plasma facing components from the anticipated high heat fluxes. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce a large neutron flux. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HAIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORAL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (da) at an irradiation temperature of ∼600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated here included unidirectional, two- directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Irradiation induced dimensional changes are reported for the materials and related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, carbon-carbon composite material dimensional changes are discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. Neutron irradiation induced reductions in the thermal conductivity of two, three-directional carbon-carbon composites are reported, and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is demonstrated. Irradiation induced strength changes are reported for several carbon-carbon composite materials and are explained in terms of in-crystal and composite structural effects

  18. Composite Structures Damage Tolerance Analysis Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, James B.; Goyal, Vinay K.; Klug, John C.; Rome, Jacob I.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the results of a literature review as part of the development of composite hardware fracture control guidelines funded by NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) under contract NNL04AA09B. The objectives of the overall development tasks are to provide a broad information and database to the designers, analysts, and testing personnel who are engaged in space flight hardware production.

  19. Nonlinear analysis for high-temperature multilayered fiber composite structures. M.S. Thesis; [turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A unique upward-integrated top-down-structured approach is presented for nonlinear analysis of high-temperature multilayered fiber composite structures. Based on this approach, a special purpose computer code was developed (nonlinear COBSTRAN) which is specifically tailored for the nonlinear analysis of tungsten-fiber-reinforced superalloy (TFRS) composite turbine blade/vane components of gas turbine engines. Special features of this computational capability include accounting of; micro- and macro-heterogeneity, nonlinear (stess-temperature-time dependent) and anisotropic material behavior, and fiber degradation. A demonstration problem is presented to mainfest the utility of the upward-integrated top-down-structured approach, in general, and to illustrate the present capability represented by the nonlinear COBSTRAN code. Preliminary results indicate that nonlinear COBSTRAN provides the means for relating the local nonlinear and anisotropic material behavior of the composite constituents to the global response of the turbine blade/vane structure.

  20. Composite Structure Monitoring using Direct Write Sensors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project seeks to develop and demonstrate a suite of sensor products to monitor the health of composite structures. Sensors will be made using...

  1. Microbial structure and chemical components of aerosols caused by rotating brushes in a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yunping; Li, Lin; Liu, Junxin; Zhang, Mengzhu

    2012-11-01

    Bacterial community structure and the chemical components in aerosols caused by rotating brushes in an Orbal oxidation ditch were assessed in a Beijing municipal wastewater treatment plant. Air samples were collected at different distances from the aerosol-generating rotating brushes. Molecular culture-independent methods were used to characterize the community structure of the airborne bacteria in each sample regardless of cell culturability. A clone library of 16S rDNA directly amplified from air DNA of each sample was constructed and sequenced to analyze the community composition and diversity. Insoluble particles and water-soluble ions emitted with microorganisms in aerosols were analysis by a scanning electron microscope together with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and ion chromatogram analyzer. In total, most of the identified bacteria were Proteobacteria. The majority of sequences near the rotating brushes (the main source of the bioaerosols) were Proteobacteria (62.97 %) with β-(18.52 %) and γ-(44.45 %) subgroups and Bacteroidetes (29.63 %). Complex patterns were observed for each sampling location, suggesting a highly diverse community structure, comparable to that found in water in the Orbal oxidation ditch. Accompany with microorganisms, 46.36 μg/m(3) of SO (4) (2-) , 29.35 μg/m(3) of Cl(-), 21.51 μg/m(3) of NO (3) (-) , 19.76 μg/m(3) of NH (4) (+) , 11.42 μg/m(3) of PO (4) (3-) , 6.18 μg/m(3) of NO (2) (-) , and elements of Mg, Cl, K, Na, Fe, S, and P were detected from the air near the aerosols source. Differences in the structure of the bacterial communities and chemical components in the aerosols observed between sampling sites indicated important site-related variability. The composition of microorganisms in water was one of the most important sources of bacterial communities in bioaerosols. Chemical components in bioaerosols may provide a media for airborne microorganism attachment, as well as a suitable microenvironment for

  2. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOLID COMPONENT OF WELDING AEROSOL. I. PHASE COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Rakitskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The phase composition of the solid component of welding aerosol (SCWA obtained as a result of metal welding with electrodes of ANO-4 and TsL-11 types manufactured according to ISO 2560 E432R 21 and ISO E19.9NbB20 standards, respectively, and differing in com-position of their wires and coatings was determined with the help of a Siemens D500 diffrac- a Siemens D500 diffrac-tometer supplied with the manufacturer’s software. Four and thirteen phases were identified in SCWA-ANO-4 and SCWA-TsL-11, respectively. Evaluation of crystallite sizes by the use of the Scherer equation showed that the crystallites formed in the course of welding with a TsL-11 type electrode are larger than those in the case of an ANO-4 type one: 65-89 nm and 30-49 nm, respectively.

  3. Diamond machining of micro-optical components and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläbe, Ralf; Riemer, Oltmann

    2010-05-01

    Diamond machining originates from the 1950s to 1970s in the USA. This technology was originally designed for machining of metal optics at macroscopic dimensions with so far unreached tolerances. During the following decades the machine tools, the monocrystalline diamond cutting tools, the workpiece materials and the machining processes advanced to even higher precision and flexibility. For this reason also the fabrication of small functional components like micro optics at a large spectrum of geometries became technologically and economically feasible. Today, several kinds of fast tool machining and multi axis machining operations can be applied for diamond machining of micro optical components as well as diffractive optical elements. These parts can either be machined directly as single or individual component or as mold insert for mass production by plastic replication. Examples are multi lens arrays, micro mirror arrays and fiber coupling lenses. This paper will give an overview about the potentials and limits of the current diamond machining technology with respect to micro optical components.

  4. Fire Response of Loaded Composite Structures - Experiments and Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Burdette, Jason A.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, the thermo-mechanical response and failure of loaded, fire-exposed composite structures was studied. Unique experimental equipment and procedures were developed and experiments were performed to assess the effects of mechanical loading and fire exposure on the service life of composite beams. A series of analytical models was assembled to describe the fire growth and structural response processes for the system used in the experiments. This series of models consists of a fire...

  5. Peak earthquake response of structures under multi-component excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jianwei; Liang, Zach; Chu, Yi-Lun; Lee, George C.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate estimation of the peak seismic responses of structures is important in earthquake resistant design. The internal force distributions and the seismic responses of structures are quite complex, since ground motions are multi-directional. One key issue is the uncertainty of the incident angle between the directions of ground motion and the reference axes of the structure. Different assumed seismic incidences can result in different peak values within the scope of design spectrum analysis for a given structure and earthquake ground motion record combination. Using time history analysis to determine the maximum structural responses excited by a given earthquake record requires repetitive calculations to determine the critical incident angle. This paper presents a transformation approach for relatively accurate and rapid determination of the maximum peak responses of a linear structure subjected to three-dimensional excitations within all possible seismic incident angles. The responses can be deformations, internal forces, strains and so on. An irregular building structure model is established using SAP2000 program. Several typical earthquake records and an artificial white noise are applied to the structure model to illustrate the variation of the maximum structural responses for different incident angles. Numerical results show that for many structural parameters, the variation can be greater than 100%. This method can be directly applied to time history analysis of structures using existing computer software to determine the peak responses without carrying out the analyses for all possible incident angles. It can also be used to verify and/or modify aseismic designs by using response spectrum analysis.

  6. Neuromelanins of human brain have soluble and insoluble components with dolichols attached to the melanic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Engelen

    Full Text Available Neuromelanins (NMs are neuronal pigments of melanic-lipidic type which accumulate during aging. They are involved in protective and degenerative mechanisms depending on the cellular context, however their structures are still poorly understood. NMs from nine human brain areas were analyzed in detail. Elemental analysis led to identification of three types of NM, while infrared spectroscopy showed that NMs from neurons of substantia nigra and locus coeruleus, which selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease, have similar structure but different from NMs from brain regions not targeted by the disease. Synthetic melanins containing Fe and bovine serum albumin were prepared to model the natural product and help clarifying the structure of NMs. Extensive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies showed the presence of dolichols both in the soluble and insoluble parts of NM. Diffusion measurements demonstrated that the dimethyl sulfoxide soluble components consist of oligomeric precursors with MWs in the range 1.4-52 kDa, while the insoluble part contains polymers of larger size but with a similar composition. These data suggest that the selective vulnerability of neurons of substantia nigra and locus coeruleus in Parkinson's disease might depend on the structure of the pigment. Moreover, they allow to propose a pathway for NM biosynthesis in human brain.

  7. Insights into Bacteriophage T5 Structure from Analysis of Its Morphogenesis Genes and Protein Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Ponchon, Luc; Lurz, Rudi; Chami, Mohamed; Flayhan, Ali; Renouard, Madalena; Huet, Alexis; Decottignies, Paulette; Davidson, Alan R.; Breyton, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5 represents a large family of lytic Siphoviridae infecting Gram-negative bacteria. The low-resolution structure of T5 showed the T=13 geometry of the capsid and the unusual trimeric organization of the tail tube, and the assembly pathway of the capsid was established. Although major structural proteins of T5 have been identified in these studies, most of the genes encoding the morphogenesis proteins remained to be identified. Here, we combine a proteomic analysis of T5 particles with a bioinformatic study and electron microscopic immunolocalization to assign function to the genes encoding the structural proteins, the packaging proteins, and other nonstructural components required for T5 assembly. A head maturation protease that likely accounts for the cleavage of the different capsid proteins is identified. Two other proteins involved in capsid maturation add originality to the T5 capsid assembly mechanism: the single head-to-tail joining protein, which closes the T5 capsid after DNA packaging, and the nicking endonuclease responsible for the single-strand interruptions in the T5 genome. We localize most of the tail proteins that were hitherto uncharacterized and provide a detailed description of the tail tip composition. Our findings highlight novel variations of viral assembly strategies and of virion particle architecture. They further recommend T5 for exploring phage structure and assembly and for deciphering conformational rearrangements that accompany DNA transfer from the capsid to the host cytoplasm. PMID:24198424

  8. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  9. Nominal and Structural Subtyping in Component-Based Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    In nominal type systems, the subtype relation is between names of types, and subtype links are explicitly declared. In structural type systems, names are irrelevant; in determining type compatibility, only the structure of types is considered, and a type name is just an abbreviation for the full...

  10. Chemical Composition of the Volatile Components of Tropaeolum majus L. (Garden Nasturtium from North Western Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. BENYELLES

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil from Tropaeolum majus L. aerial parts, a plant native to North Western Algeria, was obtained by hydrodistillation. The oil volatile components were identified by a combination of gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID, GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS techniques, and NMR spectroscopy. Nine components representing 92.0 % of the essential oil total (GC/FID chromatogram were identified. The most abundant compounds were benzyl isothiocyanate (82.5 %, benzene acetonitrile (3.9 % and 2-phenylethyl isovalerate (2.9 %. Higher content in nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds accounting to 86.4 % of the volatile fraction composition of T. majus were quantified.

  11. Foundations of compositional models: structural properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroušek, Radim; Kratochvíl, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2015), s. 2-25 ISSN 0308-1079 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20012S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP403/12/2175 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : multidimensional distribution * conditional independence * composition * semigraphoid properties * running intersection property Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/MTR/jirousek-0442412.pdf

  12. Full-field characterization of thermal diffusivity in continuous-fiber ceramic composite materials and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckenrider, J. Scott; Ellingson, William A.; Rothermel, Scott A.

    1995-03-01

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for various high-temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. Among the material classes of interest for such applications are silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC(f)/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC(f)/Si3N4), aluminum oxide (Al2O3)-fiber-reinforced Al2O3 (Al2O3(f)/Al2O3), and others. In such composites, the condition of the interfaces (between the fibers and matrix) are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component (as are conventional mechanical defects such as cracks, porosity, etc.). For example, oxidation of this interface (especially on carbon coated fibers) can seriously degrade both mechanical and thermal properties. Furthermore, thermal shock damage can degrade the matrix through extensive crack generation. A nondestructive evaluation method that could be used to assess interface condition, thermal shock damage, and to detect other `defects' would thus be very beneficial, especially if applicable to full-scale components. One method under development uses infrared thermal imaging to provide `single-shot' full-field assessment of the distribution of thermal properties in large components by measuring thermal diffusivity. By applying digital image filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, we can achieve acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system developed at Argonne National Laboratory has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density variations, and variations in oxidation resistance coatings in a full array of test specimens. Subscale CFCC components with nonplanar geometries have also been studied for manufacturing-induced variations in thermal properties.

  13. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  14. Chemical composition and antiprotozoal activities of Colombian Lippia spp essential oils and their major components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Patricia; Milena Leal, Sandra; Herrera, Laura Viviana; Martinez, Jairo Rene; Stashenko, Elena

    2010-03-01

    The chemical composition and biological activities of 19 essential oils and seven of their major components were tested against free and intracellular forms of Leishmania chagasi and Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as well as Vero and THP-1 mammalian cell lines. The essential oils were obtained from different species of Lippia, a widely distributed genus of Colombian plants. They were extracted by microwave radiation-assisted hydro-distillation and characterised by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major components were geranial, neral, limonene, nerol, carvacrol, p-cymene, gamma-terpinene, carvone and thymol. The essential oil of Lippia alba exhibited the highest activity against T. cruzi epimastigotes and intracellular amastigotes with an IC50 of 5.5 microg/mL and 12.2 microg/mL, respectively. The essential oil of Lippia origanoides had an IC50 of 4.4 microg/mL in L. chagasi promastigotes and exhibited no toxicity in mammalian cells. Thymol (IC50 3.2 +/- 0.4 microg/mL) and S-carvone (IC50 6.1 +/- 2.2 microg/mL), two of the major components of the active essential oils, were active on intracellular amastigotes of T. cruziinfected Vero cells, with a selective index greater than 10. None of the essential oils or major components tested in this study was active on amastigotes of L. chagasi infected THP-1 cells.

  15. Chemical composition and antiprotozoal activities of Colombian Lippia spp essential oils and their major components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Escobar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and biological activities of 19 essential oils and seven of their major components were tested against free and intracellular forms of Leishmania chagasi and Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as well as Vero and THP-1 mammalian cell lines. The essential oils were obtained from different species of Lippia, a widely distributed genus of Colombian plants. They were extracted by microwave radiation-assisted hydro-distillation and characterised by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major components were geranial, neral, limonene, nerol, carvacrol, p-cymene, γ-terpinene, carvone and thymol. The essential oil of Lippia alba exhibited the highest activity against T. cruzi epimastigotes and intracellular amastigotes with an IC50 of 5.5 μg/mL and 12.2 μg/mL, respectively. The essential oil of Lippia origanoides had an IC50 of 4.4 μg/mL in L. chagasi promastigotes and exhibited no toxicity in mammalian cells. Thymol (IC50 3.2 ± 0.4 μg/mL and S-carvone (IC50 6.1 ± 2.2 μg/mL, two of the major components of the active essential oils, were active on intracellular amastigotes of T. cruziinfected Vero cells, with a selective index greater than 10. None of the essential oils or major components tested in this study was active on amastigotes of L. chagasi infected THP-1 cells.

  16. Development of Structural Core Components for Breeder Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2013-01-01

    Core structural materials: • The desire is to have only fuel in the core, structural material form 25% of the total core: – To support and to retain the fuel in position; – Provide necessary ducts to make coolant flow through & transfer/remove heat. • For 500 MWe FBR with Oxide fuel (Peak Linear Power 450 W/cm), total fuel pins required in the core are of the order 39277 pins (both inner & outer core Fuel SA); • Considering 217 pins/Fuel SA there are 181 Fuel SA wrapper tubes • These structural materials see hostile core with max temperature and neutron flux

  17. Composition-Based Prediction of Temperature-Dependent Thermophysical Food Properties: Reevaluating Component Groups and Prediction Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, David Martin; Frelka, John C; Heldman, Dennis Ray

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of temperature-dependent thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity, density, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity) is an important component of process design for food manufacturing. Current models for prediction of thermophysical properties of foods are based on the composition, specifically, fat, carbohydrate, protein, fiber, water, and ash contents, all of which change with temperature. The objectives of this investigation were to reevaluate and improve the prediction expressions for thermophysical properties. Previously published data were analyzed over the temperature range from 10 to 150 °C. These data were analyzed to create a series of relationships between the thermophysical properties and temperature for each food component, as well as to identify the dependence of the thermophysical properties on more specific structural properties of the fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. Results from this investigation revealed that the relationships between the thermophysical properties of the major constituents of foods and temperature can be statistically described by linear expressions, in contrast to the current polynomial models. Links between variability in thermophysical properties and structural properties were observed. Relationships for several thermophysical properties based on more specific constituents have been identified. Distinctions between simple sugars (fructose, glucose, and lactose) and complex carbohydrates (starch, pectin, and cellulose) have been proposed. The relationships between the thermophysical properties and proteins revealed a potential correlation with the molecular weight of the protein. The significance of relating variability in constituent thermophysical properties with structural properties--such as molecular mass--could significantly improve composition-based prediction models and, consequently, the effectiveness of process design. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. COMPONENT STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONS OF THE EDUCATION QUALITY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM OF THE FUTURE ECONOMISTS

    OpenAIRE

    Kostiantyn S. Khoruzhyi

    2014-01-01

    In this article, problems and features of forming the educational quality management information system for the future economists are examined, its component structure is presented and the significance and functions of every component are explained. The functions, which bind the components mentioned to each other, are also examined. To ensure functioning of the developed components of the EQMIS an indicator system is proposed. The article also covers the program components of this system, for...

  19. Structure and Composition of Protein Bodies from Wild-Type and High-Lysine Barley Endosperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Protein bodies were isolated from 13 and 28 day old endosperms of barley mutant 1508 and its wild type, Bomi barley. The fine structure of the isolated protein bodies was determined by electron microscopy, and the proteins present in the preparations characterized by amino-acid analysis and SDS...... with a granular component. Particles with the same structure were present in the protein body preparation from the mutant, where, however, the granular component was the most prominent. Amino-acid composition and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the proteins from the protein body preparation revealed...

  20. Structures and Performance of Graphene/Polyimide Composite Graphite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry-wet spinning process was used to gain graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers, then graphene/polyimide composite carbon and graphite fibers were obtained through carbonized and graphitized. Different graphene oxide contents of the composite carbon and graphite fibers were measured by thermal gravimetric analysis, Raman, mechanical properties, electrical properties,SEM and so on. The results show that when the GO content is 0.3%(mass fraction,the same below, the thermal property of the graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers is the best. The mechanical and electrical properties are obriously improved by the addition of GO, graphitization degree also increases. When the composite carbon fibers are treated at 2800℃, GO content increases to 2.0%, the thermal conductivity of the composite graphite fibers reaches 435.57W·m-1·K-1 and cross-section structures of carbon fibers are more compact.

  1. Results of high heat flux testing of W/CuCrZr multilayer composites with percolating microstructure for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greuner, Henri, E-mail: henri.greuner@ipp.mpg.de; Zivelonghi, Alessandro; Böswirth, Bernd; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of the performance of plasma-facing components made of W and CuCrZr. • Functionally graded composite at the interface of W and CuCrZr to mitigate the CTE. • A three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed. • Design of water-cooled divertor components up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} heat load for e.g. DEMO. • HHF tests up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} were successfully performed. - Abstract: Reliable joining of tungsten to copper is a major issue in the design of water-cooled divertor components for future fusion reactors. One of the suggested advanced engineering solutions is to use functionally graded composite interlayers. Recently, the authors have developed a novel processing route for fabricating multi-layer graded W/CuCrZr composites. Previous characterization confirmed that the composite materials possess enhanced strength compared to the matrix alloy and shows reasonable ductility up to 300 °C indicating large potential to extend the operation temperature limit. Furthermore, a three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed as a graded interlayer between the W armour and CuCrZr heat sink. In this study, we investigated the structural performance of the graded joint. Three water-cooled mock-ups of a flat tile type component were fabricated using electron beam welding and thermally loaded at the hydrogen neutral beam test facility GLADIS. Cycling tests at 10 MW/m{sup 2} and screening tests up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} were successfully performed and confirmed the expected thermal performance of the compound. The measured temperature values were in good agreement with the prediction of finite element analysis. Microscopic investigation confirmed the structural integrity of the newly developed functionally graded composite after these tests.

  2. Results of high heat flux testing of W/CuCrZr multilayer composites with percolating microstructure for plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, Henri; Zivelonghi, Alessandro; Böswirth, Bernd; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Improvement of the performance of plasma-facing components made of W and CuCrZr. • Functionally graded composite at the interface of W and CuCrZr to mitigate the CTE. • A three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed. • Design of water-cooled divertor components up to 20 MW/m 2 heat load for e.g. DEMO. • HHF tests up to 20 MW/m 2 were successfully performed. - Abstract: Reliable joining of tungsten to copper is a major issue in the design of water-cooled divertor components for future fusion reactors. One of the suggested advanced engineering solutions is to use functionally graded composite interlayers. Recently, the authors have developed a novel processing route for fabricating multi-layer graded W/CuCrZr composites. Previous characterization confirmed that the composite materials possess enhanced strength compared to the matrix alloy and shows reasonable ductility up to 300 °C indicating large potential to extend the operation temperature limit. Furthermore, a three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed as a graded interlayer between the W armour and CuCrZr heat sink. In this study, we investigated the structural performance of the graded joint. Three water-cooled mock-ups of a flat tile type component were fabricated using electron beam welding and thermally loaded at the hydrogen neutral beam test facility GLADIS. Cycling tests at 10 MW/m 2 and screening tests up to 20 MW/m 2 were successfully performed and confirmed the expected thermal performance of the compound. The measured temperature values were in good agreement with the prediction of finite element analysis. Microscopic investigation confirmed the structural integrity of the newly developed functionally graded composite after these tests.

  3. Fatigue degradation and failure of rotating composite structures - Materials characterisation and underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamstedt, Kristofer; Andersen, Svend Ib Smidt

    2001-01-01

    The present review concerns rotating composite structures, in which fatigue degradation is of key concern for in-service failure. Such applications are for instance rotor blades in wind turbines, helicopter rotor blades, flywheels for energy storage,marine and aeronautical propellers, and rolls...... for paper machines. The purpose is to identify areas where impending efforts should be made to make better use of composite materials in these applications. In order to obtain better design methodologies,which would allow more reliable and slender structures, improved test methods are necessary. Furthermore......, the relation between structural, component and specimen test results should be better understood than what is presently the case. Improvedpredictive methods rely on a better understanding of the underlying damage mechanisms. With mechanism-based models, the component substructure or even the material...

  4. Soil Structure - A Neglected Component of Land-Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatichi, S.; Or, D.; Walko, R. L.; Vereecken, H.; Kollet, S. J.; Young, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Hengl, T.; Agam, N.; Avissar, R.

    2017-12-01

    Soil structure is largely absent in most standard sampling and measurements and in the subsequent parameterization of soil hydraulic properties deduced from soil maps and used in Earth System Models. The apparent omission propagates into the pedotransfer functions that deduce parameters of soil hydraulic properties primarily from soil textural information. Such simple parameterization is an essential ingredient in the practical application of any land surface model. Despite the critical role of soil structure (biopores formed by decaying roots, aggregates, etc.) in defining soil hydraulic functions, only a few studies have attempted to incorporate soil structure into models. They mostly looked at the effects on preferential flow and solute transport pathways at the soil profile scale; yet, the role of soil structure in mediating large-scale fluxes remains understudied. Here, we focus on rectifying this gap and demonstrating potential impacts on surface and subsurface fluxes and system wide eco-hydrologic responses. The study proposes a systematic way for correcting the soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions—accounting for soil-structure—with major implications for near saturated hydraulic conductivity. Modification to the basic soil hydraulic parameterization is assumed as a function of biological activity summarized by Gross Primary Production. A land-surface model with dynamic vegetation is used to carry out numerical simulations with and without the role of soil-structure for 20 locations characterized by different climates and biomes across the globe. Including soil structure affects considerably the partition between infiltration and runoff and consequently leakage at the base of the soil profile (recharge). In several locations characterized by wet climates, a few hundreds of mm per year of surface runoff become deep-recharge accounting for soil-structure. Changes in energy fluxes, total evapotranspiration and vegetation productivity

  5. Structure analysis of active components of traditional Chinese medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Qinglei; Liu, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) have been widely used for healing of different health problems for thousands of years. They have been used as therapeutic, complementary and alternative medicines. TCMs usually consist of dozens to hundreds of various compounds, which are extracted from raw...... herbal sources by aqueous or alcoholic solvents. Therefore, it is difficult to correlate the pharmaceutical effect to a specific lead compound in the TCMs. A detailed analysis of various components in TCMs has been a great challenge for modern analytical techniques in recent decades. In this chapter...

  6. Identification of damage in composite structures using Gaussian mixture model-processed Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Shuxian; Yue, Dong

    2018-04-01

    Composite materials have comprehensively better properties than traditional materials, and therefore have been more and more widely used, especially because of its higher strength-weight ratio. However, the damage of composite structures is usually varied and complicated. In order to ensure the security of these structures, it is necessary to monitor and distinguish the structural damage in a timely manner. Lamb wave-based structural health monitoring (SHM) has been proved to be effective in online structural damage detection and evaluation; furthermore, the characteristic parameters of the multi-mode Lamb wave varies in response to different types of damage in the composite material. This paper studies the damage identification approach for composite structures using the Lamb wave and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). The algorithm and principle of the GMM, and the parameter estimation, is introduced. Multi-statistical characteristic parameters of the excited Lamb waves are extracted, and the parameter space with reduced dimensions is adopted by principal component analysis (PCA). The damage identification system using the GMM is then established through training. Experiments on a glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composite laminate plate are conducted to verify the feasibility of the proposed approach in terms of damage classification. The experimental results show that different types of damage can be identified according to the value of the likelihood function of the GMM.

  7. Transition from glass to graphite in manufacture of composite aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffum, H. E.; Thompson, V. S.

    1978-01-01

    The transition from fiberglass reinforced plastic composites to graphite reinforced plastic composites is described. Structural fiberglass design and manufacturing background are summarized. How this experience provides a technology base for moving into graphite composite secondary structure and then to composite primary structure is considered. The technical requirements that must be fulfilled in the transition from glass to graphite composite structure are also included.

  8. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  9. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, T. D.

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included unidirectional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed.

  10. Variation in Biomass Composition Components among Forage, Biomass, Sorghum-Sudangrass, and Sweet Sorghum Types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefaniak, T. R.; Dahlberg, J. A.; Bean, B. W.; Dighe, N.; Wolfrum, E. J.; Rooney, W. L.

    2012-07-01

    Alternative biomass sources must be developed if the United States is to meet the goal in the U.S. Energy Security Act of 2007 to derive 30% of its petroleum from renewable sources, and several different biomass crops are currently in development. Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is one such crop that will be an important feedstock source for biofuel production. As composition influences productivity, there exists a need to understand the range in composition observed within the crop. The goal of this research was to assess the range in dietary fiber composition observed within different types of biomass sorghums. A total of 152 sorghum samples were divided into the four end-use types of sorghum: biomass, forage, sorghum-sudangrass, and sweet. These samples were analyzed chemically using dietary fiber analysis performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory using published protocols. Significant variation among the groups was detected for glucan and ash. Positive and highly significant correlations were detected between structural carbohydrates in the biomass and sweet sorghums while many of these correlations were negative or not significant in the forage and sorghum-sudangrass types. In addition, a wide range of variation was present within each group indicating that there is potential to manipulate the composition of the crop.

  11. Vegetation structure and floristic composition of Gergeda Anfillo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetation structure and floristic composition of Gergeda Anfillo Forest, West Ethiopia. ... Moreover, the forest housed 10 of the 24 national priority tree species and four plant communities were identified by cluster analysis. Structural analysis revealed that the forest is dominated by small sized trees and shrubs.

  12. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure (UCPS) for In-Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc., in conjunction with the Scorpius Space Launch Company, is developing a UCPS (Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure )for in-space propulsion. This innovative approach constitutes a clean break from traditional spacecraft design by combining what were traditionally separate primary and secondary support structures and metal propellant tanks into a single unit.

  13. Restorative Glass : Reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikonomopoulou, F.; Bristogianni, T.; Barou, L.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Nijsse, R.; Veer, F.A.; Henk, Schellen; van Schijndel, Jos

    2016-01-01

    The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and

  14. Analysis of Influence of Foaming Mixture Components on Structure and Properties of Foam Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandashova, N. S.; Goltsman, B. M.; Yatsenko, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    It is recommended to use high-quality thermal insulation materials to increase the energy efficiency of buildings. One of the best thermal insulation materials is foam glass - durable, porous material that is resistant to almost any effect of substance. Glass foaming is a complex process depending on the foaming mode and the initial mixture composition. This paper discusses the influence of all components of the mixture - glass powder, foaming agent, enveloping material and water - on the foam glass structure. It was determined that glass powder is the basis of the future material. A foaming agent forms a gas phase in the process of thermal decomposition. This aforementioned gas foams the viscous glass mass. The unreacted residue thus changes a colour of the material. The enveloping agent slows the foaming agent decomposition preventing its premature burning out and, in addition, helps to accelerate the sintering of glass particles. The introduction of water reduces the viscosity of the foaming mixture making it evenly distributed and also promotes the formation of water gas that additionally foams the glass mass. The optimal composition for producing the foam glass with the density of 150 kg/m3 is defined according to the results of the research.

  15. Recent developments of discrete material optimization of laminated composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Erik; Sørensen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    This work will give a quick summary of recent developments of the Discrete Material Optimization approach for structural optimization of laminated composite structures. This approach can be seen as a multi-material topology optimization approach for selecting the best ply material and number...... of plies in a laminated composite structure. The conceptual combinatorial design problem is relaxed to a continuous problem such that well-established gradient based optimization techniques can be applied, and the optimization problem is solved on basis of interpolation schemes with penalization...

  16. Metallic-glass-matrix composite structures with benchmark mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Joseph P.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2010-12-01

    Metallic-glass-matrix composites demonstrating unusual combination of high strength, high toughness, and excellent processability are utilized to fabricate cellular structures of egg-box topology. Under compressive loading, the egg-box panels are capable of undergoing extensive plastic collapse at very high plateau stresses enabling absorption of large amounts of mechanical energy. In terms of specific mechanical energy absorbed, the present panels far outperform panels of similar topology made of aluminum or fiber-reinforced polymer composites, and even surpass steel structures of highly buckling-resistant topologies, thus emerging among the highest performance structures of any kind.

  17. Structure and composition of single Pt–Ru electrocatalyst nanoparticles supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Malac, Marek; Alonso-Nuñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Individual Pt-Ru nanoparticles (NPs) supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) synthesized by microemulsion method were characterized by nano beam diffraction (NBD) and high resolution imaging in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Comparing the TEM images and NBD to simulations provided insight into particle composition, structure and morphology in three dimensions. In particular, the NBD allowed us to detect various components of the individual NPs that would be difficult to observe otherwise. We find that the NPs contain four different components: Pt–RuO 2 , Pt–Ru, RuO 2 and metallic Pt. Often an individual NP is composed of more than one component. The most frequently encountered external morphology is close to a spherical shape and ∼3.7 nm in diameter. The collective properties of NPs’ assemblies were studied by thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. The results allowed us to gain some insight into the relation of the NPs’ structure and composition with their catalytic performance, and revealed the presence of components not detectable by bulk methods. The electrocatalytic properties were evaluated by CO stripping, methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction. Bulk characterization methods miss many properties and structures present in the sample due to low volume fraction and due to overlap of reflections. Single NPs should be analyzed to obtain reliable indication of sample composition. (paper)

  18. Defining the loop structures in proteins based on composite β-turn mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Jesmita; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-06-01

    Asx- and ω-turns are β-turn mimics, which replace the conventional main-chain hydrogen bonds seen in the latter by those involving the side chains, and both involve three residues. In this paper we analyzed the cases where these turns occur together--side by side, with or without any gap, overlapping and in any order. These composite turns (of length 3-15 residues), occurring at ∼1 per 100 residues, may constitute the full length of many loops, and when the residues in the two component turns overlap or are adjacent to each other, the composite may take well-defined shape. It is thus possible for non-regular regions in protein structure to form local structural motifs, akin to the regular geometrical features exhibited by secondary structures. Composites having the order ω-turns followed by Asx-turns can constitute N-terminal helix capping motif. Ternary composite turns (made up of ω-, Asx- and ST-turns), some with characteristic shape, have also been identified. Delineation of composite turns would help in characterizing loops in protein structures, which often have functional roles. Some sequence patterns seen in composites can be used for their incorporation in protein design. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Ink composition for making a conductive silver structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven B.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-10-18

    An ink composition for making a conductive silver structure comprises a silver salt and a complex of (a) a complexing agent and a short chain carboxylic acid or (b) a complexing agent and a salt of a short chain carboxylic acid, according to one embodiment. A method for making a silver structure entails combining a silver salt and a complexing agent, and then adding a short chain carboxylic acid or a salt of the short chain carboxylic acid to the combined silver salt and a complexing agent to form an ink composition. A concentration of the complexing agent in the ink composition is reduced to form a concentrated formulation, and the silver salt is reduced to form a conductive silver structure, where the concentrated formulation and the conductive silver structure are formed at a temperature of about 120.degree. C. or less.

  20. Study of Influence of Composite Materials Components on Properties of Concrete Mixtures and Concrete in Time Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butakova, M. D.; Gorbunov, S. P.

    2017-11-01

    It is accepted to call concrete a special construction mix which consists of several main components - most often, these are cement, water and various fillers. As a result of grout hardening, the artificial stone, used in many areas where durability, stability and durability are required, is formed. To improve the main characteristics of concrete, various additives are added to the mix. These substances are also capable of accelerating the speed of construction and reducing the funds expenditure. It is especially important to apply additives at the installation of coverings to airfields, at the construction of moorings, roads, at the laying of pools or during other hydraulic engineering constructions, and also at the construction of monolithic industrial facilities and houses. The article deals with the composition and quantity of complex organomineral additives, the duration and conditions for the formation of composites’ structure.

  1. Design and Optimization of Composite Automotive Hatchback Using Integrated Material-Structure-Process-Performance Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xudong; Sun, Lingyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Lijun; Dai, Zongmiao; Xiong, Zhenkai

    2018-03-01

    The application of polymer composites as a substitution of metal is an effective approach to reduce vehicle weight. However, the final performance of composite structures is determined not only by the material types, structural designs and manufacturing process, but also by their mutual restrict. Hence, an integrated "material-structure-process-performance" method is proposed for the conceptual and detail design of composite components. The material selection is based on the principle of composite mechanics such as rule of mixture for laminate. The design of component geometry, dimension and stacking sequence is determined by parametric modeling and size optimization. The selection of process parameters are based on multi-physical field simulation. The stiffness and modal constraint conditions were obtained from the numerical analysis of metal benchmark under typical load conditions. The optimal design was found by multi-discipline optimization. Finally, the proposed method was validated by an application case of automotive hatchback using carbon fiber reinforced polymer. Compared with the metal benchmark, the weight of composite one reduces 38.8%, simultaneously, its torsion and bending stiffness increases 3.75% and 33.23%, respectively, and the first frequency also increases 44.78%.

  2. The Structural Geographic Components of a Territorial Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POMPEI COCEAN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available When using regional geographic approaches, i.e. when applying its concepts to the problems of anthropic communities from a certain territory, is compulsory. In this study we have taken into account the complex and the etymologically adequate meaning of the notion and not the meaning most commonly used at present (i.e. the functional zoning and regionalisation of the territory. Relying on the estimations of territorial surveys, one may give the solutions for the extant malfunctions and for optimising future developments. The geographic components of this parameter (the territorial survey are: the natural support basis, the population and its settlements, the social and economic development level, the technical equipment of the territory, and the extant risks and malfunctions. Indices from 1 to 10 will be summed in order to give us the big picture, namely the present-day situation and the favourability level of that territory for various anthropic interventions.

  3. Grapevine yield components and composition of Isabel grape produced according to the organic and conventional systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miele Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for organic grapes by the juice industry of Serra Gaúcha, Brazil. This region presents a humid and hot summer, ideal climatic conditions for the development of a number of diseases. To control such diseases and problems brought about by other organisms, growers apply pesticides on the grapevines which may leave residues in grapes. However, in general, grapes produced by organic system have lower yield, but there is a lack of research data on this subject. Thus, an experiment was carried out over three years in order to compare the yield components and the physicochemical composition of the must of Isabel grapes conducted in both production systems. When the grapes were ripe, variables related to yield components were evaluated, such as the number of clusters/vine, yield/vine and weight/cluster. Then the grapes were sampled and taken to the laboratory where they were crushed and the musts were centrifuged and analyzed. The 3-year data mean were submitted to correlation analysis and Principal Component Analysis. The results show that conventional grapevines produced 2.18 times more than organic. However, the grapes from the organic system had higher density, Brix, pH, Brix/titratable acidity ratio, P and Mg but lower K, and Ca varied little between both production systems.

  4. Disentangling the associations between parental BMI and offspring body composition using the four‐component model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva‐Eternod, Carlos; Cortina‐Borja, Mario; Williams, Jane; Fewtrell, Mary; Wells, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study sets out to investigate the intergenerational associations between the body mass index (BMI) of parents and the body composition of their offspring. Methods The cross‐sectional data were analyzed for 511 parent–offspring trios from London and south‐east England. The offspring were aged 5–21 years. Parental BMI was obtained by recall and offspring fat mass and lean mass were obtained using the four‐component model. Multivariable regression analysis, with multiple imputation for missing paternal values was used. Sensitivity analyses for levels of non‐paternity were conducted. Results A positive association was seen between parental BMI and offspring BMI, fat mass index (FMI), and lean mass index (LMI). The mother's BMI was positively associated with the BMI, FMI, and LMI z‐scores of both daughters and sons and of a similar magnitude for both sexes. The father's BMI showed similar associations to the mother's BMI, with his son's BMI, FMI, and LMI z‐scores, but no association with his daughter. Sensitivity tests for non‐paternity showed that maternal coefficients remained greater than paternal coefficients throughout but there was no statistical difference at greater levels of non‐paternity. Conclusions We found variable associations between parental BMI and offspring body composition. Associations were generally stronger for maternal than paternal BMI, and paternal associations appeared to differ between sons and daughters. In this cohort, the mother's BMI was statistically significantly associated with her child's body composition but the father's BMI was only associated with the body composition of his sons. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:524–533, 2016. © 2016 The Authors American Journal of Human Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26848813

  5. Design-Load Basis for LANL Structures, Systems, and Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Cuesta

    2004-09-01

    This document supports the recommendations in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Engineering Standard Manual (ESM), Chapter 5--Structural providing the basis for the loads, analysis procedures, and codes to be used in the ESM. It also provides the justification for eliminating the loads to be considered in design, and evidence that the design basis loads are appropriate and consistent with the graded approach required by the Department of Energy (DOE) Code of Federal Regulation Nuclear Safety Management, 10, Part 830. This document focuses on (1) the primary and secondary natural phenomena hazards listed in DOE-G-420.1-2, Appendix C, (2) additional loads not related to natural phenomena hazards, and (3) the design loads on structures during construction.

  6. Restorative glass: reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidra Oikonomopoulou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and aesthetical integrity. Concurrently, the material’s unique mechanical properties enable the structural consolidation of the monument. As a proof of concept, the restoration of Lichtenberg Castle is proposed. Solid cast glass units are suggested to complete the missing parts, in respect to the existing construction technique and aesthetics of the original masonry. Aiming for a reversible system, the glass units are interlocking, ensuring the overall stability without necessitating permanent, adhesive connections. This results in an elegant and reversible intervention.

  7. Thermal shock problems of bonded structure for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibui, M.; Kuroda, T.; Kubota, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal shock tests have been performed on W(Re)/Cu and Mo/Cu duplex structures with a particular emphasis on two failure modes: failure on the heated surface and failure near the bonding interface. The results indicate that failure of the duplex structure largely depends on the constraint of thermal strain on the heated surface and on the ductility changes of armour materials. Rapid debonding of the bonding interface may be attributed to the yielding of armour materials. This leads to a residual bending deformation when the armour cools down. Arguments are also presented in this paper on two parameter characterization of the failure of armour materials and on stress distribution near the free edge of the bonding interface. (orig.)

  8. Humus components and soil biogenic structures in Norway spruce ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Galvan, Paola; Ponge, Jean-François; Chersich, Silvia; Zanella, Augusto

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Whether the structure of Oa and A horizons varies according to animal activity is still a matter of conjecture, especially in amphi, a humus form with mixed features of mull and moder, which has been described in environments with strong seasonal contrasts. The Oa and A horizons of spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] coniferous forests of the Province of Trento (Italy) were sampled in six sites with a total of 134 humus profiles along transect lines, embracing the variety...

  9. Laboratory Inquiry for Determining the Chemical Composition of a Component in a Daily Use Detergent: Sodium Sesquicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Kimura, Tomoyasu; Shigedomi, Kana

    2011-01-01

    An inquiry-based laboratory activity to determine the chemical composition of a component in alkaline detergents, sodium sesquicarbonate (SSC), is proposed. On the basis of introductory demonstrations by the instructor on the chemical properties and reactions of SSC, students propose the hypothetical composition of SSC and possible quantitative…

  10. Study on Macro-fiber Composite Coupled-Plate Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiarui; Tu, Jianwei; Lai, Fangpeng; Luo, Wei; Zhu, Chenfei

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the dynamic and vibration control effect of macro-fiber composite (MFC) were studied on the plate and shell structure, proposing a new calculation method of MFC coupled-plate structure actuating equation. Based on the first kind of piezoelectric equation, this paper deduces the equation of P1-type MFC composite plate structure, considering the influence of the Poisson’s ratio of the controlled structure and the effect of the MFC plane strain on MFC’s actuating force and actuating moment. In this paper, the vibration control experiment of the MFC coupled-plate structure is completed. The deviation between the experimental results and the simulation results is less than 7.5%, indicating that the P1-type MFC actuating equation is correct and can be used in the simulation calculation of vibration control for the MFC coupled-plate structure.

  11. Effect of metal surface composition on deposition behavior of stainless steel component dissolved in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro

    1988-01-01

    Deposition behavior of corrosion products has been investigated to clarify the effect of metal surface composition on the deposition process in liquid sodium. For the study a sodium loop made of Type 304 stainless steel was employed. Deposition test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, iron, nickel or Inconel 718, were immersed in the sodium pool of the test pot. Corrosion test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, 50 at% Fe-50 at%Mn and Inconel 718, were set in a heater pin assembly along the axial direction of the heater pin surface. Sodium temperatures at the outlet and inlet of the heater pin assembly were controlled at 943 and 833 K, respectively. Sodium was purified at a cold trap temperature of 393 K and the deposition test was carried out for 4.3 x 10 2 - 2.9 x 10 4 ks. Several crystallized particles were observed on the surface of the deposition test pieces. The particles had compositions and crystal structures which depended on both the composition of deposition test pieces and the concentration of iron and manganese in sodium. Only iron-rich particles having a polyhedral shape deposited on the iron surface. Two types of particles, iron-rich α-phase and γ-phase with nearly the same composition as stainless steel, were deposited on Type 304 stainless steel. A Ni-Mn alloy was deposited on the nickel surface in the case of a higher concentration of manganese in sodium. On the other hand, for a lower manganese concentration, a Fe-Ni alloy was precipitated on the nickel surface. Particles deposited on nickel had a γ-phase crystal structure similar to the deposition test piece of nickel. Hence, the deposition process can be explained as follows: Corrosion products in liquid sodium were deposited on the metal surface by forming a metal alloy selectively with elements of the metal surface. (author)

  12. Woven Structures from Natural Fibres for Reinforcing Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Bernava, Aina; Manins, Maris; Strazds, Guntis

    2015-01-01

    The increase of production of woven structures from natural fibres for reinforced composites can be noticed in different sectors of economy. This can be explained by limited sources of raw materials and different environmental issues, as well as European Union guidelines for car manufacture [4]. This research produced 2D textile structures of hemp yarn and polypropylene yarn and tested the impact of added glass fibre yarn on the mechanical properties of the woven structur...

  13. Hybrid Bridge Structures Made of Frp Composite and Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajchel, Mateusz; Siwowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    Despite many advantages over the conventional construction materials, the contemporary development of FRP composites in bridge engineering is limited due to high initial cost, low stiffness (in case of glass fibers) and sudden composite failure mode. In order to reduce the given limitations, mixed (hybrid) solutions connecting the FRP composites and conventional construction materials, including concrete, have been tested in many countries for 20 years. Shaping the hybrid structures based on the attributes of particular materials, aims to increase stiffness and reduce cost without losing the carrying capacity, lightness and easiness of bridges that includes such hybrid girders, and to avoid the sudden dangerous failure mode. In the following article, the authors described examples of hybrid road bridges made of FRP composite and concrete within the time of 20 years and presented the first Polish hybrid FRP-concrete road bridge. Also, the directions of further research, necessary to spread these innovative, advanced and sustainable bridge structures were indicated.

  14. Reliability analysis of redundant structures, taking into account the dynamic effects of component failures and repair of damaged components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Munehisa.

    1990-01-01

    The dissertation explains an approach for further development of a method for the calculation of the reliability of redundant, statically and/or dynamically responding structures, taking into account the dynamic load shift in case of brittle fracture of structural components, and quantifying the favourable effects of repairs with regard to overall reliability. The first approach is done by failure tree analysis, which, however, is shown to be an extremely complex and costly method if the repair effects are included in the analysis. Another, simplified model for calculation of extreme loads is presented, which offers the possibility of assessing the impact of repair by means of the Markovian chain model. (orig.) [de

  15. Liability and lifetime of metallic components and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, B.

    2009-12-01

    In this overview of his research activity, the author describes the ductile damage process in structures subjected to high rate loadings, notably for tank steels and gas pipeline high resistance steels. Then, he describes the cleavage fracture process in bainitic steels by means of a local fracture approach. He proposes a modelling of the Charpy v-notch impact test of the resilience-to-toughness transition during the ductile-brittle transition for bainitic steels, the developed method being used to interpret resilience and toughness tests performed on an irradiated material. He finally discusses these works, describes the current ones, and discusses research perspectives within his Nuclear Material Department

  16. Relationship of structure and stiffness in laminated bamboo composites

    OpenAIRE

    Penellum, Matthew; Sharma, Bhavna; Shah, Darshil Upendra; Foster, Robert; Ramage, Michael Hector

    2018-01-01

    Laminated bamboo in structural applications has the potential to change the way buildings are constructed. The fibrous microstructure of bamboo can be modelled as a fibre-reinforced composite. This study compares the results of a fibre volume fraction analysis with previous experimental beam bending results. The link between fibre volume fraction and bending stiffness shows that differences previously attributed to preservation treatment in fact arise due to strip thickness. Composite t...

  17. Blast Testing and Modelling of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giversen, Søren

    The motivation for this work is based on a desire for finding light weight alternatives to high strength steel as the material to use for armouring in military vehicles. With the use of high strength steel, an increase in the level of armouring has a significant impact on the vehicle weight......-up proved functional and provided consistent data of the panel response. The tests reviled that the sandwich panels did not provide a decrease in panel deflection compared with the monolithic laminates, which was expected due to their higher flexural rigidity. This was found to be because membrane effects...... a pressure distribution on a selected surfaces and has been based on experimental pressure measurement data, and (ii) with a designed 3 step numerical load model, where the blast pressure and FSI (Fluid Structure Interaction) between the pressure wave and modelled panel is modelled numerically. The tested...

  18. Supersymmetric unified compositeness and the quark/lepton generation structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, A.; Sonnenschein, J.

    1983-12-01

    We attempt to construct a realistic model, incorporating the ideas of supersymmetry, compositeness and grand unification. Unification dictates the preon/spectator SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) assignments, while supersymmetry tackles the hierachy problem and partially protects chiral invariance. It is primarily the presence of scalar preons which allows for a 't Hooft-Appelquist-Carazzone consistent composite generation structure. The various quark/leptons are internally distinguished, with U(1)sub(R) serving as a broken horizontal symmetry. To demonstrate our idea, unified SU(10) is invoked to give birth to supersymmetric SU(5)sub(HC) compositeness with four low-lying standard families. (author)

  19. Thermosetting polymer-matrix composites for structural repair applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, William Kirby

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporation of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Features of somatotype and body weight component composition in patients with acne: boys and girls of Podillya region of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunas Igor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the differences in peculiarities of somatotype and body weight component composition in patients with acne, the study population being boys and girls of the Podillya region of Ukraine. In the study subjects, regardless of sex, body muscle mass, bone mass and the mesomorphic somatotype component of those with acne were significantly greater, while fat body mass indicators and the endomorphic somatotype component was smaller – in comparison to that of non-afflicted subjects of similar gender. Regarding the ectomorphic component of somatotype, between the surveyed groups of those with and without acne, whether male or female, no significant differences were revealed. For all indicators, whether the somatotype components or the component composition of body weight, between groups of boys or girls with different degrees of severity of acne, again no significant differences were established.

  1. Two-component injection moulding simulation of ABS-POM micro structured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Islam, Aminul

    2013-01-01

    Multi-component micro injection moulding (μIM) processes such as two-component (2k) μIM are the key technologies for the mass fabrication of multi-material micro products. 2k-μIM experiments involving a miniaturized test component with micro features in the sub-mm dimensional range and moulding a...... process. Flow front predictions are compared with experimental results using the short shots technique over the whole miniaturized component and within the surface micro structures....

  2. Experiment and simulation study on unidirectional carbon fiber composite component under dynamic 3 point bending loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Guowei; Sun, Qingping; Zeng, Danielle; Li, Dayong; Su, Xuming

    2018-04-10

    In current work, unidirectional (UD) carbon fiber composite hatsection component with two different layups are studied under dynamic 3 point bending loading. The experiments are performed at various impact velocities, and the effects of impactor velocity and layup on acceleration histories are compared. A macro model is established with LS-Dyna for more detailed study. The simulation results show that the delamination plays an important role during dynamic 3 point bending test. Based on the analysis with high speed camera, the sidewall of hatsection shows significant buckling rather than failure. Without considering the delamination, current material model cannot capture the post failure phenomenon correctly. The sidewall delamination is modeled by assumption of larger failure strain together with slim parameters, and the simulation results of different impact velocities and layups match the experimental results reasonable well.

  3. Behavior of grid-stiffened composite structures under transverse loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Changsheng

    The energy absorption characteristics and failure modes of grid-stiffened composite plates under transverse load were studied in detail. Several laboratory scale composite grid plates were fabricated by using co-mingled E-glass fiber/polypropylene matrix and carbon/nylon composites in a thermoplastic stamping process. Both experimental and finite element approaches were used to evaluate and understand the role of major failure modes on the performance of damaged grid-stiffened composite plates under transverse load. The load-deflection responses of grid-stiffened composite plates were determined and compared with those of sandwich composite plates of the same size. The failure modes of grid-stiffened composite plates under different load conditions were investigated and used as the basis for FEA models. The intrinsic strength properties of constituent composite materials were measured by using either three point bending or tensile test and were used as input data to the FEA models. Several FEA models including the major failure modes based on the experimental results were built to simulate the damage processes of grid-stiffened composite plates under transverse load. A FORTRAN subroutine was implemented within the ABAQUS code to incorporate the material failure models. Effects of damage on the modal frequencies and loss factors of grid-stiffened composite plates were also investigated experimentally. Experimental and simulation results showed that sandwich composite specimens failed catastrophically with the load dropping sharply at the displacement corresponding to initial and final failure. However, grid-stiffened composite specimens failed in a more gradual and forgiving way in a sequence of relatively small load drops. No catastrophic load drops were observed in the grid structures over the range of displacements investigated here. The SEA values of the grid composite specimens are typically higher than those of the sandwich specimens with the same boundary

  4. Validation of Material Models For Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures Via Physical And Crash Testing (VMM Composites Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, Anthony [General Motors Company, Flint, MI (United States); Faruque, Omar [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Truskin, James F [FCA US LLC, Auburn Hills, MI (United States); Board, Derek [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Jones, Martin [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Tao, Jian [FCA US LLC, Auburn Hills, MI (United States); Chen, Yijung [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Mehta, Manish [M-Tech International LLC, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2017-09-27

    As automotive fuel economy requirements increase, the push for reducing overall vehicle weight will likely include the consideration of materials that have not previously been part of mainstream vehicle design and manufacturing, including carbon fiber composites. Vehicle manufacturers currently rely on computer-aided engineering (CAE) methods as part of the design and development process, so going forward, the ability to accurately and predictably model carbon fiber composites will be necessary. If composites are to be used for structural components, this need applies to both, crash and quasi-static modeling. This final report covers the results of a five-year, $6.89M, 50% cost-shared research project between Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Advanced Materials Partnership (USAMP) under Cooperative Agreement DE-EE-0005661 known as “Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures Via Physical and Crash Testing (VMM).” The objective of the VMM Composites Project was to validate and assess the ability of physics-based material models to predict crash performance of automotive primary load-carrying carbon fiber composite structures. Simulation material models that were evaluated included micro-mechanics based meso-scale models developed by the University of Michigan (UM) and micro-plane models by Northwestern University (NWU) under previous collaborations with the DOE and Automotive Composites Consortium/USAMP, as well as five commercial crash codes: LS-DYNA, RADIOSS, VPS/PAM-CRASH, Abaqus, and GENOA-MCQ. CAE predictions obtained from seven organizations were compared with experimental results from quasi-static testing and dynamic crash testing of a thermoset carbon fiber composite front-bumper and crush-can (FBCC) system gathered under multiple loading conditions. This FBCC design was developed to demonstrate progressive crush, virtual simulation, tooling, fabrication, assembly, non-destructive evaluation and crash testing

  5. Chemical composition and non-volatile components of three wild edible mushrooms collected from northwest Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ibtissem Kacem Jedidi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In Tunisia, many people collect wild edible mushrooms as pickers for their own consumption. The present work aims at contributing to the determination of the chemical composition, non volatile components content (soluble sugars, free amino acids and minerals and trace elements of three popular Tunisian wild edible mushrooms species collected from the northwest of Tunisia (Agaricus campestris, Boletus edulis and Cantharellus cibarius.All investigated mushrooms revealed that these species are rich sources of proteins (123.70 – 374.10 g kg-1 dry weight (DW and carbohydrates (403.3 – 722.40 g kg-1 DW, and low content of fat (28.2 – 39.9 g kg-1 DW; the highest energetic contribution was guaranteed by C. cibarius (1542.71 kJ / 100 g. A. compestris (33.14 mg/g DW showed the highest concentration of essential amino acids. The composition in individual sugars was also determined, mannitol and trehalose being the most abundant sugars. C. cibarius revealed the highest concentrations of carbohydrates (722.4 g kg-1 DW and A. compestris the lowest concentration (403.3 g kg-1 DW. Potassium (K and sodium (Na are the most abundant minerals in analyzed samples (A. compestris showed the highest concentrations of K and Na, 49141.44 and 9263.886 µg/g DW respectively.

  6. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.; Halbig, Michael Charles; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Costa, Gustavo; Mccue, Terry R.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation reviews the NASA advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustors particularly under the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation, Fundamental Aeronautics and Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Programs. The emphases have been placed on the current design challenges of the 2700-3000F capable environmental barrier coatings for low NOX emission combustors for next generation turbine engines by using advanced plasma spray based processes, and the coating processing and integration with SiC-SiC CMCs and component systems. The developments also have included candidate coating composition system designs, degradation mechanisms, performance evaluation and down-selects; the processing optimizations using TriplexPro Air Plasma Spray Low Pressure Plasma Spray (LPPS), Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition and demonstration of EBC-CMC systems. This presentation also highlights the EBC-CMC system temperature capability and durability improvements under the NASA development programs, as demonstrated in the simulated engine high heat flux, combustion environments, in conjunction with high heat flux, mechanical creep and fatigue loading testing conditions.

  7. Flight service evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component on commercial transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The development and flight evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component is presented. The recommended concept for the covers is graphite-epoxy hats bonded to a graphite-epoxy skin. The hat flare-out has been eliminated, instead the hat is continuous into the joint. The recommended concept for the spars is graphite-epoxy caps and a hybrid of Kevlar-49 and graphite-epoxy in the spar web. The spar cap, spar web stiffeners for attaching the ribs, and intermediate stiffeners are planned to be fabricated as a unit. Access hole in the web will be reinforced with a donut type, zero degree graphite-epoxy wound reinforcement. The miniwich design concept in the upper three ribs originally proposed is changed to a graphite-epoxy stiffened solid laminate design concept. The recommended configuration for the lower seven ribs remains as graphite-epoxy caps with aluminum cruciform diagonals. The indicated weight saving for the current advanced composite vertical fin configuration is 20.2% including a 24 lb growth allowance. The project production cost saving is approximately 1% based on a cumulative average of 250 aircraft and including only material, production labor, and quality assurance costs.

  8. DETERMINATION OF THE STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF LIFE COMPETENCE IN STUDENTS OF CLASSICAL UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla Zubkova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, life competence of a person plays a very important role as it helps to solve effectively problems that every person can face in his/her life. Nevertheless, contemporary students show an unsatisfactory level of life competence, so it is very important for teachers in high education to pay attention to its formation. It was found that structural components of life competence have been researched by such scientists as M. Stepanenko, N. Nischeta, L. Scherbakova and others. However, in our opinion structural components of life competence should be generalized, so it is the purpose of our article. It is in studies revealing that there is no unified point of view of life competence structural components. In particular, scientists have distinguished such life competence structural components as 1 meta anthropologic, individual and personal, contextual, and social components (M. Stepanenko; 2 self-conception, axiological values, emotional and characterful components (V. Nischeta, 3 social, educative, communicative, and auto psychological components (L. Scherbakova. It should be noticed that the meta anthropologic component concentrates on the ability of a person to reflect individually main attributes of a human life; the individual and personal component focuses on self-identification and self-realization; the contextual component considers the ability of an individual to take real-life situations in good sense; the social component focuses on personal ability to solve real-life tasks regarding to social circumstances. The educative component of life competence includes knowledge of educational process essence and specific features of higher educational establishments. The communicative component represents knowledge about the role of communication in life success strategy. Taking into account scientists’ opinion and the author’s consideration it is concluded that the elucidation and generalization of life competence structural components

  9. EMC characteristics of composite structure - Electric/electromagnetic shielding attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegertseder, P.; Breitsameter, R.

    1989-09-01

    The paper reports electric/electromagnetic shielding-attenuation experiments performed on different test boxes built with the same materials and processes as those to be used for the construction of a helicopter. The measurements are performed in the frequency range of 14 to 18 GHz, and the effects of different composite materials, jointing and bonding of structure parts of the boxes, application and bonding of the mesh, the construction of access panels, and conductive seals on these panels are assessed. It is demonstrated that moderate electric/electromagnetic shielding-attenuation values can be achieved by composite structures made from carbon, and materials and procedures required for high shielding attenuation are discussed.

  10. Failure mechanisms in energy-absorbing composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alastair F.; David, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Quasi-static tests are described for determination of the energy-absorption properties of composite crash energy-absorbing segment elements under axial loads. Detailed computer tomography scans of failed specimens were used to identify local compression crush failure mechanisms at the crush front. These mechanisms are important for selecting composite materials for energy-absorbing structures, such as helicopter and aircraft sub-floors. Finite element models of the failure processes are described that could be the basis for materials selection and future design procedures for crashworthy structures.

  11. Structural optimization study of composite wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Shen, Wen Zhong; Wang, Quan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the initial layout of a 2. MW composite wind turbine blade is designed first. The new airfoils families are selected to design a 2. MW wind turbine blade. The finite element parametric model for the blade is established. Based on the modified Blade Element Momentum theory, a new one......-way fluid-structure interaction method is introduced. A procedure combining finite element analysis and particle swarm algorithm to optimize composite structures of the wind turbine blade is developed. The procedure proposed not only allows thickness variation but also permits the spar cap location...

  12. Development on methods for evaluating structure reliability of piping components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimpfke, T.; Grebner, H.; Peschke, J.; Sievers, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the frame of the German reactor safety research program of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour, GRS has started to develop an analysis code named PROST (PRObabilistic STructure analysis) for estimating the leak and break probabilities of piping systems in nuclear power plants. The development is based on the experience achieved with applications of the public available US code PRAISE 3.10 (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events), which was supplemented by additional features regarding the statistical evaluation and the crack orientation. PROST is designed to be more flexible to changes and supplementations. Up to now it can be used for calculating fatigue problems. The paper mentions the main capabilities and theoretical background of the present PROST development and presents a parametric study on the influence by changing the method of stress intensity factor and limit load calculation and the statistical evaluation options on the leak probability of an exemplary pipe with postulated axial crack distribution. Furthermore the resulting leak probability of an exemplary pipe with postulated circumferential crack distribution is compared with the results of the modified PRAISE computer program. The intention of this investigation is to show trends. Therefore the resulting absolute values for probabilities should not be considered as realistic evaluations. (author)

  13. Damage monitoring of aircraft structures made of composite materials using wavelet transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, D.; Safin, A.; Luhyna, N.

    2016-10-01

    The present article is dedicated to the study of the acoustic properties of composite materials and the application of non-destructive testing methods to aircraft components. A mathematical model of a wavelet transformed signal is presented. The main acoustic (vibration) properties of different composite material structures were researched. Multiple vibration parameter dependencies on the noise reduction factor were derived. The main steps of a research procedure and new method algorithm are presented. The data obtained was compared with the data from a three dimensional laser-Doppler scanning vibrometer, to validate the results. The new technique was tested in the laboratory and on civil aircraft at a training airfield.

  14. Analytical Approach for Estimating Preliminary Mass of ARES I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Structural Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Pravin

    2007-01-01

    electrical power functions to other Elements of the CLV, is included as secondary structure. The MSFC has an overall responsibility for the integrated US element as well as structural design an thermal control of the fuel tanks, intertank, interstage, avionics, main propulsion system, Reaction Control System (RCS) for both the Upper Stage and the First Stage. MSFC's Spacecraft and Vehicle Department, Structural and Analysis Design Division is developing a set of predicted mass of these elements. This paper details the methodology, criterion and tools used for the preliminary mass predictions of the upper stage structural assembly components. In general, weight of the cylindrical barrel sections are estimated using the commercial code Hypersizer, whereas, weight of the domes are developed using classical solutions. HyperSizer is software that performs automated structural analysis and sizing optimization based on aerospace methods for strength, stability, and stiffness. Analysis methods range from closed form, traditional hand calculations repeated every day in industry to more advanced panel buckling algorithms. Margin-of-safety reporting for every potential failure provides the engineer with a powerful insight into the structural problem. Optimization capabilities include finding minimum weight panel or beam concepts, material selections, cross sectional dimensions, thicknesses, and lay-ups from a library of 40 different stiffened and sandwich designs and a database of composite, metallic, honeycomb, and foam materials. Multiple different concepts (orthogrid, isogrid, and skin stiffener) were run for multiple loading combinations of ascent design load with and with out tank pressure as well as proof pressure condition. Subsequently, selected optimized concept obtained from Hypersizer runs was translated into a computer aid design (CAD) model to account for the wall thickness tolerance, weld land etc for developing the most probable weight of the components. The flow diram

  15. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  16. A Formalism for Scattering of Complex Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2012-01-01

    -unit scattering. The structural scattering expressions allow composite structures to be used as sub-units within the formalism itself. This allows the scattering expressions for complex hierarchical structures to be derived with great ease. The formalism is generic in the sense that the scattering due......We present a formalism for the scattering of an arbitrary linear or acyclic branched structure build by joining mutually non-interacting arbitrary functional sub-units. The formalism consists of three equations expressing the structural scattering in terms of three equations expressing the sub...... to structural connectivity is completely decoupled from internal structure of the sub-units. This allows sub-units to be replaced by more complex structures. We illustrate the physical interpretation of the formalism diagrammatically. By applying a self-consistency requirement, we derive the pair distributions...

  17. Flax stems: from a specific architecture to an instructive model for bioinspired composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baley, Christophe; Goudenhooft, Camille; Gibaud, Marianne; Bourmaud, Alain

    2018-01-10

    The present paper proposes to carefully study and describe the reinforcement mechanisms within a flax stem, which is an exceptional natural model of composite structure. Thanks to accurate microscopic investigations, with both optical and SEM method, we finely depicted the flax stem architecture, which can be view as a composite structure with an outer protection, a unidirectional ply on the periphery and a porous core; each component has a specific function, such as mechanical reinforcement for the unidirectional ply and the porous core. The significant mechanical role of fibres was underlined, as well as their local organisation in cohesive bundles, obtained because of an intrusive growth and evidenced in this work through nanomechanical AFM measurement and 3D reconstruction. Following a biomimetic approach, these data provide a source of inspiration for the composite materials of tomorrow. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  18. Multi-Component Molecular-Level Body Composition Reference Methods: Evolving Concepts and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Steven B.; Ebbeling, Cara B.; Zheng, Jolene; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Strauss, Boyd J.; Silva, Analiza M.; Ludwig, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Excess adiposity is the main phenotypic feature that defines human obesity and that plays a pathophysiological role in most chronic diseases. Measuring the amount of fat mass present is thus a central aspect of studying obesity at the individual and population levels. Nevertheless, a consensus is lacking among investigators on a single accepted “reference” approach for quantifying fat mass in vivo. While the research community generally relies on the multicomponent body-volume class of “reference” models for quantifying fat mass, no definable guide discerns among different applied equations for partitioning the four (fat, water, protein, and mineral mass) or more quantified components, standardizes “adjustment” or measurement system approaches for model-required labeled water dilution volumes and bone mineral mass estimates, or firmly establishes the body temperature at which model physical properties are assumed. The resulting differing reference strategies for quantifying body composition in vivo leads to small but under some circumstances important differences in the amount of measured body fat. Recent technological advances highlight opportunities to expand model applications to new subject groups and measured components such as total body protein. The current report reviews the historical evolution of multicomponent body volume-based methods in the context of prevailing uncertainties and future potential. PMID:25645009

  19. Damping Analysis of Cylindrical Composite Structures with Enhanced Viscoelastic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliem, Mathias; Høgsberg, Jan; Vanwalleghem, Joachim; Filippatos, Angelos; Hoschützky, Stefan; Fotsing, Edith-Roland; Berggreen, Christian

    2018-04-01

    Constrained layer damping treatments are widely used in mechanical structures to damp acoustic noise and mechanical vibrations. A viscoelastic layer is thereby applied to a structure and covered by a stiff constraining layer. When the structure vibrates in a bending mode, the viscoelastic layer is forced to deform in shear mode. Thus, the vibration energy is dissipated as low grade frictional heat. This paper documents the efficiency of passive constrained layer damping treatments for low frequency vibrations of cylindrical composite specimens made of glass fibre-reinforced plastics. Different cross section geometries with shear webs have been investigated in order to study a beneficial effect on the damping characteristics of the cylinder. The viscoelastic damping layers are placed at different locations within the composite cylinder e.g. circumferential and along the neutral plane to evaluate the location-dependent efficiency of constrained layer damping treatments. The results of the study provide a thorough understanding of constrained layer damping treatments and an improved damping design of the cylindrical composite structure. The highest damping is achieved when placing the damping layer in the neutral plane perpendicular to the bending load. The results are based on free decay tests of the composite structure.

  20. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  1. (Re)defining component structures in morphological constructions: a cognitive grammar perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Huyssteen, GB

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available of morphology, morphological operations, constructions and construction schemas, composite structures, or other common cognitive processes; various standard works in cognitive grammar as well as other articles in this current volume address some of these issues...

  2. Kinetics of radiation-induced structural alterations in electron-irradiated polymer-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaikin, Yu.A.; Potanin, A.S.; Koztaeva, U.P.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In our previous studies measurements of internal friction temperature dependence were used for characterization of thermally activated and radiation-induced structural evolution in different types of polymer-based composites. This paper supplements these measurements with kinetic studies of internal friction (IF) parameters and EPR signals in a glass-cloth epoxy-filled laminate ST-ETF after electron irradiation up to doses of 1-10 MGy. Experiment have shown that the lifetime of free radicals in this composite considerably exceeds the characteristic time of molecular structural rearrangement due to scission and cross-linking after irradiation, as determined from IF measurements. This result is explained by slow proceeding of sterically hindered disproportionation reactions that stabilize the end groups of the macro-chain disrupt during irradiation and finally fix the act of scission. A mathematical model is formulated for description of structural evolution and alterations of IF parameters in polymer-based composites during and after electron irradiation. The description is based on the track model of radiation damage in polymers and phenomenological theory of radiation-induced structural transformations. General description does not give details of radiation-chemical conversion in different structural components of composites but indicates the direction of their structural evolution. In the model considered a composite material was divided into three parts (binder, filler, and a boundary layer). It was supposed that after primary distribution of radiation energy radiation-chemical conversion proceeds independently in each of these regions. It was also suggested that all the radical reactions were of the second order. On the example of glass-cloth laminate ST-ETF it is shown that this model allows to describe alterations in composite structural characteristics during irradiation and in the course of their self-organization after

  3. 75 FR 24502 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures; Reopening of Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Federal Aviation... composite structures technology and provide internationally harmonized standards. The public was invited to... 793) Notice No. 09-12, entitled ``Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft...

  4. Self-learning health monitoring algorithm in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, Luigi; Iannone, Michele; Califano, America; D'Amore, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    The paper describes a system that it is able of monitoring the health state of a composite structure in real time. The hardware of the system consists of a wire of strain sensors connected to a control unit. The software of the system elaborates the strain data and in real time is able to detect the presence of an eventual damage of the structures monitored with the strain sensors. The algorithm requires as input only the strains of the monitored structured measured on real time, i.e. those strains coming from the deformations of the composite structure due to the working loads. The health monitoring system does not require any additional device to interrogate the structure as often used in the literature, instead it is based on a self-learning procedure. The strain data acquired when the structure is healthy are used to set up the correlations between the strain in different positions of structure by means of neural network. Once the correlations between the strains in different position have been set up, these correlations act as a fingerprint of the healthy structure. In case of damage the correlation between the strains in the position of the structure near the damage will change due to the change of the stiffness of the structure caused by the damage. The developed software is able to recognize the change of the transfer function between the strains and consequently is able to detect the damage.

  5. Durability of polymer matrix composites for automotive structural applications: A state-of-the-art review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corum, J.M.; Simpson, W.A. Jr.; Sun, C.T.; Talreja, R.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    1995-07-01

    A key unanswered question that must be addressed before polymeric composites will be widely used in automotive structural components is their known durability. Major durability issues are the effects that cyclic loadings, creep, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts have on dimensional stability, strength, and stiffness throughout the required life of a composite component. This report reviews the current state of understanding in each of these areas. It also discusses the limited information that exists on one of the prime candidate materials for automotive structural applications--an isocyanurate reinforced with a continuous strand, swirl mat. Because of the key role that nondestructive evaluations must play in understanding damage development and progression, a chapter is included on ultrasonic techniques. A final chapter then gives conclusions and recommendations for research needed to resolve the various durability issues. These recommendations will help provide a sound basis for program planning for the Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the Automotive Composites Consortium of Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors.

  6. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  7. Mechanical properties of Composite Engineering Structures by Multivolume Micromechanical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Novotný

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering structures often consist of elements having the character of a periodically repeated composite structure. A multivolume micromechanical model based on a representative cell division into r1 × r2 × r3 subcells with different elastic material properties has been used in this paper to derive macromechanical characteristics of the composite construction response to applied load and temperature changes. The multivolume method is based on ensuring the equilibrium of the considered volume on an average basis. In the same (average way, the continuity conditions of displacements and tractions at the interfaces between subcells and between neighboring representative elements are imposed, resulting in a homogenization procedure that eliminates the discrete nature of the composite model. The details of the method are shown for the case of a concrete block pavement. A parametric study is presented illustrating the influence of joint thickness, joint filling material properties and the quality of bonding between block and filler elements.

  8. A critical review of nanotechnologies for composite aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Masouras, Athanasios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Sotiriadis, George; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The past decade extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Integration of nano-particles into fiber composites concludes to multi-scale reinforced composites and has opened a new wide range of multi-functional materials in industry. In this direction, a variety of carbon based nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. This interest originates from several industrial applications needs that request the development of new multi-functional materials which combine enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. In this work, an attempt is performed to review the most representative processes and related performances reported in literature and the experience obtained on nano-enabling technologies of fiber composite materials. This review focuses on the two main composite manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace industry; Prepreg/Autoclave and Resin Transfer technologies. It addresses several approaches for nano-enabling of composites for these two routes and reports latest achieved results focusing on performance of nano-enabled fiber reinforced composites extracted from literature. Finally, this review work identifies the gap between available nano-technology integration routes and the established industrial composite manufacturing techniques and the challenges to increase the Technology Readiness Level to reach the demands for aerospace industry applications.

  9. Floristic Composition, Tree Canopy Structure and Regeneration in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Floristic composition, plant species diversity, tree canopy structure and regeneration were assessed in a degraded tropical humid rainforest in Nigeria using a systematic line transect sampling technique for plot demarcation. All plants in a plot were identified and classified into families while the diameters and heights of ...

  10. ALL NATURAL COMPOSITE SANDWICH BEAMS FOR STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS. (R829576)

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of developing an all natural composite roof for housing application,structural panels and unit beams were manufactured out of soybean oil based resinand natural fibers (flax, cellulose, pulp, recycled paper, chicken feathers)using vacuum assisted resin tran...

  11. Tree species composition, structure and utilisation in Maruzi Hills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the tree species composition, vegetation structure and harvesting pattern to guide management of the Maruzi Hills Forest Reserve. Stratified random sampling was used to site six (100 m × 100 m) permanent sample plots in the woodland, bushland and grassland vegetation types identified in the ...

  12. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  13. Variability in Parasites' Community Structure and Composition in Cat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the composition and structure of the parasite communities in Cat fish with respect to levels of water pollution in Lake Victoria. A total of 1071 Clarias gariepinus with mean TL range of 19 to 27 cm were analyzed from three localities in Mwanza Gulf (Kirumba, 298 fish infected with 15 parasite species), ...

  14. floristic composition and structure of the Dry Afromontane Forest

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    Key words/phrases: Bale Mountains, floristic composition, plant community, vegetation structure. INTRODUCTION. The highland area of ..... Juniperus procera had the highest dominance in. Adelle whereas Hagenia abyssinica ..... The World Bank is gratefully acknowledged for provision of financial support through the.

  15. Plant species composition and structure of the Mana Angetu moist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A floristic composition and structure study of the Mana Angetu Forest was carried out between July 2003 and June 2004 at four sites of the forest with an altitudinal range of 1533-2431 m. Three transects, 750 ... Analysis of Importance Value Index indicated that Vepris dainellii had the highest value (79). The population ...

  16. Fish species composition, size structure and distribution in non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish diversity studies in littoral non-trawlable areas of Lake Victoria (Tanzania) were undertaken during six systematic surveys (November 2000 to December 2002). Information on fish species composition, size structure as well as spatial and temporal distribution was generated from gill-netting, beach-seining and electric ...

  17. Floristic Composition and Vegetation Structure of The KNUST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diversity, relative importance, canopy height and cover of plant species in the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Botanic Garden were evaluated in five 1-ha plots using a stratified random sampling technique in order to build an understanding of its floristic composition and structure in two ...

  18. Laminated Ti-Al composites: Processing, structure and strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yan; Fan, Guohua; Yu, Tianbo

    2016-01-01

    . The mechanical properties of the composites with different volume fractions of Al from 10% to 67% show a good combination of strength and ductility. A constraint strain in the hot-rolled laminated structure between the hard and soft phases introduces an elastic-plastic deformation stage, which becomes more...

  19. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  20. Structural evolution of ZTA composites during synthesis and processing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exare, C.; Kiat, J. M.; Guiblin, N.; Porcher, F.; Petříček, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2015), s. 1273-1283 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ceramic s * alumina–zirconia composites * structural properties * strain effect * size effect Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.933, year: 2015

  1. The influence of compositional and structural diversity on forest productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    James N. Long; John D. Shaw

    2010-01-01

    Data from ~1500 ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa C. Lawson) stands in the western United States were used to examine the potential influence of compositional and structural diversity on forest productivity. Relative density, height and site quality were combined in a conceptually sound expression of the relationship between growth and growing stock for ponderosa pine-...

  2. Structural composite panel performance under long-term load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore L. Laufenberg

    1988-01-01

    Information on the performance of wood-based structural composite panels under long-term load is currently needed to permit their use in engineered assemblies and systems. A broad assessment of the time-dependent properties of panels is critical for creating databases and models of the creep-rupture phenomenon that lead to reliability-based design procedures. This...

  3. Fluid-Structure Interaction in a Fluid-Filled Composite Structure Subjected to Low Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    this study of impact force, deflection, and strain were measured in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite cylinder subjected to low...Sanchez, J. Lopez-Puente, and D. Varas, “On the influence of filling level in CFRP aircraft fuel tank subjected to high velocity impacts,” Composite ...and back sides. The baffle provided the greatest strain reduction at the high fill levels. 14. SUBJECT TERMS glass fiber composite , fluid structure

  4. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  5. Principal component analysis for surface reflection components and structure in facial images and synthesis of facial images for various ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Misa; Toyota, Saori; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Ogawa-Ochiai, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, principal component analysis is applied to the distribution of pigmentation, surface reflectance, and landmarks in whole facial images to obtain feature values. The relationship between the obtained feature vectors and the age of the face is then estimated by multiple regression analysis so that facial images can be modulated for woman aged 10-70. In a previous study, we analyzed only the distribution of pigmentation, and the reproduced images appeared to be younger than the apparent age of the initial images. We believe that this happened because we did not modulate the facial structures and detailed surfaces, such as wrinkles. By considering landmarks and surface reflectance over the entire face, we were able to analyze the variation in the distributions of facial structures and fine asperity, and pigmentation. As a result, our method is able to appropriately modulate the appearance of a face so that it appears to be the correct age.

  6. Coplanar capacitance sensors for detecting water intrusion in composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassr, Amr A; El-Dakhakhni, Wael W; Ahmed, Wael H

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials are becoming more affordable and widely used for retrofitting, rehabilitating and repairing reinforced concrete structures designed and constructed under older specifications. However, the mechanical properties and long-term durability of composite materials may degrade severely in the presence of water intrusion. This study presents a new non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for detecting the water intrusion in composite structures by evaluating the dielectric properties of different composite system constituent materials. The variation in the dielectric signatures was employed to design a coplanar capacitance sensor with high sensitivity to detect such defects. An analytical model was used to study the effect of the sensor geometry on the output signal and to optimize sensor design. A finite element model was developed to validate analytical results and to evaluate other sensor design-related parameters. Experimental testing of a concrete specimen wrapped with composite laminate and containing a series of pre-induced water intrusion defects was conducted in order to validate the concept of the new technique. Experimental data showed excellent agreement with the finite element model predictions and confirmed sensor performance

  7. A Study of Flexible Composites for Expandable Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Payload volume for launch vehicles is a critical constraint that impacts spacecraft design. Deployment mechanisms, such as those used for solar arrays and antennas, are approaches that have successfully accommodated this constraint, however, providing pressurized volumes that can be packaged compactly at launch and expanded in space is still a challenge. One approach that has been under development for many years is to utilize softgoods - woven fabric for straps, cloth, and with appropriate coatings, bladders - to provide this expandable pressure vessel capability. The mechanics of woven structure is complicated by a response that is nonlinear and often nonrepeatable due to the discrete nature of the woven fiber architecture. This complexity reduces engineering confidence to reliably design and certify these structures, which increases costs due to increased requirements for system testing. The present study explores flexible composite materials systems as an alternative to the heritage softgoods approach. Materials were obtained from vendors who utilize flexible composites for non-aerospace products to determine some initial physical and mechanical properties of the materials. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed to obtain the stress-strain response of the flexible composites and the failure behavior. A failure criterion was developed from the data, and a space habitat application was used to provide an estimate of the relative performance of flexible composites compared to the heritage softgoods approach. Initial results are promising with a 25% mass savings estimated for the flexible composite solution.

  8. A turtle-like swimming robot using a smart soft composite (SSC) structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung-Jung; Song, Sung-Hyuk; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a biomimetic swimming robot based on the locomotion of a marine turtle. To realize the smooth, soft flapping motions of this type of turtle, a novel actuator was also developed, using a smart soft composite (SSC) structure that can generate bending and twisting motions in a simple, lightweight structure. The SSC structure is a composite consisting of an active component to generate the actuation force, a passive component to determine the twisting angle of the structure, and a matrix to combine the components. The motion of such a structure can be designed by specifying the angle between a filament of the scaffold structure and a shape-memory alloy (SMA) wire. The bending and twisting motion of the SSC structure is explained in terms of classical laminate theory, and cross-ply and angled-ply structures were fabricated to evaluate its motion. Finally, the turtle-like motion of a swimming robot was realized by employing a specially designed SSC structure. To mimic the posterior positive twisting angle of a turtle’s flipper during the upstroke, the SMA wire on the upper side was offset, and a positive ply-angled scaffold was used. Likewise, for the anterior negative twisting angle of the flipper during the downstroke, an offset SMA wire on the lower side and a positive ply-angled scaffold were also required. The fabricated flipper’s length is 64.3 mm and it realizes 55 mm bending and 24° twisting. The resulting robot achieved a swimming speed of 22.5 mm s −1 . (paper)

  9. Investigation of Springback Associated with Composite Material Component Fabrication (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project 94-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research project was to examine processing and design parameters in the fabrication of composite components to obtain a better understanding and attempt to minimize springback associated with composite materials. To accomplish this, both processing and design parameters were included in a Taguchi-designed experiment. Composite angled panels were fabricated, by hand layup techniques, and the fabricated panels were inspected for springback effects. This experiment yielded several significant results. The confirmation experiment validated the reproducibility of the factorial effects, error recognized, and experiment as reliable. The material used in the design of tooling needs to be a major consideration when fabricating composite components, as expected. The factors dealing with resin flow, however, raise several potentially serious material and design questions. These questions must be dealt with up front in order to minimize springback: viscosity of the resin, vacuum bagging of the part for cure, and the curing method selected. These factors directly affect design, material selection, and processing methods.

  10. Surface Composition of the Non-Ice Component on Icy Satellites and Ring Particles in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Pearson, N.; Perlman, Z. S.; Bradley, E. T.; Hendrix, A.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Filacchione, G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Nelson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's icy satellites and ring particle surfaces have long been known to be composed mostly of frozen water. However, all surfaces show an absorption due to a non-water-ice component whose identity has not been well understood. In the near infrared, water ice has strong absorptions which limit detectability of other trace components. Similarly, at wavelengths less than about 0.18 microns, water is very absorbing. However, in the ~0.2 to ~1 micron range, water ice has low absorption and trace components are readily detected. Classical interpretations of the UV absorber and dark material on outer Solar System satellites have been varying amounts of tholins and carbon. However, tholins have spectral structure not seen in the icy spectra in the Saturn System. Many silicates also have UV spectral structure that reject them from contributing significantly to the observed spectral signatures. We have constructed a new UV spectrometer and a new environment chamber for studying the spectral properties of materials from 0.1 to 15 microns. In our survey of the spectral properties of materials so far, we find that small amounts of metallic iron and iron oxides in the icy surfaces are compatible with and can explain the UV, visible and near-infrared spectra of icy surfaces in the Saturn system (0.12 to 5.1 microns) using data from the Cassini UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The wide range of observed UV-NIR (0.1-5 micron) spectral signatures provide strong constraints on composition and grain size distribution, including grain sizes of the ice. Spectra of the Saturnian rings and icy satellites indicate they have a large range of ice grain sizes, from tens of microns to sub-micron. Sub-micron ice grains create unusual spectral properties, which are seen in the spectra of the rings and satellites of Saturn and on satellites further out in the Solar System. Clark et al. (2012, Icarus v218, p831) showed that VIMS

  11. Macro-Raman spectroscopy for bulk composition and homogeneity analysis of multi-component pharmaceutical powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Barona, David; Oladepo, Sulayman; Williams, Lisa; Hoe, Susan; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Vehring, Reinhard

    2017-07-15

    A new macro-Raman system equipped with a motorized translational sample stage and low-frequency shift capabilities was developed for bulk composition and homogeneity analysis of multi-component pharmaceutical powders. Different sampling methods including single spot and scanning measurement were compared. It was found that increasing sample volumes significantly improved the precision of quantitative composition analysis, especially for poorly mixed powders. The multi-pass cavity of the macro-Raman system increased effective sample volumes by 20 times from the sample volume defined by the collection optics, i.e., from 0.02μL to about 0.4μL. A stochastic model simulating the random sampling process of polydisperse microparticles was used to predict the sampling errors for a specific sample volume. Comparison of fluticasone propionate mass fractions of the commercial products Flixotide ® 250 and Seretide ® 500 simulated for different sampling volumes with experimentally measured compositions verified that the effective sample volume of a single point macro-Raman measurement in the multi-pass cavity of this instrument was between 0.3μL and 0.5μL. The macro-Raman system was also successfully used for blend uniformity analysis. It was concluded that demixing occurred in the binary mixture of l-leucine and d-mannitol from the observation that the sampling errors indicated by the standard deviations of measured leucine mass fractions increased during mixing, and the standard deviation values were all larger than the theoretical lower limit determined by the simulation. Since sample volume was shown to have a significant impact on measured homogeneity characteristics, it was concluded that powder homogeneity analysis results, i.e., the mean of individual test results and absolute and relative standard deviations, must be presented together with the effective sample volumes of the applied testing techniques for any measurement of powder homogeneity to be fully

  12. Structure and dielectric properties in the radio frequency range of polymer composites based on vanadium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolbunov V.R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composites with active fillers are recently considered to be promising materials for the design of new functional devices with controllable properties and are intensively investigated. Dielectric studies are one of the most effective methods for studying structural features and mechanisms of conductivity formation for this type of two-component systems. The paper presents research results of the dielectric characteristics in the range of radio frequency of 50 kHz — 10 MHz and temperature range of 30—60°C of polyethylene composites of vanadium dioxide with different volume fractions of filler. Two dispersion areas were found: a high-frequency area caused by the Maxwell charge separation on the boundaries of the polyethylene matrix — conductive filler of VI2 crystallites, and a low frequency area associated with the presence of the transition layer at this boundary. The relative permittivity of the composite has a tendency to a decrease in absolute value with increasing temperature. The analysis of the low-frequency dependence of the dielectric constant of the value of the filler’s volume fraction revealed that the investigated composite belongs to two-component statistical mixtures with a transition layer between the components.

  13. Structural characterization of biomedical Co–Cr–Mo components produced by direct metal laser sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barucca, G., E-mail: g.barucca@univpm.it [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Santecchia, E.; Majni, G. [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Girardin, E. [DISCO, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Bassoli, E.; Denti, L.; Gatto, A. [DIMeC, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Vignolese 905/B, Modena 41125 (Italy); Iuliano, L. [DISPEA, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Moskalewicz, T. [Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Mengucci, P. [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technique to manufacture complex functional mechanical parts from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. Usually, the mechanical components produced by this procedure show higher residual porosity and poorer mechanical properties than those obtained by conventional manufacturing techniques. In this work, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy produced by DMLS with a composition suitable for biomedical applications was submitted to hardness measurements and structural characterization. The alloy showed a hardness value remarkably higher than those commonly obtained for the same cast or wrought alloys. In order to clarify the origin of this unexpected result, the sample microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). For the first time, a homogeneous microstructure comprised of an intricate network of thin ε (hcp)-lamellae distributed inside a γ (fcc) phase was observed. The ε-lamellae grown on the {111}{sub γ} planes limit the dislocation slip inside the γ (fcc) phase, causing the measured hardness increase. The results suggest possible innovative applications of the DMLS technique to the production of mechanical parts in the medical and dental fields. - Highlights: • Samples of a Co–Cr–Mo biomedical alloy were produced by direct metal laser sintering. • Hardness values unexpectedly high were attributed to a peculiar microstructure. • Fine lamellae of the ε-phase alternated to the γ-phase were observed for the first time. • A nucleation and growth model for the observed microstructure is proposed.

  14. Hybrid Testing of Composite Structures with Single-Axis Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldbjørn, Jacob Paamand; Høgh, Jacob Herold; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid testing is a substructuring technique where a structure is emulated by modelling a part of it in a numerical model while testing the remainder experimentally. Previous research in hybrid testing has been performed on multi-component structures e.g. damping fixtures, however in this paper...... a hybrid testing platform is introduced for single-component hybrid testing. In this case, the boundary between the numerical model and experimental setup is defined by multiple Degrees-Of-Freedoms (DOFs) which highly complicate the transferring of response between the two substructures. Digital Image...... Correlation (DIC) is therefore implemented for displacement control of the experimental setup. The hybrid testing setup was verified on a multicomponent structure consisting of a beam loaded in three point bending and a numerical structure of a frame. Furthermore, the stability of the hybrid testing loop...

  15. Structural integrity of power generating speed bumps made of concrete foam composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, B.; Muttaqin, M.; Hastrino, D.; Sebayang, A.; Basuki, W. S.; Sabri, M.; Abda, S.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper concrete foam composite speed bumps were designed to generate electrical power by utilizing the movements of commuting vehicles on highways, streets, parking gates, and drive-thru station of fast food restaurants. The speed bumps were subjected to loadings generated by vehicles pass over the power generating mechanical system. In this paper, we mainly focus our discussion on the structural integrity of the speed bumps and discuss the electrical power generating speed bumps in another paper. One aspect of structural integrity is its ability to support designed loads without breaking and includes the study of past structural failures in order to prevent failures in future designs. The concrete foam composites were used for the speed bumps; the reinforcement materials are selected from empty fruit bunch of oil palm. In this study, the speed bump materials and structure were subjected to various tests to obtain its physical and mechanical properties. To analyze the structure stability of the speed bumps some models were produced and tested in our speed bump test station. We also conduct a FEM-based computer simulation to analyze stress responses of the speed bump structures. It was found that speed bump type 1 significantly reduced the radial voltage. In addition, the speed bump is equipped with a steel casing is also suitable for use as a component component in generating electrical energy.

  16. Hybrid Composites for LH2 Fuel Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Loos, Alfred C.; McMahon, William M.

    2001-01-01

    The application of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structure for cryogenic fuel tanks is critical to the success of the next generation of Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The recent failure of the X-33 composite fuel tank occurred in part due to microcracking of the polymer matrix, which allowed cryogen to permeate through the inner skin to the honeycomb core. As part of an approach to solve these problems, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are working to develop and investigate polymer films that will act as a barrier to the permeation of LH2 through the composite laminate. In this study two commercially available films and eleven novel LaRC films were tested in an existing cryogenics laboratory at MSFC to determine the permeance of argon at room temperature. Several of these films were introduced as a layer in the composite to form an interleaved, or hybrid, composite to determine the effects on permeability. In addition, the effects of the interleaved layer thickness, number, and location on the mechanical properties of the composite laminate were investigated. In this initial screening process, several of the films were found to exhibit lower permeability to argon than the composite panels tested.

  17. Composition-structure-property relation of oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian

    also increases such properties. Yet, these rules are not strictly followed even for the simplest binary oxide glasses, such as alkali silicates, borates and phosphates. In this thesis it is argued that the missing link between composition and properties is the glass structure. Structural models...... are proposed based on topological selection rules and experimentally verified. The relation between structure and properties is evaluated using topological constraint theory, which in its essence is a theory that quantifies the two intuitions of the glass scientist. The end result is a quantitative model...

  18. Manifestation of the shape-memory effect in polyetherurethane cellular plastics, fabric composites, and sandwich structures under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaevskii, P. G.; Kozlov, N. A.; Agapov, I. G.; Reznichenko, G. M.; Churilo, N. V.; Churilo, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    The results of experiments that were performed to test the feasibility of creating sandwich structures (consisting of thin-layer sheaths of polymer composites and a cellular polymer core) with the shapememory effect as models of the transformable components of space structures have been given. The data obtained indicate that samples of sandwich structures under microgravity conditions on board the International Space Station have recovered their shape to almost the same degree as under terrestrial conditions, which makes it possible to recommend them for creating components of transformable space structures on their basis.

  19. Structures tubulaires minces en matériaux composites. Principes de calcul Thin-Walled Composite Tubular Structures. Calculation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odru P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article présente une méthode de calcul des structures composites fibres-résine appliquée aux cas des tubes minces. Outre l'établissement des relations contraintes - déformations généralisées des tubes à partir des caractéristiques des matériaux de base et de leur orientation, on pose les relations permettant de calculer leur comportement et leur dimensionnement sous des charges axisymétriques combinées de traction, pression et flexion. Une méthode simplifiée applicable au cas des composites microfissurés est aussi présentée. On montre ensuite, à travers quelques exemples concrets d'applications, les propriétés intéressantes ou inhabituelles que le matériau permet de conférer aux structures. This article presents a method of calculation of composite structures applied to thin-walled tubes. Starting from the characteristics and orientation of the basic materials, the generalized stress-strain equations of the tubes are determined ; then the relationship allowing the calculation of their design and behavior under combined axisymmetrical loads of tension, pressure and bending are established. A simplified method applicable to microcracked composite materials is also described. Several complete examples of applications illustrate the interesting or unusual properties that this material can impart to structures

  20. Prevent recurrence of nuclear disaster (4). Future tasks in the field of structure and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Ueda, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Structure and components subcommittee under the special committee of seismic safety of nuclear power stations of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan discussed future activities related with technical problems of seismic design of structures, components and piping system and evaluation of seismic effects in collaboration with the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. These problems were arranged by 'logic of seismic safety' and tabulated just enough, and then their roadmap was prepared. This article described selected relevant problems and discussed safety margins of seismic design and their related problems, referring to state of countermeasures and evaluated results of nuclear power stations after Great East Japan Earthquake occurred in March 11, 2011. Main problems were related with seismic safety margins of structure and components, consideration of ground motion index, rationalization and upgrade of seismic design, application of new technology, integrity evaluation of structure and components after or at earthquake, and upgrade of seismic probabilistic risk assessment methodology. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Peroxynitrous acid induces structural and functional modifications to basement membranes and its key component, laminin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Y.; Hammer, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Basement membranes (BM) are specialized extracellular matrices underlying endothelial cells in the artery wall. Laminin, the most abundant BM glycoprotein, is a structural and biologically active component. Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), a potent oxidizing and nitrating agent, is formed in vivo...

  2. Extended Aging Theories for Predictions of Safe Operational Life of Critical Airborne Structural Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Chen, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The previously developed Ko closed-form aging theory has been reformulated into a more compact mathematical form for easier application. A new equivalent loading theory and empirical loading theories have also been developed and incorporated into the revised Ko aging theory for the prediction of a safe operational life of airborne failure-critical structural components. The new set of aging and loading theories were applied to predict the safe number of flights for the B-52B aircraft to carry a launch vehicle, the structural life of critical components consumed by load excursion to proof load value, and the ground-sitting life of B-52B pylon failure-critical structural components. A special life prediction method was developed for the preflight predictions of operational life of failure-critical structural components of the B-52H pylon system, for which no flight data are available.

  3. Feasibility study on measuring axial and transverse stress/strain components in composite materials using Bragg sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyckx, G.; Degrieck, J.; De Waele, W.; Van Paepegem, W.; Van Roosbroeck, J.; Chah, K.; Vlekken, J.; McKenzie, I.; Obst, A.

    2017-11-01

    A fibre optic sensor design is proposed for simultaneously measuring the 3D stress (or strain) components and temperature inside thermo hardened composite materials. The sensor is based on two fibre Bragg gratings written in polarisation maintaining fibre. Based on calculations of the condition number, it will be shown that reasonable accuracies are to be expected. First tests on the bare sensors and on the sensors embedded in composite material, which confirm the expected behaviour, will be presented.

  4. Extracting structural land cover components using small-footprint waveform LDAR data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McGlinchy, J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available that are embedded in the digitized backscattered energy from the LiDAR pulse. This study aims to extract structural components from waveform LiDAR data in terms of woody, herbaceous, and bare ground components from data collected over a savanna environment...

  5. Structural and morphological characteristics of composite: polyamide 6/ferrite nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.C.; Santos, P.T.A.; Silva, T.R.G.; Araujo, E.M.; Costa, A.C.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the structural and morphological characteristics of a composite polyamide 6 with 50% loading of nickel ferrite. The ferrite was obtained by combustion synthesis and calcined in muffle furnace at 700 deg C. The polymer matrix was previously dried in vacuum oven at 80 deg C / 48 h to eliminate moisture. The composites were characterized by XRD and SEM. XRD results show the incorporation of cargo in the matrix, and that increasing temperature led to a considerable increase in crystallinity. The particle size of the load in the matrix was changed by increasing temperature. (author)

  6. Seismic Behaviour of Post-Installed Anchors: Non-Structural Components and Art Objects Fastening

    OpenAIRE

    Abate, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The damage observation in recent seismic events (L’Aquila 2009, Chile 2010, Christchurch 2011, Tohoku 2011, Emilia 2012) helps in the identification of the critical aspects related to the response to earthquake of non-structural components (Miranda et al. 2012). Generally these elements are included in buildings and may belong to the architectural system, to the utility system or to the building content. The failure of the non-structural components can represent a significant danger for life ...

  7. A component-based open hypermedia approach to integreting structure services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Nürnberg, Peter J.; Bucka-Lassen, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the issue of integrating different structure services within a component-based open hypermedia system. We do so by considering the task of collaborative editing, which calls for a variety of different structures traditionally supplied by different structure services. We...... discuss the nature of collaborative editing and how it can be supported by a combination of spatial and navigational hypermedia services. We then present a component-based open hypermedia system architecture and describe various methods of integrating different structure services provided within...

  8. Plasma cleaning of beamline optical components: Contamination and gas composition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Smith, J.A.; Wallace, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have initiated a program to study the impact of gas composition on the carbon removal rate during plasma cleaning of optical components, and of possible contamination due to the plasma processing. The measurements were performed in a test chamber designed to simulate the geometry of the grating/Codling mirror section of a Grasshopper monochromator. Removal rates were determined for a direct-current (dc) (Al electrode) discharge using a quartz crystal microbalance coated with polymethylmethacrylate, located at the position of the grating. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis of strateg- ically located, gold-coated stainless steel samples was employed to determine contamination. The relative removal rates of the gases studied were 3% C 2 F 6 /O 2 much-gt O 2 +H 2 O>O 2 ∼N 2 O>H 2 >N 2 . Although the C 2 F 6 /O 2 gas mixture showed a 20 times greater removal rate than its nearest competitor, it also caused significant contamination to occur. Contamination studies were performed for both dc and radio-frequency (rf) discharges. For the dc discharge we found that great care must be taken in order to avoid Al contamination; for the rf discharge, significant Fe contamination was observed

  9. Single-component and fast-curing epoxy resin for liquid composite molding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yiru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of single-component and fast-curing epoxy resins is highly desired for many industry applications. In this work, we report an epoxy system based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA and 1-(2-cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4- methylimidazole (1C2E4MIM. The inductive effect of electron-withdrawing cyano group distinctly increases the latency of 1C2E4MIM without sacrificing the curing rate. The results of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA measurements indicate DGEBA/1C2E4MIM epoxy system can be fully cured in 15 min. The rheological, thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/1C2E4MIM epoxy system were studied in detail. The results show that the shelf life of this epoxy system is more than 4 days at room temperature and more than 6 months at -18 °C. The cured epoxy resins show high glass transition temperature (>155 °C, tensile strength (>80 MPa as well as excellent moist heat resistance. Finally, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRPs were fabricated using this epoxy system as matrix via vacuum assisted resin infusion (VARI process. The mechanical properties of CFRPs, including tensile, flexural, compressive and interlaminar shear properties, were investigated.

  10. Structural investigation of carbon/carbon composites by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prem, Manfred; Krexner, Gerhard; Peterlik, Herwig

    2006-01-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) composite material was investigated by means of small-angle as well as wide-angle elastic neutron scattering. The C/C-composites were built up from bi-directionally woven fabrics from PAN-based carbon fibers. Pre-impregnation with phenolic resin was followed by pressure curing and carbonization at 1000 deg. C and a final heat treatment at either 1800 or 2400 deg. C. Measurements of the samples were performed in orientations arranging the carbon fibers, respectively, parallel and perpendicular to the incoming beam. Structural features of the fibers as well as the inherently existing pores are presented and the influence of the heat treatment is discussed. The results are compared to earlier X-ray investigations of carbon fibers and C/C-composites

  11. Effects of thermal cycling on composite materials for space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the thermal and mechanical properties of composite materials that are candidates for space structures are briefly described. The results from a thermal analysis of the orbiting Space Station Freedom is used to define a typical thermal environment and the parameters that cause changes in the thermal history. The interactions of this environment with composite materials are shown and described. The effects of this interaction on the integrity as well as the properties of GR/thermoset, Gr/thermoplastic, Gr/metal and Gr/glass composite materials are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the interaction that are critical to precision spacecraft. Finally, ground test methodology are briefly discussed.

  12. Damage Evaluation and Analysis of Composite Pressure Vessels Using Fiber Bragg Gratings to Determine Structural Health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunzler, Marley; Udd, Eric; Kreger, Stephen; Johnson, Mont; Henrie, Vaughn

    2005-01-01

    .... Using fiber Bragg gratings embedded into the weave structure of carbon fiber epoxy composites allow the capability to monitor these composites during manufacture, cure, general aging, and damage...

  13. Polyurethane structural adhesives applied in automotive composite joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josue Garcia Quini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years structural adhesives technology has demonstrated great potential for application due to its capacity to transform complex structures into solid unitary and monolithic assemblies using different materials. Thus, seams or joints integrate these structures providing, besides a reduction in weight, a considerable increase in the mechanical resistance and stiffness. The increase in the industrial use of structural adhesives is mainly due to their ability to efficiently bond different materials in an irreversible manner, even replacing systems involving mechanical joints. In the automobile industry structural adhesives have been widely used for the bonding of metal substrates, thermoplastics and composites, frequently employing these in combination, particularly glass fiber and polyester resin composites molded using RTM and SMC processes. However, the use of urethane structural adhesives in applications involving composites and thermoplastics has been the subject of few investigations. In this study the effects of temperature and time on the shear strength of RTM, SMC and ABS joints, applying temperatures of -40, 25, 80, 120 and 177 °C and times of 20 minutes and 500 hours, were determined. The objective was to evaluate the performance under extreme conditions of use in order to assess whether these joints could be used in passenger or off-road vehicles. The results showed that the urethane structural adhesive promoted the efficient bonding of these materials, considering that due to the high adhesive strength the failures occurred in the substrates without adversely affecting the bonded area. For each test condition the joint failure modes were also determined.

  14. Conductivity and structure of sub-micrometric SrTiO3-YSZ composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz Trejo, Enrique; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune; Bonanos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Sub-micrometric composites of SrTiO3-YSZ (1:1 volume) and samples of SrTiO3 were prepared by high temperature consolidation of precursors obtained by precipitation with NaOH. The structure development and morphology of the precursors were studied by XRD and SEM. The perovskite and fluorite phases...... in the composites are clearly formed at 600°C with no signs of reaction up to 1100°C; the nominally pure SrTiO3 can be formed at temperatures as low as 400°C. Composites with sub-micrometric grain sizes can be prepared successfully without reaction between the components, although a change in the cell parameter...

  15. The Influence of Tool Composite's Structure During Process of Diamond Grinding of Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlik Józef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the tests performed during the grinding process of the ceramic materials: – polycrystalline ceramics (Zirconium ZrO2 and mono-crystalline ceramics (sapphire α-Al2O3 by the diamond tools. Studies have shown that the concentration (thickening of the tool composite changes the tool's pore structure when using suitable wetted adamantine additives. Such modified composite has positive impact on tribological properties of the subsurface layer of the machined components. This is manifested by the reduction of the surface roughness and reduction of the vibration amplitude of the coefficient of friction. The possibilities of the positive effects when using wetted additives on the tool's composite during the pressing (briquetting stage confirm the study results.

  16. Fuzzy Reasoning to More Accurately Determine Void Areas on Optical Micrographs of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominquez, Jesus A.; Tate, Lanetra C.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishing the best-performing composite matrix (resin) requires that not only the processing method but also the cure cycle generate low-void-content structures. If voids are present, the performance of the composite matrix will be significantly reduced. This is usually noticed by significant reductions in matrix-dominated properties, such as compression and shear strength. Voids in composite materials are areas that are absent of the composite components: matrix and fibers. The characteristics of the voids and their accurate estimation are critical to determine for high performance composite structures. One widely used method of performing void analysis on a composite structure sample is acquiring optical micrographs or Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of lateral sides of the sample and retrieving the void areas within the micrographs/images using an image analysis technique. Segmentation for the retrieval and subsequent computation of void areas within the micrographs/images is challenging as the gray-scaled values of the void areas are close to the gray-scaled values of the matrix leading to the need of manually performing the segmentation based on the histogram of the micrographs/images to retrieve the void areas. The use of an algorithm developed by NASA and based on Fuzzy Reasoning (FR) proved to overcome the difficulty of suitably differentiate void and matrix image areas with similar gray-scaled values leading not only to a more accurate estimation of void areas on composite matrix micrographs but also to a faster void analysis process as the algorithm is fully autonomous.

  17. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  18. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  19. Structure for hts composite conductors and the manufacture of same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James D.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert Neal

    1999-01-01

    A superconducting oxide composite structure including a superconducting oxide member, a metal layer surrounding the superconducting oxide member, and an insulating layer of a complex oxide formed in situ adjacent to the superconducting oxide member and the metal layer is provided together with a method of forming such a superconducting oxide composite structure including encapsulating a superconducting oxide member or precursor within a metal matrix layer from the group of: (i) a reactive metal sheath adjacent to the superconducting oxide member or precursor, the reactive metal sheath surrounded by a second metal layer or (ii) an alloy containing a reactive metal; to form an intermediate product, and, heating the intermediate product at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an insulating layer of a complex oxide in situ, the insulating layer to the superconducting oxide member or precursor and the metal matrix layer.

  20. Thermotropic nanostructured gels with complex hierarchical structure and two gelling components for water shut-off and enhance of oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunina, L. K.; Kuvshinov, I. V.; Kuvshinov, V. A.; Kozlov, V. V.; Stasyeva, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents the results of laboratory and field tests of thermotropic composition MEGA with two simultaneously acting gelling components, polymer and inorganic. The composition is intended for improving oil recovery and water shut-off at oilfields developed by thermal flooding, and cyclic-steam stimulated oil production wells. The composition forms an in-situ "gel-in-gel" system with improved structural-mechanical properties, using reservoir or carrier fluid heat for gelling. The gel blocks water breakthrough into producing wells and redistribute fluid flows, thus increasing the oil recovery factor.

  1. Nanomembrane structures having mixed crystalline orientations and compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Scott, Shelley A.; Savage, Donald E.

    2014-08-12

    The present nanomembrane structures include a multilayer film comprising a single-crystalline layer of semiconductor material disposed between two other single-crystalline layers of semiconductor material. A plurality of holes extending through the nanomembrane are at least partially, and preferably entirely, filled with a filler material which is also a semiconductor, but which differs from the nanomembrane semiconductor materials in composition, crystal orientation, or both.

  2. Glyceride structure and sterol composition of SOS-7 halophyte oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Shami, S. M.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Glyceride structure of SOS-7 halophyte oil was studied using the lipase hydrolysis technique. This halophyte sample was obtained from 1988 harvest planted in Ghardaka, on the border of the Red Sea, Egypt. The oilseed was ground and extracted for its oil using commercial hexane in Soxhlet extractor. The unsaturated fatty acids were found centralized in the 2-position of triglycerides, whereas oleic and linolenic acids showed more preference for this position. It was found that P3 was the major component of GS3, whereas P2L and PStL; PL2, POL and StL2 are predominating among GS2U and GSU3 respectively. L3 manifested itself as the principal constituent of GU3 type. Sterol composition of the halophyte oil was determined by GLC as TMS derivative. It was found that the oil contains campsterol, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and 7-stigmasterol of which 7-stigmasterol is the major sterol and constitute 52.4%.

    Se ha estudiado usando la técnica de hidrólisis mediante lipasa la estructura glicerídica de aceite de halofito SOS-7. Esta muestra de halofito fue obtenida a partir de una cosecha de 1988 plantada en Ghardaka, en la orilla del Mar Rojo, Egipto. Para la extracción del aceite de la semilla molida se utilizó hexano comercial en extractor Soxhlet. Los ácidos grasos insaturados se encontraron centralizados en la posición 2 de los triglicéridos, siendo los ácidos oleico y linolénico los que mostraron mayor preferencia por esta posición. Se encontró que P3 fue el componente mayoritario de GS3, mientras que P2L y PStL; PL2 POL y StL2 son los predominantes para GS2U y GSU3 respectivamente. L3 se manifestó como el principal constituyente de los GU3. La composición esterólica del aceite de halofito se determinó por GLC como derivados del

  3. Cuticle Structure in Relation to Chemical Composition: Re-assessing the Prevailing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Victoria; Guzmán-Delgado, Paula; Graça, José; Santos, Sara; Gil, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The surface of most aerial plant organs is covered with a cuticle that provides protection against multiple stress factors including dehydration. Interest on the nature of this external layer dates back to the beginning of the 19th century and since then, several studies facilitated a better understanding of cuticular chemical composition and structure. The prevailing undertanding of the cuticle as a lipidic, hydrophobic layer which is independent from the epidermal cell wall underneath stems from the concept developed by Brongniart and von Mohl during the first half of the 19th century. Such early investigations on plant cuticles attempted to link chemical composition and structure with the existing technologies, and have not been directly challenged for decades. Beginning with a historical overview about the development of cuticular studies, this review is aimed at critically assessing the information available on cuticle chemical composition and structure, considering studies performed with cuticles and isolated cuticular chemical components. The concept of the cuticle as a lipid layer independent from the cell wall is subsequently challenged, based on the existing literature, and on new findings pointing toward the cell wall nature of this layer, also providing examples of different leaf cuticle structures. Finally, the need for a re-assessment of the chemical and structural nature of the plant cuticle is highlighted, considering its cell wall nature and variability among organs, species, developmental stages, and biotic and abiotic factors during plant growth.

  4. Understanding the Compositional Variability of the Major Components of Hydrothermal Plumes in the Okinawa Trough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the major components of hydrothermal plumes in seafloor hydrothermal fields are critical for an improved understanding of biogeochemical cycles and the large-scale distribution of elements in the submarine environment. The composition of major components in hydrothermal plume water column samples from 25 stations has been investigated in the middle and southern Okinawa Trough. The physical and chemical properties of hydrothermal plume water in the Okinawa Trough have been affected by input of the Kuroshio current, and its influence on hydrothermal plume water from the southern Okinawa Trough to the middle Okinawa Trough is reduced. The anomalous layers of seawater in the hydrothermal plume water columns have higher K+, Ca2+, Mn2+, B3+, Ca2+/SO42-, and Mn2+/Mg2+ ratios and higher optical anomalies than other layers. The Mg2+, SO42-, Mg2+/Ca2+, and SO42-/Mn2+ ratios of the anomalous layers are lower than other layers in the hydrothermal plume water columns and are consistent with concentrations in hydrothermal vent fluids in the Okinawa Trough. This suggests that the chemical variations of hydrothermal plumes in the Tangyin hydrothermal field, like other hydrothermal fields, result in the discharge of high K+, Ca2+, and B3+ and low Mg2+ and SO42- fluid. Furthermore, element ratios (e.g., Sr2+/Ca2+, Ca2+/Cl− in hydrothermal plume water columns were found to be similar to those in average seawater, indicating that Sr2+/Ca2+ and Ca2+/Cl− ratios of hydrothermal plumes might be useful proxies for chemical properties of seawater. The hydrothermal K+, Ca2+, Mn2+, and B3+ flux to seawater in the Okinawa Trough is about 2.62–873, 1.04–326, 1.30–76.4, and 0.293–34.7 × 106 kg per year, respectively. The heat flux is about 0.159–1,973 × 105 W, which means that roughly 0.0006% of ocean heat is supplied by seafloor hydrothermal plumes in the Okinawa Trough.

  5. Effect of micella interesterification on fatty acids composition and volatile components of soybean and rapeseed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifi, Sherine M.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Micella interesterification of soybean and rapeseed oils was carried out using 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 percentages of nickel catalyst, each at different temperatures of 60, 90 and 120ºC for 2, 4, and 6 hours. The proposed interesterification reaction conditions to obtain an oil with low linoleic acid level were 0.2 % nickel catalyst at 120ºC for 4 hours, 0.4% nickel catalyst at 90ºC for 4 hours and 0.6% at 60ºC for 4 hours. Fatty acid composition and chemical analysis of the interesterified and non-esterified oils were estimated. Selected samples undergo heating at 180ºC for 4 hours determining the volatile components. The appearance of some components supported the interesterification process for modification of fatty acid constituents of the oils.Se ha llevado a cabo la interesterificación en fase miscelar de aceites de soja y de colza usando un 0.2%, 0.4% y 0.6% de níquel como catalizador, a diferentes temperaturas (60, 90 y 120ºC durante 2, 4 y 6 horas. Las condiciones de reacción de interesterificación propuestas para obtener un aceite con niveles de ácidos linolénicos bajos fueron 0.2 % de níquel a 120ºC durante 4 horas, 0.4 % de níquel a 90ºC durante 4 horas y 0.6 % a 60ºC durante 4 horas. Se han estimado la composición en ácidos grasos y el análisis químico de los aceites interesterificados y no-esterificados. Las muestras seleccionadas se sometieron a calentamiento a 180ºC durante 4 horas determinando los componentes volátiles. La aparición de algunos componentes apoyó el proceso de interesterificación por modificación de los ácidos grasos constituyentes de los aceites.

  6. Assessment of radiation fields from neutron irradiated structural components of the 40 MW research reactor CIRUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaranarayanan, S.; Sharma, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results of an assessment of the radiation fields from the long-lived neutron activation products (including the decay chain products) in the various structural components of the CIRUS reactor. Special attention is given for the analysis of neutron activation of impurity elements present in the materials of the structure. 16 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  7. Structure and chemical composition of hydrocarbons from semicoking tar of lignites from the near-Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Antonio, T.Z.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Platonova, M.V.; Shvykin, A.Y. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-02-01

    Hydrocarbons from semicoking tar of lignites from the near-Moscow fields were separated by thin-layer chromatography and the molecular and hypothetical structural formulae of the components were determined. A genetic relationship between the components and the initial biological material was revealed. A contribution of `primary` hydrocarbons to formation of the qualitative composition of tars obtained by high-temperature processing of lignites was demonstrated.

  8. Vlasov Simulation of Electrostatic Solitary Structures in Multi-Component Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Pickett, Jolene S.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic solitary structures have been observed in the Earth's magnetosheath by the Cluster spacecraft. Recent theoretical work has suggested that these solitary structures are modeled by electron acoustic solitary waves existing in a four-component plasma system consisting of core electrons, two counter-streaming electron beams, and one species of background ions. In this paper, the excitation of electron acoustic waves and the formation of solitary structures are studied by means of a one-dimensional electrostatic Vlasov simulation. The present result first shows that either electron acoustic solitary waves with negative potential or electron phase-space holes with positive potential are excited in four-component plasma systems. However, these electrostatic solitary structures have longer duration times and higher wave amplitudes than the solitary structures observed in the magnetosheath. The result indicates that a high-speed and small free energy source may be needed as a fifth component. An additional simulation of a five-component plasma consisting of a stable four-component plasma and a weak electron beam shows the generation of small and fast electron phase-space holes by the bump-on-tail instability. The physical properties of the small and fast electron phase-space holes are very similar to those obtained by the previous theoretical analysis. The amplitude and duration time of solitary structures in the simulation are also in agreement with the Cluster observation.

  9. Manufacture of Green-Composite Sandwich Structures with Basalt Fiber and Bioepoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Torres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is a growing interest for the use and development of materials synthesized from renewable sources in the polymer composites manufacturing industry; this applies for both matrix and reinforcement components. In the present research, a novel basalt fibre reinforced (BFR bioepoxy green composite is proposed as an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional petroleum-derived composites. In addition, this material system was combined with cork as core material for the fabrication of fibre composite sandwich structures. Mechanical properties of both skin and core materials were assessed through flexural and tensile tests. Finite element (FEM simulations for the mechanical stress analysis of the sandwich material were carried out, and a maximum allowable shear stress for material failure under bending loads was established. Permeability measurements of the basalt fabrics were carried out in order to perform numerical simulations of liquid composite moulding (LCM processes on the PAM-RTM software. The proposed green-composite sandwich material was used for the fabrication of a longboard as a case study for a sports equipment application. Numerical simulations of the mould filling stage allowed the determination of an optimal mould filling strategy. Finally, the load-bearing capacity of the board was studied by means of FEM simulations, and the presented design proved to be acceptable for service.

  10. Chemical composition of Galla chinensis extract and the effect of its main component(s) on the prevention of enamel demineralization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue-Lian; Liu, Ming-Dong; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Xue-Dong; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2012-09-01

    To determine the chemical composition of Galla chinensis extract (GCE) by several analysis techniques and to compare the efficacy of GCE and its main component(s) in inhibition of enamel demineralization, for the development of future anticaries agents, main organic composition of GCE was qualitatively determined by liquid chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). Inorganic ions were tested by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy and F was especially measured by ion chromatography. Then, bovine enamel blocks were randomly divided into four treatment groups and were subjected to a pH-cycling regime for 12 times. Each cycle included 5-min applications with one of four treatments: 4 g⋅L(-1) GCE solution, 4 g⋅L(-1) gallic acid (GA) solution, 1 g⋅L(-1) NaF solution (positive control), deionized water (DDW, negative control), and then 60-min application in pH 5.0 acidic buffer and 5-min application in neutral buffer. Acidic buffers were retained for calcium analysis. The main organic composition of GCE were GA and its isomer, and, to a lesser extent, small molecule gallotannins. The content of GA in GCE was 71.3%±0.2% (w/w). Inorganic ions were present in various amounts, of which Ca was (136±2.82) µg⋅g(-1), and Zn was (6.8±0.1) µg⋅g(-1). No F was detected in GCE. In pH cycling, GA showed an effect similar to GCE in inhibiting enamel demineralization (P>0.05). GA was found to be the main effective, demineralization inhibiting component of GCE and could be a promising agent for the development of anticaries agents.

  11. Pre-form ceramic matrix composite cavity and method of forming and method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Philip Harold; Delvaux, John McConnell; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-06-09

    A pre-form CMC cavity and method of forming pre-form CMC cavity for a ceramic matrix component includes providing a mandrel, applying a base ply to the mandrel, laying-up at least one CMC ply on the base ply, removing the mandrel, and densifying the base ply and the at least one CMC ply. The remaining densified base ply and at least one CMC ply form a ceramic matrix component having a desired geometry and a cavity formed therein. Also provided is a method of forming a CMC component.

  12. Experimental study on beam for composite CES structural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Tomoya

    2017-10-01

    Development study on Concrete Encase Steel (CES) composite structure system has been continuously conducted toward the practical use. CES structure is composed of steel and fiber reinforced concrete. In previous study, it was found that CES structure has good seismic performance from experimental study of columns, beam - column joints, shear walls and a two story two span frame. However, as fundamental study on CES beam could be lacking, it is necessary to understand the structural performance of CES beam. In this study, static loading tests of CES beams were conducted with experimental valuable of steel size, the presence or absence of slab and thickness of slab. And restoring characteristics, failure behavior, deformation behavior, and strength evaluation method of CES beam were investigated. As the results, it was found that CES beam showed stable hysteresis behavior. Furthermore it was found that the flexural strength of the CES beam could be evaluated by superposition strength theory.

  13. High yielding tropical energy crops for bioenergy production: Effects of plant components, harvest years and locations on biomass composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, K C; Ogoshi, Richard; Zaleski, Halina M; Hashimoto, Andrew G; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2018-03-01

    The composition of lignocellulosic feedstock, which depends on crop type, crop management, locations and plant parts, significantly affects the conversion efficiency of biomass into biofuels and biobased products. Thus, this study examined the composition of different parts of two high yielding tropical energy crops, Energycane and Napier grass, collected across three locations and years. Significantly higher fiber content was found in the leaves of Energycane than stems, while fiber content was significantly higher in the stems than the leaves of Napier grass. Similarly, fiber content was higher in Napier grass than Energycane. Due to significant differences in biomass composition between the plant parts within a crop type, neither biological conversion, including anaerobic digestion, nor thermochemical pretreatment alone is likely to efficiently convert biomass components into biofuels and biobased products. However, combination of anaerobic digestion with thermochemical conversion technologies could efficiently utilize biomass components in generating biofuels and biobased products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Free-standing carbon nanotube composite sensing skin for distributed strain sensing in structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Minegishi, Kaede; Kurata, Masahiro; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2014-04-01

    The technical challenges of managing the health of critical infrastructure systems necessitate greater structural sensing capabilities. Among these needs is the ability for quantitative, spatial damage detection on critical structural components. Advances in material science have now opened the door for novel and cost-effective spatial sensing solutions specially tailored for damage detection in structures. However, challenges remain before spatial damage detection can be realized. Some of the technical challenges include sensor installations and extensive signal processing requirements. This work addresses these challenges by developing a patterned carbon nanotube composite thin film sensor whose pattern has been optimized for measuring the spatial distribution of strain. The carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite sensing material is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using a layer-by-layer deposition process. The thin film sensors are then patterned into sensing elements using optical lithography processes common to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. The sensor array is designed as a series of sensing elements with varying width to provide insight on the limitations of such patterning and implications of pattern geometry on sensing signals. Once fabrication is complete, the substrate and attached sensor are epoxy bonded to a poly vinyl composite (PVC) bar that is then tested with a uniaxial, cyclic load pattern and mechanical response is characterized. The fabrication processes are then utilized on a larger-scale to develop and instrument a component-specific sensing skin in order to observe the strain distribution on the web of a steel beam. The instrumented beam is part of a larger steel beam-column connection with a concrete slab in composite action. The beam-column subassembly is laterally loaded and strain trends in the web are observed using the carbon nanotube composite sensing skin. The results are discussed in the context of

  15. How simulation of failure risk can improve structural reliability - application to pressurized components and pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Cioclov, Dimitru Dragos

    2013-01-01

    Probabilistic methods for failure risk assessment are introduced, with reference to load carrying structures, such as pressure vessels (PV) and components of pipes systems. The definition of the failure risk associated with structural integrity is made in the context of the general approach to structural reliability. Sources of risk are summarily outlined with emphasis on variability and uncertainties (V&U) which might be encountered in the analysis. To highlight the problem, in its practical...

  16. Sapphire/TiAl composites - structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povarova, K.B.; Antonova, A.V.; Mileiko, S.T.; Sarkissyan, N.S.

    2001-01-01

    Ti-Al-intermetallic-based alloys with lamellar microstructure, -γ(TiAl) +α 2 (Ti 3 Al) are characterized by a high melting point of 1460 o C, a low density of ∼3.9 g/cm 3 , a high gas corrosion resistance up to a temperature of about 900 o C, a high creep resistance up to a temperature of about 800 o C, and a sufficiently high fracture toughness at low temperatures, up to 30 Mpa x m 1/2 . Hence, they are considered as excellent matrices for fibres of high melting point. Unlike well-developed SiC/TiAl composites, which have an obvious upper limit for the usage temperature due to SiC/TiAl interaction, Sapphire/TiAl composites remain nearly unknown because fibres to be used in such composites have not been really available. At the present time, such fibres are developed in Solid State Physics Inst. of RAS. The results of preliminary creep tests of Al 2 O 3 /TiAl composites obtained by using pressure casting have shown that usage of such composite systems shifts the temperature limit for light structural materials in terms of creep resistance to, at least, 1050 o C: creep strength on 100 h time base reaches 120 MPa at that temperature. It occurs also that Sapphire-fibres/TiAl-matrix composite specimens have an increased gas corrosion resistance by more than one order of the magnitudes as compared with that of the matrix alloy. (author)

  17. Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbato, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue-induced damage is one of the most uncertain and extremely unpredictable failure mechanisms for a large variety of structural systems (e.g., aerospace, automotive, offshore, and civil structures) subjected to stochastic and cyclic loading during service life. Among these systems, composite lightweight aerospace structures -- such as fighter aircrafts and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) -- are particularly sensitive to both fatigue- induced and impact-induced damage. Within this scenari...

  18. Factorial structure of the 'ToM Storybooks': A test evaluating multiple components of Theory of Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarelli, Daniela; Testa, Silvia; Molina, Paola

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the factorial structure of the Theory of Mind (ToM) Storybooks, a comprehensive 93-item instrument tapping the five components in Wellman's model of ToM (emotion recognition, understanding of desire and beliefs, ability to distinguish between physical and mental entities, and awareness of the link between perception and knowledge). A sample of 681 three- to eight-year-old Italian children was divided into three age groups to assess whether factorial structure varied across different age ranges. Partial credit model analysis was applied to the data, leading to the empirical identification of 23 composite variables aggregating the ToM Storybooks items. Confirmatory factor analysis was then conducted on the composite variables, providing support for the theoretical model. There were partial differences in the specific composite variables making up the dimensions for each of the three age groups. A single test evaluating distinct dimensions of ToM is a valuable resource for clinical practice which may be used to define differential profiles for specific populations. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Influence of the synthesis conditions of gold nanoparticles on the structure and architectonics of dipeptide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loskutov, Alexander I., E-mail: ailoskutov@yandex.ru [Moscow State Technological University STANKIN (Russian Federation); Guskova, Olga A. [Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden (Germany); Grigoriev, Sergey N.; Oshurko, Vadim B. [Moscow State Technological University STANKIN (Russian Federation); Tarasiuk, Aleksei V. [Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, FSBI “Zakusov Institute of Pharmacology” (Russian Federation); Uryupina, Olga Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    A wide variety of peptides and their natural ability to self-assemble makes them very promising candidates for the fabrication of solid-state devices based on nano- and mesocrystals. In this work, we demonstrate an approach to form peptide composite layers with gold nanoparticles through in situ reduction of chloroauric acid trihydrate by dipeptide and/or dipeptide/formaldehyde mixture in the presence of potassium carbonate at different ratios of components. Appropriate composition of components for the synthesis of highly stable gold colloidal dispersion with particle size of 34–36 nm in dipeptide/formaldehyde solution is formulated. Infrared spectroscopy results indicate that dipeptide participates in the reduction process, conjugation with gold nanoparticles and the self-assembly in 2D, which accompanied by changing peptide chain conformations. The structure and morphology of the peptide composite solid layers with gold nanoparticles on gold, mica and silica surfaces are characterized by atomic force microscopy. In these experiments, the flat particles, dendrites, chains, mesocrystals and Janus particles are observed depending on the solution composition and the substrate/interface used. The latter aspect is studied on the molecular level using computer simulations of individual peptide chains on gold, mica and silica surfaces.

  20. Population Structure and Genomic Breed Composition in an Angus–Brahman Crossbred Cattle Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Gobena

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Crossbreeding is a common strategy used in tropical and subtropical regions to enhance beef production, and having accurate knowledge of breed composition is essential for the success of a crossbreeding program. Although pedigree records have been traditionally used to obtain the breed composition of crossbred cattle, the accuracy of pedigree-based breed composition can be reduced by inaccurate and/or incomplete records and Mendelian sampling. Breed composition estimation from genomic data has multiple advantages including higher accuracy without being affected by missing, incomplete, or inaccurate records and the ability to be used as independent authentication of breed in breed-labeled beef products. The present study was conducted with 676 Angus–Brahman crossbred cattle with genotype and pedigree information to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of using genomic data to determine breed composition. We used genomic data in parametric and non-parametric methods to detect population structure due to differences in breed composition while accounting for the confounding effect of close familial relationships. By applying principal component analysis (PCA and the maximum likelihood method of ADMIXTURE to genomic data, it was possible to successfully characterize population structure resulting from heterogeneous breed ancestry, while accounting for close familial relationships. PCA results offered additional insight into the different hierarchies of genetic variation structuring. The first principal component was strongly correlated with Angus–Brahman proportions, and the second represented variation within animals that have a relatively more extended Brangus lineage—indicating the presence of a distinct pattern of genetic variation in these cattle. Although there was strong agreement between breed proportions estimated from pedigree and genetic information, there were significant discrepancies between these two methods for certain animals

  1. Properties of cellulose/pectins composites: implication for structural and mechanical properties of cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoda-Tandjawa, G; Durand, S; Gaillard, C; Garnier, C; Doublier, J L

    2012-10-01

    The primary cell wall of dicotyledonous plants can be considered as a concentrated polymer assembly, containing in particular polysaccharides among which cellulose and pectins are known to be the major components. In order to understand and control the textural quality of plant-derived foods, it is highly important to elucidate the rheological and microstructural properties of these components, individually and in mixture, in order to define their implication for structural and mechanical properties of primary plant cell wall. In this study, the rheological and microstructural properties of model systems composed of sugar-beet microfibrillated cellulose and HM pectins from various sources, with varied degrees of methylation and containing different amounts of neutral sugar side chains, were investigated. The influence of the presence of calcium and/or sodium ions and the biopolymer concentrations on the properties of the mixed systems were also studied. The characterizations of the mixed system, considered as a simplified model of primary plant cell wall, showed that whatever the structural characteristics of the pectins, the ionic conditions of the medium and the biopolymer concentrations, the gelation of the composite was mainly controlled by cellulose. Thus, the cellulose network would be the principal component governing the mechanical properties of the cell walls. However, the neutral sugar side chains of the pectins seem to play a part in the interactions with cellulose, as shown by the interesting viscoelastic properties of cellulose/apple HM pectins systems. The rigidity of cellulose/pectins composite was strongly influenced by the structural characteristics of pectins. The particular properties of primary plant cell walls would thus result from the solid viscoelastic properties of cellulose, its interactions with pectins according to their structural characteristics (implication of the neutral sugar side chains and the specific potential calcic

  2. Composition-Structure-Property Relations of Compressed Borosilicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Fuglsang, Søren D.; Pedersen, Rune H.; Tjell, Anders Ø.; Østergaard, Martin B.; Youngman, Randall E.; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2014-08-01

    Hot isostatic compression is an interesting method for modifying the structure and properties of bulk inorganic glasses. However, the structural and topological origins of the pressure-induced changes in macroscopic properties are not yet well understood. In this study, we report on the pressure and composition dependences of density and micromechanical properties (hardness, crack resistance, and brittleness) of five soda-lime borosilicate glasses with constant modifier content, covering the extremes from Na-Ca borate to Na-Ca silicate end members. Compression experiments are performed at pressures ≤1.0 GPa at the glass transition temperature in order to allow processing of large samples with relevance for industrial applications. In line with previous reports, we find an increasing fraction of tetrahedral boron, density, and hardness but a decreasing crack resistance and brittleness upon isostatic compression. Interestingly, a strong linear correlation between plastic (irreversible) compressibility and initial trigonal boron content is demonstrated, as the trigonal boron units are the ones most disposed for structural and topological rearrangements upon network compaction. A linear correlation is also found between plastic compressibility and the relative change in hardness with pressure, which could indicate that the overall network densification is responsible for the increase in hardness. Finally, we find that the micromechanical properties exhibit significantly different composition dependences before and after pressurization. The findings have important implications for tailoring microscopic and macroscopic structures of glassy materials and thus their properties through the hot isostatic compression method.

  3. Electrostatic adhesion for added functionality of composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, Callum J C; Bond, Ian P; Potter, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic adhesion can be used as a means of reversible attachment. The incorporation of electrostatic adhesion into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composite structures could provide significant value added functionality. Imparting large potential differences (∼2 kV) across electrodes generates an attractive force, thus providing a means of attachment. This could be used as a reversible latching mechanism or as a means of controllable internal connectivity. Varying the connectivity for discrete elements of a substructure of a given design allows for control of internal load paths and moment of area of the cross section. This could facilitate variable stiffness (both in bending and torsion). Using a combination of existing fabrication techniques, functional electrodes have been integrated within a FRP. Copper polyimide thin film laminate material has been both co-cured with carbon fibre reinforced epoxy and bonded to PVC closed cell foam core material to provide a range of structural configurations with integrated electrodes. The ability of such integrated devices to confer variations in global bending stiffness of basic beam structures is investigated. Through the application of 4 kV across integrated electrostatic adhesive devices, a 112% increase in flexural stiffness has been demonstrated for a composite sandwich structure. (paper)

  4. Electrostatic adhesion for added functionality of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic adhesion can be used as a means of reversible attachment. The incorporation of electrostatic adhesion into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composite structures could provide significant value added functionality. Imparting large potential differences (˜2 kV) across electrodes generates an attractive force, thus providing a means of attachment. This could be used as a reversible latching mechanism or as a means of controllable internal connectivity. Varying the connectivity for discrete elements of a substructure of a given design allows for control of internal load paths and moment of area of the cross section. This could facilitate variable stiffness (both in bending and torsion). Using a combination of existing fabrication techniques, functional electrodes have been integrated within a FRP. Copper polyimide thin film laminate material has been both co-cured with carbon fibre reinforced epoxy and bonded to PVC closed cell foam core material to provide a range of structural configurations with integrated electrodes. The ability of such integrated devices to confer variations in global bending stiffness of basic beam structures is investigated. Through the application of 4 kV across integrated electrostatic adhesive devices, a 112% increase in flexural stiffness has been demonstrated for a composite sandwich structure.

  5. In-Situ EBCs for High Performance Composite Propulsion Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicon Carbide based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) offer the potential to fundamentally change the design and manufacture of aeronautical and space propulsion...

  6. In-situ EBCs for High Performance Composite Propulsion Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicon Carbide based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) offer the potential to fundamentally change the design and manufacture of aeronautical and space propulsion...

  7. Probabilistic Remaining Useful Life Prediction of Composite Aircraft Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A composite fatigue damage assessment and risk informed prognosis toolkit will be developed by enhancing and integrating existing solution modules within a...

  8. Glassy Carbon Coating Deposited on Hybrid Structure of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of production metal matrix composites with aluminum oxide foam covered by glassy carbon layer used as reinforcement. The glassy carbon coating was formed for decreasing of friction coefficient and reducing the wear. In first step of technology liquid glassy carbon precursor is on ceramic foam deposited, subsequently cured and carbonated at elevated temperature. In this way ceramic foam is covered with glassy carbon coating with thickness of 2-8 μm. It provides desirable amount of glassy carbon in the structure of the material. In the next step, porous spheres with carbon coating are infiltrated by liquid matrix of Al-Cu-Mg alloy. Thereby, equable distribution of glassy carbon in composite volume is achieved. Moreover, typical problems for composites reinforced by particles like sedimentation, agglomeration and clustering of particles are avoided. Tribological characteristics during friction in air versus cast iron as a counterpart were made. Produced composites with glassy carbon layer are characterised by friction coefficient between 0.08-0.20, thus meeting the typical conditions for solid lubricants.

  9. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Annabel K; Woods, Kaitlyn; McMahon, Anne; Probst, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user's regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11) and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding followed by thematic analysis with NVivo qualitative analysis software to extract the final themes. Schematic analysis was applied to the final themes related to database format. Desktop analysis also examined the format of six key globally available databases. 24 dominant themes were established, of which five related to format; database use, food classification, framework, accessibility and availability, and data derivation. Desktop analysis revealed that food classification systems varied considerably between databases. Microsoft Excel was a common file format used in all databases, and available software varied between countries. User's also recognised that food composition databases format should ideally be designed specifically for the intended use, have a user-friendly food classification system, incorporate accurate data with clear explanation of data derivation and feature user input. However, such databases are limited by data availability and resources. Further exploration of data sharing options should be considered. Furthermore, user's understanding of food composition data and databases limitations is inherent to the correct application of non-specific databases. Therefore, further exploration of user FCDB training should also be considered.

  10. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Annabel K.; Woods, Kaitlyn; McMahon, Anne; Probst, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user’s regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11) and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding followed by thematic analysis with NVivo qualitative analysis software to extract the final themes. Schematic analysis was applied to the final themes related to database format. Desktop analysis also examined the format of six key globally available databases. 24 dominant themes were established, of which five related to format; database use, food classification, framework, accessibility and availability, and data derivation. Desktop analysis revealed that food classification systems varied considerably between databases. Microsoft Excel was a common file format used in all databases, and available software varied between countries. User’s also recognised that food composition databases format should ideally be designed specifically for the intended use, have a user-friendly food classification system, incorporate accurate data with clear explanation of data derivation and feature user input. However, such databases are limited by data availability and resources. Further exploration of data sharing options should be considered. Furthermore, user’s understanding of food composition data and databases limitations is inherent to the correct application of non-specific databases. Therefore, further exploration of user FCDB training should also be considered. PMID:26554836

  11. Compression-induced structural and mechanical changes of fibrin-collagen composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, O V; Litvinov, R I; Chen, J; Chen, D Z; Weisel, J W; Alber, M S

    2017-07-01

    Fibrin and collagen as well as their combinations play an important biological role in tissue regeneration and are widely employed in surgery as fleeces or sealants and in bioengineering as tissue scaffolds. Earlier studies demonstrated that fibrin-collagen composite networks displayed improved tensile mechanical properties compared to the isolated protein matrices. Unlike previous studies, here unconfined compression was applied to a fibrin-collagen filamentous polymer composite matrix to study its structural and mechanical responses to compressive deformation. Combining collagen with fibrin resulted in formation of a composite hydrogel exhibiting synergistic mechanical properties compared to the isolated fibrin and collagen matrices. Specifically, the composite matrix revealed a one order of magnitude increase in the shear storage modulus at compressive strains>0.8 in response to compression compared to the mechanical features of individual components. These material enhancements were attributed to the observed structural alterations, such as network density changes, an increase in connectivity along with criss-crossing, and bundling of fibers. In addition, the compressed composite collagen/fibrin networks revealed a non-linear transformation of their viscoelastic properties with softening and stiffening regimes. These transitions were shown to depend on protein concentrations. Namely, a decrease in protein content drastically affected the mechanical response of the networks to compression by shifting the onset of stiffening to higher degrees of compression. Since both natural and artificially composed extracellular matrices experience compression in various (patho)physiological conditions, our results provide new insights into the structural biomechanics of the polymeric composite matrix that can help to create fibrin-collagen sealants, sponges, and tissue scaffolds with tunable and predictable mechanical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  12. Chitin nanofibers, networks and composites : Preparation, structure and mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel

    2014-01-01

    Chitin is an important reinforcing component in load-bearing structures in many organisms such as insects and crustaceans (i.e. shrimps, lobsters, crabs etc.). It is of increasing interest for use in packaging materials as well as in biomedical applications. Furthermore, biological materials may inspire the development of new man-made material concepts. Chitinmolecules are crystallized in extended chain conformations to form nanoscale fibrils of about 3 nm in diameter. In the present study, n...

  13. The study of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry on body composition components in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhongkui; Chen Wei; Long Liling; Li Xiaoyang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation of the bone mineral density (BMD) and the body composition components of body mass index (BMI), FAT and LEAN in Chinese obesity. Methods: There were 150 cases in obesity group diagnosed by BMI, including 75 males [ median age 46 years, mean weight (89.64 ± 8.33) kg] and 75 females [median age 45 years, mean weight (77.23 ± 6.85) kg]. There were 150 persons with normal BMI in the control group, including 75 males [(median age 47 years, mean weight (62.34 ± 5.72) kg] and 75 females [ median age 45 years, mean weight (50.16 ± 5.06) kg]. The body height and weight of 300 persons in two groups were measured respectively and ,simultaneously calculated the BMI. These data and the body composition parameters measured by the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in these two groups were compared and analyzed. The data obtained used two-sample t-test analysis, bi-variable correlation used Pearson linear correlation analysis and multi-variable correlation used multiple linear regression analysis. Results: FAT of arms, legs trunk and total body of male cases in obesity group was (2.90 ± 0.57), (7.48 ± 1.46), (15.67 ± 3.05), (30.92 ± 5.94) kg respectively, FAT% was (30.9 ± 5.1)%, (30.6 ± 5.8)%, (37.3 ± 4.7)%, (35.1 ± 4.4)% respectively, it was significantly higher than that in control group [FAT was (1.12 ± 0.64), (3.27 ± 1.22), (6.71 ± 3.29), (11.61 ± 5.16) kg respectively, FAT% was (15.4 ± 4.8)%, (16.5 ± 5.0)%, (21.8 ± 5.8)%, (18.6 ± 5.3)% respectively], P 2 respectively, it was significantly higher than that in control group [ LEAN was (22.89 ± 1.68), (48.89 ± 3.72) kg respectively, BMD was (0.89 ± 0.07), (1.15 ± 0.06) g/cm 2 respectively], P 2 respectively, and there were no statistical significance compared with those in control group [LEAN was (5.99 ± 0.72), (16.83 ± 1.67) kg respectively, BMD was (0.90 ± 0.08), (1.29 ± 0.09) g/cm 2 respectively]. FAT of arms, legs, trunk and total body of females in

  14. PROGRESS ON DEVELOPING SONIC INFRARED IMAGING FOR DEFECT DETECTION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xiaoyan; He Qi; Li Wei; Newaz, Golam; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    At last year's QNDE conference, we presented our development of Sonic IR imaging technology in metal structures, with results from both experimental studies and theoretical computing. In the latest aircraft designs, such as the B787 from Boeing, composites have become the major materials in structures such as the fuselage and wings. This is in contrast to composites' use only in auxiliary components such as flaps and spoilers in the past. With today's advanced technology of fabrication, it is expected the new materials can be put in use in even more aircraft structures due to its light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, with increases in fuel cost, reducing the aircraft's body weight becomes more and more appealing. In this presentation, we describe the progress on our development of Sonic IR imaging for aircraft composite structures. In particular, we describe the some unexpected results discovered while modeling delaminations. These results were later experimentally verified with an engineered delamination.

  15. Structural Complexity of Layered-spinel Composite Electrodes for Li-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabana, J.; Yang, X.; Johnson, C.S., Chung, K.-Y.; Yoon, W.-S.; Kang, S.-H.; Thackeray, M.M., Grey, C.P.

    2010-08-01

    The complexity of layered-spinel yLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-y)Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (Li:Mn = 1.2:1; 0 = x = 0.33; y = 0.45) composites synthesized at different temperatures has been investigated by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While the layered component does not change substantially between samples, an evolution of the spinel component from a high to a low lithium excess phase has been traced with temperature by comparing with data for pure Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4}. The changes that occur to the structure of the spinel component and to the average oxidation state of the manganese ions within the composite structure as lithium is electrochemically removed in a battery have been monitored using these techniques, in some cases in situ. Our 6Li NMR results constitute the first direct observation of lithium removal from Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} and the formation of LiMnO{sub 2} upon lithium reinsertion.

  16. Exoskeleton Heterogeneity in Crustaceans: Quantifying Compositional and Structural Variations Across Body Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, R. N.; Mergelsberg, S. T.; Dove, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Crustacean exoskeletons are a complex biocomposite of organic macromolecules and calcium carbonate minerals. The highly divergent functions and diverse morphologies of these biominerals across taxa raise the question of whether these differences are systematically reflected in exoskeleton composition and structure. Previous studies that investigated element concentrations in exoskeletons used spectroscopic methods. However, the findings were largely inconclusive because of analytical limitations and most studies concluded that magnesium, phosphorus, and other trace elements are mostly contained in the mineral fraction because concentrations in the organic framework could not be resolved. This experimental study was designed to quantify the distributions of Ca, P, Mg, and Sr in the mineral versus organic fractions of exoskeletons from the American Lobster (H. americanus), Dungeness Crab (M. magister), and Red Rock Crab (M. productus). Samples of exoskeleton from 10 body parts were collected in triplicate and dissolved using three procedures specific to extracting the 1) mineral, 2) protein, and 3) chitin phases separately. Chemical analyses of the resulting effluents using ICP-OES show the mineral fraction of the skeleton can contain significant amounts of mineralized Mg and P particularly for body parts associated with a significant difference in mineral structural ordering. The protein fraction contains more Mg and P than expected based on estimates from previous studies (Hild et al., 2008). While the element distributions vary greatly depending on the location, in body parts with thicker cuticle (e.g. claw) the mineral component appears to control overall composition. The findings have implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions based upon exoskeleton composition. First, the chemical composition of an exoskeleton cannot be assumed constant across the different body parts of an entire organism. This is particularly true when the exoskeleton of the claw is

  17. Analysis Methods for Progressive Damage of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides an overview of recent accomplishments and lessons learned in the development of general progressive damage analysis methods for predicting the residual strength and life of composite structures. These developments are described within their State-of-the-Art (SoA) context and the associated technology barriers. The emphasis of the authors is on developing these analysis tools for application at the structural level. Hence, modeling of damage progression is undertaken at the mesoscale, where the plies of a laminate are represented as a homogenous orthotropic continuum. The aim of the present effort is establish the ranges of validity of available models, to identify technology barriers, and to establish the foundations of the future investigation efforts. Such are the necessary steps towards accurate and robust simulations that can replace some of the expensive and time-consuming "building block" tests that are currently required for the design and certification of aerospace structures.

  18. Seismic assessment and performance of nonstructural components affected by structural modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Jieun; Althoff, Eric; Sezen, Halil; Denning, Richard; Aldemir, Tunc [Ohio State University, Columbus (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) requires a large number of simulations to evaluate the seismic vulnerability of structural and nonstructural components in nuclear power plants. The effect of structural modeling and analysis assumptions on dynamic analysis of 3D and simplified 2D stick models of auxiliary buildings and the attached nonstructural components is investigated. Dynamic characteristics and seismic performance of building models are also evaluated, as well as the computational accuracy of the models. The presented results provide a better understanding of the dynamic behavior and seismic performance of auxiliary buildings. The results also help to quantify the impact of uncertainties associated with modeling and analysis of simplified numerical models of structural and nonstructural components subjected to seismic shaking on the predicted seismic failure probabilities of these systems.

  19. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-07-30

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques.

  20. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Di Sante

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques.

  1. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques. PMID:26263987

  2. Components, structure, biogenesis and function of the Hydra extracellular matrix in regeneration, pattern formation and cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarras, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    The body wall of Hydra is organized as an epithelial bilayer (ectoderm and endoderm) with an intervening extracellular matrix (ECM), termed mesoglea by early biologists. Morphological studies have determined that Hydra ECM is composed of two basal lamina layers positioned at the base of each epithelial layer with an intervening interstitial matrix. Molecular and biochemical analyses of Hydra ECM have established that it contains components similar to those seen in more complicated vertebrate species. These components include such macromolecules as laminin, type IV collagen, and various fibrillar collagens. These components are synthesized in a complicated manner involving cross-talk between the epithelial bilayer. Any perturbation to ECM biogenesis leads to a blockage in Hydra morphogenesis. Blockage in ECM/cell interactions in the adult polyp also leads to problems in epithelial transdifferentiation processes. In terms of biophysical parameters, Hydra ECM is highly flexible; a property that facilitates continuous movements along the organism's longitudinal and radial axis. This is in contrast to the more rigid matrices often found in vertebrates. The flexible nature of Hydra ECM can in part now be explained by the unique structure of the organism's type IV collagen and fibrillar collagens. This review will focus on Hydra ECM in regard to: 1) its general structure, 2) its molecular composition, 3) the biophysical basis for the flexible nature of Hydra's ECM, 4) the relationship of the biogenesis of Hydra ECM to regeneration of body form, and 5) the functional role of Hydra ECM during pattern formation and cell differentiation.

  3. Engineering method to build the composite structure ply database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Shi

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method to build a composite ply database with engineering design constraints is proposed. This method has two levels: the core stacking sequence design and the whole stacking sequence design. The core stacking sequences are obtained by the full permutation algorithm considering the ply ratio requirement and the dispersion character which characterizes the dispersion of ply angles. The whole stacking sequences are the combinations of the core stacking sequences. By excluding the ply sequences which do not meet the engineering requirements, the final ply database is obtained. One example with the constraints that the total layer number is 100 and the ply ratio is 30:60:10 is presented to validate the method. This method provides a new way to set up the ply database based on the engineering requirements without adopting intelligent optimization algorithms. Keywords: Composite ply database, VBA program, Structure design, Stacking sequence

  4. Local Structure Fixation in the Composite Manufacturing Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdauskaite, Lina; Krzywinski, Sybille; Rödel, Hartmut; Wildasin-Werner, Andrea; Böhme, Ralf; Jansen, Irene

    2010-12-01

    Compared to metal materials, textile reinforced composites show interesting features, but also higher production costs because of low automation rate in the manufacturing chain at this time. Their applicability is also limited due to quality problems, which restrict the production of complex shaped dry textile preforms. New technologies, design concepts, and cost-effective manufacturing methods are needed in order to establish further fields of application. This paper deals with possible ways to improve the textile deformation process by locally applying a fixative to the structure parallel to the cut. This hinders unwanted deformation in the textile stock during the subsequent stacking and formation steps. It is found that suitable thermoplastic binders, applied in the appropriate manner do not restrict formation of the textile and have no negative influence on the mechanical properties of the composite.

  5. Production and Structural Investigation of Polyethylene Composites with Modified Kaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domka, L.; Malicka, A.; Stachowiak, N.

    2008-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of the filler (kaolin) modification with silane coupling agents on the properties of the polyethylene (HDPE Hostalen ACP 5831) composites. Powder mineral fillers are added to polymers to modify the properties of the latter and to reduce the cost of their production. A very important factor is the filler dispersion in the polymer matrix. Kaolin modified with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane and pure kaolin were characterised by surface area, pore size, water absorbing capacity, paraffin oil absorbing capacity, bulk density, scanning electron microscopy observations and X-ray diffraction measurements. Their performance was characterised by determination of the mechanical resistance upon static stretching and tearing, and their structure was observed in scanning electron microscopy images. The results were compared to those obtained for the composites with unmodified filler and pure HDPE. (authors)

  6. Dual energy CT inspection of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite combined with metal components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Jakůbek, J.; Kumpová, Ivana; Pichotka, M.

    6, Part B, November (2016), s. 47-55 ISSN 2214-6571 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-07210S Keywords : dual energy computed tomography * carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite * metal artefact suppression Subject RIV: JI - Composite Material s http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214657116300107

  7. Investigation of the interaction between the components of a Nichrome-tungsten composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopov, I.P.; Logvinova, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the effect of Nichrome melting on tungsten in the case of different rates of solidification of the composite. Consideration is given to the effect of the volume fraction of reinforced materials on the size of the transition zone between the fibers and the die and on the microhardness distribution in the composite system.

  8. Biogeochemistry of the compost bioreactor components of a composite acid mine drainage passive remediation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D. Barrie; Hallberg, Kevin B.

    2005-01-01

    The compost bioreactor ('anaerobic cell') components of three composite passive remediation systems constructed to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) at the former Wheal Jane tin mine, Cornwall, UK were studied over a period of 16 months. While there was some amelioration of the preprocessed AMD in each of the three compost bioreactors, as evidenced by pH increase and decrease in metal concentrations, only one of the cells showed effective removal of the two dominant heavy metals (iron and zinc) present. With two of the compost bioreactors, concentrations of soluble (ferrous) iron draining the cells were significantly greater than those entering the reactors, indicating that there was net mobilisation (by reductive dissolution) of colloidal and/or solid-phase ferric iron compounds within the cells. Soluble sulfide was also detected in waters draining all three compost bioreactors which was rapidly oxidised, in contrast to ferrous iron. Oxidation and hydrolysis of iron, together with sulfide oxidation, resulted in reacidification of processed AMD downstream of the compost bioreactors in two of the passive treatment systems. The dominant cultivatable microorganism in waters draining the compost bioreactors was identified, via analysis of its 16S rRNA gene, as a Thiomonas sp. and was capable of accelerating the dissimilatory oxidation of both ferrous iron and reduced sulfur compounds. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were also detected, although only in the bioreactor that was performing well were these present in significant numbers. This particular compost bioreactor had been shut down for 10 months prior to the monitoring period due to operational problems. This unforeseen event appears to have allowed more successful development of AMD-tolerant and other microbial populations with critical roles in AMD bioremediation, including neutrophilic SRB (nSRB), in this compost bioreactor than in the other two, where the throughput of AMD was not interrupted. This study has

  9. Biogeochemistry of the compost bioreactor components of a composite acid mine drainage passive remediation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D Barrie; Hallberg, Kevin B

    2005-02-01

    The compost bioreactor ("anaerobic cell") components of three composite passive remediation systems constructed to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) at the former Wheal Jane tin mine, Cornwall, UK were studied over a period of 16 months. While there was some amelioration of the preprocessed AMD in each of the three compost bioreactors, as evidenced by pH increase and decrease in metal concentrations, only one of the cells showed effective removal of the two dominant heavy metals (iron and zinc) present. With two of the compost bioreactors, concentrations of soluble (ferrous) iron draining the cells were significantly greater than those entering the reactors, indicating that there was net mobilisation (by reductive dissolution) of colloidal and/or solid-phase ferric iron compounds within the cells. Soluble sulfide was also detected in waters draining all three compost bioreactors which was rapidly oxidised, in contrast to ferrous iron. Oxidation and hydrolysis of iron, together with sulfide oxidation, resulted in reacidification of processed AMD downstream of the compost bioreactors in two of the passive treatment systems. The dominant cultivatable microorganism in waters draining the compost bioreactors was identified, via analysis of its 16S rRNA gene, as a Thiomonas sp. and was capable of accelerating the dissimilatory oxidation of both ferrous iron and reduced sulfur compounds. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were also detected, although only in the bioreactor that was performing well were these present in significant numbers. This particular compost bioreactor had been shut down for 10 months prior to the monitoring period due to operational problems. This unforeseen event appears to have allowed more successful development of AMD-tolerant and other microbial populations with critical roles in AMD bioremediation, including neutrophilic SRB (nSRB), in this compost bioreactor than in the other two, where the throughput of AMD was not interrupted. This study has

  10. Oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of carbon/carbon composites and their components in water vapour at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Fei; Peng, Li-na; He, Guo-qiang; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 4D-C/C composite was fabricated using carbon fibre and coal tar pitch. • The rate of mass loss and oxidation kinetics parameters of fibres-H 2 O and matrix-H 2 O are obtained. • The rate of mass loss and oxidation kinetics parameters of C/C–H 2 O are obtained. • Oxidation rate of the fibre bundle is greater than the oxidation rate of the matrix. - Abstract: Thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the oxidation kinetics of four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components (fibres and matrices) in a H 2 O–Ar atmosphere at high temperatures. The oxidation processes were restricted to reaction-limited oxidation. The rate of mass loss was estimated for the four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components at high temperature. The pressure exponent for the reaction of the carbon/carbon composites with H 2 O was 0.59, and the pre-exponential factor and activation energy for the reactions of H 2 O with the carbon/carbon composites, carbon fibres and matrices were determined

  11. Structural, spectral and dielectric properties of piezoelectric–piezomagnetic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemeda, O.M.; Tawfik, A.; Amer, M.A.; Kamal, B.M.; El Refaay, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    Composite materials of spinel ferrite (SF) NiZnFe 2 O 4 (NZF) and barium titanate (BT) BaTiO 3 were prepared by double sintering ceramic technique. X-ray diffraction patterns for the composite system (1–x) NZF+x BT, showed the presence of mainly of 2 phases, hence confirming the successful preparation of the composite. Some structural and microstructural parameters like porosity, X-ray density, particle size and lattice constant were deduced from the analysis of X-ray data for both phases. Scan electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows nearly a homogeneous microstructure with good dispersion of BT grains as well as the presence of some pores. There was also an enlargement of BT grains with increasing its content. Infra red (IR) spectra of the composite system indicate that BT content affects the intermolecular character of the SF phase. A rise in the dielectric constant occurred at high temperature which was attributed to the effect of space change resulting from the increase of the change carriers in the paramagnetic region. The dielectric loss (tan δ) decreased by increasing BT content. - Highlights: ► Double phase NZF-BT composite has a high magnetoelectric coefficient compared with other materials. ► This makes it strongly candidates for electromagnetic wave sensors. ► Addition of BT phase enhance dielectric constant which make it very useful for capacitor industry. ► Ni ferrite shifts the transition temperature of BT from 120 °C near room temperature. ► Decrease of dielectric loss which supply with good material with law eddy current loss for cores of t ransformers at microwave frequency.

  12. Introduction of Zirlo''TM as a structural component material in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, M. A.; Pereda, R.; King, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The more and more severe nuclear fuel operating conditions have made necessary the use of advanced fuel cladding alloys like Zirlo''TM, which allow to obtain a response clearly above Zircaloy-4 because of the elevated corrosion resistance that provides, as well as a the greater dimensional stability. The superiority in properties is also applicable to the structural components, where this dimensional stability is critical to maintain the control rod insertability. In this paper the current operating experience with Zirlo''TM as a structural component material for PWR fuel assemblies is presented, the associated advantages are detailed and, finally, the irradiation and verification programs that support these advantages are described. (Author)

  13. Application of the Safety Classification of Structures, Systems and Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-04-01

    This publication describes how to complete tasks associated with every step of the classification methodology set out in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-30, Safety Classification of Structures, Systems and Components in Nuclear Power Plants. In particular, how to capture all the structures, systems and components (SSCs) of a nuclear power plant to be safety classified. Emphasis is placed on the SSCs that are necessary to limit radiological releases to the public and occupational doses to workers in operational conditions This publication provides information for organizations establishing a comprehensive safety classification of SSCs compliant with IAEA recommendations, and to support regulators in reviewing safety classification submitted by licensees

  14. Structures of the K- and Na-components of two-phase feldspar from Primorskii Krai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organova, N.I.; Marsii, I.M.; Zakharov, N.D.; Nasedkin, V.V.; Borisovskii, S.B.; Rozhdestvenskaya, I.V.; Ivanova, T.I.

    1999-01-01

    The structures of two components of the decomposed solid solution of an alkali feldspar are refined. These structures exhibit at least two specific features: (1) the complete phase separation into pure K and pure Na phases and (2) an anomalous distribution of Al atoms over four crystallographically independent positions of silicon-aluminum tetrahedra in the Na-component (different from its usual distribution). To explain the results obtained, the ideas of synergetics are invoked (the geological history of the specimen includes a powerful explosion, which threw out the material from the volcano to the Earth's surface)

  15. Residual stress alleviation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Methods to eliminate or reduce residual stresses in aircraft metal structures reinforced by filamentary composites are discussed. Residual stress level reductions were achieved by modifying the manufacturing procedures used during adhesive bonding. The residual stress alleviation techniques involved various forms of mechanical constraint which were applied to the components during bonding. Nine methods were evaluated, covering a wide range in complexity. All methods investigated during the program affected the residual stress level. In general, residual stresses were reduced by 70 percent or more from the stress level produced by conventional adhesive bonding procedures.

  16. Study of damping characteristics of fibre reinforced composite aerospace structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.Z.; Saleh, S.; Munir, A.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials are used in a variety of high demanding structural applications. Apart from their other preferable properties, they have high-energy dissipation characteristics, which is important aspect when we repeatedly wiggle the system back and forth. It is important to have thorough understanding of material damping behavior; in general materials damping tends to be complex nonlinear function of vibration amplitude, frequency of loading and material formulation. There are number of mathematical models available in literature to obtain hysteresis curves. One approach for identifying damping characteristics used mechanical hysteresis curves. In present work, a phenomenon was observed during testing of fibre reinforced composite beam of an aerospace structure, that for increase load in structure, the path of Force vs. Displacement curve is different than the path of unloading. A plot is generated which indicate the hysteresis loop representing the steady state dynamic behavior of material. The area enclosed by such curves is proportional to energy dissipation per cycle. However, the specific shape of the curve also has important implications for characterizing the specific functional form of the damping. Therefore, it is important to develop methods for accurately accounting for such effects. The current work explores the damping characteristics both theoretically and experimentally. (author)

  17. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P.; Robbins, J.M.; Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  18. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, T. D.; Eatherly, W. P.; Robbins, J. M.; Strizak, J. P.

    1992-09-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER wilt produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.58 dpa (displacements per atom) at 600°C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models.

  19. Investigation of Structural Properties of Carbon-Epoxy Composites Using Embedded Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2003-01-01

    Real time monitoring of the mechanical integrity and stresses on key aerospace composite structures like aircraft wings, walls of pressure vessels and fuel tanks or any other structurally extended components and panels as in space telescopes is very important to NASA. Future military and commercial aircraft as well as NASA space systems such as Space Based Radar and International Space Station will incorporate a monitoring system to sense any degradation to the structure. In the extreme flight conditions of an aerospace vehicle it might be desirable to measure the strain every ten centimeters and thus fully map out the strain field of a composite component. A series of missions and vehicle health management requirements call for these measurements. At the moment thousands of people support a few vehicle launches per year. This number can be significantly reduced by implementing intelligent vehicles with integral nervous systems (smart structures). This would require maintenance to be performed only as needed. Military and commercial aircrafts have an equally compelling case. Annual maintenance costs are currently reaching astronomical heights. Monitoring techniques are therefore required that allow for maintenance to be performed only when needed. This would allow improved safety by insuring that necessary tasks are performed while reducing costs by eliminating procedures that are costly and not needed. The advantages fiber optical sensors have over conventional electro-mechanical systems like strain gauges have been widely extolled in the research literature. These advantages include their small size, low weight, immunity to electrical resistance, corrosion resistance, compatibility with composite materials and process conditions, and multiplexing capabilities. One fiber optic device which is suitable for distributed sensing is the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). This is a periodic perturbation in the refractive index of the fiber core. When a broadband light is

  20. Advanced composite structural concepts and material technologies for primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    Structural weight savings using advanced composites have been demonstrated for many years. Most military aircraft today use these materials extensively and Europe has taken the lead in their use in commercial aircraft primary structures. A major inhibiter to the use of advanced composites in the United States is cost. Material costs are high and will remain high relative to aluminum. The key therefore lies in the significant reduction in fabrication and assembly costs. The largest cost in most structures today is assembly. As part of the NASA Advanced Composite Technology Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company has a contract to explore and develop advanced structural and manufacturing concepts using advanced composites for transport aircraft. Wing and fuselage concepts and related trade studies are discussed. These concepts are intended to lower cost and weight through the use of innovative material forms, processes, structural configurations and minimization of parts. The approach to the trade studies and the downselect to the primary wing and fuselage concepts is detailed. The expectations for the development of these concepts is reviewed.