WorldWideScience

Sample records for composite materials components

  1. Fiber Optic Sensors to Monitor Structural Components Made of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob GRIETENS

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available New fiber reinforced composite materials and integrated sensors are converging to form smart structural components. They excel by their higher reliability, lead to more economical maintenance procedures and contribute significantly to reducing the cost of operating air fleets.

  2. Polyenergetic known-component CT reconstruction with unknown material compositions and unknown x-ray spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Uneri, A; Khanna, A Jay; Siewerdsen, J H; Stayman, J W

    2017-04-21

    Metal artifacts can cause substantial image quality issues in computed tomography. This is particularly true in interventional imaging where surgical tools or metal implants are in the field-of-view. Moreover, the region-of-interest is often near such devices which is exactly where image quality degradations are largest. Previous work on known-component reconstruction (KCR) has shown the incorporation of a physical model (e.g. shape, material composition, etc) of the metal component into the reconstruction algorithm can significantly reduce artifacts even near the edge of a metal component. However, for such approaches to be effective, they must have an accurate model of the component that include energy-dependent properties of both the metal device and the CT scanner, placing a burden on system characterization and component material knowledge. In this work, we propose a modified KCR approach that adopts a mixed forward model with a polyenergetic model for the component and a monoenergetic model for the background anatomy. This new approach called Poly-KCR jointly estimates a spectral transfer function associated with known components in addition to the background attenuation values. Thus, this approach eliminates both the need to know component material composition a prior as well as the requirement for an energy-dependent characterization of the CT scanner. We demonstrate the efficacy of this novel approach and illustrate its improved performance over traditional and model-based iterative reconstruction methods in both simulation studies and in physical data including an implanted cadaver sample.

  3. Structural parameter for estimating durability of composite materials with polymer components in strong electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakova, N. N.; Ushakov, V. Ya.

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present work is to reveal and to substantiate the structural parameter for estimation of the durability of composite materials with polymeric components in strong electric fields. Rubbers filled with technical carbon are chosen as objects of research. They possess almost zero water absorption, resistance to aggressive media, high electrical and mechanical strengths, capability of acquiring practically any form, etc. Because of this, they are widely used in high-voltage electrophysics and electrical engineering. Composite materials are represented by an equivalent circuit of a series-parallel connection of a set of individual contacts conductive phase-dielectric-conductive phase formed by an electroconductive grid. The processes in the materials are considered on three hierarchical levels: individual contact conductive phase-dielectric-conductive phase, distribution of the set of individual contacts over their properties taking into account the dispersion of their parameters depending on the employed initial components, macrostructural level—the electricoconductive grid imbedded into a polymer matrix. As a result of our investigations, the structural parameter—the entropy of the textural parameter that can be used to estimate the durability of composite materials with polymer components in strong electric fields—has been chosen.

  4. Study of the failure mechanism for fiber composite materials taking account of physicochemical interaction of components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabolotskii, A.A.; Ignatova, N.P.

    1985-11-01

    An analytical approach is presented to study the failure process for fiber composite materials (CM). Failure processes are modelled in a computer, including a stage for model construction and a loading and failure stage for the model CM as a simulation of CM behavior. Three composite materials were considered with an aluminum matrix reinforced with fibers of carbon, boron (coated with B/sub 4/C), and silicon carbide. The authors found that failure of a CM develops by one of three micromechanisms depending on the ratio of mechanical characteristics of interaction, i.e., retention in the CM of fiber strength and matrix ductility and creation of strong component bonds. The sequence of elementary acts forming one or another failure macromechanism is presented.

  5. Supporting structural components of fibrous composite materials in coach design; Tragende Strukturteile aus Faserverbundkunststoffen im Omnibusbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.; Bartha, E. [Gottlob Anwaerther GmbH und Co., Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-11-01

    This article is dealing with the possibilities for coach designers in using Fibrous composite materials like FGRP ans CFK. There are examples shown for three dimensional curved prefabricated parts in Fibrous composite method of Building (Sandwhich) forsupporting components. On the examples of an `integral front` are the advantages shown of such a construction in few of weight, manufacturing costs, resistance and working life. Coach specific particularities are taken particulary in consideration. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Verwendung faserverstaerkter Kunststoffe als Werkstoff fuer die Karosserieaussenhaut hat sich beim Omnibusbau insbesondere aus Gruenden der einfachen dreidimensionalen Formbarkeit grossflaechig durchgesetzt. Verglichen mit gepressten Stahlblech-Formteilen, wie bei Pkw-Karosserien ueblich, lassen sich die vergleichsweise geringen Stueckzahlen bei Omnibussen in Kunststoff-Formen wirtschaftlich fertigen. Am Beispiel des Cityliners, einem Fernreisebus von Neoplan, wird der Einsatz faserverstaerkter tragende Karosserieteile mit UP-Harz-Matrix dargestellt. (orig.)

  6. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior...... materials. Numerical procedures are outlined which facilitate the practical analysis of any feature considered in this book. Examples are presented which illustrate the analysis of well-known materials such as concrete, hardening cement paste, ceramics, tile, wood, impregnated and reinforced materials...

  7. Full-field characterization of thermal diffusivity in continuous- fiber ceramic composite materials and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckenrider, J.S.; Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rothermel, S.A. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for various high-temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. Among the material classes of interest for such applications are silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC {sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-fiber-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sub (f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and others. In such composites, the condition of the interfaces (between the fibers and matrix) are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component (as are conventional mechanical defects such as cracks, porosity, etc.). For example, oxidation of this interface (especially on carbon coated fibers) can seriously degrade both mechanical and thermal properties. Furthermore, thermal shock damage can degrade the matrix through extensive crack generation. A nondestructive evaluation method that could be used to assess interface condition, thermal shock damage, and to detect other ``defects`` would thus be very beneficial, especially if applicable to full-scale components. One method under development uses infrared thermal imaging to provide ``single-shot`` full-field assessment of the distribution of thermal properties in large components by measuring thermal diffusivity. By applying digital image filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, we can achieve acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system developed at Argonne has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density variations, and variations in oxidation resistant coatings in a full array of test specimens. Subscale CFCC components with nonplanar geometries have also been studied for manufacturing-induced variations in thermal properties.

  8. Design and Testing of Braided Composite Fan Case Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Braley, Michael S.; Arnold, William a.; Dorer, James D.; Watson, William R/.

    2009-01-01

    Triaxial braid composite materials are beginning to be used in fan cases for commercial gas turbine engines. The primary benefit for the use of composite materials is reduced weight and the associated reduction in fuel consumption. However, there are also cost benefits in some applications. This paper presents a description of the braided composite materials and discusses aspects of the braiding process that can be utilized for efficient fabrication of composite cases. The paper also presents an approach that was developed for evaluating the braided composite materials and composite fan cases in a ballistic impact laboratory. Impact of composite panels with a soft projectile is used for materials evaluation. Impact of composite fan cases with fan blades or blade-like projectiles is used to evaluate containment capability. A post-impact structural load test is used to evaluate the capability of the impacted fan case to survive dynamic loads during engine spool down. Validation of these new test methods is demonstrated by comparison with results of engine blade-out tests.

  9. Investigation of Springback Associated with Composite Material Component Fabrication (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project 94-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research project was to examine processing and design parameters in the fabrication of composite components to obtain a better understanding and attempt to minimize springback associated with composite materials. To accomplish this, both processing and design parameters were included in a Taguchi-designed experiment. Composite angled panels were fabricated, by hand layup techniques, and the fabricated panels were inspected for springback effects. This experiment yielded several significant results. The confirmation experiment validated the reproducibility of the factorial effects, error recognized, and experiment as reliable. The material used in the design of tooling needs to be a major consideration when fabricating composite components, as expected. The factors dealing with resin flow, however, raise several potentially serious material and design questions. These questions must be dealt with up front in order to minimize springback: viscosity of the resin, vacuum bagging of the part for cure, and the curing method selected. These factors directly affect design, material selection, and processing methods.

  10. Advanced thermoplastic composites: An attractive new material for usage in highly loaded vehicle components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehn, R.; Seidl, F.; Peis, R.; Heinzmann, D.; Frei, P. [BMW AG Muenchen (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    Beside the lightweight potential and further well known advantages of advanced composite materials, continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastics employed in vehicle structural parts especially offer short manufacturing cycle times and an additional economically viable manufacturing process. Presenting a frame structure concept for two highly loaded vehicle parts, a safety seat and a side door, numerous features concerning the choice of suitable composite materials, design aspects, investigations to develop a thermoforming technique, mature for a series production of vehicle parts, are discussed.

  11. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  12. Variability and component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm, T. van der

    2004-01-01

    In component-based product populations, feature models have to be described at the component level to be able to benefit from a product family approach. As a consequence, composition of components becomes very complex. We describe how component-level variability can be managed in the face of compone

  13. POSITIVE RESULTS OF TRANSPLANTATION OF MULTI-COMPONENT COMPOSITE MATERIAL CONTAINING ALLOGENEIC MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS AFTER CYSTECTOMY IN A RABBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Orlovа

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Of late much attention has been paid to tissue engineering by urologists. After successful testing on animals, artificial urinary bladders with self-specific cells were transplanted to humans. Our research is aimed at investigating the opportunity of using cellular technologies  if no healthy  self-specific material is available.The goal of this experiment  is to investigate the opportunity of using a multi-component composite material containing  allogeneic cells to replace the defect of urinary wall under experimental conditions.The standard technique was used for isolation and culturing of mesenchymal stromal stem cells from the rabbit's  bone marrow. Multi-component composite material based on the polylactide  matrix was inoculated by allogeneic cells and transplanted in vivo to the model of partial cystectomy. In 2.5 months the presence of labeled cells in the implantation site was confirmed by objective methods.

  14. Composite material of DNA and cyclodextrin-immobilized poly(ethyleneimine): Accumulation of harmful compounds from multi-component solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masanori; Hori, Minako; Tabuchi, Shinya

    2010-08-01

    Water-soluble beta-cyclodextrin-immobilized poly(ethyleneimine) (PEICD) was synthesized by the grafting of beta-cyclodextrin to the branched poly(ethyleneimine). In an aqueous solution, this PEICD polymer could encapsulate bisphenol A, known to be a harmful compound. Additionally, the stability constant of bisphenol A to the PEICD polymer was 1.1 x 10(4)M(-1). However, the water-solubility of PEICD has been making it difficult to utilize it as an environmental material. Therefore, we prepared the DNA-PEICD composite material by mixing the double-stranded DNA and PEICD. This DNA-PEICD composite material was extremely stable in water and possessed both properties of the intercalation into the double-stranded DNA and the encapsulation into the CD cavity. As a result, this material can accumulate various harmful compounds, such as dioxin- and polychlorobiphenyl (PCB)-derivatives and bisphenol A, from a multi-component solution. Therefore, the DNA-PEICD composite material may have the potential to be used as an environmental material. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  16. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  17. The role of the ionomer glass component in polyacid-modified composite resin dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusei, Gabriel O; Deb, Sanjukta; Nicholson, John W

    2004-07-01

    In order to model the processes that occur within polyacid-modified composite resin ("compomer") dental restoratives, a series of experiments has been carried out with silanated and silane-free ionomer glass G338, and silanated and silane-free unreactive glass (Raysorb T-4000). In an acid-base reaction with dental grade aqueous maleic acid-acrylic acid copolymer solution, the setting time of the silanted G338 was found to be 9 min, compared with 5 min for the silane-free glass. Inclusion of each glass in an experimental composite resin system showed that the formulations which contained G338 absorbed more water than the formulations which contained Raysorb T-4000, regardless of whether or not the glass was silanted. Biaxial flexure strength was superior for experimental composites containing Raysorb T-4000, with highest results being obtained with the silanated glass. Overall these results demonstrate that silanation of the filler is essential for optimal physical properties but that, for the ionomer glass, it inhibits the acid-base reaction. The presence of ionomer glass led to an increase in water uptake compared with the unreactive glass, regardless of the presence of silane.

  18. Advanced composite materials and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  19. Biotechnology and Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Biotechnology, in general terms, is the science and engineering of using living organisms for making useful products such as pharmaceuticals, foods , fuels...chemicals, materials or in waste treatment processes and clinical and chemical analyses. It encompases the prosaic form of using yeast cells to make...ductile component of the composite. Table 1. Mechanical Properties of Ceramics, Cermets, and Abalone Shell •if KIC Hardness MPa MPam 1n 2 /2 Mohs KIlN

  20. Unblockable Compositions of Software Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Ruzhen; Faber, Johannes; Liu, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    . To this end, we develop an algorithm to compute the unblockable interaction behavior, called the interface model of a component, from its execution model. Based on this model, we introduce composition operators for the components and prove important compositionality results, showing the conditions under which...

  1. Composite Materials in Overhead Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Kjærsgaard; Holbøll, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    The use of composite materials, e.g. fibreglass materials, in overhead transmission line systems is nothing new. Composite based insulators have been applied to transmission lines for over 30 years, mainly as suspension and post insulators and often as an option for special applications. Also...... towers and recently conductors based on composite materials are available at transmission levels. In this paper it is investigated which composite based solutions are available in connection with complete overhead line systems including insulators, towers and conductors. The components are reviewed...... with respect to solved and persisting known failures/problems of both mechanical and electrical nature. Major challenges related to extensive use of composite materials in an overhead line system are identified, as are possible benefits - both when using standard as well as customised composite components, e...

  2. Effects of the Component and Fiber Gradient Distributions on the Strength of Cement-based Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiu-jun; HAI Ran; DONG Yan-ling; WU Ke-ru

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the component gradient distribution at interface and the fiber gradient distribution on the strength of cement-based materials were studied.The results show that the flexural strength and compressive strength of the mortar and concrete with interface component and fiber gradient distributions are obviously improved.The strengthes of the fiber gradient distributed mortar and concrete (FGDM/C) are higher than those of fiber homogeneously distributed mortar and concrete (FHDM/C).To obtain the same strength,therefore,a smaller fiber volume content in FGDM/C is needed than that in FHDM/C.The results also show that the component gradient distribution of the concrete can be obtained by means of multi-layer vibrating formation.

  3. Nano-composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  4. Multifunctional materials and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Jeon, Ki-Wan

    2017-08-22

    Forming multifunctional materials and composites thereof includes contacting a first material having a plurality of oxygen-containing functional groups with a chalcogenide compound, and initiating a chemical reaction between the first material and the chalcogenide compound, thereby replacing oxygen in some of the oxygen-containing functional groups with chalcogen from the chalcogen-containing compound to yield a second material having chalcogen-containing functional groups and oxygen-containing functional groups. The first material is a carbonaceous material or a macromolecular material. A product including the second material is collected and may be processed further to yield a modified product or a composite.

  5. Multifunctional Composite Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polymeric composite materials that are currently utilized in aircraft structures are susceptible to significant damage from lightning strikes. Enhanced electrical...

  6. Superconducting composites materials. Materiaux composites supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerjouan, P.; Boterel, F.; Lostec, J.; Bertot, J.P.; Haussonne, J.M. (Centre National d' Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 22 - Lannion (FR))

    1991-11-01

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developed in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. 8 refs.; 14 figs.; 9 tabs.

  7. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  8. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  9. CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF ALLOYING COMPONENTS AND BASE COMPOSITIONS FOR MANUFACTURING OF MECHANICALLY ALLOYED DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED MATERIALS ON THE BASIS OF METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Lovshenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the investigations pertaining to creation of scientifically substantiated criteria for selection of alloying components and base compositions for manufacturing of mechanically alloyed dispersion-strengthened metallic materials. An analysis of dispersion strengthening mechanisms and regularities in mechanically activated phase and structural transformations serve as a reliable basis for solution of the assigned mission. Foer efficient strengthening at low and high temperatures as well materials must have fragmented and polygonized structure with maximum developed surface of grain and sub-grain boundaries which are stabilized by nano-sized inclusions of strengthening phases. Experimental investigations have shown that an optimum complex of mechanical properties is obtained in the case when nano-sized strengthening phase is equal to 3–5 % (volume. The phases applied for dispersion strengthening must have high value of shear modulus that determines their hardness and strength. Critical compressive stress should not cause deformation and destruction of disperse particles. Furthermore, they must have high stability in contact with a matrix. The substances applied as alloying components for realization of the developed technology on obtaining dispersion-strengthening materials must firstly meet the following requirements: they must be cheap, accessible and ecologically safety; they must interact with the basis or inter se at temperatures which are lower of material melting temperature; one of the phases which is formed in the process of the technology realization must have rather high thermodynamic stability and high value of the shear modulus; other formed phases must improve or, at the least, not reduce physical and mechanical properties of the materials

  10. Micromechanics of Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, George

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad exposition of analytical and numerical methods for modeling composite materials, laminates, polycrystals and other heterogeneous solids, with emphasis on connections between material properties and responses on several length scales, ranging from the nano and microscales to the macroscale. Many new results and methods developed by the author are incorporated into a rich fabric of the subject, which has been explored by several researchers over the last 40 years.   The first  part of the book reviews anisotropic elasticity theory, and then it describes the frequently used procedures and theorems for bounding and estimating overall properties, local fields and energy changes in elastic inhomogeneities, heterogeneous media, fiber composites and functionally graded materials.  Those are caused by mechanical loads and by phase eigenstrains, such as thermal, transformation and inelastic strains, and also by cavities and cracks.    Worked examples show that the eigendeformations may...

  11. Damping characteristics of damaged fiber composite components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, K.

    1986-01-01

    Defects in fiber composite components produce changes with respect to the vibrational characteristics of the material. These changes can be recognized in the form of a frequency shift or an alteration of the damping process. The present investigation is concerned with questions regarding the possibility of a utilization of the changes in suitable defect-detecting inspection procedures. A description is given of a method for measuring the damping characteristics of a specimen. This method provides a spectrum of the damping coefficients of the sample as a basis for a comprehensive evaluation of the damping behavior. The correlation between defects and change in the damping characteristics is demonstrated with the aid of results obtained in measurements involving specimens of carbon-fiber composites and a component consisting of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics.

  12. Component Interaction Graph: A new approach to test component composition

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Arup Abhinna

    2010-01-01

    The key factor of component based software development is component composition technology. A Component interaction graph is used to describe the interrelation of components. Drawing a complete component interaction graph (CIG) provides an objective basis and technical means for making the testing outline. Although many researches have focused on this subject, the quality of system that is composed of components has not been guaranteed. In this paper, a CIG is constructed from a state chart diagram and new test cases are generated to test the component composition.

  13. Elution of leachable components from composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L

    1994-07-01

    A significant amount of residual monomer or short chain polymers remain unbound in set composite material. Due to its potential impact on both the biocompatibility and the structural stability of the restoration, many investigators have studied the elution of these unbound molecules into aqueous media. The results of these studies suggest that elution of leachable components from composites is rapid, with the majority being released within a matter of hours. Weight losses of up to 2% of the mass of the composite have been reported under certain conditions. The studies have also shown that the extent and rate of elution of components from composites is dependent upon several factors. The quantity of leachables has been correlated to the degree of cure of the polymer network. The composition and solubility characteristics of the extraction solvent influence the kinetics and mechanism of the elution process. Elution is generally thought to occur via diffusion of molecules through the resin matrix, and is therefore dependent upon the size and chemical characteristics of the leachable species.

  14. Failure Modes in Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-19

    Derek, An Introduction to Composite Materials , New York: Cambridge University Press, 1981. 12. Jamison, R. D., Mechanical Engineering Department...1978. 19. Tsai, Stephen W., Introduction to Composite Materials , Lancaster, Pennsylvania: Technomic Publishing Company, Inc., 1980. 4,’ * .20. Vernon

  15. Component Composition Using Feature Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Michael; Klose, Karl; Mitschke, Ralf;

    2010-01-01

    In general, components provide and require services and two components are bound if the first component provides a service required by the second component. However, certain variability in services - w.r.t. how and which functionality is provided or required - cannot be described using standard...... interface description languages. If this variability is relevant when selecting a matching component then human interaction is required to decide which components can be bound. We propose to use feature models for making this variability explicit and (re-)enabling automatic component binding. In our...... approach, feature models are one part of service specifications. This enables to declaratively specify which service variant is provided by a component. By referring to a service's variation points, a component that requires a specific service can list the requirements on the desired variant. Using...

  16. Composite materials processing, applications, characterizations

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are used as substitutions of metals/traditional materials in aerospace, automotive, civil, mechanical and other industries. The present book collects the current knowledge and recent developments in the characterization and application of composite materials. To this purpose the volume describes the outstanding properties of this class of advanced material which recommend it for various industrial applications.

  17. Development of composite aircraft components in INCDT COMOTI, Bucharest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca VOICU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the recent research activities within INCDT COMOTI, in the composite materials field. The author makes a short introduction of this field and presents an example of application developed within the composite materials laboratory from INCDT COMOTI, targeting the aeronautic field. The aircraft component is a stator blade made of CFRP composites, integrating new active noise reduction technologies and manufactured by means of the autoclave technology.

  18. Clues for biomimetics from natural composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidot, Shaul; Meirovitch, Sigal; Sharon, Sigal; Heyman, Arnon; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Bio-inspired material systems are derived from different living organisms such as plants, arthropods, mammals and marine organisms. These biomaterial systems from nature are always present in the form of composites, with molecular-scale interactions optimized to direct functional features. With interest in replacing synthetic materials with natural materials due to biocompatibility, sustainability and green chemistry issues, it is important to understand the molecular structure and chemistry of the raw component materials to also learn from their natural engineering, interfaces and interactions leading to durable and highly functional material architectures. This review will focus on applications of biomaterials in single material forms, as well as biomimetic composites inspired by natural organizational features. Examples of different natural composite systems will be described, followed by implementation of the principles underlying their composite organization into artificial bio-inspired systems for materials with new functional features for future medicine. PMID:22994958

  19. Composite materials design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gay, Daniel; Tsai, Stephen W

    2002-01-01

    PART ONE. PRINCIPLES OF CONSTRUCTIONCOMPOSITE MATERIALS, INTEREST AND PROPERTIESWhat is Composite Material Fibers and MatrixWhat can be Made Using Composite Materials?Typical Examples of Interest on the Use of Composite MaterialsExamples on Replacing Conventional Solutions with CompositesPrincipal Physical PropertiesFABRICATION PROCESSESMolding ProcessesOther Forming ProcessesPractical Hints in the Manufacturing ProcessesPLY PROPERTIESIsotropy and AnisotropyCharacteristics of the Reinforcement-Matrix MixtureUnidirectional PlyWoven FabricsMats and Reinforced MatricesMultidimensional FabricsMetal Matrix CompositesTestsSANDWICH STRUCTURES:What is a Sandwich Structure?Simplified FlexureA Few Special AspectsFabrication and Design ProblemsNondestructive Quality ControlCONCEPTION AND DESIGNDesign of a Composite PieceThe LaminateFailure of LaminatesSizing of LaminatesJOINING AND ASSEMBLYRiveting and BoltingBondingInsertsCOMPOSITE MATERIALS AND AEROSPACE CONSTRUCTIONAircraftHelicoptersPropeller Blades for AirplanesTur...

  20. Mechanical and materials engineering of modern structure and component design

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on mechanical and materials engineering as applied to the design of modern engineering materials and components. The contributions cover the classical fields of mechanical, civil and materials engineering, as well as bioengineering and advanced materials processing and optimization. The materials and structures discussed can be categorized into modern steels, aluminium and titanium alloys, polymers/composite materials, biological and natural materials, material hybrids and modern nano-based materials. Analytical modelling, numerical simulation, state-of-the-art design tools and advanced experimental techniques are applied to characterize the materials’ performance and to design and optimize structures in different fields of engineering applications.

  1. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  2. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  3. Composite Sandwich Technologies Lighten Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Leveraging its private resources with several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with both NASA and the U.S. Department of Defense, WebCore Technologies LLC, of Miamisburg, Ohio, developed a fiber-reinforced foam sandwich panel it calls TYCOR that can be used for a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications. Testing at Glenn Research Center?s Ballistic Impact Facility demonstrated that the technology was able to exhibit excellent damage localization and stiffness during impact. The patented and trademarked material has found use in many demanding applications, including marine, ground transportation, mobile shelters, bridges, and most notably, wind turbines.

  4. Composite Materials for Structural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Introduction to Composite Materials , Technomic, Westport, Connecticut, 1980, pp. 19-20, 388-401. 8. W.D. Bascom, J.L. Bitner, R.J. Moulton, and A.R. Siebert...34 Introduction to Composite Materials ", Technomic Publishing Co., pp. 8-18,(1980). [6] Beckwith, S. W., "Viscoelastic Characterization of a Nonlinear Glass

  5. Cylinder components properties, applications, materials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the ever-increasing requirements to be met by gasoline and diesel engines in terms of CO2 reduction, emission behavior, weight, and service life, a comprehensive understanding of combustion engine components is essential today. It is no longer possible for professionals in automotive engineering to manage without the corresponding expertise, whether they work in the field of design, development, testing, or maintenance. This technical book provides in-depth answers to questions about design, production, and machining of cylinder components. In this second edition, every section has been revised and expanded to include the latest developments in the combustion engine. Content Piston rings Piston pins and piston pin circlips Bearings Connecting rods Crankcase and cylinder liners Target audience Engineers in the field of engine development and maintenanceLecturers and students in the areas of mechanical engineering, engine technology, and vehicle constructionAnyone interested in technology Publisher MAH...

  6. Health monitoring method for composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Jr., Kenneth S.; Morris, Shelby J [Hampton, VA

    2011-04-12

    An in-situ method for monitoring the health of a composite component utilizes a condition sensor made of electrically conductive particles dispersed in a polymeric matrix. The sensor is bonded or otherwise formed on the matrix surface of the composite material. Age-related shrinkage of the sensor matrix results in a decrease in the resistivity of the condition sensor. Correlation of measured sensor resistivity with data from aged specimens allows indirect determination of mechanical damage and remaining age of the composite component.

  7. Strain-Detecting Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Terryl A. (Inventor); Smith, Stephen W. (Inventor); Piascik, Robert S. (Inventor); Horne, Michael R. (Inventor); Messick, Peter L. (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor); Glaessgen, Edward H. (Inventor); Hailer, Benjamin T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A composite material includes a structural material and a shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite in response to a predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. In a second embodiment, the composite material includes a plurality of particles of a ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite and changes magnetic phase in response to the predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. A method of forming a composite material for sensing the predefined critical macroscopic average strain includes providing the shape-memory alloy having an austenite crystallographic phase, changing a size and shape of the shape-memory alloy to thereby form a plurality of particles, and combining the structural material and the particles at a temperature of from about 100-700.degree. C. to form the composite material.

  8. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinchcomb, W.W.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Dunyak, T.J. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics)

    1992-06-15

    The objective of the work reported herein is to develop an understanding of the mechanical behavior of advanced ceramic composites subjected to elevated temperature and dynamic (cyclic) loading, to develop a test system and test methods to obtain the properties and performance information required to design engineering components made from ceramic composite materials, and to provide critical and comprehensive evaluations of such materials to material synthesizers and developers to support and enhance progress in ceramic composite material development. The accomplishments of the investigation include the design, development, and demonstration of a high temperature, biaxial mechanical test facility for ceramic composite tubes and the development and validation of a performance simulation model (MRLife) for ceramic composites.

  9. Mechanics in Composite Materials and Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae Gil

    1993-03-15

    This book includes introduction of composite materials, stress, in-plane stiffness of laminates strain rate, ply stress, failure criterion and bending, composite materials micromechanics, composite plates and micromechanics of composite materials. It also deals with process of composite materials such as autoclave vacuum bag degassing process, connection of composite materials, filament winding process, resin transfer molding, sheet molding compound and compression molding.

  10. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  11. Advanced Electrical Materials and Component Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2003-01-01

    The primary means to develop advanced electrical components is to develop new and improved materials for magnetic components (transformers, inductors, etc.), capacitors, and semiconductor switches and diodes. This paper will give a description and status of the internal and external research sponsored by NASA Glenn Research Center on soft magnetic materials, dielectric materials and capacitors, and high quality silicon carbide (SiC) atomically smooth substrates. The rationale for and the benefits of developing advanced electrical materials and components for the PMAD subsystem and also for the total power system will be briefly discussed.

  12. On gain in homogenized composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-09-01

    Three theoretical studies were undertaken, each based on the Bruggeman homogenization formalism and each involving homogenized composite materials (HCMs) comprising active component materials. It was found that: (i) HCMs can exhibit higher degrees of amplification than are exhibited by the HCM's component materials; (ii) anisotropic HCMs can simultaneously exhibit plane-wave amplification for certain propagation directions and plane-wave attenuation for other propagation directions; and (iii) for isotropic chiral HCMs, left-circularly polarized fields may be amplified while right-circularly polarized fields may be simultaneously attenuated (or vice versa) in any propagation direction.

  13. Material Modelling - Composite Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    in this report is that cement paste and concrete behave practically as linear-viscoelastic materials from an age of approximately 10 hours. This is a significant age extension relative to earlier studies in the literature where linear-viscoelastic behavior is only demonstrated from ages of a few days. Thus......, linear-viscoelastic analysis methods are justified from the age of approximately 10 hours.The rheological properties of plain cement paste are determined. These properties are the principal material properties needed in any stress analysis of concrete. Shrinkage (autogeneous or drying) of mortar...... and concrete and associated internal stress states are examples of analysis made in this report. In this context is discussed that concrete strength is not an invariable material property. It is a property the potentials of which is highly and negatively influenced by any damage caused by stress concentrations...

  14. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    OpenAIRE

    Mummolo Stefano; Tecco Simona; Gallusi Gianni; Farini Donatella; Klinger Francesca G; Marzo Giuseppe; Libonati Antonio; De Felici Massimo; Campanella Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mo...

  15. Amorphous titania/carbon composite electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughey, John T.; Jansen, Andrew; Joyce, Christopher D.

    2017-05-09

    An isolated salt comprising a compound of formula (H.sub.2X)(TiO(Y).sub.2) or a hydrate thereof, wherein X is 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), and Y is oxalate anion (C.sub.2O.sub.4.sup.-2), when heated in an oxygen-containing atmosphere at a temperature in the range of at least about 275.degree. C. to less than about 400.degree. C., decomposes to form an amorphous titania/carbon composite material comprising about 40 to about 50 percent by weight titania and about 50 to about 60 percent by weight of a carbonaceous material coating the titania. Heating the composite material at a temperature of about 400 to 500.degree. C. crystallizes the titania component to anatase. The titania materials of the invention are useful as components of the cathode or anode of a lithium or lithium ion electrochemical cell.

  16. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  17. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  18. Hybrid and hierarchical composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Sano, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses a broad spectrum of areas in both hybrid materials and hierarchical composites, including recent development of processing technologies, structural designs, modern computer simulation techniques, and the relationships between the processing-structure-property-performance. Each topic is introduced at length with numerous  and detailed examples and over 150 illustrations.   In addition, the authors present a method of categorizing these materials, so that representative examples of all material classes are discussed.

  19. Synthesis and study of composite organic silica sorption materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nikolaevna Shipulya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, one of the promising areas of applied chemistry is research and development of composite absorption materials used as sorbents with a wide range of action, as well as media for biologic preparations and drugs. We have performed research on the development of composite organic silica chitosan-silica based materials with certain composition and biochemical action. Silica was used as the main component, and chitosan - as bio-compatible polymer in the composition of the composite sorbent.

  20. Genetic Homogenization of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on numerical studies of electromagnetic properties of composite materials used for the construction of small airplanes. Discussions concentrate on the genetic homogenization of composite layers and composite layers with a slot. The homogenization is aimed to reduce CPU-time demands of EMC computational models of electrically large airplanes. First, a methodology of creating a 3-dimensional numerical model of a composite material in CST Microwave Studio is proposed focusing on a sufficient accuracy of the model. Second, a proper implementation of a genetic optimization in Matlab is discussed. Third, an association of the optimization script and a simplified 2-dimensional model of the homogeneous equivalent model in Comsol Multiphysics is proposed considering EMC issues. Results of computations are experimentally verified.

  1. Protein-based composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based composite biomaterials have been actively pursued as they can encompass a range of physical properties to accommodate a broader spectrum of functional requirements, such as elasticity to support diverse tissues. By optimizing molecular interfaces between structural proteins, useful composite materials can be fabricated as films, gels, particles, and fibers, as well as for electrical and optical devices. Such systems provide analogies to more traditional synthetic polymers yet with expanded utility due to the material's tunability, mechanical properties, degradability, biocompatibility, and functionalization, such as for drug delivery, biosensors, and tissue regeneration.

  2. Creep of fibrous composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Models are presented for the creep behaviour of fibrous composite materials with aligned fibres. The models comprise both cases where the fibres remain rigid in a creeping matrix and cases where the fibres are creeping in a creeping matrix. The treatment allows for several contributions to the cr......Models are presented for the creep behaviour of fibrous composite materials with aligned fibres. The models comprise both cases where the fibres remain rigid in a creeping matrix and cases where the fibres are creeping in a creeping matrix. The treatment allows for several contributions...... such as Ni + W-fibres, high temperature materials such as Ni + Ni3Al + Cr3C2-fibres, and medium temperature materials such as Al + SiC-fibres. For the first two systems reasonable consistency is found for the models and the experiments, while for the third system too many unquantified parameters exist...

  3. Composite panel, wall assembly and components therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, P.J.

    1988-12-20

    This invention is concerned with improvements in wall assemblies made of a plurality of composite wall panels, such as concrete wall panels, and components and connectors for such assemblies. The invention is also concerned with a method of making such composite wall panels by molding concrete to form a concrete panel. It is particularly applicable for the provision of upstanding walls around oil tanks and hydrocarbon storage facilities, thereby to form part of a containment structure that can satisfy safety regulations for spills around such facilities. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, there is provided a composite building product comprising a concrete panel, said panel being obtained by molding a respective concrete composition. The panel has at least one metal hinge element integrally secured at a respective peripheral edge, with said metal hinge element being secured at the panel to project sufficiently therefrom so as to present a first hinge element. Several of the panels can be connected in a corral-type wall assembly in a variety of configuration. Another aspect of the invention provides, for use in a wall assembly, a portable composite panel comprising a concrete panel body, which is obtained by molding a respective concrete composition; and a frame assembly for reinforcing the peripheral edges of said concrete panel body. The frame assembly includes at least one metal member for provision of a first hing element for connecting a plurality of said panels in a corral-type wall assembly. 7 figs.

  4. Durability of building materials and components

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, JMPQ

    2013-01-01

    Durability of Building Materials and Components provides a collection of recent research works to contribute to the systematization and dissemination of knowledge related to the long-term performance and durability of construction and, simultaneously, to show the most recent advances in this domain. It includes a set of new developments in the field of durability, service life prediction methodologies, the durability approach for historical and old buildings, asset and maintenance management and on the durability of materials, systems and components. The book is divided in several chapters that intend to be a resume of the current state of knowledge for benefit of professional colleagues.

  5. Advanced composite materials for optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweben, Carl

    2013-09-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) have been well established in optomechanical systems for several decades. The other three classes of composites; metal matrix composites (MMCs), ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), and carbon matrix composites (CAMCs) are making significant inroads. The latter include carbon/carbon (C/C) composites (CCCs). The success of composites has resulted in increasing use in consumer, industrial, scientific, and aerospace/defense optomechanical applications. Composites offer significant advantages over traditional materials, including high stiffnesses and strengths, near-zero and tailorable coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs), tailorable thermal conductivities (from very low to over twice that of copper), and low densities. In addition, they lack beryllium's toxicity problems. Some manufacturing processes allow parts consolidation, reducing machining and joining operations. At present, PMCs are the most widely used composites. Optomechanical applications date from the 1970s. The second High Energy Astrophysical Observatory spacecraft, placed in orbit in 1978, had an ultrahigh-modulus carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy (carbon/epoxy) optical bench metering structure. Since then, fibers and matrix materials have advanced significantly, and use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs) has increased steadily. Space system examples include the Hubble Space Telescope metering truss and instrument benches, Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), James Webb Space Telescope and many others. Use has spread to airborne applications, such as SOFIA. Perhaps the most impressive CFRP applications are the fifty-four 12m and twelve 7m moveable ground-based ALMA antennas. The other three classes of composites have a number of significant advantages over PMCs, including no moisture absorption or outgassing of organic compounds. CCC and CMC components have flown on a variety of spacecraft. MMCs have been used in space, aircraft, military and industrial

  6. Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An examination has been made of the mechanical and failure properties of several composite materials, such as a short and a long carbon fiber reinforced plastic (short- and long-CFRP and metal based composite material. The short CFRP materials were used for a recycled CFRP which fabricated by the following process: the CFRP, consisting of epoxy resin with carbon fiber, is injected to a rectangular plate cavity after mixing with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene resin with different weight fractions of CFRP. The fatigue and ultimate tensile strength (UTS increased with increasing CFRP content. These correlations, however, break down, especially for tensile strength, as the CFPR content becomes more than 70%. Influence of sample temperature on the bending strength of the long-CFRP was investigated, and it appears that the strength slightly decreases with increasing the temperature, due to the weakness in the matrix. Broken fiber and pull-out or debonding between the fiber and matrix were related to the main failure of the short- and long-CFRP samples. Mechanical properties of metal based composite materials have been also investigated, where fiber-like high hardness CuAl2 structure is formed in aluminum matrix. Excellent mechanical properties were obtained in this alloy, e.g., the higher strength and the higher ductility, compared tothe same alloy without the fiber-like structure. There are strong anisotropic effects on the mechanical properties due to the fiber-like metal composite in a soft Al based matrix.

  7. Thermodynamics of the formation of mesostructures in nanodispersed composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisovsky A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two models of the formation of mesostructures in nanodispersed composite materials are considered. According to the first model, a mesoelement is formed of coarsely dispersed compositions as an inclusion in a nanodispersed composite body. The second model considers a mesoelement being formed from nanoparticles as an inclusion in the volume of a coarsely dispersed composite body. Depending on the class of composite materials used to produce mesoelements and a composite body, their composition and structure are defined by the liquid phase migration (or absence of the migration as well as diffusion flows of the components.

  8. Material Gradients in Oxygen System Components Improve Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen system components fabricated by Laser Engineered Net Shaping (TradeMark) (LENS(TradeMark)) could result in improved safety and performance. LENS(TradeMark) is a near-net shape manufacturing process fusing powdered materials injected into a laser beam. Parts can be fabricated with a variety of elemental metals, alloys, and nonmetallic materials without the use of a mold. The LENS(TradeMark) process allows the injected materials to be varied throughout a single workpiece. Hence, surfaces exposed to oxygen could be constructed of an oxygen-compatible material while the remainder of the part could be one chosen for strength or reduced weight. Unlike conventional coating applications, a compositional gradient would exist between the two materials, so no abrupt material boundary exists. Without an interface between dissimilar materials, there is less tendency for chipping or cracking associated with thermal-expansion mismatches.

  9. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mummolo Stefano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mothers was also evaluated. Results The results show that while the culture in media conditioned by amalgams did not affect blastocyst development, the medium conditioned by composites caused blastocyst degeneration and apoptosis. The development of blastocysts in a medium containing serum obtained from animals after transplantation was, however, without effect. Finally, inconsistent reduction in the implantation rate in transplanted mothers was observed. Conclusions In this study, we provide examples of in vitro and in vivo tests that may be used to evaluate embryotoxicity for dental materials. Our results show that leached components from our composite-material induced embryotoxicity in vitro, however, no toxicity was observed when subcutaneously implanted in vivo. This highlights the necessity of integrated in vitro and in vivo tests for valuable predictive estimation of embryotoxicity for complex materials.

  10. Fabricating porous materials using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Volosin, Alex

    2016-06-14

    Porous materials are fabricated using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels. A mixture or precursor solution including an inorganic gel precursor, an organic polymer gel precursor, and a solvent is treated to form an inorganic wet gel including the organic polymer gel precursor and the solvent. The inorganic wet gel is then treated to form a composite wet gel including an organic polymer network in the body of the inorganic wet gel, producing an interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gel. The composite wet gel is dried to form a composite material including the organic polymer network and an inorganic network component. The composite material can be treated further to form a porous composite material, a porous polymer or polymer composite, a porous metal oxide, and other porous materials.

  11. Composites materials for friction and braking application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciun, A. L.; Pinca-Bretotean, C.; Birtok-Băneasă, C.; Josan, A.

    2017-05-01

    The brake pads are an important component in the braking system of automotive. Materials used for brake pads should have stable and reliable frictional and wear properties under varying conditions of load, velocity, temperature and high durability. These factors must be satisfied simultaneously which makes it difficult to select effective brake pads material. The paper presents the results of the study for characterisation of the friction product used for automotive brake pads. In the study it was developed four frictional composites by using different percentages of coconut fibres (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%) reinforcement in aluminium matrix. The new composites tested in the laboratory, modelling appropriate percentage ratio between matrix and reinforcement volume and can be obtained with low density, high hardness properties, good thermal stability, higher ability to hold the compressive force and have a stable friction coefficient. These characteristics make them useful in automotive industry.

  12. Numerical simulation of mechanical behavior of composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    Oller, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    An original mechanical formulation to treat nonlinear orthotropic behavior of composite materials is presented in this book. It also examines different formulations that allow us to evaluate the behavior of composite materials through the composition of its components, obtaining a new composite material. Also two multiple scale homogenization methods are given, one based on the analytical study of the cells (Ad-hoc homogenization), and other one, more general based on the finite element procedure applied on the macro scale (upper-scale) and in the micro scale (sub-scale). A very general formulation to simulate the mechanical behavior for traditional composite structures (plywood, reinforced concrete, masonry, etc.), as well as the new composite materials reinforced with long and short fibers, nanotubes, etc., are also shown in this work. Typical phenomena occurring in composite materials are also described in this work, including fiber-matrix debounding, local buckling of fibers and its coupling with the over...

  13. A Review of Biomedical Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴珊珊

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the review of the biomedical composite materials.It introduces the operational definition,the classification of biomedical composite materials,and its constituents within itself.In this thesis,the last part presents the application of this kind of material.By writing this paper,I hope that people will get a comprehensive knowledge of the biomedical composite material and make further and deeper research in this material by which way to animate the material science industry.

  14. Porous multi-component material for the capture and separation of species of interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addleman, Raymond S.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Li, Xiaohong S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Gerasimenko, Aleksandr A

    2016-06-21

    A method and porous multi-component material for the capture, separation or chemical reaction of a species of interest is disclosed. The porous multi-component material includes a substrate and a composite thin film. The composite thin film is formed by combining a porous polymer with a nanostructured material. The nanostructured material may include a surface chemistry for the capture of chemicals or particles. The composite thin film is coupled to the support or device surface. The method and material provides a simple, fast, and chemically and physically benign way to integrate nanostructured materials into devices while preserving their chemical activity.

  15. Discrete component bonding and thick film materials study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results are summarized of an investigation of discrete component bonding reliability and a fundamental study of new thick film resistor materials. The component bonding study examined several types of solder bonded components with some processing variable studies to determine their influence upon bonding reliability. The bonding reliability was assessed using the thermal cycle: 15 minutes at room temperature, 15 minutes at +125 C 15 minutes at room temperature, and 15 minutes at -55 C. The thick film resistor materials examined were of the transition metal oxide-phosphate glass family with several elemental metal additions of the same transition metal. These studies were conducted by preparing a paste of the subject composition, printing, drying, and firing using both air and reducing atmospheres. The resulting resistors were examined for adherence, resistance, thermal coefficient of resistance, and voltage coefficient of resistance.

  16. Tungsten-microdiamond composites for plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livramento, V.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J. B.; Carvalho, P. A.; Mardolcar, U.; Mateus, R.; Hanada, K.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, E.

    2011-09-01

    Tungsten is considered as one of promising candidate materials for plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors due to its resistance to sputtering and high melting point. High thermal conductivity is also a prerequisite for plasma facing components under the unique service environment of fusion reactor characterised by the massive heat load, especially in the divertor area. The feasibility of mechanical alloying of nanodiamond and tungsten, and the consolidation of the composite powders with Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was previously demonstrated. In the present research we report on the use of microdiamond instead of nanodiamond in such composites. Microdiamond is more favourable than nanodiamond in view of phonon transport performance leading to better thermal conductivity. However, there is a trade off between densification and thermal conductivity as the SPS temperature increases tungsten carbide formation from microdiamond is accelerated inevitably while the consolidation density would rise.

  17. Composite materials for polymer electrolyte membrane microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolini, Ermete

    2015-07-15

    Recently, the feasibility of using composite metal-carbon, metal-polymer, polymer-carbon, polymer-polymer and carbon-carbon materials in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. These materials have been tested as MFC anode catalyst (microorganism) supports, cathode catalysts and membranes. These hybrid materials, possessing the properties of each component, or even with a synergistic effect, would present improved characteristics with respect to the bare components. In this paper we present an overview of the use of these composite materials in microbial fuel cells. The characteristics of the composite materials as well as their effect on MFC performance were compared with those of the individual component and/or the conventionally used materials.

  18. DOE Automotive Composite Materials Research: Present and Future Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, C.D.

    1999-08-10

    One method of increasing automotive energy efficiency is through mass reduction of structural components by the incorporation of composite materials. Significant use of glass reinforced polymers as structural components could yield a 20--30% reduction in vehicle weight while the use of carbon fiber reinforced materials could yield a 40--60% reduction in mass. Specific areas of research for lightweighting automotive components are listed, along with research needs for each of these categories: (1) low mass metals; (2) polymer composites; and (3) ceramic materials.

  19. Carbon fiber composites application in ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Akiba, M.; Bonal, J. P.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Nakamura, K.; Pacher, H. D.; Rödig, M.; Vieider, G.; Wu, C. H.

    1998-10-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are one of the candidate armour materials for the plasma facing components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the present reference design, CFC has been selected as armour for the divertor target near the plasma strike point mainly because of unique resistance to high normal and off-normal heat loads. It does not melt under disruptions and might have higher erosion lifetime in comparison with other possible armour materials. Issues related to CFC application in ITER are described in this paper. They include erosion lifetime, tritium codeposition with eroded material and possible methods for the removal of the codeposited layers, neutron irradiation effect, development of joining technologies with heat sink materials, and thermomechanical performance. The status of the development of new advanced CFCs for ITER application is also described. Finally, the remaining R&D needs are critically discussed.

  20. Composite materials for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic matrix composites, CMCs, are being considered for advanced first-wall and blanket structural applications because of their high-temperature properties, low neutron activation, low density and low coefficient of expansion coupled with good thermal conductivity and corrosion behavior. This paper presents a review and analysis of the hermetic, thermal conductivity, corrosion, crack growth and radiation damage properties of CMCs. It was concluded that the leak rates of a gaseous coolant into the plasma chamber or tritium out of the blanket could exceed design criteria if matrix microcracking causes existing porosity to become interconnected. Thermal conductivities of unirradiated SiC/SiC and C/SiC materials are about 1/2 to 2/3 that of Type 316 SS whereas the thermal conductivity for C/C composites is seven times larger. The thermal stress figure-of-merit value for CMCs exceeds that of Type 316 SS for a single thermal cycle. SiC/SiC composites are very resistant to corrosion and are expected to be compatible with He or Li coolants if the O{sub 2} concentrations are maintained at the appropriate levels. CMCs exhibit subcritical crack growth at elevated temperatures and the crack velocity is a function of the corrosion conditions. The radiation stability of CMCs will depend on the stability of the fiber, microcracking of the matrix, and the effects of gaseous transmutation products on properties. 23 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Voigt waves in homogenized particulate composites based on isotropic dielectric components

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2011-01-01

    Homogenized composite materials (HCMs) can support a singular form of optical propagation, known as Voigt wave propagation, while their component materials do not. This phenomenon was investigated for biaxial HCMs arising from nondissipative isotropic dielectric component materials. The biaxiality of these HCMs stems from the oriented spheroidal shapes of the particles which make up the component materials. An extended version of the Bruggeman homogenization formalism was used to investigate the influence of component particle orientation, shape and size, as well as volume fraction of the component materials, upon Voigt wave propagation. Our numerical studies revealed that the directions in which Voigt waves propagate is highly sensitive to the orientation of the component particles and to the volume fraction of the component materials, but less sensitive to the shape of the component particles and less sensitive still to the size of the component particles. Furthermore, whether or not such an HCM supports Vo...

  2. Stratospheric experiments on curing of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudinov, Viacheslav; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.; Efremov, Denis; Demin, Anton; Terpugov, Viktor; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration requires a large light-weight structure for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories and other constructions. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of polymerization of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment on Erath orbit. In orbit, the material is exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, plasma of free space due to cosmic rays, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The development of appropriate polymer matrix composites requires an understanding of the chemical processes of polymer matrix curing under the specific free space conditions to be encountered. The goal of the stratospheric flight experiment is an investigation of the effect of the stratospheric conditions on the uncured polymer matrix of the composite material. The unique combination of low residual pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short-wave UV component, cosmic rays and other aspects associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. We have done the stratospheric flight experiments with uncured composites (prepreg). A balloon with payload equipped with heater, temperature/pressure/irradiation sensors, microprocessor, carrying the samples of uncured prepreg has been launched to stratosphere of 25-30 km altitude. After the flight, the samples have been tested with FTIR, gel-fraction, tensile test and DMA. The effect of cosmic radiation has been observed. The composite was successfully cured during the stratospheric flight. The study was supported by RFBR grants 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011.

  3. (Durability of building materials and components)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.

    1990-11-27

    The traveler participated in the fourth meeting of RILEM 100-TSL, Techniques for Service Life Prediction,'' and The Fifth International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components.'' In addition, the traveler met with staff members at Taywood Engineering Ltd., Electricite de France, and AEA Technology. The meeting pertained to performance of concrete materials in nuclear power plant structures, time variation of concrete material properties, methods for evaluating concrete structures, and modeling to predict the effects of degradation factors on concrete materials. As many of the concrete structures in general civil engineering applications as well as nuclear power plant applications in Europe are aging, there is increasing emphasis on assessing the durability of these structures. Information was provided of direct application to the Structural Aging Program which would not have been available without these visits. Of equal, or possibly more importance, was the individual contacts established at the organizations visited. Each organization was extremely interested in both the approach and scope of the Structural Aging Program and requested that they be informed of progress. The initial steps were taken to cooperate with several of these researchers and this should help the Structural Aging Program keep abreast of related European activities. In summary, information obtained during this trip will benefit the ongoing Structural Aging Program by informing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) of the extensive European research programs addressing the durability of concrete structures, and also by forming and strengthening acquaintances with counterparts in other countries, thus enhancing the basis for possible international cooperation.

  4. On the Deflexion of Anisotropic Structural Composite Aerodynamic Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Whitty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents closed form solutions to the classical beam elasticity differential equation in order to effectively model the displacement of standard aerodynamic geometries used throughout a number of industries. The models assume that the components are constructed from in-plane generally anisotropic (though shown to be quasi-isotropic composite materials. Exact solutions for the displacement and strains for elliptical and FX66-S-196 and NACA 63-621 aerofoil approximations thin wall composite material shell structures, with and without a stiffening rib (shear-web, are presented for the first time. Each of the models developed is rigorously validated via numerical (Runge-Kutta solutions of an identical differential equation used to derive the analytical models presented. The resulting calculated displacement and material strain fields are shown to be in excellent agreement with simulations using the ANSYS and CATIA commercial finite element (FE codes as well as experimental data evident in the literature. One major implication of the theoretical treatment is that these solutions can now be used in design codes to limit the required displacement and strains in similar components used in the aerospace and most notably renewable energy sectors.

  5. 46 CFR 160.076-21 - Component materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Component materials. 160.076-21 Section 160.076-21 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS... Component materials. (a) Each component material used in the manufacturer of an inflatable PFD must— (1...

  6. Component-based event composition modeling for CPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhonghai; Chu, Yanan

    2017-06-01

    In order to combine event-drive model with component-based architecture design, this paper proposes a component-based event composition model to realize CPS’s event processing. Firstly, the formal representations of component and attribute-oriented event are defined. Every component is consisted of subcomponents and the corresponding event sets. The attribute “type” is added to attribute-oriented event definition so as to describe the responsiveness to the component. Secondly, component-based event composition model is constructed. Concept lattice-based event algebra system is built to describe the relations between events, and the rules for drawing Hasse diagram are discussed. Thirdly, as there are redundancies among composite events, two simplification methods are proposed. Finally, the communication-based train control system is simulated to verify the event composition model. Results show that the event composition model we have constructed can be applied to express composite events correctly and effectively.

  7. Bioenvironmental Engineering Guide for Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    materials but may often have hybrid blends of composite materials. Therefore, referencing the specific aircraft’s composite material makeup and...Health Risk Analysis; 2001 Aug. Report No. IERA-RS-BR-TR-2001-0009. 8. Martin Marietta Corporation. Dust control handbook for minerals processing

  8. Treated Coconut Coir Pith as Component of Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Koňáková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with utilization of raw and treated coir pith as potential component of cementitious composites. The studied material is coir pith originating from a coconut production. Its applicability as cement mixture component was assessed in terms of the physical properties of concrete containing different amount of coir pith. Basic physical properties, compressive and bending strength, and hygric transport characteristics as well as thermal properties belong among the studied characteristics. It was proved that the concrete with 5% (by mass of cement of this waste material shows appropriate physical properties and it gives rise to an applicable material for building structures. Generally, the coir pith can be regarded as lightening additive. When 10% of coir pith was added, it has led to higher deterioration of properties than what is acceptable since such dosing is greatly increasing the total porosity. The influence of chemical treatment of coir pith was evaluated as well; both tested treatment methods improved the performance of cementitious composites while the acetylation was somewhat more effective the treatment by NaOH.

  9. A grammatical approach to customization of shape and composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Soumitra

    With the increasing use of composite materials in Mechanical and Aerospace industries, an approach is required to facilitate designing of components using composite materials, while ensuring customization of the shape such a way that multiple design goals for the components are satisfied. Existing design methods may be used in some cases, where the component shape and loadings are simple. While a significant amount of research has been conducted to study the properties of composite materials, little attention has been paid to find out a design approach such that (1) the user requirements in the very general form may be used directly and as the input for the design, (2) the best possible composite material are selected to meet multiple desired functions, and (3) shape variation is analyzed in order to enable mass customization of the design. Thus an approach is required that will be able to handle both the shape and the material in order to design a load bearing component using composite materials. In this research the focus is to develop a design approach that will consider the user requirements for a composite component in its very general form and generate component shape and material details in a systematic order so that the designed component can withstand a given loading condition. Consequently, the Primary Research Question is: How to simultaneously explore shape and composite materials during the design of a product to meet multiple property and functional goals? The wide range of properties, covered by various fiber-matrix combinations, along with their directional property characteristics, maximizes the flexibility of the designers, while designing composite material products. Meeting multiple property goals, however, complicates the design process as both the composite material selection and the component shape formation becomes highly intricate with the loading conditions and a number of matrix calculations needs to be performed to determine theoretical

  10. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-12-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  11. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  12. Composite Materials Design Database and Data Retrieval System Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    technology. Gaining such an understanding will facilitate the eventual development and operation of utilitarian composite materials databases ( CMDB ) designed...Significant Aspects of Materials Databases. While the components of a CMDB can be mapped to components of other types of databases, some differences...stand out and make it difficult to implement an effective CMDB on current Commercial, Off-The-Shelf (COTS) systems, or general DBMSs. These are summarized

  13. Material parameter identification on metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, GJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tests were done on the compressive behaviour of different metal matrix composite materials. These extremely hard engineering materials consist of ceramic particles embedded in a metal alloy binder. Due to the high stiffness and brittle nature...

  14. Strength of Composite Joints in Structural Components and Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bakulin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the composite materials (CM are widely used in the aerospace technology and mechanical engineering where the key parameters characterizing structural components and articles are related to their weight characteristics as well as their performance under high temperatures.For the experimental investigation of composite-based threaded items, the rod-based 3Dreinforced carbon-carbon composite material (CCCM was chosen.The subject of the research was the metric thread. The test samples were cut of the aforesaid material along one of the reinforcement direction. The following thread sizes were analyzed: М24×1.5; М24×2; М24×3.Dependence of the thread strength on the number of thread turns was determined within the range of 1 to 10 thread turns for М24×2 thread size. The remaining test samples were used to obtain the relationship between the thread load bearing capacity and the thread pitch.The obtained dependence of the thread load bearing capacity on the number of thread turns showed the following:a An increment in the thread load bearing capacity decreases with increasing number of thread turns. However, this effect is less pronounced than that observed for the metal ‘screw/nut’ pair.b With the CCCM material under study, it proved to be impossible to test configurations having only 1 or 2 thread turns.c The wide confidence range (CR of the failure load can be explained by the fact that the material under study features an apparent structural heterogeneity, with a different probability of hitting a unit cell of the matrix and filler of the material. Nevertheless, the confidence range is stable, thus indicating indirectly the possibility of using this test method for further study of composite-based threaded items.There is an explicit correlation between the thread load bearing capacity and the thread pitch. Increase in the thread strength with increasing thread pitch depends on the relationship between the pitch size and the

  15. Composite materials for battery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amine, Khalil; Yang, Junbing; Abouimrane, Ali; Ren, Jianguo

    2017-03-14

    A process for producing nanocomposite materials for use in batteries includes electroactive materials are incorporated within a nanosheet host material. The process may include treatment at high temperatures and doping to obtain desirable properties.

  16. 19 CFR 141.87 - Breakdown on component materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breakdown on component materials. 141.87 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.87 Breakdown on component materials. Whenever the classification or appraisement of merchandise depends on the component materials, the invoice...

  17. Composition comprising lignin and antidi arrheal component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising lignin and at least one compound selected from the group consisting of bromelain, papain, tannin, carvacrol, thymol, alliin, allicin, fenugreek seed, egg, poppy, poppy seeds, humic acid, roots, kaolin, catechu, cellulase, flavonoid...

  18. An Expert System in FRP Composite Material Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An expert system prototype for fibre-reinforced plastic matrix (FRP) composite material design,ESFRP, has been developed. The system consists of seven main functional parts: a general inference engine, a set of knowledge bases, a material properties algorithm base, an explanation engine, various data bases, several function models and the user interface. The ESFRP can simulate human experts to make design scheme for fibre-reinforced plastics design, FRP layered plates design and FRP typical engineering components design. It can also predict the material properties and make strength analysis according to the micro and macro mechanics of composite materials. A satisfied result can be gained through the reiterative design.

  19. 10 CFR 71.131 - Nonconforming materials, parts, or components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonconforming materials, parts, or components. 71.131... RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Quality Assurance § 71.131 Nonconforming materials, parts, or components. The licensee, certificate holder, and applicant for a CoC shall establish measures to control materials, parts, or...

  20. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  1. Standards for compatibility of printed circuit and component lead materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Study of packaging of microminiature electronic components reveals methods of improving compatibility of lead materials, joining techniques, transfer molding concepts, printed circuit board materials, and process and material specifications.

  2. Potential emissions savings of lightweight composite aircraft components evaluated through life cycle assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA of structural aircraft materials has been utilised to assess and compare the total emissions produced during manufacturing, use and disposal of aerospace materials and their selected components. First, a comparison of aluminium, GLARE and carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP plates was performed to investigate the potential of lightweight composites in reducing aviation emissions. Subsequently, a case study is presented on a tubular component for which more accurate manufacturing data were directly available. A structural steel tube was replaced with a composite tubular component. The analysis has shown that once the composite material is used as a component in the aircraft, there is a cumulative saving of aircraft fuel and emissions, in particular from CFRP structures. The environmental analysis included the long-term use predictions for CFRPs, involving detailed raw materials production, use and operation, and disposal scenarios.

  3. Composite Dielectric Materials for Electrical Switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modine, F.A.

    1999-04-25

    Composites that consist of a dielectric host containing a particulate conductor as a second phase are of interest for electrical switching applications. Such composites are "smart" materials that can function as either voltage or current limiters, and the difference in fimction depends largely upon whether the dielectric is filled to below or above the percolation threshold. It also is possible to combine current and voltage limiting in a single composite to make a "super-smart" material.

  4. Friction material composites copper-metal-free material design perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2015-01-01

    This book examines material composites used in connection with brake friction, their design and safety. To aid in understanding, the essentials of friction are explained. This second edition was extended to include friction material composites without copper, as they offer an environmentally friendlier option. The second edition is intended to support beginners by offering insights into the essentials of friction material composites, helping them to develop a broader understanding of brake friction materials. Friction materials find wide-ranging applications in household and industrial appliances, brake pads for automotive applications, rail brake friction pads and composition brake blocks. This second edition is an introductory volume to a set of related books, and is based on the author’s experience and expertise with various material manufacturers, brake manufacturers, vehicle manufacturers, researchers and testing labs around the world with which the author has been associated for the past 28 years.

  5. Composites and blends from biobased materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, S.S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The program is focused on the development of composites and blends from biobased materials to use as membranes, high value plastics, and lightweight composites. Biobased materials include: cellulose derivative microporous materials, cellulose derivative copolymers, and cellulose derivative blends. This year`s research focused on developing an improved understanding of the molecular features that cellulose based materials with improved properties for gas separation applications. Novel cellulose ester membrane composites have been developed and are being evaluated under a collaborative research agreement with Dow Chemicals Company.

  6. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  7. Synthesizing Smart Polymeric and Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Smart materials have been widely investigated to explore new functionalities unavailable to traditional materials or to mimic the multifunctionality of biological systems. Synthetic polymers are particularly attractive as they already possess some of the attributes required for smart materials, and there are vast room to further enhance the existing properties or impart new properties by polymer synthesis or composite formulation. In this work, three types of smart polymer and composites have...

  8. Concentrated Solar Power: Components and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kribus, A.

    2017-07-01

    CSP technologies are well developed and offer many advantages compared to other renewable energy options. They can also be very effective in many locations with high solar radiation around the world. However today they are less competitive than other technologies. Understanding the limitations, and identifying opportunities for improvements, requires a detailed analysis of the energy conversion processes, the needed components, and the required technologies for these plant components. Here we present the three main energy conversion steps in a CSP plant, the behavior and limitations of the technologies that are currently used in commercial CSP plants, and some directions for development of plant components that will offer better performance.

  9. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  10. Materials Characterization for Space Manufactured Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long duration missions to the Moon and Mars will place new demands upon components and systems leading to increasingly stringent requirements for safety, quality,...

  11. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material Comprising Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  12. Natural Composite Systems for Bioinspired Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezzo, Joseph A; Montclare, Jin Kim

    From a relatively limited selection of base materials, nature has steered the development of truly remarkable materials. The simplest and often overlooked organisms have demonstrated the ability to manufacture multi-faceted, molecular-level hierarchical structures that combine mechanical properties rarely seen in synthetic materials. Indeed, these natural composite systems, composed of an array of intricately arranged and functionally relevant organic and inorganic substances serve as inspiration for materials design. A better understanding of these composite systems, specifically at the interface of the hetero-assemblies, would encourage faster development of environmentally friendly "green" materials with molecular level specificities.

  13. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo Lamberti; Gabriele Chiesura; Geert Luyckx; Joris Degrieck; Markus Kaufmann; Steve Vanlanduit

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component...

  14. Biomedical composites materials, manufacturing and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials are engineered materials, made from two or more constituents with significantly different physical or chemical properties which remain separate on a macroscopic level within the finished structure. Due to their special mechanical and physical properties they have the potential to replace conventional materials in various fields such as the biomedical industry.

  15. Verifying the correct composition of distributed components: Formalisation and Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Henrio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article provides formal definitions characterizing well-formed composition of components in order to guarantee their safe deployment and execution. Our work focuses on the structural aspects of component composition; it puts together most of the concepts common to many component models, but never formalized as a whole. Our formalization characterizes correct component architectures made of functional and non-functional aspects, both structured as component assemblies. Interceptor chains can be used for a safe and controlled interaction between the two aspects. Our well-formed components guarantee a set of properties ensuring that the deployed component system has a correct architecture and can run safely. Finally, those definitions constitute the formal basis for our Eclipse-based environment for the development and specification of component-based applications.

  16. Composite material based on fluoroplast and low melting oxyfluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatieva, L. N.; Savchenko, N. N.; Lalayan, V. M.; Zverev, G. A.; Goncharuk, V. K.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Shaulov, A. Yu.; Berlin, A. A.; Bouznik, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work summarizes the results of studies of the samples fabricated through extrusion blending of mixtures composed of the perfluorocarbon polymer (polyvinylidene fluoride, PVDF), which presently undergoes intensive studies, and the inorganic glass (BF-glass) of the composition 3B2O3-97(40SnF2-30SnO-30P2O5). It is revealed as a result of application of the suggested technique the composite material whose structure depends on the component ratio in the mixture (from individual areas formed by each component to homogeneously distributed composite particles) has been fabricated. The peculiarities of formation of composites were studied on the basis of the results of studying their morphology, molecular structure and phase composition. It was revealed the preservation of the polymer molecular structure and the absence of interaction with the glass in the fabricated samples. We found that in the process of sample fabrication there occur melting of the mixture, mixing of particles and changing of the phase compositions. The polymer partially and the glass almost completely crystallize in the process of composite fabrication. Glass crystals fill polymer cavities forming agglomerates. Along with the increase of the amount of inorganic component crystals, the polymer monolithic nature is disrupted and an inversion occurs at a certain component ratio: polymer particles are located between crystals of the inorganic component, mixing with them and covering them. The glass crystallization is facilitated through pre-crushing in extruder mill.

  17. Composite materials molding simulation for purpose of automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Ł.; Baier, A.; Majzner, M.; Sobek, M.

    2016-08-01

    Composite materials loom large increasingly important role in the overall industry. Composite material have a special role in the ever-evolving automotive industry. Every year the composite materials are used in a growing number of elements included in the cars construction. Development requires the search for ever new applications of composite materials in areas where previously were used only metal materials. Requirements for modern solutions, such as reducing the weight of vehicles, the required strength and vibration damping characteristics go hand in hand with the properties of modern composite materials. The designers faced the challenge of the use of modern composite materials in the construction of bodies of power steering systems in vehicles. The initial choice of method for producing composite bodies was the method of molding injection of composite material. Molding injection of polymeric materials is a widely known and used for many years, but the molding injection of composite materials is a relatively new issue, innovative, it is not very common and is characterized by different conditions, parameters and properties in relation to the classical method. Therefore, for the purpose of selecting the appropriate composite material for injection for the body of power steering system computer analysis using Siemens NX 10.0 environment, including Moldex 3d and EasyFill Advanced tool to simulate the injection of materials from the group of possible solutions were carried out. Analyses were carried out on a model of a modernized wheel case of power steering system. During analysis, input parameters, such as temperature, pressure injectors, temperature charts have been analysed. An important part of the analysis was to analyse the propagation of material inside the mold during injection, so that allowed to determine the shape formability and the existence of possible imperfections of shapes and locations air traps. A very important parameter received from

  18. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  19. Fibrous and textile materials for composite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fangueiro, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the fibers and textiles used in composite materials. It presents both existing technologies currently used in commercial applications and the latest advanced research and developments. It also discusses the different fiber forms and architectures, such as short fibers, unidirectional tows, directionally oriented structures or advanced 2D- and 3D-textile structures that are used in composite materials. In addition, it examines various synthetic, natural and metallic fibers that are used to reinforce polymeric, cementitious and metallic matrices, as well as fiber properties, special functionalities, manufacturing processes, and composite processing and properties. Two entire chapters are dedicated to advanced nanofiber and nanotube reinforced composite materials. The book goes on to highlight different surface treatments and finishes that are applied to improve fiber/matrix interfaces and other essential composite properties. Although a great deal of information about fibers and textile str...

  20. Techno-economic requirements for composite aircraft components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ray

    1993-01-01

    The primary reason for use of composites is to save structural weight. A well designed composite aircraft structure will usually save 25-30 percent of a well designed metal structure. The weight savings then translates into improved performance of the aircraft in measures of greater payload, increased flying range or improved efficiency - less use of fuel. Composite materials offer technical advantages. Key technical advantages that composites offer are high stiffness, tailored strength capability, fatigue resistance, and corrosion resistance. Low thermal expansion properties produce dimensionally stable structures over a wide range of temperature. Specialty resin 'char' forming characteristics in a fire environment offer potential fire barrier application and safer aircraft. The materials and processes of composite fabrication offer the potential for lower cost structures in the near future. The application of composite materials to aircraft are discussed.

  1. Multiphysicsbased Condition Monitoring of Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Hui; Sharma, Puneet; Khawaja, Hassan Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Composites are increasingly being used in products such as: automobiles, bridges, boats, drillships, offshore platforms, aircrafts and satellites. The increased usage of these composite materials and the fact that the conditions pertaining to their failure are not fully understood makes it imperative to develop condition monitoring systems for composite structures. In this work, we present a theoretical framework for the development of a condition monitoring system. For this, we plan...

  2. Cumulative Damage Model for Advanced Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    ultimately used an exponential in the present example for added simplicity) and we norma - lize the function so that it becomes the modifier that determines...Testing and Design (Second Conference), ASTM STP 497, ASTM (1972) pp. 170-188. 5. Halpin, J. C., et al., "Characterization of Composites for the...Graphite Epoxy Composites," Proc. Symposium on Composite Materials: Testing and Design, ASTM , (Ma’rch 20, 1978) New Orleans, LA. 18. Hashin, Z. and Rotem

  3. Method of making a composite refractory material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Marvin S.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1995-01-01

    A composite refractory material is prepared by combining boron carbide with furan resin to form a mixture containing about 8 wt. % furan resin. The mixture is formed into a pellet which is placed into a grit pack comprising an oxide of an element such as yttrium to form a sinterable body. The sinterable body is sintered under vacuum with microwave energy at a temperature no greater than 2000.degree. C. to form a composite refractory material.

  4. Passive RF component technology materials, techniques, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guoan

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on novel materials and techniques, this pioneering volume provides you with a solid understanding of the design and fabrication of smart RF passive components. You find comprehensive details on LCP, metal materials, ferrite materials, nano materials, high aspect ratio enabled materials, green materials for RFID, and silicon micromachining techniques. Moreover, this practical book offers expert guidance on how to apply these materials and techniques to design a wide range of cutting-edge RF passive components, from MEMS switch based tunable passives and 3D passives, to metamaterial-bas

  5. Code Component Composition Reuse Is a New Programming Paradigm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    After describing the characteristics of programming paradigm,this pap er introduces the approach of code component composition reuse in detail, propos es and discusses viewpoint that code component composition reuse is a kind of ne w programming paradigm. This paper also specifies the characteristics of this ne w programming paradigm in detail, and points out some issues that must be resolv ed for using this new programming paradigm.

  6. Mechanical Characterization of Cotton Fiber/Polyester Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Rajper

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of composite from natural fiber for lower structural application is growing for long-term sustainable perspective. Cotton fiber composite material has the added advantages of high specific strength, corrosion resistance, low cost and low weight compared to glass fiber on the expense of internal components of IC engines. The primary aim of the research study is to examine the effect of the cotton fiber on mechanical properties of lower structural applications when added with the polyester resin. In this paper composite material sample has been prepared by hand Lay-Up process. A mould is locally developed in the laboratory for test sample preparation. Initially samples of polyester resin with appropriate ratio of the hardener were developed and tested. At the second stage yarns of cotton fiber were mixed with the polyester resin and sample specimens were developed and tested. Relative effect of the cotton as reinforcing agent was examined and observed that developed composite specimen possess significant improvement in mechanical properties such as tensile strength was improved as 19.78 % and modulus of elasticity was increased up to 24.81%. Through this research it was also observed that developed composite material was of ductile nature and its density decreases up to 2.6%. Results from this study were compared with relevant available advanced composite materials and found improved mechanical properties of developed composite material

  7. Reo: A Channel-based Coordination Model for Component Composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present Reo, which forms a paradigm for composition of software components based on the notion of mobile channels. Reo is a channel-based exogenous coordination model in which complex coordinators, called connectors, are compositionally built out of simpler ones. The simplest conne

  8. A channel-based coordination model for component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, F.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present $P epsilon omega$, a paradigm for composition of software components based on the notion of mobile channels. $P repsilon omega$ is a channel-based exogenous coordination model wherein complex coordinators, called {em connectors are compositionally built out of simpler ones.

  9. Glass Fiber Resin Composites and Components at Arctic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited GLASS FIBER RESIN...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GLASS FIBER RESIN COMPOSITES AND COMPONENTS AT ARCTIC TEMPERATURES 5...public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Glass fiber reinforced composites (GFRC

  10. Method of making bearing materials. [self-lubricating, oxidation resistant composites for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for making a composite material which provides low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact. The composite material which is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure and a fluorine salt component which provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  11. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  12. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  13. PREPARATION OF PUZZOLANA ACTIVE TWO COMPONENT COMPOSITE FOR LATENT HEAT STORAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Fort

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Application of Phase Change Materials (PCMs represents promising way for an increase of energy efficiency of industrial devices, reduction of energy demands for heating and cooling, waste heat recovery, solar energy storage and smart control of buildings interior climate. In this paper, the potential of diatomite as the bearer for the shape stable PCM was studied in order to develop material applicable in the mix composition of composite materials. Considering availability, endurance and compatibility of diatomite with the cement and lime based materials, preparation of diatomite/wax composite brings pozzolana active PCM with great promises at a reasonable cost. Prepared composite was analysed in detail using laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Also the pozzolanic activity was measured. The prepared two components composite exhibits high latent heat storage and particle size distribution compatible with cement and hydrated lime.

  14. Center for Cement Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-31

    pastes have shown that the matrix is microporous; mesopores are absent unless the material is allowed to dry out. This results in water adsorption at low...only to water. When subsequently dried a portion of3 the porosity is converted to larger mesopores . • Only about one third of the cement reacts in a...Frictional sliding, in this case was characterized by a decreasing slope in the loading curve followed by hysteresis in the unload/reloading curves

  15. Breakthroughs in Mesoporous Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous materials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their extremely high surface area, uniform and tunable pore structure (2-50nm in diameter), and have been investigated extensively since its invention. Unfortunately,their catalytic properties are far away from the expectation due to their amorphous and inert framework and poor stability. This research project is aimed at the design and synthesis of mesoporous-

  16. Indirect composite resin materials for posterior applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellard, E; Duke, E S

    1999-12-01

    Indirect composite resin restorations were introduced a number of years ago as possible alternatives to traditional metallic or ceramic-based indirect restorations. However, the earlier formulations did not provide evidence of improvement in mechanical and physical properties over chairside-placed direct composite resin materials. Because they required more tooth structure removal than direct restorations, their use became unpopular and was abandoned by most clinicians. Over the past few years, a new class of composite resin indirect materials has surfaced in the profession. Various technologies have been suggested as reinforcement mechanisms. Fibers, matrix modifications, and an assortment of innovations have been proposed for enhancing indirect composite resin restorations. Applications are from inlay restorations all the way to multi-unit fixed prostheses. This manuscript summarizes some of the progress made in this area. When available, data is presented to provide clinicians with guidelines and indications for the use of these materials.

  17. Multifunctional Laminated Composite Materials for Protective Clothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin M. Aly

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Protective clothing performs a vital role in maintaining the safety of human in workplace. The developments in this field are proceeding to fulfill the needs with multifunctional materials at competitive costs. Recently, the protective clothing field introduces the usage of composite materials taking advantage of their outstanding properties. In this paper, the multifunctional performance of hybrid laminated composites (HLC was investigated aiming to be utilized in protective clothing. The influences of reinforcement and resin properties on the physical properties of the laminated composites and their resistance to puncture load and UV transmittance were studied. ANOVA test was used for the statistical analysis of the results. The results showed that, the reinforcement material and structure and the fiber/matrix interface have major influences on the laminated composites performance. It was revealed that, the HLC fabricated from (polyester/glass fabric with satin 4 structure and nonwoven glass fiber mat exhibited the best functional performance.

  18. Advanced Materials and Cell Components for NASA's Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2009-01-01

    This is an introductory paper for the focused session "Advanced Materials and Cell Components for NASA's Exploration Missions". This session will concentrate on electrochemical advances in materials and components that have been achieved through efforts sponsored under NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD). This paper will discuss the performance goals for components and for High Energy and Ultra High Energy cells, advanced lithium-ion cells that will offer a combination of higher specific energy and improved safety over state-of-the-art. Papers in this session will span a broad range of materials and components that are under development to enable these cell development efforts.

  19. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jingwen; Peng, Zhijian; Shen, Zhenguang; Zhao, Zengying; Zhang, Guoliang; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-05-06

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via single-component WO3-x crystals. The resistance of WO3-x crystal sensors in response to relative humidity could be tuned from a negative to positive one by increasing the compositional x. And it was revealed that the positive humidity impedance was driven by the defects of oxygen vacancy. This result will extend the application field of humidity sensors, because the positive humidity impedance sensors would be more energy-efficient, easier to be miniaturized and electrically safer than their negative counterparts for their lower operation voltages. And we believe that constructing vacancies in semiconducting materials is a universal way to fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors.

  20. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jingwen; Peng, Zhijian; Shen, Zhenguang; Zhao, Zengying; Zhang, Guoliang; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-05-01

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via single-component WO3-x crystals. The resistance of WO3-x crystal sensors in response to relative humidity could be tuned from a negative to positive one by increasing the compositional x. And it was revealed that the positive humidity impedance was driven by the defects of oxygen vacancy. This result will extend the application field of humidity sensors, because the positive humidity impedance sensors would be more energy-efficient, easier to be miniaturized and electrically safer than their negative counterparts for their lower operation voltages. And we believe that constructing vacancies in semiconducting materials is a universal way to fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors.

  1. Software component composition based on ADL and Middleware

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    How to compose prefabricated components is a key issue in component-based reuse. Research on Software Architecture (SA) and Component-based Software Development (CBSD) provides two hopeful solutions from different perspectives. SA provides a top-down approach to realizing component-based reuse. However, it pays insufficient attention to the refinement and implementation of the architectural descriptions, and does not provide the necessary capability to automate the transformation or composition to form a final executable application. CBSD provides a bottom-up way by using existing middleware infrastructures. However, these technologies do not take into account the systematic methodology that can guide the CBSD process, especially the component composition at higher abstract levels. We argue that it is a natural solution to combine these two approaches.   In this paper, an architecture-based component composition approach is presented. In this way, SA description, using mapping rules and mini-tools to narrow the gap between design and implementation, is used as the blueprint and middleware technology as the runtime scaffold for component composition. Our approach presents an ADL, which supports user-defined connectors and has an extensible framework, to specify software architectures. To map a SA description into implementation, it is necessary to map it first to an OO design model described in UML, then to the final implementation. The architectural description can be mapped into source code or executable code by using some ORB conforming to CORBA standard. Also a toolkit is provided to support this approach efficiently.

  2. Polymer bonded ferrite materials as EMC components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toepfer, J. [Fachhochschule Jena, FB Werkstofftechnik, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany); Hermsdorfer Institut fuer Technische Keramik e.V., M.-Curie-Str. 17, 07629 Hermsdorf (Germany); Pawlowski, B. [Hermsdorfer Institut fuer Technische Keramik e.V., M.-Curie-Str. 17, 07629 Hermsdorf (Germany); Graebner, F. [IMG Nordhausen, An der Salza 8a, 99734 Nordhausen (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Polymer bonded ferrites composed of a mixture of Mn-Zn ferrites or Ni-Zn ferrites in a polymer binder (PE, PA) were prepared and tested as electromagnetic-wave absorbing materials. Test samples and cases were prepared by hot or injection molding. Permeability spectra show loss contributions in the frequency range 100-1000 MHz. Absorption measurements of injection molded polymer-ferrite cases display a 3-5 dB better attenuation characteristics compared to graphite-loaded polyamide housings. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Polymer-gebundene Ferritwerkstoffe auf der Basis von Ferrit (Mn-Zn oder Ni-Zn Ferrite) - Thermoplast Mischungen wurden praepariert und hinsichtlich ihrer Eignung zur Absorption elektromagnetischer Strahlung untersucht. Es wurden sowohl Testproben wie auch komplette Gehaeusekomponenten durch Heisspressen oder Spritzgiessen hergestellt. Die Permeabilitaetsspektren weisen verlustbehaftete Komponenten im Frequenzbereich von 100-1000 MHz auf. Schirmdaempfungsmessungen an spritzgegossenen Gehaeuseteilen zeigen eine um 3-5 dB bessere Daempfung im Vergleich zu Graphit-gefuellten Polyamid-Gehaeusen. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Color stability of different composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkensammer, Frank; Arnetzl, Gerwin Vincent; Wildburger, Angelika; Freudenthaler, Josef

    2013-06-01

    Data are needed to better predict the color stability of current composite resin materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of different storage solutions on the color stability of different composite resin materials. Different restorative and adhesive composite resin specimens (dual-polymerizing self-adhesive resin cement, autopolymerizing resin-based composite resin, dual-polymerizing resin-based composite resin, nanohybrid composite resin, and microhybrid composite resin) were fabricated and stored in red wine, black tea, chlorhexidine, sodium fluoride, tea tree oil, or distilled water for 4 weeks at 37°C. Color parameters were measured with a colorimeter before and after storage. Total color differences and specific coordinate differences were expressed as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. A 2-way and 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons were applied for statistical calculations (α=.05). Red wine caused the most severe discoloration (ΔE >10), followed by black tea with perceptible (ΔE >2.6) to clinically unacceptable discoloration (ΔE >5.5). Colored mouth rinses discolored the materials to a lesser extent with clinically acceptable values. Dual-polymerizing resin adhesives showed a higher amount of discoloration. Current restorative and adhesive composite resin materials discolor over time under the influence of different storage solutions. The composition related to the polymerizing mode seemed to be a causative factor. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The application of Principal Component Analysis to materials science data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwon Suh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between apparently disparate sets of data is a critical component of interpreting materials' behavior, especially in terms of assessing the impact of the microscopic characteristics of materials on their macroscopic or engineering behavior. In this paper we demonstrate the value of principal component analysis of property data associated with high temperature superconductivity to examine the statistical impact of the materials' intrinsic characteristics on high temperature superconducting behavior

  5. Toward Uniformly Dispersed Battery Electrode Composite Materials: Characteristics and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yo Han; Huie, Matthew M; Choi, Dalsu; Chang, Mincheol; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-02-10

    Battery electrodes are complex mesoscale systems comprised of electroactive components, conductive additives, and binders. In this report, methods for processing electrodes with dispersion of the components are described. To investigate the degree of material dispersion, a spin-coating technique was adopted to provide a thin, uniform layer that enabled observation of the morphology. Distinct differences in the distribution profile of the electrode components arising from individual materials physical affinities were readily identified. Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) analysis revealed pertinent surface interactions associated with materials dispersivity. Further studies demonstrated that HSPs can provide an effective strategy to identify surface modification approaches for improved dispersions of battery electrode materials. Specifically, introduction of surfactantlike functionality such as oleic acid (OA) capping and P3HT-conjugated polymer wrapping on the surface of nanomaterials significantly enhanced material dispersity over the composite electrode. The approach to the surface treatment on the basis of HSP study can facilitate design of composite electrodes with uniformly dispersed morphology and may contribute to enhancing their electrical and electrochemical behaviors. The conductivity of the composites and their electrochemical performance was also characterized. The study illustrates the importance of considering electronic conductivity, electron transfer, and ion transport in the design of environments incorporating active nanomaterials.

  6. Automation of cutting and drilling of composite components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    The task was to develop a preliminary plan for an automated system for the cutting and drilling of advanced aerospace composite components. The goal was to automate the production of these components, but the technology developed can be readily extended to other systems. There is an excellent opportunity for developing a state of the art automated system for the cutting and drilling of large composite components at NASA-Marshall. Most of the major system components are in place: the robot, the water jet pump, and the off-line programming system. The drilling system and the part location system are the only major components that need to be developed. Also, another water jet nozzle and a small amount of high pressure plumbing need to be purchased from, and installed.

  7. Mechanical Components from Highly Recoverable, Low Apparent Modulus Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Santo, II (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Stanford, Malcolm K. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A material for use as a mechanical component is formed of a superelastic intermetallic material having a low apparent modulus and a high hardness. The superelastic intermetallic material is conditioned to be dimensionally stable, devoid of any shape memory effect and have a stable superelastic response without irrecoverable deformation while exhibiting strains of at least 3%. The method of conditioning the superelastic intermetallic material is described. Another embodiment relates to lightweight materials known as ordered intermetallics that perform well in sliding wear applications using conventional liquid lubricants and are therefore suitable for resilient, high performance mechanical components such as gears and bearings.

  8. Effect of plastic deformation on the structure and mechanical properties of an ultra-low carbon interstitial-free steel in the monolithic material and as a component of a sandwich composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkovsky, S. V.; Kuteneva, S. V.; Kamantsev, I. S.; Sergeev, S. N.; Safarov, I. M.

    2016-10-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of ultra-low carbon interstitial-free (IF) steel in the annealed state, after warm and cold rolling, and as a component of seven-layer steel-aluminum composite have been studied. A comparative analysis of the results of structural studies using optical microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy have revealed the possibility of the formation of an ultrafinegrained structure in a steel layer during rolling at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 520°C. It has been found that the seven-layer composite has higher strength properties as compared to monolithic samples of the IF steel after analogous regime of the warm rolling.

  9. Vegetable Fibers for Composite Materials In Constructive Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Francesca; Savoja, Giulia

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the research is to study and to test bio-mixture for laminas to use in construction field components. Composite materials are becoming more common in different sectors, but their embodied energy is an environmental problem. For this, in recent years, the researchers investigate new mixtures for composites, in particular with vegetable fibers and bio-based epoxy resin. The research carried out different laboratory tests for material and mechanical characterization, starting from the analysis of vegetable fibers, and arriving to test different kind of laminas with sundry fabrics and bio-based epoxy resin. In the most general organization of the theme, the research has the overall objective to contribute to reduce composites environmental impacts, with the promotion of local production chains about innovative materials from renewable and sustainable sources.

  10. Microwave Measurements of Ferrite Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dosoudil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the microwave measurements performed on the nickel-zinc sintered ferrite with the chemical formula Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 produced by the ceramic technique and composite materials based on this ferrite and a non-magnetic polymer (polyvinyl chloride matrix. The prepared composite samples had the same particle size distribution 0-250um but different ferrite particle concentrations between 23 vol% and 80 vol%. The apparatus for measurement of the signal proportional to the absolute value of scattering parameter S11 (reflexion coefficient is described and the dependence of measured reflected signal on a bias magnetic field has been studied. By means of experiments, the resonances to be connected with the geometry of microwave experimental set-up were distinguished from ferromagnetic resonance arising in ferrite particles of composite structure. The role of local interaction fields of ferrite particles in composite material has been discussed.

  11. Life of structures of composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koznetsov, N.D.; Stepanenko, N.D.

    1986-06-01

    The introduction of composite materials in gas turbine engines is rationally done in stages. It is desirable to concentrate efforts on the use of them for production of vanes, sound deadening panes, the reverse rod, and other elements of the stator. The authors use compressor blades as an example of the basic principles of design, the selection of the reinforcing structure, and inspection of the quality of structures of composite materials. A method of determination of the elastodamping properties of polymer composite materials on specimens with free ends in high frequency flexural vibrations excited by a modulated jet of compressed air has been developed and standardized. With the use of this method such defects as separations, cracks, disorientation of the reinforcing, deviations in the order of alternation and the angular orientation of the layers are revealed.

  12. New composite materials for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovu, M. S.; Buzurniuc, S. A.; Verlan, V. I.; Culeac, I. P.; Nistor, Yu. H.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of obtaining low cost but efficient luminescent materials is still actually. Data concerning fabrication and luminescent properties of new composite materials on the base of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) of Europium(III) (Eu(TTA)3) and chalcogenide glasses doped with rare earth ions and polymers are presented. The visible emission spectra of the composites on the base of Eu(TTA)3 structured with phenantroline (Eu(TTA)3Phen) and copolymer from styrene and butylmethacrylate (1:1)(SBMA) under the excitation with N2-laser (λ=337 nm) contain sharp emission bands located at 354, 415, 580, 587, 590, 596, 611.4, 616.5, 621, 652, 690, 700, 713 nm. The nature of the observed emission bands and the possible mechanisms of the radiative electron transition in the investigated composite materials are discussed.

  13. Composite Materials and Sandwich Structures - A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    quality and protects prepreg from handling damage. Non - woven unidirectional tapes can otherwise split between fibers. Clean, white lint-free cotton ...applications and S glass fibers are used in strength critical situations. S glass fibers are sometimes woven in composite materials to increase toughness...A woven form of the reinforcements (Figure 1b) is also used in certain cases, depending on the application of the composite. Figure 1a- Fiber

  14. Research on Composite Materials for Structural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Residual Stresses in Composite Laminates", (August 1983); the M.Sc. thesis of E.J. Porth , titled "Effect of an External Stress on Moisture Diffusion in...Rates in OUnidirectional Double Cantilevered Beam Fracture Toughness Specimens", December 1982. 4. Porth , E.J., "Effect of an External Stress on...Composite Materials (December 1983) Edward John Porth , B.S., University of Colorado Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Y. Weitsman This work concerns

  15. Composites Materials and Manufacturing Technologies for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, J. H.; Tate, L. C.; Gaddis, S. W.; Neal, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant advantages in space applications. Weight reduction is imperative for deep space systems. However, the pathway to deployment of composites alternatives is problematic. Improvements in the materials and processes are needed, and extensive testing is required to validate the performance, qualify the materials and processes, and certify components. Addressing these challenges could lead to the confident adoption of composites in space applications and provide spin-off technical capabilities for the aerospace and other industries. To address the issues associated with composites applications in space systems, NASA sponsored a Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM) entitled, "Composites Materials and Manufacturing Technologies for Space Applications," the proceedings of which are summarized in this Conference Publication. The NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate and the Game Changing Program chartered the meeting. The meeting was hosted by the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM)-a public/private partnership between NASA, the State of Louisiana, Louisiana State University, industry, and academia, in association with the American Composites Manufacturers Association. The Louisiana Center for Manufacturing Sciences served as the coordinator for the TIM.

  16. Gain and loss enhancement in active and passive particulate composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    Two active dielectric materials may be blended together to realize a homogenized composite material (HCM) which exhibits more gain than either component material. Likewise, two dissipative dielectric materials may be blended together to realize an HCM which exhibits more loss than either component material. Sufficient conditions for such gain/loss enhancement were established using the Bruggeman homogenization formalism. Gain/loss enhancement arises when (i) the imaginary parts of the relative permittivities of both component materials are similar in magnitude and (ii) the real parts of the relative permittivities of both component materials are dissimilar in magnitude.

  17. Multiaxial analysis of dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotche, Miiri; Drummond, James L; Sun, Kang; Vural, Murat; DeCarlo, Francesco

    2009-02-01

    Dental composites are subjected to extreme chemical and mechanical conditions in the oral environment, contributing to the degradation and ultimate failure of the material in vivo. The objective of this study is to validate an alternative method of mechanically loading dental composite materials. Confined compression testing more closely represents the complex loading that dental restorations experience in the oral cavity. Dental composites, a nanofilled and a hybrid microfilled, were prepared as cylindrical specimens, light-cured in ring molds of 6061 aluminum, with the ends polished to ensure parallel surfaces. The samples were subjected to confined compression loading to 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15% axial strain. Upon loading, the ring constrains radial expansion of the specimen, generating confinement stresses. A strain gage placed on the outer wall of the aluminum confining ring records hoop strain. Assuming plane stress conditions, the confining stress (sigma(c)) can be calculated at the sample/ring interface. Following mechanical loading, tomographic data was generated using a high-resolution microtomography system developed at beamline 2-BM of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Extraction of the crack and void surfaces present in the material bulk is numerically represented as crack edge/volume (CE/V), and calculated as a fraction of total specimen volume. Initial results indicate that as the strain level increases the CE/V increases. Analysis of the composite specimens under different mechanical loads suggests that microtomography is a useful tool for three-dimensional evaluation of dental composite fracture surfaces.

  18. Composite materials for rail transit systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.; Guerdal, Zafer; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The potential is explored for using composite materials in urban mass transit systems. The emphasis was to identify specific advantages of composite materials in order to determine their actual and potential usage for carbody and guideway structure applications. The literature was reviewed, contacts were made with major domestic system operators, designers, and builders, and an analysis was made of potential composite application to railcar construction. Composites were found to be in use throughout the transit industry, usually in secondary or auxiliary applications such as car interior and nonstructural exterior panels. More recently, considerable activity has been initiated in the area of using composites in the load bearing elements of civil engineering structures such as highway bridges. It is believed that new and improved manufacturing refinements in pultrusion and filament winding will permit the production of beam sections which can be used in guideway structures. The inherent corrosion resistance and low maintenance characteristics of composites should result in lowered maintenance costs over a prolonged life of the structure.

  19. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    8MATERIAL STRUCTURES DISCONTINUITY T•R PLY DROPOFF i 7ARC LAP/GAP . PRPAATION A, ,OM LY , 1e, ’ •INS ERVICE MAINTENANCE DAMAGE SVv , S IMPACT \\\\ CHESIE ...composite joints such as box beam members, for example, are difficult to inspect by ultrasonic techniques, and the X-ray attenuation coefficients of

  20. ECODESIGN CRITERIA FOR COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sustainable design of new generation of composite products through the .... stress relations for an orthotropic material in the principal coordinate system (1,2) .... 4.1 Example 1: Eco-bonded structures with a single-lap adhesive joint ... The effect of the eco-factor λi on the plate first natural frequency is represented in Table 2,.

  1. Candida albicans adhesion to composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to dental restorative materials in the human oral cavity may promote the occurrence of oral candidosis. This study aimed to compare the susceptibility of 14 commonly used composite resin materials (two compomers, one ormocer, one novel silorane, and ten conventional hybrid composites) to adhere Candida albicans. Differences in the amount of adhering fungi should be related to surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the type of matrix. Cylindrical specimens of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. Surface roughness R (a) was assessed by perthometer measurements and the degree of hydrophobicity by computerized contact angle analysis. Specimens were incubated with a reference strain of C. albicans (DMSZ 1386), and adhering fungi were quantified by using a bioluminometric assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Statistical differences were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations. Median R (a) of the tested composite resin materials ranged between 0.04 and 0.23 microm, median contact angles between 69.2 degrees and 86.9 degrees . The two compomers and the ormocer showed lower luminescence intensities indicating less adhesion of fungi than all tested conventional hybrid composites. No conclusive correlation was found between surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the amount of adhering C. albicans.

  2. A composite-appropriate integration method of thick functional components in fibre-reinforced plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippatos, A.; Höhne, R.; Kliem, M.; Gude, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of integrated structural health monitoring systems for critical composite parts, such as wind turbine blades, fuselage and wing parts, is an promising approach to guarantee a safe and efficient operational lifetime of such components. Therefore, the integration of thick functional components like sensors, actuators and electronic components is often necessary. An optimal integration of such components should be ensured without material imperfections in the composite structure, i.e. voids and resin rich areas, and failure of the functional components. In this paper, first investigations were undertaken for a basic understanding of the mechanical performance of a fibre reinforced plastic component with integrated functional elements. The influence of different materials and treatment methods for the encapsulation of electronic components was experimentally investigated under static and dynamic loading tests. By means of a parametric finite element model, the effects of an encapsulation and various parameters such as the shape and orientation of the electronic components were examined. Several encapsulation variants were investigated in order to minimise the chance of failure initiations. Based both on experimental and numerical results, a preferred composite integration concept was selected for an electronic board and some first recommendations for an optimal integration were derived.

  3. A generalized methodology to characterize composite materials for pyrolysis models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Mark B.

    The predictive capabilities of computational fire models have improved in recent years such that models have become an integral part of many research efforts. Models improve the understanding of the fire risk of materials and may decrease the number of expensive experiments required to assess the fire hazard of a specific material or designed space. A critical component of a predictive fire model is the pyrolysis sub-model that provides a mathematical representation of the rate of gaseous fuel production from condensed phase fuels given a heat flux incident to the material surface. The modern, comprehensive pyrolysis sub-models that are common today require the definition of many model parameters to accurately represent the physical description of materials that are ubiquitous in the built environment. Coupled with the increase in the number of parameters required to accurately represent the pyrolysis of materials is the increasing prevalence in the built environment of engineered composite materials that have never been measured or modeled. The motivation behind this project is to develop a systematic, generalized methodology to determine the requisite parameters to generate pyrolysis models with predictive capabilities for layered composite materials that are common in industrial and commercial applications. This methodology has been applied to four common composites in this work that exhibit a range of material structures and component materials. The methodology utilizes a multi-scale experimental approach in which each test is designed to isolate and determine a specific subset of the parameters required to define a material in the model. Data collected in simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry experiments were analyzed to determine the reaction kinetics, thermodynamic properties, and energetics of decomposition for each component of the composite. Data collected in microscale combustion calorimetry experiments were analyzed to

  4. Accelerated aging of polymer composite bridge materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Nancy M.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Torres, Lucinda L.; Rodriguez, Julio G.; Yoder, Timothy S.

    1999-05-01

    Accelerated aging research on samples of composite materials and candidate UV protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Durability results and sensor data form test with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.

  5. Accelerated Aging of Polymer Composite Bridge Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Nancy Margaret; Blackwood, Larry Gene; Torres, Lucinda Laine; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo; Yoder, Timothy Scott

    1999-03-01

    Accelerated aging research on samples of composite material and candidate ultraviolet (UV) protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Durability results and sensor data from tests with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards, and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.

  6. Investigation of Coating Capability of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda Akçin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, composite materials are widely used in the sectors that are overrated high strength / density and high elasticity modulus / density ratios such as defense industry, marine transportation, automotive and aerospace industry. However, because of the surface properties such as tribological behavior and low wear resistance their application areas are limited. Coating is the prominent process in order to improve these properties of the materials. In this study, hard ceramic powders (Al2O3 + TiO2 and CrO3 are coated to surface of glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite materials with plasma spray coating method started to be widely used todays and physical, mechanical and metallographic properties of obtained coatings were examined.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  8. Composite material fabrication techniques. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B J; Paulauskas, F L [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Miller, J; Parzych, W [Metters Industries, Inc. (United States)

    1996-09-30

    This report describes a low cost method of fabricating components for mockups and training simulators used in the transportation industry. This technology was developed jointly by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Metters Industries, Incorporated (MI) as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) ORNL94-0288 sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Economic Impace and Diversity Minority Business Technology Transfer Consortium. The technology involves fabricating component replicas from fiberglass/epoxy composites using a resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The original components are used as masters to fabricate the molds. The molding process yields parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still providing adequate strength and stiffness for use in training simulators. This technology permits MI to overcome an acute shortage in surplus military hardware available to them for use in manufacturing training simulators. In addition, the cost of the molded fiberglass components is expected to be less than that of procuring the original components from the military.

  9. Joining Technology of Dissimilar Materials for Automotive Components(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meung Ho Rhee; Jong Ho Song; Woo Young Chung; Young Myoung Kim

    2004-01-01

    Joining techniques of dissimilar materials for lightweight multi-material automotive body structure were discussed. The joining of 1 .4 mm thickness steel and 2 mm thickness of Al were performed by the new method that is hybrid laser welding system. After aluminum and steel were welded by laser hybrid welding process, the micro-structure investment and the micro-hardness test were carried out. Hybrid laser welding promises a bright future in joining technology of dissimilar materials for automotive components.

  10. Polymer materials and component evaluation in acidic-radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celina, M.; Gillen, K. T.; Malone, G. M.; Clough, R. L.; Nelson, W. H.

    2001-07-01

    Polymeric materials used for cable/wire insulation, electrical connectors, O-rings, seals, and in critical components such as motors, level switches and resistive thermo-devices were evaluated under accelerated degradation conditions in combined radiation-oxidative elevated-temperature acidic-vapor (nitric/oxalic) environments relevant to conditions in isotope processing facilities. Experiments included the assessment of individual materials such as PEEK, polyimides, polyolefin based cable insulation, EPDM rubbers, various epoxy systems, commercial caulking materials as well as some functional testing of components. We discuss how to conduct laboratory experiments to simulate such complex hostile environments, describe some degradation effects encountered, and evaluate the impact on appropriate material and component selection.

  11. Compression Testing of Textile Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of existing test methods, which were developed primarily for laminates made of unidirectional prepreg tape, to textile composites is an area of concern. The issue is whether the values measured for the 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit materials are accurate representations of the true material response. This report provides a review of efforts to establish a compression test method for textile reinforced composite materials. Experimental data have been gathered from several sources and evaluated to assess the effectiveness of a variety of test methods. The effectiveness of the individual test methods to measure the material's modulus and strength is determined. Data are presented for 2-D triaxial braided, 3-D woven, and stitched graphite/epoxy material. However, the determination of a recommended test method and specimen dimensions is based, primarily, on experimental results obtained by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for 2-D triaxially braided materials. They evaluated seven test methods: NASA Short Block, Modified IITRI, Boeing Open Hole Compression, Zabora Compression, Boeing Compression after Impact, NASA ST-4, and a Sandwich Column Test.

  12. Mechanical Spectroscopy of Nanostructured Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mari, Daniele; Schaller, Robert; Mazaheri, Mehdi, E-mail: daniele.mari@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Complexe, Groupe de Spectroscopie Mecanique, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-06

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of different nano-structured composite materials, which were processed within the SAPHIR European Integrated Project, has been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy. The obtained results show clearly that creep resistance of fine grain ceramics such as zirconia can be improved by carbon nano-tube (CNT) reinforcements. On the other hand the elastic modulus and the damping capacity of aluminum matrix composites were increased by SiC nano-particle additions. It has also been observed that CNT additions are responsible for a better thermal stability of polymer such as ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene) used in automotive industry.

  13. Issues of structure formation of multi-component construction materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorenko Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing volumes of construction result in the rising demand for high-quality wall materials and products, growing relevance of availability of resource and raw-material base of natural and industrial products for the construction industry. Structural, physical and mechanical qualities of these products can be improved through systematical selection of compositions based on natural and raw materials, including nano-scale products. The goal of this paper is to provide rationale for structure formation mechanisms of multicomponent materials (silica-lime, silicate, cement materials, with the possibility of using nano-scale products in their production. The primary mechanism of directed structure formation at the interface boundaries of binders are nano- and ultra-disperse particles with high absorption and adhesion properties, which are primarily intended to strengthen the contact area (one of the key structural units of multicomponent binders. The knowledge of genesis, chemical, mineralogical, and phase compositions, as well as specific features of formation of nano-technological raw materials, enables optimization of construction product properties. Using the small-angle neutron scattering method, we identified granulometric and surface properties of a series of nano-technological products (binary and sludge and materials where such products are used, which enabled us to design optimal mixture compositions and parameters of pressing operations.

  14. High-Capacity, High-Voltage Composite Oxide Cathode Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagh, Nader M.

    2015-01-01

    This SBIR project integrates theoretical and experimental work to enable a new generation of high-capacity, high-voltage cathode materials that will lead to high-performance, robust energy storage systems. At low operating temperatures, commercially available electrode materials for lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries do not meet energy and power requirements for NASA's planned exploration activities. NEI Corporation, in partnership with the University of California, San Diego, has developed layered composite cathode materials that increase power and energy densities at temperatures as low as 0 degC and considerably reduce the overall volume and weight of battery packs. In Phase I of the project, through innovations in the structure and morphology of composite electrode particles, the partners successfully demonstrated an energy density exceeding 1,000 Wh/kg at 4 V at room temperature. In Phase II, the team enhanced the kinetics of Li-ion transport and electronic conductivity at 0 degC. An important feature of the composite cathode is that it has at least two components that are structurally integrated. The layered material is electrochemically inactive; however, upon structural integration with a spinel material, the layered material can be electrochemically activated and deliver a large amount of energy with stable cycling.

  15. Contraction stresses of composite resin filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegdahl, T; Gjerdet, N R

    1977-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resin filling materials and the tensile stresses developed when the shrinkage is restrained were measured in an in vitro experiment. This allows an estimation to be made of the forces exerted upon the enamel walls of cavities filled with the resin in the acid etch technique. The results indicate that the stresses acting on the enamel are low compared to the tensile strength of the enamel.

  16. Bruggeman formalism vs. `Bruggeman formalism': Particulate composite materials comprising oriented ellipsoidal particles

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2012-01-01

    Two different formalisms for the homogenization of composite materials containing oriented ellipsoidal particles of isotropic dielectric materials are being named after Bruggeman. Numerical studies reveal clear differences between the two formalisms which may be exacerbated: (i) if the component particles become more aspherical, (ii) at mid-range values of the volume fractions, and (iii) if the homogenized component material is dissipative. The correct Bruggeman formalism uses the correct polarizability density dyadics of the component particles, but the other formalism does not.

  17. Chlorhexidine-releasing methacrylate dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Danny; Spratt, David A; Pratten, Jonathan; Gulabivala, Kishor; Mordan, Nicola J; Young, Anne M

    2005-12-01

    Light curable antibacterial, dental composite restoration materials, consisting of 80 wt% of a strontium fluoroaluminosilicate glass dispersed in methacrylate monomers have been produced. The monomers contained 40-100 wt% of a 10 wt% chlorhexidine diacetate (CHXA) in hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) solution and 60-0 wt% of a 50/50 mix of urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). On raising HEMA content, light cure polymerisation rates decreased. Conversely, water sorption induced swelling and rates of diffusion controlled CHXA release from the set materials increased. Experimental composites with 50 and 90 wt% of the CHXA in HEMA solution in the monomer were shown, within a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF), to have slower rates of biofilm growth on their surfaces between 1 and 7 days than the commercial dental composite Z250 or fluoride-releasing dental cements, Fuji II LC and Fuji IX. When an excavated bovine dentine cylinder re-filled with Z250 was placed for 10 weeks in the CDFF, both bacteria and polymers from the artificial saliva penetrated between the material and dentine. With the 50 wt% experimental HEMA/CHXA formulation, this bacterial microleakage was substantially reduced. Polymer leakage, however, still occurred. Both polymer and bacterial microleakage were prevented with a 90 wt% HEMA/CHXA restoration in the bovine dentine due to swelling compensation for polymerisation shrinkage in combination with antibacterial release.

  18. Frequency-agile microwave components using ferroelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom-Ustariz, Jose G.; Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael; Velez, Salmir; Rodriguez-Acosta, Snaider

    2003-04-01

    The non-linear electric field dependence of ferroelectric thin films can be used to design frequency and phase agile components. Tunable components have traditionally been developed using mechanically tuned resonant structures, ferrite components, or semiconductor-based voltage controlled electronics, but they are limited by their frequency performance, high cost, hgih losses, and integration into larger systems. In contrast, the ferroelectric-based tunable microwave component can easily be integrated into conventional microstrip circuits and attributes such as small size, light weight, and low-loss make these components attractive for broadband and multi-frequency applications. Components that are essential elements in the design of a microwave sensor can be fabricated with ferroelectric materials to achieve tunability over a broad frequency range. It has been reported that with a thin ferroelectric film placed between the top conductor layer and the dielectric material of a microstrip structure, and the proper DC bias scheme, tunable components above the Ku band can be fabricated. Components such as phase shifters, coupled line filters, and Lange couplers have been reported in the literature using this technique. In this wokr, simulated results from a full wave electromagnetic simulator are obtained to show the tunability of a matching netowrk typically used in the design of microwave amplifiers and antennas. In addition, simulated results of a multilayer Lange coupler, and a patch antenna are also presented. The results show that typical microstrip structures can be easily modified to provide frequency agile capabilities.

  19. Effects of Filler Components on Surface Roughness of Composite Resin Materials after Polishing%复合树脂填料组成对抛光后表面粗糙度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫鹏; 岳林

    2014-01-01

    Objective :To evaluate fillers like quartz ,nano-silica and glass in resin composites on surface roughness af-ter polishing .Methods :8 commercial resin composites with different components and technique were studied in this study .Atter consistent baseline had obtained ,the specimens were polished by use of abrasive disks .Ra values were tested by surface profilometer (Surftest SJ-401) .Results:(1) Surface roughness of AP-X ,Quixfil and TPH3 with large glass fillers was greater than composites with smaller quartz and nano fillers like Z 250 ,P60 ,P90 ,Z350 .(2)Composites with quartz and nano fillers from the same company had the similar surface roughness .(3)Ra value from the perpendic-ular direction was greater than parallel direction .Conclusion:Factors like filler component ,particle size and polishing di-rection can influent the surface roughness after polishing .%目的:观察复合树脂抛光后组成成分对其表面粗糙度的影响。方法:选择三个厂家不同组成成分和工艺配置的8种复合树脂,制作表面统一基线的试样,用Sof-Lex系列抛光,采用表面粗糙度仪(Surftest SJ-401)检测抛光后树脂的表面粗糙度(Ra值)。结果:(1)同属较大颗粒玻璃填料的复合树脂(AP-X、Quixfil和 TPH3 Spectrum)抛光后表面粗糙度较小粒度和纳米工艺的石英填料复合树脂(Z250、P60、P90和Z350)高;(2)同一厂家的石英混合填料复合树脂与石英纳米树脂抛光后的表面粗糙度相同;(3)复合树脂在垂直于抛光方向上获得的表面粗糙度要比平行于抛光方向的粗糙度高。各树脂Ra值经One-Way ANOVA分析和配对 t检验,P<0.05。结论:填料的成分和粒度会影响复合树脂抛光后表面的粗糙程度,抛光方向也是重要的影响因素。

  20. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Material Applications for Thruster Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Sandra; Holmes, Richard; Hickman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A variety of vacuum plasma spray (VPS) material systems have been successfully applied to injector and thrust chamber components. VPS offers a versatile fabrication process with relatively low costs to produce near net shape parts. The materials available with VPS increase operating margins and improve component life by providing superior thermal and oxidation protection in specific engine environments. Functional gradient materials (FGM) formed with VPS allow thrust chamber liners to be fabricated with GRCop-84 (an alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium) and a protective layer of NiCrAlY on the hot wall. A variety of thrust chamber liner designs have been fabricated to demonstrate the versatility of the process. Hot-fire test results have confined the improved durability and high temperature performance of the material systems for thrust chamber liners. Similar FGM s have been applied to provide superior thermal protection on injector faceplates with NiCrAlY and zirconia coatings. The durability of the applied materials has been demonstrated with hot-fire cycle testing on injector faceplates in high temperature environments. The material systems can benefit the components used in booster and main engine propulsion systems. More recent VPS efforts are focused on producing rhenium based material systems for high temperature applications to benefit in-space engines like reaction control system (RCS) thrusters.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  2. Simultaneous inference of a binary composite endpoint and its components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Große Ruse, Mareile; Ritz, Christian; Hothorn, Ludwig A.

    2017-01-01

    Binary composite endpoints offer some advantages as a way to succinctly combine evidence from a number of related binary endpoints recorded in the same clinical trial into a single outcome. However, as some concerns about the clinical relevance as well as the interpretation of such composite endp......). The method is compared to the gatekeeping approach and results are provided in the Supplementary Material. In two data examples we show how the procedure may be adapted to handle local significance levels specified through a priori given weights....

  3. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The Materials and Components Technology Division (MCT) provides a research and development capability for the design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs related to nuclear energy support the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR): life extension and accident analyses for light water reactors (LWRs); fuels development for research and test reactors; fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology; and safe shipment of hazardous materials. MCT Conservation and Renewables programs include major efforts in high-temperature superconductivity, tribology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), and thermal sciences. Fossil Energy Programs in MCT include materials development, NDE technology, and Instrumentation design. The division also has a complementary instrumentation effort in support of Arms Control Technology. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the database.

  4. Environment Friendly Composite Materials: Biocomposites and Green Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Mitra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Biocomposites can supplement and eventually replace petroleum-based composite materials in several applications. Several critical issues related to bio-fiber surface treatments is to make it a more suitable matrix for composite application and promising techniques need to be solved to design biocomposite of interest. The main motivation for developing biocomposites has been and still is to create a new generation of fiber reinforced plastics material competitive with glass fiber reinforced ones which are environmentally compatible in terms of products, use and renewal. There is an immense opportunity in developing new biobased products, but the real challenge isto design suitable bio-based products through innovation ideas. Green materials are the wave of the future. Bionanocomposites have very strong future prospects, though the present low level of production, some deficiency intechnology and high cost restrict them from a wide range of applications.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 64, No. 3, May 2014, pp. 244-261, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.7323

  5. Development of C/C composite for the core component of the high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. H

    2005-01-15

    This report reviewed a state of the art on development of C/C composite for the core components for VHTR and described the followings items. The fabrication methods of C/C composites. Summary on the JAERI report (JAERI-Res 2002-026) on the process screening test for the selection of a proper C/C composite material. Review of the proceedings presented at the GEN-IV VHTR material PMB meeting. A status of the domestic commercial C/C composite. The published property data and the characteristics of the commercial C/C composite.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Rare Earth Composite Materials Radiating Far Infrared for Activating Liquefied Petroleum Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth composite materials radiating far-infrared rays were prepared according to far infrared absorption spectrum of main component in liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The composite materials were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transformed infrared spectra(FTIR). The results show that after the composite materials were calcined at 873 K for 4 h, FTIR spectra of rare earth composite materials display two new peaks at 1336 and 2926 cm-1 available for activating LPG.

  7. Multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing of composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinis, Dimitri; Schaffner, Manuel; Studart, André R

    2015-10-23

    3D printing has become commonplace for the manufacturing of objects with unusual geometries. Recent developments that enabled printing of multiple materials indicate that the technology can potentially offer a much wider design space beyond unusual shaping. Here we show that a new dimension in this design space can be exploited through the control of the orientation of anisotropic particles used as building blocks during a direct ink-writing process. Particle orientation control is demonstrated by applying low magnetic fields on deposited inks pre-loaded with magnetized stiff platelets. Multimaterial dispensers and a two-component mixing unit provide additional control over the local composition of the printed material. The five-dimensional design space covered by the proposed multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing platform (MM-3D printing) opens the way towards the manufacturing of functional heterogeneous materials with exquisite microstructural features thus far only accessible by biological materials grown in nature.

  8. Candidate plasma-facing materials for EUV lithography source components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Burtseva, Tatiana; Brooks, Jeff N.; Konkashbaev, Isak K.; Rice, Bryan J.

    2003-06-01

    Material selection and lifetime issues for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are of critical importance to the success of this technology for commercial applications. This paper reviews current trends in production and use of plasma-facing electrodes, insulators, and wall materials for EUV type sources. Ideal candidate materials should be able to: withstand high thermal shock from the short pulsed plasma; withstand high thermal loads without structural failure; reduce debris generation during discharge; and be machined accurately. We reviewed the literature on current and proposed fusion plasma-facing materials as well as current experience with plasma gun and other simulation devices. Both fusion and EUV source materials involve issues of surface erosion by particle sputtering and heat-induced evaporation/melting. These materials are either bare structural materials or surface coatings. EUV materials can be divided into four categories: wall, electrode, optical, and insulator materials. For electric discharge sources, all four types are required, whereas laser-produced plasma EUV sources do not require electrode and insulator materials. Several types of candidate alloy and other materials and methods of manufacture are recommended for each component of EUV lithography light sources.

  9. Properties of nanoclay PVA composites materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. M. Ali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/ Na-rich Montmorillonite (MMT nanocomposites were prepared using solution method to create polymer-clay nanocomposite (PCN material. The PCN material was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD, demonstrating polymer-clay intercalation that has a high d-spacing (lower diffraction angles in the PCN XRD pattern, compared to the pure MMT clay XRD pattern, which has a low d-spacing (high diffraction angles. The nano-scanning electron microscope (NSEM was used to study the morphological image of the PVA, MMT and PCN materials. The results showed that intercalation that took place between the PVA and MMT produced the PCN material. The mechanical properties of the pure PVA and the intercalated polymer material were studied. It was found that the small amount of MMT clay made the tensile modulus and percentage of the total elongation of the nano-composite significantly higher than the pure PVA polymer value, due to polymer-clay intercalation. The thermal stability of the intercalated polymer has been studied using thermal analytical techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The results showed that the PCN material is more thermally stable than the pure PVA polymer.

  10. Composite material systems for hydrogen management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangborn, R. N.; Queeney, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The task of managing hydrogen entry into elevated temperature structural materials employed in turbomachinery is a critical engineering area for propulsion systems employing hydrogen or decomposable hydrocarbons as fuel. Extant structural materials, such as the Inconel series, are embrittled by the ingress of hydrogen in service, leading to a loss of endurance and general deterioration of load-bearing dependability. Although the development of hydrogen-insensitive material systems is an obvious engineering option, to date insensitive systems cannot meet the time-temperature-loading service extremes encountered. A short-term approach that is both feasible and technologically sound is the development and employment of hydrogen barrier coatings. The present project is concerned with developing, analyzing, and physically testing laminate composite hydrogen barrier systems, employing Inconel 718 as the structural material to be protected. Barrier systems will include all metallic, metallic-to-ceramic, and, eventually, metallic/ceramic composites as the lamellae. Since space propulsion implies repetitive engine firings without earth-based inspection and repair, coating durability will be closely examined, and testing regimes will include repetitive thermal cycling to simulate damage accumulation. The target accomplishments include: generation of actual hydrogen permeation data for metallic, ceramic-metallic, and hybrid metallic/ceramic composition barrier systems, practically none of which is currently extant; definition of physical damage modes imported to barrier systems due to thermal cycling, both transient temperature profiles and steady-state thermal mismatch stress states being examined as sources of damage; and computational models that incorporate general laminate schemes as described above, including manufacturing realities such as porosity, and whatever defects are introduced through service and characterized during the experimental programs.

  11. Application of Bruggeman and Maxwell Garnett homogenization formalisms to random composite materials containing dimers

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    The homogenization of a composite material comprising three isotropic dielectric materials was investigated. The component materials were randomly distributed as spherical particles, with the particles of two of the component materials being coupled to form dimers. The Bruggeman and Maxwell Garnett formalisms were developed to estimate the permittivity dyadic of the homogenized composite material (HCM), under the quasi-electrostatic approximation. Both randomly oriented and identically oriented dimers were accommodated; in the former case the HCM is isotropic, whereas in the latter case the HCM is uniaxial. Representative numerical results for composite materials containing dielectric--dielectric dimers demonstrate close agreement between the estimates delivered by the Bruggeman and Maxwell Garnett formalisms. For composite materials containing metal--dielectric dimers with moderate degrees of dissipation, the estimates of the two formalisms are in broad agreement, provided that the dimer volume fractions are...

  12. Development of a knowledge-based system for the design of composite automotive components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Gary P.; Stephens, J. Paul

    1997-01-01

    Composite materials are comprised of two or more constituents possessing significantly different physical properties. Due to their high strength and light weight, there is an emerging trend to utilize composites in the automotive industry. There is an inherent link between component design and the manufacturing processes necessary for fabrication. To many designers, this situation may be intimidating, since there is frequently little available understanding of composites and their processes. A direct results is high rates of product scrap and rework. Thus, there is a need to implement a systematic approach to composite material design. One such approach is quality function deployment (QFD). By translating customer requirements into design parameters, through the use of heuristics, QFD supports the improvement of product quality during the planning stages prior to actual production. The purpose of this research is to automate the use of knowledge pertaining to the design and application of composite materials within the automobile industry. This is being accomplished through the development of a prototype expert system incorporating a QFD approach. It will provide industry designers with access to knowledge of composite materials that might not be otherwise available.

  13. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This division has the purpose of providing a R and D capability for design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs are in support of the Integral Fast Reactor, life extension for light water reactors, fuels development for the new production reactor and research and test reactors, fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology, safe shipment of hazardous materials, fluid mechanics/materials/instrumentation for fossile energy systems, and energy conservation and renewables (including tribology, high- temperature superconductivity). Separate abstracts have been prepared for the data base.

  14. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This division has the purpose of providing a R and D capability for design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs are in support of the Integral Fast Reactor, life extension for light water reactors, fuels development for the new production reactor and research and test reactors, fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology, safe shipment of hazardous materials, fluid mechanics/materials/instrumentation for fossile energy systems, and energy conservation and renewables (including tribology, high- temperature superconductivity). Separate abstracts have been prepared for the data base.

  15. 10 CFR 72.170 - Nonconforming materials, parts, or components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonconforming materials, parts, or components. 72.170 Section 72.170 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS...

  16. Characterization of material composite marble-polyester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corpas, F. A.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we characterize a new material composite, formed with a polyester and crushed white marble mixture. The final purpose is double: to obtain a material for applications sufficiently competitive after an economic viability study, increasing the yield of the main commodity, using waste marble and improving the jobs in the quarries area. From the results obtained, we deduce then that this material could be used to inside and outside adornment.

    En este trabajo, caracterizamos un nuevo material compuesto, formado con una mezcla de poliéster y de mármol blanco triturado. El propósito final es doble: por un lado obtener un material para aplicaciones lo suficientemente competitivas como para que se pueda iniciar un estudio económico de viabilidad, aumentando el rendimiento de la materia prima y mejorando las salidas laborales de las comarcas extractoras. Para la caracterización del material se ha determinado el porcentaje adecuado de poliéster. Así como las propiedades mecánicas (flexión, compresión y dureza, químicas, fatiga térmica y su influencia a la exposición solar In order to characterized of material, we have determined the suitable porcentage of polyester Also we have carried out a study of the mechanical (stretching, resistance to traction, hardeness and thermal fatigue chemicals properties and solar radiation influence. De los resultados obtenidos, este material podría ser utilizado para ornamentación tanto de interior como de exterior.

  17. Combustion synthesis of advanced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS), has been investigated as a means of producing both dense and expanded (foamed) ceramic and ceramic-metal composites, ceramic powders and whiskers. Several model exothermic combustion synthesis reactions were used to establish the importance of certain reaction parameters, e.g., stoichiometry, green density, combustion mode, particle size, etc. on the control of the synthesis reaction, product morphology and properties. The use of an in situ liquid infiltration technique and the effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e., solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g., volatility and thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized composite materials is discussed. Conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment to take advantage of the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport is also examined.

  18. Using independent component analysis for material estimation in hyperspectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chia-Yun; Healey, Glenn

    2004-06-01

    We develop a method for automated material estimation in hyperspectral images. The method models a hyperspectral pixel as a linear mixture of unknown materials. The method is particularly useful for applications in which material regions in a scene are smaller than one pixel. In contrast to many material estimation methods, the new method uses the statistics of large numbers of pixels rather than attempting to identify a small number of the purest pixels. The method is based on maximizing the independence of material abundances at each pixel. We show how independent component analysis algorithms can be adapted for use with this problem. We demonstrate properties of the method by application to airborne hyperspectral data.

  19. Eye lens crystallins: a component of intraocular pseudoexfoliative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veromann, Siiri; Sünter, Alar; Juronen, Erkki; Tasa, Gunnar; Panov, Aleksei

    2004-01-01

    Feeding experimental animals (19 pigs) with surplus sucrose and salt (NaCl) caused cataractous changes in lens tissue and triggered the formation of pseudoexfoliative material on the lens capsule. In the control animals (15 pigs) pseudoexfoliative material was absent. The avidin-biotin complex immunohistochemical method was applied to the pseudoexfoliative material obtained from 15 porcine experimental precataractous lenses and 1 spontaneously cataractous eye and revealed crystallins as a component of the intraocular pseudoexfoliative material. To prevent the development of both intraocular pseudoexfoliative material and crystallin-dependent glaucomatous changes in the trabecular meshwork of the eye, it is important to avoid any cataractogenic insult, including surplus sucrose and salt consumption, causing crystallin leakage from the lens. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Micromechanical models for graded composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, T; Dvorak, G.J.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1997-01-01

    Elastic response of selected plane-array models of graded composite microstructures is examined under both uniform and linearly varying boundary tractions and displacements, by means of detailed finite element studies of large domains containing up to several thousand inclusions. Models consisting...... fields are predicted by Mori-Tanaka estimates. On the other hand, the response of graded materials with a skeletal microstructure in a wide transition zone between clearly defined matrix phases is better approximated by the self-consistent estimates. Certain exceptions are noted for loading by overall...

  1. Mechanics of Composite Materials for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    localization problems. Technical report, January 1987. Report ONR-N00014-86-K-0235/1. [33] Z. P. Bazant and G. Pijauder-Cabot. Nonlocal damage: continuum model...Shephard and Jerry Lin. Dr. Jan L. Teply. and graduate students.R Shah and J. F Wu. contributed to the recent work on plasticity of composite materials...Fracture. 16. 585 (1980). 94. G J Dvorak and E. C. J. Wung. in Strain Localization and Size Effect Due to Cracking and Damage" 0. MJazars and Z. P Bazant

  2. Complete Recycling of Composite Material Comprising Polybutylene Terephthalate and Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Knappich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials comprising plastic and metal parts generate a large amount of waste containing valuable components that are difficult to separate and recycle. We therefore developed an economical solvent-based process for the recovery of costly manufactured composite materials comprising several copper panels over-moulded with a polymeric matrix of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT. We applied the CreaSolv® Process, which uses proprietary formulations with a low risk to user and environment, in order to dissolve the polymer and retain the inert copper. After separating the metal from the solution, solvent recovery was achieved by means of vacuum distillation and melt degassing extrusion. The recovered solvent was collected and recycled while maintaining its original properties. We tested two candidate solvents with PBT, measuring their impact on the molecular weight (Mw and polydispersity of the polymer at different residence times and dissolution temperatures. We found that increasing the temperature-time-load had a negative effect on the Mw. Both solvents we tested were able to dissolve the polymeric matrix within 30 min and with moderate energy consumption. Furthermore, we found that the exclusion of oxygen during dissolution significantly increases the quality of the recovered polymer and metal. We transferred the process from the laboratory scale to the small-technical scale and produced material for large analytical and mechanical quality evaluation, revealing no decline in the polymer quality by blending with new plastic. The recovered copper met virgin material properties. Therefore, both components of the original composite material have been recovered in a form suitable for reuse.

  3. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.); M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar (Southwest Research Institute)

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  4. ACOUSTIC EMISSION MODEL WITH THERMOACTIVATIVE DESTRUCTION OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Filonenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of acoustic emission energy during the composite material machining for termoactivativemodel of acoustic radiation is simulated. The regularities of resultant signals energy parameters change dependingon composite materials machining speed are determined. Obtained regularities with their statistical characteristicsare described. Sensitivity of acoustic emission energy parameters to the change of composite material machiningspeed is shown.

  5. THE EOSINOPHILIC MATERIAL IN ADENOMATOID ODONTOGENIC TUMOR ASSOCIATED WITH AMYLOID PROTEIN COMPONENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Bao-ping; LI Yong-mei; Haruo Okabe

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relation between eosinophilic materials and amyloid P (AP) component in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT). Methods: The expression of amyloid proteins and basement membrane proteins, including type Ⅳ collagen, laminin and heparin sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), in AOT were analyzed by immunohistochemical method. Results:Most eosinophilic droplets among tumor cells and some epithelial cells showed positive stain for AP component.The immunoreactions of type Ⅳ collagen and laminin were only found in blood vessels of this tumor. The tumor cells and eosinophilic materials in duct-like structures were constantly unstained for both amyloid and basement membrane proteins. Present results suggest that the nature and composition of eosinophilic droplets may differ from the eosinophilic layer in ductlike structures. This study first demonstrated that the amyloid-like deposition in AOT is associated with AP component by immunohistochemical method. It supported that AP component may be epithelial origin since the AP immunolocalization was found in tumor cells.

  6. Phase selection rules for complex multi-component alloys with equiatomic or close-to-equiatomic compositions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Sheng; LIU Chain T.

    2013-01-01

    Alloying greatly expands the amount of available materials beyond the naturally existing ones,and more importantly offers the material scientists opportunities to initiatively control the composition-structure-property relationship in materials.Since commonly used metallic materials are mostly multi-component alloys,the know-how of alloying through compositional control,certainly plays a critical role in designing materials with desired structure and properties.However,alloying in multi-component alloys is an extremely complicated issue,as the alloyed products could be the amorphous phase,various solid solutions and intermetallic compounds containing two or more alloy components.By narrowing down the scope of the multi-component alloys to those with equiatomic or close-to-equiatomic compositions only,and also aiming at framing out the rules that govern the phase selection upon alloying in multi-component alloys in a broad sense,we have identified here a simple and easily executable two-parameter scheme that can effectively predict the formation of the amorphous phase,solid solutions and intermetallic compounds,in multi-component alloys,simply from the given alloy compositions.We believe this scheme reveals a clear physical scenario governing the phase selection in multi-component alloys,helps to simplify the alloy design,and benefits the future development of advanced metallic alloys like bulk metallic glasses and high entropy alloys.

  7. Piezoelectric Nanoparticle-Polymer Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, William Ray

    Herein we demonstrate that efficient piezoelectric nanoparticle-polymer composite materials can be synthesized and fabricated into complex microstructures using sugar-templating methods or optical printing techniques. Stretchable foams with excellent tunable piezoelectric properties are created by incorporating sugar grains directly into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixtures containing barium titanate (BaTiO3 -- BTO) nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by removal of the sugar after polymer curing. Porosities and elasticity are tuned by simply adjusting the sugar/polymer mass ratio and the electrical performance of the foams showed a direct relationship between porosity and the piezoelectric outputs. User defined 2D and 3D optically printed piezoelectric microstructures are also fabricated by incorporating BTO nanoparticles into photoliable polymer solutions such as polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and exposing to digital optical masks that can be dynamically altered. Mechanical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of the optically printed composite is enhanced by chemically altering the surface of the BTO nanoparticles with acrylate groups which form direct covalent linkages with the polymer matrix under light exposure. Both of these novel materials should find exciting uses in a variety of applications including energy scavenging platforms, nano- and microelectromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS), sensors, and acoustic actuators.

  8. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  9. Mixed-material coating formation on plasma-facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, R. P.; Grossman, A. A.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Sze, F. C.; Whyte, D. G.

    When any plasma confinement device is fabricated from more than a single material which can come into contact with either particle or heat flux, there is the potential for migration of one of these materials to the locations of other materials. This combination of materials, or mixed materials, can have substantially different properties than either of the original materials. The PISCES-B linear plasma device is examining the formation conditions and properties of mixed-material surface layers which can form on plasma-facing components. The PISCES-B device has been modified to incorporate an impurity gas (CD 4, CO, O 2, etc.) puffing system in the target interaction region. It is, therefore, possible to control the fraction of impurities in the incident plasma and to perform systematic tests on the conditions necessary to form mixed-materials surface layers. The concentration of the species in the plasma column is measured spectroscopically, as well as by a residual gas monitor on the vacuum chamber. Measurements of the rate of growth of the thickness of the mixed material layer are performed. A simple erosion model can adequately describe the growth rate of the mixed-material layer and may allow for growth rate predictions in other plasma environments. It is also important to investigate the role of redeposition of metallic impurities in the formation of mixed material layers. A beryllium evaporator has been independently installed upstream of the target-interaction region to allow seeding of the incident plasma with beryllium. The presence of beryllium on the sample surface is observed to reduce the chemical erosion of the graphite by more than the reduction of the surface carbon concentration. And finally, the hydrogen isotope retention properties of carbon-containing layers on beryllium could have serious implications for tritium accumulation in ITER.

  10. On the microstructural information of the short-lived positron lifetime component in polymer metallic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT-UN Centro (Argentina); Somoza, A. [IFIMAT-UN Centro (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Tandil (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LPMPyMC, Dept. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nacional de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Univ. (Argentina); Dept. de Materiales, CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rubiolo, G. [LPMPyMC, Dept. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nacional de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Univ. (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Marzocca, A. [LPMPyMC, Dept. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nacional de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Univ. (Argentina); Consolati, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-16

    Composite materials made of a polymer matrix and rigid particles normally display important residual internal stresses produced during the fabrication process. In fact, this phenomenon is a consequence of the differences in the thermal expansion characteristics between both phases. The presence of these internal stresses in the compound has a strong influence on the mechanical behavior of the material and depends on the cure process, filler type, shape, content and dispersion. The internal stresses in the composite with aluminum filler charge were recently evaluated by the authors using mechanical test and positron lifetime spectroscopy. The aim of the present note is to go deeper into the interpretation of the above mentioned data, in particular on the microstructural information that it is possible to extract from the short-lived positron lifetime component. Besides, new experimental evidences on the influence of the different metallic charges on the mechanical properties of an epoxy resin composite are given. (orig.)

  11. Materials Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRC's Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  12. Material Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRCs Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  13. Determination of Residual Stress in Composite Materials Using Ultrasonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhlin, S. I.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of high temperature composites can be significantly affected by the presence of residual stresses. These stresses arise during cooling processes from fabrication to room temperature due to mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between matrix and fiber materials. This effect is especially pronounced in metal matrix and intermetallic composites. It can lead to plastic deformations, matrix cracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding. In this work the feasibility of ultrasonic techniques for residual stress assessment in composites is addressed. A novel technique for absolute stress determination in orthotropic materials from angular dependencies of ultrasonic velocities is described. The technique is applicable for determination of both applied and residual stresses and does not require calibration measurements on a reference sample. The important advantage of this method is that stress is determined simultaneously with stress-dependent elastic constants and is thus decoupled from the material texture. It is demonstrated that when the principal plane stress directions coincide with acoustical axes, the angular velocity data in the plane perpendicular to the stress plane may be used to determine both stress components. When the stress is off the acoustical axes, the shear and the difference of the normal stress components may be determined from the angular dependence of group velocities in the plane of stresses. Synthetic sets of experimental data corresponding to materials with different anisotropy and stress levels are used to check the applicability of the technique. The method is also verified experimentally. A high precision ultrasonic wave transmission technique is developed to measure angular dependence of ultrasonic velocities. Examples of stress determination from experimental velocity data are given. A method is presented for determination of velocities of ultrasonic waves propagating through the composite material with residual

  14. Composite materials from new textile technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez, M. A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes in a general way the most important of the advanced textile technologies which are oriented to the manufacturing of organic matrix composite materials, the paper presents their applications and the possibilities of future development. The use of these advanced weaving techniques allows the production of near-net-shaped preforms, which results in important savings in processing costs; moreover, these textile processes offer the possibility of introducing out-of plane reinforcing fibres, so there is an important increment of the impact strength and the damage tolerance of the final material.

    En el presente artículo se describen, de forma genérica, las más importantes de las tejedurías avanzadas destinadas a la fabricación de materiales compuestos de matriz orgánica, presentándose sus aplicaciones y futuras posibilidades de desarrollo. La utilización de estos procesos de tejeduría avanzados permite la elaboración de preformas cercanas a la forma final de la pieza, lo que se traduce en importantes reducciones en los costes de fabricación; además, estos procesos textiles ofrecen la posibilidad de introducir fibras de refuerzo fuera del plano, aumentando de forma considerable la resistencia a impacto y la tolerancia al daño del material final.

  15. The carbon components in SNC meteorites of feldspathic harzburgite composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Two meteorites collected in Antarctica, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516, have characteristics which link them to the shergottite group of SNC meteorites. Essentially, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 are feldspathic harzburgites, being comprised of roughly equal quantities of olivine and pyroxene, with an additional few percent of feldspar which has subsequently been converted to maskelynite by shock. The meteorites represent samples of a cumulate rock which is itself composed of two different lithologies: in one, large pyroxenes poikilitically enclose olivine crystals, while the other consists of interstitial areas made up of pyroxene, olivine, maskelynite, whitlockite, troilite, ilmenite and chlorapatite. It has been proposed that meteorites such as ALH A77005 (and LEW 88516) are relict samples of the source peridotite from which the other shergottites formed. As such it should be informative to study in detail the carbon components present within these samples, in order to make comparisons with data from other shergottites. Although not plutonic in origin, and therefore not sampling a truly deep source, analyses of ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 should assist with attempts to define the bulk carbon isotopic composition of Mars. This has been assessed previously through analyses of carbon of presumed magmatic origin in other SNC meteorites, but the carbon isotopic compositions obtained seem to be at variance with what might be expected. It is important to constrain the carbon isotopic composition of Mars as well as possible so that models of atmospheric evolution, based on carbon isotopic data, can yield the most reliable results.

  16. STUDY AND FABRICATION OF SOYBEAN- KEVLAR HYBRID COMPOSITE MATERIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Dilip M R*, Dr. B R Narendra Babu

    2016-01-01

    The prerequisite for most outstanding and normal composite materials to be delivered or recognized, having eco-pleasing ascribes and have ability to acclimate to trademark changes happening on regular calendar, has passed on individuals to find new sources and variety of composite materials to be made. At the present age, trademark fiber composites having near properties, from renewable normal resources expect a vital part in course of action of composite material when diverged from man-made ...

  17. The chemical effects of the Martian environment on power system component materials: A theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    In the foreseeable future, an expedition may be undertaken to explore the planet Mars. Some of the power source options being considered for such a mission are photovoltaics, regenerative fuel cells and nuclear reactors. In addition to electrical power requirements, environmental conditions en route to Mars, in the planetary orbit and on the Martian surface must be simulated and studied in order to anticipate and solve potential problems. Space power systems components such as photovoltaic arrays, radiators, and solar concentrators may be vulnerable to degradation in the Martian environment. Natural characteristics of Mars which may pose a threat to surface power systems include high velocity winds, dust, ultraviolet radiation, large daily variation in temperature, reaction to components of the soil, atmosphere and atmospheric condensates as well as synergistic combinations. Most of the current knowledge of the characteristics of the Martian atmosphere and soil composition was obtained from the Viking 1 and 2 missions in 1976. A theoretical study is presented which was used to assess the effects of the Martian atmospheric conditions on the power systems components. A computer program written at NASA-Lewis for combustion research that uses a free energy minimization technique was used to calculate chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states of temperature and pressure. The power system component materials selected for this study include: silicon dioxide, silicon, carbon, copper, and titanium. Combinations of environments and materials considered include: (1) Mars atmosphere with power surface material, (2) Mars atmosphere and dust component with power surface material, and (3) Mars atmosphere and hydrogen peroxide or superoxide or superoxide with power system material. The chemical equilibrium calculations were performed at a composition ratio (oxidant to reactant) of 100. The temperature for the silicon dioxide material and silicon, which simulate

  18. Materials and electromagnetism. The modeling of composite materials; Materiaux en electromagnetisme. Modelisation des materiaux composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priou, A. [Institut Universitaire de Technologie, 92 - Ville-d' Avray (France)

    1999-01-01

    Maxwell laws are briefly described and the different types of electromagnetic materials are presented. Composite materials are made up of at least 2 phases: a host phase and an inclusion. The inclusion is a discontinuous phase coming from a conducting material (metal, carbon based material, semi-conductor, solid electrolytes or conducting polymers) and is spread within the host phase either in an aleatory or organized way. The modeling of such media can be made by 3 different approaches. In the multi-diffusion approach, the size of the particles enclosed in the host material and their mutual interactions are taken into account. The quasi-static approach allows the definition of an equivalent medium in order to describe percolation phenomena. The approach based on cluster theory gives a complete mathematical description of composite materials. The modeling of dielectric-conducting multilayer is also presented. The last part of the article is dedicated to the characteristics and applications of chiral media and of last generation electromagnetic materials. (A.C.)

  19. The Cost of Automotive Polymer Composites: A Review and Assessment of DOE's Lightweight Materials Composites Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.

    2001-01-26

    Polymer composite materials have been a part of the automotive industry for several decades, with early application in the 1953 Corvette. These materials have been used for applications with low production volumes, because of their shortened lead times and lower investment costs relative to conventional steel fabrication. Important drivers of the growth of polymer composites have been the reduced weight and parts consolidation opportunities the material offers, as well as design flexibility, corrosion resistance, material anisotropy, and mechanical properties. Although these benefits are well recognized by the industry, polymer composite use has been dampened by high material costs, slow production rates, and to a lesser extent, concerns about recyclability. Also impeding large scale automotive applications is a curious mixture of concerns about material issues such as crash energy absorption, recycling challenges, competitive and cost pressures, the industry's general lack of experience and comfort with the material, and industry concerns about its own capabilities (Flynn and Belzowski 1995). Polymer composite materials are generally made of two or more material components--fibers, either glass or carbon, reinforced in the matrix of thermoset or thermoplastic polymer materials. The glass-reinforced thermoset composites are the most commonly used composite in automotive applications today, but thermoplastic composites and carbon fiber-reinforced thermosets also hold potential. It has been estimated that significant use of glass-reinforced polymers as structural components could yield a 20-35% reduction in vehicle weight. More importantly, the use of carbon fiber-reinforced materials could yield a 40-65% reduction in weight.

  20. Materials Assessment of Components of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivas, John D.; Barrera, Enrique V.

    1996-01-01

    Current research interests for Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) design and development are directed toward enhancements of the Shuttle EMU, implementation of the Mark 3 technology for Shuttle applications, and development of a next generation suit (the X suit) which has applications for prolonged space flight, longer extravehicular activity (EVA), and Moon and Mars missions. In this research project two principal components of the EMU were studied from the vantage point of the materials and their design criteria. An investigation of the flexible materials which make up the lay-up of materials for abrasion and tear protection, thermal insulation, pressure restrain, etc. was initiated. A central focus was on the thermal insulation. A vacuum apparatus for measuring the flexibility of the materials was built to access their durability in vacuum. Plans are to include a Residual Gas Analyzer on the vacuum chamber to measure volatiles during the durability testing. These tests will more accurately simulate space conditions and provide information which has not been available on the materials currently used on the EMU. Durability testing of the aluminized mylar with a nylon scrim showed that the material strength varied in the machine and transverse directions. Study of components of the EMU also included a study of the EMU Bearing Assemblies as to materials selection, engineered materials, use of coatings and flammability issues. A comprehensive analysis of the performance of the current design, which is a stainless steel assembly, was conducted and use of titanium alloys or engineered alloy systems and coatings was investigated. The friction and wear properties are of interest as are the general manufacturing costs. Recognizing that the bearing assembly is subject to an oxygen environment, all currently used materials as well as titanium and engineered alloys were evaluated as to their flammability. An aim of the project is to provide weight reduction since bearing

  1. Development of Processable High-Temperature Resins for Composite Materials (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-29

    strength, high temperature polymer matrix composite materials. Despite the increased attention, successful development and utilization of many of...polymers with a high degree of cure. Since polymer matrix composite components are often mated with metallic parts in a variety of structures

  2. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a ‘fracture safe design’ is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242293

  3. Tissue response to the components of a hydroxyapatite-coated composite femoral implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, S A; Pauyo, T; Lim, L; Legoux, J G; Bureau, M N

    2010-09-01

    Bone loss around femoral implants used for THA is a persistent clinical concern. It may be caused by stress shielding, generally attributed to a mismatch in stiffness between the implants and host bone. In this regard, a fatigue resistant, carbon fiber (CF) composite femoral implant with bone-matching stiffness has been developed. This study evaluated the tissue response to the three material components of this implant in normal and textured (blasted with 24 grit alumina) surfaces: the hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, the CF composite and the intermediate crystalline HA particulate composite layer to bond to the HA coating (blended). Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral femoral implantation each receiving two rod-like implants. Bone apposition to the HA (37%) and textured Ti (41%) implants was not significantly different. Bone apposition to the untextured CF (14%) and blended (19%) implants and polished Ti (8%) implants was significantly lower. Bone apposition to the textured CF (9%) and blended (11%) implants was lower (but not statistically from the as received or untextured counterparts). Nearly all sections from femurs containing CF implants presented CF debris. There was no evidence of localized bone loss or any strong immune response associated with any of the implant materials. All materials were well tolerated with minimal inflammation despite the presence of particulate debris. The high degree of bone apposition to the HA-coated composite implants and the lack of short-term inflammation and adverse tissue response to the three material implant component support continued evaluation of this composite technology for use in THA.

  4. On the machinability of composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprino, G.; De Iorio, I.; Santo, L.; Nele, L. [Univ. of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Orthogonal cutting tests were carried out on a unidirectional Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP), a unidirectional Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP), and a Sheet Moulding Compound (SMC) R50, using high speed steel tools. The force data were interpreted in the light of the usual force scheme adopted in metal cutting, disregarding the forces developing at the tool flank. It was found that, similarly to metals, the unit cutting force depends on the depth of cut t, decreasing with increasing the latter (size effect). The same trend was followed by the coefficient of friction. A new force scheme, previously proposed for composites, together with a different definition of {open_quotes}specific energy{close_quotes}, was then applied. Irrespective of the material considered, the new model results in a coefficient of friction independent of the cutting parameters, and in a specific energy X unaffected by the depth of cut. Nevertheless, X strongly decreases with increasing the rake angle, following different trends for CFRP and GFRP. Amongst the materials tested, the poorest machinability pertains to SMC.

  5. Radiation Specifications for Fission Power Conversion Component Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Shin, E. Eugene; Mireles, Omar R.; Radel, Ross F.; Qualls, A. Louis

    2011-01-01

    NASA has been supporting design studies and technology development that could provide power to an outpost on the moon, Mars, or an asteroid. One power-generation system that is independent of sunlight or power-storage limitations is a fission-based power plant. There is a wealth of terrestrial system heritage that can be transferred to the design and fabrication of a fission power system for space missions, but there are certain design aspects that require qualification. The radiation tolerance of the power conversion system requires scrutiny because the compact nature of a space power plant restricts the dose reduction methodologies compared to those used in terrestrial systems. An integrated research program has been conducted to establish the radiation tolerance of power conversion system-component materials. The radiation limit specifications proposed for a Fission Power System power convertor is 10 Mrad ionizing dose and 5 x 10(exp 14) neutron per square centimeter fluence for a convertor operating at 150 C. Specific component materials and their radiation tolerances are discussed. This assessment is for the power convertor hardware; electronic components are not covered here.

  6. Acoustic Emission During Tensile Testing of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Začal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with possibilities of acoustic emission method utilization as an online surveillance tool for improvement of identification of structural damage onset in composite materials. With employment of AE method we are able to localize the degraded areas in stressed components and subsequently estimate the extent of degradation. In experimental part the piezoelectric sensor was employed for continuous record of emission signals, continuous processing and analysis of measured data and monitoring of stressed material feedback on applied mechanical load in real time. Partial results from distinctive areas of conducted research were implemented in this method, especially detection of emission signals and analysis of recorded signals in both frequency and temporal zones. Samples were reinforcement of 6 layers aramide-carbon weave 0/90° of specific mass 180 g/m2. In total 7 samples were tested in monoaxial tension on universal testing apparatus ZDM 5/51 with acoustic emission measurement recording in course of testing.

  7. Lectures on Composite Materials for Aircraft Structures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    lectures are related to structural applications of composites . In Lecture 7, the basic theory that is needed for composite structural analysis is...which composites have been taken up for aeronautical applications. Several specific applications of composites in aircraft structures am described in

  8. APPLICATION OF THE UNIFIED STATISTICAL MATERIAL DATABASE FOR DESIGN AND LIFE/RISK ASSESSMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE COMPONENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Fujiyama; T.Fujiwara; Y.Nakatani; K.Saito; A.Sakuma; Y.Akikuni; S.Hayashi; S.Matsumoto

    2004-01-01

    Statistical manipulation of material data was conducted for probabilistic life assessment or risk-based design and maintenance for high temperature components of power plants. To obtain the statistical distribution of material properties, dominant parameters affecting material properties are introduced into normalization of statistical variables. Those parameters are hardness, chemical composition, characteristic microstructural features and so on. Creep and fatigue properties are expressed by normalized parameters and the unified statistical distributions are obtained. These probability distribution functions show good coincidence statistically with the field database of steam turbine components. It was concluded that the unified statistical baseline approach is useful for the risk management of components in power plants.

  9. Glass matrix composite material prepared with waste foundry sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Zhao-shu

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The technology of glass matrix of the composite material manufactured through a sintering process and using waste foundry sand and waste glass as the main raw materials was studied. The effects of technological factors on the performance of this material were studied. The results showed that this composite material is formed with glass as matrix, core particulate as strengthening material, it has the performance of glass and ceramics, and could be used to substitute for stone.

  10. Glass matrix composite material prepared with waste foundry sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhao-shu; XIA Ju-pei; ZHU Xiao-qin; LIU Fan; HE Mao-yun

    2006-01-01

    The technology of glass matrix of the composite material manufactured through a sintering process and using waste foundry sand and waste glass as the main raw materials was studied. The effects of technological factors on the performance of this material were studied. The results showed that this composite material is formed with glass as matrix, core particulate as strengthening material, it has the performance of glass and ceramics, and could be used to substitute for stone.

  11. Drying and wetting of building materials and components

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book, Drying and Wetting of Building Materials and Components, provides a collection of recent contributions in the field of drying and wetting in porous building materials. The main benefit of the book is that it discusses some of the most important topics related to the drying and wetting processes, namely, innovations and trends in drying science and technology, drying mechanism and theory, equipment, advanced modelling, complex simulation and experimentation. At the same time, these topics will be going to the encounter of a variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. The book is divided in several chapters that intend to be a resume of the current state of knowledge for benefit of professional colleagues.

  12. Advanced materials for critical components in industrial gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, T.B. (Div. of Materials Metrology, National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom))

    1992-06-01

    Combined-cycle plant for power production has advantages in terms of capital costs and flexibility compared to large power plants either nuclear of fossil-fired, used for base load. In combined-cycle plant the overall efficiency is highly dependent on the performance of the gas turbine and turbine entry temperatures of > 1200deg C will be required to obtain attractive levels of efficiency. Bearing in mind the need for reliability and longterm performance from components such as turbine blades, the challenge to the materials enginer is formidable. In this paper some of the recent developments in Ni - Cr-base alloys are described and the potential for advanced materials such as ceramics and intermetallics is briefly considered. Development in coating technology to provide effective thermal barriers and good resistance to aggressive environments are discussed. (orig./MM).

  13. Design and Fabrication of Photonic Crystal Materials and Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpøth, Anders

    2005-01-01

    in the deposited silicon films and to open for a potential use with photonic crystals. In relation to photonic crystal structures, different properties have been investigated by using modelling tools such as the plane wave expansion method and the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. Furthermore different......The work described in this thesis covers the issues of producing materials for use as base material for fabricating photonic crystals and the design, fabrication and characterization of photonic crystal components. One of the aims is to investigate the possibilities of fabricating a silicon...... is in principle rather straightforward and benefits from being much cheaper compared to acquiring commercially available SOI substrates. Different issues as deposition temperature, surface roughness, crystallization, and silicon waveguide geometries have been investigated in order to reduce the optical loss...

  14. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA airworthiness certification for ceramic matrix composite components in civil aircraft systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonczy Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs are being designed and developed for engine and exhaust components in commercial aviation, because they offer higher temperature capabilities, weight savings, and improved durability compared to metals. The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA issues and enforces regulations and minimum standards covering the safe manufacture, operation, and maintenance of civil aircraft. As new materials, these ceramic composite components will have to meet the certification regulations of the FAA for “airworthiness”. The FAA certification process is defined in the Federal Aviation Regulations (Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, FAA policy statements, orders, advisory circulars, technical standard orders, and FAA airworthiness directives. These regulations and documents provide the fundamental requirements and guidelines for design, testing, manufacture, quality assurance, registration, operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair of aircraft systems and parts. For metallic parts in aircraft, the FAA certification and compliance process is well-established for type and airworthiness certification, using ASTM and SAE standards, the MMPDS data handbook, and FAA advisory circulars. In a similar manner for polymer matrix composites (PMC, the PMC industry and the FAA have jointly developed and are refining parallel guidelines for polymer matrix composites (PMCs, using guidance in FAA circulars and the CMH-17 PMC handbook. These documents discuss design methods and codes, material testing, property data development, life/durability assessment, production processes, QA procedures, inspection methods, operational limits, and repairs for PMCs. For ceramic composites, the FAA and the CMC and aerospace community are working together (primarily through the CMH-17 CMC handbook to define and codify key design, production, and regulatory issues that have to be addressed in the certification of CMC components in

  15. Broadband electromagnetic charaterization of materials for accelerator components

    CERN Document Server

    De Michele, G; Grudiev, A; Metral, E; Pieloni, T; Rumolo, G

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) characterization of materials up to high frequencies is a major requirement for the correct modeling of many accelerator components: collimators, kickers, high order modes damping devices for accelerating cavities. In this scenario, the coaxial line method has gained much importance compared to other methods because of its applicability in a wide range of frequencies. In this paper we describe a new coaxial line method that allows using only one measurement setup to characterize the material in a range of frequency from few MHz up to several GHz. A coaxial cable fed at one side is filled with the material under test and closed on a known load on the other side. The properties of the material are obtained from the measured reflection coefficient by using it as input for a transmission line (TL) model, which describes the measurements setup. In addition, 3-D electromagnetic simulations have been performed to correct for the differences between the real geometry and the simplified TL model. ...

  16. Quasimolecular Dynamic Simulation for Bending Fracture of Laminar Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recently, quasimolecular dynamics has been successfully used to simulate the deformation characteristics of actual size solid materials. In quasimolecular dynamics, which is an attempt to bridge the gap between atomistic and continuum simulations, molecules are aggregated into large units, called quasimolecules, to evaluate large scale material behavior. In this paper, a 2-dimensional numerical simulation using quasimolecular dynamics was performed to investigate laminar composite material fractures and crack propagation behavior in the uniform bending of laminar composite materials. It was verified that under bending deformation laminar composite materials deform quite differently from homogeneous materials

  17. In vitro toxicity of filler particles and methacrylates used in dental composite materials. Cytokine release and cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Ansteinsson, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    Dental polymer-based composite materials are complex materials consisting of several components, the main components being filler particles (inorganic component) and polymer matrix (organic component). The organic component consists of monomers that usually are polymerized upon activation by visible light illumination.The polymerization process is never complete, and leakage of unreacted methacrylate monomers occurs during clinical service. Degradation processes may weaken the bon...

  18. Continuation of tailored composite structures of ordered staple thermoplastic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santare, Michael H.; Pipes, R. Byron

    1992-01-01

    The search for the cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising approaches is the conversion of a planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. A framework was established which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. Predictions for the effective viscosities of a hyper-anisotropic medium consisting of collimated, discontinuous fibers suspended in viscous matrix were extended to capture the characteristics of typical polymers including non-Newtonian behavior and temperature dependence. In addition, the influence of fiber misorientation was also modeled by compliance averaging to determine ensemble properties for a given orientation distribution. A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams such as those used in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during manufacturing processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing radial and tangential gradients in material properties. Two analysis procedures are used to solve the beam problems. The first method uses separate two-dimensional elasticity solutions for the stresses in the flange and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring that forces and displacements match section boundaries. The second method uses an approximate Rayleigh-Ritz technique to find the solutions for more complex beams. Analyses

  19. Test Methods for Measuring Material Properties of Composite Materials in all Three Material Axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    conducted using ASTM D 6641/D 6641M “Standard Test Method for Determining the Compressive Properties of Polymer Matrix Composite Laminates Using a Combined...D 7291/D 7291M “Standard Test Method for Through-Thickness “Flatwise” Tensile Strength and Elastic Modulus of a Fiber- Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Material...34Flatwise" Tensile Strength and Elastic Modulus of a Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Material”. West Conshohocken, PA, 2005, DOI: 10.1520/D7291

  20. Effects of leached components from a hybrid resin composite on the reproductive system of male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Akbari Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: There is concern that leached components from dental composites may cause adverse changes in the reproductive health. This study aimed to assess the effects of leached components from a hybrid resin composite on the reproductive system of male mice.Materials and Methods: In the present animal study, twenty adult Syrian male mice were divided into two groups of 10 mice each. In the test group, components which leached from samples made from Filtek Z250 resin composite into 75% ethanol were daily administered to the mice for 28 days. In the control group, the procedure was repeated in the same way as the test group but without placing composite samples in the solution. Then, the body weight, weights of paired testes, Gonado Somatic Index, sperm viability, sperm motility, epididymal sperm reserve and daily sperm production were recorded. Four male mice in each group were mated with untreated female mice for 10 days. After that, the number of pregnant females and number of infants were recorded. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, Chi-square test and t-test.Results: There was a significant reduction in the sperm viability and sperm motility of male mice in the test group compared to the control group (P=0.001. There was no any significant differences in other parameters between two groups (P>0.05.Conclusion: This study showed that the leached components from resin composites cannot cause infertility but they could potentially cause some adverse effects on the reproductive system of male mice.

  1. 10 CFR 71.117 - Identification and control of materials, parts, and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the identification and control of materials, parts, and components. These measures must assure that... or defective materials, parts, and components. ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification and control of materials, parts, and...

  2. Non-Catalytic Self Healing Composite Material Solution Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fiber reinforce polymer (FRP) composite materials are seeing increasing use in the construction of a wide variety of aerospace structures. However, uncertainties...

  3. Composite materials of glass fiber. Los materiales compuestos de fibra de vidrio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antequera, P.; Jimenez, L.; Miravete, A.

    1991-01-01

    This book analyzes the composite materials of glass fiber. The main aspect are: matrix materials, fabrication process, composite materials properties. Design, analysis, quality control, material testing and applications.

  4. Present and Future Automotive Composite Materials Research Efforts at DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, C.D.

    1999-07-03

    Automobiles of the future will be forced to travel fi.uther on a tank of fuel while discharging lower levels of pollutants. Currently, the United States uses in excess of 16.4 million barrels of petroleum per day. Sixty-six percent of that petroleum is used in the transportation of people and goods. Automobiles currently account for just under two-thirds of the nation's gasoline consumptio~ and about one-third of the total United States energy usage. [1] By improving transportation related fiel efficiency, the United States can lessen the impact that emissions have on our environment and provide a cleaner environment for fiture generations. In 1992, The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Transportation Materials completed a comprehensive program plan entitled, The Lightweight MateriaIs (LWko Multi-Year Program Plan, for the development of technologies aimed at reducing vehicle mass [2]. This plan was followed in 1997 by the more comprehensive Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan titled, Energy Eficient Vehicles for a Cleaner Environment [3] which outlines the department's plans for developing more efficient vehicles during the next ~een years. Both plans identi~ potential applications, technology needs, and R&D priorities. The goal of the Lightweight Materials Program is to develop materials and primary processing methods for the fabrication of lighter weight components which can be incorporated into automotive systems. These technologies are intended to reduce vehicle weight, increase fuel efficiency and decrease emissions. The Lightweight Materials program is jointly managed by the Department of Energy(DOE) and the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP). Composite materiak program work is coordinated by cooperative research efforts between the DOE and the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC).

  5. Dual energy CT inspection of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite combined with metal components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Vavrik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the inspection of carbon fibre reinforced plastic composites (CFRP combined with metal components. It is well known that the high absorption of metallic parts degrades the quality of radiographic measurements (contrast and causes typical metal artefacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT reconstruction. It will be shown that these problems can be successfully solved utilizing the dual energy CT method (DECT, which is typically used for the material decomposition of complex objects. In other words, DECT can help differentiate object components with a similar overall attenuation or visualise low attenuation components that are next to high attenuation ones. The application of DECT to analyse honeycomb sandwich panels and CFRP parts joined with metal fasteners will be presented in the article.

  6. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eberle, Cliff C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pastore, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sudbury, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartman, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  7. Designing with an underdeveloped computational composite for materials experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barati, B.; Karana, E.; Hekkert, P.P.M.; Jönsthövel, I.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the urge for multidisciplinary development of computational composites, designers and material scientists are increasingly involved in collaborative projects to valorize these technology-push materials in the early stages of their development. To further develop the computational

  8. Present and future value of dental composite materials and sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogon, I L

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews the development, composition, chemistry, recent technological advances, and extent of use of composite resin restorative materials, adhesives, and pit and fissure sealants. The problems related to the clinical behavior of these materials in the oral environment are dealt with, and methods of minimizing their present deficiencies are suggested. Future directions that might be taken to improve these materials and solve some of the inadequacies that these materials exhibit are also discussed.

  9. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gobbato, Maurizio [UCSD; Conte, Joel [UCSD; Kosmatke, John [UCSD; Oliver, Joseph A [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  10. Preparation and characterization of a composite membrane based on the asphaltene component of coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Liying; Qin Zhihong; Li Xinyan; Chen Juan; Liu Peng; Wang Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    Asphaltene-ceramic composite membranes were fabricated from ceramic supports and an asphaltene component,which was obtained from the separation of coal to give a kind of new carbonaceous precursor material.Using SEM and thermogravimetric analysis to measure the microstructure and properties of the asphaltene component allowed the porosity,permeability,and retention ratios to be determined.The results show that the asphaltene component can be regarded as a good carbon membrane precursor material because of its high carbon content and strong bonding capacity.When ceramic supports are impregnated with asphaltene colloid the asphaltene easily combines with the support surface and forms a good carbonaceous film after carbonization.Little of the asphaltene component permeates into the internal pores of the ceramic support.Although the number of coats applied to the substrate had little affect on the porosity of the asphaltene-ceramic composite membranes the permeability varied depending upon the number of times the substrate was treated.The way bubbles escape from the film.and the phenomenon of coalescence,as affected by different film thicknesses also seem closely related to the number of coats.A composite membrane carbonized at a final temperature of 600 ℃ is relatively dense and the permeability of Fe(OH)3 colloid through it is very low.A membrane fired at 800 ℃ is porous and its permeability and retention of Fe(OH)3 colloid are 88 L/(m2 h MPa) and 85.3%,respectively when the trans-membrane pressure is 0.22 MPa.

  11. Imitation model of destruction of aviation fibrous polymeric composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Синеглазов

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered are models imitating influence of lighting on dielectric construction materials with elements of lighting protection. Described are models of current spreading in multilayer materials and thermal destruction of fibrous polymeric composite materials caused by lighting current flowing on such materials

  12. Improved Damage Resistant Composite Materials Incorporating Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Jeffrey S. N.; Rogers, Craig A.

    1996-01-01

    Metallic shape memory alloys (SMA) such as nitinol have unique shape recovery behavior and mechanical properties associated with a material phase change that have been used in a variety of sensing and actuation applications. Recent studies have shown that integrating nitinol-SMA actuators into composite materials increases the composite material's functionality. Hybrid composites of conventional graphite/epoxy or glass/epoxy and nitinol-SMA elements can perform functions in applications where monolithic composites perform inadequately. One such application is the use of hybrid composites to function both in load bearing and armor capacities. While monolithic composites with high strength-to-weight ratios function efficiently as loadbearing structures, because of their brittle nature, impact loading can cause significant catastrophic damage. Initial composite failure modes such as delamination and matrix cracking dissipate some impact energy, but when stress exceeds the composite's ultimate strength, fiber fracture and material perforation become dominant. One of the few methods that has been developed to reduce material perforation is hybridizing polymer matrix composites with tough kevlar or high modulus polyethynylene plies. The tough fibers increase the impact resistance and the stiffer and stronger graphite fibers carry the majority of the load. Similarly, by adding nitinol-SMA elements that absorb impact energy through the stress-induced martensitic phase transformation, the composites' impact perforation resistance can be greatly enhanced. The results of drop-weight and high velocity gas-gun impact testing of various composite materials will be presented. The results demonstrate that hybridizing composites with nitinol-SMA elements significantly increases perforation resistance compared to other traditional toughening elements. Inspection of the composite specimens at various stages of perforation by optical microscope illustrates the mechanisms by which

  13. The chemical effects of the Martian environment on power system component materials: A theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Gaier, J.R. [Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    In the foreseeable future, an expedition may be undertaken to explore the planet Mars. Some of the power source options being considered for such a mission are photovoltaics, regenerative fuel cells and nuclear reactors. In addition to electrical power requirements, environmental conditions en route to Mars, in the planetary orbit and on the Martian surface must be simulated and studied in order to anticipate and solve potential problems. Space power systems components such as photovoltaic arrays, radiators, and solar concentrators may be vulnerable to degradation in the Martian environment. Natural characteristics of Mars which may pose a threat to surface power systems include high velocity winds, dust, ultraviolet radiation, large daily variations in temperature, reaction to components of the soil, atmosphere and atmospheric condensates as well as synergistic combinations. Most of the current knowledge of the characteristics of the Martian atmosphere and soil composition was obtained from the Viking 1 and 2 missions in 1976. This paper presents a theoretical study used to assess the effects of the Martian atmospheric conditions on the power systems components. A computer program written at NASA Lewis Research Center in 1961 to 1962 for combustion research that uses a free-energy minimization technique was used to calculate chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states of temperature and pressure. The power system component materials selected for this study include: Silicon dioxide, silicon, carbon, copper, and titanium. Combinations of environments and materials considered in this study include: (1) Mars atmosphere with power surface material, (2) Mars atmosphere and dust component with power surface material, (3) Mars atmosphere and hydrogen peroxide or superoxide with power system material.

  14. Measurement of residual stresses in deposited films of SOFC component materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T.; Momma, A.; Nagata, S.; Kasuga, Y. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The stress induced in Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)s has important influence on the lifetime of SOFC. But the data on stress in SOFC and mechanical properties of SOW component materials have not been accumulated enough to manufacture SOFC. Especially, the data of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} cathode and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} interconnection have been extremely limited. We have estimated numerically the dependences of residual stress in SOFC on the material properties, the cell structure and the fabrication temperatures of the components, but these unknown factors have caused obstruction to simulate the accurate behavior of residual stress. Therefore, the residual stresses in deposited La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} films are researched by the observation of the bending behavior of the substrate strips. The films of SOFC component materials were prepared by the RF sputtering method, because: (1) It can fabricate dense films of poor sinterable material such as La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} compared with sintering or plasma spray method. (2) For the complicated material such as perovskite materials, the difference between the composition of a film and that of a target material is generally small. (3) It can fabricate a thick ceramics film by improving of the deposition rate. For example, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thick films of 50{mu}m can be fabricated with the deposition rate of approximately 5{mu}m/h industrially. In this paper, the dependence of residual stress on the deposition conditions is defined and mechanical properties of these materials are estimated from the results of the experiments.

  15. Future materials requirements for high temperature power engineering components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, J.B. (Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). Joint Nuclear Research Center)

    1989-08-01

    The two dominant technologies in power engineering are steam and gas turbines. These are, however, dependent on a prior stage of combustion and, perhaps, gasification. There is a continuous drive towards higher operating efficiencies and greater reliability of the units. This leads to a need for larger components to operate at higher temperatures and pressures and hence under more arduous conditions of mechanical and corrosive loading for times which may exceed 200,000 h (30 years). Some examples are used to illustrate generic features of the materials problems towards which research and development is aimed. In some components the high temperature time-dependent mechanical properties dominate, a good example being gas turbine blades. Uniformity of the time-dependent mechanical properties plus fracture toughness is difficult to attain in the very large forgings required for steam turbines. Within the heat generation units (boiler tubes, headers, etc.) the mechanical requirements are severe, but would not be critical without the constraints imposed by the need for inexpensive corrosion and erosion resistance. (author).

  16. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  17. Composite Materials and Films Based on Melanins, Polydopamine, and Other Catecholamine-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Ball

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Polydopamine (PDA is related to eumelanins in its composition and structure. These pigments allow the design, inspired by natural materials, of composite nanoparticles and films for applications in the field of energy conversion and the design of biomaterials. This short review summarizes the main advances in the design of PDA-based composites with inorganic and organic materials.

  18. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses.

  19. Building Block Approach' for Structural Analysis of Thermoplastic Composite Components for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carello, M.; Amirth, N.; Airale, A. G.; Monti, M.; Romeo, A.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced thermoplastic prepreg composite materials stand out with regard to their ability to allow complex designs with high specific strength and stiffness. This makes them an excellent choice for lightweight automotive components to reduce mass and increase fuel efficiency, while maintaining the functionality of traditional thermosetting prepreg (and mechanical characteristics) and with a production cycle time and recyclability suited to mass production manufacturing. Currently, the aerospace and automotive sectors struggle to carry out accurate Finite Elements (FE) component analyses and in some cases are unable to validate the obtained results. In this study, structural Finite Elements Analysis (FEA) has been done on a thermoplastic fiber reinforced component designed and manufactured through an integrated injection molding process, which consists in thermoforming the prepreg laminate and overmolding the other parts. This process is usually referred to as hybrid molding, and has the provision to reinforce the zones subjected to additional stresses with thermoformed themoplastic prepreg as required and overmolded with a shortfiber thermoplastic resin in single process. This paper aims to establish an accurate predictive model on a rational basis and an innovative methodology for the structural analysis of thermoplastic composite components by comparison with the experimental tests results.

  20. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  1. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  2. Nanoengineered Thermal Materials Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya; Dangelo, Carols

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/cm2. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. As the size of components and devices for ICs and other appliances becomes smaller, it becomes more difficult to provide heat dissipation and transport for such components and devices. A thermal conductor for a macro-sized thermal conductor is generally inadequate for use with a microsized component or device, in part due to scaling problems. A method has been developed for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler-composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place, and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  3. Flexible hydrogel-based functional composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Saiz, Eduardo; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Tomasia, Antoni P

    2013-10-08

    A composite having a flexible hydrogel polymer formed by mixing an organic phase with an inorganic composition, the organic phase selected from the group consisting of a hydrogel monomer, a crosslinker, a radical initiator, and/or a solvent. A polymerization mixture is formed and polymerized into a desired shape and size.

  4. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  5. NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle Technologies: A Composite Materials Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Cook, Steve; Effinger, Mike; Smith, Dennis; Swint, Shayne

    1999-01-01

    A materials overview of the NASA's Earth-to-Orbit Space Transportation Program is presented. The topics discussed are: Earth-to-Orbit Goals and Challenges; Space Transportation Program Structure; Generations of Reusable Launch Vehicles; Space Transportation Derived Requirements; X 34 Demonstrator; Fastrac Engine System; Airframe Systems; Propulsion Systems; Cryotank Structures; Advanced Materials, Fabrication, Manufacturing, & Assembly; Hot and Cooled Airframe Structures; Ceramic Matrix Composites; Ultra-High Temp Polymer Matrix Composites; Metal Matrix Composites; and PMC Lines Ducts and Valves.

  6. Heat-Resistant Composite Materials Based on Polyimide Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Sergeyevich Ivanov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat-resistant composite materials with a polyimide-based binder were obtained in this paper. Composites were prepared with different content of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT and nanostructured silicon carbide, and polyimides coated carbon fibers woven into the cloth. Composite materials showed high values of thermostability and resistance to thermo-oxidative degradation, as well as good mechanical properties.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification in Experimental Structural Dynamics Identification of Composite Material Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, Marcin; Peeters, Bart; Kahsin, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace and wind energy structures are extensively using components made of composite materials. Since these structures are subjected to dynamic environments with time-varying loading conditions, it is important to model their dynamic behavior and validate these models by means of vibration...... for uncertainty evaluation in experimentally estimated models. Investigated structures are plates, fuselage panels and helicopter main rotor blades as they represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled structures made of composite materials. To evaluate...

  8. Development and characterization of 430L matrix composites gradient materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maria Ruiz-Navas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new concept that is Functionally Gradient Materials (FGM. The materials developed in this work are constituted by a 430L matrix core and composite materials with this matrix and gradient concentration with NbC reinforcement, from the core to the surface, through different steps. Composite powders of different content in NbC were produced through high energy milling in order to obtain the gradient composition. The morphology and microhardness of these powders were characterised and subsequently were processed through conventional P/M techniques, pressing and sintering. The materials obtained show improved wear behaviour.

  9. The Cyogenic Evaluation of Irradiated Composite Materials for Use in Composite Pressure Vessels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HyPerComp Engineering, Inc. (HEI) proposes to continue the characterization of the cryogenic evaluation of irradiated composite materials for use in composite...

  10. Overview of bacterial cellulose composites: a multipurpose advanced material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nasrullah; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Park, Joong Kon

    2013-11-06

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has received substantial interest owing to its unique structural features and impressive physico-mechanical properties. BC has a variety of applications in biomedical fields, including use as biomaterial for artificial skin, artificial blood vessels, vascular grafts, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and wound dressing. However, pristine BC lacks certain properties, which limits its applications in various fields; therefore, synthesis of BC composites has been conducted to address these limitations. A variety of BC composite synthetic strategies have been developed based on the nature and relevant applications of the combined materials. BC composites are primarily synthesized through in situ addition of reinforcement materials to BC synthetic media or the ex situ penetration of such materials into BC microfibrils. Polymer blending and solution mixing are less frequently used synthetic approaches. BC composites have been synthesized using numerous materials ranging from organic polymers to inorganic nanoparticles. In medical fields, these composites are used for tissue regeneration, healing of deep wounds, enzyme immobilization, and synthesis of medical devices that could replace cardiovascular and other connective tissues. Various electrical products, including biosensors, biocatalysts, E-papers, display devices, electrical instruments, and optoelectronic devices, are prepared from BC composites with conductive materials. In this review, we compiled various synthetic approaches for BC composite synthesis, classes of BC composites, and applications of BC composites. This study will increase interest in BC composites and the development of new ideas in this field.

  11. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-02-01

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed.

  12. Resin-based composite as a direct esthetic restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala; Acharya, Shashirashmi

    2011-06-01

    The search for an ideal esthetic material for tooth restoration has resulted in significant improvements in both materials and the techniques for using them. Various resin-based composite (RBC) materials have recently been introduced into the market that offer improved esthetic and physical properties. This article reviews RBCs, including their compositions, advantages, and disadvantages, that are contemporary to today's clinical practice as well as those that are under research consideration and/ or in clinical trial phase.

  13. Multi-length Scale Material Model Development for Armorgrade Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-02

    synthesis -/processing-induced defects; (c) effect of 3 synthesis -/processing-induced defects on PPTA-fiber properties; (d) effect of fiber-/ yarn ...Derivation of the Materials Constitutive Relations for Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Poly-Vinyl-Ester-Epoxy Based Composites,” Journal of Materials Science, 42...fabric or PPTA-fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites. Specifically, the role of various material- synthesis -/fiber-processing-induced defects, as

  14. Damage tolerance of continuous fibre composites: material and environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibo, G.A.; Hogg, P.J. [Queen Mary and Westfield Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    1998-05-01

    Aerospace design philosophies are used to discuss critically, the suitability of composite materials to primary structural applications. The principal issues limiting the use of composites, compression after impact performance and high cost, are examined in terms of material/manufacturing form and environmental conditioning. The material types investigated consist of thermoset and thermoplastic matrix reinforced unidirectional prepreg tape and textile manufactured architectures. (orig.) 141 refs.

  15. ECODESIGN CRITERIA FOR COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    B Attaf

    2013-01-01

    According to sustainable development principles, the design of a composite product must be in compliance with the new regulations and standards in terms of Health protection (H) and Environmental preservation (E) besides Quality assurance (Q). With this argument as an objective, our contribution aims to innovate and develop new methodologies providing sustainable design of new generation of composite products through the consideration of the three balanced key aspects: H, E and Q. To achieve ...

  16. Discussion on the Standardization of Shielding Materials — Sensitivity Analysis of Material Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogata Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overview of standardization activities for shielding materials is described. We propose a basic approach for standardizing material composition used in radiation shielding design for nuclear and accelerator facilities. We have collected concrete composition data from actual concrete samples to organize a representative composition and its variance data. Then the sensitivity analysis of the composition variance has been performed through a simple 1-D dose calculation. Recent findings from the analysis are summarized.

  17. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  18. Damage Threshold Characterization in Structural Composite Materials and Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-28

    polyester, vinyl ester and epoxy, as reported earlier [1-3], the differences between resins are significant. The Vectorply ELT 5500 fabric (D) contains a...Delamination Testing,” AIAA Journal , vol. 28, 1990, pp. 1270-1276. 15. Agastra, P., "Mixed Mode Delamination of Glass Fiber/Polymer Matrix Composite

  19. Composite Material Suitable for Use as Electrode Material in a SOC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    in a solid oxide cell, said composite material being based on (Gd1-xSrx)1-sFe1-yCoyO3-[delta] or (Ln1-xSrx)1-sFe1-yCioyO3-[delta](s equal to 0.05 or larger) wherein Ln is a lanthanide element, Sc or Y, said composite material comprising at least two phases which are non-miscible, said composite material...

  20. Probabilistic Remaining Useful Life Prediction of Composite Aircraft Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Assessment Network (PFDAN) toolkit for Abaqus will be developed for probabilistic life management of a laminated composite structure...

  1. Probabilistic Remaining Useful Life Prediction of Composite Aircraft Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A composite fatigue damage assessment and risk informed prognosis toolkit will be developed by enhancing and integrating existing solution modules within a...

  2. Interfacial Design of Composite Ablative Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project proposes the development of a computational software package to provide NASA with advanced materials...

  3. Tensile and impact properties of three-component PP/wood/elastomer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Pukanszky

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP was reinforced with wood flour and impact modified with elastomers to increase stiffness and impact resistance simultaneously. Elastomer content changed in four (0, 5, 10 and 20 wt%, while that of wood content in seven steps, the latter from 0 to 60 wt% in 10 wt% steps. Structure and adhesion were controlled by the addition of functionalized (maleated polymers. Composites were homogenized in a twin-screw extruder and then injection molded to tensile bars. Fracture resistance was characterized by standard and instrumented impact tests. The results showed that the components are dispersed independently of each other even when a functionalized elastomer is used for impact modification, at least under the conditions of this study. Impact resistance does not change much as a function of wood content in PP/wood composites, but decreases drastically from the very high level of the PP/elastomer blend to almost the same value obtained without impact modifier in the three-component materials. Increasing stiffness and fiber related local deformation processes led to small fracture toughness at large wood content. Micromechanical deformation processes depend mainly on the strength of PP/wood interaction; debonding and pull-out take place at poor adhesion, while fiber fracture dominates when adhesion is strong. Composites with sufficiently large impact resistance cannot be prepared in the usual range of wood contents (50–60 wt%.

  4. The composite materials handbook (MIL handbook 17). Volume 1: Guidelines for characterization of structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-01-01

    The Composite Materials Handbook (MIL Handbook 17) is THE source for data and usage guidelines for current and emerging polymer matrix composite materials. It provides the tools needed to design and fabricate end items from polymer matrix composite materials and offers guidelines for how these data should be generated and used. The Handbook is a comprehensive guide of composites technology and engineering, an area that is advancing and changing rapidly. Volume 1 explains the methods by which materials property data should be obtained, and criteria for their acceptance for publication in the Handbook.

  5. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  6. Biomass-derived carbonaceous materials as components in wood briquettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stengl, S.; Koch, C.; Stadlbauer, E.A.; Scheer, J. [Univ. of Applied Sciences, THM Campus Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Weber, B. [Instituto de Ingenieria de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Coyoacan (Mexico); Strohal, U.; Fey, J. [Strohal Anlagenbau, Staufenberg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The present paper describes a briquette composed of a substantial amount of wooden biomass and up to 35% of carbonaceous materials derived from biogenic residues. The cellulosic component may be a mixture of any wooden residue. Suitable substrates for the carbonaceous fraction are vegetation wastes from land management or agriculture. Depending on physical and chemical nature of the substrate, Hydrothermal Carbonisation (HTC) or Low Temperature Conversion (LTC) may be used to produce the carbonaceous part of the briquette. HTC turns wet biomass at temperatures around 200 deg C in an autoclave into lignite whereas LTC treatment at 400 deg C and atmospheric pressure produces black coal. This is manifested by a molar ratio of 0.1 {<=} H/C (LTC) {<=} 0.7; 0.05{<=} O/C (LTC) {<=} 0.4 and 0.7 < H/C (HTC) <1.5 ; 0.2< O/C (HTC) < 0.5. Solid state {sup 13}C-NMR confirms these findings showing a strong absorption band for sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at chemical shifts of 100 ppm und 165 ppm for LTC biochar. Depending on the substrate, HTC gives rise to an increase in the specific calorific value (MJ/kg) by a factor of {Psi} {approx} 1.2 - 1.4; LTC by 1.5 - 1.8. In addition ash melting points are significantly increased; in case of wheat straw by about 200 deg C. Compacted products may have a cylindrical or rectangular profile.

  7. Stiffness analysis of the sarafix external fixator of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim Pervan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a structural analysis of the CAD model three versions fixators Sarafix which to explore the possibility of introducing composite materials in the construction of the connecting rod fixators comparing values of displacement and stiffness at characteristic points structure. Namely, we investigated constructional performance of fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod formed from three different composite materials, the same matrix (epoxy resin with three different types of fibers (E glass, kevlar 49 and carbon M55J. Results of structural analysis fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod made of composite materials are compared with the results of tubular connecting rod fixators made of stainless steel. After comparing the results, from the aspect of stiffness, we gave the final considerations about composite material which provides an adequate substitution for the existing material.

  8. The surface finish of light-cured composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S K; Henderson, L J

    1993-01-01

    A necessity for any dental restorative material is its ability to take and maintain a smooth surface finish. Composite resin restorative materials with fillers and matrix of differing hardness are difficult to finish and polish. The use of aluminum trioxide discs is a popular and acceptable method of finishing composite restorative materials where the material is accessible. Burs and stones are used for finishing and polishing inaccessible areas. This study was undertaken to compare the surface finish of composite resin restorative material when finished with white stones, superfine diamond burs and aluminum trioxide discs. The finished surface was measured with a profilometer and the roughness average value used to compare the surfaces. The aluminum trioxide discs gave the best and most consistent results. It was possible to attain similar results with the superfine diamond bur. However, the results were highly variable. None of the methods used achieved the smoothness of composite resin cured against a transparent matrix.

  9. Structural materials for ITER in-vessel component design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, G.; Gauster, W.; Matera, R.; Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Rowcliffe, A.; Fabritsiev, S.; Kawamura, H.

    1996-10-01

    The materials proposed for ITER in-vessel components have to exhibit adequate performance for the operating lifetime of the reactor or for specified replacement intervals. Estimates show that maximum irradiation dose to be up to 5-7 dpa (for 1 MWa/m 2 in the basic performance phase (BPP)) within a temperature range from 20 to 300°C. Austenitic SS 316LN-ITER Grade was defined as a reference option for the vacuum vessel, blanket, primary wall, pipe lines and divertor body. Conventional technologies and mill products are proposed for blanket, back plate and manifold manufacturing. HIPing is proposed as a reference manufacturing method for the primary wall and blanket and as an option for the divertor body. The existing data show that mechanical properties of HIPed SS are no worse than those of forged 316LN SS. Irradiation will result in property changes. Minimum ductility has been observed after irradiation in an approximate temperature range between 250 and 350°C, for doses of 5-10 dpa. In spite of radiation-induced changes in tensile deformation behavior, the fracture remains ductile. Irradiation assisted corrosion cracking is a concern for high doses of irradiation and at high temperatures. Re-welding is one of the critical issues because of the need to replace failed components. It is also being considered for the replacement of shielding blanket modules by breeding modules after the BPP. Estimates of radiation damage at the locations for re-welding show that the dose will not exceed 0.05 dpa (with He generation of 1 appm) for the manifold and 0.01 dpa (with He generation 0.1 appm) for the back plate for the BPP of ITER operation. Existing experimental data show that these levels will not result in property changes for SS; however, neutron irradiation and He generation promote crack formation in the heat affected zone during welding. Cu based alloys, DS-Cu (Glidcop A125) and PHCu CuCrZr bronze) are proposed as a structural materials for high heat flux

  10. ECODESIGN CRITERIA FOR COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Attaf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available According to sustainable development principles, the design of a composite product must be in compliance with the new regulations and standards in terms of Health protection (H and Environmental preservation (E besides Quality assurance (Q. With this argument as an objective, our contribution aims to innovate and develop new methodologies providing sustainable design of new generation of composite products through the consideration of the three balanced key aspects: H, E and Q. To achieve these requirements, we have defined and developed new criteria in the form of eco-coefficients, which can later on be implemented into mechanical characterization tests, in advanced composite formulations and associated constitutive equations. They can also be integrated into future finite-element computer programs to assess and improve the performance of the H-E-Q interrelated function.

  11. ECODESIGN CRITERIA FOR COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Attaf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available According to sustainable development principles, the design of a composite product must be in compliance with the new regulations and standards in terms of Health protection (H and Environmental preservation (E besides Quality assurance (Q. With this argument as an objective, our contribution aims to innovate and develop new methodologies providing sustainable design of new generation of composite products through the consideration of the three balanced key aspects: H, E and Q. To achieve these requirements, we have defined and developed new criteria in the form of eco-coefficients, which can later on be implemented into mechanical characterization tests, in advanced composite formulations and associated constitutive equations. They can also be integrated into future finite-element computer programs to assess and improve the performance of the H-E-Q interrelated function.

  12. Structured Piezoelectric Composites: Materials and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ende, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The piezoelectric effect, which causes a material to generate a voltage when it deforms, is very suitable for making integrated sensors, and (micro-) generators. However, conventional piezoelectric materials are either brittle ceramics or certain polymers with a low thermal stability, which limits t

  13. Mechanics of composite material subjected to eigenstress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang Nielsen, L.

    In this SBI Bulletin a theory is presented dealing with the mechanical behavior of composites subjected to hygro-thermal actions such as shrinkage caused by moisture variations and expansion caused by temperature variations of freezing of water in pore systems. Special attention is given to the t......In this SBI Bulletin a theory is presented dealing with the mechanical behavior of composites subjected to hygro-thermal actions such as shrinkage caused by moisture variations and expansion caused by temperature variations of freezing of water in pore systems. Special attention is given...

  14. Compendium of Fractographic Data for Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Society for Metals, 1987, p6-45. Figure B-12 Neat Resin Properties at Room Temperature/Composite Design Encyclopedia, University of Delaware, Vol 1...Mechanical Behavior, Carl Zweben and H. Thomas Hahn. Figure B-13 Graphical Representation of Neat Resin Properties at Room Temperature/Composite Design... Resin Properties at Room Temperature D180-3 1996-1 B13 100 _____________________________ 9.0 (14.5) (1.3) f-j Strength (1.1 Modulus 80 (13-1)(1.2) 0

  15. An Analysis of Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Polymer Matrix Composite Sandwich Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Roberts, Gary D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Zheng, Diahua; Averbeck, Timothy; Roth, Donald J.; Jeanneau, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Structural sandwich materials composed of triaxially braided polymer matrix composite material face sheets sandwiching a foam core are being utilized for applications including aerospace components and recreational equipment. Since full scale components are being made from these sandwich materials, it is necessary to develop proper inspection practices for their manufacture and in-field use. Specifically, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques need to be investigated for analysis of components made from these materials. Hockey blades made from sandwich materials and a flat sandwich sample were examined with multiple NDE techniques including thermographic, radiographic, and shearographic methods to investigate damage induced in the blades and flat panel components. Hockey blades used during actual play and a flat polymer matrix composite sandwich sample with damage inserted into the foam core were investigated with each technique. NDE images from the samples were presented and discussed. Structural elements within each blade were observed with radiographic imaging. Damaged regions and some structural elements of the hockey blades were identified with thermographic imaging. Structural elements, damaged regions, and other material variations were detected in the hockey blades with shearography. Each technique s advantages and disadvantages were considered in making recommendations for inspection of components made from these types of materials.

  16. Simulation of a Novel Joining Process for Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites and Metallic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, M.; Freund, A.; Vogel, C.; Kupfer, R.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new joining technology to produce hybrid structures with continuous-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics and metallic components is presented adapting the concept of classical clinching for thermoplastic composites. To demonstrate the capability of the thermoclinching process, prototypic joints were manufactured using an experimental joining installation developed. Nondestructive and destructive analyses of the thermoclinched joints showed that a relocation of the reinforcement into the neck and head area of the joining zone could be achieved. For a first estimation of the maximum load-carrying capacity of the joints, single-lap specimens with both reinforced and nonreinforced thermoplastics were manufactured and tested, revealing up to 50% higher failure loads of the reinforced joints. To understand the local material configuration and to achieve a defined and adjustable fabric structure in the head area of the joint, further analyses with regard to material- and tool-side conditions of the joining zone are necessary.

  17. Composite resin: a versatile, multi-purpose restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduced more than some 50 years ago, composite resin technology has simplified the manner in which clinicians practice restorative dentistry, offering greater predictability and improved physical properties. Decades of material science and laboratory development along with clinical trials in human subjects have culminated in composite resin being validated as a reliable, multifunctional restorative material. With a wide range of composite resins available today, clinicians can benefit from knowing the infrastructure of a given material in order to determine which type will work best in a particular clinical situation.

  18. The New Technology of Composite Materials Repairing by Light Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-min; CHEN Yu-ming; YU Xiao-lei; WANG Le-xin

    2004-01-01

    The repairing of damaged composite materials becomes a hot research subject in the late 1990s.In this paper a new technology of repairing composite materials is given on the basis of our previous research.The light wave of 675nm transmitted by optical fiber is used as repairing light source,special repairable adhesive which can be stimulated by the light is adopted.By comparing the stiffness of the composite material before and after being damaged,it can be concluded that the mechanical property will not be changed with the feasible repairing technology.

  19. 15 CFR 270.322 - Voluntary permission to enter and inspect property where building components, materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... inspect property where building components, materials, artifacts, and records with respect to a building... Voluntary permission to enter and inspect property where building components, materials, artifacts, and... components, materials, artifacts, and records with respect to the building failure are located, and take...

  20. 49 CFR 587.14 - Deformable face component dimensions and material specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deformable face component dimensions and material... BARRIERS Offset Deformable Barrier § 587.14 Deformable face component dimensions and material... and materials of the individual components are listed separately below. All dimensions allow a...

  1. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    31, 2012 X - ray Diffraction of BST Coatings • BaxSr1-xTiO3 films can be grown with stoichiometry control • Process allows for control of the film...thickness from ~500nm to 20mm •Other perovskite compositions can be synthesized 2q Henry A Sodano – AFOSR Mech. of Multifunctional and

  2. Nanostructured Shape Memory Alloys: Adaptive Composite Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    a clear relation between strain and nip gap can be observed. The use of LAT on calendering of isothermal flow, a problem analogous to the...Chemical Engineering Science, 57, (2002) 643-650. 9. Sofou S, Mitsoulis E. Calendering of Pseudoplastic and Viscoplastic Sheets of Finite Thickness

  3. High Strain Rate Characterisation of Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rasmus Normann Wilken

    The high strain rate characterisation of FRP materials present the experimenter with a new set of challenges in obtaining valid experimental data. These challenges were addressed in this work with basis in classic wave theory. The stress equilibrium process for linear elastic materials, as fibre...... a linear elastic specimen to reach a state of constant strain rate before fracture. This was in contrast to ductile materials, which are widely tested with for the High-speed servohydraulic test machine. The development of the analysis and the interpretation of the results, were based on the experience...

  4. Mathematical model predicts the elastic behavior of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoroastro de Miranda Boari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have found that the non-uniform distribution of reinforcing elements in a composite material can markedly influence its characteristics of elastic and plastic deformation and that a composite's overall response is influenced by the physical and geometrical properties of its reinforcing phases. The finite element method, Eshelby's method and dislocation mechanisms are usually employed in formulating a composite's constitutive response. This paper discusses a composite material containing SiC particles in an aluminum matrix. The purpose of this study was to find the correlation between a composite material's particle distribution and its resistance, and to come up with a mathematical model to predict the material's elastic behavior. The proposed formulation was applied to establish the thermal stress field in the aluminum-SiC composite resulting from its fabrication process, whereby the mixture is prepared at 600 °C and the composite material is used at room temperature. The analytical results, which are presented as stress probabilities, were obtained from the mathematical model proposed herein. These results were compared with the numerical ones obtained by the FEM method. A comparison of the results of the two methods, analytical and numerical, reveals very similar average thermal stress values. It is also shown that Maxwell-Boltzmann's distribution law can be applied to identify the correlation between the material's particle distribution and its resistance, using Eshelby's thermal stresses.

  5. Microbiological destruction of composite polymeric materials in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legonkova, O. A.; Selitskaya, O. V.

    2009-01-01

    Representatives of the same species of microscopic fungi developed on composite materials with similar polymeric matrices independently from the type of soils, in which the incubation was performed. Trichoderma harzianum, Penicillium auranthiogriseum, and Clonostachys solani were isolated from the samples of polyurethane. Fusarium solani, Clonostachys rosea, and Trichoderma harzianum predominated on the surface of ultrathene samples. Ulocladium botrytis, Penicillium auranthiogriseum, and Fusarium solani predominated in the variants with polyamide. Trichoderma harzianum, Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus ochraceus, and Acremonium strictum were isolated from Lentex-based composite materials. Mucor circinelloides, Trichoderma harzianum, and Penicillium auranthiogriseum were isolated from composite materials based on polyvinyl alcohol. Electron microscopy demonstrated changes in the structure of polymer surface (loosening and an increase in porosity) under the impact of fungi. The physicochemical properties of polymers, including their strength, also changed. The following substances were identified as primary products of the destruction of composite materials: stearic acid for polyurethane-based materials; imide of dithiocarbonic acid and 1-nonadecen in variants with ultrathene; and tetraaminopyrimidine and isocyanatodecan in variants with polyamide. N,N-dimethyldodecan amide, 2-methyloximundecanon and 2-nonacosane were identified for composites on the base of Lentex A4-1. Allyl methyl sulfide and imide of dithiocarbonic acid were found in variants with the samples of composites based on polyvinyl alcohol. The identified primary products of the destruction of composite materials belong to nontoxic compounds.

  6. Research with neutron and synchrotron radiation on aerospace and automotive materials and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaysser, Wolfgang; Abetz, Volker; Huber, Norbert; Kainer, Karl Ulrich; Pyczak, Florian; Schreyer, Andreas; Staron, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht Zentrum fuer Material und Kuestenforschung, Geesthacht (Germany); Esslinger, Joerg [MTU Aero Engines GmbH, Muenchen (Germany); Klassen, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht Zentrum fuer Material und Kuestenforschung, Geesthacht (Germany); Helmut Schmidt Universitaet, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Characterization with neutrons and synchrotron radiation has yielded essential contributions to the research and development of automotive and aerospace materials, processing methods, and components. This review mainly emphasises developments related to commercial passenger airplanes and light-duty cars. Improved and partly new materials for the reduction of airframe weight and joining by laser-beam welding and friction stir welding are ongoing areas of assessment. Chemical reactions, microstructure development, and residual stresses are frequently measured. Polymers and polymer matrix composites often require special experimental techniques. The thrust-to-weight ratio of aero-engines is increasing due to the improved design of components and the use of innovative materials. Investigations on superalloys, {gamma}-TiAl, and thermal barrier coatings are described in some detail. A discussion of the use of neutron and synchrotron diffraction in automotive applications covers the analysis of surface effects with respect to lubricants and wear, as well as the investigation of microstructure development, deformation, and fatigue behavior of materials, welds and components. Special steels, Al and Mg alloys are discussed and residual stresses in automotive components such as gears or crankshafts are described. Applications of characterization methods on membranes for polymeric membrane fuel cells and on nanocrystalline metal hydrides for hydrogen storage are shown. The degradation of railway tracks after long-term use is taken as an example for the application of synchrotron methods to transport systems beyond the commercial aircraft and light duty passenger car. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Smart Materials For The Realization Of An Adaptive Building Component

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, C.M.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This research focusses on the realization of adaptive architecture with the use of advanced material technology. Current material research has shown significant advances with the development of “smart” materials. Smart materials are “capable of automatically and inherently sensing or detecting chang

  8. Smart Materials For The Realization Of An Adaptive Building Component

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, C.M.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This research focusses on the realization of adaptive architecture with the use of advanced material technology. Current material research has shown significant advances with the development of “smart” materials. Smart materials are “capable of automatically and inherently sensing or detecting

  9. Comparison of self repair in various composite matrix materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    In a comparison of self repair in graphite composites (for airplane applications) versus epoxy and vinyl ester composites (for building structures or walls) 1 the type of damage that the fiber/matrix is prone to experience is a prime factor in determining which materials self repair well and 2 the flow of energy during damage determines what kinds of damage that can be self repaired well. 1) In brittle composites, repair was successful throughout the composite due to matrix cracking which allowed for optimum chemical flow, whereas in toughened composites that did not crack, the repair chemical flows into a few layers of the composite. 2) If the damage energy is stopped by the composite and goes laterally, it causes delamination which will be repaired; however if the damage energy goes through the composite as with a puncture, then there will be limited delamination, less chemical release and less self repair.

  10. Method of Manufacturing A Porous Polymer Component Involving Use of A Dissolvable, Sacrificial Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of manufacturing a porous polymer component 1 with structured and/or random pores 4 and/or channels 5. The method comprises arranging a dissolvable, sacrificial material 2 in a geometrical arrangement corresponding to an inner structure to be obtained...... in the polymer component 1. A component material 3, which is to form the final component 1, is arranged so that it surrounds at least a majority of the sacrificial material 2, and subsequently the sacrificial material 2 is dissolved and removed from the component material 3. The sacrificial material 2...... and thereby the resulting inner structure of the component 1 is arranged in a controlled and reproducible manner. The sacrificial material 2 and possibly also the component material 3 may e.g. be arranged by use of a 3D-printer or manually. The method may e.g. be used to manufacture a three...

  11. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  12. Status and Perspectives of Multiferroic Magnetoelectric Composite Materials and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haribabu Palneedi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroic magnetoelectric (ME composites are attractive materials for various electrically and magnetically cross-coupled devices. Many studies have been conducted on fundamental understanding, fabrication processes, and applications of ME composite material systems in the last four decades which has brought the technology closer to realization in practical devices. In this article, we present a review of ME composite materials and some notable potential applications based upon their properties. A brief summary is presented on the parameters that influence the performance of ME composites, their coupling structures, fabrications processes, characterization techniques, and perspectives on direct (magnetic to electric and converse (electric to magnetic ME devices. Overall, the research on ME composite systems has brought us closer to their deployment.

  13. Improved Materials for Composites and Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    pressure may be successful. It is expected that thermoforming should be successful, as the resin is capable of repeated cycles of melting and cooling...from that of F035, and that F033 is a mixture of these two components. Decon- volution of these peaks using the Kratos computer package supplied with

  14. Use of composite materials in oil industry

    OpenAIRE

    Trifunović, Prvoslav

    2011-01-01

    The most frequently used composites for fabrication of primary and secondary constructions within the oil industry are made of epoxy, phenolic or polymer matrix combined with glass, carbon or aramid fibers. For fabrication of risers, thermoplastic polymers (polyethylene, polyvinyldenefluoride, and polyamide) are used, which are to be wound around steel reinforcement of riser. Polymer may be reinforced with glass or carbon fibers. Instead of thermoplastic polymers, epoxy matrix reinforced with...

  15. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-06

    Sebald [3] used extrusion methods to produce fibers with a platinum core surrounded by a PNN-PZT/ polymer binder which was fired to leave a platinum/PNN...researchers have developed composite piezoelectric devices consisting of an active piezoceramic fiber embedded in a polymer matrix. The polymer matrix acts...active fibers are embedded in a polymer matrix, the rule of mixtures can be applied again a second time by taking the piezoelectric shell to be an

  16. Mechanical behaviour of dental composite filling materials using digital holography

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, J.M.; Lopes, H.; M. A. P. Vaz; Campos, J.C. Reis

    2010-01-01

    One of the most common clinical problems in dentistry is tooth decay. Among the dental filling materials used to repair tooth structure that has been destroyed by decay are dental amalgam and composite materials based on acrylics. Dental amalgam has been used by dentists for the past 150 years as a dental restorative material due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effects. However its safety as a filling material has been questioned due to th...

  17. Health, safety and environmental requirements for composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazer, Kathleen A.

    1994-01-01

    The health, safety and environmental requirements for the production of composite materials are discussed. The areas covered include: (1) chemical identification for each chemical; (2) toxicology; (3) industrial hygiene; (4) fire and safety; (5) environmental aspects; and (6) medical concerns.

  18. Space Radiation Effects in Inflatable and Composite Habitat Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Rojdev, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    This Year 2 project provides much needed risk reduction data to assess solar particle event (SPE) and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) space radiation damage in existing and emerging materials used in manned low-earth orbit, lunar, interplanetary, and Martian surface missions. More specifically, long duration (up to 50 years) space radiation damage is quantified for materials used in inflatable structures (1st priority), and habitable composite structures and space suits materials (2nd priority). The data collected has relevance for nonmetallic materials (polymers and composites) used in NASA missions where long duration reliability is needed in continuous or intermittent radiation fluxes.

  19. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Harold H.; Lee, Jung K.

    2017-08-08

    A durable electrode material suitable for use in Li ion batteries is provided. The material is comprised of a continuous network of graphite regions integrated with, and in good electrical contact with a composite comprising graphene sheets and an electrically active material, such as silicon, wherein the electrically active material is dispersed between, and supported by, the graphene sheets.

  20. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Harold H.; Lee, Jung K.

    2014-07-15

    A durable electrode material suitable for use in Li ion batteries is provided. The material is comprised of a continuous network of graphite regions integrated with, and in good electrical contact with a composite comprising graphene sheets and an electrically active material, such as silicon, wherein the electrically active material is dispersed between, and supported by, the graphene sheets.

  1. Support Assembly for Composite Laminate Materials During Roll Press Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catella, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    A composite laminate material is supported during the roll press processing thereof by an assembly having: first and second perforated films disposed adjacent to first and second opposing surfaces of a mixture of uncured resin and fibers defining the composite laminate material, a gas permeable encasement surrounding the mixture and the first and second films, a gas impervious envelope sealed about the gas permeable encasement, and first and second rigid plates clamped about the gas impervious envelope.

  2. Uncertainty on Fatigue Damage Accumulation for Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper stochastic models for fatigue damage accumulation for composite materials are presented based on public available constant and variable amplitude fatigue tests. The methods used for estimating the SN-curve and accumulated fatigue damage are presented.......In the present paper stochastic models for fatigue damage accumulation for composite materials are presented based on public available constant and variable amplitude fatigue tests. The methods used for estimating the SN-curve and accumulated fatigue damage are presented....

  3. Development of graphite-polymer composites as electrode materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Maria Fioramonti Calixto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Graphite powder was mixed to polyurethane, silicon rubber and Araldite® (epoxy in order to prepare composite materials to be used in the preparation of electrodes. Results showed that voltammetric response could be obtained when at least 50% of graphite (w.w-1 is present in the material. SEM and thermogravimetry were also used in the characterization of the composites.

  4. Composite Materials for Radiation Shielding During Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.; Watts, J.; Adams, J. H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Minimizing radiation exposure from the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment during deep space missions is essential to human health and sensitive instrument survivability. Given the fabrication constraints of space transportation vehicles protective shielding is, consequently, a complicated materials issue. These concerns are presented and considered in view of some novel composite materials being developed/suggested for GCR shielding applications. Advantages and disadvantages of the composites will be discussed as well as the need for coordinated testing/evaluation and modeling efforts.

  5. Sensor development exploiting graphite-epoxy composite as electrode material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, André L. M.; Oliveira, Renato S.; Ponzio, Eduardo A.; Semaan, Felipe S.

    2015-11-01

    This study presents some results regarding the development and characterization of graphite-epoxy composites for use as working electrodes in electroanalysis. Such composites were preliminary assessed by TGA-DTA, AFM, XDR and cyclic voltammetry (CV), standing for a suitable stable and low cost material for electroanalytical purposes. The described material was used, in its best proportion (65% graphite m/m), to build a cell electrochemistry.

  6. Tetracycline Loaded Collagen/Hydroxyapatite Composite Materials for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the preparation, characterisation, and testing of tetracycline loaded collagen-carboxymethylcellulose/hydroxyapatite ternary composite materials. The synthesis of this drug delivery system consists in two steps: the first step is the mineralization of collagen-carboxymethylcellulose gel while the second step corresponds to the loading of the ternary composite material with tetracycline. The obtained DDS is characterised by physicochemical, morphological, and release behavi...

  7. Physical and mechanical properties of composite materials of different compositions based on waste products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Burdonov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the effect of mineral filler on the polymer composite material based on waste products of heat and power engineering - fly ash. This type of waste products has never been used for the production of polymer-mineral composites. Depending on the type of ash, its chemical composition and its quantity in the material, we can adjust the properties of the resulting composites. The use of fly ash as a filler will not only make a product less expensive, but it also will reduce development pressure on the environment and improve the physical and mechanical properties of the material. The article shows research results of the ash chemical composition as well as the properties of the resulting materials on its basis. According to the research conclusions there is a prospect for using this material in the construction industry.

  8. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  9. Composite materials for wind power turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, P.; Lilholt, H.; Lystrup, Aa.

    2005-01-01

    Renewable energy resources, of which wind energy is prominent, are part of the solution to the global energy problem. Wind turbine and the rotorblade concepts are reviewed, and loadings by wind and gravity as important factors for the fatigue performance of the materials are considered. Wood...... procedures for documentation of properties are reviewed, and fatigue loading histories are discussed, together with methods for data handling and statistical analysis of (large) amounts of test data. Future challenges for materials in the field of wind turbines are presented, with a focus on thermoplastic...

  10. Statistical analysis and interpolation of compositional data in materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenson, Misha Z; Suram, Santosh K; Gregoire, John M

    2015-02-01

    Compositional data are ubiquitous in chemistry and materials science: analysis of elements in multicomponent systems, combinatorial problems, etc., lead to data that are non-negative and sum to a constant (for example, atomic concentrations). The constant sum constraint restricts the sampling space to a simplex instead of the usual Euclidean space. Since statistical measures such as mean and standard deviation are defined for the Euclidean space, traditional correlation studies, multivariate analysis, and hypothesis testing may lead to erroneous dependencies and incorrect inferences when applied to compositional data. Furthermore, composition measurements that are used for data analytics may not include all of the elements contained in the material; that is, the measurements may be subcompositions of a higher-dimensional parent composition. Physically meaningful statistical analysis must yield results that are invariant under the number of composition elements, requiring the application of specialized statistical tools. We present specifics and subtleties of compositional data processing through discussion of illustrative examples. We introduce basic concepts, terminology, and methods required for the analysis of compositional data and utilize them for the spatial interpolation of composition in a sputtered thin film. The results demonstrate the importance of this mathematical framework for compositional data analysis (CDA) in the fields of materials science and chemistry.

  11. Friction Stir Processing of Particle Reinforced Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Solomon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to provide a review of friction stir processing (FSP technology and its application for microstructure modification of particle reinforced composite materials. The main focus of FSP was on aluminum based alloys and composites. Recently, many researchers have investigated this technology for treating other alloys and materials including stainless steels, magnesium, titanium, and copper. It is shown that FSP technology is very effective in microstructure modification of reinforced metal matrix composite materials. FSP has also been used in the processing and structure modification of polymeric composite materials. Compared with other manufacturing processes, friction stir processing has the advantage of reducing distortion and defects in materials. The layout of this paper is as follows. The friction stir processing technology will be presented first. Then, the application of this technology in manufacturing and structure modification of particle reinforced composite materials will be introduced. Future application of friction stir processing in energy field, for example, for vanadium alloy and composites will be discussed. Finally, the challenges for improving friction stir processing technology will be mentioned.

  12. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2014-03-18

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  13. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O' Neill, Hugh M.

    2016-03-01

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  14. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  15. Mechanical behaviour of engineering materials. Metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesler, Joachim; Baeker, Martin [TU Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffe; Harders, Harald

    2007-07-01

    How do engineering materials deform when bearing mechanical loads? To answer this crucial question, the book bridges the gap between continuum mechanics and materials science. The different kinds of material deformation (elasticity, plasticity, fracture, creep, fatigue) are explained in detail. The book also discusses the physical processes occurring during the deformation of all classes of engineering materials (metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites) and shows how these materials can be strengthened to meet the design requirements. It provides the knowledge needed in selecting the appropriate engineering material for a certain design problem.

  16. Fatigue Prediction for Composite Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Teoría de Mezclas Serie-Paralelo Avanzada para el Análisis de Materiales Compuestos ” V Congreso de la Asociacion Española de Materiales Compuestos ...Computational Materials Science 32, 175–195 [2] Rastellini, F.; Oller, S. (2004). Modelado numérico de no linealidad constitutiva en laminados compuestos

  17. Neutron Shielding Effectiveness of Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Neutrons are moderated or reduced in energy by scattering off of nuclei. When cosmic neutrons with high kinetic energy enter earth’s atmosphere...neutron flux. The simulation volume was modeled as a sphere centered at the origin with a radius of 100 cm. The shielding material was modeled as a

  18. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1985-10-11

    Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 2/, wherein Eg/sub 2/ > Eg/sub 1/, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg/sub 1/ but less than Eg/sub 2/, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  19. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Dishman, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.1 in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.2, wherein Eg.sub.2 >Eg.sub.1, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method, comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg.sub.1 but less than Eg.sub.2, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  20. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1987-03-10

    A method is described of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap E/sub g1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap E/sub g2/, wherein E/sub g2/>E/sub g1/. The second semiconductor material is not substantially etched during the method, comprising subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where the etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material where the photons are not present, the photons being of an energy greater than E/sub g1/ but less than E/sub g2/, whereby the first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and the second material is substantially not etched.

  1. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  2. Technologies of bearings systems production from composite materials by polyester resin injection into the closed mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аnatoliy M. Turenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of modern technologies for manufacturing components and bearing systems made of composite materials has been conducted. These technologies are based on the polyester resin injection method and do not require high financial costs in manufacturing. The proposed method, due to the low cost of tooling, is convenient to produce a wide range of items made of composite materials, both in large-scale and single-piece production. Composite materials are intensively used in automotive industry, especially for motor racing vehicles’ parts. These technologies allow to solve the problem of creating ultra-light assemblies for modern car bodies, energy-absorbing passive safety elements and other high-loaded parts. They provide better strength and weight characteristics and better specific energy-output ratio of passive safety elements, as compared to conventional materials (metals and plastics. Considering the above, the most appropriate technology for the automotive industry has been assessed with that choice substantiation.

  3. Phase stress measurements in composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Keisuke [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering

    1997-06-01

    Using an aluminum alloy composite containing 20 wt.% of SiC powder and an aluminum alloy itself, a phase stress under monoaxial tensile load was tested using x-ray and neutron methods, to compare both of them. For specimens, a 20 vol.% SiC powder reinforced aluminum alloy and an aluminum alloy itself were used. As a result, the following results could be obtained. Young`s modulus and Poisson ratio of the aluminum alloy itself using x-ray method were E=74.5 GPa and {nu}=0.312, respectively, and those using neutron method were E=75.3 GPa and {nu}=0.384, respectively. A relationship between loading stress and lattice strain of the aluminum alloy itself using neutron method was possible to approximate linearly by containing macroscopic plastic deformation region. The lattice strain of each phase in the composite increased proportionally with loading stress in its elastic region, but when remarkably increasing plastic deformation, the lattice strain decreased proportionally in aluminum phase and increased in SiC phase. (G.K.)

  4. Prediction of Thermophysical and Thermomechanical Characteristics of Porous Carbon-Ceramic Composite Materials of the Heat Shield of Aerospace Craft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, S. V.; Prosuntsov, P. V.; Mikhailovskii, K. V.

    2015-05-01

    A procedure for predicting thermophysical and thermomechanical characteristics of porous carbon-ceramic composite materials of the heat shield of aerospace craft as functions of the type of reinforcement, porosity of the structure, and the characteristics of the material's components has been developed. Results of mathematical modeling of the temperature and stressed-strained states of representative volume elements for determining the characteristics of a carbon-ceramic composite material with account taken of its anisotropy have been given.

  5. Composition of waste materials and recyclables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götze, Ramona

    decisions in waste planning thus require a holistic and systematic assessment of environmental impacts of different waste management options. Such assessment requires reliable information on the physical and chemical waste properties to model the flows of waste materials and substances throughout the entire...... the selection of appropriate acid digestion method for future waste characterization studies and the comparison of data across existing studies. A consistent dataset for 73 physico-chemical parameters in 49 residual and 24 source-segregated Danish household waste fractions was obtained and is now available...... for future modelling and assessment of waste management systems. The analyzed fractions were selected based on material properties with relevance for potential recycling processes. The physico-chemical analysis revealed chemical differences between residual and source-segregated samples for several fractions...

  6. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  7. Regeneration and Remodeling of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    binary image (Figure 21a and 21b), overlaying a 30x30 cell grid (cell size ~200 µm x 200 µm, Figure 21c), and calculating cell concentrations of each...2011) 3536–3544. doi:10.1557/JMR.2001.0485. [64] J.A. Carioscia, H. Lu, J.W. Stanbury, C.N. Bowman, Thiol-ene oligomers as dental restorative materials

  8. Thin Film Composite Materials, Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    were Kevlar coated with silicone, EPDM , or neoprene rubber, with the following results: 1. Tensile testing of coated Kevlar fabric is very difficult...materials. 2. A method was developed for measuring water vapor permeability. Neoprene and EPDM are promising as coatings with good water resistance; however...control the folding of the fabric, since the diameters of the spiral channel will be fixed. Because of the stability imparted by the channel, it is

  9. Thermal pretreatment of silica composite filler materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Quan; Ramsey, Christopher; Baran, George

    2010-01-01

    Three different silica filler materials were thermally treated in order to effect dehydration, dehydroxylation, and rehydroxylation. Samples were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), pycnometry, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For all fillers, our results indicate incremental removal of silanol groups at higher heating temperatures and irreversible dehydroxylation at over 673 K. To remove the organic content and maintain adequate silanol density for subsequent s...

  10. An interrelation of physical working capacity and body component composition indicators of amateur athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Gorenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: determine the features of the body component composition and the level of physical performance, as well as the structure of the correlation between these indicators in amateur athletes. Material & Methods: in conditions of the test with physical load with stepwise increasing power in the 71-st physically active person, the reaction of the cardio-respiratory system to physical activity. The body component composition was determined by the bioelectrical impedance method. Result: in amateur athletes, the relative VO2max and power ratings are positively correlated with the relative body water content and have a negative relationship with age, body weight, body mass index, fat content. Oxygen pulse with a high degree of probability positively correlated with body weight, body mass index, metabolic rate, fat-free mass, water content and predictable muscle mass in all body segments. Conclusion: Conducted studies indicate a sufficient level of aerobic capacity, overall performance, the efficiency of the cardiac cycle, the functioning of the О2-transport system and skeletal muscles ability to absorb oxygen from the amateur athletes, and excess fat tissue negatively affects physical performance, overall endurance and achieving high sports results in sports on the endurance.

  11. Accelerated hygrothermal stabilization of composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, Jeffrey Alan [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Experimentation validated a simple moisture conditioning scheme to prepare Gr/Ep composite parts for precision applications by measuring dimensional changes over 90 days. It was shown that an elevated temperature moisture conditioning scheme produced a dimensionally stable part from which precision structures could be built/machined without significant moisture induced dimensional changes after fabrication. Conversely, that unconditioned Gr/Ep composite panels exhibited unacceptably large dimensional changes (i.e., greater than 125 ppM). It was also shown that time required to produce stable parts was shorter, by more than an order of magnitude, employing the conditioning scheme than using no conditioning scheme (46 days versus 1000+ days). Two final use environments were chosen for the experiments: 50% RH/21C and 0% RH/21C. Fiberite 3034K was chosen for its widespread use in aerospace applications. Two typical lay-ups were chosen, one with low sensitivity to hygrothermal distortions and the other high sensitivity: [0, ± 45, 90]s, [0, ± 15, 0]s. By employing an elevated temperature, constant humidity conditioning scheme, test panels achieved an equilibrium moisture content in less time, by more than an order of magnitude, than panels exposed to the same humidity environment and ambient temperature. Dimensional changes, over 90 days, were up to 4 times lower in the conditioned panels compared to unconditioned panels. Analysis of weight change versus time of test coupons concluded that the out-of-autoclave moisture content of Fiberite 3034K varied between 0.06 and 0.1%.

  12. Extended propagation model for interfacial crack in composite material structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫相桥; 冯希金

    2002-01-01

    An interfacial crack is a common damage in a composite material structure . An extended propaga-tion model has been established for an interfacial crack to study the dependence of crack growth on the relativesizes of energy release rates at left and right crack tips and the properties of interfacial material characterize thegrowth of interfacial crack better.

  13. Designing with an underdeveloped computational composite for materials experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barati, B.; Karana, E.; Hekkert, P.P.M.; Jönsthövel, I.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the urge for multidisciplinary development of computational composites, designers and material scientists are increasingly involved in collaborative projects to valorize these technology-push materials in the early stages of their development. To further develop the computational com

  14. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  15. Effective Dielectric Response of Composites with Graded Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zi-Dong; WEI En-Bo; SONG Jin-Bao

    2004-01-01

    The effective dielectric response of linear composites containing graded material is investigated under an applied electric field Eo. For the cylindrical inclusion with gradient dielectric function, εi(r) = b+cr, randomly embedded in a host with dielectric constant εm, we have obtained the exact solution of local electric potential of the composite media regions, which obeys a linear constitutive relation D= εE, using hypergeometric function. In dilute limit, we have derived the effective dielectric response of the linear composite media. Furthermore, for larger volume fraction, the formulas of effective dielectric response of the graded composite media are given.

  16. Electromechanical coupling of 2-2 piezo-composite material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    水永安; 薛强

    1996-01-01

    A dynamic mode) for 2-2 piezo-composite material was developed,in which the acoustic plane waves propagating along the interface were solved and their dispersion curves were obtained.By taking the resonator thickness as half a wavelength or its odd fold,the resonant frequencies of the composite transducers are in agreement with the dispersion curves.From the dynamic model the piezoelectric coupling coefficients for the thickness vibration of the composite could be obtained as a function of the composite thickness as well as the volume fraction of the ceramic phase.The results show that when the thickness vibration mode is decoupled with the lateral periodical vibration mode,the piezoelectric coupling reaches its maximum.This condition gives a maximum frequency bandwidth and a greatest piezoelectric coupling coefficient for the composite material.

  17. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  18. Development and characterization of composite materials for production of composite risers by filament winding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrinho, L.L.; Bastian, F.L. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering], e-mail: ledjane@metalmat.ufrj.br; Calado, V.M.A. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Industry has been challenged to provide riser systems which are more cost effective and which can fill the technology gaps with respect to water depth, riser diameter and high temperatures left open by flexible, steel catenary risers (SCRs) and hybrid risers. Composite materials present advantages over conventional steel risers because composite materials are lighter, more fatigue and corrosion resistant, better thermal insulators and can be designed for improving the structural and mechanical response. Besides, composite materials present some attractive attributes for the offshore service, such as: high specific strength and stiffness. This paper focuses on the development and characterization of a polymer matrix (epoxy) and of material composite (epoxy/fiber glass), which will be used in a development for composites risers by the filament winding process (wet winding). (author)

  19. Emissivity Results on High Temperature Coatings for Refractory Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Lewis, Ronald K.; Rodriguez, Alvaro C.; Milhoan, James D.; Koenig, John R.

    2007-01-01

    The directional emissivity of various refractory composite materials considered for application for reentry and hypersonic vehicles was investigated. The directional emissivity was measured at elevated temperatures of up to 3400 F using a directional spectral radiometric technique during arc-jet test runs. A laboratory-based relative total radiance method was also used to measure total normal emissivity of some of the refractory composite materials. The data from the two techniques are compared. The paper will also compare the historical database of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon emissivity measurements with emissivity values generated recently on the material using the two techniques described in the paper.

  20. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  1. Microscale Fracture of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martyniuk, Karolina

    materials models can be developed if the understanding of the microscale damage- the first stage of material failure- is increased. Therefore it is important to characterize materials’ microstructures and micro-cracks initiation and propagation.The microstructure of fibre reinforced composite materials...... which are the most extensively used in the rotor blades, has been shown to play an important role on the overall response of the material. The properties of a fibre/matrix interface have been found to have a significant influence on the macroscopic behavior of composites. Therefore, the characterization......Due to the increase in wind turbines size it is essential that weight savings due to design changes do not compromise the reliability of the rotor blades. The reliability can be increased by improving design rules and the material models that describe the materials properties. More reliable...

  2. Photometric stereo sensor for robot-assisted industrial quality inspection of coated composite material surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Eva; Zambal, Sebastian; Stöger, Matthias; Eitzinger, Christian

    2015-04-01

    While composite materials are increasingly used in modern industry, the quality control in terms of vision-based surface inspection remains a challenging task. Due to the often complex and three-dimensional structures, a manual inspection of these components is nearly impossible. We present a photometric stereo sensor system including an industrial robotic arm for positioning the sensor relative to the inspected part. Two approaches are discussed: stop-and-go positioning and continuous positioning. Results are presented on typical defects that appear on various composite material surfaces in the production process.

  3. Damage monitoring of aircraft structures made of composite materials using wavelet transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, D.; Safin, A.; Luhyna, N.

    2016-10-01

    The present article is dedicated to the study of the acoustic properties of composite materials and the application of non-destructive testing methods to aircraft components. A mathematical model of a wavelet transformed signal is presented. The main acoustic (vibration) properties of different composite material structures were researched. Multiple vibration parameter dependencies on the noise reduction factor were derived. The main steps of a research procedure and new method algorithm are presented. The data obtained was compared with the data from a three dimensional laser-Doppler scanning vibrometer, to validate the results. The new technique was tested in the laboratory and on civil aircraft at a training airfield.

  4. Crustacean-derived biomimetic components and nanostructured composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunenfelder, Lessa Kay; Herrera, Steven; Kisailus, David

    2014-08-27

    Over millions of years, the crustacean exoskeleton has evolved into a rigid, tough, and complex cuticle that is used for structural support, mobility, protection of vital organs, and defense against predation. The crustacean cuticle is characterized by a hierarchically arranged chitin fiber scaffold, mineralized predominately by calcium carbonate and/or calcium phosphate. The structural organization of the mineral and organic within the cuticle occurs over multiple length scales, resulting in a strong and tough biological composite. Here, the ultrastructural details observed in three species of crustacean are reviewed: the American lobster (Homarus americanus), the edible crab (Cancer pagurus), and the peacock mantis shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus). The Review concludes with a discussion of recent advances in the development of biomimetics with controlled organic scaffolding, mineralization, and the construction of nanoscale composites, inspired by the organization and formation of the crustacean cuticle. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Dissecting the role of milk components on gut microbiota composition

    OpenAIRE

    Maga, Elizabeth A.; Weimer, Bart C.; Murray, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The composition of human milk is tailored to contribute to the development of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of newborns and infants. Importantly, human milk contains the antimicrobial compounds lysozyme and lactoferrin that are thought to contribute to the formation of a health-promoting microbiota. As these protective factors are lacking in the milk of dairy animals, we genetically engineered goats expressing human lysozyme in their milk and have recently reported a new animal model to dis...

  6. Thermoviscoelastic dynamic response for a composite material thin narrow strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Hong Liang; Qi, Li-Li; Liu, Hai-Bo [Hunan University, Changsha (China)

    2015-02-15

    Based on von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relationships and classical thin plate theory, a list of nonlinear dynamic equilibrium equations for a viscoelastic composite material thin narrow strip under thermal and mechanic loads are deduced. According to the material constitutive relationship and the relaxation modulus in the form of the Prony series, combing with the Newmark method and the Newton-cotes integration method, a new numerical algorithm for direct solving the whole problem in the time domain is established. By applying this numerical algorithm, the viscoelastic composite material thin narrow strip as the research subject is analyzed systematically, and its rich dynamical behaviors are revealed comprehensively. To verify the accuracy of the present work, a comparison is made with previously published results. Finally, the viscoelastic composite material thin narrow strip under harmonic excitation load and impact load are discussed in detail, and many valuable thermoviscoelastic dynamic characteristics are revealed.

  7. Surveyor television camera, selected materials and electronic components, Appendix C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    The locations of various parts of the Surveyor camera are presented. Tables were prepared with emphasis on: (1) exterior parts and surfaces that are directly exposed to space, (2) parts that shield others from space radiation, (3) representative or unique materials, and (4) electronic devices that may contain unique or well-characterized materials.

  8. Tribology of ceramics and composites materials science perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Bikramjit

    2011-01-01

    This book helps students and practicing scientists alike understand that a comprehensive knowledge about the friction and wear properties of advanced materials is essential to further design and development of new materials. With important introductory chapters on the fundamentals, processing, and applications of tribology, the book then examines in detail the nature and properties of materials, the friction and wear of structural ceramics, bioceramics, biocomposites, and nanoceramics, as well as lightweight composites and the friction and wear of ceramics in a cryogenic environment.

  9. Composite materials based on wastes of flat glass processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhovsky, A V; Escalante-Garcia, J I; Gashnikova, G Yu; Nikulina, L P; Artemenko, S E

    2005-01-01

    Glass mirrors scrap and poly (vinyl) butiral waste (PVB) obtained from flat glass processing plants were investigated as raw materials to produce composites. The emphasis was on studying the influence of milled glass mirror waste contents on properties of composites produced with PVB. The characterization involved: elongation under rupture, water absorption, tensile strength and elastic modulus tests. The results showed that the composite containing 10 wt% of filler powder had the best properties among the compositions studied. The influence of the time of exposure in humid atmosphere on the composite properties was investigated. It was found that the admixture of PVB iso-propanol solution to the scrap of glass mirrors during milling provided stabilization of the properties of the composites produced.

  10. Recycling Wood Composite Panels: Characterizing Recycled Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Downgraded medium density fiberboard (MDF, particleboard (PB, and oriented strandboard (OSB panels were individually subjected to steam explosion treatment. Downgraded MDF and PB panels were separately treated with thermal chemical impregnation using 0.5% butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA. And downgraded PB panels were processed with mechanical hammermilling. The pH, buffer capacity, fiber length, and particle size of these recycled materials were evaluated. After the steam explosion and thermal chemical impregnation treatments, the pH and buffer capacity of recycled urea formaldehyde resin (UF-bonded MDF and PB furnishes increased and the fiber length decreased. The hammermilling of recycled PB was less likely to break particles down into sizes less than 1 mm2.

  11. Highly explosive nanosilicon-based composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, D.; Diener, J.; Gross, E.; Kuenzner, N.; Kovalev, D. [Technical University of Munich, Physics Department, James-Franck-Str., 85747 Garching (Germany); Timoshenko, V.Yu. [Moscow State M.V. Lomonosov University, Physics Department, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    We present a highly explosive binary system based on porous silicon layers with their pores filled with solid oxidizers. The porous layers are produced by a standard electrochemical etching process and exhibit properties that are different from other energetic materials. Its production is completely compatible with the standard silicon technology and full bulk silicon wafers can be processed and therefore a large number of explosive elements can be produced simultaneously. The application-relevant parameters: the efficiency and the long-term stability of various porous silicon/oxidizer systems have been studied in details. Structural properties of porous silicon, its surface termination, the atomic ratio of silicon to oxygen and the chosen oxidizers were optimized to achieve the highest efficiency of the explosive reaction. This explosive system reveals various possible applications in different industrial fields, e.g. as a novel, very fast airbag igniter. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: Caries is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. For (direct restaurations of carious lesions, tooth-coloured composite materials are increasingly used. The compulsory health insurance pays for composite fillings in front teeth; in posterior teeth, patients have to bear the extra cost. Scientific background: Amalgam is an alloy of mercury and other metals and has been used in dentistry for more than one hundred and fifty years. Composites consist of a resin matrix and chemically bonded fillers. They have been used for about fifty years in front teeth. Amalgam has a long longevity; the further development of composites has also shown improvements regarding their longevity. Research questions: This HTA-report aims to evaluate the longevity (failure rate, median survival time (MST, median age of direct amalgam fillings in comparison to direct composite fillings in permanent teeth from a medical and economical perspective and discusses the ethical, legal and social aspects of using these filling materials. Methods: The systematic literature search yielded a total of 1,149 abstracts. After a two-step selection process based on defined criteria 25 publications remained to be assessed. Results: The medical studies report a longer longevity for amalgam fillings than for composite fillings. However, the results of these studies show a large heterogeneity. No publication on the costs or the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings exists for Germany. The economic analyses (NL, SWE, GB report higher costs for composite fillings when longevity is assumed equal (for an observation period of five years or longer for amalgam compared to composite fillings. These higher costs are due to the higher complexity of placing composite fillings. Discussion: Due to different study designs and insufficient documentation of study details, a comparison of different studies on longevity of direct amalgam and composite

  13. Multi-physics modeling of multifunctional composite materials for damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujidkul, Thanyawalai

    This study presents a modeling of multifunction composite materials for damage detection with its verification and validation to mechanical behavior predictions of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer composites (CFRPs), CFRPs laminated composites, and woven SiC/SiC matrix composites that are subjected to fracture damage. Advantages of those materials are low cost, low density, high strength-to-weight ratio, and comparable specific tensile properties, the special of SiC/SiC is good environmental stability at high temperature. Resulting in, the composite has been used for many important structures such as helicopter rotors, aerojet engines, gas turbines, hot control surfaces, sporting goods, and windmill blades. Damage or material defect detection in a mechanical component can provide vital information for the prediction of remaining useful life, which will result in the prevention of catastrophic failures. Thus the understanding of the mechanical behavior have been challenge to the prevent damage and failure of composites in different scales. The damage detection methods in composites have been investigated widely in recent years. Non-destructive techniques are the traditional methods to detect the damage such as X-ray, acoustic emission and thermography. However, due to the invisible damage in composite can be occurred, to prevent the failure in composites. The developments of damage detection methods have been considered. Due to carbon fibers are conductive materials, in resulting CFRPs can be self-sensing to detect damage. As is well known, the electrical resistance has been shown to be a sensitive measure of internal damage, and also this work study in thermal resistance can detect damage in composites. However, there is a few number of different micromechanical modeling schemes has been proposed in the published literature for various types of composites. This works will provide with a numerical, analytical, and theoretical failure models in different damages to

  14. Microstructural Characterisation and Wear Behaviour of Diamond Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing S. Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the initial research leading to the production of diamond composite materials, there have been several important developments leading to significant improvements in the properties of these superhard composite materials. Apart from the fact that diamonds, whether originating from natural resources or synthesised commercially, are the hardest and most wear-resistant materials commonly available, there are other mechanical properties that limit their industrial application. These include the low fracture toughness and low impact strength of diamond. By incorporating a range of binder phases into the sintering production process of these composites, these critically important properties have been radically improved. These new composites can withstand much higher operating temperatures without markedly reducing their strength and wear resistance. Further innovative steps are now being made to improve the properties of diamond composites by reducing grain and particle sizes into the nano range. This review will cover recent developments in diamond composite materials with special emphasis on microstructural characterisation. The results of such studies should assist in the design of new, innovative diamond tools as well as leading to radical improvements in the productivity of cutting, drilling and sawing operations in the exploration, mining, civil construction and manufacturing industries.

  15. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  16. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  17. Photochemical Degradation of Composition B and Its Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    1,3,7,9-tetranitroindazolo-2,1-a- indazol -6-ol-12-one 1% N N O OH NO2 NO2 NO2 O2N 11 2,2’-dicarboxy-3,3’,5,5’- Tetranitroazoxybenzene Trace...a 450-watt, medium pressure, quartz, mercury-vapor lamp, housed in a quartz immersion well, and equipped with a 1.0-L reaction vessel. The Pyrex...percent wax. If no reaction occurred, the relative abundance of TNT in Composition B treatments would be approximately 66.4 percent of the

  18. Fabrication of a nanostructured gold-polymer composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, K; Witcomb, M; Scurrell, M

    2006-07-01

    A facile synthesis route is described for the preparation of a poly-(o-aminophenol)-gold nanoparticle composite material by polymerization of o-aminophenol (AP) monomer using HAuCl(4) as the oxidant. The synthesis was carried out in a methanol medium so that it could serve a dual solvent role, a solvent for both the AP and the water solution of HAuCl(4). It was found that oxidative polymerization of AP leads to the formation of poly-AP with a diameter of 50+/-10nm, while the reduction of AuCl(4) (-) results in the formation of gold nanoparticles ( approximately 2nm). The gold nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed and highly stabilized throughout the macromolecular chain that formed a uniform metal-polymer composite material. The resultant composite material was characterized by means of different techniques, such as UV-vis, IR and Raman spectroscopy, which offered the information about the chemical structure of polymer, whereas electron microscopy images provided information regarding the morphology of the composite material and the distribution of the metal particles in the composite material.

  19. One Component Encapsulating Material Matrix as High Barrier Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for new flexible food packaging materials with effective high barrier against oxygen and moisture to protect food, minimize weight and...

  20. Vine vigor components and its variability - relationship to wine composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Magali; Tittmann, Susanne; Stoll, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    It was pointed out that a high spatial variability for canopy size and yield would exist within a vineyard but a high temporal stability over the years was observed. Furthermore, a greater variability in grape phenolics than in sugars and pH was detected within a vineyard. But the link between remote sensing indices and quality parameters of grapes is still unclear. Indeed, though in red grape varieties anthocyanins content was spatially negatively correlated to vigor parameters, it seemed that yield, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Plant Cell Density (PCD) indices were poorly correlated. Moreover, the link to quality parameters of wines remains uncertain. It was shown that more vigorous vines would lead to wines with less tannins while anthocyanins in wines would be highest when the vines were balanced but the question is if vine size or architecture, yield or nitrogen assimilation would play major contribution to those differences. The general scope of our project was to provide further knowledge on the relationship between vigor parameters and wine composition and relate these to the information gained by remote sensing. Variability in a 0.15 ha vineyard of Pinot noir planted in 2003 and grafted on SO4 rootstock at Geisenheim (Germany) was followed. Vine vigor was assessed manually for each of the 400 vines (cane number, pruning weight, trunk diameter) together with yield parameters (number of bunches per vine, crop yield). Leaf composition was assessed with a hand-held optical sensor (Multiplex3® [Mx3] (Force-A, Orsay, France) based on chlorophyll fluorescence screening providing information on leaf chlorophyll (SFR_G) and nitrogen (NBI_G) content. A micro-scale winemaking of single vines with a 3 factorial design on yield (L low, M middle, H high), SFRG (L, M, H) and canopy size (pruning weight, trunk diameter) (L, M, H) was performed for 2013 and 2014 to completely reflect variability. Wine tannin concentration represented the highest

  1. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  2. Material efficient production of complex (hybrid) components using semi solid forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmüller, Kim Rouven; Liewald, Mathias

    2016-10-01

    By means of lightweight design and lightweight material structures, weight of single components and of resulting component assemblies should be reduced and, additionally, existing functionalities, reliabilities and material properties should be preserved. Therefore, on the one hand novel materials and hybrid material combinations are investigated and on the other hand weight reduction is realized by material efficient component designs. With regard to the manufacturing of such complex component geometries with high dimensional accuracy and relating to the realization of hybrid material concepts, semi solid forming technology offers promising prospects. This paper deals with two research projects recently conducted at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology (IFU, University of Stuttgart) in the field of this forming technology. First project is concerned with the manufacturing of hybrid components with integrated sensor and/or actuator functions and second project is in the field of material efficient manufacturing.

  3. Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hirschfeld, D.A. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

  4. Cementitious composite materials with improved self-healing potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia BAERA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement-based composites have proved, over the time, certain abilities of self-healing the damages (cracks and especially microcracs that occur within their structure. Depending on the level of damage and of the composite type in which this occurs, the self - healing process (SH can range from crack closing or crack sealing to the stage of partial or even complete recovery of material physical - mechanical properties. The aim of this paper is to present the general concept of Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECCs with their unique properties including their self-healing (SH capacity, as an innovative direction for a global sustainable infrastructure. The experimental steps initiated for the development in Romania of this unique category of materials, using materials available on the local market, are also presented.

  5. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  6. Percolation Phenomena For New Magnetic Composites And Tim Nanocomposites Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Thabet Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical investigation in order to obtain new composite and nanocomposite magnetic industrial materials. The effective conductivity and thermal effective conductivity have been predicted by adding various types and percentages of conductive particles (Al2O3, MgO, ZnO, Graphite etc. to the main matrices of Epoxy, Iron and Silicon for formulating new composite and nanocomposite industrial materials. The characterization of effective conductivity of new polymeric composites has been investigated with various applied forces, inclusion types and their concentrations. In addition, the effect of inclusion types and their concentrations on the effective thermal conductivities of thermal interface nanocomposite industrial materials has been explained and discussed.

  7. Heat induced damage detection in composite materials by terahertz radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzieński, Maciej; Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2015-03-01

    In recent years electromagnetic Terahertz (THz) radiation or T-ray has been increasingly used for nondestructive evaluation of various materials such as polymer composites and porous foam tiles in which ultrasonic waves cannot penetrate but T-ray can. Most of these investigations have been limited to mechanical damage detection like inclusions, cracks, delaminations etc. So far only a few investigations have been reported on heat induced damage detection. Unlike mechanical damage the heat induced damage does not have a clear interface between the damaged part and the surrounding intact material from which electromagnetic waves can be reflected back. Difficulties associated with the heat induced damage detection in composite materials using T-ray are discussed in detail in this paper. T-ray measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure of composite specimens.

  8. Composite materials applied to the E-ELT structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajuelo, Eugenio; Gómez, José Ramón; Ronquillo, Bernardo; Brunetto, Enzo; Koch, Fran

    2008-07-01

    The upper part of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) altitude structure is one of the most critical areas of the telescope's structure. This part hosts sensitive optical elements of the telescope. Its structural performance has a major impact on the whole system. The most critical requirements are low optical path obscuration, high static and dynamic performance (high specific modulus), high mechanical safety (high specific strength), low wind cross section and low weight. Composite materials are ideally suited to meet these requirements. This study is carried out in order to quantify the relative advantage of composite material over mild steel, in terms of performance and costs. The mechanical behavior of the steel structure can be easily improved with a structure manufactured with composite materials. This structure is significantly lighter than the steel one and reduces relative displacements between primary and secondary mirror. Consequently, optical performance is improved, assembly process is simplified and transport cost is reduced.

  9. Mimesis, Memory, and Borrowed Materials: A Portfolio of Compositions

    OpenAIRE

    Bunce, Guy

    2013-01-01

    This thesis consists of a portfolio of nine musical compositions with accompanying recordings and commentary. The works included range from solo chamber music to large ensemble and explore the notions of mimesis, memory, and borrowed materials in musical composition. The commentary begins by providing a framework and historical context to the portfolio and in particular explores mimesis as an æsthetic device across the centuries and art forms. Music for amateurs and multiple tempi are then pr...

  10. Experimental Investigation of Textile Composite Materials Using Moire Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    The viability as an efficient aircraft material of advanced textile composites is currently being addressed in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. One of the expected milestones of the program is to develop standard test methods for these complex material systems. Current test methods for laminated composites may not be optimum for textile composites, since the architecture of the textile induces nonuniform deformation characteristics on the scale of the smallest repeating unit of the architecture. The smallest repeating unit, also called the unit cell, is often larger than the strain gages used for testing of tape composites. As a result, extending laminated composite test practices to textiles can often lead to pronounced scatter in material property measurements. It has been speculated that the fiber architectures produce significant surface strain nonuniformities, however, the magnitudes were not well understood. Moire interferometry, characterized by full-field information, high displacement sensitivity, and high spatial resolution, is well suited to document the surface strain on textile composites. Studies at the NASA Langley Research Center on a variety of textile architectures including 2-D braids and 3-D weaves, has evidenced the merits of using moire interferometry to guide in test method development for textile composites. Moire was used to support tensile testing by validating instrumentation practices and documenting damage mechanisms. It was used to validate shear test methods by mapping the full-field deformation of shear specimens. Moire was used to validate open hole tension experiments to determine the strain concentration and compare then to numeric predictions. It was used for through-the-thickness tensile strength test method development, to verify capabilities for testing of both 2-D and 3-D material systems. For all of these examples, moire interferometry provided vision so that test methods could be developed with less

  11. Accelerating MRO procedures for composite materials using innovative detection techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J.; Pelt, M.; Schoemaker, C.; Borst, M.; Groves, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of large commercial aircraft such as the Airbus A350 and the Boeing 787, together with military aircraft such as the Lockheed Martin F35, with a large share of composite components of up to 50%, make it necessary for attention to be focussed on the development of new and effective ma

  12. Accelerating MRO procedures for composite materials using innovative detection techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J.; Pelt, M.; Schoemaker, C.; Borst, M.; Groves, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of large commercial aircraft such as the Airbus A350 and the Boeing 787, together with military aircraft such as the Lockheed Martin F35, with a large share of composite components of up to 50%, make it necessary for attention to be focussed on the development of new and effective

  13. Tracer techniques for the assessment of material migration and surface modification of plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M., E-mail: rubel@kth.se [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Weckmann, A.; Ström, P.; Petersson, P.; Garcia-Carrasco, A. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Wienhold, P. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Fortuna-Zaleśna, E. [Faculty of Materials Science, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Tracer techniques were used in the TEXTOR tokamak to determine high-Z metal migration and the retention of species used for plasma edge cooling or wall cleaning under different operation conditions. • Volatile molybdenum hexa-fluoride, nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 were used as markers in tokamak or ion cyclotron wall conditioning discharges (ICWC). • The objective was to obtain qualitative and quantitative of a global and local deposition pattern and material mixing effects. • The deposition and retention was studied on plasma-facing components, collector probes and test limiters. • Optical spectroscopy and ex-situ analysis techniques were used to determine the plasma response to tracer injection and surface composition modification. - Abstract: Tracer techniques were used in the TEXTOR tokamak to determine high-Z metal migration and the deposition of species used for plasma edge cooling or wall conditioning under different types of operation conditions. Volatile molybdenum hexa-fluoride, nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 were used as markers in tokamak or ion cyclotron wall conditioning discharges (ICWC). The objective was to obtain qualitative and quantitative of a global and local deposition pattern and material mixing effects. The deposition and retention was studied on plasma-facing components, collector probes and test limiters. Optical spectroscopy and ex-situ analysis techniques were used to determine the plasma response to tracer injection and the modification of surface composition. Molybdenum and light isotopes were detected on all types of limiters and short-term probes retrieved from the vessel showing that both helium and nitrogen are trapped following wall conditioning and edge cooling. Only small amounts below 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} of {sup 18}O were detected on surfaces treated by oxygen-assisted ICWC.

  14. Application of sandwich honeycomb carbon/glass fiber-honeycomb composite in the floor component of electric car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmaji, I. C.; Wijang, W. R.; Andri, S.; Bambang, K.; Teguh, T.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays composite is a superior material used in automotive component due to its outstanding mechanical behavior. The sandwich polypropylene honeycomb core with carbon/glass fiber composite skin (SHCG) as based material in a floor component of electric car application is investigated in the present research. In sandwich structure form, it can absorb noise better compare with the conventional material [1]. Also in present paper, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of SHCG as based material for floor component of the electric car is analyzed. The composite sandwich is contained with a layer uniform carbon fiber and mixing non-uniform carbon-glass fiber in upper and lower skin. Between skins of SHCG are core polypropylene honeycomb that it have good flexibility to form following dies profile. The variables of volume fraction ratio of carbon/glass fiber in SHCG skin are 20/80%, 30/70%, and 50/50%. The specimen of SHCG is tested using the universal testing machine by three points bending method refers to ASTM C393 and ASTM C365. The cross point between tensile strength to the volume fraction the mixing carbon/glass line and ratio cost line are the searched material with good mechanical performance and reasonable cost. The point is 30/70 volume fraction of carbon/glass fiber. The result of the testing experiment is become input properties of model structure sandwich in FEA simulation. FEA simulation approach is conducted to find critical strength and factor of complex safety geometry against varied distributed passenger loads of a floor component the electric car. The passenger loads variable are 80, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 kg.

  15. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  16. Chemical composition of the clays as indicator raw material sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khramchenkova Rezida Kh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of study on the chemical composition of unglazed pottery from the excavations of the Bulgar fortified settlement site and the clay, selected from the modern deposits of ceramic raw materials located near the medieval settlement sites. Significant differences in macro- and microelement composition of different groups of ceramics have been revealed. The difference in the macroelemental composition is largely determined by the ceramic fabric recipe. Thus, the high calcium content corresponds to the addition of river shells, the high content of silicon results from sand addition. A more interesting picture has been revealed in the course of studies of the so-called “trace elements” (microelements. Nine groups of ceramics with different elemental set have been distinguished. The first two groups consist of imported ceramics; other groups have demonstrated a rather pronounced elemental composition. The most notable variations are observed in chromium, vanadium and nickel content. Similar microelement composition variety has been observed in clays from deposits of different localization, while the concentration of the mentioned elements in a variety of clays also differs considerably. Therefore, marker elements typical of different clays have been identified. A comparative analysis of the data obtained for clay raw materials and ceramics has been conducted. The results demonstrate the potential of studying the elemental composition in order to determine the localization of the raw material sources for ceramic production.

  17. Method of Making an Electroactive Sensing/Actuating Material for Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a, third component of micro -sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  18. Sensing/actuating materials made from carbon nanotube polymer composites and methods for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  19. Manufacturing technology of the composite materials: nanocrystalline material – polymer type

    OpenAIRE

    B. Ziębowicz; D. Szewieczek; L.A. Dobrzański

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents the material and technological solution which makes it possible to obtain the nanocrystalline, ferromagnetic powder material of Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 alloy after its thermal nanocrystallization with the succeeding high-energy milling. Another aspect was to develop the technology to obtain the nanocrystalline composite materials made by binding the obtained powder material with the high density low-pressures polyethylene (PEHD) with the controlled ferromagnetic and ...

  20. METHODS OF THE APPROXIMATE ESTIMATIONS OF FATIGUE DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE AIRFRAME COMPONENT TYPICAL ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Strizhius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods of the approximate estimations of fatigue durability of composite airframe component typical elements which can be recommended for application at the stage of outline designing of the airplane are generated and presented.

  1. Graphene Oxide: A One- versus Two-Component Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Anton; Grote, Fabian; Overgaard, Marc; Roth, Alexandra; Halbig, Christian E; Nørgaard, Kasper; Guldi, Dirk M; Eigler, Siegfried

    2016-09-14

    The structure of graphene oxide (GO) is a matter of discussion. While established GO models are based on functional groups attached to the carbon framework, another frequently used model claims that GO consists of two components, a slightly oxidized graphene core and highly oxidized molecular species, oxidative debris (OD), adsorbed on it. Those adsorbents are claimed to be the origin for optical properties of GO. Here, we examine this model by preparing GO with a low degree of functionalization, combining it with OD and studying the optical properties of both components and their combination in an artificial two-component system. The analyses of absorption and emission spectra as well as lifetime measurements reveal that properties of the combined system are distinctly different from those of GO. That confirms structural models of GO as a separate oxygenated hexagonal carbon framework with optical properties governed by its internal structure rather than the presence of OD. Understanding the structure of GO allows further reliable interpretation of its optical and electronic properties and enables controlled processing of GO.

  2. A LOWER BOUND LIMIT ANALYSIS OF DUCTILE COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongtao; Liu Yinghua; Xu Bingye

    2005-01-01

    The plastic load-bearing capacity of ductile composites such as metal matrix composites is studied with an insight into the microstructures. The macroscopic strength of a composite is obtained by combining the homogenization theory with static limit analysis, where the temperature parameter method is used to construct the self-equilibrium stress field. An interface failure model is proposed to account for the effects of the interface on the failure of composites.The static limit analysis with the finite-element method is then formulated as a constrained nonlinear programming problem, which is solved by the Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP)method. Finally, the macroscopic transverse strength of perforated materials, the macroscopic transverse and off-axis strength of fiber-reinforced composites are obtained through numerical calculation. The computational results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Components of abstracts in materials science and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Šauperl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the structure of abstracts in Slovenian and international journals in the field of materials and technology. The aim of the study was to analyze the adherence of the abstracts published in Materials and Technology (MIT and Materials Science and Technology (MST to two different instructions for the preparation of abstracts (scheme based on ISO 214:1976 and Spanring system. 25 abstracts from each journal were divided into sentences. We tried to place the sentences into one of the categories of the above mentioned schemes. The research was a part of the postgraduate study in the Department of Library and Information Science and Book Studies (Faculty of Arts, Ljubljana in September and October 2008. There are no important differences between MIT and MST. Spanring system seems more appropriate for the field of materials and technology. The place and the time of the research should be added to abstracts and the Hu-bit category should be distributed into two parts: Hu-M (method and Hu-R (results. The recommended Spanring system should be harmonized with authors, who publish in these serials and the effect of the instructions should be analyzed, too.

  4. Electrostatic Discharge Sensitivity and Electrical Conductivity of Composite Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Daniels; Daniel J. Prentice; Chelsea Weir; Michelle L. Pantoya; Gautham Ramachandran; Tim Dallas

    2013-02-01

    Composite energetic material response to electrical stimuli was investigated and a correlation between electrical conductivity and ignition sensitivity was examined. The composites consisted of micrometer particle aluminum combined with another metal, metal oxide, or fluoropolymer. Of the nine tested mixtures, aluminum with copper oxide was the only mixture to ignite by electrostatic discharge with minimum ignition energy (MIE) of 25 mJ and an electrical conductivity of 1246.25 nS; two orders of magnitude higher than the next composite. This study showed a similar trend in MIE for ignition triggered by a discharged spark compared with a thermal hot wire source.

  5. Determination of replicate composite bone material properties using modal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuridan, Steven; Goossens, Quentin; Pastrav, Leonard; Roosen, Jorg; Mulier, Michiel; Denis, Kathleen; Desmet, Wim; Sloten, Jos Vander

    2017-02-01

    Replicate composite bones are used extensively for in vitro testing of new orthopedic devices. Contrary to tests with cadaveric bone material, which inherently exhibits large variability, they offer a standardized alternative with limited variability. Accurate knowledge of the composite's material properties is important when interpreting in vitro test results and when using them in FE models of biomechanical constructs. The cortical bone analogue material properties of three different fourth-generation composite bone models were determined by updating FE bone models using experimental and numerical modal analyses results. The influence of the cortical bone analogue material model (isotropic or transversely isotropic) and the inter- and intra-specimen variability were assessed. Isotropic cortical bone analogue material models failed to represent the experimental behavior in a satisfactory way even after updating the elastic material constants. When transversely isotropic material models were used, the updating procedure resulted in a reduction of the longitudinal Young's modulus from 16.00GPa before updating to an average of 13.96 GPa after updating. The shear modulus was increased from 3.30GPa to an average value of 3.92GPa. The transverse Young's modulus was lowered from an initial value of 10.00GPa to 9.89GPa. Low inter- and intra-specimen variability was found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Infrared thermography to impact damaging of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Simone; Boffa, Natalino D.; Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; Meola, Carosena; Ricci, Fabrizio; Russo, Pietro; Simeoli, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Composite materials are becoming ever more popular and being used in an increasing number of applications. This because, to meet the users' demand, it is possible to create a new material of given characteristics in a quite simple way by changing either the type of matrix, or reinforcement. Of course, any new material requires characterization for its appropriate exploitation. In this context, infrared thermography (IRT) represents a viable means since it is non-contact, non-intrusive and can be used either for non-destructive evaluation to detect manufacturing defects, or fatigue induced degradation, or else for monitoring online the response to applied loads. In this work, IRT is used to investigate different types of composite materials which are based on either a thermoset, or a thermoplastic matrix, which may be neat, or modified by addition of a percentage of a specific compatibilizing agent, and reinforced with carbon, glass, or jute fibers. IRT is used with a twofold function. First, to non-destructively evaluate, with the lock-in technique, materials before and after impact to either assure absence of manufacturing defects, or discover the damage caused by the impact. Second, IRT is used to visualize thermal effects, which develop when the material is subjected to impact. The obtained results show that it is possible to follow the material bending, delamination and eventual failure under impact and get information, which may be valuable to deepen the complex impact damaging mechanisms of composites

  7. Tetracycline Loaded Collagen/Hydroxyapatite Composite Materials for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cristina Rusu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the preparation, characterisation, and testing of tetracycline loaded collagen-carboxymethylcellulose/hydroxyapatite ternary composite materials. The synthesis of this drug delivery system consists in two steps: the first step is the mineralization of collagen-carboxymethylcellulose gel while the second step corresponds to the loading of the ternary composite material with tetracycline. The obtained DDS is characterised by physicochemical, morphological, and release behaviour by using FTIR spectroscopy and microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy. Based on the release study, it can be assumed that tetracycline is released in a prolonged way, assuring at least 6 days of antiseptic properties.

  8. Preparation of Nano/Micron Composite Materials by Process Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Ai-feng; WEI Qi; JI; Yuan; HU Chuan-xin; YAO Jun-min

    2004-01-01

    This thesis put forward a method that controls the process of synthesizing nanomaterial to realize the composite of nanomaterial and micronmaterial. This thesis realizes the composite of nanomaterial and micronmaterial by adding micronmaterial during production of nanomaterial through sol-gel method, also introduces the technique and experiment's process preparation of nanocomposite material, and successfully prepared nanocomposite materials with nano-PbTiO3 covered on the surface of micron-Ni. According to the sample's SEM-pictures, the core-shell can be observed plate microstructure, and it is uniform, tight, full and good.

  9. Novel Composite Materials for SOFC Cathode-Interconnect Contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. H. Zhu

    2009-07-31

    This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions of our University Coal Research Project, which focused on developing a new class of electrically-conductive, Cr-blocking, damage-tolerant Ag-perovksite composite materials for the cathode-interconnect contact of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The Ag evaporation rate increased linearly with air flow rate initially and became constant for the air flow rate {ge} {approx} 1.0 cm {center_dot} s{sup -1}. An activation energy of 280 KJ.mol{sup -1} was obtained for Ag evaporation in both air and Ar+5%H{sub 2}+3%H{sub 2}O. The exposure environment had no measurable influence on the Ag evaporation rate as well as its dependence on the gas flow rate, while different surface morphological features were developed after thermal exposure in the oxidizing and reducing environments. Pure Ag is too volatile at the SOFC operating temperature and its evaporation rate needs to be reduced to facilitate its application as the cathode-interconnect contact. Based on extensive evaporation testing, it was found that none of the alloying additions reduced the evaporation rate of Ag over the long-term exposure, except the noble metals Au, Pt, and Pd; however, these noble elements are too expensive to justify their practical use in contact materials. Furthermore, the addition of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) into Ag to form a composite material also did not significantly modify the Ag evaporation rate. The Ag-perovskite composites with the perovskite being either (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2})O{sub 3} (LSCF) or LSM were systematically evaluated as the contact material between the ferritic interconnect alloy Crofer 22 APU and the LSM cathode. The area specific resistances (ASRs) of the test specimens were shown to be highly dependent on the volume percentage and the type of the perovskite present in the composite contact material as well as the amount of thermal cycling

  10. Development and Analysis of Synthetic Composite Materials Emulating Patient AAA Wall Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, Christa M.

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) rupture accounts for 14,000 deaths a year in the United States. Since the number of ruptures has not decreased significantly in recent years despite improvements in imaging and surgical procedures, there is a need for an accurate, noninvasive technique capable of establishing rupture risk for specific patients and discriminating lesions at high risk. In this project, synthetic composite materials replicating patient-specific wall stiffness and strength were developed and their material properties evaluated. Composites utilizing various fibers were developed to give a range of stiffness from 1825.75 kPa up through 8187.64 kPa with one base material, Sylgard 170. A range of strength from 631.12 kPa to 1083 kPa with the same base material was also found. By evaluating various base materials and various reinforcing fibers, a catalogue of stiffnesses and strengths was started to allow for adaptation to specific patient properties. Three specific patient properties were well-matched with two composites fabricated: silk thread-reinforced Sylgard 170 and silk thread-reinforced Dragon Skin 20. The composites showed similar stiffnesses to the specific patients while reaching target stresses at particular strains. Not all patients were matched with composites as of yet, but recommendations for future matches are able to be determined. These composites will allow for the future evaluation of flow-induced wall stresses in models replicating patient material properties and geometries.

  11. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: j.h.you@ipp.mpg.de

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated.

  12. Two-component membrane material properties and domain formation from dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illya, G; Lipowsky, R; Shillcock, J C

    2006-09-21

    The material parameters (area stretch modulus and bending rigidity) of two-component amphiphilic membranes are determined from dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The preferred area per molecule for each species is varied so as to produce homogeneous mixtures or nonhomogeneous mixtures that form domains. If the latter mixtures are composed of amphiphiles with the same tail length, but different preferred areas per molecule, their material parameters increase monotonically as a function of composition. By contrast, mixtures of amphiphiles that differ in both tail length and preferred area per molecule form both homogeneous and nonhomogeneous mixtures that both exhibit smaller values of their material properties compared to the corresponding pure systems. When the same nonhomogeneous mixtures of amphiphiles are assembled into planar membrane patches and vesicles, the resulting domain shapes are different when the bending rigidities of the domains are sufficiently different. Additionally, both bilayer and monolayer domains are observed in vesicles. We conclude that the evolution of the domain shapes is influenced by the high curvature of the vesicles in the simulation, a result that may be relevant for biological vesicle membranes.

  13. Quantitative characterization of the carbon/carbon composites components based on video of polarized light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yixian; Qi, Lehua; Song, Yongshan; Chao, Xujiang

    2017-02-13

    The components of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have significant influence on the thermal and mechanical properties, so a quantitative characterization of component is necessary to study the microstructure of C/C composites, and further to improve the macroscopic properties of C/C composites. Considering the extinction crosses of the pyrocarbon matrix have significant moving features, the polarized light microscope (PLM) video is used to characterize C/C composites quantitatively because it contains sufficiently dynamic and structure information. Then the optical flow method is introduced to compute the optical flow field between the adjacent frames, and segment the components of C/C composites from PLM image by image processing. Meanwhile the matrix with different textures is re-segmented by the length difference of motion vectors, and then the component fraction of each component and extinction angle of pyrocarbon matrix are calculated directly. Finally, the C/C composites are successfully characterized from three aspects of carbon fiber, pyrocarbon, and pores by a series of image processing operators based on PLM video, and the errors of component fractions are less than 15%.

  14. A single-component liquid-phase hydrogen storage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Campbell, Patrick G; Zakharov, Lev N; Liu, Shih-Yuan

    2011-12-07

    The current state-of-the-art for hydrogen storage is compressed H(2) at 700 bar. The development of a liquid-phase hydrogen storage material has the potential to take advantage of the existing liquid-based distribution infrastructure. We describe a liquid-phase hydrogen storage material that is a liquid under ambient conditions (i.e., at 20 °C and 1 atm pressure), air- and moisture-stable, and recyclable; releases H(2) controllably and cleanly at temperatures below or at the proton exchange membrane fuel cell waste-heat temperature of 80 °C; utilizes catalysts that are cheap and abundant for H(2) desorption; features reasonable gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity; and does not undergo a phase change upon H(2) desorption. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.; Yanar, N.; Chyu, M.; Mazzotta, D.; Slaughter, W.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.; Feng, C.; Chen, R.; Fu, T-C.

    2008-10-01

    In order to meet the 2010-2020 DOE Fossil Energy goals for Advanced Power Systems, future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbines will need to be operated at higher temperatures for extended periods of time, in environments that contain substantially higher moisture concentrations in comparison to current commercial natural gas-fired turbines. Development of modified or advanced material systems, combined with aerothermal concepts are currently being addressed in order to achieve successful operation of these land-based engines. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has initiated a research program effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers as Howmet International and Coatings for Industry (CFI), and test facilities as Westinghouse Plasma Corporation (WPC) and Praxair, to develop advanced material and aerothermal technologies for use in future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine applications. Our program efforts and recent results are presented.

  16. A novel biaxial specimen for inducing residual stresses in thermoset polymers and fibre composite material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens Henrik; Jensen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    engineers when they challenge the material limits in present and future thermoset and composite component. In addition to the new specimen configuration, this paper presents an analytical solution for the residual stress state in the specimen. The analytical solution assumes linear elastic and isotropic......A new type of specimen configuration with the purpose of introducing a well-defined biaxial residual (axisymmetric) stress field in a neat thermoset or a fibre composite material is presented. The ability to experimentally validate residual stress predictions is an increasing need for design...... material behaviour. Experimental strain release measurements and the analytical solution determine the residual stress state present in the material. A demonstration on neat epoxy is conducted and residual stress predictions of high accuracy and repeatability have been achieved. The precise determination...

  17. Research & Development of Materials/Processing Methods for Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Phase 2 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szweda, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Initiative that begun in 1992 has led the way for Industry, Academia, and Government to carry out a 10 year R&D plan to develop CFCCs for these industrial applications. In Phase II of this program, Dow Corning has led a team of OEM's, composite fabricators, and Government Laboratories to develop polymer derived CFCC materials and processes for selected industrial applications. During this phase, Dow Corning carried extensive process development and representative component demonstration activities on gas turbine components, chemical pump components and heat treatment furnace components.

  18. How to determine composite material properties using numerical homogenization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2014-01-01

    Numerical homogenization is an efficient way to determine effective macroscopic properties, such as the elasticity tensor, of a periodic composite material. In this paper an educational description of the method is provided based on a short, self-contained Matlab implementation. It is shown how t...... cell of the periodic material can take the shape of a square, rectangle, or parallelogram, allowing for all kinds of 2D periodicities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Numerical homogenization is an efficient way to determine effective macroscopic properties, such as the elasticity tensor, of a periodic composite material. In this paper an educational description of the method is provided based on a short, self-contained Matlab implementation. It is shown how...... the basic code, which computes the effective elasticity tensor of a two material composite, where one material could be void, is easily extended to include more materials. Furthermore, extensions to homogenization of conductivity, thermal expansion, and fluid permeability are described in detail. The unit...

  19. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  20. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  1. Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are ceramic materials, such as SiC, that have been reinforced by high strength fibers, such as carbon. Designers are interested in using ceramic matrix composites because they have the capability of withstanding significant loads while at relatively high temperatures (in excess of 1,000 C). Ceramic matrix composites retain the ceramic materials ability to withstand high temperatures, but also possess a much greater ductility and toughness. Their high strength and medium toughness is what makes them of so much interest to the aerospace community. This work concentrated on two different tasks. The first task was to do an extensive literature search into the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composite materials. This report contains the results of this task. The second task was to use this understanding to help interpret the ceramic matrix composite mechanical test results that had already been obtained by NASA. Since the specific details of these test results are subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), they are reported in a separate document (Jordan, 1997).

  2. Tensile & impact behaviour of natural fibre-reinforced composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, B.C. [Victoria Univ. of Technology, Footscray (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-12-31

    Short abaca fiber reinforced composite materials are fabricated and investigated for short term performance. Abaca plants which grow in abundance in Asia contain fibers that are inexpensive but underutilized. This study attempts to utilize the abaca fibers for composite material structure as a possible alternative to timber products in building applications. The composite material is fabricated using the hand lay-up method under varying fiber length and fiber volume fraction. The fibers are impregnated with a mixture of resins which cures at room temperature. A fabricating facility is designed to accommodate fabrication of lamina. Tensile and impact properties are determined in relation to the length and volume fraction of the fiber. For a given fiber length, the tensile and impact strength increase as the volume fraction increases up to a limiting value. And for a given fiber volume fraction, the tensile strength increases but the impact strength decreases as the fiber length increases. This behavior of abaca fiber-reinforced composite lamina will help in optimizing the design parameter in random composite panels.

  3. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, M A; Pettit, F; Meier, G H; Yanar, M; Helminiak, M; Chyu, M; Siw, S; Slaughter, W S; Karaivanov, V; Kang, B S; Feng, C; Tannebaum, J M; Chen, R; Zhang, B; Fu, T; Richards, G A; Sidwell, T G; Straub, D; Casleton, K H; Dogan, O M

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen-fired and oxy-fueled land-based gas turbines currently target inlet operating temperatures of ~1425-1760°C (~2600-3200°F). In view of natural gas or syngas-fired engines, advancements in both materials, as well as aerothermal cooling configurations are anticipated prior to commercial operation. This paper reviews recent technical accomplishments resulting from NETL’s collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University for future land-based gas turbine applications.

  4. Resistance Welding of Advanced Materials and Micro Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard

    presented problems. Simulation of two- and three sheet spot welding of advanced high strength steels DP600 and TRIP700 did generally agree well with experimental observations. Microstructure characterisation revealed that martensite was the main constituent in the final weld. By using empirical formulae......, thermal, electrical and metallurgical effects all signifcantly in uencing the process. Modelling is further complicated when down-scaling the process for welding micro components or when welding new advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry. The current project deals with three main themes...... resistance is addressed both theoretically and experimentally. Secondly the consequences of downscaling the process is investigated experimentally and discussed in relation to simulation of the process. Finally resistance welding of advanced high strength steels is addressed aimed at improving the simulation...

  5. Analysis of Composite Material Blended With Thermoplastics and Jute Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopal S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently natural fibres have been receiving considerable attention as substitutes for synthetic fibre reinforcements due to their low cost, low density, acceptable specific strength, good thermal insulation properties, reduced tool wear, reduced thermal and respiratory irritation and renewable resources. The aim of this work is to develop chemically treated and chemically untreated fibre reinforced composite material with optimum properties so that it can replace the existing synthetic fibre reinforced composite material for a suitable application. In this work, polyester resin has been reinforced with jute fabric, so as to develop jute fibre reinforced plastic (JFRP with a weight ratio of 10:1:1 Hand lay-up technique was used to manufacture the composites where Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide and cobalt Naphthalene were used as coupling agent and accelerator respectively. The thickness of the composite specimen was obtained by laying up layer of fibre and matrix. The untreated composites have been used and mechanical properties are compared with natural fibre and jute fibre composite by using the Ansys method.

  6. NASA Composite Materials Development: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Pipes, R. Byron; Johnston, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Composite materials have emerged as the materials of choice for increasing the performance and reducing the weight and cost of military, general aviation, and transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. Major advancements have been made in the ability to design, fabricate, and analyze large complex aerospace structures. The recent efforts by Boeing and Airbus to incorporate composite into primary load carrying structures of large commercial transports and to certify the airworthiness of these structures is evidence of the significant advancements made in understanding and use of these materials in real world aircraft. NASA has been engaged in research on composites since the late 1960 s and has worked to address many development issues with these materials in an effort to ensure safety, improve performance, and improve affordability of air travel for the public good. This research has ranged from synthesis of advanced resin chemistries to development of mathematical analyses tools to reliably predict the response of built-up structures under combined load conditions. The lessons learned from this research are highlighted with specific examples to illustrate the problems encountered and solutions to these problems. Examples include specific technologies related to environmental effects, processing science, fabrication technologies, nondestructive inspection, damage tolerance, micromechanics, structural mechanics, and residual life prediction. The current state of the technology is reviewed and key issues requiring additional research identified. Also, grand challenges to be solved for expanded use of composites in aero structures are identified.

  7. Uncertainty modelling and code calibration for composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Branner, Kim; Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr

    2013-01-01

    between risk of failure and cost of the structure. Consideration related to calibration of partial safety factors for composite material is described, including the probability of failure, format for the partial safety factor method and weight factors for different load cases. In a numerical example...

  8. Graphics and composite material computer program enhancements for SPAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, G. L.; Baker, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    User documentation is provided for additional computer programs developed for use in conjunction with SPAR. These programs plot digital data, simplify input for composite material section properties, and compute lamina stresses and strains. Sample problems are presented including execution procedures, program input, and graphical output.

  9. Quantitative Description of the Morphology and Microdamages of Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M. S.

    The purpose of the present Ph.D project is to investigate correlation between the microstructure variability and transverse mechanical properties. The material considered here is a polymer based unidirectional composite with long cylindrical fibers, and the transverse properties can be analysed...

  10. The Deflated Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Method Applied to Composite Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jönsthövel, T.B.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations with composite materials often involve large jumps in the coefficients of the underlying stiffness matrix. These jumps can introduce unfavorable eigenvalues in the spectrum of the stiffness matrix. We show that the rigid body modes; the translations and rotations, of the disjunct rigid b

  11. Aluminum-matrix composite materials with shungite rock fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikov, I. E.; Kovalevski, V. V.; Chernyshova, T. A.; Bolotova, L. K.

    2010-11-01

    A method is proposed for the introduction of shungite rocks into aluminum melts by mechanical mixing with carriers, namely, aluminum granules and reactive titanium powders taking part in exothermic in situ reactions. The structures of composite materials with shungite rock additions are studied, and a stabilizing effect of these additions on dry sliding friction is revealed.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Calcium Fluoride-Based Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleczewska, Joanna; Pryliński, Mariusz; Podlewska, Magdalena; Sokołowski, Jerzy; Łapińska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate mechanical properties of light-curing composite materials modified with the addition of calcium fluoride. The study used one experimental light-curing composite material (ECM) and one commercially available flowable light-curing composite material (FA) that were modified with 0.5–5.0 wt% anhydrous calcium fluoride. Morphology of the samples and uniformity of CaF2 distribution were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Mechanical properties were tested after 24-hour storage of specimens in dry or wet conditions. Stored dry ECM enriched with 0.5–1.0 wt% CaF2 showed higher tensile strength values, while water storage of all modified ECM specimens decreased their tensile strength. The highest Vickers hardness tested after dry storage was observed for 2.5 wt% CaF2 content in ECM. The addition of 2.0–5.0 wt% CaF2 to FA caused significant decrease in tensile strength after dry storage and overall tensile strength decrease of modified FA specimens after water storage. The content of 2.0 wt% CaF2 in FA resulted in the highest Vickers hardness tested after wet storage. Commercially available composite material (FA), unmodified with fluoride addition, demonstrated overall significantly higher mechanical properties. PMID:28004001

  13. Mechanical Properties of Calcium Fluoride-Based Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Łukomska-Szymańska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study was to evaluate mechanical properties of light-curing composite materials modified with the addition of calcium fluoride. The study used one experimental light-curing composite material (ECM and one commercially available flowable light-curing composite material (FA that were modified with 0.5–5.0 wt% anhydrous calcium fluoride. Morphology of the samples and uniformity of CaF2 distribution were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS. Mechanical properties were tested after 24-hour storage of specimens in dry or wet conditions. Stored dry ECM enriched with 0.5–1.0 wt% CaF2 showed higher tensile strength values, while water storage of all modified ECM specimens decreased their tensile strength. The highest Vickers hardness tested after dry storage was observed for 2.5 wt% CaF2 content in ECM. The addition of 2.0–5.0 wt% CaF2 to FA caused significant decrease in tensile strength after dry storage and overall tensile strength decrease of modified FA specimens after water storage. The content of 2.0 wt% CaF2 in FA resulted in the highest Vickers hardness tested after wet storage. Commercially available composite material (FA, unmodified with fluoride addition, demonstrated overall significantly higher mechanical properties.

  14. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). MATERIALS AND METHODS Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). RESULTS Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia. PMID:27555895

  15. Calculation of Gamma Photon Propagation Processes in a Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenko, V. I.; Cherkashina, N. I.; Noskov, A. V.; Yastrebinskii, R. N.; Sokolenko, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the data on radiation protection properties of a composite material consisting of the glass-crystalline matrix and nanotubular chrysotile modified by inserting PbWO4 into its structure, as well as the data on key physico-mechanical characteristics of the composite, such as density, ultimate compression strength, microhardness, porosity, water absorption, temperature stability, and thermostability. It was established that in addition to radiation protection properties, the examined material has enhanced practical design characteristics and can be used as a construction material. The propagation of gamma photons with different energy levels through the composite material is examined. A graph is built for dependence of the linear gamma radiation attenuation coefficient (μ) on energy in the range 0.25 data is very small and equals around 2%, which confirms that the developed model is correct. It is established that the composite possesses enhanced radiation protection characteristics, far exceeding those of iron and slightly (by 10.4%) yielding to pure lead.

  16. Data-driven design optimization for composite material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Michopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Athanasios Iliopoulos; Samuel G. Lambrakos; Tomonari Furukawa

    2011-06-01

    The main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the value of design optimization beyond its use for structural shape determination in the realm of the constitutive characterization of anisotropic material systems such as polymer matrix composites with or without damage. The approaches discussed are based on the availability of massive experimental data...

  17. Composite flywheel material design for high-speed energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Conteh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lamina and laminate mechanical properties of materials suitable for flywheel high-speed energy storage were investigated. Low density, low modulus and high strength composite material properties were implemented for the constant stress portion of the flywheel while higher density, higher modulus and strength were implemented for the constant thickness portion of the flywheel. Design and stress analysis were used to determine the maximum energy densities and shape factors for the flywheel. Analytical studies along with the use of the CADEC-online software were used to evaluate the lamina and laminate properties. This study found that a hybrid composite of M46J/epoxy–T1000G/epoxy for the flywheel exhibits a higher energy density when compared to known existing flywheel hybrid composite materials such as boron/epoxy–graphite/epoxy. Results from this study will contribute to further development of the flywheel that has recently re-emerged as a promising application for energy storage due to significant improvements in composite materials and technology.

  18. Physical and Model Uncertainty for Fatigue Design of Composite Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    The main aim of the present report is to establish stochastic models for the uncertainties related to fatigue design of composite materials. The uncertainties considered are the physical uncertainty related to the static and fatigue strength and the model uncertainty related to Miners rule...

  19. Manufacturing of Aluminum Composite Material Using Stir Casting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hayat Jokhio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of aluminum alloy based casting composite materials via stir casting is one of the prominent and economical route for development and processing of metal matrix composites materials. Properties of these materials depend upon many processing parameters and selection of matrix and reinforcements. Literature reveals that most of the researchers are using 2, 6 and 7xxx aluminum matrix reinforced with SiC particles for high strength properties whereas, insufficient information is available on reinforcement of \\"Al2O3\\" particles in 7xxx aluminum matrix. The 7xxx series aluminum matrix usually contains Cu-Zn-Mg. Therefore, the present research was conducted to investigate the effect of elemental metal such as Cu-Zn-Mg in aluminum matrix on mechanical properties of stir casting of aluminum composite materials reinforced with alpha \\"Al2O3\\" particles using simple foundry melting alloying and casting route. The age hardening treatments were also applied to study the aging response of the aluminum matrix on strength, ductility and hardness. The experimental results indicate that aluminum matrix cast composite can be manufactured via conventional foundry method giving very good responses to the strength and ductility up to 10% \\"Al2O3\\" particles reinforced in aluminum matrix.

  20. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  1. Study on the Compatibility of SMA and Composite Materials by Holographic Interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhimin

    2000-01-01

    With the help of holographic interferometry a study is conducted on the compatibility of SMA (shape memory alloy) and epoxy resin composite material. The paper gives experiment results and analysis which show that after coupling SMA with the composite material, the flexural rigidity of composite material is somewhat reinforced. Under certain conditions, SMA and the epoxy resin composite material are compatible.

  2. Method of Manufacturing A Porous Polymer Component Involving Use of A Dissolvable, Sacrificial Material

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Larsen, Layla Bashir; Skolimowski, Maciej; Amato, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of manufacturing a porous polymer component 1 with structured and/or random pores 4 and/or channels 5. The method comprises arranging a dissolvable, sacrificial material 2 in a geometrical arrangement corresponding to an inner structure to be obtained in the polymer component 1. A component material 3, which is to form the final component 1, is arranged so that it surrounds at least a majority of the sacrificial material 2, and subsequently the sacrif...

  3. Embedding Designed Deformation: towards the computational design of graded material components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recognising that the process of making materials affords opportunities not available when using existing natural or off-the-shelf materials, the focus of this paper is upon abstraction strategies by which the mechanical properties of composite materials might be engaged within digital architectural...

  4. A review of composite and metallic bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Materials, fabrication, and material selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer exceptional potential for a clean, efficient, and reliable power source. The bipolar plate (BP) is a key component in this device, as it connects each cell electrically, supplies reactant gases to both anode and cathode, and removes reaction products from the cell. BPs have primarily been fabricated from high-density graphite, but in recent years, much attention has been paid to develop the cost-effective and feasible alternative materials. Recently, two different classes of materials have been attracted attention: metals and composite materials. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the current researches being carried out on the metallic and composite BPs, covering materials and fabrication methods. In this research, the phenomenon of ionic contamination due to the release of the corrosion products of metallic BP and relative impact on the durability as well as performance of PEM fuel cells is extensively investigated. Furthermore, in this paper, upon several effective parameters on commercialization of PEM fuel cells, such as stack cost, weight, volume, durability, strength, ohmic resistance, and ionic contamination, a material selection is performed among the most common BPs currently being used. This material selection is conducted by using Simple Additive Weighting Method (SAWM).

  5. Recent developments of discrete material optimization of laminated composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Erik; Sørensen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    This work will give a quick summary of recent developments of the Discrete Material Optimization approach for structural optimization of laminated composite structures. This approach can be seen as a multi-material topology optimization approach for selecting the best ply material and number....... The different interpolation schemes used are described, and it is briefly outlined how design rules/manufacturing constraints can be included in the optimization. The approach has been demonstrated for a number of global design criteria like mass, compliance, buckling load factors, etc., but recent work makes...

  6. Bioinspired Composite Materials: Applications in Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Alisha; Mahato, Kuldeep; Chandra, Pranjal; Srivastava, Ananya; Joshi, Shrikrishna N.; Maurya, Pawan Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Evolution-optimized specimens from nature with inimitable properties, and unique structure-function relationships have long served as a source of inspiration for researchers all over the world. For instance, the micro/nanostructured patterns of lotus-leaf and gecko feet helps in self-cleaning, and adhesion, respectively. Such unique properties shown by creatures are results of billions of years of adaptive transformation, that have been mimicked by applying both science and engineering concepts to design bioinspired materials. Various bioinspired composite materials have been developed based on biomimetic principles. This review presents the latest developments in bioinspired materials under various categories with emphasis on diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  7. Concept of a Conducting Composite Material for Lightning Strike Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katunin A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on development of a multifunctional material which allows conducting of electrical current and simultaneously holds mechanical properties of a polymeric composite. Such material could be applied for exterior fuselage elements of an aircraft in order to minimize damage occurring during lightning strikes. The concept introduced in this paper is presented from the points of view of various scientific disciplines including materials science, chemistry, structural physics and mechanical engineering with a discussion on results achieved to-date and further plans of research.

  8. [Effects of composite resin materials on gingiva and pulp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S; Ishikawa, I; Masunaga, H; Matsue, M; Matsue, I

    1989-09-01

    Composite resin materials are now widely used for dental therapy. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of composite resins on gingiva and pulp in case of application of them for temporally splint in periodontal treatment. 60 teeth in 6 female dogs ranging between 1 and 2 years of age with healty teeth and gingiva were divieded to 4 groups; (1) 12 teeth, controls; (2) 12 teeth, self-cured composite resin (Clearfil F II, CF II); (3) 18 teeth, light-cured resin (Belfel LX, BLX), curing time 20 sec. and (4) 18 teeth, BLX, 40 sec., and then 48 class V composite resins were restored supragingivally. The experimental procedure were carried out for 5 days and 30 days. Histopathological observations of 60 teeth inclusive of controls were made by applying to specimens with Hematoxylin eosin staining. For the materials and time periods in this study it was found that; 1. Light-cured composite resin was superior to self-cured composite resin on handlings. 2. There were no significant differences in periodontium between the experimentals (BLX, CF II) and controls in 5 days. At the 30 days the histologic score showed more gingivitis for the experimental teeth than for the controls (BLX-40 greater than BLX-20 greater than CF II greater than Cont.). 3. At 5 days hyperemia occurred in some cases of experimentals (both BLX and CF II). The appearance of predentin and changes of odontblastic layer were observed slightly in 30 days. But there were no significant differences between BLX and CF II. 4. The result suggested that applying to composite resin materials for temporally splint, both gingiva and pulp have to be protected.

  9. Cryogenic piping material selection for the Component Test Facility (CTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, William W.

    1991-01-01

    The anticipated high cost of the 8500 psi cryogenic and 15,000 psi gas piping systems used in the CTF at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center led to the consideration of high-strength materials for these piping systems. Based on years of satisfactory service using austenitic stainless steels in cryogenic applications, particularly for hydrogen service, consideration was limited to the austenitic stainless steels. Attention was focused on alternatives to the 304/304L grades of stainless steel traditionally used in these applications. This paper discusses the various considerations that resulted in the decision to continue using 304/304L for the cryogenic piping and the selection of the nitrogen-strengthened 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn alloy (UNS S21903) for the high-pressure gas systems at the CTF.

  10. DAMAGE AND FRACTURE EVALUATION OF GRANULAR COMPOSITE MATERIALS BY DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jue; XIONG Chunyang; LI Hongju; LI Ming; WANG Jianxiang; FANG Jing

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the applications of digital image correlation technique to the mesoscopic damage and fracture study of some granular based composite materials including steelfiber reinforced concrete, sandstone and crystal-polymer composite. The deformation fields of the composite materials resulted from stress localization were obtained by the correlation computation of the surface images with loading steps and thus the related damage prediction and fracture parameters were evaluated. The correlation searching could be performed either directly based on the gray levels of the digital images or from the wavelet transform (WT) coefficients of the transform spectrum. The latter was developed by the authors and showed higher resolution and sensitivity to the singularity detection.Because the displacement components came from the rough surfaces of the composite materials without any coats of gratings or fringes of optical interferometry, both surface profiles and the deformation fields of the composites were visualized which was helpful to compare each other to analyze the damage of those heterogeneous materials.

  11. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Alfredo; Chiesura, Gabriele; Luyckx, Geert; Degrieck, Joris; Kaufmann, Markus; Vanlanduit, Steve

    2015-10-26

    The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component is a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer automotive control arm; the second is a glass fiber-reinforced polymer aeronautic hinge arm. The modal parameters of both components were estimated by processing the FBG signals with two interrogation techniques: the maximum detection and fast phase correlation algorithms were employed for the demodulation of the FBG signals; the Peak-Picking and PolyMax techniques were instead used for the parameter estimation. To validate the FBG outcomes, reference measurements were performed by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. Sensors 2015, 15 27175 The analysis of the results showed that the FBG sensing capabilities were enhanced when the recently-introduced fast phase correlation algorithm was combined with the state-of-the-art PolyMax estimator curve fitting method. In this case, the FBGs provided the most accurate results, i.e. it was possible to fully characterize the vibration behavior of both composite components. When using more traditional interrogation algorithms (maximum detection) and modal parameter estimation techniques (Peak-Picking), some of the modes were not successfully identified.

  12. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Lamberti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component is a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer automotive control arm; the second is a glass fiber-reinforced polymer aeronautic hinge arm. The modal parameters of both components were estimated by processing the FBG signals with two interrogation techniques: the maximum detection and fast phase correlation algorithms were employed for the demodulation of the FBG signals; the Peak-Picking and PolyMax techniques were instead used for the parameter estimation. To validate the FBG outcomes, reference measurements were performed by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. Sensors 2015, 15 27175 The analysis of the results showed that the FBG sensing capabilities were enhanced when the recently-introduced fast phase correlation algorithm was combined with the state-of-the-art PolyMax estimator curve fitting method. In this case, the FBGs provided the most accurate results, i.e. it was possible to fully characterize the vibration behavior of both composite components. When using more traditional interrogation algorithms (maximum detection and modal parameter estimation techniques (Peak-Picking, some of the modes were not successfully identified.

  13. Self-wound composite nanomembranes as electrode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Heng-Xing; Krien, Cornelia; Fiering, Irina [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, Dresden D-01069 (Germany); Wu, Xing-Long; Guo, Yu-Guo [Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructure and Nanotechnology and Beijing National, Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Center for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190 (China); Fan, Li-Zhen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Mei, Yongfeng [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, Dresden D-01069 (Germany); Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Handan Road 220, 200433 Shanghai (China); Schmidt, Oliver G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, Dresden D-01069 (Germany); Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, Chemnitz D-09107 (Germany)

    2010-11-02

    Self-wound nanomembranes out of functional multilayered structures were designed to improve lithium storage performance. The intrinsic strain is relaxed by rolling; the composite components are uniformly dispersed; the micro/nanohierarchical structure assumes a mixed ion/electron conduction network; and conventional nanomembrane deposition techniques allow for various materials combinations, suitable to meet different demands of lithium ion batteries. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. A composite construction material that solidifies in water

    OpenAIRE

    Moriyoshi, Akihiro; Fukai, Ichiro; Takeuchi, Mikio

    1990-01-01

    A flexible, waterproof material that will solidify in water has long been desired in civil engineering. We have developed a new class of material, called Aquaphalt, which has these and other desirable properties. Aquaphalt is composed of an asphalt emulsion, cement and a water-absorbing polymer. The components are liquid at ambient temperature and can therefore be pumped, but they form a gel almost instantly when mixed. The hardened mixture is similar to hard bitumen, and has very low water p...

  15. Experimental analysis of electrical properties of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, L.; Rovnaník, P.; Černý, R.

    2017-02-01

    Dry cement-based composites are electrically non-conductive materials that behave in electric field like dielectrics. However, a relatively low amount of electrically conductive admixture significantly increases the electrical conductivity which extends applicability of such materials in practice. Therefore, they can be used as self-monitoring sensors controlling development of cracks; as sensors monitoring moisture content or when treated by an external electrical voltage as heat sources used for deicing of material's surface layer. Alkali-activated aluminosilicates (AAA), as competing materials to cement-based materials, are intensively investigated in the present due to their superior durability and environmental impact. Whereas the electrical properties of AAA are similar to those cement-based, they can be enhanced in the same way. In both cases, it is crucial to find a reasonable amount of electrically conductive phase to design composites with a sufficient electrical conductivity at an affordable price. In this paper, electrical properties of composites based on AAA binder and electrically conductive admixture represented by carbon nanotubes (CNT) are investigated. Measurements of electrical properties are carried out by means of 2-probes DC technique on nine types of samples; reference sample without the conductive phase and samples with CNT admixture in amount of 0.1 % - 2.5 % by vol. A significant increase of the electrical conductivity starts from the amount of 0.5 % CNT admixture and in case of 2.5 % CNT is about three orders of magnitude higher compared to the reference sample.

  16. Stress and Damage in Polymer Matrix Composite Materials Due to Material Degradation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Hugh L.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods for calculating stresses and damage caused by degradation of the matrix constituent in polymer matrix composite materials. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. The model is incorporated into an existing composite mechanics computer code. Stresses, strains, and deformations at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are calculated, and from these calculations it is determined if there is failure of any kind. The rationale for the model (based on published experimental work) is presented, its integration into the laminate analysis code is outlined, and example results are given, with comparisons to existing material and structural data. The mechanisms behind the changes in properties and in surface cracking during long-term aging of polyimide matrix composites are clarified. High-temperature-material test methods are also evaluated.

  17. Operational strategies for contamination control of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Patricia A.

    1992-01-01

    Composite materials, used on many instruments, are a potential contamination source for sensitive sensors, especially for sensors or detectors cooled below -80 C. It is a well known fact that composite materials absorb water during fabrication, integration, test, and launch activities and desorb this water under vacuum conditions. Water absorption can be divided into two types: shallow water and deep water. Shallow water is generally about 500 A thick on a clean material surface and is easily desorbed under vacuum conditions. Deep water is a function of the material and is absorbed into the bulk of the material. Deep water can outgas for weeks, months, or years, depending on the vent path, the amount of absorbed water, and the temperature of the material. Several operational strategies have been successfully employed on the Wide Field Planetary Camera. The operational strategies include ultradry gaseous nitrogen purge, dew point of less than -80 C, and vacuum bake-out with verification of outgassing rates. The nitrogen purge is instituted during the fabrication phase and is continued through launch activities. Great care is taken to avoid extended periods of time that the material is exposed to the ambient environment (50 percent relative humidity). On-orbit operational strategies include heat-up and cool-down scenarios which allow the deep water to be sufficiently outgassed before cooling the sensors or detectors.

  18. Chemical composition of material fractions in Danish household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Christian; Petersen, Claus; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    The chemical composition of Danish household waste was determined by two approaches: a direct method where the chemical composition (61 substances) of 48 material fractions was determined after hand sorting of about 20 tonnes of waste collected from 2200 households; and an indirect method where...... batches of 80-1200 tonnes of unsorted household waste was incinerated and the content of the waste determined from the content of the outputs from the incinerator. The indirect method is believed to better represent the small but highly contaminated material fractions (e,g., batteries) than the direct...... method, because of the larger quantities included and the more homogenous material to sample from. Differences between the direct and the direct methods led to corrections in the of heavy metal concentration of a few fractions. The majority of the energy content of the waste originates from organic waste...

  19. Designing Listening Material Based on Visual Multimodality Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jepri Ali Saiful

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, multimodality has eventually augmented into the realm of language teaching and learning known as Applied Multimodality. This interdisciplinary approach draws on a multiplicity of communication or representation modes, all of which contribute to meaning. Accordingly, images, colors, and sounds within a text are catalysts to increase an audience’s reception of an idea or concept of the text, that is, a message. Thus, the present article intends to make a contribution to the field of material development in English language teaching. The aim of this article is therefore to provide guidelines for ELT teachers on how to design listening materials based on visual multimodal compositions of image and text. The result is that the compositions of image and text in designing listening materials rests upon three main principles: information value, salience and framing. These principles enable students’ L2 acquisition through listening as proved by recent research.

  20. Water defluoridation by aluminium oxide-manganese oxide composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Sheta; Mulugeta, Eyobel; Zewge, Feleke; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, aluminium oxide-manganese oxide (AOMO) composite material was synthesized, characterized, and tested for fluoride removal in batch experiments. AOMO was prepared from manganese(II) chloride and aluminium hydroxide. The surface area of AOMO was found to be 30.7m2/g and its specific density was determined as 2.78 g/cm3. Detailed investigation of the adsorbent by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and ion chromatography (for sulphate only) showed that it is composed of Al, Mn, SO4, and Na as major components and Fe, Si, Ca, and Mg as minor components. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to study the thermal behaviour of AOMO. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the adsorbent is poorly crystalline. The point of zero charge was determined as 9.54. Batch experiments (by varying the proportion of MnO, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial F concentration, and raw water pH) showed that fluoride removal efficiency ofAOMO varied significantly with percentage of MnO with an optimum value of about I11% of manganese oxide in the adsorbent. The optimum dose of the adsorbent was 4 g/L which corresponds to the equilibrium adsorption capacity of 4.8 mg F-/g. Both the removal efficiency and adsorption capacity showed an increasing trend with an increase in initial fluoride concentration of the water. The pH for optimum fluoride removal was found to be in the range between 5 and 7. The adsorption data were analysed using the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinirn-Radushkevich models. The minimum adsorption capacity obtained from the non-linear Freundlich isotherm model was 4.94 mg F-/g and the maximum capacity from the Langmuir isotherm method was 19.2mg F-/g. The experimental data of fluoride adsorption on AOMO fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption is well described by a non-linear pseudo-second-order reaction model with an average rate constant of 3

  1. Ferroelectromagnetic solid solutions on the base piezoelectric ceramic materials for components of micromechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, Dariusz; Zachariasz, Radosław; Niemiec, Przemysław; Ilczuk, Jan; Bartkowska, Joanna; Brzezińska, Dagmara

    2016-10-01

    In the presented work, a ferroelectromagnetic solid solutions based on PZT and ferrite powders have been obtained. The main aim of combination of ferroelectric and magnetic powders was to obtain material showing both electric and magnetic properties. Ferroelectric ceramic powder (in amount of 90%) was based on the doped PZT type solid solution while magnetic component was nickel-zinc ferrite Ni1-xZnxFe2O4 (in amount of 10%). The synthesis of components of ferroelectromagnetic solid solutions was performed using the solid phase sintering. Final densification of synthesized powder has been done using free sintering. The aim of the work was to obtain and examine in the first multicomponent PZT type ceramics admixed with chromium with the following chemical composition Pb0.94Sr0.06(Zr0.46Ti0.54)O3+0.25 at% Cr2O3 and next ferroelectromagnetic solid solution based on a PZT type ferroelectric powder (Pb0.94Sr0.06(Zr0.46Ti0.54)O3+0.25 at% Cr2O3) and nickel-zinc ferrite (Ni0.64Zn0.36Fe2O4), from the point of view of their mechanical and electric properties, such as: electric permittivity, ε; dielectric loss, tanδ; mechanical losses, Q-1; and Young modulus, E.

  2. Composite materials for medical purposes based on polyvinylpyrrolidone modified with ketoprofen and silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, L. N.; Vasil'Kov, A. Yu.; Banchero, M.; Manna, L.; Naumkin, A. V.; Podshibikhin, V. L.; Abramchuk, S. S.; Buzin, M. I.; Korlyukov, A. A.; Khokhlov, A. R.

    2011-07-01

    A method for obtaining composite medical materials based on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP K15) modified with ketoprofen in a medium of supercritical carbon dioxide and with Ag nanoparticles prepared by metal vapor synthesis is developed. A system in which ketoprofen and Ag nanoparticles with an average size of ˜16 nm are uniformly distributed over the bulk of PVP is obtained. It is found that the yield of ketoprofen from the composite in the physiological solution is higher than that for an analogous system obtained by mechanical mixing of the components.

  3. Percolation modeling of self-damaging of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Privman, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    We propose the concept of autonomous self-damaging in “smart” composite materials, controlled by activation of added nanosize “damaging” capsules. Percolation-type modeling approach earlier applied to the related concept of self-healing materials, is used to investigate the behavior of the initial material's fatigue. We aim at achieving a relatively sharp drop in the material's integrity after some initial limited fatigue develops in the course of the sample's usage. Our theoretical study considers a two-dimensional lattice model and involves Monte Carlo simulations of the connectivity and conductance in the high-connectivity regime of percolation. We give several examples of local capsule-lattice and capsule-capsule activation rules and show that the desired self-damaging property can only be obtained with rather sophisticated “smart” material's response involving not just damaging but also healing capsules.

  4. Strain Sensing Based on Multiscale Composite Materials Reinforced with Graphene Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriche, Rocío; Prolongo, Silvia G; Sánchez, María; Jiménez-Suárez, Alberto; Campo, Mónica; Ureña, Alejandro

    2016-11-07

    The electrical response of NH2-functionalized graphene nanoplatelets composite materials under strain was studied. Two different manufacturing methods are proposed to create the electrical network in this work: (a) the incorporation of the nanoplatelets into the epoxy matrix and (b) the coating of the glass fabric with a sizing filled with the same nanoplatelets. Both types of multiscale composite materials, with an in-plane electrical conductivity of ~10(-3) S/m, showed an exponential growth of the electrical resistance as the strain increases due to distancing between adjacent functionalized graphene nanoplatelets and contact loss between overlying ones. The sensitivity of the materials analyzed during this research, using the described procedures, has been shown to be higher than commercially available strain gauges. The proposed procedures for self-sensing of the structural composite material would facilitate the structural health monitoring of components in difficult to access emplacements such as offshore wind power farms. Although the sensitivity of the multiscale composite materials was considerably higher than the sensitivity of metallic foils used as strain gauges, the value reached with NH2 functionalized graphene nanoplatelets coated fabrics was nearly an order of magnitude superior. This result elucidated their potential to be used as smart fabrics to monitor human movements such as bending of fingers or knees. By using the proposed method, the smart fabric could immediately detect the bending and recover instantly. This fact permits precise monitoring of the time of bending as well as the degree of bending.

  5. A single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC algorithm for impact localization on complex composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Qiu, Lei; Zhong, Yongteng

    2015-10-01

    The growing use of composite materials on aircraft structures has attracted much attention for impact monitoring as a kind of structural health monitoring (SHM) method. Multiple signal classification (MUSIC)-based monitoring technology is a promising method because of its directional scanning ability and easy arrangement of the sensor array. However, for applications on real complex structures, some challenges still exist. The impact-induced elastic waves usually exhibit a wide-band performance, giving rise to the difficulty in obtaining the phase velocity directly. In addition, composite structures usually have obvious anisotropy, and the complex structural style of real aircrafts further enhances this performance, which greatly reduces the localization precision of the MUSIC-based method. To improve the MUSIC-based impact monitoring method, this paper first analyzes and demonstrates the influence of measurement precision of the phase velocity on the localization results of the MUSIC impact localization method. In order to improve the accuracy of the phase velocity measurement, a single frequency component extraction method is presented. Additionally, a single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC (SFCBR-MUSIC) algorithm is proposed to reduce the localization error caused by the anisotropy of the complex composite structure. The proposed method is verified on a real composite aircraft wing box, which has T-stiffeners and screw holes. Three typical categories of 41 impacts are monitored. Experimental results show that the SFCBR-MUSIC algorithm can localize impact on complex composite structures with an obviously improved accuracy.

  6. A Study of Failure Criteria of Fibrous Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Federico; Jackson, Karen E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The research described in this paper is focused on two areas: (1) evaluation of existing composite failure criteria in the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, MSC.Dytran, and (2) exploration of the possibilities for modification of material and failure models to account for large deformations, progressive failure, and interaction of damage accumulation with stress/strain response of laminated composites. Following a review of the MSC.Dytran user manual, a bibliographical review of existing failure criteria of composites was performed. The papers considered most interesting for the objective of this report are discussed in section 2. The failure criteria included in the code under consideration are discussed in section 3. A critical summary of the present procedures to perform analysis and design of composites is presented in section 4. A study of the most important historical failure criteria for fibrous composite materials and some of the more recent modifications proposed were studied. The result of this analysis highlighted inadequacies in the existing failure criteria and the need to perform some numerical analyses to elucidate the answer to questions on which some of the proposed criteria are based. A summary of these ideas, which is a proposal of studies to be developed, is presented in section 5. Finally, some ideas for future developments are summarized in section 6.

  7. Advanced tungsten materials for plasma-facing components of DEMO and fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, R., E-mail: Rudolf.Neu@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultät für Maschinenbau, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riesch, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Coenen, J.W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Brinkmann, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Calvo, A. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Elgeti, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); García-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Greuner, H.; Hoeschen, T.; Holzner, G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Klein, F. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Koch, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Development of W-fibre enhanced W-composites incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. • Production of a large sample (more than 2000 long fibres) for mechanical and thermal testing. • Even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms are still effective. • Emissions of volatile W-oxides can be suppressed by alloying W with elements forming stable oxides. • WCr10Ti2 has been successfully tested under accidental conditions and high heat fluxes. - Abstract: Tungsten is the major candidate material for the armour of plasma facing components in future fusion devices. To overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten, which strongly limits its operational window, a W-fibre enhanced W-composite material (W{sub f}/W) has been developed incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. Small W{sub f}/W samples show a large increase in toughness. Recently, a large sample (50 mm × 50 mm × 3 mm) with more than 2000 long fibres has been successfully produced allowing further mechanical and thermal testing. It could be shown that even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms as crack bridging by intact fibres, as well as the energy dissipation by fibre-matrix interface debonding and crack deflection are still effective. A potential problem with the use of pure W in a fusion reactor is the formation of radioactive and highly volatile WO{sub 3} compounds and their potential release under accidental conditions. It has been shown that the oxidation of W can be strongly suppressed by alloying with elements forming stable oxides. WCr10Ti2 alloy has been produced on a technical scale and has been successfully tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS. Recently, W-Cr-Y alloys have been produced on a lab-scale. They seem to have even improved properties compared to the previously investigated W alloys.

  8. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  9. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Asefi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow, Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists. A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  10. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics. PMID:27651887

  11. Olivine and Pyroxene Compositions in Fine-Grained Chondritic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Frank, D.

    2011-01-01

    Our analyses of the Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust Mission have illuminated critical gaps in our understanding of related astromaterials. There is a very large database of olivine and low-calcium pyroxene compositions for coarse-grained components of chondrites, but a sparse database for anhydrous silicate matrix phases. In an accompanying figure, we present comparisons of Wild-2 olivine with the available chondrite matrix olivine major element data. We thus have begun a long-term project measuring minor as well as major element compositions for chondrite matrix and chondritic IDPs, and Wild 2 grains. Finally, we wish to re-investigate the changes to fine-grained olivine and low-Ca pyroxene composition with progressive thermal metamorphism. We have examined the LL3-4 chondrites which because of the Hayabusa Mission have become very interesting.

  12. Influence of emulsifying component composition on creams formulated with fractionated milkfat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lisa L; Duncan, Susan E; Sumner, Susan S; Waterman, Kim M; Kaylegian, Kerry E

    2003-09-24

    Dairy systems formulated with fractionated milkfat and milk-derived components have compositional differences that may affect functionality and nutritional aspects as compared to natural dairy products. The composition of 20% milkfat creams formulated with emulsifying components (skim milk, sweet buttermilk, and butter-derived aqueous phase) and low- or medium-melt fractionated butteroil was compared with natural cream. Cream separation temperatures (49 and 55 degrees C) and processing conditions (commercial and pilot plant) in obtaining emulsifying components were examined for effect on content of surface active agents. Individual fatty acids, lipids, cholesterol, phospholipids, protein levels, and types varied with components. Separation temperature influenced the cholesterol level in the aqueous phase. A commercially produced aqueous phase contained less total lipid, protein, cholesterol, and phospholipid than aqueous phase obtained in the pilot plant. Milkfat globule membrane concentration of emulsifying components affected phospholipid and cholesterol content of formulated creams. Butteroil type affected cholesterol levels and cream formulations.

  13. Hybrid fiber reinforcement and crack formation in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    reinforcement systems. The research described in this paper shows that the multi-scale conception of cracking and the use of hybrid fiber reinforcements do not necessarily result in an improved tensile behavior of the composite. Particular material design requirements may nevertheless justify the use of hybrid......- to the macroscale. In this study, the performance of different fiber reinforced cementitious composites is assessed in terms of their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The results obtained from this investigation allow a direct quantitative comparison of the behavior obtained from the different fiber...

  14. Development of a novel regenerated cellulose composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Rasike; Vongsanga, Kylie; Wang, Xungai; Byrne, Nolene

    2015-05-01

    We report for the first time on a new natural composite material achieved by blending cotton and duck feather using an ionic liquid. The addition of duck feather was found to improve the elasticity, strain at break, by 50% when compared to regenerated cellulose alone. This is a significant finding since regenerated cotton using ionic liquids often suffers from poor elasticity. The improved elasticity is likely due to the regenerated duck feather maintaining its helical structure. The new regenerated cellulose composites were characterized using a combination of dynamic mechanical analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Smart Soft Composite Actuators According to Material Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Song, Sung-Hyuk; Ahn, Sung-Hoon [Seoul Nat’l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites, which are made by combining a continuous fiber that acts as reinforcement and a homogeneous polymeric material that acts as a host, are engineering materials with high strength and stiffness and a lightweight structure. In this study, a shape memory alloy(SMA) reinforced composite actuator is presented. This actuator is used to generate large deformations in single lightweight structures and can be used in applications requiring a high degree of adaptability to various external conditions. The proposed actuator consists of numerous individual laminas of the glass-fiber fabric that are embedded in a polymeric matrix. To characterize its deformation behavior, the composition of the actuator was changed by changing the matrix material and the number of the glass-fiber fabric layers. In addition, current of various magnitudes were applied to each actuator to study the effect of the heating of SMA wires on applying current.

  16. Chitosan-cellulose composite materials: Preparation, Characterization and application for removal of microcystin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Chieu D., E-mail: chieu.tran@marquette.edu [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Duri, Simon [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Delneri, Ambra; Franko, Mladen [Laboratory for Environmental Research, University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska 13, 5001 Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: •A novel and recyclable synthetic method using an ionic liquid, a Green Solvent. •Ecocomposite materials were synthesized from cellulose (CEL) and chitosan (CS). •Adding CEL into CS substantially increases tensile strength of the composite. •The composite is much better adsorbent for cyanotoxins than other materials. •The composite can be reused because adsorbed microcystin can be desorbed. -- Abstract: We developed a simple and one-step method to prepare biocompatible composites from cellulose (CEL) and chitosan (CS). [BMIm{sup +}Cl{sup −}], an ionic liquid (IL), was used as a green solvent to dissolve and prepare the [CEL + CS] composites. Since majority (>88%) of IL used was recovered for reuse by distilling the aqueous washings of [CEL + CS], the method is recyclable. XRD, FTIR, NIR, {sup 13}C CP-MAS-NMR and SEM were used to monitor the dissolution and to characterize the composites. The composite was found to have combined advantages of their components: superior mechanical strength (from CEL) and excellent adsorption capability for microcystin-LR, a deadly toxin produced by cyanobacteria (from CS). Specifically, the mechanical strength of the composites increased with CEL loading; e.g., up to 5× increase in tensile strength was achieved by adding 80% of CEL into CS. Kinetic results of adsorption confirm that unique properties of CS remain intact in the composite, i.e., it is not only a very good adsorbent for microcystin but also is better than all other available adsorbents. For example, it can adsorb 4× times more microcystin than the best reported adsorbent. Importantly, the microcystin adsorbed can be quantitatively desorbed to enable the composite to be reused with similar adsorption efficiency.

  17. DOE/MSU composite material fatigue database: Test methods, materials, and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandell, J.F.; Samborsky, D.D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-01

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the results from fatigue studies of wind turbine blade composite materials carried out at Montana State University (MSU) over the last seven years. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the DOE/MSU composite Materials Fatigue Database. The fatigue testing of composite materials requires the adaptation of standard test methods to the particular composite structure of concern. The stranded fabric E-glass reinforcement used by many blade manufacturers has required the development of several test modifications to obtain valid test data for materials with particular reinforcement details, over the required range of tensile and compressive loadings. Additionally, a novel testing approach to high frequency (100 Hz) testing for high cycle fatigue using minicoupons has been developed and validated. The database for standard coupon tests now includes over 4,100 data points for over 110 materials systems. The report analyzes the database for trends and transitions in static and fatigue behavior with various materials parameters. Parameters explored are reinforcement fabric architecture, fiber content, content of fibers oriented in the load direction, matrix material, and loading parameters (tension, compression, and reversed loading). Significant transitions from good fatigue resistance to poor fatigue resistance are evident in the range of materials currently used in many blades. A preliminary evaluation of knockdowns for selected structural details is also presented. The high frequency database provides a significant set of data for various loading conditions in the longitudinal and transverse directions of unidirectional composites out to 10{sup 8} cycles. The results are expressed in stress and strain based Goodman Diagrams suitable for design. A discussion is provided to guide the user of the database in its application to blade design.

  18. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  19. Study of the costs and benefits of composite materials in advanced turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen, C. A.; Stotler, C. L.; Neitzel, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Composite component designs were developed for a number of applicable engine parts and functions. The cost and weight of each detail component was determined and its effect on the total engine cost to the aircraft manufacturer was ascertained. The economic benefits of engine or nacelle composite or eutectic turbine alloy substitutions was then calculated. Two time periods of engine certification were considered for this investigation, namely 1979 and 1985. Two methods of applying composites to these engines were employed. The first method just considered replacing an existing metal part with a composite part with no other change to the engine. The other method involved major engine redesign so that more efficient composite designs could be employed. Utilization of polymeric composites wherever payoffs were available indicated that a total improvement in Direct Operating Cost (DOC) of 2.82 to 4.64 percent, depending on the engine considered, could be attained. In addition, the percent fuel saving ranged from 1.91 to 3.53 percent. The advantages of using advanced materials in the turbine are more difficult to quantify but could go as high as an improvement in DOC of 2.33 percent and a fuel savings of 2.62 percent. Typically, based on a fleet of one hundred aircraft, a percent savings in DOC represents a savings of four million dollars per year and a percent of fuel savings equals 23,000 cu m (7,000,000 gallons) per year.

  20. Space Systems - Safety and Compatibility of Materials - Method to Determine the Ignition Susceptibility of Materials or Components to Particle Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this International Technical Specification is to provide a method to determine the ignition susceptibility of materials and components to particle impact. The method can be used to determine the conditions at which ignition and consumption of a specimen material occurs when impacted by single or multiple particles entrained in a flow of gaseous oxygen (GOX). Alternatively, the method can be used to determine if a specific material or component is subject to ignition and sustained combustion in a given flow environment when impacted by single or multiple particles entrained in a flow of GOX.

  1. Wetting, superhydrophobicity, and icephobicity in biomimetic composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Vahid

    Recent developments in nano- and bio-technology require new materials. Among these new classes of materials which have emerged in the recent years are biomimetic materials, which mimic structure and properties of materials found in living nature. There are a large number of biological objects including bacteria, animals and plants with properties of interest for engineers. Among these properties is the ability of the lotus leaf and other natural materials to repel water, which has inspired researchers to prepare similar surfaces. The Lotus effect involving roughness-induced superhydrophobicity is a way to design nonwetting, self-cleaning, omniphobic, icephobic, and antifouling surfaces. The range of actual and potential applications of superhydrophobic surfaces is diverse including optical, building and architecture, textiles, solar panels, lab-on-a-chip, microfluidic devices, and applications requiring antifouling from biological and organic contaminants. In this thesis, in chapter one, we introduce the general concepts and definitions regarding the wetting properties of the surfaces. In chapter two, we develop novel models and conduct experiments on wetting of composite materials. To design sustainable superhydrophobic metal matrix composite (MMC) surfaces, we suggest using hydrophobic reinforcement in the bulk of the material, rather than only at its surface. We experimentally study the wetting properties of graphite-reinforced Al- and Cu-based composites and conclude that the Cu-based MMCs have the potential to be used in the future for the applications where the wear-resistant superhydrophobicity is required. In chapter three, we introduce hydrophobic coating at the surface of concrete materials making them waterproof to prevent material failure, because concretes and ceramics cannot stop water from seeping through them and forming cracks. We create water-repellant concretes with CA close to 160o using superhydrophobic coating. In chapter four, experimental

  2. Dynamic mechanical properties of PTFE-based composites filled with multi-component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To improve performance of PTFE-based damping material, composites with several fillers were prepared by compressing and sintering. The dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were investigated by means of viscoanalyser. Temperature-dependent loss factors, storage modulus and loss modulus were obtained.And SEM was employed to study the compatibility between PTFE and fillers. The results show that, when blending PPS and PEEK at proper content, the loss factor curve appears double peaks, which can widen the high-damping temperature region of the composites. Blending graphite or alumina can increase the storage modulus obviously, but decrease the value of loss factor. And because graphite or alumina combines with matrix poorly, glide would happen at interface when bearing external load. The interface friction can dissipate vibration energy, which increases the loss modulus of the composites. Blending PPS, PEEK and graphite or alumina at right content, PTFE-based composites can meet demands as damping material in practical engineering.

  3. Analysis of a New Composite Material for Watercraft Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandre Wahrhaftig; Henrique Ribeiro; Ademar Nascimento; Milton Filho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of an alternative material for use in marine engineering, namely a rigid and light sandwich-structured composite made of expanded polystyrene and fiberglass. Not only does this material have an improved section modulus, but it is also inexpensive, light, easy to manipulate, and commercially available in various sizes. Using a computer program based on the finite element method, we calculated the hogging and sagging stresses and strains acting on a prismatic boat model composed of this material, and determined the minimum sizes and maximum permissible stresses to avoid deformation. Finally, we calculated the structural weight of the resulting vessel for comparison with another structure of comparable dimensions constructed from the commonly used core material Divinycell.

  4. Production and Properties of Composite Material Comprising Gd Multiscale Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski Jacek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a novel method of producing Gd particles and preserving them from oxidation. The particles were produced in liquid paraffin by means of AC electric discharge and stored in the solidified paraffin. After seven months, the surface of the Gd was found to be exempt of oxidation. Moreover a composite material formed from mixing paraffin with Gd particles was conductive and magnetic and also presented photovoltaic effect. This method is a promising means of producing, at an industrial scale, particles from materials extremely sensitive to environment such as rare earth materials. Also the new material consisted of Gd particles in a paraffin matrix can find applications in many branches of industry.

  5. Analysis of a new composite material for watercraft manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahrhaftig, Alexandre; Ribeiro, Henrique; Nascimento, Ademar; Filho, Milton

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of an alternative material for use in marine engineering, namely a rigid and light sandwich-structured composite made of expanded polystyrene and fiberglass. Not only does this material have an improved section modulus, but it is also inexpensive, light, easy to manipulate, and commercially available in various sizes. Using a computer program based on the finite element method, we calculated the hogging and sagging stresses and strains acting on a prismatic boat model composed of this material, and determined the minimum sizes and maximum permissible stresses to avoid deformation. Finally, we calculated the structural weight of the resulting vessel for comparison with another structure of comparable dimensions constructed from the commonly used core material Divinycell.

  6. Characterization of carbon fiber composite materials for RF applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) materials have been used for decades in the aerospace, automotive, and naval industries. They have often been used because of their mechanical advantages. These advantageous characteristics have typically included low weight and high strength. It is also a benefit that CFC materials can be made into nearly any shape or size. With the abundant use of CFC materials, it seems desirable to better under- stand the electromagnetic applications of these materials. CFC materials consist of a non-conductive resin or epoxy in addition to conductive carbon fibers. The carbon fibers can be oriented and layered in many different configurations. The specific orientation and layering of the carbon fibers has a direct impact on its electrical characteristics. One specific characteristic of interest is the conductivity of CFC materials. The work in this paper deals with probing the conductivity characteristics of CFC materials for applications in antenna and radar design. Multiple layouts of carbon fiber are investigated. The DC conductivity was measured by applying a conductive epoxy to sample edges and using a milliohm meter. Shielding effectiveness was then predicted based on fundamental electromagnetics for conducting media. Finally, prototype dipole antennas made from CFC materials were investigated.

  7. Novel composite piezoelectric material for energy harvesting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janusas, Giedrius; Guobiene, Asta; Palevicius, Arvydas; Prosycevas, Igoris; Ponelyte, Sigita; Baltrusaitis, Valentinas; Sakalys, Rokas

    2015-04-01

    Past few decades were concentrated on researches related to effective energy harvesting applied in modern technologies, MEMS or MOEMS systems. There are many methods for harvesting energy as, for example, usage of electromagnetic devices, but most dramatic changes were noticed in the usage of piezoelectric materials in small scale devices. Major limitation faced was too small generated power by piezoelectric materials or high resonant frequencies of such smallscale harvesters. In this research, novel composite piezoelectric material was created by mixing PZT powder with 20% solution of polyvinyl butyral in benzyl alcohol. Obtained paste was screen printed on copper foil using 325 mesh stainless steel screen and dried for 30 min at 100 °C. Polyvinyl butyral ensures good adhesion and flexibility of a new material at the conditions that requires strong binding. Five types of a composite piezoelectric material with different concentrations of PZT (40%, 50%, 60%, 70% and 80 %) were produced. As the results showed, these harvesters were able to transform mechanical strain energy into electric potential and, v.v. In experimental setup, electromagnetic shaker was used to excite energy harvester that is fixed in the custom-built clamp, while generated electric potential were registered with USB oscilloscope PICO 3424. The designed devices generate up to 80 μV at 50 Hz excitation. This property can be applied to power microsystem devices or to use them in portable electronics and wireless sensors. However, the main advantage of the created composite piezoelectric material is possibility to apply it on any uniform or nonuniform vibrating surface and to transform low frequency vibrations into electricity.

  8. Strain analysis of a bonded, dissimilar, composite material T-joint using moiré interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, H. E.; Abdallah, M. G.

    High-sensitivity moiré interferometry and finite-element analysis are used to analyze the state of deformation and stress in the region of contact between a plane orthotropic rectangular punch bonded to a foundation with dissimilar elastic properties which models a highly loaded region of a composite material rocket motor casing. Stress distributions are presented for the contact region and an estimate of the maximum shear stress in the foundation is given. The displacement components show good qualitative agreement between analysis and experiment. The lack of quantitative agreement between the experimental and the finite-element analysis is attributed to uncertainty of the material properties.

  9. Inspection of the metal composite materials using a combination of X-ray radiography and Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavrik, D [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Jeon, I [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lehmann, E; Kaestner, A [Paul Scherrer Institut, Neutron Imaging and Activation Group, WBBA/110 , CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Vacik, J, E-mail: vavrik@itam.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR and Research Center Rez CZ-25068 (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-01

    Neutron Imaging and X-ray radiography are complementary methods from the point of view of the visibility and contrast of the material imaged. One potential application is the observation of the behavior of so-called 'metal composite materials', in which metallic and light material parts are combined. This material type is commonly used in the aerospace industry. Neutron Imaging is a suitable tool for the observation of the structure of light materials in an environment of heavier elements like metals. X-ray radiography on other hand is an appropriate tool for the observation of geometry of metal components inside an environment of lighter materials.

  10. Impact Responses of Composite Cushioning System considering Critical Component with Simply Supported Beam Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-de Lu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In some microelectronic products, one or several components can be idealized as simply supported beam type and viewed as vulnerable elements or critical component due to the fact that they are destroyed easily under impact loadings. The composite cushioning structure made of expanded polyethylene (EPE, and expanded polystyrene (EPS was utilized to protect the vulnerable elements against impact loadings during transportation. The vibration equations of composite cushioning system were deducted and virtual mass method was applied to predict impact behavior of critical component. Numerical results indicate that virtual mass method is appropriate for computing impact response of composite cushioning system with vulnerable element of simply supported beam type, which is affirmed by the fact that the impact responses of structure element in terms of velocity- and displacement-time curves are almost unchanged when virtual mass is smaller than a certain value. The results in this paper make it possible for installation of packaging optimization design.

  11. New effective method for analysis of the component composition of enzyme complexes from Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, A V; Gusakov, A V; Kondratyeva, E G; Okunev, O N; Bekkarevich, A O; Sinitsyn, A P

    2005-06-01

    A method for analysis of the component composition of multienzyme complexes secreted by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei was developed. The method is based on chromatofocusing followed by further identification of protein fractions according to their substrate specificity and molecular characteristics of the proteins. The method allows identifying practically all known cellulases and hemicellulases of T. reesei: endoglucanase I (EG I), EG II, EG III, cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I), CBH II, xylanase I (XYL I), XYL II, beta-xylosidase, alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase, acetyl xylan esterase, mannanase, alpha-galactosidase, xyloglucanase, polygalacturonase, and exo-beta-1,3-glucosidase. The component composition of several laboratory and commercial T. reesei preparations was studied and the content of the individual enzymes in these preparations was quantified. The influence of fermentation conditions on the component composition of secreted enzyme complexes was revealed. The characteristic features of enzyme preparations obtained in "cellulase" and "xylanase" fermentation conditions are shown.

  12. Axial guided wave technique for rapid inspection of the "Noodle" regions in a stiffened composite component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manogharan, Prabhakaran; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Composite structures are used in a wide variety of applications. The use of stiffened composites is common in aerospace box-like components and provides the additional stiffness required. Examples of such stiffened structural geometries include airfoils, fuselage, wing box, tail section, etc. The inspection of the radius filler "Noodle" that fills the interface between skin and stiffener has been of great concern to the aerospace composites industry. This paper describes the 3D FEM models of the ultrasonic axially propagating guided wave modes. Additionally, the models were used for understanding their confinement in the Noodle region, their leakage to the remaining sections of the component and their interaction with defects of different types, sizes and their locations along Noodle region. The ultrasonic guided wave modes that propagate along the length of the Noodle were identified using the 3D finite element model. These simulations were validated using graphite-epoxy test coupons and components from aerospace industry.

  13. Mechanical properties of Al-mica particulate composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, D.; Bhatt, R. T.; Rohatgi, P. K.; Biswas, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    Cast aluminum alloy mica particle composites of varying mica content were tested in tension, compression, and impact. With 2.2 percent mica (size range 40-120 microns) the tensile and compression strengths of aluminum alloy decreased by 56 and 22 percent, respectively. The corresponding decreases in percent elongation and percent reduction are 49 and 39 percent. Previous work shows that despite this decrease in strength the composite with 2.5 percent mica and having an UTS of 15 kg/sq mm and compression strength of 28 kg/sq mm performs well as a bearing material under severe running conditions. The differences in strength characteristics of cast aluminum-mica particle composites between tension and compression suggests that, as in cast iron, expansion of voids at the matrix particle interface may be the guiding mechanism of the deformation. SEM studies show that on the tensile fractured specimen surface, there are large voids at the particle matrix interface.

  14. Proposal of a Novel Approach to Developing Material Models for Micro-scale Composites Based on Testing and Modeling of Macro-scale Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schembri, Philip Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapon Systems Engineering division's Advanced Engineering Analysis group employs material constitutive models of composites for use in simulations of components and assemblies of interest. Experimental characterization, modeling and prediction of the macro-scale (i.e. continuum) behaviors of these composite materials is generally difficult because they exhibit nonlinear behaviors on the meso- (e.g. micro-) and macro-scales. Furthermore, it can be difficult to measure and model the mechanical responses of the individual constituents and constituent interactions in the composites of interest. Current efforts to model such composite materials rely on semi-empirical models in which meso-scale properties are inferred from continuum level testing and modeling. The proposed approach involves removing the difficulties of interrogating and characterizing micro-scale behaviors by scaling-up the problem to work with macro-scale composites, with the intention of developing testing and modeling capabilities that will be applicable to the mesoscale. This approach assumes that the physical mechanisms governing the responses of the composites on the meso-scale are reproducible on the macro-scale. Working on the macro-scale simplifies the quantification of composite constituents and constituent interactions so that efforts can be focused on developing material models and the testing techniques needed for calibration and validation. Other benefits to working with macro-scale composites include the ability to engineer and manufacture—potentially using additive manufacturing techniques—composites that will support the application of advanced measurement techniques such as digital volume correlation and three-dimensional computed tomography imaging, which would aid in observing and quantifying complex behaviors that are exhibited in the macro-scale composites of interest. Ultimately, the goal of this new approach is to develop a meso

  15. POLYMER COMPOSITES MODIFIED BY WASTE MATERIALS CONTAINING WOOD FIBRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardeta Dębska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the idea of sustainable development has become one of the most important require-ments of civilization. Development of sustainable construction involves the need for the introduction of innovative technologies and solutions that will combine beneficial economic effects with taking care of the health and comfort of users, reducing the negative impact of the materials on the environment. Composites obtained from the use of waste materials are part of these assumptions. These include modified epoxy mortar containing waste wood fibres, described in this article. The modification consists in the substitution of sand by crushed waste boards, previously used as underlays for panels, in quantities of 0%, 10%, 20%, 35% and 50% by weight, respectively. Composites containing up to 20% of the modifier which were characterized by low water absorption, and good mechanical properties, also retained them after the process of cyclic freezing and thawing.

  16. Peridynamics for analysis of failure in advanced composite materials

    KAUST Repository

    Askari, A.

    2015-08-14

    Peridynamics has been recently introduced as a way to simulate the initiation and propagation of multiple discontinuities (e.g. cracks). It is an alternative to classical continuum damage mechanics and fracture mechanics and is based on a nonlocal rewriting of the equilibrium equation. This new technique is particularly promising in the case of composite materials, in which very complex mechanisms of degradation must be described. We present here some fundamental aspects of peridynamics models for composite materials, and especially laminates. We also propose an approach to couple peridynamics domains with classical continuum mechanics (which relies on the concept of contact forces) by the use of a recently introduced coupling technique: the morphing technique, that appears to be a very versatile and powerful tool for coupling local to nonlocal descriptions.

  17. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  18. Theoretical determination of thermal diffusivity of composite material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Kabayabaya; Fan Yu; Xinxin Zhang

    2004-01-01

    A very simple model based on the Quadrupole method was used in the theoretical analysis of thermal diffusivity of composite materials of Cu-PVC, PVC-Cu-PVC, and Cu-PVC-Cu. The use of MATLAB software with a return to real space using the Stehfest algorithm makes the time of calculation very short. The thermal responses on the rear face of each considered sample, which determine the thermal diffusivity were represented. A mathematical demonstration which confirmed the results was given. Thermal diffusivity determined from the rear face thermal responses were compared with the results of the thermal diffusivity calculated by considering the composite materials to be homogeneous, and a discussion on the two kinds of results was provided.

  19. Degradation, fatigue, and failure of resin dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J L

    2008-08-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  20. Study of erosion characterization of carbon fiber reinforced composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Uttam Kumar; Chowdhury, Mohammad Asaduzzaman; Kowser, Md. Arefin; Mia, Md. Shahin

    2017-06-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials are widely used at different engineering and industrial applications there are good physical, mechanical, chemical properties and light weight. Erosion behavior of materials depends on various factors such as impact angle, particle velocity, particle size, particle shape, particle type, particle flux, temperature of the tested materials. Among these factors impact angle and particle velocity have been recognized as two parameters that noticeably influence the erosion rates of all tested materials. Irregular shaped sand (SiO2) particles of various sizes (200-300 µm, 400-500 µm, and 500-600 µm) were selected erosive element. Tested conditions such as impingement angles between 15 degree to 90 degree, impact velocities between 30-50 m/sec, and stand-off distances 15-25 mm at surrounding room temperature were maintained. The highest level of erosion of the tested composite is obtained at 60° impact angle, which signifies the semi-ductile behavior of this material. Erosion showed increasing trend with impact velocity and decreasing nature in relation to stand-off distance. Surface damage was analyzed using SEM to examine the nature of the erosive wear mechanism.