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Sample records for composite resin polymerized

  1. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

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    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  2. Assessment of polymerization contraction stress of three composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadenaro, M.; Biasotto, M.; Scuor, N.; Breschi, L.; Davidson, C.L.; Di Lenarda, R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure the development of contraction stress of three composite resin restorative materials during photo-polymerization: a micro-hybrid composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA); a nano-filled composite (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN,

  3. Assessment of polymerization contraction stress of three composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadenaro, M.; Biasotto, M.; Scuor, N.; Breschi, L.; Davidson, C.L.; Di Lenarda, R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure the development of contraction stress of three composite resin restorative materials during photo-polymerization: a micro-hybrid composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA); a nano-filled composite (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, U

  4. A qualitative chemometric study of resin composite polymerization

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    Regina Ferraz Mendes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: An experiment was carried out to assess the effect produced by different polymerization techniques on resin composite color after it has been immersed in coffee. Methods: Samples were manufactured using TPH Spectrum composite. It was polymerized for 10 or 40 seconds, with the light tip at one or zero millimeters from the resin surface, and afterwards the samples were immersed in coffee for 24 hours or 7 days. Ten different evaluators classified the samples according to their degree of staining. Results: The samples that were polymerized for 10 seconds were more susceptible to staining than the ones polymerized by 40 seconds. Samples immersed in coffee for 7 days were more susceptible to staining than the ones immersed for 24 hours. Conclusion: The variables polymerization time and immersion time were determinant in the staining susceptibility of the studied composite by coffee. However, there was no significant difference, irrespective of whether the resin was polymerized 10 or zero millimeters away from the resin surface.

  5. The effect of resin shades on microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change of dental composite resins.

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    Jeong, Tae-Sung; Kang, Ho-Seung; Kim, Sung-Ki; Kim, Shin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2009-07-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the effect of resin shades on the degree of the polymerization. To this end, response variables affected by the degree of polymerization were examined in this study - namely, microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change. Two commercial composite resins of four different shades were employed in this study: shades A3, A3.5, B3, and C3 of Z250 (Z2) and shades A3, A3.5, B3, and B4 of Solitaire 2 (S2). After light curing, the reflectance/absorbance, microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change of the specimens were measured. On reflectance and absorbance, Z2 and S2 showed similar distribution curves regardless of the resin shade, with shade A3.5 of Z2 and shade A3 of S2 exhibiting the lowest/highest distributions. Similarly for attenuation coefficient and microhardness, the lowest/highest values were exhibited by shade A3.5 of Z2 and shade A3 of S2. On polymerization shrinkage, no statistically significant differences were observed among the different shades of Z2. Similarly for color change, Z2 specimens exhibited only a slight (DeltaE*=0.5-0.9) color change after immersion in distilled water for 10 days, except for shades A3 and A3.5. Taken together, results of the present study suggested that the degree of polymerization of the tested composite resins was minimally affected by resin shade.

  6. Influence of composition on rate of polymerization contraction of light-curing resin composites.

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    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2002-06-01

    A slow contraction may result in reduced gap formation when a restorative resin polymerizes in a dental cavity. It was the aim in the present work to investigate the rate of contraction in relation to composition of experimental light-curing resin composites. The monomer of the resin composites consisted of mixtures of BisGMA, TEGDMA, and in one series HEMA. The resins contained varying amounts of initiators, co-initiators, and inhibitor, and were made composite by adding a silanized glass filler to a content of 74% by weight of the composite paste. The polymerization contraction up to 120 sec was determined by means of the bonded-disk method. Within the ranges studied, the concentration of initiator and co-initiator in the monomer mixture had only an insignificant influence on rate of polymerization. In comparison to camphorquinone, the initiators 1-phenyl-1,2-propanedione and benzil reduced the rate of polymerization without affecting the final contraction. In comparison to N,N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, N,N-cyanoethyl methylaniline was as effective, while N,N-diethanol-p-toluidine was less effective as co-initiator. A relatively high content of the inhibitor methoxyhydroquinone reduced the initial rate but not the final polymerization contraction. The rate of polymerization increased with the level of HEMA and TEGDMA in the monomer mixture. It was concluded that intrinsic slow cure may be obtained with certain compositions of resin composites without impairing the final extent of polymerization.

  7. Polymerization shrinkage assessment of dental resin composites: a literature review.

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    Kaisarly, Dalia; Gezawi, Moataz El

    2016-09-01

    Composite restorations are widely used worldwide, but the polymerization shrinkage is their main disadvantage that may lead to clinical failures and adverse consequences. This review reports, currently available in vitro techniques and methods used for assessing the polymerization shrinkage. The focus lies on recent methods employing three-dimensional micro-CT data for the evaluation of polymerization shrinkage: volumetric measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation through tracing particles before and after polymerization. Original research articles reporting in vitro shrinkage measurements and shrinkage stresses were included in electronic and hand-search. Earlier methods are easier, faster and less expensive. The procedures of scanning the samples in the micro-CT and performing the shrinkage vector evaluation are time consuming and complicated. Moreover, the respective software is not commercially available and the various methods for shrinkage vector evaluation are based on different mathematical principles. Nevertheless, these methods provide clinically relevant information and give insight into the internal shrinkage behavior of composite applied in cavities and how boundary conditions affect the shrinkage vectors. The traditional methods give comparative information on polymerization shrinkage of resin composites, whereas using three-dimensional micro-CT data for volumetric shrinkage measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation is a highly accurate method. The methods employing micro-CT data give the researchers knowledge related to the application method and the boundary conditions of restorations for visualizing the shrinkage effects that could not be seen otherwise. Consequently, this knowledge can be transferred to the clinical situation to optimize the material manipulation and application techniques for improved outcomes.

  8. The effect of resin thickness on polymerization characteristics of silorane-based composite resin

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    Sung-Ae Son

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study examined the influence of the resin thickness on the polymerization of silorane- and methacrylate-based composites. Materials and Methods One silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE and two methacrylate-based (Filtek Z250 and Z350, 3M ESPE composite resins were used. The number of photons were detected using a photodiode detector at the different thicknesses (thickness, 1, 2 and 3 mm specimens. The microhardness of the top and bottom surfaces was measured (n = 15 using a Vickers hardness with 200 gf load and 15 sec dwell time conditions. The degree of conversion (DC of the specimens was determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Scratched powder of each top and bottom surface of the specimen dissolved in ethanol for transmission FTIR spectroscopy. The refractive index was measured using a Abbe-type refractometer. To measure the polymerization shrinkage, a linometer was used. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at p < 0.05 level. Results The silorane-based resin composite showed the lowest filler content and light attenuation among the specimens. P90 showed the highest values in the DC and the lowest microhardness at all depth. In the polymerization shrinkage, P90 showed a significantly lower shrinkage than the rest two resin products (p < 0.05. P90 showed a significantly lower refractive index than the remaining two resin products (p < 0.05. Conclusions DC, microhardness, polymerization rate and refractive index linearly decreased as specimen thickness linearly increased. P90 showed much less polymerization shrinkage compared to other specimens. P90, even though achieved the highest DC, showed the lowest microhardness and refractive index.

  9. Light induced polymerization of resin composite restorative materials

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    Blažić Larisa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dimensional stability of polymer-based dental materials is compromised by polymerization reaction of the monomer. The conversion into a polymer is accompanied by a closer packing of molecules, which leads to volume reduction called curing contraction or polymerization shrinkage. Curing contraction may break the adhesion between the adhesive system and hard tooth tissues forming micrographs which may result in marginal deterioration, recurrent caries and pulp injury. Polymerization shrinkage of resin-based restorative dental materials Polymerization of the organic phase (monomer molecules of resin-based dental materials causes shrinkage. The space occupied by filler particles is not associated with polymerization shrinkage. However, high filler loading within certain limits, can contribute to a lesser curing contraction. Polymerization shrinkage stress and stress reduction possibilities Polymerization shrinkage stress of polymer-based dental resins can be controlled in various ways. The adhesive bond in tooth-restoration interface guides the contraction forces to cavity walls. If leakage occurs, complications like secondary caries and pulpal irritation may jeopardize the longevity of a restoration. Stress relieve can be obtained by modifications of the monomer and photoinitiator, or by specially designed tooth preparation and application of bases and liners of low modulus of elasticity. The polymerization contraction can be compensated by water absorption due to oral cavity surrounding. The newest approach to stress relief is based on modulation of polymerization initiation. Conclusion This work deals with polymerization contraction and how to achieve leak-proof restoration. Restorative techniques that may reduce the negative effect of polymerization shrinkage stress need further research in order to confirm up-to-date findings.

  10. The effectiveness of different polymerization protocols for class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L.C.G. de; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Geitenbeek, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of reduced light exposure times on Vickers hardness (VH) of class II composite resin restorations. METHODS: Class II restorations were made in vitro in three 2mm thick increments in a human molar. Two composite resins (Clearfil AP-X; Esthet-X) were polymerized w

  11. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.T. Tauböck; A.J. Feilzer; W. Buchalla; C.J. Kleverlaan; I. Krejci; T. Attin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Re

  12. Effect of Distance on Light Transmission Through Polymerized Resin Composite.

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    Aromaa, M K; Lassila, L V J; Vallittu, P K

    2017-09-01

    Light transmittance of dental composites varies between products and shades, but also light curing units differ to each other in their irradiance and fiber optic structure of curing tip. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is linear relationship between the distance of the curing tip to the resin composite and irradiance at lower surface of the resin composite. Disks of 1 mm thickness (6mm diameter) were fabricated. Light transmittance (intensity) through the disk was measured at distance of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 mm from the light tip with two light curing units Elipar S10 (3M-ESPE) and Silverlight (GC). Irradiance ratio (irradiance on the sensor surface without the composite disk / with the composite disk) was calculated and plotted against the distance of the light curing tip. Statistical analysis was carried out using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA, Tukey's, α =0.05). Irradiance ratio varied between 18% to 24% with Silverlight and 21% to 26% with Elipar S10 light curing units. There were statistically significant differences between the ratios with different distances of the light curing tip (p⟨0.05). Interestingly, the highest irradiance ratio for Elipar S10 unit was found with 4 mm distance of the tip, whereas Silverlight unit had the highest ratio with 6 mm distance. Out of two tested resin composites, the flowable composite showed higher irradiance ratio than regular packable resin composite. Increase of distance of the light curing tip from the composite surface decreased the absolute irradiance underneath of composite, as expected. However, there seemed to be device dependent optimal distance of 4-6 mm to reach the most efficient irradiance ratio through the composite resin keeping in mind that most efficient transmission of light through the material is reached by having light curing tip in contact to the material. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  13. Bulk-fill resin composites: polymerization contraction, depth of cure, and gap formation.

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    Benetti, A R; Havndrup-Pedersen, C; Honoré, D; Pedersen, M K; Pallesen, U

    2015-01-01

    The bulk-filling of deep, wide dental cavities is faster and easier than traditional incremental restoration. However, the extent of cure at the bottom of the restoration should be carefully examined in combination with the polymerization contraction and gap formation that occur during the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk-fill materials produced a significantly larger depth of cure and polymerization contraction. Although most of the bulk-fill materials exhibited a gap formation similar to that of the conventional resin composite, two of the low-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites, x-tra base and Venus Bulk Fill, produced larger gaps.

  14. Fracture and Tribological Evaluation of Dental Composite Resins Containing Pre-polymerized Particle Fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The fracture and tribological evaluation of dental composite resin containing pre-polymerized particle fillers wereinvestigated. Composite resins, e.g. metafil, silux plus, heliomolar and palfique estelite were selected as specimensin order to evaluate the effects of pre-polymerized particle filler on the fracture and wear characteristics of compositeresins. In the wear tests, a ball-on-flat wear test method was used. The friction coefficient of metafil was quite high.The wear resistance of silux plus and palfique estelite was better than that of metafil and heliomolar underthe sameexperimental condition. The main wear mechanism of composite resins containing pre-polymerized particle fillers wasan abrasive wear by brittle fracture of pre-polymerized particles and by debonding of fillers and matrix.

  15. Color changes of dental resin composites before and after polymerization and storage in water.

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    Çelık, Esra Uzer; Aladağ, Akin; Türkün, L Şebnem; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2011-06-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the A2 shades of various types and brands of resin composites to determine if any color differences occurred before and after polymerization and after 1 month of storage in water and (2) examine the correlation among the color changes and changes in Commission internationale de l'éclairage L*, a*, and b* values after polymerization and after 1 month of storage in water. One submicron-hybrid (Spectrum TPH3, DENTSPLY DeTrey, Milford, DE, USA), one nano-filled (Filtek Supreme XT, 3 M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), three micro-hybrid (Filtek Z250, 3 M ESPE; Esthet X, DENTSPLY DeTrey; and Gradia Direct, GC, Tokyo, Japan), and five nano-hybrid (Ceram X, DENTSPLY DeTrey; Clearfil Majesty Esthetics, Kuraray, Osaka, Japan; Premise, Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA; Tetric Evo Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and Tetric N Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent) light-curing resin composites were tested. The specimens (N = 10 for each composite) were prepared as discs, 12 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness, using round molds. The measurements were performed "before polymerization,"after polymerization," and "after 1 month of storage in water" using a contact type dental spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA). The range of ΔE* values after polymerization (ΔE*1) and storage in water (ΔE*2) were 4.59 to 14.13 and 1.26 to 6.29, respectively. Nested analysis of variance and post hoc tests revealed that the type of resin composites significantly affected Δa*1, Δa*2, Δb*1, Δb*2, ΔE*2-values, whereas the brand of resin composites affected the changes in all color parameters (p compositions and fillers of the contemporary composites, color changes after polymerization were perceptible in all resin composites. However, color changes after storage in water were in the acceptable ranges for all resin composites except Clearfil Majesty Esthetic and Gradia Direct. In spite of many improvements in chemical compositions

  16. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins

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    Yih-Dean Jan

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins.

  17. Temperature rise during polymerization of different cavity liners and composite resins

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    Ozcan Karatas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulating properties of different light curing cavity liners and composite resins during light emitting diode (LED curing. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four dentin discs, 1 mm thick and 8 mm in diameter, were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups. Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH] 2 , resin-modified glass ionomer cement, flowable composite and adhesive systems were applied to dentin discs according to the manufacturers′ instructions. The rise in temperature during polymerization with a LED curing unit (LCU was measured using a K-type thermocouple connected to a data logger. Subsequently, all specimens were randomly divided into one of two groups. A silorane-based composite resin and a methacrylate-based composite resin were applied to the specimens. Temperature rise during polymerization of composite resins with LCU were then measured again. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey analyses. Results: There were significant differences in temperature rise among the liners, adhesives, and composite resins (P < 0.05. Silorane-based composite resin exhibited significantly greater temperature rises than methacrylate-based resin (P < 0.05. The smallest temperature rises were observed in Ca(OH 2 specimens. Conclusion: Thermal insulating properties of different restorative materials are important factors in pulp health. Bonding agents alone are not sufficient to protect pulp from thermal stimuli throughout curing.

  18. CURING OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES USING MICROWAVE RESIN TRANSFER MOULDING (RTM

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    R. YUSOFF

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to compare the difference between microwave heating and conventional thermal heating in fabricating carbon/epoxy composites. Two types of epoxy resin systems were used as matrices, LY5052-HY5052 and DGEBA-HY917-DY073. All composite samples were fabricated using resin transfer moulding (RTM technique. The curing of the LY5052-HY5052-carbon and the DGEBA-HY917-DY073-carbon composite systems, were carried out at 100 °C and 120 °C, respectively. Microwave heating showed better temperature control than conventional heating, however, the heating rate of the microwave cured samples were slower than the conventionally cured samples. This was attributed to the lower power (250 W used when heating with microwaves compared to 2000 W used in conventional heating. Study of thermal characteristics as curing progressed showed that the polymerisation reaction occurred at a faster rate during microwave curing than in conventional curing for both the DGEBA and the LY/HY5052 carbon composite systems. The actual cure cycle was reduced from 60 minutes to 40 minutes when using microwaves for curing DGEBA-carbon composites. As for LY/HY5052-carbon composites, the actual cure cycle was reduced from 3 hours to 40 minutes. Both conventional and microwave heating yielded similar glass transition temperatures (120 °C for DGEBA systems and 130 °C for LY/HY5052 systems. Microwave cured composites had higher void contents than conventionally cured composites (2.2-2.8% and 1.8-2.4% for DGEBA and LY/HY5052 microwave cured composites, respectively, compared to 0.2-0.4% for both DGEBA and LY/HY5052 thermally cured composites. C-scan traces showed that all composites, regardless of methods of curing, had minimal defects.

  19. Cuspal Displacement Induced by Bulk Fill Resin Composite Polymerization: Biomechanical Evaluation Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

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    Vinagre, Alexandra; Ramos, João; Alves, Sofia; Messias, Ana; Alberto, Nélia; Nogueira, Rogério

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern to the clinical success of direct composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of polymerization shrinkage strain of two resin composites on cuspal movement based on the use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Twenty standardized Class II cavities prepared in upper third molars were allocated into two groups (n = 10). Restorations involved the bulk fill placement of conventional microhybrid resin composite (Esthet•X® HD, Dentsply DeTrey) (Group 1) or flowable "low-shrinkage" resin composite (SDR™, Dentsply DeTrey) (Group 2). Two FBG sensors were used per restoration for real-time measurement of cuspal linear deformation and temperature variation. Group comparisons were determined using ANCOVA (α = 0.05) considering temperature as the covariate. A statistically significant correlation between cuspal deflection, time, and material was observed (p < 0.01). Cuspal deflection reached 8.8 μm (0.23%) and 7.8 μm (0.20%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. When used with bulk fill technique, flowable resin composite SDR™ induced significantly less cuspal deflection than the conventional resin composite Esthet•X® HD (p = 0.015) and presented a smoother curve slope during the polymerization. FBG sensors appear to be a valid tool for accurate real-time monitoring of cuspal deformation.

  20. Cuspal Displacement Induced by Bulk Fill Resin Composite Polymerization: Biomechanical Evaluation Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, João; Alves, Sofia; Nogueira, Rogério

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern to the clinical success of direct composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of polymerization shrinkage strain of two resin composites on cuspal movement based on the use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Twenty standardized Class II cavities prepared in upper third molars were allocated into two groups (n = 10). Restorations involved the bulk fill placement of conventional microhybrid resin composite (Esthet•X® HD, Dentsply DeTrey) (Group 1) or flowable “low-shrinkage” resin composite (SDR™, Dentsply DeTrey) (Group 2). Two FBG sensors were used per restoration for real-time measurement of cuspal linear deformation and temperature variation. Group comparisons were determined using ANCOVA (α = 0.05) considering temperature as the covariate. A statistically significant correlation between cuspal deflection, time, and material was observed (p flowable resin composite SDR™ induced significantly less cuspal deflection than the conventional resin composite Esthet•X® HD (p = 0.015) and presented a smoother curve slope during the polymerization. FBG sensors appear to be a valid tool for accurate real-time monitoring of cuspal deformation. PMID:27190517

  1. Cuspal Displacement Induced by Bulk Fill Resin Composite Polymerization: Biomechanical Evaluation Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

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    Alexandra Vinagre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern to the clinical success of direct composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of polymerization shrinkage strain of two resin composites on cuspal movement based on the use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors. Twenty standardized Class II cavities prepared in upper third molars were allocated into two groups (n=10. Restorations involved the bulk fill placement of conventional microhybrid resin composite (Esthet•X® HD, Dentsply DeTrey (Group 1 or flowable “low-shrinkage” resin composite (SDR™, Dentsply DeTrey (Group 2. Two FBG sensors were used per restoration for real-time measurement of cuspal linear deformation and temperature variation. Group comparisons were determined using ANCOVA (α=0.05 considering temperature as the covariate. A statistically significant correlation between cuspal deflection, time, and material was observed (p<0.01. Cuspal deflection reached 8.8 μm (0.23% and 7.8 μm (0.20% in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. When used with bulk fill technique, flowable resin composite SDR™ induced significantly less cuspal deflection than the conventional resin composite Esthet•X® HD (p=0.015 and presented a smoother curve slope during the polymerization. FBG sensors appear to be a valid tool for accurate real-time monitoring of cuspal deformation.

  2. Statistical estimation of resin composite polymerization sufficiency using microhardness.

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    Cohen, Mark E; Leonard, Daniel L; Charlton, David G; Roberts, Howard W; Ragain, James C

    2004-02-01

    With respect to determining sub-surface resin polymerization sufficiency, this study compared a traditional method of applying linear regression to bottom- to top-surface Knoop hardness ratios to an alternative method based on nonlinear regression. Inverse linear regression on ratios was used to estimate the exposure duration required for 80% bottom-surface hardness with respect to the top, in six light-by-material groups. Alternatively, a one-phase, two-parameter, exponential association of the form Y=Y(max)(1-e(-kt)) (where Y(max) is maximum hardness, k is a rate constant, and t is exposure duration), was used to model hardness. Inverse nonlinear regression estimated, for each condition, the exposure duration required for the bottom surface to achieve 80% of corresponding condition (light and material) top-surface Y(max). Mathematically, analysis of ratios was demonstrated to yield potentially less precise and biased estimates. Nonlinear regression yielded better statistical fit and provided easily accessible tests for differences in k across light-system groups. Another recently proposed nonlinear model for polymerization, Y=Y(max)kt(n)/(1+kt(n)), was also considered. While this new model has substantially greater phenomenological and mechanistic justification, we found that the model-fitting process was more sensitive to initial parameter values and sometimes yielded untenable results when applied to our data. However, we believe that these problems would not occur if sample points are well distributed across a wide range of exposure durations, and that the model, Y=Y(max)kt(n)/(1+kt(n)), should be considered for such data sets.

  3. µCT-3D visualization analysis of resin composite polymerization and dye penetration test of composite adaptation.

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    Yoshikawa, Takako; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2017-08-25

    This study evaluated the effects of the light curing methods and resin composite composition on composite polymerization contraction behavior and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall using μCT-3D visualization analysis and dye penetration test. Cylindrical cavities were restored using Clearfil tri-S Bond ND Quick adhesive and filled with Clearfil AP-X or Clearfil Photo Bright composite. The composites were cured using the conventional or the slow-start curing method. The light-cured resin composite, which had increased contrast ratio during polymerization, improved adaptation to the cavity wall using the slow-start curing method. In the μCT-3D visualization method, the slow-start curing method reduced polymerization shrinkage volume of resin composite restoration to half of that produced by the conventional curing method in the cavity with adhesive for both composites. Moreover, μCT-3D visualization method can be used to detect and analyze resin composite polymerization contraction behavior and shrinkage volume as 3D image in the cavity.

  4. Polymerization shrinkage and contraction force of composite resin restorative inserted with "Megafiller".

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    Tani, Y; Nambu, T; Ishikawa, A; Katsuyama, S

    1993-12-01

    This study quantified the contraction force and polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with/without beta-Quartz Glass Ceramic Inserts (BQCI) as "Megafiller". The materials used for the determination included a chemically cured composite and five light-cured composites. The system for measuring contraction force consisted of a transparent teflon tube for preparing the specimen, a small load cell, a dynamic strain gauge and a pen-recorder. After the composite was packed into the teflon mold, a BQCI (Type R3) was inserted through the opening and the specimen was cured. Linear polymerization shrinkage of the composites was measured every 10 seconds from the start of mixing or irradiation to 90 minutes by the mercury bath method. Three pieces each of BQCI (Type T3) were inserted in each specimen. The results suggested that BQCI was markedly effective in reducing polymerization shrinkage, but was not always effective in reducing the contraction force during polymerization.

  5. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test.

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    Jafarzadeh, Tahereh-Sadat; Erfan, Mohammad; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Masaeli, Reza; Rezaei, Yashar; Bagheri, Hossein; Erfan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm). Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length) were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan) was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm) surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness.

  6. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Tahereh-Sadat; Erfan, Mohammad; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Masaeli, Reza; Rezaei, Yashar; Bagheri, Hossein; Erfan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm). Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length) were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan) was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm) surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness. PMID:26889359

  7. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh-Sadat Jafarzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm. Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness.

  8. [Comparative study of polymerization shrinkage and related properties of flowable composites and an unfilled resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovinszky, Katalin; Molnár, Lilla; Bakó, József; Szalóki, Melinda; Hegedus, Csaba

    2014-03-01

    The polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of dental composites are in the center of the interest of researchers and manufacturers. It is a great challenge to minimize this important property as low as possible. Many factors are related and are in complicated correlation with each other affecting the polymerization shrinkage. Polymerization shrinkage stress degree of conversion and elasticity has high importance from this aspect. Our aim was to study the polymerization shrinkage and related properties (modulus of elasticity, degree of conversion, shrinkage stress) of three flowable composite (Charisma Opal Flow, SDR, Filtek Ultimate) and an unfilled composite resin. Modulus of elasticity was measured using three point flexure tests on universal testing machine. The polymerization shrinkage stress was determined using bonded-disc technique. The degree of conversion measurements were performed by FT-IR spectroscopy. And the volumetric shrinkage was investigated using Archimedes principle and was measured on analytical balance with special additional equipment. The unfilled resin generally showed higher shrinkage (8,26%), shrinkage stress (0,8 MPa) and degree of conversion (38%), and presented the lowest modulus of elasticity (3047,02MPa). Highest values of unfilled resin correspond to the literature. The lack of fillers enlarges the shrinkage, and the shrinkage stress, but gives the higher flexibility and higher degree of conversion. Further investigations needs to be done to understand and reveal the differences between the composites.

  9. Polymerization shrinkage, flexural and compression properties of low-shrinkage dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Kil; Lee, Geun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hwa; Park, Mi-Gyoung; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the polymerization shrinkage, flexural and compressive properties of low-shrinkage resin composites. For the study, four methacrylate-based and one silorane-based resin composites were light cured using three different light-curing units (LCUs) and their polymerization shrinkage, flexural (strength (FS) and modulus (FM)) and compressive (strength (CS) and modulus (CM)) properties were evaluated. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey test. The polymerization shrinkage ranged approximately 7.6-14.2 μm for 2-mm thick specimens depending on the resin product and LCU. Filtek LS showed the least shrinkage while the rest shrank approximately 13.2-14.2 μm. However, Filtek LS showed the greatest shrinkage difference for the used LCUs. FS and CS of the tested specimens ranged 96.2-152.1 MPa and 239.2-288.4 MPa, respectively, depending on the resin product and LCU. The highest and lowest FS and FM were recorded for the methacrylate-based resin composites. Among the specimens, Filtek LS showed the lowest CS and CM.

  10. A comparative study to determine strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and autopolymerizing composite resin influenced by temperature during polymerization: An In Vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Anuj; Rudraprasad, I V; Nandeeshwar, D B; Nidhi, C

    2017-01-01

    Temporary coverage of a prepared tooth is an important step during various stages of the fixed dental prosthesis. Provisional restorations should satisfy proper mechanical requirements to resist functional and nonfunctional loads. A few studies are carried out regarding the comparison of the effect of curing environment, air and water, on mechanical properties of autopolymerizing acrylic and composite resin. Hence, the aim of this study was to compare the transverse strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and autopolymerizing composite resin as influenced by the temperature of air and water during polymerization. Samples of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and composite resin were prepared by mixing as per manufacturer's instructions and were placed in a preformed stainless steel mold. The mold containing the material was placed under different controlled conditions of water temperature and air at room temperature. Polymerized samples were then tested for transverse strength using an Instron universal testing machine. Alteration of curing condition during polymerization revealed a significant effect on the transverse strength. The transverse strength of acrylic resin specimens cured at 60°C and composite resin specimens cured at 80°C was highest. Polymerizing the resin in cold water at 10°C reduced the mechanical strength. Polymerization of the resin in hot water greatly increased its mechanical properties. The method of placing resin restoration in hot water during polymerization may be useful for improving the mechanical requirements and obtaining long-lasting performance.

  11. Microcomputed Tomography Evaluation of Polymerization Shrinkage of Class I Flowable Resin Composite Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, C S; Chiu, K-J; Farrokhmanesh, E; Janal, M; Puppin-Rontani, R M; Giannini, M; Bonfante, E A; Coelho, P G; Hirata, R

    The present study aimed to characterize the pattern and volume of polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin composites, including one conventional, two bulk fill, and one self-adhesive. Standardized class I preparations (2.5 mm depth × 4 mm length × 4 mm wide) were performed in 24 caries-free human third molars that were randomly divided in four groups, according to the resin composite and adhesive system used: group 1 = Permaflo + Peak Universal Bond (PP); group 2 = Filtek Bulk Fill + Scotchbond Universal (FS); group 3 = Surefil SDR + XP Bond (SX); and group 4 = Vertise flow self-adhering (VE) (n=6). Each tooth was scanned three times using a microcomputed tomography (μCT) apparatus. The first scan was done after the cavity preparation, the second after cavity filling with the flowable resin composite before curing, and the third after it was cured. The μCT images were imported into three-dimensional rendering software, and volumetric polymerization shrinkage percentage was calculated for each sample. Data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance and post hoc comparisons. No significant difference was observed among PP, FS, and VE. SX bulk fill resin composite presented the lowest values of volumetric shrinkage. Shrinkage was mostly observed along the occlusal surface and part of the pulpal floor. In conclusion, polymerization shrinkage outcomes in a 2.5-mm deep class I cavity were material dependent, although most materials did not differ. The location of shrinkage was mainly at the occlusal surface.

  12. Thermal, spectral, and surface properties of LED light-polymerized bulk fill resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pişkin, Mehmet Burçin; Atalı, Pınar Yılmaz; Figen, Aysel Kantürk

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the thermal, spectral, and surface properties of four different bulk fill materials – SureFil SDR (SDR, Dentsplay DETREY), QuixFil (QF, Dentsplay DETREY), X-tra base (XB, Voco) X-tra fil (XF, Voco) – polymerized by light-emitting diode (LED). Resin matrix, filler type, size and amount, and photoinitiator types influence the degree of conversion. LED-cured bulk fill composites achieved sufficient polymerization. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis revealed different patterns of surface roughness, depending on the composite material. Bulk fill materials showed surface characteristics similar to those of nanohybrid composites. Based on the thermal analysis results, glass transition (T(g)) and initial degradation (T(i)) temperatures changed depending on the bulk fill resin composites.

  13. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  14. Relationship between degree of polymerization of resin composite and bond strength to Gluma-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, T; Finger, W J

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between shear bond strength (SBS) to dentin and degree of polymerization of resin adjacent to the coupling interface. A hybrid-type resin composite was polymerized on Gluma-treated dentin at thicknesses of 1, 2, 3 and 5 mm, respectively, with seven different light activation times (LAT) from 3 through 180 seconds. SBS of the specimens was determined 10 minutes after the end of light activation. The degree of polymerization of resin close to the dentin interface was determined by Wallace Indentation Depth (WID) of specimens polymerized under the same conditions as the SBS samples, however, separated from the dentin surface by a thin glass plate. Consistent relationships were found for SBS vs. LAT and WID vs. LAT by regression analyses (y = A+B/x). There was a strong linear correlation between SBS and WID (r = -0.93), indicating that the early bond strength to Gluma-treated dentin is a function of mechanical characteristics of resin close to the bonding interface.

  15. Dental composite resins: measuring the polymerization shrinkage using optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Chah, K.; Mégret, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental composite materials is recognized as one of the main reasons for the development of marginal leakage between a tooth and filling material. As an alternative to conventional measurement methods, we propose optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors to perform real-time strain and shrinkage measurements during the curing process of dental resin cements. We introduce a fully automated set-up to measure the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG strain sensors and to accurately monitor the linear strain and shrinkage of dental resins during curing. Three different dental resin materials were studied in this work: matrix-filled BisGMA-based resins, glass ionomers and organic modified ceramics.

  16. Reducing composite restoration polymerization shrinkage stress through resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoum, S J; Mutzelburg, P R; Shumack, T G; Thode, Djg; Martin, F E; Ellakwa, A E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether employing resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives can reduce polymerization contraction stress generated at the interface of restorative composite adhesive systems. Five resin based adhesives (G Bond, Optibond-All-in-One, Optibond-Solo, Optibond-XTR and Scotchbond-Universal) and two resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives (Riva Bond-LC, Fuji Bond-LC) were analysed. Each adhesive was applied to bond restorative composite Filtek-Z250 to opposing acrylic rods secured within a universal testing machine. Stress developed at the interface of each adhesive-restorative composite system (n = 5) was calculated at 5-minute intervals over 6 hours. The resin based adhesive-restorative composite systems (RBA-RCS) demonstrated similar interface stress profiles over 6 hours; initial rapid contraction stress development (0-300 seconds) followed by continued contraction stress development ≤0.02MPa/s (300 seconds - 6 hours). The interface stress profile of the resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesive-restorative composite systems (RMGIBA-RCS) differed substantially to the RBA-RCS in several ways. Firstly, during 0-300 seconds the rate of contraction stress development at the interface of the RMGIBA-RCS was significantly (p resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives can significantly reduce the magnitude and rate of polymerization contraction stress developed at the interface of adhesive-restorative composite systems. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Polymerization shrinkage and depth of cure of bulk-fill resin composites and highly filled flowable resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J-H; Park, S-H; Hwang, I-N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization behavior and depth of cure (DOC) of recently introduced resin composites for posterior use: highly filled flowable composite and composites for bulk fill. A highly filled flowable (G-aenial Universal Flo [GUF]), two bulk-fill flowables (Surefil SDR Flow [SDR] and Venus Bulk fill [VBF]), and a bulk-fill nonflowable composite (Tetric N-Ceram Bulk fill [TBF]) were compared with two conventional composites (Tetric Flow [TF], Filtek Supreme Ultra [FS]). Linear polymerization shrinkage and polymerization shrinkage stress were each measured with custom-made devices. To evaluate DOC, the composite specimen was prepared using a mold with a hole of 4 mm depth and 4 mm internal diameter. The hole was bulk filled with each of the six composites and light cured for 20 seconds, followed by 24 hours of water storage. The surface hardness was measured on the top and the bottom using a Vickers microhardness (HV) indenter. The linear polymerization shrinkage of the composite specimens after photo-initiation decreased in the following order: TF and GUF > VBF > SDR > FS and TBF (pcomposite groups decreased in the following order: GUF > TF and VBF > SDR > FS and TBF (pflowable (GUF) revealed limitations in polymerization shrinkage and DOC. Bulk-fill flowables (SDR and VBF) were properly cured in 4-mm bulk, but they shrank more than the conventional nonflowable composite. A bulk-fill nonflowable (TBF) showed comparable shrinkage to the conventional nonflowable composite, but it was not sufficiently cured in the 4-mm bulk.

  18. Polymerization contraction of resin composite vs. energy and power density of light-cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2005-10-01

    This study measured the polymerization contraction of a resin composite cured at three levels of energy density, each attained at six different levels of power density. The polymerization contraction of the composite was recorded by the method of the deflecting disc (n = 5) for 1 h following the start of irradiation. Power densities of 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1,000 mW cm(-2), as measured on a dental radiometer, were obtained by variation of distance and supply voltage of a commercial light-curing unit. The spectral distribution at each power density was recorded using a spectrophotometer. The absorption spectrum of camphorquinone was also recorded, and the efficiency of the radiation at each power density was calculated as the integral over wavelength of the product of absorption and emission. From the slope of the contraction curves, an approximation to the initial rate of polymerization, Rp, was calculated and was taken as an alternative measure of power density. Statistical analyses showed that polymerization contraction increased significantly with increasing levels of energy density received by the resin composite, and, for each level of energy density, that the contraction decreased significantly with increasing power density.

  19. Microhardness of different thicknesses of resin composite polymerized by conventional photocuring at different distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; e Oliveria, Thalita Regina Viera; Lima, Debora Alves Nunes Leite; Ambrosano, Glaucia maria ovi; Lovadino, Jose Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate the influence of photocuring modes and polymerization time on the microhardness of a hybrid composite resin. Sixty composite resin specimens were prepared at random and divided into 12 experimental groups (n=5), consisting of four curing tip distances (2.0 mm, 4.0 mm, 6.0 mm, and 8.0 mm) and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 2.0 mm). All samples were polymerized with a continuous output at 550 mW/cm2. After 24 hours, Knoop microhardness measurements were obtained on top and bottom surfaces of the sample, with a load of 25 g for 10 seconds. Five indentations were made on each surface of each sample. Subdivided parcels ANOVA test and Tukey test were performed (p = 0.05). There were no statistical differences among the experimental groups for the top surface. On the bottom surface, 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm sample thicknesses showed significantly higher hardness means for all photocuring tip distances when compared with the 2.0 mm sample thickness. In terms of the photocuring tip distance, the 2.0 mm and 4.0 mm distances showed significantly higher hardness means for all sample thicknesses when compared with the 8.0 mm distance. For all experimental conditions, the top surface showed higher hardness than the bottom surface. It was concluded that the resin composite increments should be decreased to improve the polymerization of the resin composite bottom surface in deep cavities.

  20. Effect of light intensity and irradiation time on the polymerization process of a dental composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Discacciati José Augusto César

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerization shrinkage is a critical factor affecting the longevity and acceptability of dental composite resins. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of light intensity and irradiation time on the polymerization process of a photo cured dental composite resin by measuring the Vickers hardness number (VHN and the volumetric polymerization shrinkage. Samples were prepared using a dental manual light-curing unit. The samples were submitted to irradiation times of 5, 10, 20 and 40 s, using 200 and 400 mW.cm-2 light intensities. Vickers hardness number was obtained at four different moments after photoactivation (immediate, 1 h, 24 h and 168 h. After this, volumetric polymerization shrinkage values were obtained through a specific density method. The values were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's (p = 0.05. Results showed increase in hardness values from the immediate reading to 1 h and 24 h readings. After 24 h no changes were observed regardless the light intensities or activation times. The hardness values were always smaller for the 200 mW.cm-2 light intensity, except for the 40 s irradiation time. No significant differences were detected in volumetric polymerization shrinkage considering the light intensity (p = 0.539 and the activation time (p = 0.637 factors. In conclusion the polymerization of the material does not terminate immediately after photoactivation and the increase of irradiation time can compensate a lower light intensity. Different combinations between light intensity and irradiation time, i.e., different amounts of energy given to the system, have not affected the polymerization shrinkage.

  1. Measurement of linear polymerization shrinkage in light cure Ideal Makoo composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available "nAbstract: Polymerization shrinkage of light cure composite resins causes many complications in conservative and esthetic restorations. The objective of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion and the amount of filler in IDM and tetric ceram composites. Ten disk shaped, uncured specimens (8mm×1.547mm of each composite were placed on glass slide in the center of the metal attached to it. Then specimens were light cured for 60s from underneath. After 30 minutes, the thickness of specimens, using a micrometer and the percent of the polymerization shrinkage of each sample were measured. Statistical analysis was carried out by t-test (P<0.05. Also the degree of conversion of specimens was evaluated with FTIR and the mineral filler content was measured by burning in electric oven. Polymerization shrinkage in IDM and tetric ceram was not significantly different. Degree of conversion and mineral filler content in tetric ceram was greater than that of IDM. "nIt is assumed that the low degree of conversion in IDM is due to its chemical composition and filler content. Also, the similarity in linear polymerization shrinkage between IDM and tetric ceram may be caused by the low degree of conversion in IDM.

  2. Analytical methods for the measurement of polymerization kinetics and stresses of dental resin-based composites: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami-Lahiji, Mehrsima; Hooshmand, Tabassom

    2017-01-01

    Resin-based composites are commonly used restorative materials in dentistry. Such tooth-colored restorations can adhere to the dental tissues. One drawback is that the polymerization shrinkage and induced stresses during the curing procedure is an inherent property of resin composite materials that might impair their performance. This review focuses on the significant developments of laboratory tools in the measurement of polymerization shrinkage and stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization. An electronic search of publications from January 1977 to July 2016 was made using ScienceDirect, PubMed, Medline, and Google Scholar databases. The search included only English-language articles. Only studies that performed laboratory methods to evaluate the amount of the polymerization shrinkage and/or stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization were selected. The results indicated that various techniques have been introduced with different mechanical/physical bases. Besides, there are factors that may contribute the differences between the various methods in measuring the amount of shrinkages and stresses of resin composites. The search for an ideal and standard apparatus for measuring shrinkage stress and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of resin-based materials in dentistry is still required. Researchers and clinicians must be aware of differences between analytical methods to make proper interpretation and indications of each technique relevant to a clinical situation. PMID:28928776

  3. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Keiko; Nomoto, Rie; Tsubota, Yuji; Tsuchikawa, Masuji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2017-06-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS). Polymerization shrinkage was measured according to ISO/FDIS 17304. BBS showed the significantly lowest polymerization shrinkage and significantly higher depth of cure than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). The Knoop hardness, flexural strength and elastic modulus of that were significantly lower than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). BBS had the significantly greatest filler content (p<0.05). SEM images of the surface showed failure of fillers. The lowest polymerization shrinkage was due to the incorporation of a new type of low shrinkage monomer, which has urethane moieties. There were no clear correlations between inorganic filler contents and polymerization shrinkage, flexural strength and elastic modulus. In conclusion, the low polymerization shrinkage of BBS will be useful for cavity treatment in dental clinics.

  4. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Feilzer, Albert J; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Krejci, Ivo; Attin, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Rebilda DC) were subjected to different irradiation protocols with identical energy density (27 J cm(-2) ): high-intensity continuous light (HIC), low-intensity continuous light (LIC), soft-start (SS), and pulse-delay curing (PD). Axial shrinkage and shrinkage force of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real time for 15 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences among the curing protocols for both Knoop hardness and axial shrinkage, irrespective of the composite material. Pulse-delay curing generated the significantly lowest shrinkage forces within the three light-curing materials SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD. High-intensity continuous light created the significantly highest shrinkage forces within Esthet X HD and Rebilda DC, and caused significantly higher forces than LIC within Esthet X flow. In conclusion, both the composite material and the applied curing protocol control shrinkage force formation. Pulse-delay curing decreases shrinkage forces compared with high-intensity continuous irradiation without affecting hardening and axial polymerization shrinkage. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  5. Photoacoustic analysis of dental resin polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloiano, E. C. R.; Rocha, R.; Martin, A. A.; da Silva, M. D.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we use the photoacoustic technique to monitor the curing process of diverse dental materials, as the resins chemically activated (RCA). The results obtained reveal that the composition of a determined RCA significantly alters its activation kinetics. Photoacoustic data also show that temperature is a significant parameter in the activation kinetics of resins. The photoacoustic technique was also applied to evaluate the polymerization kinetics of photoactivated resins. Such resins are photoactivated by incidence of continuous light from a photodiode. This leads to the polymerization of the resin, modifying its thermal properties and, consequently, the level of the photoacoustic signal. Measurements show that the polymerization of the resin changes the photoacoustic signal amplitude, indicating that photoacoustic measurements can be utilized to monitor the polymerization kinetic and the degree of polymerization of photoactivated dental resins.

  6. Effect of hydroxyapatite whisker surface graft polymerization on water sorption, solubility and bioactivity of the dental resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengwei; Jiang, Xiaoze; Bao, Shuang; Wang, Ruili; Sun, Bin; Zhu, Meifang

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of poly bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (poly(Bis-GMA)) grafted hydroxyapatite whisker (PGHW) on water sorption, solubility and bioactivity of the dental resin composite. PGHW with different graft ratios was synthesized, by controlling grafting time, and filled into a dental resin matrix respectively. Fracture surface of the resin composites showed that PGHW-matrix interfacial compatibility and bonding were enhanced, and lower amounts of poly(Bis-GMA) on PGHW-1h (graft ratio: 8.5 wt.%) could facilitate the dispersion of PGHW-1 h in the composite. The PGHW-1h filled resin composite absorbed the lowest amount of water (27.16 μg/mm(3), 7 d), whereas the untreated hydroxyapatite whisker (HW) filled resin composite absorbed the highest. PGHW with higher graft ratios induced the decrease of the monomer conversion in the resulting composite, therefore, the PGHW-18 h (graft ratio: 32.8 wt.%) filled resin composite had the highest solubility. In vitro bioactivity of the studied resin composites in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that a dense and continuous apatite layer was formed on the surface of the resin composite, and the surface graft polymerization on the whisker did not significantly affect the apatite forming ability of the resin composite. It was revealed that graft polymerization of an appropriate amount of Bis-GMA onto HW could be an effective method to improve the interfacial properties and stability in water of the dental resin composite without compromising the bioactivity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  8. Influence of polymerization time and depth of cure of resin composites determined by Vickers hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lombardini

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Among the materials tested, the nanofilled and the nanohybrid resin composites were rather insensible to thickness variations. Miicrohybrid composites, instead, had features different from one another.

  9. Effect of base monomer's refractive index on curing depth and polymerization conversion of photo-cured resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kou; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Nemoto, Kimiya; Okada, Tamami; Ikemi, Takuji

    2005-09-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of the transmitted amount of visible light through a resin composite on the curing depth and polymerization conversion. Transmitted amount of visible light was strongly dependent on the magnitude of refractive index difference that existed between the resin and silica filler. More specifically, the differences arose from the type of base monomer used. The transmitted amount of visible light exhibited a good correlation with the curing depth and Knoop hardness ratio of the bottom surface against the top surface of the resin composite. To improve the polymerization conversion of the cavity floor, it is important to reduce the refractive index difference that exists between the base resin and silica filler.

  10. Effect of light-curing units and activation mode on polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Pereira, José Carlos; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composites polymerized with a LED and a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light sources. The LED was used in a conventional mode (CM) and the QTH was used in both conventional and pulse-delay modes (PD). The composite resins used were Z100, A110, SureFil and Bisfil 2B (chemical-cured). Composite deformation upon polymerization was measured by the strain gauge method. The shrinkage stress was measured by photoelastic analysis. The polymerization shrinkage data were analyzed statistically using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p contraction and the stress values when compared to CM. LED generated the same stress as QTH in conventional mode. Regardless of the activation mode, SureFil produced lower contraction and stress values than the other light-cured resins. Conversely, Z100 and A110 produced the greatest contraction and stress values. As expected, the chemically cured resin generated lower shrinkage and stress than the light-cured resins. In conclusion, The PD mode effectively decreased contraction stress for Z100 and A110. Development of stress in light-cured resins depended on the shrinkage value.

  11. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Cavalcanti, Ana Paula; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250), a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB), and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB) adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm(2) for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses.

  12. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Castañeda-Espinosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250, a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB, and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm² for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses.

  13. SPEEK/epoxy resin composite membranes in situ polymerization for direct methanol fell cell usages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Tiezhu; Zhao, Chengji; Zhong, Shuangling; Zhang, Gang; Shao, Ke; Zhang, Haiqiu; Wang, Jing; Na, Hui [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Qianwei Road 2699, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2007-03-20

    Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK)/4,4'-diglycidyl(3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbiphenyl) epoxy resin (TMBP) composite membranes in situ polymerization were prepared for the purpose of improving the methanol resistance and mechanical properties of SPEEK membranes with high ion-exchange capacities (IEC) for the usage in the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The effects of introduction of TMBP content on the properties of the composite membranes were investigated in detail. The composite membranes have good mechanical, thermal properties, lower swelling ratio, lower water diffusion coefficient (0.87 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 80 C) and better methanol resistance (5.26 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 25 C) than SPEEK membranes. The methanol diffusion coefficients of the composite membranes are much lower than that of SPEEK membrane (17.5 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 25 C). Higher selectivity was been found for the composite membranes in comparison with SPEEK. Therefore, the SPEEK/TMBP composite membranes show a good potential in DMFCs usages. (author)

  14. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  15. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Pooran; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Shirban, Farinaz; Davoodi, Amin; Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs) should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Prompt L-Pop (PLP) adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1) Immediate light-curing, (2) delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3) self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05). PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  16. Evaluation of internal adaptation of Class V resin composite restorations using three techniques of polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pereira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the internal adaptation of Class V composite restorations to the cavity walls using three different techniques of polymerization. METHODS: Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 24 extracted human third molars with margins located above and below the cementoenamel junction. Restorations were placed in one increment using two restorative systems: 3M Filtek A110/ Single Bond (M and 3M Filtek Z250/ Single Bond (H in the same tooth, randomly in the buccal and lingual surfaces. Resin composites were polymerized using three techniques: Group 1 - Conventional (60 s - 600 mW/cm²; Group 2 - Soft-start (20 s - 200 mW/cm² , 40 s - 600 mW/cm²; Group 3 - Pulse Activation (3 s - 200 mW/cm², 3-min hiatus, 57 s - 600 mW/cm². Buccolingual sections were polished, impressions taken and replicated. Specimens were assessed under scanning electron microscopy up to X1000 magnification. Scores were given for presence or absence of gaps (0 - no gap; 1 - gap in one wall; 2 - gap in two walls; 3 - gap in three walls. RESULTS: The mean scores of the groups were (±SD were: G1M-3.0 (± 0.0; G2M-2.43 (± 0.8; G3M- 1.71 (± 0.9; G1H- 2.14 (± 1.2; G2H- 2.00 (± 0.8; G3H- 1.67 (± 1.1. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunnet's tests. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05 was found among groups. Gaps were observed in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: The photocuring technique and the type of resin composite had no influence on the internal adaptation of the material to the cavity walls. A positive effect was observed when the slow polymerization techniques were used.

  17. Sensor-property-NDE relationships of polymeric composites processed through resin infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, U. K.; Mohamed, H.; Fotedar, K.; Haque, A.; Mahfuz, H.; Jeelani, S.

    1998-04-01

    Liquid molding manufacturing techniques including vacuum assisted resin infusion molding (VARIM) and resin transfer molding (RTM) offer low cost alternatives for producing composites. The cure characteristics of these composites are monitored by dielectric tool mount sensors in an RTM process, however embedded inter-digitated electrode sensors (IDEX) are becoming popular in the VARIM process. The IDEX sensors remain an integral part of the composite after cure. In this paper, first the response of the dielectric IDEX sensors to various resin systems in neat resin stage as well as in the resin matrix composite is presented. The paper then investigates the mechanical performance of the composites containing IDEX sensors for various loading situations involving interlaminar shear strength, low velocity impact and high strain rate testing. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation conducted is also presented.

  18. Influence of the curing method on the post-polymerization shrinkage stress of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gonçalves Cunha

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different curing methods on the stress generated by the polymerization shrinkage of a restorative composite in two moments: immediately after light exposure and after 5 min. Photoactivation was performed using two different light sources: (1 xenon plasma arc (PAC light (1,500 mW/cm2 - 3s and (2 a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH light with three light-curing regimens: continuous exposure (40 s at 800 mW/cm2 - CL; soft-start (10 s at 150 mW/cm2 and 30 s at 800 mW/cm2 - SS and intermittent light [cycles of 4 s (2 s with light on at 600 mW/cm2 and 2 s of light off, for 80s - IL]. The composite resin was applied between two 5-mm diameter metallic rods, mounted in a servohydraulic machine. The maximum stress was recorded immediately after light exposure (FF and after 5 min (5F. The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. For each method, the results obtained in FF and 5F were, respectively: CL (3.58 and 4.46 MPa; SS (2.99 and 4.36 MPa; IL (3.11 and 4.32 MPa and PAC (0.72 and 3.27 MPa. The stress generated by the polymerization shrinkage during light exposure can be associated with the photoactivation method used. A significant increase in the stress level was observed during the post-curing period up to 5 min, for all evaluated methods.

  19. Effect of light-curing units and activation mode on polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Gonzaga Lopes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composites polymerized with a LED and a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH light sources. The LED was used in a conventional mode (CM and the QTH was used in both conventional and pulse-delay modes (PD. The composite resins used were Z100, A110, SureFil and Bisfil 2B (chemical-cured. Composite deformation upon polymerization was measured by the strain gauge method. The shrinkage stress was measured by photoelastic analysis. The polymerization shrinkage data were analyzed statistically using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05, and the stress data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. Shrinkage and stress means of Bisfil 2B were statistically significant lower than those of Z100, A110 and SureFil. In general, the PD mode reduced the contraction and the stress values when compared to CM. LED generated the same stress as QTH in conventional mode. Regardless of the activation mode, SureFil produced lower contraction and stress values than the other light-cured resins. Conversely, Z100 and A110 produced the greatest contraction and stress values. As expected, the chemically cured resin generated lower shrinkage and stress than the light-cured resins. In conclusion, The PD mode effectively decreased contraction stress for Z100 and A110. Development of stress in light-cured resins depended on the shrinkage value.

  20. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  1. Evaluation of Vickers hardness and depth of cure of six composite resins photo-activated with different polymerization modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Poggio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The current in vitro study evaluated Vickers hardness (VK and depth of cure (hardness ratio of six resin composites, polymerized with a light-emitting diode (LED curing unit by different polymerization modes: Standard 20 s, Standard 40 s, Soft-start 40 s. Materials and Methods: Six resin composites were selected for the present study: three microhybrid (Esthet.X HD, Amaris, Filtek Silorane, two nanohybrid (Grandio, Ceram.X mono and one nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT. The VK of the surface was determined with a microhardness tester using a Vickers diamond indenter and a 200 g load applied for 15 seconds. The mean VK and hardness ratio of the specimens were calculated using the formula: hardness ratio = VK of bottom surface / VK of top surface. Results: For all the materials tested and with all the polymerization modes, hardness ratio was higher than the minimum value indicated in literature in order to consider the bottom surface as adequately cured (0.80. Curing time did not affect hardness ratio values for Filtek Silorane, Grandio and Filtek Supreme XT. Conclusion: The effectiveness of cure at the top and bottom surface was not affected by Soft-start polymerization mode.

  2. Polymerization contraction of light-cured composite resins containing silica/polymethylmethacrylate bonded microstructured networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefferkorn, A; Haïkel, Y; Pefferkorn, E

    2005-11-15

    The adsorption of methylmethacrylate polymer at silica/methylmethacrylate interfaces was determined to provide microstructured networks whose structural characteristics were determined to be controlled by the amount of polymer initially supplied to the system. First, the microstructure was investigated by determining as a function of the amount of polymer (i) the shrinking rate due to evaporation of the methylmethacrylate monomer, (ii) the rate of sedimentation of the silica/polymer complexes in the methylmethacrylate monomer, and (iii) the height of the sediment in the long term. These different characteristics were found to be strongly correlated. Second, the sedimentation characteristics were determined as a function of the amount of polymer initially supplied to the dispersion of the same silica/polymer system in the ethylene glycol dimethacrylate monomer. Then the rate of the polymerization contraction during light-curing of the resin was determined for the sediment recovered after centrifugation. The slowest polymerization contraction and the smallest contraction were obtained with the filler/polymer/resin system composed of aggregates of medium porosity and size.

  3. Impact of quantity of resin, C-factor, and geometry on resin composite polymerization shrinkage stress in Class V restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, A L S; Borges, A B; Xavier, T A; Bottino, M C; Platt, J A

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of quantity of resin composite, C-factor, and geometry in Class V restorations on shrinkage stress after bulk fill insertion of resin using two-dimensional finite element analysis. An image of a buccolingual longitudinal plane in the middle of an upper first premolar and supporting tissues was used for modeling 10 groups: cylindrical cavity, erosion, and abfraction lesions with the same C-factor (1.57), a second cylindrical cavity and abfraction lesion with the same quantity of resin (QR) as the erosion lesion, and then all repeated with a bevel on the occlusal cavosurface angle. The 10 groups were imported into Ansys 13.0 for two-dimensional finite element analysis. The mesh was built with 30,000 triangle and square elements of 0.1 mm in length for all the models. All materials were considered isotropic, homogeneous, elastic, and linear, and the resin composite shrinkage was simulated by thermal analogy. The maximum principal (MPS) and von Mises stresses (VMS) were analyzed for comparing the behavior of the groups. Different values of angles for the cavosurface margin in enamel and dentin were obtained for all groups and the higher the angle, the lower the stress concentration. When the groups with the same C-factor and QR were compared, the erosion shape cavity showed the highest MPS and VMS values, and abfraction shape, the lowest. A cavosurface bevel decreased the stress values on the occlusal margin. The geometry factor overcame the effects of C-factor and QR in some situations. Within the limitations of the current methodology, it is possible to conclude that the combination of all variables studied influences the stress, but the geometry is the most important factor to be considered by the operator.

  4. The influence of "C-factor" and light activation technique on polymerization contraction forces of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kiyoshi Ishikiriama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the influence of the cavity configuration factor ("C-Factor" and light activation technique on polymerization contraction forces of a Bis-GMA-based composite resin (Charisma, Heraeus Kulzer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three different pairs of steel moving bases were connected to a universal testing machine (emic DL 500: groups A and B - 2x2 mm (CF=0.33, groups C and D - 3x2 mm (CF=0.66, groups e and F - 6x2 mm (CF=1.5. After adjustment of the height between the pair of bases so that the resin had a volume of 12 mm³ in all groups, the material was inserted and polymerized by two different methods: pulse delay (100 mW/cm² for 5 s, 40 s interval, 600 mW/cm² for 20 s and continuous pulse (600 mW/cm² for 20 s. Each configuration was light cured with both techniques. Tensions generated during polymerization were recorded by 120 s. The values were expressed in curves (Force(N x Time(s and averages compared by statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey's test, p<0.05. RESULTS: For the 2x2 and 3x2 bases, with a reduced C-Factor, significant differences were found between the light curing methods. For 6x2 base, with high C-Factor, the light curing method did not influence the contraction forces of the composite resin. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse delay technique can determine less stress on tooth/restoration interface of adhesive restorations only when a reduced C-Factor is present.

  5. Influence of compliance of the substrate materials on polymerization contraction stress in thin resin composite layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, D; Venhoven, B A; Feilzer, A J; Davidson, C L

    1997-02-01

    The present study determined in a laboratory set-up the influence of compliance of the substrate material on polymerisation contraction stress for various thicknesses of bonded dental resin composite films. When the compliance of the tensilometer set-up was increased from 0.029 micron MPa-1 to 0.150 micron MPa-1, the contraction stress in films with a thickness of 100 microns and a diameter of 5.35 mm decreased from 22 to 7 MPa. For the 700 microns samples the stress decreased from 12 to 11 MPa. It was concluded that if compliance from the substrate materials is possible, a thinner resin composite film may effect a more reliable bond.

  6. Kinetic study of polymerization/curing of filament-wound composite epoxy resin systems with aromatic diamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M. A.; Lerner, N. R.; Hsu, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of polymerization/curing of a filament-wound composite epoxy resin consisting of an 80/20 DGEBA/DGEBD blend and an MDA/m-PDA blend (Tonox 60/40) was studied at various temperatures and at amine epoxy ratios between 1.1 and 4.4 by means of Fourier-transform (FT) IR and bulk viscosity measurements. The activation energy for the polymerization/curing reaction using an amine/epoxy ratio of 1.1 was 11.9 kcal/mole, in agreement with a previous value. The FT-IR conversion-time plots were fitted to a kinetic expression containing two rate constants with activation energies of 13.7 and 10.0 kcal/mole. The bulk viscosity followed the Williams et al. (1955) equation, with a Di Benedetto (1965) expression for the glass transition temperature.

  7. Gamma-rays initiated cationic polymerization of epoxy resins and their carbon nanotubes composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybytniak, Grażyna; Nowicki, Andrzej; Mirkowski, Krzysztof; Stobiński, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) in the presence cationic initiator in the form of iodonium salt were exposed to gamma-rays in order to initiate curing process. The influence of the initiator concentration, dose rate, chemical structure of monomers and the presence of carbon nanotubes were determined on the basis of the recorded on-line thermal effects. The induction time of radiation curing increased with lowering concentration of the initiator and oxirane groups as well as with decreasing dose rates. As was confirmed by SEM images, carbon nanotubes were uniformly distributed over the matrix and closely surrounded by the macromolecules. Such a structure resulted from adsorption of the initiator on the filler surface what allowed to begin polymerization around nanoparticles and facilitated their incorporation into the matrix. As a consequence, the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were improved.

  8. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  9. Polymerization shrinkage of a dental resin composite determined by a fiber optic Fizeau interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Gustavo; Noriega, Sergio; Vallo, Claudia; Duchowicz, Ricardo

    2007-03-01

    A fiber optic sensing method based on a Fizeau-type interferometric scheme was employed for monitoring linear polymerization shrinkage in dental restoratives. This technique offers several advantages over the conventional methods of measuring polymerization contraction. This simple, compact, non-invasive and self-calibrating system competes with both conventional and other high-resolution bulk interferometric techniques. In this work, an analysis of the quality of interference signal and fringes visibility was performed in order to characterize their resolution and application range. The measurements of percent linear contraction as a function of the sample thickness were carried out in this study on two dental composites: Filtek P60 (3M ESPE) Posterior Restorer and Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) Universal Restorer. The results were discussed with respect to others obtained employing alternative techniques.

  10. Remineralizing amorphous calcium phosphate based composite resins: the influence of inert fillers on monomer conversion, polymerization shrinkage, and microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marović, Danijela; Šariri, Kristina; Demoli, Nazif; Ristić, Mira; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Škrtić, Drago; Rosentritt, Martin; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine if the addition of inert fillers to a bioactive dental restorative composite material affects its degree of conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (PS), and microhardness (HV). Methods Three amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-based composite resins: without added fillers (0-ACP), with 10% of barium-glass fillers (Ba-ACP), and with 10% of silica fillers (Si-ACP), as well as commercial control (Ceram•X, Dentsply DeTrey) were tested in laboratory conditions. The amount of ACP (40%) and the composition of the resin mixture (based on ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate) was the same for all ACP materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the DC (n = 40), 20 min and 72 h after polymerization. Linear PS and Vickers microhardness (n = 40) were also evaluated. The results were analyzed by paired samples t test, ANOVA, and one-way repeated measures ANOVA with Student-Newman-Keuls or Tukey’s post-hoc test (P = 0.05). Results The addition of barium fillers significantly increased the DC (20 min) (75.84 ± 0.62%) in comparison to 0-ACP (73.92 ± 3.08%), but the addition of silica fillers lowered the DC (71.00 ± 0.57%). Ceram•X had the lowest DC (54.93 ± 1.00%) and linear PS (1.01 ± 0.24%) but the highest HV (20.73 ± 2.09). PS was significantly reduced (P < 0.010) in both Ba-ACP (1.13 ± 0.25%) and Si-ACP (1.17 ± 0.19%) compared to 0-ACP (1.43 ± 0.21%). HV was significantly higher in Si-ACP (12.82 ± 1.30) than in 0-ACP (10.54 ± 0.86) and Ba-ACP (10.75 ± 0.62) (P < 0.010). Conclusion Incorporation of inert fillers to bioactive remineralizing composites enhanced their physical-mechanical performance in laboratory conditions. Both added fillers reduced the PS while maintaining high levels of the DC. Silica fillers additionally moderately improved the HV of ACP composites. PMID:27815937

  11. Indirect resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were ′indirect resin composites,′ composite inlays,′ and ′fiber-reinforced composites.′

  12. Fine-Tuning of Polymeric Resins and Their Interfaces with Amorphous Calcium Phosphate. A Strategy for Designing Effective Remineralizing Dental Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Drago Skrtic; Antonucci, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    For over a decade our group has been designing, preparing and evaluating bioactive, remineralizing composites based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) fillers embedded in polymerized methacrylate resin matrices. In these studies a major focus has been on exploring structure-property relationships of the matrix phase of these composites on their anti-cariogenic potential. The main challenges were to gain a better understanding of polymer matrix/filler interfacial properties through controlli...

  13. Fine-Tuning of Polymeric Resins and Their Interfaces with Amorphous Calcium Phosphate. A Strategy for Designing Effective Remineralizing Dental Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Joseph M; Skrtic, Drago

    2010-09-01

    For over a decade our group has been designing, preparing and evaluating bioactive, remineralizing composites based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) fillers embedded in polymerized methacrylate resin matrices. In these studies a major focus has been on exploring structure-property relationships of the matrix phase of these composites on their anti-cariogenic potential. The main challenges were to gain a better understanding of polymer matrix/filler interfacial properties through controlling the surface properties of the fillers or through fine-tuning of the resin matrix. In this work, we describe the effect of chemical structure and composition of the resin matrices on some of the critical physicochemical properties of the copolymers and their ACP composites. Such structure-property studies are essential in formulating clinically effective products, and this knowledge base is likely to have strong impact on the future design of therapeutic materials, appropriate for mineral restoration in defective tooth structures.

  14. Fine-Tuning of Polymeric Resins and their Interfaces with Amorphous Calcium Phosphate. A Strategy for Designing Effective Remineralizing Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Skrtic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available For over a decade our group has been designing, preparing and evaluating bioactive, remineralizing composites based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP fillers embedded in polymerized methacrylate resin matrices. In these studies a major focus has been on exploring structure-property relationships of the matrix phase of these composites on their anti-cariogenic potential. The main challenges were to gain a better understanding of polymer matrix/filler interfacial properties through controlling the surface properties of the fillers or through fine-tuning of the resin matrix. In this work, we describe the effect of chemical structure and composition of the resin matrices on some of the critical physicochemical properties of the copolymers and their ACP composites. Such structure-property studies are essential in formulating clinically effective products, and this knowledge base is likely to have strong impact on the future design of therapeutic materials, appropriate for mineral restoration in defective tooth structures.

  15. Influence of light-polymerization modes on the degree of conversion and mechanical properties of resin composites: a comparative analysis between a hybrid and a nanofilled composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzed the influence of the light polymerization mode on the degree of conversion (DC) and mechanical properties of two resin composites: a hybrid (Filtek P60) and a nanofilled composite (Filtek Supreme). The composites were light activated by three light polymerization modes (Standard-S: 650 mW/cm2 for 30 seconds; High intensity-H: 1000 mW/cm2 for 20 seconds and Gradual-G: 100 up to 1000 mW/cm2 for 10 seconds + 1000 mW/cm2 for 10 seconds). The DC (%) was measured by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Flexural strength and flexural modulus were obtained from bar-shaped specimens (1 x 2 x 10 mm) submitted to the three-point bending test. Microhardness was evaluated by Knoop indentation (KHN). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple range test and linear regression analysis. The results showed the following DC: H > S > G (p hybrid > nanofilled (p S = G (p hybrid composite presented higher flexural strength and flexural modulus than the nanofilled composite (p composites (p = 0.1605). The results suggest that nanofilled composites may present a lower degree of conversion and reduced mechanical properties compared to hybrid composites.

  16. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. CONCLUSION: In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  17. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANG, Hoon-Sang; CHO, Kyu-Jeong; PARK, Su-Jung; LEE, Bin-Na; HWANG, Yun-Chan; OH, Won-Mann; HWANG, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Material and Methods Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. Results The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. Conclusion In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity. PMID:24037066

  18. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  19. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Saurabh K Gupta; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies h...

  20. Resin Systems and Chemistry-Degradation Mechanisms and Durability in Long-Term Durability of Polymeric Matrix Composites. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    In choosing a polymer-matrix composite material for a particular application, a number of factors need to be weighed. Among these are mechanical requirements, fabrication method (e.g. press-molding, resin infusion, filament winding, tape layup), and use conditions. Primary among the environmental exposures encountered in aerospace structures are moisture and elevated temperatures, but certain applications may require resistance to other fluids and solvents, alkaline agents, thermal cycling, radiation, or rapid, localized heating (for example, lightning strike). In this chapter, the main classes of polymer resin systems found in aerospace composites will be discussed. Within each class, their responses to environmental factors and the associated degradation mechanisms will be reviewed.

  1. Color stability of different composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkensammer, Frank; Arnetzl, Gerwin Vincent; Wildburger, Angelika; Freudenthaler, Josef

    2013-06-01

    Data are needed to better predict the color stability of current composite resin materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of different storage solutions on the color stability of different composite resin materials. Different restorative and adhesive composite resin specimens (dual-polymerizing self-adhesive resin cement, autopolymerizing resin-based composite resin, dual-polymerizing resin-based composite resin, nanohybrid composite resin, and microhybrid composite resin) were fabricated and stored in red wine, black tea, chlorhexidine, sodium fluoride, tea tree oil, or distilled water for 4 weeks at 37°C. Color parameters were measured with a colorimeter before and after storage. Total color differences and specific coordinate differences were expressed as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. A 2-way and 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons were applied for statistical calculations (α=.05). Red wine caused the most severe discoloration (ΔE >10), followed by black tea with perceptible (ΔE >2.6) to clinically unacceptable discoloration (ΔE >5.5). Colored mouth rinses discolored the materials to a lesser extent with clinically acceptable values. Dual-polymerizing resin adhesives showed a higher amount of discoloration. Current restorative and adhesive composite resin materials discolor over time under the influence of different storage solutions. The composition related to the polymerizing mode seemed to be a causative factor. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of composite resin polymerization modes on temperature rise in human dentin of different thicknesses: an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggio Aguiar, Flavio Henrique; Kanda Peres Barros, Gisele; Alves Nunes Leite Lima, Debora; Bovi Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria; Lovadino, Jose Roberto [Piracicaba School of Dentistry, Campinas State University, Av. Limeira, 901, SP (Brazil)

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different polymerization modes on temperature rise in human dentin of different thicknesses, and to evaluate the relation between dentin thickness and temperature rise (TR). For this purpose, 60 specimens were assigned into 20 groups (n = 3): five polymerization modes (1-conventional; 2-soft-start; 3-high intensity; 4-ramp cure: progressive and high intensity; 5-high intensity with the tip of the light-curing unit at a distance of 1.3 cm for 10 s and the tip leaning on the sample) at four dentin thicknesses (0, 1, 2, 3 mm). During composite sample polymerization (2 mm), the temperature was measured by a digital laser thermometer (CMSS2000-SL/SKF). The statistical analyses were conducted by ANOVA (p = 0.05) and post-hoc Tukey's test. There were statistical differences of TR among polymerization modes and dentin thicknesses. The temperature rise was dependent on the polymerization mode and the dentin thickness: the thicker the dentin and the lower the polymerization mode energy, the lower the temperature rise.

  3. [Radiopacity of composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburús, J R

    1990-01-01

    The author studied the radiopacity of six composite resins, submitted to radiographic examination in standardized conditions, only with kilovoltage variations. Along with resins it was radiographed an aluminium penetrometer, to compare their optical densities. The results showed that kilovoltagem variations interfered in optical densities of the resins, being more pronounced in 50-55, 55-60 and 60-65 kilovoltages. Despite this, the relations of optical densities as compared with that of penetrometer steps kept unaltered most fo the kilovoltages used.

  4. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concern...

  5. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  6. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined.

  7. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity.

  8. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  9. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  10. Contraction stresses of composite resin filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegdahl, T; Gjerdet, N R

    1977-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resin filling materials and the tensile stresses developed when the shrinkage is restrained were measured in an in vitro experiment. This allows an estimation to be made of the forces exerted upon the enamel walls of cavities filled with the resin in the acid etch technique. The results indicate that the stresses acting on the enamel are low compared to the tensile strength of the enamel.

  11. Color of bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcigil, Çağatay; Barutcigil, Kubilay; Özarslan, Mehmet Mustafa; Dündar, Ayşe; Yilmaz, Burak

    2017-09-28

    To evaluate the color stability of novel bulk-fill composite resins. Color measurements of a nanohybrid composite resin (Z550) and 3 bulk-fill composite resins (BLK, AFX, XTF; n = 45) were performed before polymerization. After polymerization, color measurements were repeated and specimens were immersed in distilled water or red wine, or coffee. Color change [CIEDE2000 (ΔE00 )] was calculated after 24 h, 1 and 3 weeks. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Color changes observed after polymerization were significant for all groups. Color changes observed in distilled water for Z550 and AFX were significant. Color changes after stored in red wine and coffee were significant for all groups. Bulk-fill composite resin color change increased over time for all groups in red wine and coffee (P composite resin and bulk-fill composite resins. AFX had the highest color change in distilled water. The color of tested bulk-fill composite resins significantly changed after immersion in beverages and over time. Color change observed with the nanohybrid composite resin after 1 week was stable. Clinicians should keep in mind that tested composite resins may change color when exposed to water and significantly change color immediately after they are polymerized. In addition, the color change continues over time should the patient is a coffee and/or red wine consumer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. THE POLYMERIZATION OF ROOM TEMPERATURE CURING EPOXY RESINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPOXY RESINS , *PLASTICS, *POLYMERIZATION, AGING (PHYSIOLOGY), CHEMICAL BONDS, ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES, EMBEDDING SUBSTANCES, MONITORS, POLYMERS, RESISTANCE (ELECTRICAL), STORAGE, STRUCTURES, TEMPERATURE, TEST METHODS, VOLUME

  13. PMR Resin Compositions For High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to identify polymer matrix resins suitable for making graphite-fiber laminates used at 700 degree F (371 degree C) in such applications as aircraft engines to achieve higher thrust-to-weight ratios. Two particular high-molecular-weight formulations of PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) resins most promising. PMR compositions of higher FMW exhibit enhanced thermo-oxidative stability. Formation of high-quality laminates with these compositions requires use of curing pressures higher than those suitable for compositions of lower FMW.

  14. Ceramic inlay movement during polymerization of resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J A; Munksgaard, E C

    1995-06-01

    In cavities with no support for inlays, polymerization contraction of the resin cement may move the ceramic inlay axially. The purpose of this study was to determine the velocity and extent of such movement. Cylindrical ceramic inlays were placed in dentin cavities filled with one of four commercially available resin composite cements. An initial standardized 200-microns-thick cement film was created. The movement of the ceramic inlay during polymerization of one of the resin cements was measured by a dial gauge. The velocity of the inlay movement decreased exponentially with time and with a velocity constant of 0.09 min-1. The majority of the movement occurred within the first 12 min after photopolymerization and probably continued for several days, reaching an estimated value of 5.8 microns. After 1-2 d of water storage, 1-2-microns contraction gaps at the cavity floors were observed microscopically for every cement used. It is concluded that in cavities without support for the inlay, about 2/3 of the resin cement contraction results in movement of the inlay and about 1/3 results in formation of gaps at the cavity floors.

  15. Effect of post-polymerization heat treatments on the cytotoxicity of two denture base acrylic resins

    OpenAIRE

    Janaina Habib Jorge; Eunice Teresinha Giampaolo; Carlos Eduardo Vergani; Ana Lúcia Machado; Ana Cláudia Pavarina; Iracilda Zeppone Carlos

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Most denture base acrylic resins have polymethylmethacrylate in their composition. Several authors have discussed the polymerization process involved in converting monomer into polymer because adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in optimizing the physical properties and biocompatibility of denture base acrylic resins. To ensure the safety of these materials, in vitro cytotoxicity assays have been developed as preliminary screening tests to evaluate material biocompatibil...

  16. High-temperature-pressure Polymerized Resin-infiltrated Ceramic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, J.F.; Ruse, D.; Phan, A.C.; Sadoun, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce composite blocks (CB) for CAD/CAM applications by high-temperature-pressure (HT/HP) polymerization of resin-infiltrated glass-ceramic networks. The effect of network sintering and the absence/presence of initiator was investigated. Mechanical properties were determined and compared with those of Paradigm MZ100 (3M ESPE) blocks and HT/HP polymerized experimental “classic” CB, in which the filler had been incorporated by conventional mixing. The networks were made   from glass-ceramic powder (VITA Zahnfabrik) formed by slip casting and were either sintered or not. They were silanized, infiltrated by urethane dimethacrylate, with or without initiator, and polymerized under HT/HP (300 MPa, 180°C) to obtain resin-infiltrated glass-ceramic network (RIGCN) CB. HT/HP polymerized CB were also made from an experimental “classic” composite. Flexural strength (σf), fracture toughness (KIC), and Vickers hardness were determined and analyzed by one- or two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffé multiple-means comparisons (α = 0.05), and Weibull statistics (for σf). Fractured surfaces were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of RIGCN CB were significantly higher. Sintering induced significant increases in σf and hardness, while the initiator significantly decreased hardness. The results suggested that RIGCN and HT/HP polymerization could be used to obtain CB with superior mechanical properties, suitable for CAD/CAM applications. PMID:24186559

  17. Polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin-based restorative materials

    OpenAIRE

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of flowable resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 22 flowable resin-based restorative materials (Admira Flow, Aelite Flow, Aeliteflow LV, Aria, Crystal Essence, Definite Flow, Dyract Flow, Filtek Flow, FloRestore, Flow-it, Flow-Line, Freedom, Glacier, OmegaFlo, PermaFlo, Photo SC, Revolution 2, Star Flow, Synergy Flow, Tetric Flow, Ultrase...

  18. Effects of light curing method and resin composite composition on composite adaptation to the cavity wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the light curing method and resin composite composition on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on the buccal or lingual cervical regions. The teeth were restored using Clearfil Liner Bond 2V adhesive system and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composite. The resins were cured using the conventional or slow-start light curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to a dye penetration test. The slow-start curing method showed better resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall for both composites. Furthermore, the slow-start curing method resulted in significantly improved dentin marginal sealing compared with the conventional method for Clearfil Photo Bright. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios duringpolymerization, seems to suggest high compensation for polymerization contraction stress when using the slow-start curing method.

  19. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins: effect of alcohols on cationic polymerization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N N Ghosh; G R Palmese

    2005-10-01

    Electron-beam (e-beam) induced polymerization of epoxy resins proceeds via cationic mechanism in presence of suitable photoinitiator. Despite good thermal properties and significant processing advantages, epoxy-based composites manufactured using e-beam curing suffer from low compressive strength, poor interlaminar shear strength, and low fracture toughness. A detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism involving e-beam induced polymerization is required to properly address the shortcomings associated with ebeam curable resin systems. This work investigated the effect of hydroxyl containing materials on the reaction mechanism of e-beam induced cationic polymerization of phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE). The alcohols were found to play important roles in polymerization. Compared to hydroxyl group of aliphatic alcohol, phenolic hydroxyl group is significantly less reactive with the oxonium active centre, generated during e-beam induced polymerization of epoxy resin system.

  20. Conventional and microfilled composite resins. Part II. Chip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, P; Ameye, C; Vanherle, G

    1982-11-01

    Dentists are accustomed to advantages and disadvantages in the materials at their disposal. This article was concerned with one disadvantage of microfilled composite resins, namely, chip fractures. Probably due to their higher coefficient of thermal expansion, higher water sorption, higher polymerization shrinkage, and lower tensile strengths, cohesive as well as adhesive chip fractures occur three to four times more often with microfilled composite resins than with conventional composite resins. Microfilled composite resins are indicated for esthetic purposes. They are contraindicated for Class IV and stress-bearing restorations. They are indicated for limited use in Class I restorations where esthetics is of primary importance. The technique of use must include acid-etching and intermediate bonding. The microfilled composite resins enjoy a smooth finish and high luster. This offers advantages in areas where smoothness is paramount. They may replace conventional composite resins for resurfacing existing restorations and veneering stained or mottled anterior teeth. They are indicated for treatment of cervical erosion.

  1. Properties of hybrid resin composite systems containing prepolymerized filler particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackham, Jason T; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Lien, Wen

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the properties of newer hybrid resin composites with prepolymerized-filler particles to traditional hybrids and a microfill composite. The following properties were examined per composite: diametral tensile strength, flexural strength/modulus, Knoop microhardness and polymerization shrinkage. Physical properties were determined for each Jason T Blackham, DMD, USAF, General Dentistry, Tyndall composite group (n = 8), showing significant differences between groups per property (p hybrid composites (Z250, Esthet-X) had higher strength, composites containing pre-polymerized fillers (Gradia Direct Posterior, Premise) performed more moderately and the microfill composite (Durafill VS) had lower strength. Premise and Durafill VS had the lowest polymerization shrinkage.

  2. A comparative study of microleakage of micro-ceramic polymerized resin inlay and composite resin inlays%微瓷树脂嵌体和复合树脂嵌体微渗漏的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍萍萍; 杨楠; 李桂红; 樊明文

    2012-01-01

    目的 对比研究1种微瓷聚合树脂嵌体和另外3种复合树脂嵌体的边缘微渗漏情况,为临床选择嵌体材料提供参考.方法 将80颗健康离体上颌前磨牙随机分为8组,每组10颗,嵌体窝洞制备后,分别用微瓷聚合树脂Ceramage(C)和复合树脂Brilliant new line(B)、Z350(Z)、P60(P)间接法制成嵌体,每种材料2组,使用即刻牙本质封闭(immediate dentin sealing,IDS)/延时牙本质封闭(delayed dentin sealing,DDS)技术粘结,冷热循环品红染色后,用金刚砂片将实验牙切开,体视镜下观察微渗漏.结果 4种树脂嵌体龈壁与轴壁微渗漏无显著性差异(P>0.05),各IDS组与DDS组微渗漏亦无显著性差异(P>0.05).无论龈壁还是轴壁,采用IDS或DDS粘结技术,4种材料之间皆有显著性差异(P<0.05)并且渗漏情况一致.微渗漏从小到大依次均为C、Z、P、B.结论 单从微渗漏方面评价,Ceramage和Z350均为制作树脂嵌体的良好选择.%Objective To evaluate and compare the marginal microleakage of one type of micro-ceramic polymerized resin inlay and three types of composite resin inlays to find proper restorative materials which have good marginal fitness for teeth for clinical reference. Methods 80 healthy maxillary premolars were randomly assigned to 8 groups, 10 in each. C、B、Z、P resins were made into inlays in indirect ways, each material in two groups. Resin inlays in each group were bonded with IDS (immediate dentin sealing) or DDS (delayed dentin sealing) technique respectively. All the specimen were thermocycled. After dying, the microleakage was examined under stereo-microscope and the data were statistically analyzed. Results No significant difference was found between the gingival wall groups and axial wall groups(P >0.05). All the IDS groups and DDS groups also showed no significant difference. In all the groups,the four types of materials demonstrated significantly different degree of microleakage,and the ranking from

  3. The efficiency of different light sources to polymerize resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumez, A; Ozturk, A N; Usumez, S; Ozturk, B

    2004-02-01

    Plasma arc light units for curing resin composites have been introduced with the claim of relatively short curing times. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two different light sources to polymerize dual curing resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers. Twenty extracted healthy human maxillary centrals were used. Teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cemento-enamel junction and crown parts were embedded into self-cure acrylic resin, labial surface facing up. Cavity preparation was carried out on labial surfaces. These teeth were divided into two groups of 10 each. The resin cement/veneer combination was exposed to two different photo polymerization units. A conventional halogen light (Hilux 350, Express Dental Products) and a plasma arc light (Power PAC, ADT) were used to polymerize resin cement. Ten specimens were polymerized conventionally (40 s) and the other specimens by plasma arc curing (PAC) (6 s). Two samples from each tooth measuring 1.2 x 1.2 x 5 mm were prepared. These sections were subjected to microshear testing and failure values were recorded. Statistically significant differences were found between the bond strength of veneers exposed to conventional light and PAC unit (P < 0.001). Samples polymerized with halogen light showed better bond strength. The results of this study suggest that the curing efficiency of PAC through ceramic was lower compared with conventional polymerization for the exposure durations tested in this study.

  4. The application of nanotechnology in the improvement of dental composite resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yang; Xie Haifeng; Zhang Feimin; Gu Ning

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, nanotechnology for the improvement of dental composite resins has been reviewed in the back- ground of the existing shortcomings, focusing on the improvement for polymerization shrinkage, anti-bacterial properties and mechanical properties of composite resins. The results show that the use of nanotechnology and nano materials can be an effective method to improve the performance of dental composite resins in a various ways. At last, the paper also discusses the perspective about the dental composite resins.

  5. Color stability and flexural strength of poly (methyl methacrylate) and bis-acrylic composite based provisional crown and bridge auto-polymerizing resins exposed to beverages and food dye: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjari, Anil K; Bhatnagar, Vishrut M; Basavaraju, Ravi M

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the color stability and flexural strength of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and bis-acrylic composite based provisional crown and bridge auto-polymerizing resins exposed to tea, coffee, cola, and food dye. Two provisional crown and bridge resins, one DPI self-cure tooth molding powder (PMMA) (Group A), and one Protemp 4 Temporization Material (bis-acrylic composite) (Group B) were used. Disk-shaped specimens for color stability testing (n = 30 for each material) and bar-shaped specimens for flexural strength testing (n = 30 for each material) were fabricated using a metal mold. The specimens were immersed in artificial saliva, artificial saliva + tea, artificial saliva + coffee, artificial saliva + cola, and artificial saliva + food dye solutions and stored in an incubator at 37°C. Color measurements were taken before immersion, and then after 3 and 7 days of immersion. Flexural strength was evaluated after 7 days of immersion. Group A showed significantly higher color stability as compared to Group B, and artificial saliva + coffee solution had the most staining capacity for the resins. Test solutions had no effect on the flexural strength of Group A, but Group B specimens immersed in artificial saliva + cola showed significantly lower flexural strength values as compared to the control group. The findings of the study showed that for materials used in the study, PMMA was more color stable than bis-acrylic composite based resin. Also, material based on PMMA was more resistant to damage from dietary beverages as compared to bis-acrylic composite based provisional crown and bridge resin.

  6. The effects of restorative composite resins on the cytotoxicity of dentine bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghwan; Son, Kyung Mi; Kwon, Ji Hyun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    During restoration of damaged teeth in dental clinics, dentin bonding agents are usually overlaid with restorative resin composites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of restorative resin composites on cytotoxicity of dentin bonding agents. Dentin bonding agents were placed on glass discs, pre-cured and uncured resin composite discs. Bonding agents on the glass discs and composite resins discs were light cured and used for agar overlay cytotoxicity testing. Dentin bonding agents on composite resin discs exhibited far less cytotoxicity than that on glass discs. The polymerization of resin composite increased the surface hardness and decreased the cytotoxicity of bonding agents. In conclusion, composite resins in dental restorations are expected to enhance the polymerization of dentin bonding agents and reduce the elution of resin monomers, resulting in the decrease of cytotoxicity.

  7. Processing of continuous fiber composites using thermoplastic polyimide matrix resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranjc, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Composites have been produced which contain a solvent resistant polyimide matrix with favorable physical properties. The polyimide matrix resin has been designated as P12. The prepegs used to produce the composite contain a low molecular weight resin which is the polyamic acid precursor to P12. Polymerization and imidization of the precursor resin occurs in-situ during processing. Similar commercial systems are often processed in an autoclave and pressure is used at high temperatures to obtain consolidation between prepreg laminates. Pressure is generally applied after polymerization and imidization are complete and at temperatures above the melting point of the polymer. In this research a significant decrease in composite void content was obtained by applying pressure earlier in the cure. Obtaining composites with low void content with these types of systems can be difficult. This is due in part to the generation of low molecular weight reaction by products, water and methanol. High void content results in a decrease in the physical properties of the composite structure. This is especially true for fracture properties. An empirical equation was used to describe the rate of resin removal from the composite to the bleeder cloth during processing. This equation is based on Springer-Loos resin flow model. The conditions in which this model does not apply were also determined. Determining resin removal rates is helpful in producing composites with consistent fiber/resin ratios. In addition, conditions which favor void growth can be prevented.

  8. [On the polymerization of pour type resin (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, K; Hirasawa, T; Masuhara, E

    1976-05-01

    The initial polymerization point and the polymerization progress have been observed on powder-liquid pour type acrylic resin and one-liquid pour type acrylic resin. The results are as follows: 1. In case of un-heating at the bottom of powder liquid resin, in the former stage the polymerization makes the regular progress from the bottom part to the upper of the mould, but in the latter stage it does some irregular one. In case of heating at the bottom, at first it shows a better regular progress as in the case of un-heating. 2. In case of un-heating at the bottom of one-liquid resin, in the first stage the polymerization makes the regular progress from the bottom part of the resin and at the same time from its middle of the mould, and then to the upper part and the sprue part. In case of heating at the bottom, it begins just from the heated part, then it goes quite regularly to the middle, the upper, and the sprue part, and lastly the polymerization shrinkage concentrates exclusively at the sprue part.

  9. Mercuric iodide semiconductor detectors encapsulated in polymeric resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Joao F. Trencher; Santos, Robinson A. dos; Ferraz, Caue de M.; Oliveira, Adriano S.; Velo, Alexandre F.; Mesquita, Carlos H. de; Hamada, Margarida M., E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disch, Christian; Fiederle, Michael [Albert-Ludwigs Universität Freiburg - UniFreibrug, Freiburg Materials Research Center - FMF, Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The development of new semiconductor radiation detectors always finds many setback factors, such as: high concentration of impurities in the start materials, poor long term stability, the surface oxidation and other difficulties discussed extensively in the literature, that limit their use. In this work was studied, the application of a coating resin on HgI2 detectors, in order to protect the semiconductor crystal reactions from atmospheric gases and to isolate electrically the surface of the crystals. Four polymeric resins were analyzed: Resin 1: 50% - 100%Heptane, 10% - 25% methylcyclohexane, <1% cyclohexane; Resin 2: 25% - 50% ethanol, 25% - 50% acetone, <2,5% ethylacetate; Resin 3: 50% - 100% methylacetate, 5% - 10% n-butylacetate; Resin 4: 50% - 100% ethyl-2-cyanacrylat. The influence of the polymeric resin type used on the spectroscopic performance of the HgI{sub 2} semiconductor detector is, clearly, demonstrated. The better result was found for the detector encapsulated with Resin 3. An increase of up to 26 times at the stability time was observed for the detectors encapsulated compared to that non-encapsulated detector. (author)

  10. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimmada Kesrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3 were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm, Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 37∘C storage in an incubator, Knoop hardness measurements were obtained at the bottom. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA, t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results. The KHN of NX3 was of significantly higher than that of Variolink Veneer (<0.05. The KHN of resin cement polymerized under different ceramic types and thicknesses was significant difference (<0.05. Conclusion. Resin cements polymerized under different ceramic materials and thicknesses showed statistically significant differences in KHN.

  11. Flexural strength of acrylic resins polymerized by different cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Barros Barbosa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of studies addressing the effect of microwave polymerization on the properties of acrylic resin, this method has received limited clinical acceptance. This study evaluated the influence of microwave polymerization on the flexural strength of a denture base resin. A conventional heat-polymerized (Clássico, a microwave-polymerized (Onda-Cryl and a autopolymerizing acrylic (Jet resins were used. Five groups were established, according to polymerization cycles: A, B and C (Onda-Cryl, short cycle - 500W/3 min, long - 90W/13 min + 500W/90 sec, and manufacturing microwave cycle - 320W/3 min + 0W/3 min + 720W/3 min; T (Clássico, water bath cycle - 74ºC/9h and Q (Jet, press chamber cycle - 50ºC/15 min at 2 bar. Ten specimens (65 x 10 x 3.3mm were prepared for each cycle. The flexural strength of the five groups was measured using a three-point bending test at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min. Flexural strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey's test was performed to identify the groups that were significantly different at 5% level. The microwave-polymerized groups showed the highest means (p<0.05 for flexural strength (MPa (A = 106.97 ± 5.31; B = 107.57 ± 3.99; C = 109.63 ± 5.19, and there were no significant differences among them. The heat-polymerized group (T showed the lowest flexural strength means (84.40 ± 1.68, and differ significantly from all groups. The specimens of a microwavable denture base resin could be polymerized by different microwave cycles without risk of decreasing the flexural strength.

  12. Alternative methods for determining shrinkage in restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Monteiro, Gabriela Queiroz; Montes, Marcos Antonio Japiassú Resende; Rolim, Tiago Vieira; de Oliveira Mota, Cláudia Cristina Brainer; de Barros Correia Kyotoku, Bernardo; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage of resin composites using a coordinate measuring machine, optical coherence tomography and a more widely known method, such as Archimedes Principle. Two null hypothesis were tested: (1) there are no differences between the materials tested; (2) there are no differences between the methods used for polymerization shrinkage measurements. Polymerization shrinkage of seven resin-based dental composites (Filtek Z250™, Filtek Z350™, Filtek P90™/3M ESPE, Esthet-X™, TPH Spectrum™/Dentsply 4 Seasons™, Tetric Ceram™/Ivoclar-Vivadent) was measured. For coordinate measuring machine measurements, composites were applied to a cylindrical Teflon mold (7 mm × 2 mm), polymerized and removed from the mold. The difference between the volume of the mold and the volume of the specimen was calculated as a percentage. Optical coherence tomography was also used for linear shrinkage evaluations. The thickness of the specimens was measured before and after photoactivation. Polymerization shrinkage was also measured using Archimedes Principle of buoyancy (n=5). Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Games-Howell test. The results show that polymerization shrinkage values vary with the method used. Despite numerical differences the ranking of the resins was very similar with Filtek P90 presenting the lowest shrinkage values. Because of the variations in the results, reported values could only be used to compare materials within the same method. However, it is possible rank composites for polymerization shrinkage and to relate these data from different test methods. Independently of the method used, reduced polymerization shrinkage was found for silorane resin-based composite. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of dry and wet environment on the resin composite polymerization shrinkage%干燥、湿润环境对光固化复合树脂聚合收缩影响的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹立群; 赵守亮; 杨国标; 倪凡

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of dry and wet environment on the polymerization shrinkage of three dental resin composites . MEHTODS: 18 freshly extracted human mandibular third molars were collected, MO cavities with the width of 1/3 of buccolingual cusp distance and depth of 2 mm were prepared on the molars. Cavities were treated with G-BOND bonding system except for P90 with its own bonding system, then three commercially available dental resin composites GRADIA DIRECT-P, Z350 and P90 were used to fill the cavities respectively( n =6). The teeth were then divided into wet and dry groups randomly (n = 3). The shrinkages of the composites and the deformation of the teeth were measured by electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) immediately after light cure for 40 s under the 650mW/cm2. RESULTS: Among the three dental resin composites, GRADIA DIRECT-P showed the largest polymerization shrinkage and tooth deformation, while P90 showed the minimum. The polymerization shrinkage in the moist environment was less than that under dry condition. CONCLUSION: The environment has a certain impact on the polymerization shrinkage of the dental resin composite. In wet environment, the polymerization shrinkage is less.%目的:测试干燥、湿润环境对3种光固化复合树脂聚合收缩的影响.方法:取18个新鲜拔除的下颌第三磨牙,制备近中邻(牙合)(MO)洞,洞宽为颊舌牙尖距的1/3,洞深为2 mm,然后分别用GRADIA DIRECT-P、Z350和P90树脂充填窝洞(P90用其自带粘结剂,其余均用G-BOND粘结剂处理洞壁)(n=6),并随机分成干燥组和湿润组(n=3).在650 mW/cm2光源下,光照固化40 s后采用电子散斑干涉技术测量树脂修复体的(牙合)面、近中邻面收缩和牙齿颊面的变形情况.结果:3种树脂中GRADIA DIRECT-P的收缩量和牙齿变形量最大,P90的收缩量和牙齿变形量最小;湿润环境可降低树脂修复体聚合收缩量和牙齿的变形量.结论:环境对光固化树脂的聚合

  14. Investigation of the bio-resistance of insulating protective coatings modified by polymeric petroleum resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nykulyshyn, Irena; Pikh, Zorian; Gnatush, Svitlana; Gnativ, Zoriana; Chajkivska, Ruslana

    2016-01-01

    Basic patterns of modification of bitumen composites by polymeric petroleum resins (PPR) are processed. Creation of new highly effective metal protecting compositions and study of their action patterns is an important scientific problem. It is found that introduction of PPR to the insulating petroleum bitumen improves the anticorrosive properties of protective coatings for underground pipelines. The adhesive strength of petroleum bitumen coatings is investigated. The mechanism of influence of...

  15. Visualization study on distortion of a metal frame by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakino, Ken; Endo, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masanori; Furuta, Kunihiko; Ohno, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Three types of metal specimens (ring-shaped, plate-shaped, and a simulated anterior arch) for distortion observations were made from Au-Ag-Pd-Cu alloy. Distortion due to polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing acrylic resin containing 4-META (4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride, 4-META resin) could be visualized for the ring-shaped specimen, which showed increasing distortion of the metal frame upon adhesion of the resin to the outer metal surface. Distortion of the plateshaped specimen adhering to 4-META resin decreased with increasing thickness of the cured resin. The distortion of the metal frame simulating an anterior arch of a six-unit bridge with a facing composite resin showed that the curvature of the metal frame was larger after curing of the facing composite resin. However, it recovered most of its original curvature with an associated increase in the number of cracks between the crowns after trimming the resin to a tooth profile.

  16. Dental composite polymerization: a three different sources comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzi, Michele; Fornaini, Carlo; Lagori, Giuseppe; Merigo, Elisabetta; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Vescovi, Paolo; Selleri, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of photo-activators, with absorption spectra in the violet region, in composite resins raised interest in the use of 405 nm diode lasers for polymerization. The purpose of this research is the evaluation of the resins polymerization by means of violet diode laser compared to traditional lamps. Two different resins have been used for the experiments: Filtek Supreme XT flow (3M ESPE, USA) and Tetric Evo flow (Ivoclar, Vivadent). The photo-activator used is Camphoroquinone, alone, or in combination with Lucirin TPO. The resins have been cured with an halogen lamp (Heliolux DXL, Vivadent Ivoclar, Austria), a broadband LED curing light (Valo Ultradent, USA) and a 405 nm laser (Euphoton, Italy). The measure of cure depth, of the volumetric shrinkage, and the conversion degree (DC%) of the double bond during the curing process have been evaluated. A composite layer of 3 mm was cured in Filtek Supreme resin (Camphoroquinone activator), lower if compared to the use of the other two light sources. Tests on Tetric Evo (Camphoroquinone + Lucirin) didn't show any improvement of the use of laser compared to the halogen lamp and the broadband LED. By measuring the volumetric shrinkage the laser induced the lower change with both the composites. In terms of DC% the lower performance was obtained with the laser. Considering that the polymerization process strongly depends on the kind of composite used the effectiveness of 405 nm laser proved to be lower than halogen lamps and broadband LEDs.

  17. Photothermal determination of thermal diffusivity and polymerization depth profiles of polymerized dental resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Mandelis, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    The degree and depth of curing due to photopolymerization in a commercial dental resin have been studied using photothermal radiometry. The sample consisted of a thick layer of resin on which a thin metallic gold layer was deposited, thus guaranteeing full opacity. Purely thermal-wave inverse problem techniques without the interference of optical profiles were used. Thermal depth profiles were obtained by heating the gold coating with a modulated laser beam and by performing a frequency scan. Prior to each frequency scan, photopolymerization was induced using a high power blue light emitted diode (LED). Due to the highly light dispersive nature of dental resins, the polymerization process depends strongly on optical absorption of the blue light, thereby inducing a depth dependent thermal diffusivity profile in the sample. A robust depth profilometric method for reconstructing the thermal diffusivity depth dependence on degree and depth of polymerization has been developed. The thermal diffusivity depth profile was linked to the polymerization kinetics.

  18. Dimensional accuracy of acrylic resin maxillary denture base polymerized by a new injection pressing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takahiro; Kita, Seiichi; Nokubi, Takashi

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the dimensional accuracy of a newly developed injection pressing method for resin polymerization by making use of the internal electric resistance of resin to determine the optimal timing for resin injection. A new injection pressing polymerization pot with a built-in system to measure the internal electric resistance of resin was used for resin polymerization. Fluid-type resin was injected into the mold of a maxillary complete denture base under nine different conditions: three different timings for resin injection according to the electric resistance of resin dough (early stage: 11 Mohms; intermediate stage: 16 Mohms; final stage: 21 Mohms) and three different motor powers for resin injection (2000 N, 4000 N, and 6000 N). In the best polymerization condition (injected during the early stage of resin dough under a motor power of 6000 N), the adaptation of the denture base showed a statistically significant improvement compared with the conventional pouring method.

  19. Polymerization and curing kinetics of furan resins under conventional and microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Vergara, Unai, E-mail: bergara@gaiker.es [Plastics and Composites Department, Gaiker IK4 Research Centre, Parque Tecnológico, Ed. 202, 48170 Zamudio Spain (Spain); Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Manufacturing Department, Mondragón Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, 20500 Mondragón Spain (Spain); Sarrionandia, Mariasun [Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Manufacturing Department, Mondragón Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, 20500 Mondragón Spain (Spain); Gondra, Koldo [Plastics and Composites Department, Gaiker IK4 Research Centre, Parque Tecnológico, Ed. 202, 48170 Zamudio Spain (Spain); Aurrekoetxea, Jon [Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Manufacturing Department, Mondragón Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, 20500 Mondragón Spain (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The furan resin structure was investigated using IR and RMN techniques. • The polymerization of furan resins was developed based on multistage kinetics. • Vyazovkin numerical analysis was found the most accurate kinetic method. • Microwave curing of furan resins was much faster than thermal curing. - Abstract: The challenge of this work is the microwave curing study of low free-furfuryl alcohol content furan resins. The chemical characterization of the furan resins has been made by infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The chemical composition of the resin and its reactions with p-toluensulfonic acid are proposed, with the aim of understanding the mechanism responsible for the main reactions. The results show the presence of methyl and ether bridges between the furan rings, and the formation of ketone and conjugated structures. Furthermore, the curing kinetics of the furan resins has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. Different methods have been applied in order to obtain and compare the activation energy of the process. Vyazovkin numerical analysis was found the most accurate method. Finally, microwave and conventional curing processes has been compared. The analysis showed that microwave curing of furan resins was twice faster than thermal curing.

  20. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  1. Bacterial Viability and Physical Properties of Antibacterially Modified Experimental Dental Resin Composites: e79119

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stefan Rüttermann; Taina Trellenkamp; Nora Bergmann; Thomas Beikler; Helmut Ritter; Ralf Janda

    2013-01-01

    ... to experimental dental resin composites. Materials and Methods A delivery system based on novel polymeric hollow beads, loaded with Irgasan and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan as active agents were used to manufacture three commonly...

  2. Polymerization Shrinkage and Flexural Modulus of Flowable Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Cavalcanti Xavier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS, flexural strength (FS and modulus of elasticity (ME of low-viscosity resin composites (Admira Flow™, Grandio Flow™/VOCO; Filtek Z350 Flow™/3M ESPE; Tetric Flow™/Ivoclar-Vivadent was evaluated using a well-established conventional micro-hybrid composite as a standard (Filtek Z250™/3M ESPE. For the measurement of LPS, composites were applied to a cylindrical metallic mould and polymerized (n = 8. The gap formed at the resin/mould interface was observed using SEM (1500×. For FS and ME, specimens were prepared according to the ISO 4049 specifications (n = 10. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. The conventional resin presented significantly lower LPS associated with high FS and ME, but only the ME values of the conventional resin differed significantly from the low-viscosity composites. The relationship between ME and LPS of low-viscosity resin composites when used as restorative material is a critical factor in contraction stress relief and marginal leakage.

  3. Branched polymeric media: Perchlorate-selective resins from hyperbranched polyethyleneimine

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Dennis P.

    2012-10-02

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is a persistent contaminant found in drinking groundwater sources in the United States. Ion exchange (IX) with selective and disposable resins based on cross-linked styrene divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads is currently the most commonly utilized process for removing low concentrations of ClO4 - (10-100 ppb) from contaminated drinking water sources. However, due to the low exchange capacity of perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins (∼0.5-0.8 eq/L), the overall cost becomes prohibitive when treating groundwater with higher concentration of ClO4 - (e.g., 100-1000 ppb). In this article, we describe a new perchlorate-selective resin with high exchange capacity. This new resin was prepared by alkylation of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension polymerization process. Batch and column studies show that our new PEI resin with mixed hexyl/ethyl quaternary ammonium chloride exchange sites can selectively extract trace amounts of ClO4 - from a makeup groundwater (to below detection limit) in the presence of competing ions. In addition, this resin has a strong-base exchange capacity of 1.4 eq/L, which is 1.75-2.33 times larger than those of commercial perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins. The overall results of our studies suggest that branched PEI beads provide versatile and promising building blocks for the preparation of perchlorate-selective resins with high exchange capacity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Effect of configuration factor on gap formation in hybrid composite resin, low-shrinkage composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Parvin M; Mousavinasab, Sayyed M; Hasanli, Elham

    2015-05-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the important factors in creation of gap between dental structure and composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of configuration factor (C-factor) on gap formation in a hybrid composite resin, a low shrinkage composite resin and a resin modified glass ionomer restorative material. Cylindrical dentin cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mm) were prepared on the occlusal surface of 99 human molars and the cavities assigned into three groups (each of 33). Each group contained three subgroups depend on the different depths and then cavities restored using resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC Improved) and two type composite resins (Filtek P90 and Filtek Z250). Then the restorations were cut into two sections in a mesiodistal direction in the middle of restorations. Gaps were measured on mesial, distal and pulpal floor of the cavities, using a stereomicroscope. Data analyses using Kruskal-Wallist and Mann-Whitney tests. Increasing C-factor from 1.8 to 3.4 had no effect on the gap formation in two type composite resins, but Fuji II LC Improved showed significant effect of increasing C-factor on gap formation. Taken together, when C-factor increased from 1.8 up to 3.4 had no significant effect on gap formation in two tested resin composites. Although, Filtek P90 restorations showed smaller gap formation in cavities walls compared to Filtek Z250 restorations. High C-factor values generated the largest gap formation. Silorane-based composite was more efficient for cavity sealing than methacrylate-based composites and resin modified glass ionomer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Resin composites in minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive dentistry will provide favorable conditions for the use of composite resin. However, a number of factors must be considered when placing composite resins in conservatively prepared cavities, including: aspects on the adaptation of the composite resin to the cavity walls; the use of adhesives; and techniques for obtaining adequate proximal contacts. The clinician must also adopt an equally conservative approach when treating failed restorations. The quality of the composite resin restoration will not only be affected by the outline form of the preparation but also by the clinician's technique and understanding of the materials.

  6. Advanced resin systems for graphite epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Jayarajan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The value of resin/carbon fiber composites as lightweight structures for aircraft and other vehicle applications is dependent on many properties: environmental stability, strength, toughness, resistance to burning, smoke produced when burning, raw material costs, and complexity of processing. A number of woven carbon fiber and epoxy resin composites were made. The epoxy resin was commercially available tetraglycidylmethylene dianiline. In addition, composites were made using epoxy resin modified with amine and carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer. Strength and toughness in flexure as well as oxygen index flammability and NBS smoke chamber tests of the composites are reported.

  7. Industrial application of Raman spectroscopy for control and optimization of vinyl acetate resin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauendorfer, Eric; Hergeth, Wolf-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring and control of resin polymerizations is essential for high process safety, high product quality, and competitive production costs. Vinyl acetate resins created by bulk and solution polymerization usually have a high molecular weight and viscosity, making sample extraction for analysis a cumbersome process. In-process analytical methods, like Raman spectroscopy, enable not only the measurement of monomer and polymer composition during the reaction without complex mathematical calibrations but also the determination of final product properties. The latter is also possible in conjunction with other process data like temperatures and feed rates and with a multivariate approach. An overview of challenges, necessary considerations, and results is given. Graphical abstract Prediction of product quality parameter viscosity using online-Raman spectroscopy data vs. reference data (Hoeppler viscosity measured in the lab after sample extraction) using partial least squares modelling.

  8. Depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedalino, Inaam; Hartup, Grant R; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, manufacturers have introduced flowable composite resins that reportedly can be placed in increments of 4 mm or greater. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins (SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Venus Bulk Fill) and a conventional flowable composite resin (Revolution Formula 2). Depth of cure was measured in terms of bottom-maximum Knoop hardness number (KHN) ratios and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4049 scrape technique. Shades A2 and A3 of SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Revolution Formula 2 were tested. Venus Bulk Fill was tested in its only available shade (universal). Specimens in thicknesses of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm were polymerized for 20 or 40 seconds, and a hardness tester was used to determine the hardness ratios for each shade at each thickness. For the scraping technique, after specimens were exposed to the curing light, unpolymerized composite resin was removed with a plastic instrument, the polymerized composite was measured, and the length was divided by 2 per ISO guidelines. According to the KHN ratios and the scrape test, Venus Bulk Fill predictably exceeded the manufacturer's claim of a 4-mm depth of cure at both 20 and 40 seconds of curing time. The overall results for depth of cure showed that Venus Bulk Fill ≥ SureFil SDR Flow ≥ Grandio Flow ≥ Revolution Formula 2.

  9. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel); Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry (Israel); Domb, Abraham J., E-mail: avid@ekmd.huji.ac.i [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel)

    2010-02-15

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  10. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I.; Domb, Abraham J.

    2010-02-01

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  11. The absorption of polymeric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  12. Surface hardness comparison of resins polymerized by argon, xenon, and conventional light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenau, Richard J.; Pace, Scott; Powell, G. L.; Wilwerding, Terry

    1996-04-01

    A great deal of discussion has taken place regarding how to properly polymerize light activated resins. Claims are made that effective testing can be made by using surface hardness tests on samples with various dental instruments. Although these tests would probably identify a material that had been very poorly polymerized it would not identify materials that were properly polymerized. The lack of consistent, reproducible forces and evaluation of the results make these test practically worthless. Surface hardness which is important clinically has value when combined with evaluation of the surface immediately adjacent to the light source and the surface adjacent to the tooth. Also immediate and 24 hour testing to allow for continued polymerization is helpful in determining how to achieve best results for our patients. A variety of new light sources have been introduced to dentistry with claims of faster and better polymerizations. The visible light units are also undergoing improvements to include built in meters to monitor light output. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the top and bottom surface hardness of a composite resin using the following light sources: argon, xenon, and two visible light sources.

  13. Diametral tensile strength of composite resins submitted to different activation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselli, Denise Sá Maia; Worschech, Claudia Cia; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Dos Santos

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of composite resins submitted to different curing techniques. Four composite resins were tested in this study: Targis (Ivoclar), Solidex (Shofu), Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer) and Filtek Z250 (3M Espe). Sixty-four cylindrical specimens were prepared and divided into eight groups according to each polymerization technique (n = 8). The indirect composite resins (Targis and Solidex) were polymerized with their respective curing systems (Targis Power and EDG-lux); Charisma and Filtek Z250 were light-cured with conventional polymerization (halogen light) and additionally, with post-curing systems. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for one week. DTS tests were performed in a Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan tests. The results were (MPa): Z250/EDG-lux: 69.04 feminine; Z250/Targis Power: 68.57 feminine; Z250/conventional polymerization: 60.75b; Charisma/Targis Power: 52.34c; Charisma/conventional polymerization: 49.17c; Charisma/EDG-lux: 47.98c; Solidex: 36.62d; Targis: 32.86d. The results reveal that the post-cured Z250 composite resin showed the highest DTS means. Charisma composite presented no significant differences when activation techniques were compared. Direct composite resins presented higher DTS values than indirect resins.

  14. Three-year clinical evaluation of a silorane composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Ricardo; Boushell, Lee W; Heymann, Harald O; Ritter, Andre V; Sturdevant, John R; Wilder, Aldridge D; Chung, Yunro; Swift, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Composite resins are still outperformed by amalgams in the clinical practice with secondary caries and fractures being their most common failures. A material that suffers less polymerization shrinkage might improve the clinical performance of composite resins. To evaluate the clinical performance of a low-shrink silorane-based composite resin (Filtek LS Low Shrink Posterior Restorative, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) in comparison with a methacrylate-based composite resin (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Principality of Liechtenstein) over time. Candidates in need of Class II composite resin restorations participated in this randomized controlled clinical trial. Those were 25 female and six male subjects with average age of 44.3 ± 12.7 years. Participants received 82 restorations, being 54 in premolars and 28 in molars. Procedures, which included the restoration of primary caries lesions or replacement of failing restorations, were done using modified preparations with no bevels or additional retention. Restorations were placed using Filtek LS (and dedicated self-etch adhesive) or Tetric EvoCeram (with AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent), following manufacturers' instructions. Incremental placement technique was applied and the restorations were immediately finished. Follow-up evaluations occurred at six, 12, 24, and 36 months and were done using the Fédération Dentaire Internationale criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using generalized estimating equations. The recall rate at 36 months was 89%. All interaction terms were not significant. Filtek LS performs as well as Tetric EvoCeram performs in the clinical setting at 36 months. The silorane-based composite resin Filtek LS and the conventional methacrylate-based composite resin Tetric EvoCeram performed similarly well in posterior restorations over at least 36 months of clinical service. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Microdureza de resina composta: efeito de aparelhos e tempos de polimerização em diferentes profundidades Microhardness of composite resins: effect of photocuring units and polymerization periods in different depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Aily SANTOS

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available As propriedades das resinas compostas têm sido estudadas com freqüência, bem como os fatores que podem influenciar seu grau de polimerização. Diante da evolução desses materiais e da necessidade de buscarmos melhora do seu comportamento na cavidade bucal, objetivamos, por meio deste estudo avaliar a eficácia de dois aparelhos fotopolimerizadores do tipo pistola (de alta intensidade de luz, comparando com a de um aparelho a cabo (de baixa intensidade de luz, com tempos de exposição de 20 e de 40 segundos e em profundidades de 1 a 4 milímetros. Os testes avaliaram o grau de polimerização da resina por meio de testes de microdureza Knoop. Os resultados mostraram haver diferença estatisticamente significante entre os tempos, sendo que com 40 segundos a dureza foi maior que com 20 segundos para as 4 diferentes profundidades. Para o fator aparelhos, os dois aparelhos tipo pistola se comportaram superiores ao do tipo cabo Fibralux (Dabi Atlante, e entre eles, o XL 1500 (3M promoveu dureza maior que o Optilight II (Gnatus no tempo de polimerização de 40 segundos. As profundidades de 1, 2, 3 e 4 milímetros mostraram estatisticamente diferença entre si tendo sido encontrada maior dureza para as menores profundidades (p The properties of composite resins have been frequently studied, as well as the factors that might influence the polymerization degree. Considering the evolution of composites and the need to improve their clinical performance, this study intends to evaluate the efficacy of two high-intensity and one low-intensity photocuring units, as a function of exposure time (20 and 40seconds and composite depth (from 1 to 4 millimeters. Composite properties were evaluated via Knoop Microhardness Test. Statistical analysis (1 way ANOVA, p < 0.05 of the obtained results showed that there was statistically significant difference regarding the time factor. The 40-seconds polymerization time showed the best results, for the four depths

  16. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  17. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  18. Posterior adhesive composite resin: a historic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusayama, T

    1990-11-01

    Since development of the BIS-GMA composite resin, there have been many innovations to improve the physical properties for posterior use. Subsequent development of a caries detector and chemically adhesive composite resin has further revolutionally raised the value of composite resin restoration, replacing the traditional restorative system of mechanical approach by the new system of biological approach. In this system only the infected irreversibly deteriorated insensitive tissue, stainable with the caries detector, is removed painlessly. The cavity is immediately filled with the composite resin with no further tissue reduction for retention or resistance form or extension for prevention. Both enamel and dentin walls are etched by a single etchant without lining. The chemical adhesion to the cavity margin and wall minimizes the marginal failure in size and prevalence and prevents secondary caries penetration along the wall. The chemically adhesive composite resin is thus a useful restorative material much kinder to teeth than amalgam.

  19. Additional chemical polymerization of dual resin cements: reality or a goal to be achieved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Sakaguti UMETSUBO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This study serves as a warning to dentists and researchers that dual-cured resin cements may not polymerize completely under some prosthetic crowns. Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the polymerization degree of dual-cured resin cements under prosthetic barrier, by microhardness test. Material and method Three cements (Bistite II, RelyX ARC and Variolink II were light-cured through different barriers, placed between the cement and the light source: G1: without barrier; G2: composite resin (Cesead; G3: Inceram alumina; G4: IPS Empress; G5: Inceram zirconia; G6: tooth fragment. Photopolymerization was carried out using a halogen light unit (650 mW/cm2; microhardness was evaluated using the Microhardness Tester FM 700, under a load of 50gf with a dwell time of 15s, at two evaluation times (30min and 24h. Result The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (5%. Both Inceram alumina and Inceram zirconia ceramic barriers hindered polymerization. Bistite, followed by RelyX and Variolink, exhibited the highest microhardness values (p<0.05. As the highest values were obtained without a barrier, it was determined that the barrier, followed by the tooth, influenced microhardness. Both Empress and Cesead had the smallest microhardness values but with no statistically significant difference between them. Conclusion The barrier negatively affected the microhardness of dual-cured resin cements; evaluation time did not affect microhardness values for most of the conditions tested. There is a limited effect of the chemical activator on the polymerization of some dual-cured cements, and their performance is product specific.

  20. Hardness of a bleaching-shade resin composite polymerized with different light-curing sources Microdureza de uma resina composta para dentes clareados polimerizada com diferentes fontes de luz fotoativadora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Mongruel Gomes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The microhardness of a bleaching-shade resin composite polymerized with different light-curing units was evaluated. Composite samples (3M ESPE Filtek Supreme were applied to brass rings (2 mm in thickness, 5 mm in diameter. Three commercial LED lights were used to polymerize the specimens and the results were compared to those of a conventional halogen light. The light sources used in the present study were: Demetron Optilux 401 (QTH, 3M ESPE Elipar FreeLight (LED 1; Kerr L.E.Demetron I (LED 2, and ColtoluxLED lights (LED 3. The microhardness of the top and bottom surfaces was assessed with a digital Vickers hardness-measuring instrument, under load. At the bottom surface, no significant difference among the light sources was observed (two-way ANOVA. At the top surface, the QTH light source presented significantly higher hardness values compared to the values observed when LED 1 and LED 3 were used. There were no significant differences between the QTH and LED 2 light sources. Significantly higher hardness values were also found at the top surface when compared to the values observed at the bottom surface. The power density of the polymerization light sources seemed to be responsible for the observed resin composite hardness, not their irradiance.Avaliou-se a microdureza de uma resina composta para dentes clareados fotoativada com diferentes fontes de luz fotoativadora. Espécimes de resina composta (3M ESPE Filtek Supreme foram aplicados a cilindros de latão (2 mm de espessura, 5 mm de diâmetro. Três fontes comerciais de luz LED foram utilizadas para polimerizar os espécimes e os resultados foram comparados aos obtidos utilizando-se uma fonte de luz halógena convencional. As fontes de luz utilizadas no presente estudo foram: Demetron Optilux 401 (QTH, 3M ESPE Elipar FreeLight (LED 1; Kerr L.E.Demetron I (LED 2, e ColtoluxLED lights (LED 3. A microdureza das superfícies topo e base foram avaliadas com um microdurômetro digital (Dureza

  1. Luminous Efficient Compositions Based on Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Palaiah

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium/sodium nitrate illuminating compositions with epoxy resin - E 605 have beenstudied for luminosity and luminous efficiency by varying fuel oxidizer ratio and binder content.The compositions have been evaluated for impact and friction sensitivities, burn rate, thermalcharacteristics, and mechanical properties. Flame temperature and combustion products areevaluated theoretically by using REAL program. Experimental results show that, luminosity,burn rate, and calorimetric value are higher for polyester resin-based compositions. The highluminous efficiency composition is achieved with magnesium/sodium nitrate ratio of 70/30 with4 per cent epoxy resin.

  2. Effect of light emission on polymerization of luting resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Indirect esthetic restorations have recently gained popularity, and choosing suitable cement is"nan important concern in this regard. A wide variety of resin cements with different curing models:"n(chemical, light, dual, have been introduced to the profession, and among them the dual systems are"nclaimed to be able to continue polymerization after stopping the light. In order to study and compare the"npolymerization process of different curing systems, this research was performed."nThe present study measured the degree of conversion (DC of three types of resin cements: a self cured,"na light cured and a dual cured cement. The samples were prepared as follows:"n1-The self cured samples were made according to the manufacturer."n2-The light cured samples were exposed to the curing light for 60 seconds, through a 2 mm thick wafer"nof porcelain."n3- The dual cured samples were divided into 2 groups. The first was lighted similar to the light cured"nsamples, and the second did not receive any light."nThe degree of polymerization was measured by FTIR at time levels of 5, 10,20,30,45,60 minutes and 24"nhours post mixing. The infrared spectrum of the samples were recorded and degree of conversion were"ndetermined. The results demonstrated an increase in mean DC of all groups at post mixing time, but this"nwas significant only in the lighted dual cured cement (PO.05. The light cure resin showed high DC at"nthe base line time (5min. At the end of 60 minutes, the self cure resin had the most DC. The unlighted"ndual cement had a very low DC and didn't improve in polymerization during the post mixing controls."nThe lighted dual cement had a significant improve in curing at post mixing times, and it was"nsignificantly different from unlighted dual cement. So the dual cure cement needs to receive sufficient"nlight energy to initiate the curing process and the chemical component of this cement could not improve"nthe DC completely."nAfter 24 hours migration

  3. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  4. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the restorations were removed out leaving only middle part. One side of the cavity was finished with course diamond bur and the other was air-abraded with 50 μm Al2O3. They were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10) to receive: Group 1: Adper Single Bond 2; Group 2: All Bond 3; Group 3: ClearfilSE; Group 4: BeautiBond, before being repaired with the same resin composite (Filtek Z250). The specimens were re-thermocycled (1000×), sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned mesiodistally and photographed digitally. The extent of dye penetration was measured by image analysis software (ImageJ) for both bur-finished and air-abraded surfaces at resin-tooth and resin-resin interfaces. The data were analyzed statistically. BeautiBond exhibited the most microleakage at every site. Irrespective of adhesive and initial composite type, air-abrasion showed less microleakage except for BeautiBond. The type of initial repaired restorative material did not affect the microleakage. BeautiBond adhesive may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. Surface treatment with air-abrasion produced the lowest microleakage scores, independent of the adhesive systems and the pre-existing resin composite type. Pre-existing composite type does not affect the microleakage issue. All-in-one adhesive resin (BeautiBond) may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention.

  5. Novel Alkyd-Type Coating Resins Produced Using Cationic Polymerization [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, Bret; Kalita, Harjyoti; Alam, Samim; Jayasooriyamu, Anurad; Fernando, Shashi; Samanata, Satyabrata; Bahr, James; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Sibi, Mukund; Vold, Jessica; Ulven, Chad

    2014-04-07

    Novel, partially bio-based poly(vinyl ether) copolymers derived from soybean oil and cyclohexyl vinyl ether (CHVE) were produced by cationic polymerization and investigated for application as alkyd-type surface coatings. Compared to conventional alkyd resins, which are produced by high temperature melt condensation polymerization, the poly(vinyl ether)s provide several advantages. These advantages include miler, more energy efficient polymer synthesis, elimination of issues associated with gelation during polymer synthesis, production of polymers with well-defined composition and relatively narrow molecular weight distribution, and elimination of film formation and physical property issues associated with entrained monomers, dimers, trimmers, etc. The results of the studied showed that the thermal, mechanical, and physical properties of the coatings produced from these novel polymers varied considerable as a function of polymer composition and cure temperature. Overall, the results suggest a good potential for these novel copolymers to be used for coatings cured by autoxidation.

  6. Clinical applications of preheated hybrid resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, L J; Padipatvuthikul, P; Chee, B

    2011-07-22

    This clinical article describes and discusses the use of preheated nanohybrid resin composite for the placement of direct restorations and luting of porcelain laminate veneers. Two clinical cases are presented. Preheating hybrid composite decreases its viscosity and film thickness offering the clinician improved handling. Preheating also facilitates the use of nanohybrid composite as a veneer luting material with relatively low polymerisation shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion compared to currently available resin luting cements.

  7. Evaluation of bond strength between glass fiber and resin composite using different protocols for dental splinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral R Fabrício

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Many different polymeric materials to chair-side application on pre-impregnated glass fibers (PGF are available and different protocols are used in clinical procedure. Aims: This study evaluated protocols used for dental splinting on adhesion between PGF and resin. Settings and Design: 42 pair of nano composite resin blocks with (6 × 6 × 8 mm 3 were assigned into seven groups (n=6 and bonded according to the protocol: Gar adhesive, resin; Ggr glass fiber, resin; Ggar glass fiber, adhesive, resin; Gfgar flowable resin, glass fiber, adhesive, resin; Ggafr glass fiber, adhesive, flowable resin, resin; Ggfar glass fiber, flowable resin, adhesive, resin; Gfgr flowable resin, glass fiber, resin. Materials and Methods: Micro sticks obtained from each group were submitted to the micro tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically evaluated using ANOVA and Tukey`s test (5%. Results: The protocol had a significant effect on the bond strength results (P=0.00. Gar and Ggar resulted in the highest bond strength with no statistical difference. Conclusions: The use of adhesive agent showed to be efficient to promote initial adhesion between fiber and nano composite resin.

  8. Repair of dental resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Veronika; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-03-01

    The study analyzed the reparability and compatibility of light-curing resin-based composites (RBCs) of the categories "microhybrid," "nanohybrid," and "packable." Six RBCs with different matrix and filler formulation--purely methacrylate-based composites (MBCs), ormocer-based composites (OBCs), and silorane-based composites (SBCs)--were used for the specimens. Every material was combined with itself and with the other five RBCs, resulting in a total of 36 combination groups (n = 20). The specimens were polymerized, aged for 8 weeks in distilled water at 37 °C, and then repaired by means of a repair kit. Shear bond strength and fracture mode were measured after aging of the specimens, undergoing storage for 24 h in distilled water at 37 °C followed by thermocycling (5,000 cycles, 5-55 °C) and an additional 4-week storage in distilled water at 37 °C. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA with TUKEY HSD post hoc test (α = 0.05). On average, the OBC Admira reached the highest value as a substrate material (30.41 MPa), and the SBC Filtek Silorane reached the lowest value (8.14 MPa). Filtek Silorane was identified as the repair material with the highest bond strength value (28.70 MPa), while a packable composite reached the lowest bond strength value (15.55 MPa). The analysis of the break modes showed that adhesive breaks are typical when strength is at its lowest (6.27 MPa). A large number of cohesive fractures are conspicuous when identical materials are used for repair, except Filtek Silorane (2 % cohesive fractures). The study demonstrated that the effect of the different materials on bond strength varies strongly, depending on whether the material is used as filling or as repair material. It is generally advisable but not compulsory to combine identical RBCs.

  9. Polymerization shrinkage and stress development in amorphous calcium phosphate/urethane dimethacrylate polymeric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, J.M.; Regnault, W. F.; Skrtic, D.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how substituting a new high molecular mass oligomeric poly(ethylene glycol) extended urethane dimethacrylate (PEG-U) for 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in photo-activated urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) resins affects degree of vinyl conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (PS), stress development (PSSD) and biaxial flexure strength (BFS) of their amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) composites. The composites were prepared from four types of resins (UDMA, PEG-U, UDMA/HEMA and UDMA/PEG-U) and zirconia-hybridized ACP. Introducing PEG-U improved DC while not adversely affecting PS, PSSD and the BFS of composites. This improvement in DC is attributed to the long, more flexible structure between the vinyl groups of PEG-U and its higher molecular mass compared to poly(HEMA). The results imply that PEG-U has the potential to serve as an alternative to HEMA in dental and other biomedical applications. PMID:20169007

  10. New Resins for Dental Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugolin, A P P; Pfeifer, C S

    2017-09-01

    Restorative composites have evolved significantly since they were first introduced in the early 1960s, with most of the development concentrating on the filler technology. This has led to improved mechanical properties, notably wear resistance, and has expanded the use of composites to larger posterior restorations. On the organic matrix side, concerns over the polymerization stress and the potential damage to the bonded interface have dominated research in the past 20 y, with many "low-shrinkage" composites being launched commercially. The lack of clinical correlation between the use of these materials and improved restoration outcomes has shifted the focus more recently to improving materials' resistance to degradation in the oral environment, caused by aqueous solvents and salivary enzymes, as well as biofilm development. Antimicrobial and ester-free monomers have been developed in the recent past, and evidence is mounting for their potential benefit. This article reviews literature on the newest materials currently on the market and provides an outlook for the future developments needed to improve restoration longevity past the average 10 y.

  11. Fluid Effects in Polymers and Polymeric Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Weitsman, Y Jack

    2012-01-01

    Fluid Effects in Polymers and Polymeric Composites, written by the late Dr. Y. Jack Weitsman, addresses the wide range of parameters that affect the interaction of fluids with polymers and polymeric composites. The book aims at broadening the scope of available data, mostly limited up to this time to weight-gain recordings of fluid ingress into polymers and composites, to the practical circumstances of fluctuating exposure. Various forms of experimental data are given, in conjunction with theoretical models derived from basic scientific principles, and correlated with severity of exposure conditions and interpreted by means of rationally based theoretical models. The practical implications of the effects of fluids are discussed. The issue of fluid effects on polymers and polymeric composites is of concern to engineers and scientists active in aerospace and naval structures, as an increasing portion of these structures are made of polymeric composites and employ polymeric adhesives as a joining device. While...

  12. Indirect composite resin materials for posterior applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellard, E; Duke, E S

    1999-12-01

    Indirect composite resin restorations were introduced a number of years ago as possible alternatives to traditional metallic or ceramic-based indirect restorations. However, the earlier formulations did not provide evidence of improvement in mechanical and physical properties over chairside-placed direct composite resin materials. Because they required more tooth structure removal than direct restorations, their use became unpopular and was abandoned by most clinicians. Over the past few years, a new class of composite resin indirect materials has surfaced in the profession. Various technologies have been suggested as reinforcement mechanisms. Fibers, matrix modifications, and an assortment of innovations have been proposed for enhancing indirect composite resin restorations. Applications are from inlay restorations all the way to multi-unit fixed prostheses. This manuscript summarizes some of the progress made in this area. When available, data is presented to provide clinicians with guidelines and indications for the use of these materials.

  13. Composite resin in medicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Pamela S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Haubenreich, James E; Osborne, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. Use of this material has recently increased as a result of consumer demands for esthetic restorations, coupled with the public's concern with mercury-containing dental amalgam. Composite is now used in over 95% of all anterior teeth direct restorations and in 50% of all posterior teeth direct restorations. Carbon fiber reinforced composites have been developed for use as dental implants. In medicine, fiber-reinforced composites have been used in orthopedics as implants, osseous screws, and bearing surfaces. In addition, hydroxyapatite composite resin has become a promising alternative to acrylic cement in stabilizing fractures and cancellous screw fixation in elderly and osteoporotic patients. The use of composite resin in dentistry and medicine will be the focus of this review, with particular attention paid to its physical properties, chemical composition, clinical applications, and biocompatibility.

  14. Two-photon polymerization of an epoxy-acrylate resin material system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, R.J., E-mail: richard.winfield@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); O' Brien, S. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-04-01

    Improved material systems are of great interest in the development of two-photon polymerization techniques for the fabrication of three dimensional micro- and nano-structures. The properties of the photosensitive resin are important in the realisation of structures with submicron dimensions. In this study investigation of a custom organic resin, cross-linked by a two-photon induced process, using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, is described. A structural, optical and mechanical analysis of the optimised material is presented. The influence of both material system and laser processing parameters on achievable micro-structure and size is presented as are representative structures. Parameters include: laser power, photo-initiator concentration and material composition.

  15. Experimental study of bamboo using banana and linen fibre reinforced polymeric composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of natural fibres such as bamboo, jute, banana, coir, linen and the like in Fibre Reinforced Polymeric (FRP composites have become so vital due to their high effective stiffness and strength, availability, low cost, specific strength, better dimensional stability and mechanical properties, eco-friendly and biodegradable as compared with synthetic fibres. The interest in natural fibre reinforced polymeric composites is rapidly springing up in terms of research and industrial applications. The increased applications of these natural fibres in such composites are a proof to this claim. The paper deals with the detailed study of bamboo fibre, banana fibre and linen fibre cut into 2−4 mm of length with epoxy resin having random orientations. Various tests like Impact test (IZOD and CHARPY test, Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR test and Rockwell Hardness test were conducted on 10 specimens of bamboo epoxy resin composite, bamboo−banana epoxy resin composite and bamboo−linen epoxy resin composite. It is analysed and proved that bamboo−banana epoxy resin composite shows better results in Impact test with values of 4 Joules for Izod test and 5 Joules for Charpy test and in FTIR test, compatibility of fibres with polymers in bamboo−banana epoxy resin composite are the best while bamboo−linen epoxy resin composite shows better result in Rockwell hardness test with value of 40 RHN.

  16. Resin composites : Sandwich restorations and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s resin composite has been used for Class II restorations in stress-bearing areas as an alternative to amalgam. Reasons for this were the patients’ fear of mercury in dental amalgam and a growing demand for aesthetic restorations. During the last decades, the use of new resin composites with more optimized filler loading have resulted in reduced clinical wear. Improved and simplified amphiphilic bonding systems have been introduced. However, one of the main problems with res...

  17. Effects of different curing methods and microleakage and degree of conversion of composite resin restorations

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Recently, investigators have presented new methods to reduce polymerization shrinkage of composite resin restorations. It is claimed that more powerful light cure systems associated with a change in radiation patterns, lead to improved mechanical properties and reduced microleakage. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of two curing systems, known as Soft-Start, Pulse-Delay, on microleakage and degree of conversion of composite resin restorat...

  18. Composite depth of cure using four polymerization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericson Janolio de Camargo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The light-curing technique is relevant to reduce the degree of polymerization shrinkage, improving clinical and esthetic success of composite resin restorations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in vitro the effect of four light-curing techniques on depth of cure of a composite resin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten specimens of a composite resin were made in cylindrical cavities prepared in PVC plates (3.0 X 7.0 mm for each light-curing technique. Four photoactivation methods were investigated: stepped, ramped, pulse-delay and traditional. Specimens were longitudinally sectioned and polished for microhardness measurements (kg/mm², which were made at 0.1, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm from the irradiated surface. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS: The effect of factors studied (curing method and distance from the surface and the interaction of these factors was statistically significant (p<0.05. The traditional method of cure provided higher microhardness values (69.6 ± 2.5 than the stepped (63.5 ± 3.1 and pulsed (63.9 ± 3.2 methods at all depths evaluated, but it did not differ from the ramped method (66.7± 4.4 at 0.1 and 1.0 mm of depth. CONCLUSION: All techniques employed provided satisfactory cure of the composite resin up to the depth of 2.0 mm from the irradiated surface.

  19. Resin cement to indirect composite resin bonding: effect of various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Barutcugil, Cagatay; Harorli, Osman; Kapdan, Alper; Er, Kursat

    2015-01-01

    Debonding at the composite-adhesive interface is a major problem for indirect composite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength (BS) of an indirect composite resin after various surface treatments (air-abrasion with Al2O3, phosphoric acid-etchig and different applications of NdYAG laser irradiations). Fifty composite disks were subjected to secondary curing to complete polymerization and randomly divided into five experimental groups (n = 10) including Group 1, untreated (control); Group 2, phosphoric acid-etched; Group 3, air-abrasion with Al2 O3 ; Group 4, Nd:YAG laser irradiated with non-contact and Group 5, Nd:YAG laser irradiated with contact. They were then bonded to resin cement and shear BS was determined in a universal testing device at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the BS values. The highest BS value was observed in Group 4 and followed by Group 3. Tukey test showed that there was no statistical difference between Group1, 2 and 5. Furthermore, differences in BSs between Group 4 and the other groups except Group 3 were significant (p composite and resin cement. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. STUDY ON THE KINETICS OF POLYMERIZATION OF MMA BY COPPER(Ⅱ) CHELATING RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangHongzuo; JiangYuanzhang; 等

    1993-01-01

    The polymerization of MMA initiated by copper(Ⅱ) chelating resins/CCl4 system was studied.From the kinetic data,the kinetic equation of polymerization can be expressed as Rp=Ke-56400/RT[MMA]1.57[CCl4]m[RESIN-Cu]0.18 where m:3-4.5,when[CCl4] 0.1-6.93M.The free radical polymerization mechanism is proposed.The primary radicals are formed by the process of complexation-chlorine transformation among the copper(Ⅱ) chelating resin,CCl4 and methacrylate.

  1. Effects of light-curing modes on the polymerization shrinkage and surface hardness of composite resins%光照模式对复合树脂聚合收缩率和表面硬度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩冰; 董艳梅; 王晓燕; 高学军

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of light-curing modes on the polymerization shrinkage and surface hardness of resins and to explore the related clinical relevance. Methods: Resins with filler content of 76% ( mass fraction) were light-cured by high intensity, low intensity and soft start curing modes for 10 s and 20 s, respectively. Specimens for detecting volumetric shrinkage and surface hardness were prepared. Volumetric shrinkage was measured with Acuvol (n =7) and surface hardness were tested with an indenter (n=5). Results: The volumetric shrinkage of composites cured by high intensity, low intensity and soft-start curing mode was: 2.95% ±0. 08%/3.06% ±0.03% (10 s/20 s), 2.98% ± 0. 12%/3.05% ±0. 13% (10 s/20 s), and 3.03% ±0.05%/3. 11% ±0.07% (10 s/20 s), respectively. No significant difference existed among polymerization shrinkage of composites cured by the three light-curing modes (P>0. 05). The hardness of composites cured by high intensity, low intensity and soft-start curing mode was; (36.82 ±4.45) Mpa/(47.58 ±3.16) Mpa (10 s/20 s), (32.30 ±1.33) Mpa/(41.60±1.83) Mpa (10 s/20 s), and (34. 56 ± 1. 38) Mpa/(44. 62 ±2. 13) Mpa (10 s/20 s) , respectively. There existed significant difference among hardness of composites cured by the three light-curing modes ( P<0. 05 ). Polymerization shrinkage was correlated with energy density ( r = -0. 363, P = 0. 018). Surface hardness was also correlated with energy density (r = -0. 890, P < 0.001 ). Conclusion:It would be better to use high intensity curing mode to improve the physical properties of restorations. In order to keep the physical properties of composites, it is necessary to prolong the curing time using soft-start/low intensity curing modes to increase the energy density.%目的:研究光固化模式对复合树脂聚合收缩率和表面硬度的影响,探讨这些因素的影响对临床工作的指导意义.方法:研究使用填料含量为76%(质量分数)的

  2. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  3. Properties of silorane-based dental resins and composites containing a stress-reducing monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J David; Kotha, Shiva P; Chappelow, Cecil C; Kilway, Kathleen V; Giese, Gregory J; Glaros, Alan G; Pinzino, Charles S

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate properties of silorane-based resins and composites containing a stress reducing monomer. Resin mixtures and composites were formulated containing (a) a developmental stress reducing monomer [TOSU; Midwest Research Institute]; (b) Sil-Mix (3M-ESPE); (c) photo cationic initiator system. Standard BISGMA/TEGDMA resin (B/T) and composite (Filtek Z250) were used as controls. Polymerization volume change was measured using a NIST mercury dilatometer and polymerization stress using an Enduratec mechanical testing machine. Three point bend tests determined flexural elastic modulus, work of fracture, and ultimate strength (ADA 27; ISO 4049). Fracture toughness was measured using ASTM E399-90. Four groups of resins and composites were tested: Sil-Mix, methacrylate standard, and Sil-Mix with two addition levels of TOSU. An ANOVA was used and significant differences ranked using Student-Newman-Keuls test (alpha=0.05). Polymerization stress values for resins containing TOSU were significantly less than the other materials. Polymerization shrinkage values for Sil-Mix formulations were significantly less than for B/T, but were not different from each other. TOSU-containing formulations generally had somewhat lower mechanical properties values than Sil-Mix or B/T. Polymerization stress values for Sil-Mix-based composites were significantly less as compared to Z250. The 1wt.% TOSU composite had the lowest stress. No difference between composite groups was noted for fracture toughness or work of fracture. For ultimate strength, the 5wt.% TOSU formulation differed significantly from Z250. All Sil-Mix formulations had elastic modulus values significantly different from Z250. The ability of TOSU to reduce polymerization stress without a proportional reduction in mechanical properties provides a basis for improvement of silorane-based composites.

  4. In vitro evaluation of the bond strength of composite resin foundation materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; Baba, Nadim Z

    2015-10-01

    Achieving adequate bonding of composite resin foundation materials to dentin can be a challenge. Bonding can be affected by the type of bonding material and method used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the bond strengths of selected dual-polymerizing composite resin foundation materials to dentin using light, chemical, or dual-polymerized adhesive systems. Eighty freshly extracted human third molars were sectioned vertically into mesial and distal halves and embedded in acrylic resin using a copper cylinder. Specimens were divided into 16 groups. Each group received a resin foundation that was bonded to dentin according to each manufacturer's instructions. All tested foundations were dual polymerized except Tetric Ceram, which was light polymerized. BisCore, Build-it, CompCore, CoreRestore, and FluoroCore resin foundation materials were bonded to dentin with the use of the corresponding adhesives in 3 different bonding methods: adhesive was light polymerized; adhesive was chemically polymerized; and adhesive was dual polymerized. Each specimen was seated in a custom shear test device, and a load was applied with the descending rod of the jig from a mechanical testing machine with a perpendicular force to the dentin-adhesive interface. Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc pairwise comparison with Tukey test when statistically significant differences were found (α=.05). Resin foundation materials bonded to dentin with light-polymerized adhesives produced significantly higher bond strengths than when bonded with chemically or dual-polymerized adhesives. No significant difference was found between the single-component and multiple-components adhesives used with Tetric Ceram and BisCore foundations (P=.083). However, BisCore used with All-Bond 2 adhesive (multiple components) produced significantly lower bond strengths than when used with One-Step (P=.024). Adhesive failure was the most common failure location. Cohesive

  5. Degree of conversion and microhardness of dental composite resin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marovic, D.; Panduric, V.; Tarle, Z.; Ristic, M.; Sariri, K.; Demoli, N.; Klaric, E.; Jankovic, B.; Prskalo, K.

    2013-07-01

    Dental composite resins (CRs) are commonly used materials for the replacement of hard dental tissues. Degree of conversion (DC) of CR measures the amount of the un-polymerized monomers in CR, which can cause adverse biological reactions and weakening of the mechanical properties. In the past, studies have determined the positive correlation of DC values determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and microhardness (MH) values. The aim of this study was to establish whether MH can replace FTIR for the determination of DC of contemporary CR.

  6. Water sorption of heat-polymerized acrylic resins processed in mono and bimaxillary flasks

    OpenAIRE

    Meloto, Carolina B.; Silva-Concílio,Laís R.; Machado, Cristiane; Ribeiro,Margarete C.; Joia,Fábio A.; Rizzatti-Barbosa,Célia M.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated water sorption in heat-polymerized acrylic resins processed in monomaxillary flasks by water bath and in bimaxillary flasks by microwave energy and water bath. Fifty heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens were fabricated according to the 12th specification of the American Dental Association and assigned to 3 groups: group 1 was processed by water bath in monomaxillary metallic flask; group 2 was processed by microwave energy in bimaxillary PVC flask; and group 3 was pro...

  7. PREPARATION OF MICROGEL-EPOXY RESIN TWO-PHASE POLYMERS BY IN SITU POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yunzhao; WU Xianghong; SONG Aiteng

    1991-01-01

    Microgel-epoxy resin two-phase polymers were prepared by in situ copolymerization of ethylenic monomers with unsaturated polyesters. The choice of monomers and the effect of monomer concentration on microgel particle size were discussed. Agglomeration of particles played a significant role in the early stage of polymerization. The microgel dispersion in epoxy resin was stable after the finish of polymerization. Upon curing the particles remained well dispersed.

  8. [Modification of the composite resin with the hyperbranched polyester and evaluation of the mechanical properties of the modified composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y C; Sun, S; Xiao, Y H

    2016-04-09

    To study the effect of hyperbranched polyester(HBP)on mechanical properties of the conventional resin matrix. Two hyperbranched monomers(HBP2-X and HBP2-Y)were synthesized and incorporated at 40%(by mass)into a 2∶1(by mass)bisphenol-A diglycidyl methacrylate(Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate(TEGDMA)resin. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA without the incorporation of hyperbranched polyester was used as control(n=8 per group). The mechanical properties of the modified neat resin, including polymerization volumetric shrinkage, Vickers hardness, water absorption and dissolution rate, as well as the flexural strength, compressive strength and diametral tensile strength of the composite resin with different content of filler(0%, 30%, 50%, 70%)were measured. Mechanical properties of the composite resin were measured by universal testing machine. The results were analyzed by the ANOVA and LSD-t-test. The resin with HBP greatly decreased the polymerization shrinkage of the composite resin, and the value of group X was(6.32±0.49)%, and that of group Y was(6.31±0.68)%, whereas that of the control group was(8.14 ± 0.53)%. The value of volumetric shrinkage of the modified groups were significantly lower than that of the control group(Presin(Pcomposite materials, with 70% inorganic filler, there were no significant difference in the value of flexural strength among the groups(P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the value of compressive strength, between group X([244 ± 13]MPa)and the standard group([234 ± 17]MPa)(P>0.05). However, they were significantly higher than that in group Y([204 ± 24]MPa)(P0.05), but both were significantly lower than that in group X([41.1 ± 3.0]MPa)(Presin that was modified with the HBP, we should make further analysis and study based on the property of low volumetric shrinkage, to strive for the development of low volumetric shrinkage of HBP, without affecting its mechanical properties.

  9. Polymerization shrinkage and contraction stress of novel low shrinking dental composite resin%新型环氧树脂聚合体积收缩率及聚合收缩应力初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蕴聪; 孙翔; 熊洁; 陈吉华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a new dedicated adhesive system employing a silorane composite exhibits low shrinking properties than does conventional methacrylate-based composites.Methods The following materials were used:group A:Xeno Ⅲ-TPH,group B:Clearfil SE bond-Clearfil Majesty Posterior,and group C:the FiltekTM silorane system.Polymerization volumetric shrinkage and contraction stress development were measured using a micro-CT instrument and a tensilometer.Results The volumetric shrinkage of the resin composite/adhesive combinations were 3.38% ± 0.17% (group A),1.95% ± 0.37% (group B) and 1.05% ±0.09% (group C) 30 min after light curing respectively.Group C had the lowest volumetric shrinkage (P <0.001),followed by group B,and group A.The contraction stress of the materials were (3.04 ± 0.26) MPa(group A),(3.49 ± 0.46) MPa (group B),and (1.54 ± 0.15) MPa (group C) respectively.The lowest contraction stress was observed in group C at 30 min during the stress test (P < 0.001).Conclusions The silorane composite and dedicated adhesive system exhibited excellent characteristics of low volumetric shrinkage and contraction stress development compared to conventional methacrylate-based composites.%目的 评价新型环氧树脂的聚合体积收缩率和聚合收缩应力,为其临床应用提供参考.方法 选用3种复合树脂材料:A组:丙烯酸酯树脂(XenoⅢ-TPH);B组:丙烯酸酯树脂(Clearfil SE bond-Clearfil Majesty Posterior);C组:新型环氧树脂(FiltekTM silorane adhesive-P90).3组复合树脂经光照固化后,用显微CT测量聚合体积收缩率,用万能材料实验机测试聚合收缩应力.结果 A、B和C组复合树脂的聚合体积收缩率分别为(3.38±0.17)%、(1.95±0.37)%和(1.05%±0.09)%;C组最小,与A、B组的差异均有统计学意义(P <0.001).A、B和C组复合树脂的聚合收缩应力分别为(3.04 ±0.26)、(3.49±0.46)和(1.54±0.15) MPa;C组最小,与A、B组的

  10. Synthesis and application of a hydrophobic hypercrosslinked polymeric resin for removing VOCs from humid gas stream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Liu; Chao Long; Hong Ming Qian; Ying Lia; Ai Min Li; Quan Xing Zhanga

    2009-01-01

    A hydrophobic hypercrosslinked polymeric resin LC-1 was prepared and characterized.The properties of LC-1 resin were compared with those of a commercial hypercrosslinked polymer NDA-201 resin.In addition,the dynamic adsorption of trichloroethylene(TCE)onto LC.1 under dry and humid conditions at 303 K was investigated,the result shows that LC-1possesses high hydrophobic property and can remove TCE from gas stream without effect of high humidity efficiently.

  11. Synthesis of iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes for using as radiopacifiers in dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Lan, Jinle; Wang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Xuliang; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a strategy of using iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes as radiopacifiers for dental composite resin was evaluated. It was hypothesized that cyclophosphazenes bearing both iodine and acrylate group swere able to endow composite resins radiopacity without compromising mechanical properties. The cyclophosphazene compounds were synthesized by subsequently nucleophilic substitution of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene with hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 4-iodoaniline. Cyclotriphosphazenes containing two different molar ratios of HEMA to 4-iodoaniline (1:5 and 2:4) were obtained, and were identified with (1)H NMR, FT-IR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes were able to dissolve well in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin, and were added at two contents (10 or 15%wt. of the resin). The resins were photo-cured and post-thermal treated before characterizations. The resulting composite resins demonstrated the ability of blocking X-ray. And the addition of HEMA-co-iodoaniline substituted cyclotriphosphazenes caused minor adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resins because the cyclotriphosphazenes could mix well and react with the resins. The presence of rigid phosphazene rings between resin backbones displayed an effective function of decreasing polymerization shrinkage. In summary, soluble and reactive iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes demonstrated advantages over traditional heavy metals or metal oxides in being used as additives for producing radiopaque dental resins.

  12. Advances in the history of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguez, Nieves; Ellacuria, Joseba; Soler, José Ignacio; Triana, Rodrigo; Ibaseta, Guillermo

    2003-11-01

    The use of composite resins as direct restoration material in posterior teeth has demonstrated a great increase, due to esthetic requirements and the controversy regarding the mercury content in silver amalgams. In this article, we have reviewed the composition modifications which have occurred in materials based on resins since their introduction over a half a century ago which have enabled great improvements in their physical and mechanical properties. Likewise, we have highlighted current lines of research, centered on finding the ideal material for replacing silver amalgam as a direct filling material.

  13. Properties evaluation of silorane, low-shrinkage, non-flowable and flowable resin-based composites in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Rodrigo R.; Reis, Rodrigo S.; Moro, André F.V.; Perez, Cesar R.; Bárbara M. Pessôa; Dias, Katia R.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study tested the null hypothesis that different classes of direct restorative dental materials: silorane-based resin, low-shrinkage and conventional (non-flowable and flowable) resin-based composite (RBC) do not differ from each other with regard to polymerization shrinkage, depth of cure or microhardness. Methods. 140 RBC samples were fabricated and tested by one calibrated operator. Polymerization shrinkage was measured using a gas pycnometer both before and immediately after ...

  14. Effects of High-Temperature-Pressure Polymerized Resin-Infiltrated Ceramic Networks on Oral Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Tassin

    Full Text Available The development of CAD-CAM techniques called for new materials suited to this technique and offering a safe and sustainable clinical implementation. The infiltration of resin in a ceramic network under high pressure and high temperature defines a new class of hybrid materials, namely polymer infiltrated ceramics network (PICN, for this purpose which requires to be evaluated biologically. We used oral stem cells (gingival and pulpal as an in vitro experimental model.Four biomaterials were grinded, immersed in a culture medium and deposed on stem cells from dental pulp (DPSC and gingiva (GSC: Enamic (VITA®, Experimental Hybrid Material (EHM, EHM with initiator (EHMi and polymerized Z100™ composite material (3M®. After 7 days of incubation; viability, apoptosis, proliferation, cytoskeleton, inflammatory response and morphology were evaluated in vitro.Proliferation was insignificantly delayed by all the tested materials. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in presence of resin based composites (MTT assay, however no detectable apoptosis and some dead cells were detected like in PICN materials. Cell morphology, major cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix components were not altered. An intimate contact appeared between the materials and cells.The three new tested biomaterials did not exhibit adverse effects on oral stem cells in our experimental conditions and may be an interesting alternative to ceramics or composite based CAD-CAM blocks.

  15. Composite resin fillings and inlays: An 11-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Qvist, V.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth......Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth...

  16. Effect of temperature, curing time, and filler composition on surface microhardness of composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos; Constantinos Papadopoulos; Eugenia Koliniotou-Koumpia

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of two composite resins when subjected to three different temperatures and three different light-curing times. Materials and Methods: Two composites were used; Filtek Z250 and Grandio. Three different temperatures (23, 37, and 55 o C) were used, utilizing a composite warmer. The heated samples were immediately injected into cylindrical molds (6 mm × 2 mm) and the top surface of the specimens was polymerized for 10, 20, and 40 se...

  17. 2种光固化灯固化对3种不同复合树脂聚合收缩的影响%Effect of polymerization-shrinkages of different resin composite curing by two different light curing units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓小林; 张保卫; 陆鹏

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of light-emitting diode (LED) light curing unit (LCU) and quartztungsten (QTH) LCU on the polymerization-shrinkage of different resin composites.METHODS: Three composites Z100,Z250, AP-X were irradiated by QTH LCU and LED LCU.Polymerization-shrinkage of 50s and 400s after the composites curing were measured by 3D-profile measuring apparatus by phase-shifted projected grating.The polymerization-shrinkage of LED and QTH curing composites were analysed by SPSS12.0 software package of one-way ANOVA.RESULTS: At 50s curing and 400s curing period, the polymerization- shrinkage of Z100, Z250 resin was different by QTH LCU and LED LCU curing, the polymerization-shrinkage by LED LCU curing was less than that by QTH LCU (P<0.05); the polymerization-shrinkage of AP-X was not statistically different by QTH LCU and LED LCU curing (P>0.05).CONCLUSUINS: The polymerization-shrinkage of Z100,Z250 resin is statistically less cured by LED LCU than QTH;the polymerization-shrinkage of AP-X resin is not statistically different cured by QTH LCU and LED LCU.Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality(08DZ2271100).%目的:比较2种光固化灯对3种复合树脂聚合收缩的影响.方法:相移投影栅形貌测量仪测量Z100、Z250、AP-X 等3种复合树脂在卤素灯和发光二极管同化灯开始固化后50s及开始固化后400s的树脂聚合收缩量.使用SPSS12.0 软件包对 QTH 及LFD 固化组聚合收缩量进行单因素方差分析.结果:在开始固化后50s和400s,QTH同化灯和 LED 固化灯固化Z100、Z250树脂产生的聚合收缩量有显著差异,QTH 固化灯固化Z100、Z250树脂产生的聚合收缩量显著大于LED固化灯(P<0.05),QTH和 LED 固化灯固化 AP-X 树脂产生的聚合收缩量则无统计学差异(P>0.05).结论:LED及QTH固化灯固化Z100、Z250树脂产生的聚合收缩影响有显著差异(P<0.05),LED及QTH固化灯固化 AP-X 产生的

  18. Restoration of traumatized teeth with resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2017-01-01

    For a long time, the primary choice for initial restoration of a crown-fractured front tooth has been resin composite material. The restoration can in most cases be performed immediately after injury if there is no sign of periodontal injury. The method’s adhesive character is conservative to tooth...

  19. Extended Resin Composite Restorations: Techniques and Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Hilton, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the state of the art of different restorative treatment procedures and techniques needed for placing extended posterior resin composite restorations. Clinical aspects related to the procedure are discussed and reviewed based on the current literature, such as the

  20. The influence of a packable resin composite, conventional resin composite and amalgam on molar cuspal stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, J D; Diefenderfer, K E; Strother, J M

    2002-01-01

    Packable resin composites may offer improved properties and clinical performance over conventional resin composites or dental amalgam. This in vitro study examined the cuspal stiffness of molars restored with a packable resin composite, a conventional posterior microfilled resin composite and amalgam. Forty-eight intact caries-free human third molars were distributed into four treatment groups (n=12) so that the mean cross-sectional areas of all groups were equal. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were made and specimens restored using one of four restorative materials: (1) a spherical particle amalgam (Tytin); (2) Tytin amalgam with a dentin adhesive liner (OptiBond Solo); (3) a conventional microfilled posterior resin composite (Heliomolar); (4) a packable posterior resin composite (Prodigy Posterior). Cuspal stiffness was measured using a Bionix 200 biomaterials testing machine (MTS). Specimens were loaded vertically to 300 N at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Stiffness was measured at 10 intervals: (1) prior to cavity preparation (intact); (2) following cavity preparation, but before restoration; (3) seven days after restoration; then (4) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 12 months after restoration. All specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in deionized water throughout the study and thermocycled (5 degrees/55 degrees C; 2000 cycles) monthly for 12 months. Repeated Measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among treatment groups over time (presin composite increased cuspal stiffness over that of amalgam.

  1. Influence of Suspended Emulsion Polymerization Conditions on Particle Characteristics of Polyvinyl Chloride Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包永忠; 魏真理; 翁志学; 黄志明

    2003-01-01

    Suspended emulsion polymerization of vinyl chloride was carried out in a 5 L autoclave. The influence of agitation, polymerization conversion, dispersant and surfactant on the average particle size (PS) and particle size distribution (PSD), particle morphology and porosity of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) resin was investigated. It showed that the agitator had great influence on the smooth operation of polymerization, PS and PSD. The PS increased and PSD became narrow as polymerization conversion became high. The porosity decreased with the increase of conversion. A convenient choice of additives, both dispersants and non-ionic surfactants, allows one to adjust PS and PSD. The PS decreased with the addition of polyvinyl alcohol or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose dispersants,and increased with the addition of Span surfactants. The addition of dispersants or surfactants also affected the morphology and porosity of resin, and PVC resin with looser agglomeration and homogeneous distribution of primary particles was prepared.

  2. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  3. Effectiveness of composite resin polymerization using light-emitting diodes (LEDs or halogen-based light-curing units Efetividade de polimerização de uma resina composta fotopolimerizada por diodos emissores de luz (LEDs ou luz halógena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Micali

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical performance of composite resins is greatly influenced by the quality of the light-curing unit used. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of a commercial light-emitting diode (LED with that of a halogen-based light-curing unit by means of dye penetration of a micro hybrid composite resin. The composite resin evaluated was Filtek Z250 (3M Dental. The composite was filled into acrylic moulds that were randomly polymerized for 40 seconds by each of the light-emitting systems: light-emitting diode Ultraled (Dabi Atlante or halogen light Degulux (Degussa Hüls curing units. Immediately after polymerization, each specimen was individually immersed in 1 ml of 2% methylene blue solution at 37°C ± 2°C. After 24 hours, the specimens were rinsed under running distilled water for 1 minute and stored at 37°C ± 2°C at relative humidity for 24 hours. The composite resins were removed from the moulds and individually triturated before being immersed in new test tubes containing 1 ml of absolute alcohol for 24 hours. The solutions were filtered and centrifuged for 3 minutes at 4,000 rpm and the supernatant was used to determine absorbance in a spectrophotometer at 590 nm. To verify the differences between groups polymerized by LED or halogen light t-test was applied. No significant differences were found between composite resins light-cured by LED or halogen light-curing unit (p > 0.05. The commercially LED-based light-curing unit is as effective to polymerize hybrid composite resins as the halogen-based unit.A longevidade clínica das resinas compostas é grandemente influenciada pela qualidade do aparelho fotopolimerizador utilizado. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar a eficácia de um aparelho fotopolimerizador de diodos emissores de luz e a de um de luz halógena através do grau de penetração de um corante em uma resina composta micro-híbrida. A resina composta utilizada (Filtek Z250/3M Dental foi inserida em matrizes

  4. The effect of light-cured nanofilled composite resin shades on their under-surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanum, U. A.; Herda, E.; Indrani, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effect of shades of light-cured nanofilled composite resins on their under-surface temperature. Resin composites specimens of shades bright, medium, and dark shade were obtained from a cylindrical mold. While polymerizing using a curing unit, the under-surface temperature was determined at the bottom of the specimens using a thermocouple wire 20 sec after the start. Results showed that the under-surface temperature of the darker shade specimens were relatively higher that those of the brighter shades with significant diffferences between the resin composites of different shades. To conlude, the under-surface temperature of the light-cured nanofilled resin composites raised from the brighter to the darker shades.

  5. The assessment of metal fiber reinforced polymeric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wenchiang R.

    1990-01-01

    Because of their low cost, excellent electrical conductivity, high specific strength (strength/density), and high specific modulus (modulus/density) short metal fiber reinforced composites have enjoyed a widespread use in many critical applications such as automotive industry, aircraft manufacturing, national defense, and space technology. However, little data has been found in the study of short metal fibrous composites. Optimum fiber concentration in a resin matrix and fiber aspect ratio (length-to-diameter ratio) are often not available to a user. Stress concentration at short fiber ends is the other concern when the composite is applied to a load-bearing application. Fracture in such composites where the damage will be initiated or accumulated is usually difficult to be determined. An experimental investigation is therefore carefully designed and undertaken to systematically evaluate the mechanical properties as well as electrical properties. Inconel 601 (nickel based) metal fiber with a diameter of eight microns is used to reinforce commercially available thermoset polyester resin. Mechanical testing such as tensile, impact, and flexure tests along with electrical conductivity measurements is conducted to study the feasibility of using such composites. The advantages and limitations of applying chopped metal fiber reinforced polymeric composites are also discussed.

  6. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2 and after (B2. It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  7. Does the light source affect the repairability of composite resins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel KARAMAN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the light source on the microshear bond strength of different composite resins repaired with the same substrate. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each composite resin—Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z550 (3M ESPE, Gradia Direct Anterior (GC, and Aelite Posterior (BISCO—were prepared and light-cured with a QTH light curing unit (LCU. The specimens were aged by thermal cycling and divided into three subgroups according to the light source used—QTH, LED, or PAC (n = 10. They were repaired with the same substrate and a Clearfil Repair Kit (Kuraray. The specimens were light-cured and aged for 1 week in distilled water at 37 °C. The microshear bond strength and failure modes were assessed. There was no significant difference in the microshear bond strength values among the composite resins, except for the Filtek Silorane group that showed significantly lower bond strength values when polymerized with the PAC unit compared to the QTH or LED unit. In conclusion, previously placed dimethacrylate-based composites can be repaired with different light sources; however, if the composite to be repaired is silorane-based, then using a QTH or LED device may be the best option.

  8. Evaluation of cuspal deflection in premolar teeth restored with low shrinkable resin composite (in vitro study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Labib Mohamed; Nabih, Sameh Mahmoud; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated cuspal deflection in premolar teeth restored with low shrinkable resin composite. A total of 40 human premolars were used for cuspal deflection evaluation in this study. Each group was divided into four equal groups according to the type of resin composite and the adhesive used as follows: group A: Using low shrinkable resin composite (silorane) with its adhesive system; group B: Using low shrinkable composite (silorane) with G-bond; group C: Using Filtek Z350 composite with G-bond; and group D: Using Filtek Z350 composite with AdheSE. Cusp deflection was detected using Universal measuring microscope and laser horizontal metroscope. This study was done to investigate the effect of polymerization shrinkage stresses of two resin composite materials (Filtek Z350 and Filtek P90) on cuspal deflection of mesio-occluso-distal restoration. For this study, the extracted non-carious maxillary second premolars were selected. Forty teeth that showed no more than 5% variation in their dimensions were used. A significant increase in cuspal deflection of cavities restored with the methacrylate-based (Filtek Z350) compared with the silorane (P90) resin-based composites was obtained. The change in the organic matrix or materials formulation of the resin composite using silorane has a positive effect on controlling the cusp deflection.

  9. Class II direct composite resin restorations with beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, R E

    1993-11-01

    With the increasing demand for esthetic posterior restorations, numerous techniques have been developed. The direct resin restoration has probably been used most extensively in Class II situations. Problems with Class II direct resin restorations include difficulty in developing proximal contact, occlusal wear, and polymerization shrinkage. Beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts have been developed in an attempt to reduce the incidence of these potential problems. They can be placed in a one-appointment technique, are relatively inexpensive, and can readily be utilized by the clinician adept in placing Class II composite resin restorations.

  10. Color difference of composite resins after cementation with different shades of resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Karakaya, Izgen; Aktore, Huseyin

    2017-07-26

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color difference of nanohybrid and ormocer-based composite resins with different thicknesses when 4 different shades of resin luting cement were used. 56 disc specimens of each composite resin (Aelite aesthetic enamel, Ceram-X mono) with 0.5 and 1 mm thicknesses were fabricated. Baseline color measurements were performed using a clinical spectrophotometer. The specimens of each thicknesses of each resin were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the shades of resin luting cement (white/A1, yellow/universal/A3, transparent and white opaque) (n = 7). Mixed resin cement was applied onto the resin specimens using a Teflon mold in 0.1 mm thickness. Color measurements of cemented composite resin specimens were repeated and color difference (∆E) between baseline and after cementation measurements was calculated. ANOVA and Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis. The opaque shade had significantly increased ∆E values as compared to the other shades (p resins in terms of ∆E values. The shade of resin cement and the type of the resin affected the final color; however, the thickness of composite resin had no influence on the final color of restoration. Selecting the shade of resin luting cement before cementation of indirect composite laminate restoration is important to achieve final color match.

  11. Effect of high-pressure polymerization on mechanical properties of PMMA denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Natsuko; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Matsushima, Rie; Kishida, Akio; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of high-pressure polymerization on mechanical properties of denture base resin. A heat-curing denture base resin and an experimental PMMA were polymerized under 500MPa of pressure by means of an isostatic pressurization machine at 70°C for 24h to make rectangular specimens whose dimensions were 30mm×2mm×2mm. Each specimen was deflected on a three-point flexural test until either fracture occurred or the sample was loaded up to 8mm in deflection. The molecular weight of the PMMA without filler was analyzed using the high-speed liquid chromatography system. Increased ductility without fracture was shown in the specimens subjected to high pressure, while most of the control specimens (ambient pressure) fractured. The mean toughness of the PMMA specimens polymerized under the high pressure was significantly higher than the same material polymerized under ambient pressure (ppressure groups of the denture resin and the PMMA revealed a significantly lower mean 0.2% yield stress, flexural strength, and elastic modulus than control groups (ppressure specimens than were present in the controls. The increased toughness shown in the PMMA polymerized under the high pressure was presumably attributed to the higher molecular weight produced by the pressure. The result suggests a potential application of the high-pressure polymerization to the development of PMMA-based denture resin with improved fracture resistance.

  12. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-05-02

    With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adhesive resins. Alumina ceramic specimens (Techceram Ltd, Shipley, UK) were assigned to three groups. Three types of commercially available prosthodontic resin composites [BelleGlass®, (BG, Kerr, CA, USA), Sinfony® (SF, 3 M ESPE, Dental Products, Germany), and GC Gradia® (GCG, GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan)] were bonded to the alumina substrate using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group (N = 40) were stored dry for 24 hours, the remaining were stored for 30 days in water. The bonding strength, so-called shear bond strengths between composite resin and alumina substrate were measured. Data were analysed statistically and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Bond strengths were influenced by the brand of prosthodontic resin composites. Shear bond strengths of material combinations varied from 24.17 ± 3.72-10.15 ± 3.69 MPa and 21.20 ± 4.64-7.50 ± 4.22 at 24 h and 30 days, respectively. BG resin composite compared with the other resin composites provided the strongest bond with alumina substrate (p resin composite was found to have a lower bond strength than the other composites. The Weibull moduli were highest for BG, which was bonded by using Optibond Solo Plus adhesive resin at 24 h and 30 days. There was no effect of storage time and adhesive brand on bond strength. Within the limitations of this study, the shear bond strengths of composite resins to alumina substrate are related to the composite

  13. [Adaptation of acrylic resin dentures polymerized using various activation modes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamata, T; Inoue, Y; Hashimoto, K; Sugitou, S; Arakawa, H; Kurasawa, I

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of maxillary dentures made using a conventional heat-activated PMMA resin, a pour resin, a visible light-activated resin, and a microwave-activated acrylic resin. Two simple methods for measuring dimensional accuracy were used: (1) weight of impression material entrapped between the base and master die and (2) measurement of the posterior border gap at five locations. The volume of space between the denture base and the master die was determined by (1) computation and (2) estimation. Statistical analysis (Bartlett, ANOVA and Tukey's Tests) supported the following conclusions: (1) all groups showed a processing contraction, most apparent from buccal flange to buccal flange, (2) the poorest fitting group was processed in a brass flask and a water bath at a temperature which rose from 70 to 100 degrees C, using a heat activated resin (Acron), (3) the visible light activated resin (Triad) produced dentures of intermediate accuracy, as did Acupac 20 when either heat or microwave activated, (4) the two best fitting groups were prepared from a chemically activated resin system using pressure at low heat (PER form), and the resin developed for microwave activation (Acron MC).

  14. ASSESMENT OF SELF HEALING PROPERTY IN HYBRID FIBER POLYMERIC COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.ABILASH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Natural fiber reinforced composites is an emerging area in polymer technology. Fibers resulting from plants are considered a budding substitute for non-renewable synthetic fibers like glass and carbon fibers. The objective of this study is to merge the benefits of natural and synthetic fibers by developing ahybrid composite of jute and glass fibers along with self healing property to eliminate delamination without compromising the benefits of hybridization. This concept offers the designer an ability to incorporate secondary functional ability of counteracting service degradation in addition to achieving the primary, usually structuralintegrity, requirement. The self-healing approach utilizes a releasable healing agent contained in a hollow fiber that is embedded in a resin system. Specimens are produced using a hollow glass fiber and epoxy resin. In addition, in the case of multiple fibers test, e-glass fibers are incorporated in the composite. When a crack isinitiated and propagates through the composite breaking the hollow fiber, a liquid healing agent comes out and fills the crack gap. Polymerization of the monomer healing agent is facilitated when it contacts a catalyst that is pre-coated on the outside surface of the hollow glass fiber. Self-healing materials also have the benefit ofoffering lighter and optimized structures as well as reduced maintenance cost.

  15. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (Pcomposite resin. RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range.

  16. Nanomechanical properties of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Akhtar, R; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-12-01

    To determine by nanoindentation the hardness and elastic modulus of resin-composites, including a series with systematically varied filler loading, plus other representative materials that fall into the categories of flowable, bulk-fill and conventional nano-hybrid types. Ten dental resin-composites: three flowable, three bulk-fill and four conventional were investigated using nanoindentation. Disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material using a metallic mold. Specimens were irradiated in the mold at top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points (40s each) with light curing unit at 650mW/cm(2). Specimens were then mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. After grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were investigated using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius). Each specimen was loaded at one loading rate and three different unloading rates (at room temperature) with thirty indentations, per unloading rate. The maximum load applied by the nanoindenter to examine the specimens was 10mN. Dependent on the type of the resin-composite material, the mean values ranged from 0.73GPa to 1.60GPa for nanohardness and from 14.44GPa to 24.07GPa for elastic modulus. There was a significant positive non-linear correlation between elastic modulus and nanohardness (r(2)=0.88). Nonlinear regression revealed a significant positive correlation (r(2)=0.62) between elastic moduli and filler loading and a non-significant correlation (r(2)=0.50) between nanohardness and filler loading of the studied materials. Varying the unloading rates showed no consistent effect on the elastic modulus and nanohardness of the studied materials. For a specific resin matrix, both elastic moduli and nanohardness correlated positively with filler loading. For the resin-composites investigated, the group-average elastic

  17. Apoptotic and necrotic influence of dental resin polymerization initiators in human gingival fibroblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuki, Kouhei; Nomura, Yuji; Bhawal, Ujjal Kumar; Sawajiri, Masahiko; Hirata, Isao; Nahara, Yukinori; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic and necrotic influence of four dental resin polymerization initiators--namely benzoyl peroxide (BPO), camphorquinone (CQ), dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and dimethyl-para-toluidine (DMPT)--on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. To this end, the growth inhibition of HGF cells with 1 mM BPO, CQ, and DMAEMA, and 500 microM DMPT was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8. Then, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry was used to assess propidium iodide-stained cells (distribution of cells in G0/G1, S, G2/M phases). All four dental resin polymerization initiators induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. As for the patterns of cell death (necrosis and/or apoptosis), they were analyzed using Annexin V-FITC/PI staining with flow cytometry. All four dental resin polymerization initiators most likely induced necrosis.

  18. Facile synthesis of hypercrosslinked resin via photochlorination of p-xylene and succedent alkylation polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Ling Bai; Yong Hao Zhou; Xiu Li Wang; Si Guo Yuan; Xian Li Wu

    2011-01-01

    A combination of photochlorination of p-xylene and succedent Friedel-Crafts alkylation polymerization was firstly used in the preparation of the hypercrosslinked adsorptive resin. The data of GC-MS and GC showed that a series of chlorizates were produced when p-xylene was photochlorinated. Hypercrosslinked resins could be synthesized by copolymerization, self-polymerization of chlorizates or post crosslinking reaction. The chemical structure and micromorphology of the porous resins were characterized by BET, FT-IR, SEM and elementary analysis (EA). The results showed that the novel adsorptive resins possess high BET surface near to 1038 m2/g and large pore volumes range from 0.5 to 1.2 cm3/g.

  19. Modified Technique for Making Auto-polymerized Polymethylmethacrylate Resin Custom Tray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ramesh; Rajendran, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Muthu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Custom made tray for dental impression is designed to provide a uniform space for the impression material and thereby improve the accuracy of the resultant working cast. Auto-polymerized acrylic resins have been the most commonly used material for the fabrication of these trays. The custom tray produces more accurate and reliable results for inter-abutment distance at the occlusal and gingival level than stock trays. This article describes a modified technique for fabrication of auto-polymerized Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) resin trays. PMID:28050525

  20. Polymerization shrinkage evaluation of three packable composite resins using a gas pycnometer Avaliação da contração de polimerização de três resinas compactáveis, medida por picnômetro a gás

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Amore

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern restorative dentistry has been playing an outstanding role lately since composite resins, allied to adhesive systems, have been widely applied on anterior and posterior teeth restorations. The evolution of composite resins has mostly been verified due to the improvement of their aesthetic behavior and the increase in their compressive and abrasive strengths. In spite of these developments, the polymerization shrinkage inherent to the material has been a major deficiency that, so far, has been impossible to avoid. Using a gas pycnometry, this research investigated the polymerization shrinkage of three packable composite resins: Filtek P60 (3M, Prodigy Condensable (Kerr, and SureFil (Dentsply/Caulk, varying the distance from the light source to the surface of the resins (2 mm or 10 mm. The pycnometer Accupyc 1330 (Micromeritics, USA precisely records helium displacement, allowing fast and reliable measurements of the volume of composite resin immediately before and after polymerization, without interference of temperature or humidity. Results were not found to be statistically different for the three tested resins, either for 2 mm or 10 mm-distance from the light source to the composite surface.A Odontologia Restauradora moderna tem se destacado nos últimos anos e as resinas compostas, aliadas aos sistemas adesivos, têm sido muito empregadas para restaurações de dentes anteriores e posteriores. A evolução das resinas compostas tem sido constatada na melhoria do seu comportamento estético e no aumento da sua resistência à compressão e à abrasão. Apesar dos avanços mencionados, a contração de polimerização, inerente a esse material, continua sendo uma grande deficiência e, por enquanto, impossível de ser evitada. Nesta pesquisa a contração de polimerização de três resinas compostas compactáveis, Filtek P60 (3M, Prodigy Condensável (Kerr e SureFil (Dentsply/Caulk, variando-se a distância entre a fonte de luz e a

  1. Low-shrink composite resins: a review of their history, strategies for managing shrinkage, and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitel, Mark L

    2013-09-01

    Despite numerous advances in composite resin technology over the course of many decades, shrinkage behavior and the resultant stresses inherent to direct placed composite restorations continue to challenge clinicians. This overview of composite resins includes a review of their history and development along with a discussion of strategies for reducing polymerization shrinkage. An assessment of the clinical significance of these materials is also provided, including a discussion of the differences between polymerization shrinkage and stress, incremental layering versus bulk placement, and the emergence of lower shrinkage stress monomer chemistry.

  2. In vitro comparison of autoclave polymerization on the transverse strength of denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkan, Rukiye; Ozel, Mehmet Birol; Bağiş, Bora; Usanmaz, Ali

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of autoclave polymerization on the transverse strength of denture base polymers. To this end, 30 rectangular test specimens were fabricated of two heat-polymerized denture base polymers. The test groups were: (I) control, i.e., conventional water bath to polymerize resins by heat at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes; (II) autoclave polymerization at 60 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by 130 degrees C for 10 minutes; and (III) autoclave polymerization at 60 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by 130 degrees C for 20 minutes. The specimens were tested with three-point bending test at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. It was revealed that the transverse strength of specimens increased with statistical significance when the autoclave was used for polymerization.

  3. Reducing marginal leakage of posterior composite resin restorations: a review of clinical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, G S

    1990-03-01

    It has been well established that composite resin restorations have leakage at the margins. The polymerization shrinkage of the material and its inadequate adhesion to the cavity walls are the primary causes. Unlike silver amalgam restorations, which are self-sealing with age, the gap at the composite-to-tooth interface tends to persist and invite postoperative sensitivity, adverse pulp reactions, and the development of recurrent caries. Many techniques or materials have been advocated to improve the clinical adaptation of this material and to reduce marginal leakage. They limit the effect of polymerization shrinkage and/or enhance the bonding of the composite material to the tooth structure. This article reviews the clinical techniques and materials that have been suggested and are presently available to improve the marginal quality of composite resins, with special reference to posterior restorations.

  4. Properties of magnetically attractive experimental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, S; Yasukawa, H; Nomoto, R; Moriyama, K; Hirasawa, T

    1996-12-01

    SUS444 stainless steel filled chemically cured resin composites that can attract magnet were fabricated. The filler was treated with various concentrations of silane. The experimental composite was easy to handle and showed a good shelf life. The maximal properties obtained are as follows; The attraction force to a magnetic attachment was 1/3-1/4 lower than the commercially available magnet-keeper system for dental magnetic attachment. Flexural strength and Knoop hardness of the composite were 76MPa (7.7 kgf/mm2) and 64 KHN. These values were lower than the commercially available chemically cured composite used as a reference. Eluted metal from the composite in 1% lactic acid solution for 7 days showed 0.7 mg/cm2, but in 0.9% NaCl solution for 7 days, it could not be detected.

  5. Bonding between CAD/CAM resin and resin composite cements dependent on bonding agents: three different in vitro test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Simona; Keul, Christine; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bonding properties between CAD/CAM resin and three resin composite cements combined with different bonding agents using three test methods. Four hundred twenty CAD/CAM resin substrates were fabricated and divided into three test methods (shear bond strength (SBS, n = 180), tensile bond strength (TBS, n = 180) and work of adhesion (WA, n = 60)), further into four pretreatment methods (VP connect (VP), visio.link (VL), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP) and no pretreatment (CG)) and three cements (RelyX ARC, Variolink II and Clearfil SA Cement). Each subgroup contained 15 specimens. SBS and TBS were measured after 24 h H2O/37 °C + 5000 thermal-cycles (5/55 °C) and failure types were assessed. WA was determined for pretreated CAD/CAM resin and non-polymerized resin composite cements. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, Chi(2) and Spearman's Rho tests. Within SBS and TBS tests, CGs and groups pretreated with CP (regardless of resin composite cements), and VP pretreated with Clearfil SA Cement showed no bond. However, CG combined with RelyX ARC showed a TBS of 5.6 ± 1.3 MPa. In general, highest bond strength was observed for groups treated with VL. CG and groups pretreated using VL showed lower WA than the groups treated with VP or CP. Measured TBS values were higher than SBS ones. In general, SBS and TBS showed similar trends for the ranges of the values for the groups. WA results were not comparable with SBS/TBS results and admitted, therefore, no conclusions on it. For a clinical use of XHIP-CAD/CAM resin, the bond surface should be additionally pretreated with visio.link as bonding agent.

  6. Silanising agents promote resin-composite repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staxrud, Frode; Dahl, Jon E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silane in the repair of old and new resin-composite restorations. Part 1: repair of old composite was performed on 60 resin-composite substrates that were 6 years old and were made of six different brands of composite. Three experiments were performed. In the first experiment, the substrates were ground flat and composite was fixed to the surface with bonding agent without silane (i.e. Clearfil Bond SE only, the control). Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested according to ISO/TS 11405 after thermocycling. In the second experiment, the same 60 substrates were ground again and treated with bis-silane a 2-part silane mixed shortly before application before applying bonding agent (Clearfil Bond SE plus silane) and repair composite before SBS testing. In the third experiment, the same substrates were ground again and a one-step bonding product containing silane (Scotchbond Universal bond containing silane) was used for the repair procedure before SBS testing. Part 2: to evaluate the repair of newly made composite restorations, 66 composite substrates were made and stored in water for 2 months. The specimens were divided into three groups and were tested using the same protocols as used to evaluate repair of old composite. Mean SBS (± standard deviation), in MPa, for repair of old composite was 6.2 ± 4.0 (Clearfil Bond SE only, control), 14.8 ± 7.8 (Clearfil Bond SE plus silane) and 15.3 ± 5.6 (Scotchbond Universal bond with silane), whereas for new composite mean SBS was 15.4 ± 8.6 (Clearfil Bond SE only, control), 23.4 ± 8.3 (Clearfil Bond SE with silane) and 23.7 ± 5.8 (Scotchbond Universal containing silane). A significant difference was observed between the control and the test groups with silanising agents, both in Part 1 (P resin composite repair. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  7. Acceleration of curing of resin composite at the bottom surface using slow-start curing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two slow-start curing methods on acceleration of the curing of resin composite specimens at the bottom surface. The light-cured resin composite was polymerized using one of three curing techniques: (1) 600 mW/cm(2) for 60 s, (2) 270 mW/cm(2) for 10 s+0-s interval+600 mW/cm(2) for 50 s, and (3) 270 mW/cm(2) for 10 s+5-s interval+600 mW/cm(2) for 50 s. After light curing, Knoop hardness number was measured at the top and bottom surfaces of the resin specimens. The slow-start curing method with the 5-s interval caused greater acceleration of curing of the resin composite at the bottom surface of the specimens than the slow-start curing method with the 0-s interval. The light-cured resin composite, which had increased contrast ratios during polymerization, showed acceleration of curing at the bottom surface.

  8. Effect of delayed light curing of a resin composite on marginal integrity in cylindrical dentine cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, A; Debari, K; Itoh, K; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1993-12-01

    The effect of delayed light curing of resin composite on marginal adaptation has been examined by measuring the wall-to-wall polymerization contraction gap when using a commercial resin composite together with experimental dentine bonding systems to restore cylindrical preparations in dentine. Morphological changes in dentine during dentine bonding procedures were observed using a scanning electron microscope. In a previous report, the contraction gap width for a resin composite increased when irradiation of the resin system was delayed, despite the use of a dentine bonding system considered to be 'contraction' gap free. Such deterioration in marginal adaptation was minimized by use of an experimental dentine primer, 40% erythritol methacrylate aqueous solution (EM), followed by the use of a commercial dual- or autocured dentine bonding agent. Under scanning electron microscopy, the dentine surface microstructure became unclear after EM priming, and a polymer film was detected after polymerization of the dual-cured dentine bonding agent. The hydrogelled primer and the formation of a polymer network on the dentine surface may prevent the flow of fluid from the pulp through the dentine tubules, and maintain marginal integrity if there is delay in light curing of light-activated resin composite systems.

  9. Synthesis of iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes for using as radiopacifiers in dental composite resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Lan, Jinle [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Xuliang [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Cai, Qing, E-mail: caiqing@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Xiaoping [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a strategy of using iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes as radiopacifiers for dental composite resin was evaluated. It was hypothesized that cyclophosphazenes bearing both iodine and acrylate group swere able to endow composite resins radiopacity without compromising mechanical properties. The cyclophosphazene compounds were synthesized by subsequently nucleophilic substitution of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene with hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 4-iodoaniline. Cyclotriphosphazenes containing two different molar ratios of HEMA to 4-iodoaniline (1:5 and 2:4) were obtained, and were identified with {sup 1}H NMR, FT-IR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes were able to dissolve well in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin, and were added at two contents (10 or 15%wt. of the resin). The resins were photo-cured and post-thermal treated before characterizations. The resulting composite resins demonstrated the ability of blocking X-ray. And the addition of HEMA-co-iodoaniline substituted cyclotriphosphazenes caused minor adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resins because the cyclotriphosphazenes could mix well and react with the resins. The presence of rigid phosphazene rings between resin backbones displayed an effective function of decreasing polymerization shrinkage. In summary, soluble and reactive iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes demonstrated advantages over traditional heavy metals or metal oxides in being used as additives for producing radiopaque dental resins. - Highlights: • Iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes were prepared via nucleophilic substitution. • The cyclotriphosphazenes endowed Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins radiopacity. • The cyclotriphosphazenes caused a minor adverse effect on mechanical properties.

  10. Efeito das técnicas de inserção e ativação da resina composta sobre a microinfiltração e microdureza Effect of techniques of composite resin insertion and polymerization on microleakage and microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Mariote Amaral

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência da técnica de ativação e de inserção da resina composta sobre a microinfiltração marginal e microdureza em restaurações classe II. Foram preparadas 180 cavidades que foram divididas em 6 grupos: G1 - incremento único + ativação convencional; G2 - incrementos vestíbulo-linguais + ativação convencional; G3 - incremento único + ativação "soft-start"; G4 - incrementos vestíbulo-linguais + ativação "soft-start"; G5 - incremento único + ativação progressiva; G6 - incrementos vestíbulo-linguais + ativação progressiva. Todas as cavidades foram restauradas com o sistema Z100/Single Bond (3M. Após 1.000 ciclos térmicos (5 e 55ºC, os espécimes foram imersos em solução aquosa de azul de metileno a 2%, por 4 horas e a microinfiltração foi avaliada. Metade dos espécimes foram incluídos em resina de poliestireno e a microdureza Knoop foi avaliada. Após o teste Kruskal-Wallis, não foi observada diferença significativa (p > 0,05 entre todas as técnicas de ativação e de inserção quanto à microinfiltração. Quanto à microdureza, após os testes análise de variância (2 fatores e Tukey, não houve diferença significativa entre as técnicas restauradoras empregadas (p > 0,05, porém a ativação progressiva (G5 e G6 apresentou menor dureza Knoop (p The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of techniques of composite resin polymerization and insertion on microleakage and microhardness. One hundred and eighty class II cavities were prepared in bovine teeth and assigned to six groups: G1 - bulk filling + conventional polymerization; G2 - bucco-lingual increments + conventional polymerization; G3 - bulk filling + soft-start polymerization; G4 - bucco-lingual increments + soft-start polymerization; G5 - bulk filling + progressive polymerization; G6 - bucco-lingual increments + progressive polymerization. All cavities were restored with the Z100/Single Bond

  11. Use of transparent vinyl polysiloxane in a minimally invasive approach for creating composite resin undercuts for partial removable dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjão, Fabiana Mansur

    2012-01-01

    A technique using a transparent vinyl polysiloxane material developed for use with light-polymerized composite resin and that does not require a lubricant is presented for creating composite resin undercuts for partial removable dental prosthesis clasps. With a surveyor, the undercut is waxed on the diagnostic cast according to the intended path of insertion. The transparent vinyl polysiloxane is used to fabricate a template for the undercut. The template is used intraorally to create the undercut in composite resin on the abutment tooth.

  12. Investigation of flexural strength and cytotoxicity of acrylic resin copolymers by using different polymerization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ali Kemal; Turgut, Mehmet; Boztug, Ali; Sumer, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to appraise the some mechanical properties of polymethyl methacrylate based denture base resin polymerized by copolymerization mechanism, and to investigate the cytotoxic effect of these copolymer resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and isobutyl methacrylate (IBMA) were added to monomers of conventional heat polymerized and injection-molded poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin contents of 2%, 3%, and 5% by volume and polymerization was carried out. Three-point bending test was performed to detect flexural strength and the elasticity modulus of the resins. To determine the statistical differences between the study groups, the Kruskall-Wallis test was performed. Then pairwise comparisons were performed between significant groups by Mann-Whitney U test. Agar-overlay test was performed to determine cytotoxic effect of copolymer resins. Chemical analysis was determined by FTIR spectrum. RESULTS Synthesis of the copolymer was approved by FTIR spectroscopy. Within the conventional heat-polymerized group maximum transverse strength had been seen in the HEMA 2% concentration; however, when the concentration ratio increased, the strength decreased. In the injection-molded group, maximum transverse strength had been seen in the IBMA 2% concentration; also as the concentration ratio increased, the strength decreased. Only IBMA showed no cytotoxic effect at low concentrations when both two polymerization methods applied while HEMA showed cytotoxic effect in the injection-molded resins. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, it may be concluded that IBMA and HEMA may be used in low concentration and at high temperature to obtain non-cytotoxic and durable copolymer structure. PMID:25932307

  13. Post-Irradiation Polymerization of a Silorane Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    Ferracane and Greener, 1986). The DC of dental composite was shown to be affected by resin composition (Ryuter and Svendsen, 1978). For example lower...unfilled dental restorative resins . Dent Mater 1985;1:11-4. Ferracane JL, Berge HX. Fracture toughness of experimental dental composites aged...Silikas N, Eliades G, Watts DC. Light intensity effects on resin - composite degree of conversion and mechanical properties of dental restorative

  14. Effect of LED and Argon Laser on Degree of Conversion and Temperature Rise of Hybrid and Low Shrinkage Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Ayob; Tabatabaei, Masumeh Hasani; Arami, Sakineh; Valizadeh, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Different light curing units are used for polymerization of composite resins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) and temperature rise in hybrid and low shrinkage composite resins cured by LED and Argon Laser curing lights. Materials and Methods: DC was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. For measuring temperature rise, composite resin samples were placed in Teflon molds and cured from the top. The thermocouple under samples recorded the temperature rise. After initial radiation and specimens reaching the ambient temperature, reirradiation was done and temperature was recorded again. Both temperature rise and DC data submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests (5% significance). Results: The obtained results revealed that DC was not significantly different between the understudy composite resins or curing units. Low shrinkage composite resin showed a significantly higher temperature rise than hybrid composite resin. Argon laser caused the lowest temperature rise among the curing units. Conclusion: Energy density of light curing units was correlated with the DC. Type of composite resin and light curing unit had a significant effect on temperature rise due to polymerization and curing unit, respectively. PMID:27843507

  15. Effect of resin shades on opacity of ceramic veneers and polymerization efficiency through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Coşgun, Erdal; Bolay, Şükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different resin cement shades on the opacity and color difference of ceramics and to determine the polymerization efficiency of the resin cement at different shades after curing through ceramics. Two different ceramics (IPS e.max Press and IPS Empress(®)CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were used for this study. A light-cured veneer luting resin (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent) in four different shades of HV+1, HV+3, LV-1, and LV-3 was used for the colorimetric measurements. The color and spectral reflectance of the ceramics were measured according to the CIELab color scale relative to the standard illuminant D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer (ColorEye7000A, USA). Color differences (ΔE values) and the contrast ratios (CR) of the different groups of samples were calculated. In order to analyse the polymerization efficiency of the resin cements, the micromechanical properties of the resins were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). The results were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc tests (SPSS 18.0). The one-way ANOVA test showed that the values of ΔE and CR of the different specimen groups were significantly different (p<0.05). Group 1 (20.7 ± 0.5) (IPS-CAD without resin cement) exhibited the highest and group 10 (14.8 ± 0.5) (e.max:HV+3) exhibited the lowest ΔE value. Significant differences in the micromechanical properties were identified among the tested resin cements in different shades (p<0.05). Resin cement shade is an important factor for the opacity of a restoration. Furthermore, the resin shade affects the micromechanical properties of the underlying resin cement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hardness Evaluation of Composite Resins Cured with QTH and LED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Esmaeili

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Today light cured composites are widely used. Physical and mechanical properties of composites are related to the degree of conversion. Light curing unit (LCU is an important factor for composite polymerization. Aim of this study is evaluation of composite resins hardness using halogen and LED light curing units. Materials and methods. In this study, 30 samples of Filtek Z250 and C-Fill composite resins were provided. Samples were light cured with Ultralume2, Valo and Astralis7. Vickers hardness number (VHN was measured in 0, 1, 2 mm depth. Statistical analysis used: Data were analysed by SPSS software and compared with each other by T-test, one-way and twoway ANOVA and Post-hoc Tukey test. Results. In Filtek Z250, at top surface, VHN of Ultralume2 was higher than VHN of Valo (P = 0.02 and Astralis7 (P = 0.04, but in depth of 1, 2 mm, VHN of Ultralume2 and Astralis7 were almost the same and both LCUs were more than Valo which the difference between Ultralume2 and Valo was significant in depth of 1mm (0.05 and 2mm (0.02. In C-Fill composite, at top surface, Astralis7 showed higher VHN, but in depth of 2 mm, performance of all devices were rather similar. Conclusion. In Z250, which contains camphorquinone initiator, light cure LED Ultra-lume2 with narrow wavelength showed higher hardness number than Valo. In C-fill, in top surface, Astralis7 with more exposure time, resulted higher VHN. But In depth of 2 mm, various light curing devices had rather similar hardness number.

  17. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS Resin with Polyester Resin in Composite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Ugoamadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resins can compete effectively with the synthetic ones in composite development. In this research, cashew nuts were picked and processed for the extraction of the resin content. The resin (natural resin so obtained was mixed with cobalt amine (accelerator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (catalyst to develop two sets of composite specimens – specimens without fibres and specimens reinforced with glass fibres. This method of sample specimen development was repeated with polyester (synthetic resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate compressive strength of 55MPa compared to that of polyester resin with an ultimate strength of 68MPa. The result of tensile strength proved cashew nut shell liquid resin (with ultimate strength of 44MPa to be better than polyester resin with 39MPa as ultimate tensile strength. This means that natural resins could be a better substitute for the synthetic ones when the required quantities of fibers (reinforcements and fillers are used in the fibre-reinforced plastic composite developments.

  18. Microhybrid and Flowable Microhybrid Dental Resin Composites Measured in Fracture Toughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decky J. Indrani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture toughness of a microhybrid and a flowable microhyrid resin composites. Methods. Test specimens (30x15x2mm made of a microhybrid and a flowable microhybrid were prepared in a double torsion mould and were then polymerized for 20 seconds using a light-curing device. Taken out from the mould, the specimens were than soaked in disfilled water (37°C for 1 hour and then fractured in a double-torsion technique. t-Test was used to test significance difference between the microhybrid and flowable microhybrid resin composites. Result. The use of double-torsion technique resulted in crack initition and crack arrest which revealed Klc of 1.14 MN/m3/2 and 1.045 MN/m3/2 for the microhybrid and the flowable microhybrid resin composites, respectively. Both resin composites were insignificantly different in the fracture toughness values showed by t–Test. Conclusions. The present study suggested that there was no significant difference between the microhybrid and the flowable microhybrid resin composites tested. It appreared that filler fraction might not affect the fracture toughness of the resin composties tested.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i1.15

  19. Effect of adhesion to cavity walls on the mechanical properties of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayif, Ma'an M; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Aksornmuang, Juthatip; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the regional mechanical properties of resin composite under free and constrained conditions during polymerization. Forty cavities (8mm diameter and 5mm depth) were fabricated in resin blocks. Half of the cavities were bonded and the other half left un-bonded. The cavities were bulk-filled with one of the following composites: flowable composite (Palfique Estelite LV, Unifil Lo Flo), and Universal composites (Clearfil AP-X, Palfique Estelite Sigma), followed by photo-curing for 30s. After 24h storage, each specimen was sliced parallel to the long axis to harvest three slabs. The middle slab was serially sliced to harvest five sticks, which were trimmed to an hour-glass shape for measurement of regional ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The remaining semi-circular slabs were polished for microhardness measurement (KHN). Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test and t-test (alpha=.05). The KHNs of all the resin composites were not significantly different between the bonded and unbonded groups at each cavity depth (p>0.05). The Ucapital TE, CyrillicS of the bonded group of flowable composites was significantly lower than those of the un-bonded group at the upper regions (pcomposites, there were no significant differences in UTS between the bonded and un-bonded groups (p>0.05), although Clearfil AP-X had a trend toward lower UTS under the constrained condition at the upper regions. The UTS of resin composite decreases due to polymerization shrinkage stress when polymerized under a constrained condition, however, these effects were dependent upon regions in the cavity and the resin materials.

  20. Candida albicans adhesion to composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to dental restorative materials in the human oral cavity may promote the occurrence of oral candidosis. This study aimed to compare the susceptibility of 14 commonly used composite resin materials (two compomers, one ormocer, one novel silorane, and ten conventional hybrid composites) to adhere Candida albicans. Differences in the amount of adhering fungi should be related to surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the type of matrix. Cylindrical specimens of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. Surface roughness R (a) was assessed by perthometer measurements and the degree of hydrophobicity by computerized contact angle analysis. Specimens were incubated with a reference strain of C. albicans (DMSZ 1386), and adhering fungi were quantified by using a bioluminometric assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Statistical differences were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations. Median R (a) of the tested composite resin materials ranged between 0.04 and 0.23 microm, median contact angles between 69.2 degrees and 86.9 degrees . The two compomers and the ormocer showed lower luminescence intensities indicating less adhesion of fungi than all tested conventional hybrid composites. No conclusive correlation was found between surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the amount of adhering C. albicans.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Andréa Cândido; de Castro, Denise Tornavoi; Schiavon, Marco Antônio; da Silva, Leandro Jardel; Agnelli, José Augusto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of accelerated artificial aging (AAA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, 4 Seasons, Herculite, P60, Tetric Ceram, Charisma and Filtek Z100. composite resins. The composites were characterized by Fourier-transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analyses (Differential Scanning Calorimetry - DSC and Thermogravimetry - TG). The microstructure of the materials was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Surface hardness and compressive strength data of the resins were recorded and the mean values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The results showed significant differences among the commercial brands for surface hardness (F=86.74, psurface hardness: F=0.39, p=0.53; compressive strength: F=2.82, p=0.09) of any of the composite resins. FTIR, DSC and TG analyses showed that resin polymerization was complete, and there were no differences between the spectra and thermal curve profiles of the materials obtained before and after AAA. TG confirmed the absence of volatile compounds and evidenced good thermal stability up to 200 °C, and similar amounts of residues were found in all resins evaluated before and after AAA. The AAA treatment did not significantly affect resin surface. Therefore, regardless of the resin brand, AAA did not influence the microstructure or the mechanical properties.

  2. Determination and Correlation of Depth of Cure of a New Composite Resin Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Barry M; Slaven; Phebus, Jeffrey G; Ragain, James C

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the depth of cure (DOC) of a composite resin system using two different testing criteria. The DOC testing employed two different experimental protocol: 1) Forty-eight previously extracted human molars were randomly assigned to four groups of twelve each (n = 12): Group 1 SonicFill composite resin system, shade A1; Group 2 SonicFill, shade A3; Group 3 Herculite Ultra composite resin, shade A1; Group 4 Herculite Ultra, shade A3. Cylindrical cavities (4.0 mm diameter and 10 mm depth) were prepared at the tooth CEJ, in a mesiodistal direction. The preparations were filled with each composite resin material in one bulk increment and polymerized with a LED light for 20 seconds. After 5 minutes, the occlusal surfaces of the teeth (specimens) were ground flat until the composite was exposed in a transverse plane. The uncured (soft) composite was scraped away, using a "modified" ISO 4049 DOC specification, and the remaining cured (hard) material was measured. Three measurements, at different positions of the specimen, were performed, for a total of thirty-six measurements per specimen group. The measurements were averaged and divided by fifty percent, arriving at the final DOC for each specimen. 2) A DOC testing protocol was performed using a two-piece (4.0 mm x 10.0 mm) custom-made Teflon device (mold). The groupings duplicated the previous experimental protocol. The mold was filled with each composite resin material in one bulk increment to a 10 mm length (depth). Excess composite material was removed, followed by placement of a Mylar strip over the external orifice. The composite resin specimen was light-polymerized for 20 seconds. Again, the uncured (soft) composite was scraped away, with the same measurement protocol followed as in method 1. Statistical analyses were conducted using ANOVA tests at a p composite revealed significantly greater DOC compared to the Herculite Ultra composite resin. Also, significant differences were displayed between the Al

  3. Assessment of the impact strength of the denture base resin polymerized by various processing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashree Jadhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To measure the impact strength of denture base resins polymerized using short and long curing cycles by water bath, pressure cooker and microwave techniques. Materials and Methods: For impact strength testing, 60 samples were made. The sample dimensions were 60 mm × 12 mm × 3 mm, as standardized by the American Standards for Testing and Materials (ASTM. A digital caliper was used to locate the midpoint of sample. The impact strength was measured in IZOD type of impact tester using CEAST Impact tester. The pendulum struck the sample and it broke. The energy required to break the sample was measured in Joules. Data were analyzed using Student′s " t" test. Results: There was statistically significant difference in the impact strength of denture base resins polymerized by long curing cycle and short curing cycle in each technique, with the long curing processing being the best. Conclusion: The polymerization technique plays an important role in the influence of impact strength in the denture base resin. This research demonstrates that the denture base resin polymerized by microwave processing technique possessed the highest impact strength.

  4. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers on Chloromethyl Polystyrene Resin Prepared via RAFT Polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Surface molecularly imprinted polymers (SMIP) was prepared via the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization on the chloromethyl polystyrene resin (CPR) in the presence of the template D-phenylalanine. The structure of SMIP was characterized by FTIR and SEM. The adsorption behavior of D-phenylalanine of SMIP was preliminarily investigated.

  5. [Classification and several mechanical properties of core composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T; Hosoda, H; Tsurugai, T

    1990-03-01

    According to the classification proposed by Hosoda, six core resins could be divided into two categories on the basis of the elemental composition and size distribution of filler particles by SEM observation and EDX analysis. Furthermore, several mechanical properties of the resins were determined. The following facts were found: Bell Feel Core, Clearfil Core, Clearfil PhotoCore, Core Max, and Core Max II resins were classified as a semihybrid resin, and Microrest Core resin as a hybrid type resin. The elements detected in the resins by the EDX were Si, Zr, Al, Ba and La. The mechanical properties of the resins were shown to be highly stable at one day or one week after curing. The mechanical properties of the resins suggest that the subsequent crown preparation and impression taking should be postponed until the next appointment.

  6. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (tung). Coconut. Corn. Cottonseed. Fish (refined). Hempseed. Linseed. Oiticica. Perilla. Poppyseed... section). 2-(Dimethylamino) ethanol (C.A.S. Registry No. 108-01-0) may be employed as an optional adjuvant... polysiloxane. Siloxane resins originating from the platinum-catalyzed reaction product of...

  7. Under-surface hardness of light-cured nanofilled resin composites of different shades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanitya, A.; Indrani, D. J.; Herda, E.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the this study was to analyze the under-surface hardness of light-cured nanofilled composite resins of different shades. The specimens were resin composites of each light (B1), medium (A3), and dark (C3) shades packed in a cylinder mold and subsequently polymerized. The hardness was tested using a Knoop system. The hardness test results for the bright (B1), medium (A3), and dark (C3) shades were 82.4+1.1, 75.9+1.2 and 65.9+1.9, respectively, and indicated significant differences between the under-surface hardness of each shade. It was concluded that resin composites of darker to brigher shades demonstrated lower to higher under-surface hardness.

  8. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  9. Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis

  10. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susila Anand, V. [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077 (India); Balasubramanian, Venkatesh, E-mail: chanakya@iitm.ac.in [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm{sup 2} with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal

  11. Effect of Light Direction on the Microleakage of Micro Filled and Hybrid Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Davari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important factors affecting the marginal seal of composite restorations is polymerization shrinkage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro leakage of two resin composites cured with two light directions. Methods: In this experimental study, forty similar class III preparations were prepared in 40 human anterior teeth. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups according to the resin composite used for filling the cavities (Microfilled composite: Heliomolar or hybrid composite: Spectrum. Etch group was further divided in two subgroups according to the light direction buccal and lingual. All the cavities were filled with the composites and cured for 40 seconds. The teeth were then thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5-55°c and covered with nail polish except for 1mm around cavity margins and immersed in 1% methylene blue for 12 hours. The teeth were sectioned and the dye penetration scores were recorded using stereo microscope. Data was analyzed using non parametric Mann Whitney test. Results: No significant difference was observed between the composite resins (p>0.05 or the light directions used for curing the composite resins (p>0.05. Conclusion: Directions of the light does not have any effect on the micro leakage of hybrid or micro filled composites in class III cavities.

  12. Has resin-based composite replaced amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-02-01

    The major health organizations in the world continue to accept amalgam use, but the "amalgam war" of the 1800s is still going on. The end is not in sight. There is little disagreement that amalgam serves well and, although controversial, it appears to have minimal to no health hazards. There is a wide variation in the relative amount of amalgam placed in developed countries, and many dentists in North America do not use it. However, amalgam is still being used at least some of the time by the majority of practitioners in North America, and most of those practitioners also place resin-based composite in Class II locations. The evolution from amalgam to tooth-colored restorations has been a slow and tumultuous journey. The acceptability of resin-based composite in Class II locations continues to be a question for some dentists, while others have concluded that amalgam is "dead." It would be highly desirable if some of dentists using the alleged poisonous properties of amalgam as a "practice building" ploy would find more legitimate methods to increase their practice activity.

  13. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  14. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  15. Effect of cooled composite inserts in the sealing ability of resin composite restorations placed at intraoral temperatures: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Moreno, Francisco José; Rosales-Leal, Juan Ignacio; Bravo, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage causes microleakage of resin composite restorations. New materials and operative techniques should be developed in order to reduce polymerization shrinkage. This research studied the effects of cooled composite inserts and room-temperature composite inserts in the sealing ability of resin composite restorations placed at intraoral temperatures. Forty-eight extracted human molars (providing a total of 155 sections) were kept at intraoral temperatures, and Class V cavities were restored with an ormocer-based resin composite (Admira, Voco). Three restorative techniques were used: conventional bulk insertion (Group I or control group) (n = 53 sections), room-temperature resin composite inserts (Group II) (n = 52) and cooled resin composite inserts (Group III) (n = 50). Microleakage and penetrating microleakage were studied under the microscope. Cooled composite inserts reduce microleakage at the gingival margins with respect to Groups I (p = 0.002) and II (p = 0.014). When small-size cooled composite inserts were used, the sealing ability at the gingival margins of Class V composite restorations was improved with respect to the bulk insertion technique and the room-temperature composite inserts technique.

  16. Bond Strength of Repaired Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Máximo de ARAÚJO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the bond strength of direct composite resins and composite repairs, using 3 different commercial brands - GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (Tokuyama, GII: Filtek Z350 (3M/ESPE and GIII: Te Econon (Ivoclar/Vivadent - and the use of AdperTM Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE adhesive system at the base/repair interface. Method: Thirty conic bases (5 mm x 5 mm x 3 mm of each commercial brand of composite resin were fabricated. All bases of each group were submitted to a thermocycling regimen of 20,000 cycles (5ºC to 55ºC ± 2ºC, for 30 s. The bases of each group were randomly assigned to 3 sub-groups, in which a combination of the commercial brands was performed for the repairs. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C during 7 days and were thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC - MEM 2000 with 500 kgf load cell running at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data in MPa were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (5%.Results: The following results were found: GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (11.22±4.00 MPa, Te Econom (12.03±3.47 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.66±2.89 MPa; GII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.88±2.04 MPa, Te Econom (7.77±1.64 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.50±6.14 MPa; and GIII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.41±2.50 MPa, Te Econom (12.33±3.18 MPa and Z350 (11.73±3.54 MPa.Conclusion: The bond strengths at the interface of the different composite resins submitted to repair were statistically similar regardless of the commercial brand.

  17. Glass Fiber Resin Composites and Components at Arctic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited GLASS FIBER RESIN...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GLASS FIBER RESIN COMPOSITES AND COMPONENTS AT ARCTIC TEMPERATURES 5...public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Glass fiber reinforced composites (GFRC

  18. Effect of photoactivation on the reduction of composite resin contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletti, Natalia A; Girotto, Luiza P S; Leite, Françoise H S; Mario, Débora N

    2017-06-01

    Composite resins are predominantly marketed in developing countries in tube form, and the contents of the tube may be used in numerous procedures for different patients. This represents a problem because of the risk of cross-contamination. This study aimed to evaluate contamination in vitro of the internal contents of composite resin tubes in the dental clinics of a higher-education institution, as well as the effect of photoactivation on the level of contamination. Twenty-five tubes containing composite resin were randomly chosen (by lottery). From each tube, two samples of approximately 2 mm of composite resin were removed, and then one sample, but not the other, was photoactivated. These samples were plated on Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI), Sabouraud and MacConkey agars, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48 h. Colony counting and Gram staining were performed for subsequent microscopic identification of fungi and bacteria. The non-photoactivated composite resin group presented significantly higher microbial contamination in relation to the photoactivated composite resin group. The photoactivation of camphorquinone present in composite resin produces reactive oxygen species, which might promote cell death of contaminant microorganisms. Thus, although the same tube of composite resin may be used for a number of different patients in the dental clinics of developing countries, the photoactivation process potentially reduces the risk of cross-contamination. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  19. Vegetal fibers in polymeric composites: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Fernandes Pereira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The need to develop and commercialize materials containing vegetal fibers has grown in order to reduce environmental impact and reach sustainability. Large amounts of lignocellulosic materials are generated around the world from several human activities. The lignocellulosic materials are composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, extractives and ashes. Recently these constituents have been used in different applications; in particular, cellulose has been the subject of numerous works on the development of composite materials reinforced with natural fibers. Many studies have led to composite materials reinforced with fibers to improve the mechanical, physical, and thermal properties. Furthermore, lignocellulosic materials have been treated to apply in innovative solutions for efficient and sustainable systems. This paper aims to review the lignocellulosic fibers characteristics, as well as to present their applications as reinforcement in composites of different polymeric matrices.

  20. Investigation of tribological properties of biobased polymers and polymeric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Satyam Kumar

    Worldwide potential demands for replacing petroleum derived raw materials with renewable plant-based ones in the production of valuable polymeric materials and composites are quite significant from the social and environmental standpoints. Therefore, using low-cost renewable resources has deeply drawn the attention of many researchers. Among them, natural oils are expected to be ideal alternative feedstock since oils, derived from plant and animal sources, are found in profusion in the world. The important feature of these types of materials is that they can be designed and tailored to meet different requirements. The real challenge lies in finding applications which would use sufficiently large quantities of these materials allowing biodegradable polymers to compete economically in the market. Lack of material and tribological characterizations have created an awareness to fulfill this essential objective. In order to understand the viability of biobased polymers in structural applications, this thesis work elucidates the study of friction and wear characteristics of polymers and polymeric composites made out of natural oil available profusely in plants and animals. The natural oils used in this study were soybean and tung oil. Various monomeric components like styrene, divinely benzene etc. were used in the synthesis of biobased polymers through Rh-catalyzed isomerization techniques. For the different polymeric composites, spent germ, a byproduct of ethanol production, is used as the filler and an organoclay called montmorillonite is used as the reinforcing agent in the polymer matrix. The effect of crosslinker concentration, filler composition and reinforcement agent concentration was studied under dry sliding. A ball-on-flat tribometer with a probe made out of steel, silicon nitride or diamond was used for most of the experimental work to measure friction and generate wear. The wear tracks were quantified with an atomic force microscope and a contact

  1. Correlation between flexural and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Gianluca; Fischer, Jens; Rohr, Nadja

    2016-11-04

    To evaluate a potential correlation between flexural strength and indirect tensile strength in assessing the mechanical strength of resin composite cements. Flexural strength (n = 5) and indirect tensile strength (n = 5) of 7 resin composite cements (RelyX Unicem 2 Automix [RXU], Panavia SA [PSA], Clearfil SA [CSA], Panavia F2.0 [PF2], Multilink Implant [MLI], DuoCem [DCM], Panavia 21 [P21]) were determined. Specimens were either auto-polymerized or dual-cured (except P21) and stored in water at 37 °C for 1 day prior to measurement. Flexural and indirect tensile strength of 4 cements (RXU, PSA, PF2, MLI) was additionally measured directly after curing and after 96 h water storage at 37 °C. Except for PF2, dual-cured specimens achieved higher flexural strength than auto-polymerized specimens. In the indirect tensile strength test differences in auto-polymerized and dual-cured specimens were only detected for RXU and DCM. A general non-linear correlation was found between flexural and indirect tensile strength values. However, strength values of auto-polymerized and dual-cured specimens did not generally correlate. Flexural strength and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements are correlated. At high strength values the indirect tensile test is less sensitive than the flexural test. The results suggest that the indirect tensile test may only be recommended as a screening test especially for low or medium strength resin composite cements.

  2. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  3. Posterior resin-based composite: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J O; Walker, Richard; Davidson, J M

    2002-01-01

    The use of direct posterior resin-based composite has increased primarily due to patient esthetic desires and product improvements. Other factors (substantiated or not) contributing to increased use of resin-based composite are environmental and health concerns with dental amalgam. New visible light cured resin-based composite products are introduced yearly, as manufacturers continue to improve this tooth-colored restorative material. This paper will characterize current posterior resin-based composite materials (hybrid, microfill, flowable, and packable), review recent in vitro and clinical research, and recommend indications for these materials. In addition, the literature on compomers will be reviewed and recommendation made for their use. The data indicates that composite resin is a technique sensitive restorative material that can be used in large preparations if proper manipulation and isolation can be maintained. Compomers may also be used as an esthetic posterior restorative if proper isolation is provided.

  4. Laminated composite based on polyester geotextile fibers and polyurethane resin for coating wood structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Andrey Olivato Assagra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New environmental laws have restricted the use of hardwood trees in overhead power lines structures, such as, poles and cross-arms, leading companies to seek alternative materials. Reforested wood coated with polymeric resin has been proposed as an environmental friendly solution, with improved electrical properties and protection against external agents, e.g. moisture, ultraviolet radiation and fungi. However, the single thin layer of resin, normally applied on such structures reveal to be inefficient, due to be easily damage during handling. In this paper, we present a composite coating, based on geotextile fibers and polyurethane resin that is suitable for wooden structures. Results obtained from two different tree species (from managed and reforested areas coated with the composite reveal that the additional layer not only provided a stronger adhesion between wood and ccoating layer but also a further improvement in the electrical properties and better protection against abrasion and moisture.

  5. Spectroscopic and mechanical properties of dental resin composites cured with different light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, C.; Giorgini, E.; Landi, L.; Putignano, A.; Tosi, Giorgio

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of polymerization in order to achieve an adequate clinical composite filling. Photopolymerization of new micro matrix restorative resin composite, Esthet-x, shade A3, from Dentsply Corp., was performed with plasma xenon, halogen and light emitting diode (LED) lamps. The degree of conversion (DC) of the resins was determined by means of middle, near infrared and Raman spectroscopy in transmittance and in DRIFT modes. The resin conversion was influenced by the nature of the light source, the distance from the irradiated surface, the exposure time and the depth from the surface. High DC values were obtained with all lamps but they resulted almost constant with the depth only in the LED unit. Micro-hardness and differential thermal analysis were in satisfactory agreement with DC data.

  6. Effect of epoxy resin properties on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hong-Wei; Gao, Feng [Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering; Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials; Li, Kai-Xi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China). Key Laboratory of Carbon Materials

    2013-09-15

    Three kinds of epoxy resins, i.e. tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (AG80), difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (E51) and novolac type epoxy resin (F46) were selected as matrices for carbon fiber/epoxy composites. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical properties of fiber/epoxy composites by using these three kinds of epoxy resins with different physical and chemical performance. The results show that the composites fabricated with AG80 present the best stiffness and the composites prepared with E5 1have the best toughness. The stiffness and toughness of the composites prepared with F46 are middle values located between those for AG80/epoxy and E51/epoxy composites. Thus, the mixed epoxy resin is a promising approach for industrial production. (orig.)

  7. Bacterial viability and physical properties of antibacterially modified experimental dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Trellenkamp, Taina; Bergmann, Nora; Beikler, Thomas; Ritter, Helmut; Janda, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the antibacterial effect and the effect on the material properties of a novel delivery system with Irgasan as active agent and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan when added to experimental dental resin composites. A delivery system based on novel polymeric hollow beads, loaded with Irgasan and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan as active agents were used to manufacture three commonly formulated experimental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as standard (ST). Material A contained the delivery system providing 4 % (m/m) Irgasan, material B contained 4 % (m/m) methacrylated Irgasan and material C 8 % (m/m) methacrylated Irgasan. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), water sorption (WS), solubility (SL), surface roughness Ra, polymerization shrinkage, contact angle Θ, total surface free energy γS and its apolar γS (LW), polar γS (AB), Lewis acid γS (+)and base γS (-) term as well as bacterial viability were determined. Significance was p Dental resin composites with small quantities of a novel antibacterially doped delivery system or with an antibacterial monomer provided acceptable physical properties and good antibacterial effectiveness. The sorption material being part of the delivery system can be used as a vehicle for any other active agent.

  8. Polymerization contraction and conversion of light-curing BisGMA-based methacrylate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venhoven, B A; de Gee, A J; Davidson, C L

    1993-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerization contraction and the conversion of light-curing methacrylate resins based on bisphenol-A bis(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylate (BisGMA) diluted with triethylene glycol dimethyacrylate (TEGDMA), methyl methacrylate (MMA), hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) or (+/-)-2-ethylhexyl methacrylate (EHMA). The contraction measurements were carried out with a linometer, a simple device to determine true linear polymerization contraction of liquid monomers at ambient temperature. The contraction increased with the amount of diluting monomer. The estimated conversion of the BisGMA-TEGDMA, calculated using the contraction, is consistent with literature values. The BisGMA-HPMA mixtures showed high conversions at moderate contraction.

  9. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  10. Effects of different cavity disinfectants on shear bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Soley; Yazici, A Ruya; Gorucu, Jale; Ertan, Atilla; Pala, Kansad; Ustun, Yakup; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2011-07-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of different cavity disinfection agents on bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite. Thirty-six caries-free human third mandibular molars sectioned in mesio-distal direction were mounted in acrylic resin with their flat dentin surfaces exposed. After the dentin surfaces were wet ground with # 600 silicon carbide paper, the teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups of 12 each according to the cavity disinfection agents; chlorhexidine (CHX); sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), propolis, ozone, Er,Cr:YSGG laser and no treatment (control). After treatment of dentin surfaces with one of these cavity disinfection agents, Filtek Silorane adhesive system was applied. The silorane-based resin composite, Filtek Silorane was condensed into a mold and polymerized. After storage at 37°C for 24 hours, the specimens were tested in shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups (p>0.05). The use of the tested cavity disinfection agents, chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, propolis, ozone and Er,Cr:YSGG laser did not significantly affect the dentin bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite, filtek supreme. Cavity disinfectant applications did not affect the dentin bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite.

  11. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p composite resin exhibited the lowest shear bond strength values when used with the same adhesive resins. The adhesive mode of failure was higher than cohesive with all laboratory composite resins bonded to the StickNet substructure at both storage times. Water storage had a tendency to lower the bond strengths of all laboratory composites, although the statistical differences were not significant. Within the limitations of this study, it was found that bonding of the veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. BINARY COMPETITIVE AND COOPERATIVE ADSORPTION OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS ON POLYMERIC RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ming Zhang; Jin-long Chen; Bing-cai Pan; Quan-xing Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid and aniline on a conventional macroporous resin Amberlite XAD4 and the other two newly-developed hypercrosslinked resins NDA101 and NDA100 were investigated in a single or binary batch system at 293 K and 313 K, respectively. All the adsorption isotherms of 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid and aniline on the test resins in both systems can fit well with the Langmuir equation, indicating that the adsorption is a favorable process. At the identical equilibrium concentration, the amount of aniline adsorbed on polymeric resins in the single system is higher than that in the binary system because of the competitive adsorption between 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid and aniline on the resin surface. However, the uptake amount of 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid in the binary system is markedly larger than that in the single system, which is presumably due to the cooperative effect arisen from the electrostatic interaction between 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid and aniline adsorbed on the resin surface. The simultaneous adsorption system was proven to be helpful for the selective adsorption toward 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid due to its larger selective index.

  13. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Smile makeover utilizing direct composite resin veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczarski, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Creating a beautiful smile is more than restoring a single tooth back to its proper form. One must take into account the entire aesthetic zone, along with the mechanics of restoring the teeth to proper form and function. To make this effort even more challenging, the clinician is in full control and completely accountable for making the direct composite resin restorations from which the smile is created. Patients usually won't critique the aesthetics of a posterior direct resin, but once we move into the visible smile (along with the fact that most cosmetic procedures are patient desire- and want-driven) we must be able to deliver what the patient expects. Preplanning the case and avoiding the "prep and pray" approach to the smile-design process is the cornerstone of success. Utilizing tools for the creation of the restorations, such as a preoperative wax-up and silicone putty matrix, help the clinician break the procedure down to individual restorations that when created in harmony with the pre-operative design or wax-up, will allow a final "smile design" to emerge with predictability without getting lost in the daunting task of creating the entire smile all at once. Proper use of ideal composite materials adds the final touch on creating realistic results that even the most discerning patients demand. Layering colors, utilizing differing opacities and translucencies within the restorative process, is a must. Having a "recipe" to follow simplifies the process and gives the clinician confidence that the final result will have that realistic look. All in all, the easiest way to handle a challenging case is to break it down into smaller and more manageable increments in order to ensure a predictable outcome.

  15. Influence of curing tip distance on resin composite Knoop hardness number, using three different light curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Danilo Biazzetto de Menezes; de Almeida, Janaina Bertoncelo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Simonides

    2003-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of curing tip distance on the Knoop Hardness Number (KHN) of a resin composite when using three different light curing units: (1) a halogen light (XL 1500 curing unit-3M), (2) a "softstart-polymerization" (Elipar Trilight curing in an exponential mode-ESPE) and (3) a PAC (Apolo 95E curing unit-DMD). The resin composite, Filtek Z250 (3M), was cured by these curing units at three light-tip distances from the resin composite: 0 mm, 6 mm and 12 mm. The resin composite specimens were flattened to their middle portion and submitted to 18 KHN measurements perspecimen. The results showed that for the Elipar Trilight unit, the hardness of the resin composite decreased as the light tip distance increased. The XL 1500 unit presented a significant decrease in hardness as the depth of cure of the resin composite increased. Apolo 95E caused a decrease in the resin composite hardness values when the depth of cure and light tip distance increased.

  16. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  17. Modified Technique for Making Auto-polymerized Polymethylmethacrylate Resin Custom Tray

    OpenAIRE

    Chidambaranathan, Ahila Singaravel; Reddy, Ramesh; Rajendran, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Muthu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Custom made tray for dental impression is designed to provide a uniform space for the impression material and thereby improve the accuracy of the resultant working cast. Auto-polymerized acrylic resins have been the most commonly used material for the fabrication of these trays. The custom tray produces more accurate and reliable results for inter-abutment distance at the occlusal and gingival level than stock trays. This article describes a modified technique for fabrication of auto-polymeri...

  18. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiraldo Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46. A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk of 1.0 mm thickness obtained from bovine tooth. On the acrylic resin base, elastomer mold of 2.0 mm was adapted. The temperature increase was measured after composite light curing. After 24 h, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test (HMV-2000, Shimadzu, Tokyo, Japan. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey′s test (a = 0.05. Results: For both composites, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05 in the top surface hardness; however, PAC promoted statistically lower (P < 0.05 Knoop hardness number values in the bottom. The mean temperature increase showed no significant statistical differences (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The standardized radiant exposure showed no influence on the temperature increase of the composite, however, showed significant effect on hardness values.

  19. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio HB Aguiar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Flávio HB Aguiar1, Kelly RM Andrade1, Débora AN Leite Lima1, Gláucia MB Ambrosano2, José R Lovadino11Department of Restorative Dentistry; 2Department of Social Dentistry/Statistics, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, SP, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5: considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm2 – 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm2 – 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm2 – 40 s and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm. All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization.Keywords: photo-polymerization, light-curing distance, light-curing units, composite resin, composite thickness, microhardness

  20. Assessing the effects of adsorptive polymeric resin additions on fungal secondary metabolite chemical diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Menéndez, Víctor; Asensio, Francisco; Moreno, Catalina; de Pedro, Nuria; Monteiro, Maria Candida; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Vicente, Francisca; Bills, Gerald F.; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Tormo, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorptive polymeric resins have been occasionally described to enhance the production of specific secondary metabolites (SMs) of interest. Methods that induce the expression of new chemical entities in fungal fermentations may lead to the discovery of new bioactive molecules and should be addressed as possible tools for the creation of new microbial chemical libraries for drug lead discovery. Herein, we apply both biological activity and chemical evaluations to assess the use of adsorptive resins as tools for the differential expression of SMs in fungal strain sets. Data automation approaches were applied to ultra high performance liquid chromatography analysis of extracts to evaluate the general influence in generating new chemical entities or in changing the production of specific SMs by fungi grown in the presence of resins and different base media. PMID:25379340

  1. Waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resin obtained by mini emulsion polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murillo, Edwin, E-mail: edwinalbertomurillo@gmail.com [Grupo de Investigacion en Materiales Polimericos (GIMAPOL), Universidad Francisco de Paula Santander, San Jose de Cucuta (Colombia); Lopez, Betty [Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle, Medellin (Colombia)

    2016-10-15

    Four waterborne hyper branched alkyd-acrylic resins (HBRAA) were synthesized by mini emulsion polymerization from a hyper branched alkyd resin (HBR), methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and acrylic acid (AA), by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and ammonium persulfate (AP) as initiators. The reaction between HBR and acrylic monomers was evidenced by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The conversion percentage, glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), content of acrylic polymer (determined by soxhlet extraction) and molecular weight increased with the content of acrylic monomers used in the synthesis. The main structure formed during the synthesis was the HBRAA. The analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the particle size distribution of HBRAA2, HBRAA3 and HBRAA4 resins were mainly mono modal. The film properties (gloss, flexibility, adhesion and drying time) of the HBRAA were good. (author)

  2. Equilibrium study of single-solute adsorption of anionic surfactants with polymeric XAD resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Delgado, R.A.; Cotoruelo-Minguez, L.M.; Rodriguez, J.J. (Univ. de Malaga (Spain))

    1992-06-01

    Equilibrium data for the adsorption of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) from aqueous solutions by Amberlite XAD-4 and XAD-7 polymeric resins at temperatures in the 10-40C range have been obtained. The specific surface area of the resins plays a major role in adsorption, and thus the best results have been obtained with XAD-4 resin. A higher adsorption of SDBS over SLS was also observed. Several adsorption isotherm models have been used to fit the experimental data. The best results have been obtained with the Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir-Freundlich equations. Estimations of the isosteric heat of adsorption, free energy, and entropy of adsorption are also reported.

  3. Zinc Chloride Influence on The Resins Furan Polymerization to Foundry Moulds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Leila Figueiredo; Vale, Marcus; Júnior, Antonio Hortêncio Munhoz; Masson, Terezinha Jocelen; de Andrade e Silva, Leonardo Gondin

    The resins used in foundry molds developed for the automotive market has led to major changes in the manufacturing method of foundry molds. The polymerization of these resins and a subsequent curing are used to connect to the foundry sand in a rigid structure capable of receiving and holding liquid metal. It is essential to know the process of polymerization of these resins and their impact on the final properties of the obtained molds, especially in the mechanical characteristics. In this work it was studied the influence of the addition of zinc chloride (in solution) in the sand-furan resin mixture, with the aim of reducing the relation between the extraction time intervals and time bench life. The results showed that addition of percentages of the order of 5.0wt% to 7.5wt% zinc chloride solution reduces this ratio between 10% and 17%; this means that the casting model may be extracted from the sand mass in a smaller time interval increasing the productivity of manufacturing molds. It was also observed that there was also an increase of 9% to 18% in bench life intervals.

  4. Improvement of Strength Characteristics of Aerospace Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials using Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Graft Polymerization Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Tatsuji; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Tahara, Mitsuru; Okubo, Masaaki

    The atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasma-graft polymerization treatment is applied for the surface modification of the organic fibers in order to enhance the strength of the aerospace structural composite material consisting of the laminated textiles. The influence of the treatment on the composite materials' strength properties is examined. As a result, the plasma-graft polymerization surface treatment is effective for the compression and bend of the composite materials. Because the interfacial bonding between each fiber and matrix resin is strengthened by the treatment, the strengths of the composite materials are increased.

  5. Color Stability of IDM Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Discoloration of composite resins is considered to be a major factor in esthetic restoration"nfailures. The aim of this study was to evaluate color stability of IDM composite (both light and self cure"nsamples namely IL and IS, and to compare it with a self-cure composite (Degufill named DS and a light"ncure ormocer composite (Definite, called DL in the Report. 60 disk shaped samples of each composite"nwere prepared, according to ISO-7491. The samples were divided into 3 groups and aged as follows:"nA- (Control 7 days in dark 37°c chamber"nB- Foil covered and kept in 100% humidity, and 37°c in xenotest chamber for 24 hours, then transferred"nto a dark 37°c chamber for 6 more days."nC- Kept in 37°c, 100% humidity under the emission of xiiion lamp of xenotest chamber for 24 hours,"nand then transferred to 37°c dark chamber for 6 more days"nThe lightness and chromaticity values of samples were measured both before and after aging using a"nspectrophotometer (Data Flash. The total color changes as well as changes in lightness and chromaticity"nvalues were measured in the CIE L * a * b * scale, and analyzed. Color change was recorded to be"nsignificant in all samples after aging. The maximum change belonged to IL, which was significantly"ndifferent from DL and DS. It seems, in order to have a durable esthetic restoration using IDM, more"nscientific and professional consideration is needed in the production process.

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Indirect Composite Resin Restorations Cemented with Different Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Maurem; Souza, Niélli; Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    To clinically evaluate the performance of indirect composite resin restorations cemented with conventional and self-adhesive resin cements over a 12-month period. Ten patients fulfilled all the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four composite resin restorations were performed using an indirect technique and cemented with a resin cement (RelyX ARC) or a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). Two independent evaluators analyzed the restorations using modified USPHS criteria after periods of two weeks and 6 and 12 months. Statistical significance between the cements at each timepoint was evaluated with the Wilcoxon test and between timepoints with the Mann-Whitney test, both at a significance level of 5%. Fisher's exact test was used to assess the occurrence of absolute failures. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups at the same timepoint nor between groups at different timepoints. The only significant difference was found for color match for both groups after 12 months. After 12 months, indirect composite resin restorations cemented with self-adhesive resin cement performed similarly to those cemented with conventional resin cement.

  7. Clinical evaluation of a flowable resin composite and flowable compomer for preventive resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Man; Liu, HongSheng

    2005-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the retention and caries protection of a flowable resin composite (Flow Line) and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow) used in preventive resin restorations as compared to the conventional preventive resin technique which uses a resin composite (Brilliant) and a sealant (Concise). This study observed 205 permanent molars with small carious cavities less than 1.5 mm in width, which were obtained from 165 children aged 7 to 15 years. Flowable resin composite was used to treat 75 teeth, and 71 teeth were treated with flowable compomer in both cavities and caries-free fissures. For the control group, 59 teeth were treated with resin composite in cavities and sealant in caries-free fissures. The teeth were evaluated at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24-month intervals. After three months, all 205 treated teeth were completely intact. After six months, 66 of the 71 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 65 of the 70 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 57 of the 58 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 12 months, 60 of the 67 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 61 of the 67 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 51 of the 55 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 18 months, 53 of the 61 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 54 of the 62 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 47 of the 53 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 24 months, 49 of the 58 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 45 of the 57 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 42 of the 52 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. There were no statistically significant differences in retention rates among all groups after 3, 6, 12, 18 or 24-months (p>0.05). One tooth treated with flowable resin composite and one tooth treated with flowable

  8. Relationship between Color and Translucency of Multishaded Dental Composite Resins.

    OpenAIRE

    Naeimi Akbar, H.; Moharamzadeh, K.; Wood, D. J.; van Noort, R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the translucency of different shades of two highly aesthetic multilayered restorative composite resins. In total nine shades from Esthet.X and ten shades from Filtek Supreme composite resins were chosen. Discs of each shade were prepared (N = 3) and light-cured. Total and diffuse transmittance values for each sample were measured. Statistical analysis showed that the opaque dentine shades of both composites were the least translucent and the enamel ...

  9. Properties of Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Resin Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jijun Tang; Haijun Zhou; Yunxia Liang; Xinlan Shi; Xin Yang; Jiaoxia Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The graphene oxide (GO) was obtained by pressurized oxidation method using natural graphite as raw materials. Then the GO/epoxy resin composites were prepared by casting. The mechanical and damping properties of composites were studied. As a result, the impact intensity of GO/epoxy resin composites was prominently improved with the content of the graphene oxide increasing. The glass transition temperature decreased and the damping capacity is improved.

  10. Properties of Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Resin Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jijun Tang; Haijun Zhou; Yunxia Liang; Xinlan Shi; Xin Yang; Jiaoxia Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The graphene oxide (GO) was obtained by pressurized oxidation method using natural graphite as raw materials. Then the GO/epoxy resin composites were prepared by casting. The mechanical and damping properties of composites were studied. As a result, the impact intensity of GO/epoxy resin composites was prominently improved with the content of the graphene oxide increasing. The glass transition temperature decreased and the damping capacity is improved.

  11. Properties of Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijun Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The graphene oxide (GO was obtained by pressurized oxidation method using natural graphite as raw materials. Then the GO/epoxy resin composites were prepared by casting. The mechanical and damping properties of composites were studied. As a result, the impact intensity of GO/epoxy resin composites was prominently improved with the content of the graphene oxide increasing. The glass transition temperature decreased and the damping capacity is improved.

  12. Recent Development of Flax Fibres and Their Reinforced Composites Based on Different Polymeric Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrushikesh Abhyankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work describes flax fibre reinforced polymeric composites with recent developments. The properties of flax fibres, as well as advanced fibre treatments such as mercerization, silane treatment, acylation, peroxide treatment and coatings for the enhancement of flax/matrix incompatibility are presented. The characteristic properties and characterizations of flax composites on various polymers including polypropylene (PP and polylactic acid, epoxy, bio-epoxy and bio-phenolic resin are discussed. A brief overview is also given on the recent nanotechnology applied in flax composites.

  13. Polimerización de un cemento de composite a través de restauraciones de cerómero utilizando lámparas halógenas y LEDs Polymerization of dual-cure resin luting cements through laboratory-processed-resins: LED versus halogen lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Grau Grullón

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evaluó la influencia del grosor de una restauración indirecta de cerómero, el tipo de lámpara fotoactivadora y el tiempo de almacenamiento en la dureza Vickers de un cemento de composite. Dos lámparas de diodos (Optilight CL [CL] y Ultra-Lume 5 [UL] fueron comparadas con la lámpara halógena (Optilux 401 [OH]. Fueron confeccionados especímenes en cerómero con un diámetro de 5 mm y una espesura de 1 y 2 mm, los cuales fueron interpuestos entre la luz y la matriz metálica de 5 mm de ancho y 0,5 mm de grosor que contenía el cemento de composite. Los 45 cuerpos de prueba fueron divididos en 9 grupos: G1: exposición directa de luz DLE/OH; G2: 1 mm/OH; G3: 2 mm/OH; G4: DLE/CL; G5: 1 mm/CL; G6: 2 mm/CL; G7: DLE/UL; G8: 1 mm/UL y G9: 2 mm/UL. La fotoactivación fue realizada durante 60 segundos. La dureza Vickers (50 g/30s fue medida en la superficie tope de todos los especímenes luego de 24 horas y 180 días de almacenamiento. La lámpara fotoactivadora y el grosor del cerómero fueron estadísticamente significativas (pThis study evaluated the influence of indirect composite resin thickness, the storage time and light-curing units on the Vickers hardness of a dual-cure resin luting cement. Two light-emitting diodes lights (Optilight CL [CL] and UltraLume5 [UL] were compared with a quartz tungsten halogen unit (Optilux 401 [OH]. Laboratory-processed composite specimens with a diameter of 5mm and thickness of 1 and 2 mm were constructed to be interposed between the light guide and the metal matrix (5mm wide and 0.5 mm deep with the resin luting cement. Then, 45 dual-cure resin luting specimens were divided in nine groups: G1: direct light exposure DLE/OH; G2: 1 mm/OH; G3: 2 mm/OH; G4: DLE/CL; G5: 1 mm/CL; G6: 2 mm/CL; G7: DLE/UL; G8: 1 mm/UL and G9: 2 mm/UL. The light curing was performed for 60 seconds. The Vickers hardness (50g/30s was measured at the top surface of all specimens, either after 24 hours or 180 days. The Light

  14. Sorption kinetics of ethanol/water solution by dimethacrylate-based dental resins and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Achilias, Dimitris S; Karabela, Maria M

    2007-04-01

    In the present investigation the sorption-desorption kinetics of 75 vol % ethanol/water solution by dimethacrylate-based dental resins and resin composites was studied in detail. The resins examined were made by light-curing of bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA), and mixtures of these monomers. The resin composites were prepared from two commercial light-cured restorative materials (Z100 MP and Filtek Z250), the resin matrix of which is based on copolymers of the above-mentioned monomers. Ethanol/water sorption/desorption was examined in both equilibrium and dynamic conditions in two adjacent sorption-desorption cycles. For all the materials studied, it was found that the amount of ethanol/water sorbed or desorbed was always larger than the corresponding one reported in literature in case of water immersion. It was also observed that the chemical structure of the monomers used for the preparation of the resins directly affects the amount of solvent sorbed or desorbed, as well as sorption kinetics, while desorption rate was nearly unaffected. In the case of composites studied, it seems that the sorption/desorption process is not influenced much by the presence of filler. Furthermore, diffusion coefficients calculated for the resins were larger than those of the composites and were always higher during desorption than during sorption. Finally, an interesting finding concerning the rate of ethanol/water sorption was that all resins and composites followed Fickian diffusion kinetics during almost the whole sorption curve; however, during desorption the experimental data were overestimated by the theoretical model. Instead, it was found that a dual diffusion-relaxation model was able to accurately predict experimental data during the whole desorption curve. Kinetic relaxation parameters, together with diffusion coefficients, are reported

  15. Dentine bond strength of a composite resin polymerized with conventional light and argon laser Resistência de união à dentina de resina composta polimerizada com luz halógena e laser de argônio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ramos Lloret

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of argon laser (488 nm has been suggested as a new alternative for polymerizing adhesive materials. This study aimed to evaluate the tensile bond strength of a microfilled composite (A110, 3M inserted by incremental technique (3 increments of 1 mm and by single increment (3 mm polymerized by argon laser for 10, 20 and 30 seconds and halogen light for 40 seconds. Eighty (8 groups of 10 teeth freshly extracted bovine teeth were stored in a freezer in distilled water for one week. The crowns were cross-sectioned from the roots. Pulpectomy was performed and the pulp chambers were sealed with wax. The buccal surfaces of the teeth were ground with wet sandpaper (grains: 120, 400, and 600 to expose the surface dentin, and the teeth were then included in acrylic resin. A metal device was used to fix each sample and a black propylene matrix25 (3 mm high with an internal millimetric delimitation was used to insert the material according to the groups studied. The polymerization intervals were of 10, 20 and 30 seconds for the laser polymerization and 40 seconds for the conventional polymerization. Tensile tests were performed by a Universal Testing Machine 4442 (Instron at a speed of 0.5 mm/min and 500 N load. According to the methodology used, the incremental technique increased bond strength values. There was no difference between the studied polymerization techniques when resin was filled in 3 increments.O uso do laser de argônio (488 nm tem sido sugerido como uma nova alternativa para polimerização de materiais adesivos. Este estudo tem o objetivo de avaliar a resistência adesiva de uma resina composta microparticulada (A110, 3M inserida pela técnica incremental (3 incrementos de 1 mm e de incremento único (3 mm polimerizada com laser de argônio por 10, 20 e 30 segundos e com luz halógena por 40 segundos. Oitenta (8 grupos com 10 dentes dentes bovinos recém-extraídos foram armazenados em geladeira, em água destilada, por uma semana

  16. [Stress profile during curing contraction of composite resin adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, K H; Hickel, R

    1990-11-01

    The wall-to-wall curing contraction of thin composite resin layers was recorded with a tensometer. The composite resin was applied to cylindrically shaped ceramic sample holders with diameters of 3 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm. The distances of the sample holders was set at 50 microns, 100 microns, 150 microns, 200 microns and 300 microns. The shrinkage stress recordings clearly show that the shrinkage forces are governed by the distance of the sample holders and not by the volume or the configuration factor of the composite resin layers.

  17. Composite resin: a versatile, multi-purpose restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduced more than some 50 years ago, composite resin technology has simplified the manner in which clinicians practice restorative dentistry, offering greater predictability and improved physical properties. Decades of material science and laboratory development along with clinical trials in human subjects have culminated in composite resin being validated as a reliable, multifunctional restorative material. With a wide range of composite resins available today, clinicians can benefit from knowing the infrastructure of a given material in order to determine which type will work best in a particular clinical situation.

  18. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed-Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH and light-emitting diode (LED units (LCUs. Materials and Methods Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12 during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey, a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE, and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH, was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p 0.05. Conclusions Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU.

  19. Produced water treatment using polymeric resins; Resinas polimericas para tratamento da agua produzida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louvisse, Ana Maria Travalloni; Freire, Norma de Oliveira [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Queiros, Yure Gomes de Carvalho; Silva, Carla Michele Frota da; Barros, Cintia Chagas; Lucas, Elizabeth Fernandes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas

    2008-07-01

    The treatment and disposal of oily waters from oil production and refining processes represent an important technological pass for attendance of the ambient legislation and to the politics of the Cia of search of the environmental excellence. The reuse or reinjection of the co-produced water has been considered an interesting strategical alternative, however, the water quality requirement for these processes demands a pretreatment step, considering the exit effluent from primary and secondary treatment processes currently used. This work presents resulted of the polymeric resin development for tertiary treatment of oily waters with low oil and grasses content and fine solids, including the dissolved fraction. These resins can adsorb, in reversible form, organic components. Its high adsorption capacity is determined by the polarity, superficial area, range of porosity and a wide distribution of particle size and pore. Another important characteristic is the possibility of its use in some cycles of work due to its weak forces of interaction between the contaminants and the surface of the resin. Regeneration can be carried through of diverse forms, including the use of solvent, with or without the variation of temperature and/or pH. The gotten results indicated a high resin adsorption capacity, with concentrated oily water treatment volume 10,000 times the volume of resin used. (author)

  20. Evaluation of temperature rise with different curing methods and units in two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaei M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The majority of commercial curing units in dentistry are of halogen lamp type. The new polymerizing units such as blue LED are introduced in recent years. One of the important side effects of light curing is the temperature rise in composite resin polymerization which can affect the vitality of tooth pulp. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature rise in two different composite resins during polymerization with halogen lamps and blue LED. Materials and Methods: This experimental study investigated the temperature rise in two different composites (Hybrid, Tetric Ceram/Nanofilled, Filteke Supreme of A2 shade polymerized with two halogen lamps (Coltolux 50, 350 mW/cm2 and Optilux 501 in standard, 820 mW/cm2 and Ramp, 100-1030 mW/cm2 operating modes and one blue LED with the intensity of 620 mW/cm2. Five samples for each group were prepared and temperature rise was monitored using a k-type thermocouple. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Light curing units and composite resins had statistically significant influence on the temperature rise (p<0.05. Significantly, lower temperature rise occurred in case of illumination with Coltolux 50.There was no significant difference between Optilux 501 in standard curing mode and LED. Tetric Ceram showed higher temperature rise. Conclusion: According to the results of this study the high power halogen lamp and LED could produce significant heat which may be harmful to the dental pulp.

  1. Structure-Composition-Property Relationships in Polymeric Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Skrtic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP-based materials over the last decade have yielded bioactive polymeric composites capable of protecting teeth from demineralization or even regenerating lost tooth mineral. The anti-cariogenic/remineralizing potential of these ACP composites originates from their propensity, when exposed to the oral environment, to release in a sustained manner sufficient levels of mineral-forming calcium and phosphate ions to promote formation of stable apatitic tooth mineral. However, the less than optimal ACP filler/resin matrix cohesion, excessive polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of these experimental materials can adversely affect their physicochemical and mechanical properties, and, ultimately, limit their lifespan. This study demonstrates the effects of chemical structure and composition of the methacrylate monomers used to form the matrix phase of composites on degree of vinyl conversion (DVC and water sorption of both copolymers and composites and the release of mineral ions from the composites. Modification of ACP surface via introducing cations and/or polymers ab initio during filler synthesis failed to yield mechanically improved composites. However, moderate improvement in composite’s mechanical stability without compromising its remineralization potential was achieved by silanization and/or milling of ACP filler. Using ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate as base monomers and adding moderate amounts of hydrophilic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate or its isomer ethyl-α-hydroxymethacrylate appears to be a promising route to maximize the remineralizing ability of the filler while maintaining high DVC. Exploration of the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP fillers and polymer matrices is complex but essential for achieving a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern dissolution/re-precipitation of bioactive ACP fillers, and

  2. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin and Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    Cyanate ester (or polycyanate) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14A polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. Process trials, tests and analyses were conducted in order to gain insight into factors that can affect final properties of the cured cyanate ester resin and its composites. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to cure is also crucial as it affects the T{sub g} of the resin and composite. Recommendations for reducing moisture contact with the resin during wet-winding are presented. High fiber volume fraction ({approximately}80%) composites wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent hoop tensile strengths (660 to 670 ksi average with individual rings failing above 700 ksi), which are believed to be the highest recorded strengths for this class of materials. The measured transverse properties were also exceptional for these high fiber fraction composites. Based on the available data, this cyanate ester resin system and its composites are recommended for space and vacuum applications only. Further testing is required before these materials can be recommended for long term use at elevated temperatures in an ambient air environment. The results of all analyses and tests performed as part of this study are presented as well as baseline process for fabricating thick, stage-cured composites. The manufacture of a 1 in. thick composite cylinder made with this process is also described.

  3. Effect of exposure time on the polymerization of resin cement through ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShaafi, Maan M; AlQahtani, Mohammed Q; Price, Richard B

    2014-04-01

    This study measured the effects of using three different exposure times to cure one resin cement through two types of ceramic. One light-curing resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent) was exposed for 20 s, 40 s, or 60 s with a BluePhase G2 light (Ivoclar Vivadent) on the high power setting through 1.0 mm of either ZirPress (ZR) or Empress Esthetic (EST) ceramic (Ivoclar Vivadent). The degree of conversion (DC) of the resin was measured 100 s after light exposure. The Knoop microhardness (KHN) was measured 5 min after light exposure and again after 24 h. The DC and KHN results were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Scheffe's post-hoc multiple comparison tests at α = 0.05. Increasing exposure time had a significant effect on the KHN and DC values for the resins exposed through both ceramics. As exposure times increased, the influence of the ceramic was reduced; however, the microhardness values were greater for the cement exposed through EST ceramic. When the exposure time was increased from 20 s to 40 s, microhardness values for the resin increased by 39.6% through the EST ceramic. When exposed for 60 s, there were no differences between the 100-s DC values or 5-min KHN values using either ceramic (p > 0.05). There was an excellent correlation between the DC at 100 s and the microhardness values measured at 5 min. Resin polymerization was greater through EST than ZR ceramic. At least 40 s to 60 s from the Blue- Phase G2 on high power mode is required to cure this resin cement through 1.0 mm of ceramic.

  4. Evaluation of wear rate of dental composites polymerized by halogen or LED light curing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaghehmand H.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Sufficient polymerization is a critical factor to obtain optimum physical properties and clinical efficacy of resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate wear rates of composite resins polymerized by two different systems Light Emitting Diodes (LED to and Halogen lamps. Materials and Methods: In this laboratory study, 20 specimens of A3 Tetric Ceram composite were placed in brass molds of 2*10*10 mm dimensions and cured for 40 seconds with 1 mm distance from surface. 10 specimens were cured with LED and the other 10 were cured with Halogen unit. A device with the ability to apply force was developed in order to test the wear of composites. After storage in distilled water for 10 days, the specimens were placed in the wear testing machine. A chrome cobalt stylus with 1.12 mm diameter was applied against the specimens surfaces with a load of 2 kg. The weight of each samples before and after 5000, 10000, 20000, 40000, 80000 and 120000 cycles was measured using an electronic balance with precision of 10-4 grams. Data were analyzed using t test and paired t test. P0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, LED and halogen light curing units resulted in a similar wear rate in composite resin restorations.

  5. Surface roughness of etched composite resin in light of composite repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Cardoso, M.V.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Munck, J. De; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Meerbeek, B. Van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In search for clinically effective composite repair protocols, the effect of various etching protocols on the surface roughness of composite resins with different filler composition were investigated. METHODS: Of two composite resins (hybrid-filled Clearfil AP-X; nano-filled Filtek Supre

  6. EFFECTS OF THERMOCYCLING AND VARIOUS DRINKS ON THE COLOR STABILITY OF HEAT-POLYMERIZED ACRYLIC RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar ALTINCI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The discoloration of acrylic resin denture bases may lead to significant esthetic problems. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of frequently consumed drinks on the color changes of fresh and aged, heat-polymerized, conventional acrylic resin. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four, heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens (4 mm x 5 mm x 30 mm were fabricated. Half of the specimens were aged by thermal cycling (between 5°C and 55°C, 60-second dwell time, 3000 cycles. The specimens were stored at 37°C in different drinks as non-aged and aged subgroups including water (control group, black tea, green tea, sour cherry juice, coke and coffee (n=7. The discoloration of each specimen after 1 and 7 days storage in the drinks were measured by a colorimeter based on CIE Lab system. The data of colour differences (ΔE were analyzed by ANOVA and Dunnet’s tests. Results: Thermal cycling and storage in water induced a slight color change. The highest ΔE values were observed in the aged groups, which was also noticeable for black tea and sour cherry juice after 7 days of storage (ΔE>1.5 (p<0.05. The ΔE values of all test groups were detected within the acceptable clinical limits (ΔE<3.5. Conclusion: These results suggest that the color stability of denture base acrylic resins is influenced by ageing. Black tea, sour cherry juice and coke can cause significant discolorations on acrylic resin denture bases.

  7. Relationship between Color and Translucency of Multishaded Dental Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Naeimi Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the translucency of different shades of two highly aesthetic multilayered restorative composite resins. In total nine shades from Esthet.X and ten shades from Filtek Supreme composite resins were chosen. Discs of each shade were prepared (N=3 and light-cured. Total and diffuse transmittance values for each sample were measured. Statistical analysis showed that the opaque dentine shades of both composites were the least translucent and the enamel shades had the highest translucency. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2 to C2 of regular body shades and also from A4 to C4 of opaque dentine shades of Esthet.X composite resin. Grey enamel shade had a significantly higher diffuse translucency compared to clear and yellow enamel shades. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2B to D2B and also in diffuse translucency from A4D to C6D shades of Filtek Supreme composite resin. It can be concluded that the color of the composite resins tested in this study had a significant effect on their translucency. Information on the translucency of different shades of composite resins can be very useful for the clinicians in achieving optimal esthetic restorative outcome.

  8. Cytotoxicity evaluation of methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsah Goktolga Akin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate and compare the cytotoxic effects of four composite resin materials with different content.

    Material and Methods: Two traditional methacrylate-based (Clearfil AP-X, RefleXions, as well as a self-adhering methacrylate-based (Vertise Flow and a silorane-based (Filtek Silorane composite resin were tested in the experiment. Ten cylindrical specimens were made of each material, using a mould (2mm. thick and 8 mm. in diameter. An agar diffusion method was employed, and cytotoxicity rankings were determined using lysis index scores. For statistical analysis, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used.

    Results: Amongst the composite resins, the silorane-based composite was found to be less cytotoxic than the methacrylate-based composite resins, which all had the same cytotoxicity ranking.

    Conclusions: The silorane-based composite resin was considered more biocompatible than the methacrylate-based composite resins.

  9. A new method for sealing composite resin contraction gaps in lined cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstenson, B; Brännström, M; Mattsson, B

    1985-03-01

    Composite resin restorations are often applied in cavities where cervical margins are left unetched, resulting in poorer adaptation in this area. Recent experiments have indicated the possibility of impregnating with resin the gap caused by polymerization contraction. Cavities were prepared in vitro and in vivo. A thin liner was applied inside and outside the cavity. Except for the cervical wall, enamel margins were bevelled and acid-etched, and the cavities restored with Concise Enamel Bond and Composite. In another series, cavities with unetched enamel were restored. Since the liner was placed outside the cavity margins, excess material could be removed without blockage of the air-filled gap. Enamel Bond with a fluorescent additive was applied to various margins. Ground sections were prepared, and the penetration of this resin into the gap was examined with a microscope. In most teeth, the resin penetrated from 0.5 to 2 mm from the cervical margins. Similar penetration was seen from unetched margins, except for the occlusal one. No penetration was seen at acid-etched margins. By impregnating gaps with low-viscous resin after the filling has cured, one can obtain an improved seal at unetched margins.

  10. Bonded composite resin crowns for primary incisors: technique update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1990-02-01

    A technique for restoration of carious primary maxillary incisors with a hybrid visible light-curing composite resin and a dentinal bonding agent is described. Careful use of this technique and the new materials can provide a restoration that is esthetic and resistant to fracture and displacement. The technique requires careful preparation of the operative field and precise handling of the restorative materials. The method is illustrated by the placement of bonded composite resin crowns in a 3-year-old boy.

  11. Influence of different manipulation methods on surface roughness of auto polymerized acrylic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Borges Retamoso

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of acrylic resin according to the manipulation method.Methods: Sixty specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=15 according to the manipulation method: G1 - addition with pressure, G2 - addition without pressure, G3 - mass with pressure and G4 - mass without pressure. After resin polymerization, all specimens were submitted to finishing with abrasive paper and mechanical polishing. Topographical surface analysis surfaces was performed twice on each sample using the rugosimeter. Results: The results were statistically analyzed and means were: G1 - 0,130μm; G2 - 0,120μm, G3 - 0,218μm e G4 - 0,192μm. ANOVA for one criterion and the Tukey test showed significant difference between G1 and G3, G2 and G3, G2 and G4. Conclusion: The manipulation method seems to affect the physical characteristics of auto polymerized acrylic resin. The addition manipulation method decreased the surface roughness.

  12. PARTICLE MORPHOLOGY OF POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) RESIN PREPARED BY SUSPENDED EMULSION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-zhong Bao; Zhen-li Wei; Zhi-xue Weng; Zhi-ming Huang

    2003-01-01

    Suspended emulsion polymerization was used to prepare poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) resin. Fine PVC particles were formed at low polymerization conversions. The amount of fine particles decreases as conversion increases and disappears at conversions greater than 30%. Scanning electron micrographs show that PVC grains are composed of loosely coalesced primary particles, especially for PVC resins prepared in the presence of poly(vinyl alcohol) dispersant. The size of primary particles increases and porosity decreases with the increase of conversion. In view of the particle features of PVC resin, a particle formation mechanism including the formation of primary particles and grains is proposed. The formation process of primary particles includes the formation of particle nuclei, coalescence of particle nuclei to form primary particles,and growth of primary particles. PVC grains are formed by the coagulation of primary particles. The loose coalescence of primary particles is caused by the colloidal stability of primary particles and the low swelling degree of vinyl chloride in the primary particles.

  13. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Flávio Hb; Andrade, Kelly Rm; Leite Lima, Débora An; Ambrosano, Gláucia Mb; Lovadino, José R

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5): considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm(2) - 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm(2) - 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm(2) - 40 s) and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm). All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization.

  14. Indirect posterior restorations using a new chairside microhybrid resin composite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, F R; Wei, S H

    2001-01-01

    A plethora of choices is available as potential tooth-colored restoratives for the posterior dentition. Advances in adhesive technology and esthetic chairside microhybrid composite resins have permitted clinicians to perform inlay/onlay restorations. The use of adhesive indirect procedures offers advantages such as better control of polymerization shrinkage and anatomical form, when compared to conventional, direct restorative techniques. This article describes the use of a new chairside microhybrid composite system as an indirect restorative material, using semidirect and indirect techniques that can be accomplished within the realm of a dental operatory.

  15. Effect of leaching residual methyl methacrylate concentrations on in vitro cytotoxicity of heat polymerized denture base acrylic resin processed with different polymerization cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Canan Bural; Esin AktaŞ; Günnur Deniz; Yeşim Ünlüçerçi; Gülsen Bayraktar

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) may leach from the acrylic resin denture bases and have adverse effects on the oral mucosa. This in vitro study evaluated and correlated the effect of the leaching residual MMA concentrations ([MMA]r) on in vitro cytotoxicity of L-929 fibroblasts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 144 heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens were fabricated using 4 different polymerization cycles: (1) at 74ºC for 9 h, (2) at 74ºC for 9 h and terminal boiling (at 1...

  16. [Influence Factors on Monomer Conversion of Dental Composite Resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yuntao; Wang, Fanghui; Wang, Qingshan

    2015-04-01

    Dental composite resin is a kind of material which has been widely used in dental restoration. Research has found that the influence of residual monomer on the material mechanical, chemical and biological properties cannot be ignored. This paper elaborates these harms of residual monomers. The effects of resin matrix, inorganic filler and initiating system, illumination, secondarily treatment on the degree of conversion were also analyzed. The paper also discusses the effective measures to increase the conversion, and offers theoretical basis for the clinical application and development of composite resin.

  17. Polymer grafted hydroxyapatite whisker as a filler for dental composite resin with enhanced physical and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengwei; Wang, Ruili; Cheng, Yanhua; Jiang, Xiaoze; Zhang, Qinghong; Zhu, Meifang

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface graft polymerization of hydroxyapatite whisker (HW) on physical and mechanical properties of dental composite resin. Poly bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Poly(Bis-GMA)) was grafted onto silanized hydroxyapatite whisker (SHW) via solution polymerization and the amount of the Poly(Bis-GMA) on the surface was effectively controlled by polymerization time. The obtained poly(Bis-GMA) grafted hydroxyapatite whisker (PGHW) with different polymer contents was filled into a resin matrix respectively, meanwhile the composites with HW and with SHW served as controls. Monomer conversion was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and volume shrinkage of the composite resin was measured with a density tester. Mechanical properties were tested with a universal testing machine. The results indicated that the composite filled with PGHW-1h (graft ratio of poly(Bis-GMA): 8.5 wt.%) showed lower shrinkage and better mechanical properties, improving flexural strength by 6.5% and 11.9% compared with SHW filled composite and HW filled composite, respectively. However, PGHW with higher graft ratios aggregated seriously and formed defects in the composite, leading to deterioration of mechanical properties. It was revealed that the poly(Bis-GMA) on the surface of PGHW acted as a functional transition layer and enhanced interfacial compatibility and interaction between whisker and resin matrix, which facilitated the dispersion of PGHW in the composite and decreased the composite shrinkage. Thus, the graft polymerization of Bis-GMA on the surface of filler might be a promising modification method for the fabrication of dental materials.

  18. Resin-based composites and compomers in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Godoy, F

    2000-07-01

    Resin-based composite resins and polyacid-modified resin-based composites (compomers) have become popular for the restoration of primary anterior and posterior teeth. In some European countries, resin-based composites or glass-ionomers are the materials of choice for primary teeth because of the controversy over dental amalgam and its alleged adverse health effects resulting from the release of mercury, although a clear correlation between amalgam restorations and health has not been determined. Another reason for the worldwide increased use of resin-based composites and glass-ionomers in pediatric dentistry could be attributed to the growing demand from parents to provide esthetic restorations to their children. More conservative preparations can be performed maintaining more tooth structure because of the adhesive properties of the composites and compomers. The most conservative treatment planning and meticulous care in the placement of the resin-based composites and compomers would produce long-term satisfactory results. These restorations should be placed in patients with low-to-moderate caries risk, and after placement the restorations should be monitored carefully to avoid complications mainly produced by recurrent caries and wear.

  19. [Effects of composite resin materials on gingiva and pulp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S; Ishikawa, I; Masunaga, H; Matsue, M; Matsue, I

    1989-09-01

    Composite resin materials are now widely used for dental therapy. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of composite resins on gingiva and pulp in case of application of them for temporally splint in periodontal treatment. 60 teeth in 6 female dogs ranging between 1 and 2 years of age with healty teeth and gingiva were divieded to 4 groups; (1) 12 teeth, controls; (2) 12 teeth, self-cured composite resin (Clearfil F II, CF II); (3) 18 teeth, light-cured resin (Belfel LX, BLX), curing time 20 sec. and (4) 18 teeth, BLX, 40 sec., and then 48 class V composite resins were restored supragingivally. The experimental procedure were carried out for 5 days and 30 days. Histopathological observations of 60 teeth inclusive of controls were made by applying to specimens with Hematoxylin eosin staining. For the materials and time periods in this study it was found that; 1. Light-cured composite resin was superior to self-cured composite resin on handlings. 2. There were no significant differences in periodontium between the experimentals (BLX, CF II) and controls in 5 days. At the 30 days the histologic score showed more gingivitis for the experimental teeth than for the controls (BLX-40 greater than BLX-20 greater than CF II greater than Cont.). 3. At 5 days hyperemia occurred in some cases of experimentals (both BLX and CF II). The appearance of predentin and changes of odontblastic layer were observed slightly in 30 days. But there were no significant differences between BLX and CF II. 4. The result suggested that applying to composite resin materials for temporally splint, both gingiva and pulp have to be protected.

  20. Direct composite resin layering techniques for creating lifelike CAD/CAM-fabricated composite resin veneers and crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSage, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Direct composite resin layering techniques preserve sound tooth structure and improve function and esthetics. However, intraoral placement techniques present challenges involving isolation, contamination, individual patient characteristics, and the predictability of restorative outcomes. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations enable dentists to better handle these variables and provide durable restorations in an efficient and timely manner; however, milled restorations may appear monochromatic and lack proper esthetic characteristics. For these reasons, an uncomplicated composite resin layering restoration technique can be used to combine the benefits of minimally invasive direct restorations and the ease and precision of indirect CAD/CAM restorations. Because most dentists are familiar with and skilled at composite resin layering, the use of such a technique can provide predictable and highly esthetic results. This article describes the layered composite resin restoration technique.

  1. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bonding of experimental composite resin artificial teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Reza, Fazal

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation using an ordinary UV sterilizer would affect the bonding of experimental composite resins to an autopolymerizing acrylic resin. To this end, three composite resins and one unfilled resin--of which the compositions were similar to commercial composite resin artificial teeth--were prepared as repair composites. Their shear bond strengths after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes were significantly greater than those before UV irradiation regardless of composite resin type. Failure mode after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes was mainly cohesive failure of the composite resins, but that before UV irradiation and after 24 hours' irradiation was mainly adhesive failure. These results thus suggested that a short period of UV irradiation on composite resin teeth would improve the bonding efficacy of composite resin artificial teeth to autopolymerizing resin.

  2. Microtensile bond strength of repaired indirect resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuttiwattanakorn, Porntida; Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Angkoonsit, Duangjai; Kaewthong, Sunattha; Charoonanan, Piyanan

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs) of two types of indirect resin composites bonded to a conventional direct resin composite. Indirect resin composite blocks of Ceramage and SR Nexco were prepared in a plastic mold having a dimension of 10 × 10 × 4 mm. These composite blocks were divided into three groups according to their surface treatments: Group1: Sandblast (SB); Group2: Sandblast and ultrasonically clean (SB+UL); Group3: Sandblast plus silane (SB+SI). After bonding with direct resin composite, indirect-direct resin composite blocks were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at 37℃ and cut into microbars with the dimension of 1 × 1 × 8 mm. Microbar specimens (n = 40 per group) were loaded using a universal testing machine. Failure modes and compositions were evaluated by SEM. The statistical analyses of MTBS were performed by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test at α = .05. Surface treatments and brands had effects on the MTBS without an interaction between these two factors. For SR Nexco, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI group were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. For Ceramage, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. The mean MTBS of the Ceramage specimens was significantly higher than that of SR Nexco for all surface treatments. Sandblasting with or without silane application could improve the bond strengths of repaired indirect resin composites to a conventional direct resin composite.

  3. Microtensile bond strength of repaired indirect resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Angkoonsit, Duangjai; Kaewthong, Sunattha; Charoonanan, Piyanan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs) of two types of indirect resin composites bonded to a conventional direct resin composite. MATERIALS AND METHODS Indirect resin composite blocks of Ceramage and SR Nexco were prepared in a plastic mold having a dimension of 10 × 10 × 4 mm. These composite blocks were divided into three groups according to their surface treatments: Group1: Sandblast (SB); Group2: Sandblast and ultrasonically clean (SB+UL); Group3: Sandblast plus silane (SB+SI). After bonding with direct resin composite, indirect-direct resin composite blocks were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at 37℃ and cut into microbars with the dimension of 1 × 1 × 8 mm. Microbar specimens (n = 40 per group) were loaded using a universal testing machine. Failure modes and compositions were evaluated by SEM. The statistical analyses of MTBS were performed by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test at α = .05. RESULTS Surface treatments and brands had effects on the MTBS without an interaction between these two factors. For SR Nexco, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI group were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. For Ceramage, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. The mean MTBS of the Ceramage specimens was significantly higher than that of SR Nexco for all surface treatments. CONCLUSION Sandblasting with or without silane application could improve the bond strengths of repaired indirect resin composites to a conventional direct resin composite. PMID:28243390

  4. Water Sorption and Flexural Strength of Thermoplastic and Conventional Heat-Polymerized Acrylic Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Mohammad Ali; Vafaee, Fariborz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the water sorption and flexural strength of thermoplastic and conventional acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: Water sorption and flexural strength were compared between a thermoplastic modified polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin (group A) and a heat-polymerized PMMA acrylic resin (group B) as the control group (n=10). A three-point bending test was carried out for flexural strength testing. For water sorption test, 10 disc-shaped samples were prepared. After desiccating, the samples were weighed and immersed in distilled water for seven days. Then, they were weighed again, and desiccated for the second and third times. Differences between the mean values in the two groups were analyzed using Student’s t-test. Results: The mean value of water sorption was 14.74±1.36 μg/mm3 in group A, and 19.11±0.90 μg/mm3 in group B; this difference was statistically significant (PPMMA acrylic resins as denture base materials. PMID:26877737

  5. Resin characterization in cured graphite fiber reinforced composites using diffuse reflectance-FTIR. [Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, P. R.; Stein, B. A.; Chang, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using diffuse reflectance in combination with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to obtain information on cured graphite fiber reinforced polymeric matrix resin composites was investigated. Several graphite/epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide composites exposed to thermal or radiation environments were examined. An experimental polyimide-sulfone adhesive tape was also studied during processing. In each case, significant changes in resin molecular structure was observed due to environmental exposure. These changes in molecular structure were correlated with previously observed changes in material properties providing new insights into material behavior.

  6. A temporary space maintainer using acrylic resin teeth and a composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochavi, D; Stern, N; Grajower, R

    1977-05-01

    A one-session technique for preparing a temporary space maintainer has been described. The technique consists of attaching an acrylic resin pontic to etched surfaces of natural adjacent teeth by means of a composite resin. The main advantages of this technique are elimination of premature tooth preparation, good esthetics, fair strength, low cost, and rapid completion of the restoration without the need of a dental laboratory.

  7. Thermal expansion characteristics of light-cured dental resins and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini; Achilias, Dimitris S; Kyrikou, Eleni

    2004-07-01

    The thermal expansion characteristics of dental resins prepared by light-curing of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA, Bis-EMA(4) or PCDMA dimethacrylate monomers and of commercial light-cured resin composites (Z-100 MP, Filtek Z-250, Sculpt-It and Alert), the organic matrix resin of which is based on different combinations of the above monomers, were studied by thermomechanical analysis (TMA). This study showed the existence of a glass transition temperature at around 35-47 degrees C for the resins and 40-45 degrees C for the composites; then the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE) was calculated at the temperature intervals 0-60 degrees C, 0-T(g) and T(g)-60 degrees C. The CLTE values of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA and UDMA resins are similar and lower than those of Bis-EMA (4) and PCDMA resins. The CLTE values of the composites indicated that the major factor that affects the CLTE of a composite is the filler content, but it also seems to be affected by the chemical structure of the matrix resin. TMA on water-saturated samples showed that water desorption takes place during the measurement and that the residual water acts as a plasticizer decreasing the T(g) and increasing the CLTE values. Furthermore, TMA on post-heated samples for 1, 3 or 6h showed, only for the resins, an initial decrease of CLTE and increase of the T(g) after 1h that was not significantly changed after 6h of heating.

  8. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (Pauto-polymerized reline resin.

  9. Kinetic studies of the polymerization of an epoxy resin modified with rhodamine B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Raquel; Fernandez d' Arlas, Borja [' Materials - Technologies' Group, Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Polytechnic School, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pza Europa 1, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Oyanguren, Patricia A. [INTEMA Univ. Nac. de Mar del Plata-CONICET, JB Justo 4302 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Mondragon, Inaki, E-mail: inaki.mondragon@ehu.es [' Materials - Technologies' Group, Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Polytechnic School, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pza Europa 1, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain)

    2009-09-10

    Novel fluorescent materials were satisfactorily synthesized. With this aim, an epoxy resin based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) was reacted with a laser dye, rhodamine B (RB), to achieve an epoxy-based prepolymer. Then, a diamine, m-xylylenediamine (MXDA), was used as hardener with the purpose of obtaining a crosslinked polymer. The curing conditions strongly influence the intended final properties and the optimization of the curing requires a reliable kinetic model. For that reason, this work presents the kinetic study of the polymerization of the epoxy resin by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in isothermal mode as well as by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). DSC data were fitted using a Kamal autocatalytic equation. Conversion as a function of reaction time curves obtained by means of both techniques agreed well. In addition, the synthesized epoxy-based materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H NMR) and their fluorescent properties were also analysed.

  10. ADSORPTION BEHAVIORS OF Pt(IV) AND Pd(II) ON POLYMERIC ESTER THIOUREA RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Polymeric ester thiourea resin (PDTU-I) is a new kind of chelating resin with functional atoms S, N and O, so it is an excellent adsorbent for noble metal ions. In batch testes, the adsorption capacities of PDTU-I for Pt(IV) and Pd(II) increase with the increase of contact time, temperature and initial concentration of metal ions. The adsorption data fit Boyd’s diffusion equation of liquid film, Langmuir adsorption isotherm and Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated by Langmuir equation are 2.54mmol/g for Pt(IV) and 4.88mmol/g for Pd(II). According to FTIR and XPS results, functional groups of PDTU-I coordinate with noble metal ions in the adsorption process.

  11. THE SYNTHESIS OF MODIFIED DIPHENYL OXIDE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAOMingfei; LIUZhifang; 等

    2002-01-01

    Modified diphenyl oxide resin was synthesized by co-polymerization of unsaturated acid and diphenyl oxide derivants.And then modified bismaleimide resin and expoxide linear phenolic resin were added into modified diphenyl oxide resin to co-polymerized and modify once more.The system was applied in composites.Their properties wrer investigated and found that they met the requirements as a heat-resisting adhesive.

  12. Timing for composite resin placement on mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Masaki; Tsujimoto, Yasuhisa; Ookubo, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Watanabe, Ikuya; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the proper time to restore composite resin over mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Thirty-five samples of MTA blocks were divided into 7 groups with 3 different times (10 minutes, 1 day, and 7 days) selected for restoring the composite resin over MTA with and without bonding resin, and a control group was included for comparison. After 21 days, the distances between MTA and the composite resin or between MTA and the bonding agent on sectioned planes along the long axis were measured using a scanning electron microscope (×2,000 magnification). The hardness of the MTA near the composite resin was presented as the Vickers microhardness. There were no gaps at the interface in the 10-minute groups, the 1-day group with a bonding agent, and the 7-day group with a bonding agent. The groups without a bonding agent at 1 and 7 days presented a separation or gap at the interface. The value of the Vickers microhardness in the 1-day groups was significantly decreased compared with those of the other groups regardless of the presence or absence of a bonding agent. These findings suggest that composite resin with a bonding agent over MTA can be restored almost immediately after MTA mixing during a single visit. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fiber reinforced silicon-containing arylacetylene resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A silicon-containing arylacetylene resin (SAR, a poly(dimethylsilyleneethynylene phenyleneethynylene (PMSEPE, was synthesized. The PMSEPE is a solid resin at ambient temperature with a softening temperature about 60°C and soluble in some solvents like tetrahydrofuran. The melt viscosity of the PMSEPE resin is less than 1 Pa•s. The resin could cure at the temperature of lower than 200°C. Fiber reinforced PMSEPE composites were prepared from prepregs which were made by the impregnation of fibers in PMSEPE resin solution. The composites exhibit good mechanical properties at room temperature and 250°C. The observation on fracture surfaces of the composites reinforced by glass fibers and carbon fibers demonstrates that the adhesion between the fibers and resin is good. The results from an oxyacetylene flame test show that the composites have good ablation performance and XRD analyses indicate that SiC forms in the residues during the ablation of the composites.

  14. Clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite with and without an intermediate layer of flowable resin composite: a 7-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite.......The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite....

  15. Comparison effect of artificial tooth type and cyclic loading on the bond strength to auto-polymerized acrylic denture base resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Nematollahi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Failure of bonding between artificial teeth and denture base material is a considerable problem for patients who wear dentures. According to the different impact of artificial teeth and different information about resistance force of mastication and also with deficiency in researchs, this study was designed to compare the bond strength of composite and acrylic artificial teeth to auto-polymerized denture base resins with and without cyclic loading.   Materials and Methods: In this experimental and in vitro study, an acrylic resin auto-polymerized (Rapid Repair, Dentsply and four artificial teeth (Acrylic Marjan new, Composite Glamour teeth and Ivoclar acrylic and composite teeth were used. Therefore, 8 groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated. All specimens were thermocycled for 5000 cycles, in water baths between 5 and 55 ◦ C. Half the specimens in each group were treated with cyclic loading at 50N for 14, 400 cycles at 1.2 Hz. The shear bond strengths were measured using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed using Two-way ANOVA test.   Results: Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant effect of cyclic loading on the shear bond strength, but the type of artificial tooth affected the shear bond strength (P=0.006. Also, the interaction between Cyclic loading and the type of artificial tooth showed no significant difference (P=0.98. Tukey test showed that acrylic teeth (Ivoclar had statistically higher bond strength values than that of other teeth (PGlamour=0.02, (PComposite ivoclar=0.01 and (PMarjan new=0.02.   Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, the predominant type of fracture in all groups was cohesive, therefore the bond strength was adequate in all teeth and the type of artificial tooth may influence the bond strength of denture teeth to denture base resin. Cyclic loading had no significant effect on the bond strength of denture teeth to the auto-polymerized acrylic resin.

  16. Heat Treatment Influences Monomer Conversion and Bond Strength of Indirect Composite Resin Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magne, Pascal; Malta, Daniel Alexandre Menezes Pedrosa; Enciso, Reyes; Monteiro-Junior, Sylvio

    2015-12-01

    To assess the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and the degree of conversion (DC) of indirect composite resin restorations polymerized with light and heat. Two direct (Filtek Z100 and Premise) and one indirect (Premise Indirect) composite resins were polymerized with a combination of light and heat (138°C for 20 min). For MTBS, 42 cylinders were fabricated (n = 7). After the surface treatment, cylinders were bonded to each other using adhesive resin (Optibond FL). Specimens were stored in water for 24 h. Another 15 cylinders (n = 5) were fabricated for determining degree of conversion using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry immediately and at 24 h. The MTBS and the DC was submitted to two-way ANOVA. The interaction with existing data was explored with univariate ANOVA and two-way ANOVA. Tukey's HSD post-hoc test was used to detect pairwise differences (α = 0.05). The MTBS to light and heat polymerized Z100 was 75.7 MPa, significantly higher than that to Premise (58.6 MPa) and Premise Indirect (63.9 MPa). The immediate DC for Z100, Premise, and Premise Indirect were 51.0%, 68.7%, and 61.8%, respectively. The DC at 24 h ranged from 53.4% (Z100) to 72.8% (Premise Indirect) and significantly increased for Premise Indirect only. Comparison with previously published data revealed that the heat treatment increased both MTBS and DC of Premise and Premise Indirect. Z100 showed better bond strength but lower DC. Heat treatment and a 24-h delay before delivery can benefit DC of Premise Indirect. The increase in DC of Premise and Premise Indirect did not affect their bond strength.

  17. Effect of Various Surface Treatment on Repair Strength of Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Alizade

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: In some clinical situations, repair of composite restorations is treatment of choice. Improving the bond strength between one new and old composite usually requires increased surface roughness to promote mechanical interlocking sincechemical bonding might not be adequate. Similarly, the treatment of a laboratory fabricated resin composite restoration involves the same procedures, and there is a need to create the strongest possible bond of a resin cement to a previously polymerized composite.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the shear bond strength of repaired to aged composite resin.Materials and Methods: Eighty four cylindrical specimens of a composite resin were fabricated and stored in distilled water for 100 days prior to surface treatment. Surface treatment of old composite was done in 6 groups as follow:1- Air abrasion with CoJet sand particles with micoretcher + silane + dentin bonding agent2- Air abrasion with 50μm Al2O3 particles+ phosphoric acid+ silane+ dentin bonding agent3- Air abrasion with 50μm Al2O3 particles + phosphoric acid + dentin bonding agent4- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + silane + dentin bonding agent5- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + dentin bonding agent6- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + composite activator + dentin bonding agentThen fresh composite resin was bonded to treated surfaces. Twelve specimens were also fabricated as control group with the same diameter but with the height twice as much as other specimens. All of the specimens were thermocycled prior to testing for shear bondstrength. The bond strength data were analyzed statistically using one way ANOVA test, t test and Duncan's grouping test.Results: One-way ANOVA indicated no significant difference between 7 groups (P=0.059. One-way ANOVA indicated significant difference between the three diamond bur groups (P=0.036. Silane had a significant effect on the repair bond

  18. Post silanization improves bond strength of translucent posts to flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Alberto; Osorio, Raquel; Papacchini, Federica; Goracci, Cecilia; Toledano, Manuel; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of post silanization on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of translucent fiber posts to seven flowable composite resins used as core material. Seventy fiber posts were employed. In half of the posts, silanization was performed with Monobond-S. A cylindrical plastic matrix was placed around the post and filled with different resins: UniFil Flow Experimental, UniFil Low Flow Plus Experimental, Venus Flow, Revolution Formula 2, Point 4 Flowable, X-Flow, and Wave mv. Five posts were bonded per group. After polymerization, two longitudinal cuts were made on two opposite sides of the post at its outermost periphery. Then, each specimen was serially sectioned, obtaining 30-35 beams with 1-mm(2) cross-sectional area. Each beam was tested in tension in an Instron machine at 0.5 mm/min. ANOVA and Student Newman Keuls tests were performed. The different resin composite materials and the post silanization procedure had a significant effect on MTBS. The application of a silane coupling agent increased MTBS of flowable composite resins to translucent posts. X-flow and Point 4 attained the highest MTBS regardless of the silane treatment.

  19. HYPERBRANCHED EPOXY RESINS PREPARED BY PROTON TRANSFER POLYMERIZATION FROM AN A2 + B3 SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jie Ma; Hai-qiao Wang; Li fan He; Xiao-yu Li

    2011-01-01

    Epoxy-terminated hyperbranched polymers (EHBPs) were prepared by proton transfer polymerization and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR and GPC. The solution and thermal properties of the uncured samples and mechanical properties of cured samples were examined. The thermo-stable products had good solubility in polar solvents, low solution viscosity and Tgs ranging from 15℃ to 33℃ depending on their molecular weights. The mechanical properties of cured films were studied and compared with those of a bisphenol-A type epoxy resin. The films of EHBPs had good impact resistance and high gloss values without sacrificing hardness and adhesion.

  20. Using a Visible Light-Polymerized Resin to Fabricate an Interim Partial Removable Dental Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Aaron; Yu, Hui Wen; Elkassaby, Heba

    2017-02-01

    An interim partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP) is any dental prosthesis that replaces some teeth in a partially dentate arch designed to enhance esthetics, stabilization, and/or function for a limited period of time, after which it is to be replaced by a definitive dental prosthesis. This article describes a technique that uses a visible light-polymerized (VLP) resin as the base material for an interim partial RDP. This technique can be easily accomplished in a dental office or laboratory and results in a predictable dental prosthesis. This technique eliminates the need for laboratory processing.

  1. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  2. Analysis of surface hardness of artificially aged resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of artificially accelerated aging (AAA on the surface hardness of eight composite resins: Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, 4 Seasons, Herculite, P60, Tetric Ceram, Charisma, and Filtek Z100. Sixteen specimens were made from the test piece of each material, using an 8.0 × 2.0 mm teflon matrix. After 24 hours, eight specimens from each material were submitted to three surface hardness readings using a Shimadzu Microhardness Tester for 5 seconds at a load of 50 gf. The other eight specimens remained in the artificially accelerated aging machine for 382 hours and were submitted to the same surface hardness analysis. The means of each test specimen were submitted to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (p > 0.05, ANOVA and Tukey test (p < 0.05. With regard to hardness (F = 86.74, p < 0.0001 the analysis showed significant differences among the resin composite brands. But aging did not influence the hardness of any of the resin composites (F = 0.39, p = 0.53. In this study, there was interaction between the resin composite brand and the aging factors (F = 4.51, p < 0.0002. It was concluded that notwithstanding the type of resin, AAA did not influence surface hardness. However, with regard to hardness there was a significant difference among the resin brands.

  3. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1999-05-23

    Cyanate ester resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption, and radiation resistance. This paper describes the results of a processing study to develop a high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray TI 000G carbon fiber and YLA RS- 14A cyanate ester resin as the constituent materials. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to and during cure is also crucial as it affects the glass transition temperature of the resin and composite. Composite cylinders wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent ring tensile strengths both at room and elevated temperature. A summary of the measured mechanical and thermal property data for these composites is presented. Potential applications for these materials include flywheeI energy storage systems for space and satellite structures.

  4. Resin infusion of large composite structures modeling and manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, A.C. [Michigan State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The resin infusion processes resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are cost effective techniques for the fabrication of complex shaped composite structures. The dry fibrous preform is placed in the mold, consolidated, resin impregnated and cured in a single step process. The fibrous performs are often constructed near net shape using highly automated textile processes such as knitting, weaving and braiding. In this paper, the infusion processes RTM, RFI and VARTM are discussed along with the advantages of each technique compared with traditional composite fabrication methods such as prepreg tape lay up and autoclave cure. The large number of processing variables and the complex material behavior during infiltration and cure make experimental optimization of the infusion processes costly and inefficient. Numerical models have been developed which can be used to simulate the resin infusion processes. The model formulation and solution procedures for the VARTM process are presented. A VARTM process simulation of a carbon fiber preform was presented to demonstrate the type of information that can be generated by the model and to compare the model predictions with experimental measurements. Overall, the predicted flow front positions, resin pressures and preform thicknesses agree well with the measured values. The results of the simulation show the potential cost and performance benefits that can be realized by using a simulation model as part of the development process. (au)

  5. SORPTION AND SOLUBILITY OF LOW-SHRINKAGE RESIN-BASED DENTAL COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Yantcheva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-based composites are well-established restorative materials. However, these materials may absorb significant amounts of water when exposed to aqueous environments. Sorption and solubility are affecting composite restorations by two different mechanisms; the first is the up taking of water producing an increased weight and the second is the dissolution of materials in water, leading to a weight reduction of the final conditioned samples. Objective: To measure the water sorption and solubility of different low-shrinkage resin-based composites. Six materials were selected: Filtek P60, Filtek Ultimate, SonicFill, Filtek Silorane, Kalore and Venus Diamond. Materials and methods: Five disc specimens were prepared of each material and polymerized with diode light-curing unit. Water sorption and solubility of the different materials were were calculated by means of weighting the samples before and after water immersion and desiccation. Data were statistically analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk One Way Analysis of Variance followed by the Holm-Sidak comparison test . Results: There were significant differences (p<=0.001 between materials regarding sorption and solubility. Regarding sorption F. Silorane showed lowest values, followed by SonicFill, without significant difference between them. Statistical significant differences exist between F. Silorane and F.P60, F. Ultimate, Kalore. Significant differences exist between SonicFill and F. Ultimate. F.Silorane (-0.018 and Kalore (-0.010 showed lowest values of solubility but there were marginal difference among all composites investigated. Conclusions: 1.The material with lowest values of sorption and solubility was F.Silorane. 2. The attained sorption and solubility values for composites are influenced by the differences in resin matrix composition and filler contend. 3. Modifications of dimethacrylate matrix did not minimize significantly sorption and solubility of composites. 4. Besides water

  6. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  7. Degradation, fatigue, and failure of resin dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J L

    2008-08-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  8. Water Sorption and Flexural Strength of Thermoplastic and Conventional Heat-Polymerized Acrylic Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Hemmati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the water sorption and flexural strength of thermoplastic and conventional acrylic resins.Materials and Methods: Water sorption and flexural strength were compared between a thermoplastic modified polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA denture base resin (group A and a heat-polymerized PMMA acrylic resin (group B as the control group (n=10. A three-point bending test was carried out for flexural strength testing. For water sorption test, 10 disc-shaped samples were prepared. After desiccating, the samples were weighed and immersed in distilled water for seven days. Then, they were weighed again, and desiccated for the second and third times. Differences between the mean values in the two groups were analyzed using Student's t-test.Results: The mean value of water sorption was 14.74±1.36 μg/mm3 in group A, and 19.11±0.90 μg/mm3 in group B; this difference was statistically significant (P< 0.001. The mean value of flexural strength was 88.21±8.63 MPa in group A and 77.77±9.49 MPa in group B. A significant difference was observed between the two groups (P= 0.019.Conclusion: Flexural strength of group A was significantly higher than that of group B, and its water sorption was significantly lower. Thus, thermoplastic resins can be a suitable alternative to conventional PMMA acrylic resins as denture base materials.

  9. Furfuralcohol Co-Polymerized Urea Formaldehyde Resin-derived N-Doped Microporous Carbon for CO2 Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yi; Du, Zhenyu; Xing, Wei; Komarneni, Sridhar; Zhang, Zhongdong; Gao, Xionghou; Yan, Zifeng

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-based adsorbent is considered to be one of the most promising adsorbents for CO2 capture form flue gases. In this study, a series of N-doped microporous carbon materials were synthesized from low cost and widely available urea formaldehyde resin co-polymerized with furfuralcohol. These N-doped microporous carbons showed tunable surface area in the range of 416-2273 m2 g-1 with narrow pore size distribution within less than 1 nm and a high density of the basic N functional groups (2.93-13.92 %). Compared with the carbon obtained from urea resin, the addition of furfuralcohol apparently changed the surface chemical composition and pore size distribution, especially ultramicropores as can be deduced from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and pore size distribution measurements and led to remarkable improvement on CO2 adsorption capacity. At 1 atm, N-doped carbons activated at 600 °C with KOH/UFFC weight ratio of 2 (UFFA-2-600) showed the highest CO2 uptake of 3.76 and 1.57 mmol g-1 at 25 and 75 °C, respectively.

  10. Postoperative sensitivity in class I composite resin restorations in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Casselli, DSM; Martins, LRM

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the postoperative sensitivity of posterior Class I composite resin restorations, restored with a self-etching or a total-etch one-bottle adhesive system. Materials and Methods: One hundred four restorations were replaced by one clinician in 52 patients. Each patient received two restorations. After cavity preparations were completed under rubber-dam isolation, they were restored using Clearfil SE Bond or Single Bond and a resin-based restorative material (Filtek ...

  11. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  12. Bisimide amine cured epoxy /IME/ resins and composites. II - Ten-degree off-axis tensile and shear properties of Celion 6000/IME composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Bisimide amines (BIAs), which are presently used as curing agents in a state-of-the-art epoxy resin, are oligomeric and polymeric mixtures. A series of composites consisting of the novel BIA-cured epoxy resin reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fibers were fabricated and evaluated, and the ten-degree, off-axis uniaxial tensile and shear properties of these composites were determined. The use of the intralaminar shear strain-to-failure was used in the calculation of resin shear strain-to-failure. Study results indicate that several of these novel composite systems exhibit shear strain properties that are superior to those of the control composite system of the present experiments, which employed a sulfone curing agent.

  13. The surface finish of light-cured composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S K; Henderson, L J

    1993-01-01

    A necessity for any dental restorative material is its ability to take and maintain a smooth surface finish. Composite resin restorative materials with fillers and matrix of differing hardness are difficult to finish and polish. The use of aluminum trioxide discs is a popular and acceptable method of finishing composite restorative materials where the material is accessible. Burs and stones are used for finishing and polishing inaccessible areas. This study was undertaken to compare the surface finish of composite resin restorative material when finished with white stones, superfine diamond burs and aluminum trioxide discs. The finished surface was measured with a profilometer and the roughness average value used to compare the surfaces. The aluminum trioxide discs gave the best and most consistent results. It was possible to attain similar results with the superfine diamond bur. However, the results were highly variable. None of the methods used achieved the smoothness of composite resin cured against a transparent matrix.

  14. Application of nanoemulsions in the regeneration of adsorbent polymeric resins; Emprego de nanoemulsoes na regeneracao de resinas polimericas adsorvedoras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Josane A.; Queiros, Yure G.C.; Vieira, Helida V.P.; Lucas, Elizabete F.; Mansur, Claudia R.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas. Lab. de Macromoleculas e Coloides na Industria de Petroleo], e-mails: josaneacosta@yahoo.com.br, yuregomes@ima.ufrj.br, elucas@ima.ufrj.br, celias@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the solbrax/water/polyoxyethylene nanoemulsions were produced under high pressure homogenizer (HPH). These systems presented droplets diameter ranging between 7 to 30 nm. The nanoemulsions were used in regeneration of a polymeric resin, which has been used in treatment of oily water. This resin was contaminated with different kinds of oils. The nanoemulsions presented high cleaning efficiency, above of 90% and its performance was higher than equivalent micellar systems. (author)

  15. Solid phase extractive preconcentration of uranium(VI) using quinoline-8-ol anchored chloromethylated polymeric resin beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, R S; Metilda, P; Daniel, S; Rao, T Prasada

    2005-10-31

    A new chelating polymeric sorbent has been developed using Merrifield chloromethylated resin anchored with quinoline-8-ol (HQ). The modified polymeric resin was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The HQ anchored resin showed superior binding affinity for U(VI) over Th(IV) and La(III). The influence of various physicochemical parameters on the recovery of U(VI) were optimized by both static and dynamic methods. The phase exchange kinetic studies performed for U(VI) revealed that XAD-16. The developed HQ anchored polymeric resin is highly selective as none of the extraneous species were found to have any deleterious effect. Solid phase extraction (SPE) studies performed using HQ anchored polymeric resin offered enrichment factor of 100 and the lowest concentration below which recoveries become non-quantitative is 5mugl(-1). The accuracy of the developed SPE method in conjunction with Arsenazo III procedure was tested by analyzing marine sediment (MESS-3) and soil (IAEA-Soil 7) reference materials. Furthermore, the above procedure has been successfully employed for the analysis of real soil and sediment samples.

  16. Preparation and properties of lignin-epoxy resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanfu Yin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A cross-linked biomass-polymer composite with a lignin content of up to 60% was prepared by blending lignin with an epoxy resin and polyamine using a hot press molding process. The characteristics of the curing reaction of lignin with epoxy resin were studied using DSC and FTIR analysis. The effect of molding temperature and molding pressure on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the lignin/epoxy resin composite was also studied by SEM, DMA, and TG analyses. The results showed that the epoxy resin can be cured by lignin, and the curing temperature for the blends can be reduced by the introduction of a polyamine cure agent. The properties of the composite, such as bending strength, impact strength, glass-transition temperature, and thermal stability, were evidently influenced by the molding process. A good interfacial combination was formed between lignin and epoxy resin. Increasing the molding temperature and pressure proved beneficial to achieve a better interfacial combination for the composite, and the degree of ductile fracture was increased in the fracture surface of the composite.

  17. Bacterial viability and physical properties of antibacterially modified experimental dental resin composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rüttermann

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the antibacterial effect and the effect on the material properties of a novel delivery system with Irgasan as active agent and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan when added to experimental dental resin composites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A delivery system based on novel polymeric hollow beads, loaded with Irgasan and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan as active agents were used to manufacture three commonly formulated experimental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as standard (ST. Material A contained the delivery system providing 4 % (m/m Irgasan, material B contained 4 % (m/m methacrylated Irgasan and material C 8 % (m/m methacrylated Irgasan. Flexural strength (FS, flexural modulus (FM, water sorption (WS, solubility (SL, surface roughness Ra, polymerization shrinkage, contact angle Θ, total surface free energy γS and its apolar γS (LW, polar γS (AB, Lewis acid γS (+and base γS (- term as well as bacterial viability were determined. Significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: The materials A to C were not unacceptably influenced by the modifications and achieved the minimum values for FS, WS and SL as requested by EN ISO 4049 and did not differ from ST what was also found for Ra. Only A had lower FM than ST. Θ of A and C was higher and γS (AB of A and B was lower than of ST. Materials A to C had higher γS (+ than ST. The antibacterial effect of materials A to C was significantly increased when compared with ST meaning that significantly less vital cells were found. CONCLUSION: Dental resin composites with small quantities of a novel antibacterially doped delivery system or with an antibacterial monomer provided acceptable physical properties and good antibacterial effectiveness. The sorption material being part of the delivery system can be used as a vehicle for any other active agent.

  18. Effects of bonding agent types and incremental techniques on minimizing contraction gaps around resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstenson, B; Oden, A

    1989-07-01

    In this in vitro study, large rectangular cavities were prepared on the proximal surfaces of human premolars with cervical margins placed beyond the cemento-enamel junction. Before the insertion of resin composite, the cavity walls were treated with Bowen's system, Scotchbond, or Gluma combined with different bonding agents. Various incremental techniques were tested. The contraction gap was determined by use of the resin impregnation technique: After polymerization shrinkage, a low-viscosity resin with a fluorescent additive was applied to the cervical and occlusal margins to penetrate the contraction gap. After being ground, the width of fluorescent resin could be measured with a microscope. All combinations of materials and techniques produced contraction gaps at the cervical wall. The range for mean width of the impregnated gap at the cervical wall was from 5 to 13 microns. The lowest mean value was obtained for Gluma in combination with Clearfil Bonding Agent. Placement of the composite in two increments significantly reduced the gap width. No reduction was achieved when a three-step insertion technique was used.

  19. Two Organic Phase Suspension Polymerization for Novel Hypercrosslinked Resin Bead by Polycondensation of CMB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Linxiu; ZHANG Xin; L(U) Xingxin; YUAN Siguo; WU Xianli

    2013-01-01

    The suspension polymerization with two organic phases was adopted to prepare spherical hypercrosslinked resin by self-polycondensation of 4,4'-bis-(chloromethyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (CMB).The chemical structure,morphology and pore characteristics of the novel spherical resin were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR),micrograph and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET).It is found that the suspension system and stirring speed impose a great influence upon the regularity and size distribution of hypercrosslinked beads.To prepare CMB resin beads with diameter of about 300.u',the optimal condition is as follows:stirring speed 300 r·min-1,and the volume ratio of the two organic phases (nitrobenzene/dimethyl silicon oil) 1 ∶ 5.After the self-polycondensation and succedent post-crosslinking of CMB monomer,the spherical adsorbent presents high special surface area (1190 m2·g-1) and abundant pore volume (0.714 cm3· g-1),and could be potentially applied in the adsorption of various organic molecules and synthesis of porous ion exchanger.

  20. The effect of flowable and dual-cure resin composite liners on gingival microleakage of posterior resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirani F.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Microleakage has been always a major concern in restorative dentistry. The curing contraction of composites still presents a problem with controlling microleakage and postoperative sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of flowable and dual-cure resin composite liners on gingival microleakage of packable resin composite restorations. "nMaterials and Methods: Sixty Class II cavities with cervical margins 1 mm below the CEJ were prepared in 30 extracted human molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups of 12 each. In control group, each tooth was restored incrementally with Tetric Ceram composite without applying any liner. In the second and forth groups, flowable materials- Tetric Flow and dual-cure composite resin cement Relay X ARC were placed respectively as a 1-mm thick gingival increment and cured before the resin composite restoration, whereas, in the third and fifth groups liners were cured with the first increment of packable composite.The restored teeth were stored for one week in distilled water at 370C, and thermocycled between 50C and 550C, sealed with nail varnish except the tooth - composite interface in cervical restoration margins and immersed in 2% basic fuchsin for 24 hours. Dye penetration was evaluated using a stereomicroscope with 28x magnification. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. "nResults: The results of this study indicated that there were significant statistical differences between control - cured flowable liner, control-flowable liner without separately curing, control-cured dual cure composite resin cement groups.However there were no significant differences between dual-cure composite resin cement without separately curing-control,cured flowable liner-cured dual cure composite resin cement, flowable liner without separately curing-dual cure composite resin cement without separately

  1. Vickers Hardness of Composite Resins Cured with LED and QTH Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaghemand H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the factors affecting the degree of polymerization of light-cured composites is the type of light-curing unit used. In addition, physicomechanical properties of the composite resins depend on the degree of conversion and polymerization. Objectives: Since the type of initiator in new composite resins is not explained by manufacturers, this study is an attempt to compare the depth of hardening, with two LED and QTH light-curing units. Materials and Methods: Fifteen samples prepared from Gradia Direct and Filtek Z250, both of which being universal, were cured with QTH (Astralis 7 and LED (Bluephase C8 light-curing units. All the samples were molded in polyester resin and cut from the middle by a disk. The hardness of the cut area was evaluated at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5 and 4-mm depth intervals and also at the same interval as the width of the sample, with Vickers hardness machine, while the samples were placed in a darkroom. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA, t-test and post Hoc Tukey’s tests in SPSS, version 16. Results: Filtek Z250 was harder than Gradia Direct at all the depth with both light-curing units. The hardness of Filtek Z250 sample cured with Astralis 7 was higher than that cured with LED, but with Gradia Direct the LED unit resulted in higher hardness. Curing depth was not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.109. Conclusions: Vickers hardness number for both composites used in this study is in an acceptable range for clinical implications. The composites’ composition is important to be considered for selection of light unit. Based on the findings of the present study, LED did not present more curing depth compared with QTH.

  2. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials.

  3. Effect of surface treatment and aging on bond strength of composite resin onlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cura, Maria; González-González, Inmaculada; Fuentes, Victoria; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Additional polymerization of indirect composite resins enhances their physical properties but lessens the potential for chemical bonding. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments and 6-month water storage on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of composite resin onlays. Composite resin onlays (Filtek Z250) randomly received 6 different surface treatments: (1) airborne-particle abrasion with 27-μm alumina particles+Adper Scotchbond 1XT adhesive application, (2) airborne-particle abrasion with alumina particles+silane application (ESPE SIL)+Adper Scotchbond 1XT, (3) airborne-particle abrasion with alumina particles+Scotchbond Universal adhesive, (4) tribochemical silica coating with 30-μm particles (CoJet Sand)+Adper Scotchbond 1XT adhesive, (5) tribochemical silica coating+silane application+Adper Scotchbond 1XT, and (6) tribochemical silica coating+Scotchbond Universal adhesive. Onlays were luted to fresh composite resin specimens with RelyX Ultimate resin cement. Bonded assemblies were stored in water for 24 hours or 6 months at 37°C and subjected to the μTBS test. Additional surface-treated composite resin onlays were analyzed with a contact profilometer to determine average roughness, and micromorphologic changes were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Airborne-particle abrasion with alumina followed by Adper Scotchbond 1XT or Scotchbond Universal adhesive application provided the highest bond strength values at 24 hours. Lower values were obtained after tribochemical silica coating. After 6 months of artificial aging, airborne-particle abrasion with alumina or silica-coated alumina particles followed by Scotchbond Universal application yielded the greatest bond strength results. Airborne-particle abrasion with alumina produced the highest roughness values and a more irregular surface. Adhesive selection seems to be relevant to the μTBS of luted composite resin onlays after 6 months of

  4. Preparation and thermal properties of mesoporous silica/phenolic resin nanocomposites via in situ polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lv

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the adhesion between inorganic particles and polymer matrix, in this paper, the mesoporous silica SBA-15 material was synthesized by the sol-gel method. The surface of SBA-15 was modified using γ-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GOTMS as a coupling agent, and then mesoporous silica/phenolic resin (SBA-15/PF nanocomposites were prepared via in situ polymerization. The structural parameters and physical properties of SBA-15, SBA-15-GOTMS (SBA-15 surface treated using GOTMS as coupling agents and E-SBA-15/PF (SBA-15/PF nanocomposites extracted using ethanol as solvent were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The thermal properties of the nanocomposites were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The results demonstrated that the GOTMS were successfully grafted onto the surface of SBA-15, and chemical bonds between PF and SBA-15-GOTMS were formed after in situ polymerization. In addition, it is found that the in situ polymerization method has great effects on the textural parameters of SBA-15. The results also showed that the glass transition temperatures and thermal stability of the PF nanocomposites were obviously enhanced as compared with the pure PF at silica contents between 1–3 wt%, due to the uniform dispersion of the modified SBA-15 in the matrix.

  5. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Alander, P; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a new composite onto such failed composite restorations, will eliminate unnecessary loss of tooth tissue and repeated insults to the pulp. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a particulate filler resin-composite (PFC) to 5 PFC substrates. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) Hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel (9.5%) etching, (2) Air-borne particle abrasion (50 microm Al2O3), (3) Silica coating (30 microm SiOx, CoJet-Sand). After each conditioning method, a silane coupling agent was applied. Adhesive resin was then applied in a thin layer and light polymerized. The low-viscosity diacrylate resin composite was bonded to the conditioned substrates in polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested in dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. One-way ANOVA showed significant influence of the surface conditioning methods (p acid etched specimens (5.7-14.3 MPa) and those treated with either air-borne particle abrasion (13.0-22.5 MPa) or silica coating (25.5-41.8 MPa) in dry conditions (ANOVA, p < 0.001). After thermocycling, the silica coating process resulted in the highest bond values in all material groups (17.2-30.3 MPa).

  6. Sensitivity of catalyst/base ratio on curing of resin luting agents: polymerization exotherm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, J A; Shen, C; Anusavice, K J

    1994-09-01

    Currently, the proposed test of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) for measuring working and setting times of resin luting agents is based on measurement of times to reach specified stages on the polymerization exotherm. The objective of this study was to use this test to investigate the influence of variations in the mass ratios of catalyst paste to base paste on the working and setting times of three dual-cured dental resin luting agents. The materials used were Dicor Light Activated Cement (Dentsply International Inc.), Palfique Inlay Resin Cement (Tokuyama Soda Co.), and Vivadent Dual Cement (Vivadent). Fifteen specimens of each material were tested for working time by spatulating mass ratios from 0.7 to 1.3 for 30s at 23 degrees C and recording the time from beginning of spatulation to the time at which a temperature increase occurs. Ten specimens of each material were tested for setting time by spatulating in a similar manner at 37 degrees C and recording the time at which the temperature reaches a maximum value. The data were fitted to the relation, In t = In A + Bm, where t is the time in seconds, m is the mass ratio, and A and B are regression coefficients. The results suggest that working and setting times of the specimens were independent of variations in mass ratio. A comparison among the materials was made by using a multiple linear regression with the relation, In t = In C + Dm + E gamma + Fm gamma, where gamma is a dummy variable to help distinguish between materials, and C, D, E, and F are regression coefficients. The results suggest that differences in materials influence the working time but not the setting time. These results infer that variations in mass ratio (+/- 20%) often observed in the clinical setting should not have a significant influence on the working and setting times of resin luting agents.

  7. Effect of Ingested Liquids on Color Change of Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beheshteh Malek Afzali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Color change of composite restorations is well known to dentists. However, the effect of commonly consumed drinks on discoloration of composite resins has yet to be determined. This study sought to assess the color change of a nanofilled (Premise and a flowable composite resin (Premise flowable following simulated consumption of tea, cola, iron drops and multivitamin syrup.Materials and Methods: Forty disk-shaped specimens (7 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated from each composite resin. The baseline color values were measured according to the CIE L*a*b* system using digital imaging. The specimens of each restorative material were randomly divided into five groups (eight each according to the storage media namely tea, cola, iron drops, multivitamin syrup or distilled water (control. The specimens were immersed in staining solutions for three hours daily over a 40-day test period. Following this, the color change values (ΔE* were calculated. For statistical analyses, the color differences were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P< 0.05.Results: There was no significant difference in ΔE* values between the two types of composite resins (P>0.05. In both composite materials, the difference among the solutions was not significant (P>0.05. Conclusion: Under the tested experimental conditions, both restorative materials were susceptible to discoloration by all four staining solutions. The color change values were not related to the solution or the type of material used.

  8. Comparative evaluation of surface porosities in conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin cured by water bath and microwave energy with microwavable acrylic resin cured by microwave energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunint Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional heat cure poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA is the most commonly used denture base resin despite having some short comings. Lengthy polymerization time being one of them and in order to overcome this fact microwave curing method was recommended. Unavailability of specially designed microwavable acrylic resin made it unpopular. Therefore, in this study, conventional heat cure PMMA was polymerized by microwave energy. Aim and Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate the surface porosities in PMMA cured by conventional water bath and microwave energy and compare it with microwavable acrylic resin cured by microwave energy. Materials and Methods: Wax samples were obtained by pouring molten wax into a metal mold of 25 mm × 12 mm × 3 mm dimensions. These samples were divided into three groups namely C, CM, and M. Group C denotes conventional heat cure PMMA cured by water bath method, CM denotes conventional heat cure PMMA cured by microwave energy, M denotes specially designed microwavable acrylic denture base resin cured by microwave energy. After polymerization, each sample was scanned in three pre-marked areas for surface porosities using the optical microscope. As per the literature available, this instrument is being used for the first time to measure the porosity in acrylic resin. It is a reliable method of measuring area of surface pores. Portion of the sample being scanned is displayed on the computer and with the help of software area of each pore was measured and data were analyzed. Results: Conventional heat cure PMMA samples cured by microwave energy showed maximum porosities than the samples cured by conventional water bath method and microwavable acrylic resin cured by microwave energy. Higher percentage of porosities was statistically significant, but well within the range to be clinically acceptable. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in-vitro study, conventional heat cure PMMA can be cured by

  9. Paired observation on light-cured composite resin and nano-composite resin in dental caries repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoling, Tao; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Yanyan, Zhao

    2016-11-01

    To compare the value of light-cured composite resin with that of nano-composite resin in dental caries repair. 88 patients taking dental caries repair in our hospital from May 2014 to April 2015 were selected, and divided into observation group and control group by coin method with 44 patients in each group. Nano-composite resin was used in observation group, while light-cured composite resin in control group. Then, the occurrence rates of odontohyperesthesia, aesthetic satisfaction with dental caries repair and complications were compared between two groups by visual analogue scale (VAS). The occurrence rate of odontohyperesthesia in observation group is significantly lower than that in control group (9.09% (4/44) vs 31.82% (14/44), 6.82% (3/44) vs 22.73% (10/44), 2.27% (1/44) vs 13.64% (6/44)) with difference of statistical significance (Pcomposite resin can lower the occurrence rate of odontohyperesthesia in dental caries repair, reduce the pain of patients, and improve the satisfaction of patients with tooth appearance.

  10. Microbiological characterization and effect of resin composites in cervical lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Bonfanti; Piccinelli, Giorgio; Faus-Matoses, Vicente; Cerutti, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Non carious cervical lesions associated to muscle hyperfunctions are increasing. Microhybrid resin composites are used to restore cervical abfractions. The purpose of this study was to investigate if resin composites modify tooth plaque, inducing an increment of cariogenic microflora and evaluate their effect, in vivo and in vitro, against S. mutans. Material and Methods Eight abfractions were restored with two microhybrid resin composites (Venus, Heraeus-Kulzer® and Esthet-X, Dentsply®), after gnatological therapy, in three patients with muscle hyperfunctions. For each abfraction three samples of plaque were taken from the cervical perimeter: before the restoration, one week and three months after restoration. The samples were evaluated both by traditional microbiological methods and by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). In vitro, disk-shaped specimens of the two composites were prepared to estimate the effects against pre-cultured S. mutans, after incubation at 37°C for 24h and assessed by a turbidimetric technique. Results In vivo no differences were found in plaque growth, for all samples, before and after restoration with both composites; in vitro, instead, a significant reduction of S. mutans growth was found between specimens of two composites (Mann-Whitney U-test p>0,06). Conclusions In this study a relevant consideration was elicited: composite materials, in vivo, do not modify plaque composition of non carious cervical lesions to a potential cariogenic plaque. Key words:Abfraction, restoration, S. mutans, composite, class V. PMID:28149461

  11. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N; Thompson, Van P; Opdam, Niek J; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n=24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n=24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electron microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450N. Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3-4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of polymerization mode and C-factor on cohesive strength of dual-cured resin cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Pallav, P.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to determine the influence of the C-factor and the mode of polymerization on the cohesive strength of various dual-cure resin cements. Methods Three curing conditions were tested; chemical curing with free shrinkage conditions (C = 0), and constraint shrinkage con

  13. Influence of the material for preformed moulds on the polymerization temperature of resin materials for temporary FPDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Philipp-Cornelius; Schmitz-Wätjen, Hans; Stiesch, Meike; Eisenburger, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Temperature increase of 5.5 ℃ can cause damage or necrosis of the pulp. Increasing temperature can be caused not only by mechanical factors, e.g. grinding, but also by exothermic polymerization reactions of resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate influences of the form material on the intrapulpal temperature during the polymerization of different self-curing resin materials for temporary restorations. 30 provisonal bridges were made of 5 resin materials: Prevision Temp (Pre), Protemp 4 (Pro), Luxatemp Star (Lux), Structure 3 (Str) and an experimental material (Exp). Moulds made of alginate (A) and of silicone (S) and vacuum formed moulds (V) were used to build 10 bridges each on a special experimental setup. The intrapulpal temperatures of three abutment teeth (a canine, a premolar, and a molar,) were measured during the polymerization every second under isothermal conditions. Comparisons of the maximum temperature (TMax) and the time until the maximum temperature (tTMax) were performed using ANOVA and Tukey Test. Using alginate as the mould material resulted in a cooling effect for every resin material. Using the vacuum formed mould, TMax increased significantly compared to alginate (Pmaterial on tTMax. All of the mould materials are suitable for clinical use if the intraoral application time does not exceed the manufacturer's instructions for the resin materials.

  14. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W.; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the effects of ceramic veneer thicknesses on the polymerization of two different resin cements. Materials and Methods A total of 80 ceramic veneer discs were fabricated by using a pressable ceramic material (e.max Press; Ivoclar Vivadent) from a Low Translucency (LT) ingot (A1 shade). These discs were divided into light-cured (LC; NX3 Nexus LC; Kerr) and dual-cured (DC; NX3 Nexus DC; Kerr) and each group was further divided into 4 subgroups, based on ceramic disc thickness (0.3 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.2 mm). The values of Vickers microhardness (MH) and degree of conversion (DOC) were obtained for each specimen after a 24-hour storage period. Association between ceramic thickness, resin cement type, and light intensity readings (mW/cm2) with respect to microhardness and degree of conversion was statistically evaluated by using ANOVA. Results For the DOC values, there was no significant difference observed among the LC resin cement subgroups, except in the 1.2 mm subgroup; only the DOC value (14.0 ± 7.4%) of 1.2 mm DC resin cement had significantly difference from that value (28.9 ± 7.5%) of 1.2 mm LC resin cement (P.05). Conclusion The degree of conversion and hardness of the resin cement was unaffected with veneering thicknesses between 0.3 and 0.9 mm. However, the DC resin cement group resulted in a significantly lower DOC and MH values for the 1.2 mm subgroup. Clinical Significance While clinically adequate polymerization of LC resin cement can be achieved with a maximum 1.2 mm of porcelain veneer restoration, the increase of curing time or light intensity is clinically needed for DC resin cements at the thickness of more than 0.9 mm. PMID:26162252

  15. Photoelastic evaluation of the effect of composite formulation on polymerization shrinkage stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Mychellyne Costa Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We compared polymerization stress in two commercial composites and three experimental composites made using camphorquinone (CQ and/or phenylpropanedione (PPD as photoinitiators. The internal surfaces of photoelastic resin discs with cylindrical cavities were roughened and treated with adhesive. Composites were divided into five groups: two commercial composites (Filtek Silorane and Filtek Z250 and three experimental composites with CQ/amine, CQ/PPD/amine, and PPD/amine. Composites were photopolymerized inside cavities, and subjected to photoelastic analysis immediately and at 24 hours and 7 days later using a plane polariscope. Stress created by Silorane (3.08 ± 0.09 MPa was similar to that of Z250 (3.19 ± 0.13 MPa immediately after photopolymerization (p > 0.05. After 24 hours and 7 days, Z250 (3.53 ± 0.15 and 3.69 ± 0.10 MPa, respectively showed higher stress than Silorane (3.19 ± 0.10 and 3.16 ± 0.10 MPa, respectively. Qualitative analysis immediately after photopolymerization showed composite/CQ promoted higher stress than PPD, but stress levels at other evaluated times were statistically similar, varying between 3.45 ± 0.11 MPa and 3.92 ± 0.13 MPa. At 24 hours and 7 days, Silorane created the lowest stress. All photoinitiators created comparable tensions during polymerization.

  16. Dental composite resins containing silica-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers with various filler levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H

    1999-07-01

    Currently available direct-filling composite resins are susceptible to fracture and hence are not recommended for use in large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to use ceramic single-crystalline whiskers as fillers to reinforce composites, and to investigate the effect of whisker filler level on composite properties. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whiskers, thereby improving retention in the matrix. The composite flexural strength, elastic modulus, hardness, and degree of polymerization conversion were measured as a function of whisker filler mass fraction, which ranged from 0% to 70%. Selected composites were polished simulating clinical procedures, and the surface roughness was measured with profilometry. The whisker composite with a filler mass fraction of 55% had a flexural strength (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 196+/-10 MPa, significantly higher than 83+/-14 MPa of a microfill and 120+/-16 MPa of a hybrid composite control (family confidence coefficient = 0.95; Tukey's multiple comparison). The composite modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. The flexural strength first increased, then plateaued with increasing filler level. The degree of conversion decreased with increasing filler level. The whisker composite had a polished surface roughness similar to that of a conventional hybrid composite (p>0.1; Student's t). To conclude, ceramic whisker reinforcement can significantly improve the mechanical properties of composite resins; the whisker filler level plays a key role in determining composite properties; and the reinforcement mechanisms appear to be crack pinning by whiskers and friction from whisker pullout resisting crack propagation.

  17. Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    resins . Packable composite resins were first introduced as an alternative to amalgam .10 They are characterized by a high filler load and a filler...clearance: -"_Paper _Article _ Book _ Poster _ Presentation _Other 6. Title: Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative...Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material ABSTRACT A new nanohybrid composite activated by sonic energy (SonicFill

  18. Mechanical and Physical Properties and Adhesion Durability of Flowable Resin Composite

    OpenAIRE

    金丸, 充徳; カナマル, ミツノリ; Mitsunori, KANAMARU

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanical and physical properties and adhesion durability to bovine dentin of the flowable resin composites in comparison with those of conventional resin composites and glass ionomers. In this experiment, four flowable resin composites, two conventional resin composites and two glass ionomers were used. The consistency, thermal expansion coefficiency, compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, brittleness, Vickers hardness, elastic modulus...

  19. The Basic Ply Properties of a Kevlar 49/Epoxy Resin Composite System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Fibre 4 2.3 Composite 4 3 Results 7 3.1 Resin Properties 7 3.2 Composite Properties 9 4 Discussion 14 4.1 Resin System 14 4.2 Composite System 15 5...of the fibre creels before and after fabrication and from the weight of the composite. 3 RESULTS 3.1 Resin Properties TABLE I Resin Tensile Properties

  20. The effect of resin infiltration and oxidative pre-treatment on microshear bond strength of resin composite to hypomineralised enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chay, Pui Ling; Manton, David J; Palamara, Joseph E A

    2014-07-01

    Reduced bond strengths of resin composites to hypomineralised enamel increase restorative failure. To investigate if the adhesion of resin composite to hypomineralised enamel can be improved by pre-treatments: resin infiltration, oxidative pre-treatment followed by a resin infiltration, or oxidative pre-treatment. Twenty-one enamel specimens in each of five Groups: 1) Normal enamel; 2) Hypomineralised enamel; 3) Hypomineralised enamel pre-treated with a resin infiltrant, (Icon(®)); 4) Hypomineralised enamel pre-treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite then treatment with resin infiltrant; 5) Hypomineralised enamel pre-treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite. A resin composite rod was bonded to each specimen using Clearfil™ SE bond as the adhesive (hereafter termed 'routine bonding'), then subjected to microshear bond strength (MSBS) testing. Overall, the mean MSBS between the five groups differed significantly (P = 0.001). Pre-treatment of hypomineralised enamel with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite with or without subsequent resin infiltration in Groups 4 and 5 prior to routine bonding resulted in increased mean MSBS compared to Groups 2 and 3, with mean MSBS values not differing significantly when compared to routine bonding to normal enamel. Increased bond strength of resin composite to hypomineralised enamel was obtained by pre-treatment of hypomineralised enamel specimens with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite with or without subsequent resin infiltration. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. MATERIALS AND METHODS 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (P<.001 for both). However, statistically significant difference was not observed between group A and group S. According to the independent Student's t-test, the shear bond strength values of AT were significantly higher than those of AG (P<.001). CONCLUSION The surface treatment of polyamide denture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin. PMID:28018569

  2. Flexural properties of experimental nanofiber reinforced composite are affected by resin composition and nanofiber/resin ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotti, Hugo A; Manso, Adriana P; Leung, Victor; do Valle, Accácio L; Ko, Frank; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of different resin blends concentrations and nanofibers mass ratio on flexural properties of experimental Poliacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers reinforced composites. Poliacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers mats were produced by electrospinning and characterized by tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental resin-fiber composite beams were manufactured by infiltrating PAN nanofiber mats with varied concentrations of BisGMA-TEGDMA resin blends (BisGMA/TEGDMA: 30/70, 50/50 and 70/30weight%). The mass ratio of fiber to resin varied from 0% to 8%. Beams were cured and stored in water at 37°C. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM) and work of fracture (WF) were evaluated by three-point bending test after 24h storage. The tensile properties of the PAN nanofibers indicated an anisotropic behavior being always higher when tested in a direction perpendicular to the rotation of the collector drum. Except for WF, the other flexural properties (FS and FM) were always higher as the ratio of BisGMA to TEGDMA increased in the neat resin beams. The addition of different ratios of PAN fibers did not affect FS and FM of the composite beams as compared to neat resin beams (p>0.05). However, the addition of fibers significantly increased the WF of the composite beams, and this was more evident for the blends with higher TEGDMA ratios (presin blends did not negatively affect the properties of the composite and resulted in an increase in toughness that is a desirable property for a candidate material for prosthodontics application. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of dental adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Piva, Evandro; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Resin adhesives (RA) have been applied between resin composite (RC) increments, but there is no consensus on the impact of this technique on the properties of the final restoration. This study evaluated the effect of the presence of RA between RC layers on physical properties, translucency and long-term color stability of the restorative material. Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose (bond, 3M ESPE) and Adper™ Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) were used as RA, and Filtek™ Z350 (3M ESPE) as RC. Specimens containing RA were prepared by applying 3 layers of the adhesive between 4 increments of RC; adhesive-free specimens were also used (control). Tests of water sorption and solubility, mechanical performance (microtensile cohesive strength, flexural strength, and flexural modulus, after immediate and long-term water storage), and translucency and color stability (after immediate and 1, 7, 90, and 180 days of water or wine storage) were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were also taken from the fractured specimens (flexural strength test). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (padhesive resin (SBMP). This study is the first to show positive results from the use of resin adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composite, which is common in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Composite resin fillings and inlays. An 11-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; Qvist, Vibeke

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, clinical study was to evaluate the clinical performance of composite resin materials used for fillings and indirect inlays. Twenty-eight sets of five class II restorations (two fillings, three inlays) were placed in 88 premolars and 52 molars in 28 adults. Brillian...

  5. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  6. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and attribu

  7. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  8. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  9. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  10. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and

  11. Optimal depth of cure for nanohybrid resin composite using quartz tungsten halogen and new high intensity light-emitting diode curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanthanuch, Saijai; Ruengsri, Prapansri; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) photocuring units on the degree of conversion (DC) and surface microhardness of a resin composite that had been cured for optimal depth of cure (DoC) assessment. Two hundred and forty cylindrical specimens (4.0 mm in diameter, 2.0-4.0 mm thick) of shade A2 resin composite were prepared and cured with either a QTH or an LED. The DC and top and bottom surface hardness were recorded, and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, t-test (α = 0.05) and linear regression analysis. The results showed that surface microhardness values and DC were affected by light intensity (P resin composite thickness (2, 3, and 4 mm) (P Resin composite polymerized by the QTH had an optimal DoC of 3 mm, compared to 4 mm for the LED.

  12. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds...

  13. Effect of toothbrushes and denture brushes on heat-polymerized acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Pontes, Karina Matthes; de Holanda, Janaína Câncio; Fonteles, Cristiane Sa Roriz; Pontes, Cassio de Barros; Lovato da Silva, Cláudia Helena; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    It is important to choose an appropriate brush for denture cleaning to prevent damage to the surface properties of prosthetic devices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasiveness of toothbrushes and denture brushes on boiled and microwave-processed acrylic resins. Specimens of 4 resin brands were prepared (n = 30). Five brands of brushes (n = 6) were used in a toothbrushing machine, first for 17,800 strokes and then for an additional 35,600 strokes (total of 53,400), at a load of 200 g. An analytical balance and a profilometer were used to assess the weight and surface roughness, respectively, before and after 17,800 and 53,400 strokes. Analysis of variance and Tukey tests were used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Weight loss increased with time, while surface roughness remained the same. There were no statistically significant differences among toothbrushes and denture brushes in the resulting weight loss (17,800 strokes, 1.83 mg; 53,400 strokes, 3.78 mg) or surface roughness (17,800 or 53,400 strokes, 0.14 µm). The weight loss values after 53,400 brush strokes indicated that Clássico (2.28 mg) and VIPI Wave (2.75 mg) presented significantly greater abrasion resistance than Lucitone 550 (3.36 mg) and Onda-Cryl (2.85 mg) (P < 0.05). The type of brush and the polymerization method did not influence resin wear after brushing.

  14. Depth of Cure of New Flowable Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    Flowable composites were introduced to the dental community in the late 1990’s (Ikeda, 2009; Bayne , 1998). The advantage of flowable composite-based...allowing the increased resin to reduce the viscous nature of the material (Ikeda, 2009; Bayne 1998). They also exhibit low wear resistance (Ikeda...Oper Dent 2008; 33:31-6. Bayne SC, Thompson JY, Swift EJ Jr, Stamatiades P, Wilkerson M. A characterization of first-generation flowable

  15. Resin-based composite as a direct esthetic restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala; Acharya, Shashirashmi

    2011-06-01

    The search for an ideal esthetic material for tooth restoration has resulted in significant improvements in both materials and the techniques for using them. Various resin-based composite (RBC) materials have recently been introduced into the market that offer improved esthetic and physical properties. This article reviews RBCs, including their compositions, advantages, and disadvantages, that are contemporary to today's clinical practice as well as those that are under research consideration and/ or in clinical trial phase.

  16. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  17. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  18. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Asefi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow, Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists. A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  19. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics. PMID:27651887

  20. Generalized effective medium theory and dielectric relaxation in particle-filled polymeric resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Christian

    2002-03-01

    Dielectric relaxation in disordered solids continue to be in the focus due to the important technological applications in the context of microwave and optical remote sensing and communication. The pragmatic philosophy of the present article is to use a combination of Jonscher's phenomenological equations with a generalized effective medium equation, due to McLachlan, to study the microwave relaxation dynamics in a technologically interesting system, i.e., a particle-filled polymeric resin. The introduction of a small number of parameters (critical exponents s and t, conductivity threshold φc) into the standard Bruggeman effective medium equation dramatically improves its predictive power. This approach, termed the McLachlan-Jonscher model, has the potential to be quite flexible and is very sensitive to the values of the critical exponents s, t and of the conductivity threshold φc. Furthermore, a comparison of the calculated complex effective permittivity for a series of carbon black-filled polymers with experimental results shows that it can accurately describe the microwave response over a broad range of volume fraction of carbon black. These considerations illustrate the potential for using this coarse grained model to help understand the dielectric relaxation of particle dispersions in polymeric matrixes.

  1. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  2. Microwave absorption properties of graphite flakes-phenolic resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Jyoti P.; Gogoi, Pragyan J.; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, microwave absorption properties of a conductor back single layer designed on graphite flakes (GF)-novolac phenolic resin (NPR) composites is studied. The complex permittivity of the developed composite enhance for higher GF percentages. The reflection loss(RL) measured using E8362C VNA shows a maximum RL values -25 dB at 9.8 GHz for 7 wt. % composition with -10 dB bandwidth of 0.3 GHz. The developed composites are being light weight and cost effective shows potential to be used as dielectric absorber.

  3. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries.

  4. Development of a composite resin disclosing agent based on the understanding of tooth staining mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Light, Nathan; Amin, Wala M; Retrouvey, Jean-Marc; Cerruti, Marta; Tamimi, Faleh

    2014-06-01

    To characterize the surface composition of dental enamel and composite resin, assess the ability of dyes with different affinities to stain these surfaces, and use this information to develop a disclosing agent that stains composite resin more than dental enamel. One hundred and ten sound extracted teeth were collected and 60 discs of composite resin, 9 mm diameter and 3 mm thick, were prepared. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to determine the elemental composition on the different surfaces. A tooth shade spectrophotometer was used to assess the change in shade after staining the surfaces with different dyes. XPS analysis revealed that surfaces of both outer dental enamel and composite resin contained relatively high amounts of carbon, specifically hydrocarbons. Both dental enamel and composite surfaces were stainable with the hydrophobic dye (pcomposite resin was stained more than the dental enamel (pcomposite resin might explain their high affinity to be stained by food and beverages containing hydrophobic molecules. The composite resin is more stainable by hydrophobic dyes than dental enamel. We used this information to develop an agent for disclosing composite resins that could be used to visualize composite resins that need to be removed. Removal of composite resin can be problematic, time consuming and stressful to the dental practitioner. A composite disclosing agent would help the dental practitioner identify the composite resin and facilitate its removal without damaging the adjacent healthy tooth tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  6. Terpenoid composition and class of Tertiary resins from India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Suryendu; Mallick, Monalisa; Mathews, Runcie Paul [Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India); Bertram, Norbert [LTA-Labor fuer Toxikologie und Analytik, Friedrichshoeher Str. 28, D-53639 Koenigswinter (Germany); Greenwood, Paul F. [John De Laeter Mass Spectrometry and WA Biogeochemitry Centres (M090), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA, 6009 (Australia); WA - Organic and Isotope Geochemistry Centre, Curtin University of Technology, Kent St., Bentley 6102 (Australia)

    2009-10-01

    The terpenoid composition and class of Tertiary resins preserved within lignites of Cambay, Kutch and Cauvery Basins of India have been characterized using Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. Major pyrolysis products include cadalene-based C{sub 15}-bicyclic sesquiterpenoids with some C{sub 30} and C{sub 31} bicadinanes and bicadinenes typical of Class II or dammar resin. The occurrence of these terpenoids in Early Eocene sediments may extend the first appearance of Dipterocarpaceae angiosperms, the predominant source of this resin class, back to the Early Eocene epoch in India. The same terpenoid biomarkers have been detected in many SE Asian oils reflecting a close source relationship with these resins. Strong CH{sub 3} (1377 cm{sup -} {sup 1}) and other CH{sub x} (3000-2800 and 1460-1450 cm{sup -} {sup 1}) aliphatic absorptions of much larger intensity than the aromatic C = C (1560-1650 cm{sup -} {sup 1}) absorption were detected in the Indian resins by FTIR Spectroscopy, confirming the quantitative significance of the terpenoid pyrolysates. (author)

  7. [The method of esthetic crown restoration with composite resin jacket crown in primary molars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K; Shibui, N; Suda, M; Uehara, M; Karibe, H; Kondou, K

    1990-10-01

    The term "esthetics" has recently been also used in the dental field, and a field called esthetic dentistry is increasingly being noted. The number of not only adult but also pediatric patients who visit for treatment aiming at esthetic recovery is being increased. Inpedodontics, composite resin of the coronal color is generally used in the restoration of deciduous incisors. However, the method using metal crowns for the deciduous teeth is used for the deciduous molars at present. We applied a composite resin jacket crown to the deciduous molar in a way similar to that of esthetic crown restoration for the anterior teeth. The surgical procedure before crown preparation varied slightly according to the presence or absence of pulpal treatment of vital teeth and with non-vital teeth, but the application was performed as follows: 1) Desensitization of pulp, pulpal treatment and core construction. 2) Preparation of crown. 3) Selection, trial set and occlusal equilibration of a metal crown for the deciduous tooth. 4) Precision impression with a silicone impression material. 5) Removal of the metal crown for the deciduous tooth from the impression material. 6) Making of an under-cut to the abutment tooth on the buccal lingual side. 7) Filling of the impression with chemical polymerization resin. 8) Application of pressure in the oral cavity. 9) Adjustment of edge and crown forms. Thus, the preparation method for the composite resin jacket crown was relatively simple. Since this surgery, the patient has been followed up for 1 year and 6 months, and no specifically troublesome points have been observed clinically. The patient and her parents are satisfied with the results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Synthesis of Photochromic AgCl-Urethane Resin Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Miyazaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AgCl-resin photochromic composite films were prepared using AgNO3, HCl-EtOH, CuCl2 solution, and a liquid-state urethane resin as starting materials. The obtained composite films showed a photochromic property. The rate of darkening of the composite film increased after mixing with CuCl2. The AgCl particle size in the film without heat treatment was 6–20 nm, and that of the heat-treated film was 25–80 nm; these results were confirmed using TEM observations. The fading rate of the film without heat treatment was higher than that of the heat-treated films.

  9. [The surface degradation of various light-cured composite resins by thermal cycling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, S; Nomoto, R; Harashima, I; Hirasawa, T

    1990-01-01

    The durability of four commercially available light-cured composite resins was investigated by thermal cycling, GR containing inorganic fillers treated with the graft polymerization of acryl ester, LF inorganic fillers treated with a silane coupling agent, PC silanized inorganic fillers and organic composite fillers, and the MFR-type SI containing the organic composite fillers. These materials were given 10,000, 30,000 and 50,000 thermal cycles (4 degrees C-60 degrees C) and the deterioration of materials by thermal cycling was evaluated by the measurement of the mechanical properties and the SEM observations of the surface of the thermocycled materials. Compressive strength and bending elastic moduli for all materials did not change greatly by thermal cycling. However, bending strength, toothbrush abrasion resistance and surface hardness decreased with increasing number of thermal cycles between 0 and 30,000, and changed little after 30,000 cycles. The percentage of bending strength after 50,000 thermal cycles to that of the non-thermocycled sample was 75% for GR, 60% for LF, 50% for PC and 65% for SI, respectively. Deterioration of materials was observed as cracks on the surface, which generated at the interface of the filler and matrix. The cracks generated relatively earlier during thermal cycling for SI and PC which contained the organic composite filler, later for LF which contained the silanized inorganic fillers, and the number of cracks on LF were fewer than SI and PC. On the other hand, for GR, no cracks were observed even after 50,000 thermal cycles. From these results, it can be presumed that the pre-treatment of filler by the graft polymerization is more effective to improve the durability of composite resin.

  10. Tensile bond strength between auto-polymerized acrylic resin and acrylic denture teeth treated with MF-MA solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effect of chemical surface treatment using methyl formate-methyl acetate (MF-MA) solution on the tensile bond strength between acrylic denture teeth and auto-polymerized acrylic resin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy maxillary central incisor acrylic denture teeth for each of three different brands (Yamahachi New Ace; Major Dent; Cosmo HXL) were embedded with incisal edge downwards in auto-polymerized resin in polyethylene pipes and ground with silicone carbide paper on their ridge lap surfaces. The teeth of each brand were divided into seven groups (n=10): no surface treatment (control group), MF-MA solution at a ratio of 25:75 (v/v) for 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 60 seconds, 120 seconds, 180 seconds, and MMA for 180 seconds. Auto-polymerized acrylic resin (Unifast Trad) was applied to the ground surface and polymerized in a pressure cooker. A tensile strength test was performed with a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Dunnett T3 test (α=.05). RESULTS The surface treatment groups had significantly higher mean tensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P.05), except for the Yamahachi New Ace MF-MA 180-second group (P<.05). CONCLUSION 15-second MF-MA solution can be an alternative chemical surface treatment for repairing a denture base and rebonding acrylic denture teeth with auto-polymerized acrylic resin, for both conventional and cross-linked teeth. PMID:27555897

  11. The influence of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements on bonding to metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzijden, C W; Feilzer, A J; Creugers, N H; Davidson, C L

    1992-02-01

    During the setting of a resin composite cement (RCC) used as an adhesive between a resin-bonded bridge and tooth structure, the adhesion may be disrupted by the development of shrinkage stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the shrinkage stress of three different RCCs on their adhesive and cohesive qualities when bonded to metal surfaces in a rigid set-up. Two opposing parallel NiCr discs (Wiron 77) were mounted in a tensilometer at a mutual distance of 200 microns and cemented with Panavia Ex, Clearfil F2, or Microfill Pontic C. The alloy surfaces were treated by either electrolytic etching, sand-blasting, silane-coating, or tin-plating. During setting, the discs were kept at their original mutual distance to simulate the extreme clinical situation of "complete" rigidity, where the casting and the tooth cannot move toward each other. The developing shrinkage stress was recorded continuously. During setting, the adhesive strength of the RCCs to silane-coated surfaces was always higher than their early cohesive strength. Electrolytically-etched surfaces as well as sand-blasted surfaces showed, in almost all cases, adhesive failure. The tin-plated samples showed mainly adhesive failure at the metal/resin interface. The highest bond strength values were found for silane-coated surfaces in combination with Clearfil F2.

  12. Heat conduciton properties of flowable composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Yalçin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate and compare heat conduction of different flowable composites. Materials and Methods: In this study, four different flowable composites; GC Gradia Direct LoFlo (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, Filtek Ultimate (3M ESPE, St. Paul, USA, Grandio Flow (VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany and SDI Wave (SDI, Victoria, Australia were used. Flowable composites were placed into standard molds and used according to manufacturer instructions. The samples were prepared for every brand of flowable composites. The Heat Conduction Unit's (P. A. Hilton Ltd., England linear heat conduction module was used in determining the flowable composites heat conductivity. The data were statistically analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test (SPSS 13.0, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA. Results: Heat conduction values of flowable composites were found different each other. Results for GC Gradia Direct and Grandio Flow were significantly different from 3M ESPE and SDI (P 0.005. Conclusions: Within the limits of this study, flowable composites transmit the heat. However, results for GC Gradia Direct and Grandio Flow were significantly different from 3M ESPE and SDI.

  13. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM , size R4, embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37°C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN. Independent sample ′t′ test revealed a nonsignificant ( P < 0.385 difference between mean shear bond strength values of conventional and nanocomposite group. The bond strength values revealed that nanocomposite had slightly higher mean shear bond strength (21.04 ± 0.56 compared to conventional composite (20.78 ± 0.60. It was found that conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  14. Penggunaan Composit Resin pada Kasus Resisi Gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suryono

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical appearance of gingival tissue play an essential role in aesthetics. Gingival morphology and color effect on the aesthetic concerns for the patient. Gingival recession can cause exposure of the underlying rootsurface and hypersensitive of the tooth. Purpose: this case reports showed the treatment of gingival recession by using gingival-shaded composite. Case and treatment: Exposed root surface is layered by gingival-shaded composite and its also improved aesthetics by replacement of the restoration. Conclusion: The use of gingival-shaded composite in the area of exposed root surface for layering improved the aesthetic and relief the sensitive denting of patient.

  15. Silicone Resin Applications for Ceramic Precursors and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Narisawa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the applications of silicone resins as ceramic precursors. The historical background of silicone synthesis chemistry is introduced to explain the production costs and supply availability of various silicones. Thermal degradation processes of silicones are classified in terms of the main chain structure and cyclic oligomer expulsion process, which determine the resulting ceramic yield and the chemical composition. The high temperature decomposition of Si-O-C beyond 1,400 °C in an inert atmosphere and formation of a protective silica layer on material surfaces beyond 1,200 °C in an oxidative atmosphere are discussed from the viewpoints of the wide chemical composition of the Si-O-C materials. Applications of the resins for binding agents, as starting materials for porous ceramics, matrix sources with impregnation, fiber spinning and ceramic adhesions are introduced. The recent development of the process of filler or cross-linking agent additions to resin compounds is also introduced. Such resin compounds are useful for obtaining thick coatings, MEMS parts and bulk ceramics, which are difficult to obtain by pyrolysis of simple organometallic precursors without additives.

  16. Dynamic thermo-mechanical properties of various flowable resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balthazard, Rémy; Vincent, Marin; Dahoun, Abdessellam; Mortier, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the storage modulus (E’), the loss modulus (E’’) and the loss tangent (tan δ) of various flowable resin composites. Material and Methods Grandio Flow (GRF), GrandioSo Heavy Flow (GHF), Filtek Supreme XTE (XTE) and Filtek Bulk Fill (BUL) flowable resins and Clinpro Sealant (CLI) ultra-flowable pit and fissure sealant resin were used. 25 samples were tested using a dynamical mechanical thermal analysis system in bending mode. Measurements were taken within a temperature range of 10 to 55°C. The results were statistically analyzed using mixed-effect and repeated-measure analysis of variance followed by paired multiple comparisons. Results For all the materials, the E’ values decrease with temperature, whereas the tan δ values increase. Irrespective of the temperature, GHF and GRF present E’ and E’’ values significantly higher than all the other materials and CLI presents values significantly lower than all the other materials. Observation of the values for all the materials reveals a linear progression of the tan δ values with temperature. Conclusions A variation in temperature within a physiological range generates modifications in mechanical properties without damaging the material, however. Filler content in volume terms appears to be the crucial parameter in the mechanical behavior of tested materials. Key words:Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, elastic modulus, filler content, flowable resin composites, loss modulus, loss tangent. PMID:27957266

  17. Profile of Fluoride Release from a Nanohybrid Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assed Bezerra Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the amount and profile of fluoride release from a fluoride-containing nanohybrid composite resin (Tetric® N-Ceram by direct potentiometry. Thirty specimens (5 mm diameter x 3 mm high; n=10/material were made of Tetric® N-Ceram, Vitremer® resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (positive control or Filtek® Z350 nanofill composite resin (negative control. The specimens were stored individually in plastic tubes containing 1 mL of artificial saliva at 37°C, which was daily renewed during 15 days. At each renewal of saliva, the amount of fluoride ions released in the solution was measured using a fluoride ion-selective electrode with ion analyzer, and the values obtained in mV were converted to ppm (µg/mL. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test at a significance level of 5%. The results showed that the resins Tetric® N-Ceram and Filtek® Z350 did not release significant amounts of fluoride during the whole period of evaluation (p>0.05. Only Vitremer® released significant amounts of fluoride ions during the 15 days of the experiment, with greater release in first 2 days (p0.05. In conclusion, the nanohybrid composite resin Tetric® N-Ceram did not present in vitro fluoride-releasing capacity throughout the 15 days of study.

  18. Resin infusion of layered metal/composite hybrid and resulting metal/composite hybrid laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of fabricating a metal/composite hybrid laminate is provided. One or more layered arrangements are stacked on a solid base to form a layered structure. Each layered arrangement is defined by a fibrous material and a perforated metal sheet. A resin in its liquid state is introduced along a portion of the layered structure while a differential pressure is applied across the laminate structure until the resin permeates the fibrous material of each layered arrangement and fills perforations in each perforated metal sheet. The resin is cured thereby yielding a metal/composite hybrid laminate.

  19. Effect of inhomogeneity of light from light curing units on the surface hardness of composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Takahashi, Hideo; Ban, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of output light from different types of light curing units, and their effects on polymerization of light-activated composite resin. Three quartz-tungsten-halogen lamps, one plasma arc lamp, and one LED light curing unit were used. Intensity distribution of light emitted from the light guide tip was measured at 1.0-mm intervals across the guide tip. Distribution of Knoop hardness number on the surface of resin irradiated with the light curing units was also measured. For all units, inhomogeneous distribution of light intensity across the guide tip was observed. Minimum light intensity values were 19-80% of the maximum values. In terms of surface hardness, inhomogeneous distribution was also observed for the materials irradiated with the tested units. Minimum values were 53-92% of the maximum values. Our results indicated that markedly inhomogeneous light emitted from light curing unit could result in inhomogeneous polymerization in some areas of the restoration below the light guide tip.

  20. A Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage of Two Low-Shrinkage Composites with a Conventional Resin Composite: an In Vitro Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavangar, Maryam; Tayefeh Davalloo, Reza; Darabi, Farideh; Karambin, Mahsa; Kazemi, Reza

    2016-03-01

    Polymerization shrinkage stress in composite restorations may lead to microleakage. Clinical methods such as using low-shrinkage composites have been suggested to overcome this problem; however, there are controversies about their efficiency in decreasing the microleakage. This in vitro study was conducted to compare the microleakage of two low-shrinkage resin composites with a conventional one. Fifty class V cavities of 2.5×3×2 mm (depth× length× width) were prepared in the buccal surfaces of intact bovine incisor teeth with the incisal margin on the enamel and gingival margin on the cementum. The teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups. In group 1, Clearfil APX (conventional) with SE Bond was used in 2 layers (Kuraray; Japan). In group 2, GC Kalore (low -shrinkage) with GC UniFil Bond was applied in one layer (GC Company). In group 3, the material of group 2 was applied in two layers. In group 4, FiltekP90 (low -shrinkage) with P90 System adhesive was applied in one layer (3M ESPE). In group 5, the materials of group 4 were applied in two layers. The samples were thermocycled and immersed in 0.5% fuchsin solution for 24h. The restorations were sectioned in buccolingual direction. Then they were evaluated for microleakage by using a stereomicroscope and scored as 0, 1, 2, and 3 and then Kruskal-Wallis test was used (p< 0.05). The groups were not significantly different regarding the microleakage in the coronal and cervical margins (p< 0.423 and p< 0.212, respectively); however, the Filtek P90 yielded the best results. In all groups, except group 5 (p= 0.018), the cervical margins had greater microleakage than the coronal margins. The results suggested that low-shrinkage resin composites may not reduce the marginal microleakage. The proper use of conventional resin composites may offer comparable clinical results.

  1. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits.

  2. Histo-pathological study of pulp response to a composite resin restoration with two lining materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S; Ishikawa, T

    1990-11-01

    This histopathological study investigated the pulp reaction to a restoration system employing a posterior composite resin with or without the pulp protection of visible light curing calcium hydroxide composition and alpha-TCP cement lining to dentin. Black's class V cavities were prepared in 120 adult dog teeth. They were then extracted for histological examination. As a result of this study, their lining materials were found to be effective in pulp protection. To understand the pathological finding, the pH values of "Fulfil", "Universal bond", "VLC Dycal" and "Vitacemen Type II" were measured. The pH levels of "Fulfil" and "Universal Bond" were mildly acidic (4.79-5.18) before polymerization, with no subsequent changes. "VLC Dycal" was initially a strongly alkaline (11.75) and remained this condition. "Vitacemen Type II" was initially acidic (3.78), but eventually reached the milder acidity of 5.12 after 24 hours.

  3. Boron/aluminum graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication feasibility and potential of an adhesively bonded metal and resin matrix fiber-composite hybrid are determined as an advanced material for aerospace and other structural applications. The results show that using this hybrid concept makes possible a composite design which, when compared with nonhybrid composites, has greater transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  4. Effects of light intensity and curing time of the newest LED Curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, D.; Herda, E.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of light intensity and curing time of the latest LED curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins. Sixty-three specimens from three brands (Polofil Supra, Filtek Z250, and Solare X) were divided into two test groups and one control group. The test groups were polymerized with a Flashmax P3 LED curing unit for one or three seconds. The control group was polymerized with a Ledmax 450 curing unit with the curing time based on the resin manufacturer’s instructions. A higher light intensity and shorter curing time did not influence the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins.

  5. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  6. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  7. Engineering and Design of Polymeric Shells: Inwards Interweaving Polymers as Multilayer Nanofilm, Immobilization Matrix, or Chromatography Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Houwen Matthew; Yu, Han; Guigas, Gernot; Fery, Andreas; Weiss, Matthias; Patzel, Volker; Trau, Dieter

    2017-02-15

    Hydrogels with complex internal structures are required for advanced drug delivery systems and tissue engineering or used as inks for 3D printing. However, hydrogels lack the tunability and diversity of polymeric shells and require complicated postsynthesis steps to alter its structure or properties. We report on the first integrated approach to assemble and design polymeric shells to take on various complex structures and functions such as multilayer nanofilms, multidensity immobilization matrix, or multiadhesive chromatography resins via the tuning of four assembly parameters: (a) poly(allylamine) (PA) concentration, (b) number of poly(allylamine)/poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PA/PSSA) incubations, (c) poly(allylamine) (PA) to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafting ratio, and (d) % H2O present during assembly. Our approach combines the complex 3D structures of hydrogels with the versatility of self-assembled polymeric layers. Polymeric shells produced from our method have a highly uniform material distribution and well-defined shell boundaries. Shell thickness, density, and adhesive properties are easily tunable. By virtue of such unique material features, we demonstrate that polymeric shells can be designed to expand beyond its conventional function as thin films and serve as immobilization matrix, chromatography resins, or even reaction compartments. This technique could also uncover interesting perspectives in the development of novel multimaterials for 3D printing to synthesize scaffolds at a higher order of complexity.

  8. Conversion-dependent shrinkage stress and strain in dental resins and composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Trujillo-Lemon, Marianela; Lu, Hui; Ding, Xingzhe; Lin, Yan; Ge, Junhao

    2005-01-01

    The placement of dental composites is complicated by the contraction that accompanies polymerization of these materials. The resulting shrinkage stress that develops during cure of a bonded restoration can induce defects within the composite, the tooth or at the interface resulting in compromised clinical performance and/or esthetics. In light of the substantial efforts devoted to understanding and attempting to control shrinkage stress and strain in dental composite restoratives, this paper offers a perspective on the conversion dependent development of shrinkage and stress. The relationships between polymer property development and the physical evolution of the network structures associated with dental polymers as well as the interrelated kinetics of the photopolymerization reaction process are examined here. Some of the methods used to assess conversion in dental resins and composites are considered. In particular, newly introduced techniques that allow real time analysis of conversion by near-infrared spectroscopy to be coupled directly to simultaneous dynamic measurements of either shrinkage stress or strain are described. The results are compared with reports from the dental materials literature as well as complementary studies in other related fields of polymer science. The complex, nonlinear correlation between conversion, shrinkage and stress are highlighted. A brief review of some of the materials-based approaches designed to minimize polymerization shrinkage and stress is also provided.

  9. Multilayered composite microgels synthesized by surfactant-free seeded polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Yamagata, Tomoyo; Murai, Masaki

    2013-08-20

    We report on a simple and rapid method to produce multilayered composite microgels. Thermosensitive microgels were synthesized by aqueous free radical precipitation polymerization using N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) as a monomer. Using the microgels as cores, surfactant-free seeded polymerization of an oil-soluble monomer, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), was carried out at 70 °C, where the microgels were highly deswollen in water. All of the oil-soluble monomers were polymerized, and the resultant polymers were attached on the pre-existing microgel cores, resulting in hard shell formation. It is worth mentioning that secondary particles of oil-soluble monomers have never been formed during the polymerization. The composite microgels were characterized by electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. In particular, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed that the surface of the composite microgels was composed of a hydrogel layer, although microgel cores were covered by polyGMA shell. The mechanism of the trilayered composite microgel formation will be discussed.

  10. Structural Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Carbopol Polymeric Composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    XRD) peaks of the pure ... relative intensity of these peaks was higher in the polymeric composites. ... oscillator, was set to alternately emit sound ... In order to prepare a sample for analysis, a glass slide was clipped to the top face of the sample.

  11. Imitation model of destruction of aviation fibrous polymeric composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Синеглазов

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered are models imitating influence of lighting on dielectric construction materials with elements of lighting protection. Described are models of current spreading in multilayer materials and thermal destruction of fibrous polymeric composite materials caused by lighting current flowing on such materials

  12. Quantitative determination of TEGDMA, BHT, and DMABEE in eluates from polymerized resin-based dental restorative materials by use of GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiss, Mario; Langer, Christopher; Hickel, Reinhard; Reichl, Franz-Xaver

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the leaching of ingredients from several commercial dental composite resins cured with LED, and immersed in methanol or water for 24 h, respectively. The composites used were: Admira Dentin (VOCO), Artemis Schmelz (Enamel) (Ivoclar Vivadent), Els extra low shrinkage (Saremco Dental), Filtek Supreme XT Dentin (3 M ESPE), Gradia Direct (GC), Venus & Venus flow (Heraeus Kulzer), and XRV Herculite Prodigy Enamel (Kerr). From each dental composite four specimens with defined structure and 100-mg net weight were made. After the polymerization process, according to manufacturer's instructions, the specimens were immersed in either 1 ml water or 1 ml methanol and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Eluted ingredients triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT), and 4-N,N-dimethylaminobenzoicacidethylester (DMABEE) were detected and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The amounts of the detected analytes from 100 mg polymerized composites ranged between the following values: TEGDMA: 0-0.5 mg (water), 0-1.6 mg (methanol); BHT: 0-0.03 μg (water), 0-0.11 mg (methanol); and DMABEE: 0-0.11 mg (water), 0-1.4 mg (methanol). We conclude from the results that the elution rates into methanol and water differ significantly. Furthermore, it is concluded that all the determined amounts eluting from the composites are far below toxic-relevant concentrations.

  13. Effects of silane-modified fillers on properties of dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydınoğlu, Aysu; Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silanization on the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of dental composites was investigated. Silica fillers were obtained from colloidal silica solution, Ludox® HS-40 and they were silanized by using 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) in an acidic media. Mineralogical and chemical structures of unsilanized and silanized fillers were determined by using XRD and FT-IR analyses. The modification of unsilanized/silanized fillers were investigated by performing XPS and TGA analyses. The morphological evaluations, surface area, and particle size measurements were performed by using SEM, BET, and Zeta-Sizer, respectively. Eventually, pure and amorphous silica fillers were obtained. Furthermore, the weight percentage of the silane in silica/silane structure was compatible with theoretical values. SEM images, surface area, and particle size measurements showed that agglomeration tendencies of silanized fillers were lower compared to silanized fillers because of the MPTMS addition. Experimental composites (5/10/10/5BisGMA/HEMA/UDMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 70wt% silanized/unsilanized SiO2) were fabricated into 4mm diameter×6mm thick discs for compressive strength (CS), angular flexural strength (AFS), curing depth (CD), and polymerization shrinkage (PS) on a 25×2×2mm rectangular Teflon mold for flexural strength (FS) and modulus of elasticity (E) tests. The curing depth (CD) and degree of polymerization percentage (DP) of composites were determined. Consequently, results showed that mechanical properties and DP of composite resins can be greatly influenced by silanization as a result of the organic matrix-inorganic filler interface bonding formed by silane structures. Despite of these findings, silanization of the SiO2 was not effected DC and PS values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface hardness properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and polyacid-modified composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2004-11-15

    In this study the top and bottom surface hardness of two polyacid-modified composite resins (PMCRs), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and one composite resin were evaluated. The affect of water storage on their hardness was also investigated. The study was conducted using four different groups, each having five specimens obtained from fiberglass die molds with a diameter of 5 mm and a height of 2 mm. Measurements were made on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and recorded after 24 hours and again at 60 days. All tested materials showed different hardness values, and the values of top surfaces of the specimens were found to be higher than the bottom surface in all test groups. There was no statistical difference in the Vickers hardness (HV) values when the test specimens were kept in water storage. In conclusion Hytac displayed microhardness values higher than Vitremer and Dyract. We found the order of HV values to be Surfil > Hytac > Dyract > Vitremer, respectively. Vitremer presented the lowest microhardness level and Surfil the highest.

  15. Handling characteristics of resin composites in posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, M; Kugel, G

    1998-09-01

    In the last 10 years, tremendous improvements in strength and shade selection for resin composites have been achieved. Also, a new generation of enamel-dentin bonding systems has been developed, and patient expectations of esthetic treatment have risen. Several techniques are available for restoring posterior teeth. When a caries lesion is limited, a direct esthetic restoration is indicated. Essential elements for obtaining good, long-term clinical results for direct esthetic restorations of posterior teeth are: (1) cavity preparation; (2) knowledge of the characteristics of the three dental substrates; (3) rubber dam use and matrix and wedge placement; (4) correct use of the enamel-dentin bonding system; (5) proper selection of the resin composite material; (6) use of the multilayering technique; (7) finishing and polishing procedures; and (8) maintenance of the restoration.

  16. Factors involved in mechanical fatigue degradation of dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, U; Belli, R; Ferracane, J L

    2013-07-01

    The design of clinical trials allows for limited insights into the fatigue processes occurring in resin composites and the factors involved therein. In vitro studies, in contrast, can fundamentally narrow study interests to focus on particular degradation mechanisms and, to date, represent the major contributors to the state of knowledge on the subject. These studies show that microstructural features are important in determining strength and fracture toughness, whereas fatigue resistance is mainly related to the susceptibility of the matrix and the filler/matrix interface to mechanical and chemical degradation. In this review, we focus on fracture mechanisms occurring during fatigue, on the methods used to assess them, and on additional phenomena involved in the degradation of initial mechanical properties of resin composites.

  17. Synthesizing Smart Polymeric and Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Smart materials have been widely investigated to explore new functionalities unavailable to traditional materials or to mimic the multifunctionality of biological systems. Synthetic polymers are particularly attractive as they already possess some of the attributes required for smart materials, and there are vast room to further enhance the existing properties or impart new properties by polymer synthesis or composite formulation. In this work, three types of smart polymer and composites have...

  18. [Bonding compatibility between adhesive systems and composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachetti, L; Scaminaci Russo, D; Landi, D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse bonding compatibility between photo- and self-polymerising composite resins ad two-step total-etch (one component) adhesive systems with a different activation method. Thirty healthy extracted molars were cut transversally to obtain sixty flat dentin surfaces. The acid conditioned surfaces were bonded with Scotchbond 1 (3M), Excite (Vivadent) or Excite DSC (Vivadent). A cylinder of composite resin (3 mm diameter and 4 mm height) was constructed on each adhesive layer using photopolymerised Tetric Ceram (Vivadend) and dual Luxacore (DMG) but activated only chemically. The samples were subjected to the shear bond test. The fracture surfaces obtained were classified by type and site in the stereomicroscope. Twelve samples representing each group were further prepared for the SEM. The data obtained from the test, the microscopic investigation and statistical analysis (ANOVA and Bonferroni) seem to confirm the presence of a reduced bonding compatibility between one-component adhesive systems and self-polymerising composites. This incompatibility is evident for the adhesive Scotchbond 1 and limited for Excite, while it seems to be overcome by Excite DSC which appears to bond well with both Tetric Ceram and Luxacore. Adhesive-composite incompatibility seems to depend on the activation method of the composite as well as on that of the adhesive system. The chemical compatibility bet-ween these two materials is influenced not only by the chemical composition of the adhesive, but also by that of the composite.

  19. Comparative study of resin composite class I restoration microleakage between bulk fill technique with and without sonic activation, and incremental technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartikasari, A. D.; Indrawati, D.; Kamizar

    2017-08-01

    A good marginal adaptation of a restoration can be measured by the absence of microleakage at the interface area. Resin composite undergo contraction during polymerization which may result in microleakage The purpose of this study was to analyze the microleakage of class I cavity preparations that were filled with sonic-activated bulk-fill resin composite, bulk-fill resin composite without sonic activation, and composites that were filled incrementally Standardized class I cavities were prepared in 27 extracted human upper premolars and randomly assigned to three groups. The first group was filled with sonic-activated bulk-fill resin composite; the second group was filled with bulk-fill resin composite without sonic activation; and the third group was filled incrementally. The specimens were subjected to: thermocycling; immersion in 1% methylene blue dye for 24 hours; sectioning longitudinally; evaluation of microleakage under a 12 x magnification stereomicroscope; and scoring on an ordinal scale (0-4). Statistical analysis was performed with a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. There were no statistically significant differences among the three groups. Class I cavity preparations that were filled with resin composites incrementally have less microleakage compared to both sonic-activated bulk-fill and bulk-fill without sonic activation.

  20. Effects of polishing procedures on color stability of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Umut Güler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different polishing methods on color stability of posterior, universal and nanohybrid composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to a staining agent. Twenty-five specimens were prepared for each of 5 different composite resins (Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, Quadrant LC, Grandio and Filtek Supreme. Specimens were divided into 5 groups and different polishing procedures, including polishing discs (Pd, polishing discs then diamond polishing paste (PdP, polishing discs then a liquid polishing system (Biscover (PdB, and combinations of these (PdPB were used. Unpolished specimens served as the control (C. The specimens were stored for 48 h in a coffee solution. The color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter, and total color change (DE* were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and the means were compared by Tukey HSD test (a=0.05. The lowest color difference was observed in the groups PdP and C, while the highest color difference was observed in PdPB, and PdB. When comparing the five different restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between FiltekP60 and FiltekZ250, and these materials demonstrated significantly less color change than Quadrant LC and the nanohybrid materials (Grandio, Filtek Supreme. The posterior (Filtek P60 and universal (Filtek Z250 composite resin restorative materials, which do not contain tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA, were found to be less stainable than the nanohybrid (Grandio, Filtek Supreme and universal (Quadrant LC composite resins, which contain TEGDMA. The use of diamond polishing paste after polishing with polishing discs significantly decreased staining when compared to the groups that used polishing discs alone, for all restorative materials tested. The highest color change values were obtained for the specimens that were polished with the Biscover liquid polish

  1. Physical Properties of an Ag-Doped Bioactive Flowable Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiba Kattan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the physical and antibacterial properties of a flowable resin composite incorporating a sol-gel derived silver doped bioactive glass (Ag-BGCOMP. The depth of the cure was calculated by measuring the surface micro-hardness for the top and bottom surfaces. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage was measured by recording the linear shrinkage as change in length, while the biaxial flexural strength was studied measuring the load at failure. The antibacterial properties of the samples were tested against Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans and Lactobacillus casei (L. casei. The measured values were slightly decreased for all tested physical properties compared to those of control group (flowable resin composite without Ag-BG, however enhanced bacteria inhibition was observed for Ag-BGCOMP. Ag-BGCOMP could find an application in low stress-bearing areas as well as in small cavity preparations to decrease secondary caries. This work provides a good foundation for future studies on evaluating the effects of Ag-BG addition into packable composites for applications in larger cavity preparations where enhanced mechanical properties are needed.

  2. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage, polymerization shrinkage stress, wear resistance, and compressive strength of a silorane-based composite: A finite element analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Mitthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the mechanical properties is important in predicting the clinical behavior of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA evaluates properties of materials replicating clinical scenario. Aim: This study evaluated polymerization shrinkage and stress, wear resistance (WR, and compressive strength (CS of silorane in comparison with two methacrylate resins. Settings and Design: This study design was a numerical study using FEA. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional (3D models of maxillary premolar with Class I cavities (2 mm depth, 4 mm length, and 2.5 mm width created and restored with silorane, nanohybrid, and microhybrid; Groups I, II, and III, respectively. Loads of 200–600 N were applied. Polymerization shrinkage was first determined by displacement produced in the X, Y, and Z planes. Maximum stress distribution due to shrinkage was calculated using AN SYS software. 3D cube models of composite resins were simulated with varying filler particle size. Similar loads were applied. WR and compressive stress were calculated: K W L/H and load/cross-sectional area, respectively. Statistical analysis done using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey's honestly significant difference test (P < 0.05. Results: Polymerization shrinkage (0.99% and shrinkage stress (233.21 Mpa of silorane were less compared to microhybrid (2.14% and 472.43 Mpa and nanohybrid (2.32% and 464.88 Mpa. Silorane (7.92×/1011 μm/mm3 and nanohybrid (7.79×/1011 showed superior WR than microhybrid (1.113×/1017. There was no significant difference in compressive stress among the groups. Conclusion: Silorane exhibited less polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress compared to methacrylates. Silorane and nanohybrid showed greater WR compared to microhybrid. CS of all groups was similar.

  3. Effect of light curing modes and ethanol immersion media on the susceptibility of a microhybrid composite resin to staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Oliveira, Thalita Regina Vieira E; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the susceptibility of a hybrid composite resin (Filtek Z250 - 3M ESPE) to staining, when light cured in four different modes and immersed in two different media. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and polymerized according to the experimental groups (conventional -50 mW/cm(2) / 30 seconds; soft start -300 mW/cm(2) / 10 seconds + 550 mW/cm(2) / 20 seconds; high intensity -1060 mW/cm(2)--10 seconds; pulse delay -550 mW/cm(2)--1 seconds + 60 seconds of waiting time + 550 mW/cm(2)--20 seconds) and immersed in one of two media (distilled water or absolute ethanol) for 24 h. Next, the specimens were immersed in a 2% methylene blue solution for 12 hours. Afterwards, the specimens were washed and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA (4X2) and Tukey's test were performed on the data at 0.05 confidence level. Soft start showed the least staining, and was statistically different from the high intensity and pulse delay light curing modes (p0.05). There were no significant differences between the two immersion media (p>0.05). The soft start polymerization mode showed lower susceptibility of the composite resin to staining than high intensity and pulse delay, irrespective of the immersion medium.

  4. Effect of light curing modes and ethanol immersion media on the susceptibility of a microhybrid composite resin to staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Baggio Aguiar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the susceptibility of a hybrid composite resin (Filtek Z250 - 3M ESPE to staining, when light cured in four different modes and immersed in two different media. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and polymerized according to the experimental groups (conventional - 550 mW/cm² / 30 seconds; soft start - 300mW/cm² / 10 seconds + 550 mW/cm² / 20 seconds; high intensity - 1060 mW/cm² - 10 seconds; pulse delay - 550 mW/cm² - 1 seconds + 60 seconds of waiting time + 550 mW/cm² - 20 seconds and immersed in one of two media (distilled water or absolute ethanol for 24h. Next, the specimens were immersed in a 2% methylene blue solution for 12 hours. Afterwards, the specimens were washed and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA (4X2 and Tukey's test were performed on the data at 0.05 confidence level. Soft start showed the least staining, and was statistically different from the high intensity and pulse delay light curing modes (p0.05. There were no significant differences between the two immersion media (p>0.05. The soft start polymerization mode showed lower susceptibly of the composite resin to staining than high intensity and pulse delay, irrespective of the immersion medium.

  5. Retention of composite resin restorations in class IV preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Hani

    2002-01-01

    Clinicians often utilized composite resin restorations in combination with different types of preparation to restore class IV fractures on anterior incisors. A new preparation technique called (stair-step chamfer technique) is investigated in this study to detect bond strength to tooth structure. Eighty-eight bovine teeth were divided into 4 groups. Group I had twenty-three samples with a 45 degree bevel that extended 2 millimeters beyond the fracture line. Group II had twenty-three samples with a circumferential chamfer, which extended 2 mm beyond the fracture line and half the enamel thickness in depth. Group III had twenty-three samples with a facial stair-step chamfer, which followed the anatomical contour and extended 2 mm beyond the fracture line with a lingual plain chamfer. Group IV had eighteen samples as controls, which were untreated teeth. The first three groups were prepared and restored with hybrid composite resin in conjunction with a single step bonding agent and as surface penetrating sealer, then tested for shear-bond strength on the Instron machine. The results were that there was no significant difference found between the treated teeth when tested for shear-bond strength. However, according to the site of the fracture, the stair-step chamfer technique gave significantly better results. It can be concluded that, the stir-step chamfer technique provides the clinician better environment to place a composite resin restoration resulting in good shear-bond strength and better esthetics.

  6. Effect of whitening toothpaste on superficial roughness of composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cas, Natalia Ventura; Ruat, Gabrielle Rodrigues; Bueno, Renata Pla Rizzolo; Pachaly, Raquel; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2013-07-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effect of different toothpastes with whitening action on the average surface roughness (Ra) of a microhybrid composite resin. Twenty-five specimens of composite resin were prepared and distributed randomly among 5 experimental groups (n = 5). Groups 1-3 were treated with whitening toothpastes: Close-up Extra Whitening, Colgate Ultra White, and Colgate Total 12 Whitening. Group 4 was a negative control group (with samples brushed with deionized water), and Group 5 was a positive control group (with samples brushed using a non-whitening toothpaste). A profilometer was used to determine Ra before and after brushing. A simulated brushing machine was used for all groups, providing horizontal back and forth movement with an amplitude of 3.8 cm applying an axial load of 200 g and a speed of 356 rpm, totaling 20,000 cycles. To determine the Ra in each specimen, 6 readings were taken at various positions before and after brushing. The results were submitted to variance analyses and Tukey's test. (P toothpaste, regardless of formulation, significantly increased the Ra of the resin composite evaluated in this study.

  7. In vitro wear of flowable resin composite for posterior restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Koichi; Taira, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shiro; Suzuki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine three- and two-body wear values of flowable resin composites for posterior restorations, using a mechanical loading device. The cavities prepared on flattened extracted molars were restored with flowable resin composites (Clearfil Majesty LV: MLV, Estelite Flow Quick: EFQ, Beautifil Flow Plus F00: BFP, and MI Fill: MIF) using accompanying adhesive systems. A universal resin composite (Clearfil Majesty) was used as a control. The specimens were subjected to in vitro three- and two-body wear testing. MLV showed high wear value (three-body: 14.69 µm, two-body: 0.268 mm(3)) compared with other materials tested in both three- and two-body wear tests. BFP showed high three-body wear value (5.78 µm), whereas low two-body wear value (0.008 mm(3)). MIF and EFQ showed equivalent wear values (MIF, three-body: 0.42 µm, two-body: 0.026 mm(3); EFQ, three-body: 1.15 µm, two-body: 0.14 mm(3)) to that of the control in both wear tests.

  8. Properties evaluation of silorane, low-shrinkage, non-flowable and flowable resin-based composites in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Rodrigo R; Reis, Rodrigo S; Moro, André F V; Perez, Cesar R; Pessôa, Bárbara M; Dias, Katia R H C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study tested the null hypothesis that different classes of direct restorative dental materials: silorane-based resin, low-shrinkage and conventional (non-flowable and flowable) resin-based composite (RBC) do not differ from each other with regard to polymerization shrinkage, depth of cure or microhardness. Methods. 140 RBC samples were fabricated and tested by one calibrated operator. Polymerization shrinkage was measured using a gas pycnometer both before and immediately after curing with 36 J/cm(2) light energy density. Depth of cure was determined, using a penetrometer and the Knoop microhardness was tested from the top surface to a depth of 5 mm. Results. Considering polymerization shrinkage, the authors found significant differences (p flowable RBCs showed lower values compared to flowable RBCs, with the silorane-based resin presenting the smallest shrinkage. The low shrinkage flowable composite performed similarly to non-flowable with significant statistical differences compared to the two other flowable RBCs. Regarding to depth of cure, low-shrinkage flowable RBC, were most effective compared to other groups. Microhardness was generally higher for the non-flowable vs. flowable RBCs (p flowable did not differ significantly from those of non-flowable, but were significantly higher than those of the other flowable RBCs. Clinical Significance. RBCs have undergone many modifications as they have evolved and represent the most relevant restorative materials in today's dental practice. This study of low-shrinkage RBCs, conventional RBCs (non-flowable and flowable) and silorane-based composite-by in vitro evaluation of volumetric shrinkage, depth of cure and microhardness-reveals that although filler content is an important determinant of polymerization shrinkage, it is not the only variable that affects properties of materials that were tested in this study.

  9. The effect of surface roughness on repair bond strength of light-curing composite resin to polymer composite substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Timo T; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the shear bond strength of a new composite resin to polymer-based composite substrates using various surface roughnesses and two kinds of polymer matrices. Particulate filler composite resin with cross-linked polymer matrix and fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix were used as bonding substrates after being ground to different roughnesses. Substrates were aged in water for one week before bonding to new resin composites. Twelve specimens in the substrate groups were ground with grinding papers of four grits; 320, 800, 1200 and 2400. Corresponding values of surface roughness (Ra) varied from 0.09 to 0.40 for the particulate filler composite resin and 0.07 to 0.96 for the fiber-reinforced composite resin. Characteristic shear bond strength between the new resin and particulate filler composite resin was highest (27.8 MPa) with the roughest surface (Weibull modulus: 2.085). Fiber-reinforced composite showed the highest bond strength (20.8 MPa) with the smoothest surface (Weibull modulus: 4.713). We concluded that surface roughness did not increase the bonding of new resin to the substrate of IPN based fiber-reinforced composite, whereas the roughness contributed to bonding the new resin to the particulate filler composite resin with a cross-linked polymer matrix.

  10. Nanoindentation creep versus bulk compressive creep of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Akhtar, R; Watts, D C

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate nanoindentation as an experimental tool for characterizing the viscoelastic time-dependent creep of resin-composites and to compare the resulting parameters with those obtained by bulk compressive creep. Ten dental resin-composites: five conventional, three bulk-fill and two flowable were investigated using both nanoindentation creep and bulk compressive creep methods. For nano creep, disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material by first injecting the resin-composite paste into metallic molds. Specimens were irradiated from top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points to ensure optimal polymerization using a visible light curing unit with output irradiance of 650mW/cm(2). Specimens then were mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. Following grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h. Using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius), the nano creep was measured at a maximum load of 10mN and the creep recovery was determined when each specimen was unloaded to 1mN. For bulk compressive creep, stainless steel split molds (4mm×6mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens which were thoroughly irradiated at 650mW/cm(2) from multiple directions and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h. Specimens were loaded (20MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. One-way ANOVA, Levene's test for homogeneity of variance and the Bonferroni post hoc test (all at p≤0.05), plus regression plots, were used for statistical analysis. Dependent on the type of resin-composite material and the loading/unloading parameters, nanoindentation creep ranged from 29.58nm to 90.99nm and permanent set ranged from 8.96nm to 30.65nm. Bulk compressive creep ranged from 0.47% to 1.24% and permanent set ranged from 0.09% to 0.38%. There was a significant (p=0.001) strong positive non-linear correlation (r(2)=0.97) between bulk

  11. Influence of polymerization method, curing process, and length of time of storage in water on the residual methyl methacrylate content in dental acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Gulsen; Guvener, Bora; Bural, Canan; Uresin, Yagiz

    2006-02-01

    This study compared the influence of different polymerization methods (heat, auto-, and microwave energy), different curing processes (in the case of heat- and autopolymerized specimens), and length of storage of the polymerized specimens in distilled water at 37 degrees C on the residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) content in dental acrylic resin specimens. Residual MMA of 120 resin specimens were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. For the heat-polymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were given a long-term terminal boil and then stored in the distilled water for at least 1 day. For the autopolymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were additionally cured in water at 60 degrees C and then stored in the distilled water at least 1 day. For the microwave-polymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were stored in the distilled water at least 1 month. The lowest overall residual MMA content was obtained from heat-polymerized specimens that were given a long-term terminal boil cure and then stored in the distilled water at least 1 day. Different polymerization methods and curing processes have different effects on residual MMA content. It is thus shown that storing a dental acrylic resin specimen in distilled water at 37 degrees C is a simple but effective method of reducing its residual MMA content.

  12. Polymerization kinetics of dual-curing adhesive systems when used solely or in conjunction with chemically-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kyung; Chun, Ju-Na; Kwon, Pyung Cheol; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the chemical polymerization kinetics of commercial dual-curing adhesive systems when used solely or in conjunction with chemically-curing resin cement. Four adhesive systems comprising simplified-step adhesives and activators (Prime&Bond NT with Self Cure Activator, Excite DSC, AQ Bond Plus, All-Bond SE) were used. The pH values of the adhesives and adhesive/activator blends were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to investigate the extent of the chemical polymerization of the adhesives when used alone or directly intermixed with a chemically-cured resin cement (C&B Cement) for 60 min (n = 5). The data derived from the DSC analysis were statistically compared using one-way ANOVA and the Games-Howell post-hoc test (α = 0.05). All the adhesives were highly acidic; when they were blended with the respective activators, their pH values increased. Neither the adhesive/activator blends nor the adhesive alone/cement mixtures showed any detectable heat generation. The Prime&Bond NT/activator showed delayed heat generation only when intermixed with the catalyst/base paste. The other three adhesive systems produced similar exotherms when intermixed with the catalyst paste alone or with the catalyst/base paste (p > 0.05), but at significantly different maximum rates of polymerization (p adhesive system/resin cement interface appears highly dependent on the adhesive system used and may be considerably delayed.

  13. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  14. Effect of aluminum oxide addition on the flexural strength and thermal diffusivity of heat-polymerized acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellakwa, Ayman E; Morsy, Mohamed A; El-Sheikh, Ali M

    2008-08-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the effect of adding from 5% to 20% by weight aluminum oxide powder on the flexural strength and thermal diffusivity of heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Seventy-five specimens of heat-polymerized acrylic resin were fabricated. The specimens were divided into five groups (n = 15) coded A to E. Group A was the control group (i.e., unmodified acrylic resin specimens). The specimens of the remaining four groups were reinforced with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) powder to achieve loadings of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% by weight. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week before flexural strength testing to failure (5 mm/min crosshead speed) in a universal testing machine. Results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey paired group comparison tests (p denture bases to provide increased flexural strength and thermal diffusivity. Increasing the flexural strength and heat transfer characteristics of the acrylic resin base material could lead to more patient satisfaction.

  15. Effect of leaching residual methyl methacrylate concentrations on in vitro cytotoxicity of heat polymerized denture base acrylic resin processed with different polymerization cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Bural

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Residual methyl methacrylate (MMA may leach from the acrylic resin denture bases and have adverse effects on the oral mucosa. This in vitro study evaluated and correlated the effect of the leaching residual MMA concentrations ([MMA]r on in vitro cytotoxicity of L-929 fibroblasts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 144 heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens were fabricated using 4 different polymerization cycles: (1 at 74ºC for 9 h, (2 at 74ºC for 9 h and terminal boiling (at 100ºC for 30 min, (3 at 74ºC for 9 h and terminal boiling for 3 h, (4 at 74ºC for 30 min and terminal boiling for 30 min. Specimens were eluted in a complete cell culture medium at 37ºC for 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. [MMA]r in eluates was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. In vitro cytotoxicity of eluates on L-929 fibroblasts was evaluated by means of cell proliferation using a tetrazolium salt XTT (sodium 3´-[1-phenyl-aminocarbonyl-3,4-tetrazolium]bis(4-methoxy-6-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid assay. Differences in [MMA]r of eluates and cell proliferation values between polymerization cycles were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman and Dunn's multiple comparison tests. The correlation between [MMA]r of eluates and cell proliferation was analyzed by Pearson's correlation test (p<0.05. RESULTS: [MMA]r was significantly (p<0.001 higher in eluates of specimens polymerized with cycle without terminal boiling after elution of 1 and 2 days. Cell proliferation values for all cycles were significantly (p<0.01 lower in eluates of 1 day than those of 2 days. The correlation between [MMA]r and cell proliferation values was negative after all elution periods, showing significance (p<0.05 for elution of 1 and 2 days. MMA continued to leach from acrylic resin throughout 7 days and leaching concentrations markedly reduced after elution of 1 and 2 days. CONCLUSION: Due to reduction of leaching residual MMA concentrations, use of terminal boiling in

  16. The effect of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion of resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Hajizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This experimental study was designed to focus on the effects of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion in three types of composites with different filler size. Materials and Methods: Forty eight disks were prepared from three types of composite and divided into 6 groups. In the first three groups the abrasion test was done. The remaining groups were bleached and the abrasion test was performed. The weight of the samples before and after abrasion was measured. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: There was a significant difference in abrasion of composites with different filler size (P < 0.05. The most amount of abrasion was observed in Z100 after being bleached. An increase in abrasion was noticed in all three types of tested composite after bleaching. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is suggested to use a nano filled resin composite for restoration if the bleaching treatment is required.

  17. Anterior makeover on fractured teeth by simple composite resin restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Priyo Prasetyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In daily practice dentists usually treat tooth fractures with more invasive treatments such as crown, veneer and bridges which preparation require more tooth structure removal. While currently there is trend toward minimal invasive dentistry which conserves more tooth structure. This is enhanced with the vast supply of dental materials and equipment in the market, including restorative materials. Provided with these supporting materials and equipment and greater patient’s demand for esthetic treatment, dentists must aware of the esthetics and basic principle of conserving tooth which should retain tooth longevity. Purpose: This article showed that a simple and less invasive composite resin restoration can successfully restore anterior esthetic and function of fractured teeth which generally treated with more invasive treatment options. Case: A 19 year-old female patient came with fracture on 21 and 22. This patient had a previous history of dental trauma about nine years before and was brought to a local dentist for debridement and was given analgesic, the involved teeth were not given any restorative treatment. Case management: The fractured 21 and 22 were conventionally restored with simple composite resin restoration. Conclusion: Fracture anterior teeth would certainly disturbs patient’s appearance, but these teeth could be managed conservatively and economically by simple composite resin restoration.Latar belakang: Dalam praktek sehari-hari pada umumnya dokter gigi merawat fraktur dengan restorasi invasif seperti mahkota, veneer dan jembatan yang semuanya memerlukan pengambilan jaringan gigi lebih banyak, sedangkan saat ini trend perawatan gigi lebih menuju kearah invasif minimal yang mempertahankan jaringan gigi sebanyak mungkin. Keadaan ini ditunjang oleh tersedianya berbagai macam bahan dan peralatan kedokteran gigi di pasaran, termasuk bahan restorasi. Dengan tersedianya bahan dan peralatan yang mendukung serta tingginya

  18. Composite resin susceptibility to red wine staining after water sorption

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Color stability of restorative materials is essential for longevity of esthetic composite restoration over time. The aim of this investigation was assess the effect of prior water immersion on the color stability of a composite resin to red wine staining. Seventy disc-shaped specimens (6 mm x 1.5 mm) were carried out and randomized in 7 groups (n = 10), according to distilled water immersion time at 0 (control), 24, 48, 72,120,192, and 240 h. Baseline color was measured according to the CIE L...

  19. Impact of refrigeration on the surface hardness of hybrid and microfilled composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osternack, Fernando Henrique Ruppel; Caldas, Danilo Biazzetto de Menezes; Rached, Rodrigo Nunes; Vieira, Sérgio; Platt, Jeffrey A; Almeida, Janaina Bertoncelo de

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the Knoop hardness of the composite resins Charisma (C) and Durafill VS (D) polymerized in 3 different conditions: at room temperature (A) (23 +/- 1 degrees C); refrigerated at 4 +/- 1 degrees C and immediately photo-activated after removal from the refrigerator (0); and, refrigerated at 4 +/- 1 degrees C and photo-activated after a bench time of 15 min at room temperature (15). One hundred and twenty specimens (4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth) were made using a stainless steel mold and following manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were tested immediately after polymerization (I) and after 7 days of water storage in the dark at room temperature (7d). The data were subjected to ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). On the top surface, C(AI) was statistically similar to C(15I) and D(AI) to D(15I) (p>0.05). On the bottom surface, C(AI) presented higher hardness values when compared to COI and C(15I) (p0.05) on the bottom surfaces for any tested polymerization condition. After 7 days of storage, the Knoop hardness decreased significantly (psurface (p>0.05). D(07d) showed higher Knoop hardness (psurface when compared to the other groups.

  20. Effect of radiotherapy on the hardness and surface roughness of two composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Flavio Luiz; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Demarco, Flavio Fernando; Faot, Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge about the potential adverse effects of radiotherapy compared to dental composites is a useful information for the clinician's decision regarding adoption of repairs or replacement of dental restorations during oral cancer treatment. This study evaluated the effects of irradiation on microhardness and surface roughness of a microfilled and a packable composite resin. The microfilled composite resin demonstrated significantly lower microhardness and a smoother surface compared to the packable composite resin (p composite resins (P surface hardness (P > 0.05). Meanwhile, irradiation did not produce a significantly rougher surface (P > 0.05), but specimens submitted to abrasion exhibited a significant increase in surface roughness for both composite resins (P hardness of tested composite resins, it does not interfere with surface roughness.

  1. Properties of Eco-friendly Acrylic Resin/Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Non-aqueous Dispersion (NAD) Polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeongho; Lee, Minho; Jeon, Hyeon Yeol; Min, Byong Hun; Kim, Jeong Ho [Univ. of Suwon, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Chul [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Eco-friendly acrylic resin/clay nanocomposites containing pristine montmorillonite (PM) or modified clays (30B and 25A) were prepared from acrylic and styrenic monomers using non-aqueous dispersion (NAD) polymerization. Effect of nanoclays on physical properties of polymerization product and resulting nanocomposites was investigated. In view of NAD particle stability, addition of nanoclay at the beginning of polymerization is proved to be good. Results of gel fraction, acid value and viscosity of the NAD product showed that nanocomposites containing clay 25A showed better physical properties than the ones with other clays. GPC results exhibit the increase in molecular weight and decrease in polydispersity index for the 25A nanocomposite. Increase in layer distance confirmed from XRD analysis showed good dispersion of 25A in the nanocomposite. Thermal and dynamic mechanical analysis showed that highest glass transition temperature and storage modulus for 25A nanocomposites. These results indicate that 25A nanoclay gives the best properties in the process of non-aqueous dispersion polymerization of acrylic resin/nanoclay nanocomposites.

  2. Effect of surface penetrating sealant on surface texture and microhardness of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, M F; Leforestier, E; Muller, M; Lupi-Pégurier, L; Bolla, M

    2000-01-01

    The application of Fortify (Bisco, Lombard, IL), an unfilled resin, to the surface of composite resin restorations is intended to fill in defects in the surface that persist despite polishing, improve marginal integrity, and increase these materials' resistance to abrasion. The aim of this study was to observe the surface texture by scanning electron microscopy and measure the microhardness of the surface. For each sample of composite resin covered with glaze, 40 measurements were made of the thickness of the resin. Measurements of the Vickers microhardness included three samples of composite resin, three samples of glaze, and six samples of composite resin covered with glaze. A relationship was established between microhardness and thickness. Scanning electron microscopy showed a noticeable improvement in the surface texture. Nevertheless, areas were seen in which glaze seemed very thin or even completely absent. Measurements of the thickness ranged from 0-70 microm. The mean microhardness of composite resin was 65.8 +/- 0.7, while the mean hardness of glaze was 7.3 +/- 0.7. The microhardness of the double layer was reduced, depending on the thickness of the glazing resin. The capacity of glaze to mask surface defects of composite resin was shown, but it was difficult to obtain a regular surface with liquid resin. The application of this product caused a decrease of the microhardness of the composite resin's surface.

  3. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  4. Cytotoxicity of dental resin composites: an in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausiello, Pietro; Cassese, Angela; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Di Jeso, Bruno; Ulianich, Luca

    2013-06-01

    Resin-based dental restorative materials release residual monomers that may affect the vitality of pulp cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of two light-cured restorative materials with and without bis-GMA resin, respectively (Clearfil Majesty Posterior and Clearfil Majesty Flow) and a self-curing one (Clearfil DC Core Automix) when applied to the fibroblast cell line NIH-3T3. Samples of the materials were light-cured and placed directly in contact to cells for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by measuring cell death by flow cytometry, cell proliferation by proliferation curves analysis and morphological changes by optical microscopy analysis. All the composite materials tested caused a decrease in cell proliferation, albeit at different degrees. However, only Clearfil DC Core Automix induced cell death, very likely by increasing apoptosis. Morphological alteration of treated cells was also evident, particularly in the Clearfil DC Core Automix-treated cells. The different cytotoxic effects of dental composites should be considered when selecting an appropriate resin-based dental restorative material for operative restorations.

  5. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GEORGE PELIN; CRISTINA-ELISABETA PELIN; ADRIANA STEFAN; ION DINC\\u{A}; ANTON FICAI; ECATERINA ANDRONESCU; ROXANA TRUSC\\u{A}

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based composites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ensure uniform dispersion of the nanopowder, followed by heat curing of the phenolic-based materials at controlled temperature profile up to 120$^{\\circ}$C. The obtained nanocomposites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis and evaluated in terms of mechanical, tribological and thermal stability under load. The results highlight the positive effect of the nanometric silicon carbide addition in phenolic resin on mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological performance, improving their strength, stiffness and abrasive properties. The best results were obtained for 1 wt% nSiC, proving that this value is the optimum nanometric silicon carbide content. The results indicate that these materials could be effectively used to obtain ablative or carbon–carbon composites in future studies.

  6. Inlfuences of Iodonium Salts on the Properties of a Hybrid Composite Resin Containing BisS-GMA and Expanding Monomer Modiifed Epoxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wenjia; FU Jing; WU Xiangnan; MA Yuanyuan; LIU Xiaoqing; LIAO Yunmao; WANG Hang

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce shrinkage and improve the mechanical properties of dental composite resins, we designed a hybrid resin formulation containing a novel matrix resin, BisS-GMA [bisphenol-S-bis(3-methacrylato-2-hydroxypropyl)ether], and epoxy modiifed by a spiro-orthocarbonate (SOC) expanding monomer. Then, we tested the effects of an iodonium salt, diphenyliodonium hexalfuorphosphate (DPIHFP), on the properties of the hybrid resin with seven different concentrations. The hybrid resin was polymerized by a ternary photo-initiator system. The volumetric shrinkage (VS), degree of conversion (DC) and compressive strength (CS) were assessed using AcuVolTM , FTIR and a universal testing machine, respectively. The VS, DC and CS were improved with increasing DPIHFP concentration, but a high concentration of DPIHFP had a negative inlfuence on the mechanical properties of the hybrid resin and offered no added improvement in the VS and DC. The best performance of a composite resin containing BisS-GMA and SOC-modiifed epoxy was achieved with 2wt%DPIHFP. The results also indicated that the resin containing BisS-GMA was superior to that containing Bis-GMA in terms of VS, DC and CS.

  7. Effect of Two Surface Sealants on Microleakage of Class V Resin Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosa Aboali

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: When composite resin polymerizes, shrinkage stresses tend to produce gaps at the tooth/ restoration interfaces. Surface sealants may reduce or avoid problems related to the marginal interface. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surface sealants (Fortify and Optiguard on the microleakage of class V resin composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Twenty three sound noncarious molars were collected. Totally, 45 Class V cavities with the occlusal margins in enamel and cervical margins in cementum were prepared in both buccal and lingual surfaces. The specimens were randomly assigned in three groups (15 cavities in each group and then restored with a resin composite. After the finishing and polishing procedures, the restorations in each group were covered with a specific surface sealant, except for the control samples, which were not sealed. After placing restorations, the specimens were thermocycled and then immersed in a 50% silver nitrate solution (tracer agent for four hours, sectioned longitudinally and analyzed for leakage using a stereomicroscope in a blind manner. The marginal microleakage was evaluated at the occlusal and cervical interfaces and compared among the three groups using the Kruskall-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all groups at both occlusal and cervical margins. Significantly greater leakage was observed at the cervical margins compared to the enamel margins of the material groups (P=0.005. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups at occlusal margins (P=0.66. In the cervical region, Fortify showed improved results and statistically presented the lowest degree of microleakage (P=0.003. onclusion: The used sealant materials presented different rates of effectiveness and Fortify decreased marginal microleakage significantly.

  8. Color changes in resin cement polymerized with different curing lights under indirect restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Bayindir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different interface materials and curing units on color changes in a resin cement material. Materials and Methods: Three interface materials and different curing systems, quartz-tungsten-halogen and polywave and monowave light-emitting diode (LED light curing units, were studied at two-time intervals. Polystyrene strip was used as a control group. All measurements were made on a white background for standard color measurement. According to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 color space, the baseline color values of each specimen were measured. Differences between the measurements were calculated as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Duncan′s tests (α = 0.05 with SPSS 20.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. ANOVA revealed significance for interface materials and curing units and time for ΔE (P 0.05. Monowave LED exhibited significantly higher color changes than the other units ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 2.94 ± 0.44]. QTH promoted composite specimens significantly less color change ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 0.87 ± 0.41]. Conclusion: This study concluded that color of resin cement used in the adhesion of indirect restorations was affected by curing device light and indirect restoration material type.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of the Compressive Strength of a Direct Composite Resin and Two Laboratorial Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Costa Reis BRITO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the compressive strength of two commercially available laboratorial resins - Solidex® (Shofu and Cristobal® (Dentsply - to that of a direct composite resin (Concept®; Vigodent, as a control group.Method: Five specimens of each tested material were fabricated using stainless steel matrices with the following dimensions: 8 mm of internal diameter on the base, 9 mm of internal diameter on the top and 4 mm of height. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 72 hours and submitted to an axial load by the action of a 2-mm-diameter round-end tip adapted to a universal testing machine (EMIC 500. A 200 kgf load cell was used running at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load and the point of failure were recorded. Results: Means, in kgf, were: Concept® (Ct = 124.26; Cristobal® (C =184.63; Solidex® (S =173.58. Data (means and standard deviations were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s for comparisons among the groups using the SPSS software (version 10.0. Significance level was set at á=0.05 (95%. Concept® presented significantly lower (p<0.05 compressive strength than the other two materials, Cristobal® and Solidex®, which, in turn, did not differ significantly to each other.Conclusion: Cristobal® and Solidex® laboratorial resins did not show significant difference to each other and both presented compressive strength significantly higher than that of Concept® direct resin.

  10. Mechanical properties and fire retardancy of bidirectional reinforced composite based on biodegradable starch resin and basalt fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental problems caused by extensive use of polymeric materials arise mainly due to lack of landfill space and depletion of finite natural resources of fossil raw materials, such as petroleum or natural gas. The substitution of synthetic petroleum-based resins with natural biodegradable resins appears to be one appropriate measure to remedy the above-mentioned situation. This study presents the development of a composite that uses environmentally degradable starch-based resin as matrix and basalt fibre plain fabric as reinforcement. Prepreg sheets were manufactured by means of a modified doctor blade system and a hot power press. The sheets were used to manufacture bidirectional-reinforced specimens with fibre volume contents ranging from 33 to 61%. Specimens were tested for tensile and flexural strength, and exhibited values of up to 373 and 122 MPa, respectively. Through application of silane coupling agents to the reinforcement fibres, the flexural composite properties were subsequently improved by as much as 38%. Finally, in order to enhance the fire retardancy and hence the applicability of the composite, fire retardants were applied to the resin, and their effectiveness was tested by means of flame rating (according to UL 94 and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, respectively.

  11. Incorporation of antimicrobial macromolecules in acrylic denture base resins: a research composition and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Indumathi; Arunachalam, Kuthalingam Subbiah; Sajjan, Suresh; Ramaraju, Alluri Venkata; Rao, Bheemalingeshwara; Kamaraj, Bindu

    2014-06-01

    Contemporary research in acrylic denture base materials focuses on the development of a novel poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) resin with antimicrobial properties. Although PMMA resin has fulfilled all the requirements of an ideal denture base material, its susceptibility to microbial colonization in the oral environment is a formidable concern to clinicians. Many mechanisms including the absence of ionic charge in the methyl methacrylate resins, hydrophobic interactions, electrostatic interactions, and mechanical attachment have been found to contribute to the formation of biofilm. The present article outlines the basic categories of potential antimicrobial polymer (polymeric biocides) formulations (modified PMMA resins) and considers their applicability, biological status, and usage potential over the coming years.

  12. Properties evaluation of silorane, low-shrinkage, non-flowable and flowable resin-based composites in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo R. Maia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study tested the null hypothesis that different classes of direct restorative dental materials: silorane-based resin, low-shrinkage and conventional (non-flowable and flowable resin-based composite (RBC do not differ from each other with regard to polymerization shrinkage, depth of cure or microhardness.Methods. 140 RBC samples were fabricated and tested by one calibrated operator. Polymerization shrinkage was measured using a gas pycnometer both before and immediately after curing with 36 J/cm2 light energy density. Depth of cure was determined, using a penetrometer and the Knoop microhardness was tested from the top surface to a depth of 5 mm.Results. Considering polymerization shrinkage, the authors found significant differences (p < 0.05 between different materials: non-flowable RBCs showed lower values compared to flowable RBCs, with the silorane-based resin presenting the smallest shrinkage. The low shrinkage flowable composite performed similarly to non-flowable with significant statistical differences compared to the two other flowable RBCs. Regarding to depth of cure, low-shrinkage flowable RBC, were most effective compared to other groups. Microhardness was generally higher for the non-flowable vs. flowable RBCs (p < 0.05. However, the values for low-shrinkage flowable did not differ significantly from those of non-flowable, but were significantly higher than those of the other flowable RBCs.Clinical Significance. RBCs have undergone many modifications as they have evolved and represent the most relevant restorative materials in today’s dental practice. This study of low-shrinkage RBCs, conventional RBCs (non-flowable and flowable and silorane-based composite—by in vitro evaluation of volumetric shrinkage, depth of cure and microhardness—reveals that although filler content is an important determinant of polymerization shrinkage, it is not the only variable that affects properties of materials that were tested in

  13. Glass Transition Temperature Depression at the Percolation Threshold in Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Resin and Polypyrrole-Epoxy Resin Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Barrau, Sophie; Demont, Philippe; Maraval, Céline; Bernès, Alain; Lacabanne, Colette

    2005-01-01

    The glass transition temperatures of conducting composites, obtained by blending carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or polypyrrole (PPy) particles with epoxy resin, were investigated by using both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). For both composites, dc and ac conductivity measurements revealed an electrical percolation threshold at which the glass transition temperature and mechanical modulus of the composites pass through a minimum.

  14. Poly(vinyl chloride) composite emulsion resins modified by polyurethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolei ZHANG; Mingwang PAN; Shengnan XING; Jingsheng LI

    2008-01-01

    An ionomer-type of polyurethane (PU) emul-sion was prepared from toluene diisocyanate (TDI), polypropylene glycol (PPG) and dimethylol propionic acid (DMPA) following a self-emulsification process. The modified poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) emulsion resin was obtained by in situ emulsion copolymerization using the PU as seeds in an autoclave. The effects of PU molecular weight on the mechanical properties and thermal stability of the PU/PVC materials were investigated. The composite latex particles and composite materials were determined and characterized using a laser particle size analyzer, transmission electron microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The study results showed that the PU/PVC hybrid emulsion particles possess a core/shell structure. When the general mechanical properties of the composite materials increase, the thermal stabilities decrease a little. The tough fractures on the surface of the PU/PVC composite sample following impact are quite obvious.

  15. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15 according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [2] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of Panavia F; [3] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [4] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of Panavia F. The adhesive systems and the resin cements were applied according to the experimental groups, using a Tygon matrix.The samples were stored in distilled water at 37±2ºC for 24 hours.Microshear bond strengths were determined using an apparatus attached to an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Results: The results obtained in MPa (SD were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, p<0.05, and showed the following results: [1] 39.76 (5.34; [2] 45.01 (8.53; [3] 46.39 (9.22; [4]45.78 (9.06.There was no statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [2]; and between groups [3] and [4]. However, there was statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [3]. Conclusion:When Clearfil AP-X block was used with Clearfil SE Bond adhesive or RelyX resin cement, the microshear bond strength values were higher.The results suggest that in the union of the resin cements to the restorative composites, hydrophobic adhesives are necessary.

  16. Low shrinkage composite resins: influence on sealing ability in unfavorable C-factor cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Burlamaqui Klautau

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation observed the sealing ability of low shrinkage composite resins in large and deep cavities, placed and photocured in one increment. Large, deep cavities (5.0 mm diameter and 2.5 mm deep surrounded by enamel were prepared in bovine teeth, which were then divided into five groups. Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4: acid conditioning + Adper Single Bond (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA and restoration with Aelite LS Posterior (BISCO Inc. Schaumburg, IL, USA (G1; Filtek Z-350 (3M/ESPE,St Paul, MN, USA (G2; Filtek Z-350 Flow (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA (G3; Premisa (KERR Corporation, Orange, CA, USA (G4. Group 5: Silorane Adhesive system (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA + restoration with Filtek Low Shrinkage Posterior P90 (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA. After polymerization, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine solution and immediately washed. Using the Imagetool Software, the extent of dye along the margins was calculated as a percentage of total perimeter. The restorations were then transversally sectioned and the depth of dye penetration was calculated in mm, using the same software. Kruskal-Wallis analysis for all groups showed no statistical differences for extent (p = 0.54 or depth (p = 0.8364 of dye penetration. According to this methodology, the so-called low shrinkage composite resins had the same sealing ability compared to regular and flowable nanocomposite materials.

  17. Effect of pre-heating on the viscosity and microhardness of a resin composite.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lucey, S

    2010-04-01

    The effect of pre-heating resin composite on pre-cured viscosity and post-cured surface hardness was evaluated. Groups of uncured specimens were heated to 60 degrees C and compared with control groups (24 degrees C) with respect to viscosity and surface hardness. Mean (SD) viscosities of the pre-heated specimens (n = 15) were in the range of 285 (13)-377 (11) (Pa) compared with 642 (35)-800 (23) (Pa) at ambient temperature. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.001). Mean (SD) Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the pre-heated group (n = 15) was 68.6 (2.3) for the top surface and 68.7 (1.8) for the bottom surface measured at 24 h post curing (specimen thickness = 1.5 mm). The corresponding values for the room temperature group were 60.6 (1.4) and 59.0 (3.5). There was a statistically significant difference between corresponding measurements taken at the top and bottom for the pre-heated and room temperature groups (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between top and bottom measurements within each group. Pre-heating resin composite reduces its pre-cured viscosity and enhances its subsequent surface hardness. These effects may translate as easier placement together with an increased degree of polymerization and depth-of-cure.

  18. Thermal and Ablative Properties of Ipns and Composites of High Ortho Resole Resin and Difurfurylidene Acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq S. NAJIM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High ortho resole resin was prepared by condensation of phenol with excess of formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide as catalyst. Reaction of furfuraldehyde with acetone in basic medium led to difurfurylidene acetone (DFA. Their interpenetrating polymer network (IPNS were obtained by the reaction of predetermined quantities of difurfurylidene acetone and high ortho resole using p-toluene sulphonic acid (PTSA as curing agent. The thermal behavior of the resins was studied using thermogravimetry (TG under ambient and nitrogen atmospheres over a temperature range of (25-1000 Cº. It was observed that the IPN of 20% DFA – 80% resole has higher thermal stability than that of resole alone and the decomposition temperature was higher by 80 Cº. This behavior was attributed to highly cross linked structure and thermally stable backbone of ploy difurfurylidene acetone due to formation of ladder structure.Impregnation of chopped fiber glass type (E with the polymeric solutions was used to prepare their composites, and the ablative properties were investigated according to ASTM E-285 –80. It was observed that the IPN of (DFA- resol perform better than the resole composite alone.

  19. Interface structure and strength in model dental resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard

    Most composites for dental restoration are based on a methacrylate polymer matrix and a ceramic filler, often silanized silica or silicate glasses. A problem with these composites is the polymerization shrinkage, which causes the filling to loosen from the tooth under formation of a crack....... This will facilitate discoloration by colorants from e.g. coffee and red wine entering the crack, or even worse lead to secondary caries and infection of dental pulp due to bacteria. The aim of this study was to develop a low shrinkage dental composite based on an expandable metastable zirconia filler A metastable...... the polymer shrinkage and reduces the overall shrinkage of the composite. In this thesis the zirconia filler is characterized and tested for the potential as a filler for use in dental composites. The zirconia powder is composed of highly agglomerated particles of nanosized crystals. The average particle size...

  20. Polishing and toothbrushing alters the surface roughness and gloss of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Kanehira, Masafumi; Finger, Werner J

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the surface roughness and gloss of composite resins after using two polishing systems and toothbrushing. Six composite resins (Durafill VS, Filtek Z250, Filtek Z350 XT, Kalore, Venus Diamond, and Venus Pearl) were evaluated after polishing with two polishing systems (Sof-Lex, Venus Supra) and after toothbrushing up to 40,000 cycles. Surface roughness (Ra) and gloss were determined for each composite resin group (n=6) after silicon carbide paper grinding, polishing, and toothbrushing. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences in both Ra and gloss between measuring stages for the composite resins tested, except Venus Pearl, which showed significant differences only in gloss. After polishing, the Filtek Z350 XT, Kalore, and Venus Diamond showed significant increases in Ra, while all composite resin groups except the Filtek Z350 XT and Durafill VS with Sof-Lex showed increases in gloss. After toothbrushing, all composite resin demonstrated increases in Ra and decreases in gloss.

  1. [Effects of silicon carbide on the cure depth, hardness and compressive strength of composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Lin, Yi'na; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2009-08-01

    The hardness, compressive strength and cure depth are important indices of the composite resin. This investigation was made with regard to the effects of silicon carbide on the cure depth, hardness and compressive strength of the light-curing composite resin. Different amounts of silicon carbide were added to the light-curing composite resin, which accounted for 0 wt%, 1 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 0.3 wt%, 0.1 wt%, 0.05 wt% and 0.005 wt% of the composite resin, respectively. The hardness, compressive strength and cure depth of the six afore-mentioned groups of composite resin were measured by the vernier caliper, the vickers hardness tester and the tensile strength of machine, respectively. The results showed that silicon carbide improved the hardness and compressive strength of the light-curing composite resin,when the concentration was 0.05 wt%. And the cure depth was close to that of control.

  2. Thermal stability relationships between PMR-15 resin and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Bors, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 matrix resin and the stability of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites that contain this resin as the matrix material. Three areas were investigated. The first was the effect of fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength on the isothermal aging weight loss of composites. By using type-A graphite fibers produced by Hercules, it was possible to study composites reinforced with fibers that were processed to receive different surface treatments. One of the fibers was untreated, a second fiber was treated by oxidation to enhance fiber/matrix bonding, and the third type of fiber was coated with an epoxy sizing. These treatments produced three significantly different interfacial bond strengths. The epoxy sizing on the third fiber was quickly oxidized from the bare fiber surfaces at 288, 316, and 343 C. The weight loss due to the removal of the sizing was constant at 1.5 percent. This initial weight loss was not observed in thermo-oxidative stability studies of composites. The PMR-15 matrix satisfactorily protected the reinforcemnt at all three temperatures.

  3. Clinical evaluation of resin composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement in non-carious cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke; Oginni, Ao

    2012-10-01

    The clinical performance of various tooth-coloured materials used to restore Non-Carious Cervical Lesions (NCCLs) has been evaluated. However, most of these evaluations were in western societies where soft diets requiring little mastication were common. The present study sets out to evaluate resin composite and RMGIC in the restoration of NCCLs among a Nigerian subpopulation group with fibrous diet requiring more rigorous mastication. The study included all adult patients that presented at the Dental Hospital, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria with non-carious cervical lesions over a period of six months. The teeth with non-carious cervical lesions in each patient were allocated into treatment with either resin composite or resin-modified glass ionomer cement by simple random sampling using ballots. The depth of the NCCLs was measured using a graduated flat ash periodontal probe. All the treatment was done by the first author according to the manufacturer's instructions. Patients were recalled and evaluated at 48- hours, 3- months, 6- months and 12- months using the USPHS criteria. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 15. The level of significance was put at 0.05. At the end of 12 months, 143 resin composite and 144 RMGIC restorations were evaluated, out of which 37 resin composite and 13 RMGIC restorations were dislodged, giving a retention rate of 74.1% and 91.0% respectively. The difference was statistically significant (pcarious cervical lesions than resin composite over a period of 12 month.

  4. Effect of an Extra Hydrophobic Resin Layer on Repair Shear Bond Strength of a Silorane-Based Composite Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Rahbani Nobar, Behnam

    2015-12-01

    Composite repair is a minimally invasive and conservative approach. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an additional hydrophobic resin layer on the repair shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite repaired with silorane or methacrylate-based composite. Sixty bar-shaped composite blocks were fabricated and stored in saline for 72 hours. The surface of the samples were roughened by diamond burs and etched with phosphoric acid; then, they were randomly divided into three groups according to the repairing process: Group 1: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-silorane composite; group 2: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin-silorane composite, and group 3: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin methacrylate-based composite. Repairing composite blocks measured 2.5×2.5×5mm. After repairing, the samples were stored in saline for 24 hours and thermocycled for 1500 cycles. The repair bond strength was measured at a strain rate of 1mm/min. Twenty additional cylindrical composite blocks (diameter: 2.5mm, height: 6mm) were also fabricated for measuring the cohesive strength of silorane-based composite. The data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and the post hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05). Cohesive bond strength of silorane composite was significantly higher than the repair bond strengths in other groups (Presin layer for repair of silorane-based composite with a methacrylate-based composite enhanced the repair shear bond strength.

  5. Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites under Different Modes and Media: Review of Articles

    OpenAIRE

    Fani M; Farmani S; Bagheri R

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to review various modes of fracture toughness of resin composites. Also, this study intends to review the papers on the fracture mode, namely “fractography”, under scanning electron microscopy finding fracture initiation site, and the effect of filler content on the fracture toughness of resin composites. It will also review the effect of aging on the fracture toughness of resin composites in different media, mainly distilled water, and acidic environment. ...

  6. Effects of 35% Carbamide Peroxide Gel on Surface Roughness and Hardness of Composite Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sharafeddin, F; GR. Jamalipour

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Bleaching agents may not be safe for dental materials. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effects of Opalescent Quick “in-office bleaching gel” containing 35% carbamide peroxide on the surface roughness and hardness of microfilled (Heliomolar) and hybride (Spectrum TPH) composite resins. Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens of Spectrum TPH composite resins and twenty Heliomolar composite resins were fabricated using a metallic ring (6.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm...

  7. Relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive. As controls, micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites were tested. The universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond. The fracture toughness and flexural properties of resin composites, and shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive with resin composite using both total-etch and self-etch modes were determined. In the results, short fiber-reinforced resin composite showed significantly higher fracture toughness than did micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The flexural strength and modulus of short fiber-reinforced and nano-hybrid resin composites were significantly lower than were those of micro-hybrid resin composites. Regardless of etching mode, the shear bond strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite did not show any significant differences from micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite and micro-hybrid resin composites were significantly higher than that of nano-hybrid resin composites. The results of this study suggest that the mechanical properties of short fiber-reinforced resin composite improve their bond durability with universal adhesive.

  8. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  9. The Effect of Different Polishing Methods and Storage Media on Discoloration of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deljoo Z

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Accu