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Sample records for composite biofilms grown

  1. Composite Biofilms grown in Acidic Mining Lakes and assessed by Electron Microscopy and Molecular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luensdorf, Heinrich; Wenderoth, Dirk F.; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer [GBF, German Research Center for Biotechnology, Department Environmental Microbiology (Germany)], E-mail: wab@gbf.de

    2002-05-15

    Microbial consortia of composite biofilms, grown in surface water of acidicmining lakes near Lauchhammer, Germany, were investigated. The red-brown colored lake water was acidic (pH 2.5), had high concentrations of Fe(III), Al(III), and sulphate and low concentrations of dissolved organic matter. As a result the abundance of bacteria in the lake is with 10{sup 4} cells mL{sup -1} rather low. One input of organic material into the lake are autumnal leaves from trees, growing in the lakeside area. From aliquots of unfixed birch leave biofilms the 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and community fingerprints were determined by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Specific bands within the fingerprints were extracted from SSCP gels and sequenced for the taxonomical affiliation.These results were compared with those from the second type of biofilms which were grown on sterile substrata, floating submersed in surface waters of the lakes. By excising the bands from the gel and sequencing the individual bands bacterial taxa, common to both types of biofilms, were found but also some, which were only present in one type of biofilm. Ultrathin sectioned biofilms often showed bacteria associated with electron dense particles as main inorganic constituents. Elemental microanalysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) revealed them to contain iron, sulfur and oxygen as main elemental fractions and electron diffraction ring pattern analysis classified them to be schwertmannite. These bacteria and their interactions with each other as well as with the inorganic minerals formed in this lake generally is of great interest, in order to use these results for bioremediation applications.

  2. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  3. Shifts in microbial community structure and function in light- and dark-grown biofilms driven by warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaní, Anna M; Borrego, Carles M; Díaz-Villanueva, Verónica; Freixa, Anna; Gich, Frederic; Ylla, Irene

    2014-08-01

    Biofilms are dynamic players in biogeochemical cycling in running waters and are subjected to environmental stressors like those provoked by climate change. We investigated whether a 2°C increase in flowing water would affect prokaryotic community composition and heterotrophic metabolic activities of biofilms grown under light or dark conditions. Neither light nor temperature treatments were relevant for selecting a specific bacterial community at initial phases (7-day-old biofilms), but both variables affected the composition and function of mature biofilms (28-day-old). In dark-grown biofilms, changes in the prokaryotic community composition due to warming were mainly related to rotifer grazing, but no significant changes were observed in functional fingerprints. In light-grown biofilms, warming also affected protozoan densities, but its effect on prokaryotic density and composition was less evident. In contrast, heterotrophic metabolic activities in light-grown biofilms under warming showed a decrease in the functional diversity towards a specialized use of several carbohydrates. Results suggest that prokaryotes are functionally redundant in dark biofilms but functionally plastic in light biofilms. The more complex and self-serving light-grown biofilm determines a more buffered response to temperature than dark-grown biofilms. Despite the moderate increase in temperature of only 2°C, warming conditions drive significant changes in freshwater biofilms, which responded by finely tuning a complex network of interactions among microbial populations within the biofilm matrix.

  4. The composition and compression of biofilms developed on ultrafiltration membranes determine hydraulic biofilm resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlon, Nicolas; Grütter, Alexander; Brandenberger, Fabienne; Sutter, Anja; Kuhlicke, Ute; Neu, Thomas R; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at identifying how to improve the level of permeate flux stabilisation during gravity-driven membrane filtration without control of biofilm formation. The focus was therefore on understanding (i) how the different fractions of the biofilms (inorganics particles, bacterial cells, EPS matrix) influence its hydraulic resistance and (ii) how the compression of biofilms impacts its hydraulic resistance, i.e., can water head be increased to increase the level of permeate flux stabilisation. Biofilms were developed on ultrafiltration membranes at 88 and 284 cm water heads with dead-end filtration for around 50 days. A larger water head resulted in a smaller biofilm permeability (150 and 50 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for biofilms grown at 88 cm and 284 cm water head, respectively). Biofilms were mainly composed of EPS (>90% in volume). The comparison of the hydraulic resistances of biofilms to model fouling layers indicated that most of the hydraulic resistance is due to the EPS matrix. The compressibility of the biofilm was also evaluated by subjecting the biofilms to short-term (few minutes) and long-term variations of transmembrane pressures (TMP). A sudden change of TMP resulted in an instantaneous and reversible change of biofilm hydraulic resistance. A long-term change of TMP induced a slow change in the biofilm hydraulic resistance. Our results demonstrate that the response of biofilms to a TMP change has two components: an immediate variation of resistance (due to compression/relaxation) and a long-term response (linked to biofilm adaptation/growth). Our results provide relevant information about the relationship between the operating conditions in terms of TMP, the biofilm structure and composition and the resulting biofilm hydraulic resistance. These findings have practical implications for a broad range of membrane systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of surface characteristics on adherence of S. mutans biofilms to indirect resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Matin, Khairul; Nikaido, Toru; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adherence of biofilms to the surfaces of two indirect resin composites, Estenia C&B and Gradia. Slabs were prepared from the materials, and then either ground with 800-grit silicon carbide paper or polished with diamond pastes up to 1 microm. Artificial biofilms of Streptococcus mutans were grown on the composite slabs in an artificial mouth system for 20 hours. Thereafter, the amounts of retained biofilm on the surfaces were measured after sonication. Surface characteristics of the resins--such as surface roughness, amount of residual monomers, and distribution of filler particles--were examined. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the amount of retained biofilm varied (pcomposition and surface roughness of the material. In particular, biofilm adherence was lowest on Estenia C&B slabs when polished with diamond pastes up to 1 microm. It was thus concluded that the surface roughness and composition of a resin composite influenced biofilm adherence.

  6. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ-Grown Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper Jon Steenberg; Birkedal, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    This two-period crossover study investigated the effect of calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles on biofilm formation and pH in 48-h biofilms grown in situ. Bovine milk osteopontin is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that has been shown to interfere with bacterial adhesion to salivary......-coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either...... calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles or sterile saline. After growth, the amount of biofilm formed was determined by confocal microscopy, and pH drops upon exposure to glucose were monitored using confocal-microscopy-based pH ratiometry. A total of 160 biofilms were analysed. No adverse effects...

  7. Influence of chemical speciation and biofilm composition on mercury accumulation by freshwater biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranguet, P; Le Faucheur, S; Cosio, C; Slaveykova, V I

    2017-01-25

    Mercury (Hg) is a pollutant of high concern for aquatic systems due to the biomagnification of its methylated form along the food chain. However, in contrast to other metals, gaining knowledge of its bioavailable forms for aquatic microorganisms remains challenging, making Hg risk assessment difficult. Ubiquitous and sessile freshwater biofilms are well known to accumulate and to transform Hg present in their ambient environment. The present study thus aims to evaluate whether non-extractable (proxy of intracellular) Hg accumulated by biofilms could be a good indicator of Hg bioavailability for microorganisms in freshwater. To that end, the link between Hg concentration and speciation, as well as biofilm composition (percentage of abiotic, biotic, chlorophyll and phycocyanin-fractions and abundance of dsrA, gcs, merA and hgcA bacterial genes) and biofilm Hg accumulation was examined. The studied biofilms were grown on artificial substrata in four reservoirs along the Olt River (Romania), which was contaminated by Hg coming from chlor-alkali plant effluents. The 0.45 μm-filterable Hg concentrations in ambient waters were measured and inorganic IHg speciation was modelled. Biofilms were analyzed for their non-extractable IHg and methylmercury (MeHg) contents as well as for their composition. The non-extractable IHg content was related, but not significantly, to the concentration of total IHg (r(2) = 0.88, p = 0.061) whereas a significant correlation was found with the predicted IHg concentration that is not bound to dissolved organic matter (r(2) = 0.95, p = 0.027), despite its extremely low concentrations (10(-25) M), showing a limitation of the thermodynamic Hg modelling to predict Hg bioavailability. The studied biofilms were different in biomass and composition and a principal component analysis showed that the non-extractable IHg content correlated with the abundance of the merA and hgcA genes, while MeHg accumulation was only linked with the abundance of the r

  8. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...... were carried out with aerobic glucose and starch degrading biofilms. The well described aerobic glucose degradation biofilm system was used to test the combined reactor set-up. Results predicted from known biofilm kinetics were obtained. In the starch degrading biofilm, basic assumptions were tested...

  9. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ Grown Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper J S; Birkedal, Henrik; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-01-01

    This 2-period crossover study investigated the effect of calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles on biofilm formation and pH in 48-h biofilms grown in situ. Bovine milk osteopontin is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that has been shown to interfere with bacterial adhesion to salivary-coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles or sterile saline. After growth, the amount of biofilm formed was determined by confocal microscopy, and pH drops upon exposure to glucose were monitored using confocal-microscopy-based pH ratiometry. A total of 160 biofilms were analysed. No adverse effects of repeated ex vivo treatment with calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles were observed. Particle treatment resulted in a 32% lower amount of biofilm formed (p Biofilm pH was significantly higher upon particle treatment, both shortly after the addition of glucose and after 30 min of incubation with glucose (p biofilms as well as the remineralizing potential of the particles.

  10. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt G Vandervoort

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the

  11. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, Kurt G; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  12. Characteristics of Candida albicans biofilms grown in a synthetic urine medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppuluri, Priya; Dinakaran, Hemamalini; Thomas, Derek P; Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2009-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infection, and Candida albicans is the most frequent organism causing fungal UTIs. Presence of an indwelling urinary catheter represents a significant risk factor for UTIs. Furthermore, these infections are frequently associated with the formation of biofilms on the surface of these catheters. Here, we describe the characterization of C. albicans biofilms formed in vitro using synthetic urine (SU) medium and the frequently used RPMI medium and compare the results. Biofilms of C. albicans strain SC5314 were formed in 96-well microtiter plates and on silicon elastomer pieces using both SU and RPMI media. Biofilm formation was monitored by microscopy and a colorimetric XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay. As in biofilms grown in RPMI medium, time course studies revealed that biofilm formation using SU medium occurred after an initial adherence phase, followed by growth, proliferation, and maturation. However, microscopy techniques revealed that the architectural complexity of biofilms formed in SU medium was lower than that observed for those formed using RPMI medium. In particular, the level of filamentation of cells within the biofilms formed in SU medium was diminished compared to those in the biofilms grown in RPMI medium. This observation was also corroborated by expression profiling of five filamentation-associated genes using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. Sessile C. albicans cells were resistant to fluconazole and amphotericin B, irrespective of the medium used to form the biofilms. However, caspofungin exhibited potent in vitro activity at therapeutic levels against C. albicans biofilms grown in both SU and RPMI media.

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon enhanced growth, nutrient uptake, and lipid accumulation in wastewater grown microalgal biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesaano, Maureen; Gardner, Robert D; Moll, Karen; Lauchnor, Ellen; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; Sims, Ronald C

    2015-03-01

    Microalgal biofilms grown to evaluate potential nutrient removal options for wastewaters and feedstock for biofuels production were studied to determine the influence of bicarbonate amendment on their growth, nutrient uptake capacity, and lipid accumulation after nitrogen starvation. No significant differences in growth rates, nutrient removal, or lipid accumulation were observed in the algal biofilms with or without bicarbonate amendment. The biofilms possibly did not experience carbon-limited conditions because of the large reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon in the medium. However, an increase in photosynthetic rates was observed in algal biofilms amended with bicarbonate. The influence of bicarbonate on photosynthetic and respiration rates was especially noticeable in biofilms that experienced nitrogen stress. Medium nitrogen depletion was not a suitable stimulant for lipid production in the algal biofilms and as such, focus should be directed toward optimizing growth and biomass productivities to compensate for the low lipid yields and increase nutrient uptake.

  14. Real-time Assessment of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Metabolism on Resin Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Fernando Luis Esteban; Hiers, Rochelle Denise; Smart, Kristin; Kreth, Jens; Qi, Fengxia; Merritt, Justin; Khajotia, Sharukh Soli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The release of unpolymerized monomers and by-products of resin composites influences biofilm growth and confounds the measurement of metabolic activity. Current assays to measure biofilm viability have critical limitations and are typically not performed on relevant substrates. The objective of the present study was to determine the utility of firefly luciferase assay for quantification of the viability of intact biofilms on a resin composite substrate, and correlate the results with a standard method (viable colony counts). Methods Disk-shaped specimens of a dental resin composite were fabricated, wet-polished, UV-sterilized, and stored in water. Biofilms of S. mutans (strain UA159 modified by insertion of constitutively expressed firefly luc gene) were grown (1:500 dilution; anaerobic conditions, 24h, 37°C) in two media concentrations (0.35x and 0.65x THY medium supplemented with 0.1% sucrose; n=15/group). An additional group of specimens with biofilms grown in 0.65x + sucrose media was treated with chlorhexidine gluconate solution to serve as the control group. Bioluminescence measurements of non-disrupted biofilms were obtained after addition of D-luciferin substrate. The adherent biofilms were removed by sonication, and bioluminescence of sonicated bacteria was then measured. Viable colony counts were performed after plating sonicated bacteria on THY agar plates supplemented with spectinomycin. Bioluminescence values and cell counts were correlated using Spearman Correlation tests (α=0.05). Results Strong positive correlations between viable colony counts and bioluminescence values, both before- and after-sonication, validated the utility of this assay. Significance A novel non-disruptive, real-time bioluminescence assay is presented for quantification of intact S. mutans biofilms grown on a resin composite, and potentially on antibacterial materials and other types of dental biomaterials. PMID:27515531

  15. Effect of biofilm dryness on the transfer of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms grown on stainless steel to bologna and hard salami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Andrés; Autio, Wesley R; McLandsborough, Lynne A

    2007-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes continues to be a major cause of class I food recalls in the United States. Very little is known about its transfer and cross-contamination in processing scenarios. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydration level on L. monocytogenes biofilms grown on stainless steel and its effect on the biofilm transfer to foods. Biofilms were grown on stainless steel in diluted tryptic soy broth 1:20 for 48 h at 32 degrees C. After this, biofilms were equilibrated over saturated salt solutions at 20 degrees C for 24 h (94, 75, 58, and 33% relative humidity; % RH) prior to transferring. Transfer experiments were conducted from inoculated stainless steel to bologna and hard salami at a constant pressure (45 kPa) and time (30 s) with a universal testing machine. The experiment was designed with a factorial design 4 x 2 (biofilms equilibrated at 4% RH and two foods) and duplicated every day, and the whole experiment was repeated nine times. The results were analyzed with an analysis of variance by SAS Statistical Analysis Software. Our results showed that more bacteria were transferred to bologna (mean efficiency of transfer [EOT] = 3.0) than to hard salami (mean EOT = 0.35, P biofilms became drier, the transfer of Listeria from stainless steel to both foods increased (P biofilm for bologna and hard salami, respectively. This study may be an indication that as biofilms were dried, the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions became weaker, and bacterial transfer increased. This phenomenon was enhanced in foods containing higher water activity levels. We hypothesize that this increased in transfer was due to the presence of capillary forces in the food.

  16. Impact of Nutrient Restriction on the Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Grown in a Microfluidic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamazight Cherifi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a major concern in food industries. The aim of this work was to elucidate the effect of nutrient limitation on both biofilm architecture and on the viability of the bacteria in microfluidic growth conditions. Biofilm formation by two L. monocytogenes strains was performed in a rich medium (BHI and in a 10-fold diluted BHI (BHI/10 at 30°C for 24 h by using both static conditions and the microfluidic system Bioflux. In dynamic conditions, biofilms grown in rich and poor medium showed significant differences as well in structure and in the resulting biovolume. In BHI/10, biofilm was organized in a knitted network where cells formed long chains, whereas in the rich medium, the observed structure was homogeneous cellular multilayers. Biofilm biovolume production in BHI/10 was significantly higher than in BHI in these dynamic conditions. Interestingly, biovolume of dead cells in biofilms formed under limited nutrient conditions (BHI/10 was significantly higher than in biofilms formed in the BHI medium. In the other hand, in static conditions, biofilm is organized in a multilayer cells and dispersed cells in a rich medium BHI and poor medium BHI/10 respectively. There was significantly more biomass in the rich medium compared to BHI/10 but no difference was noted in the dead/damaged subpopulation showing how L. monocytogenes biofilm could be affected by the growth conditions. This work demonstrated that nutrient concentration affects biofilm structure and the proportion of dead cells in biofilms under microfluidic condition. Our study also showed that limited nutrients play an important role in the structural stability of L. monocytogenes biofilm by enhancing cell death and liberating extracellular DNA.

  17. The Composition and Metabolic Phenotype of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Apicella

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available N. gonorrhoeae has been shown to form biofilms during cervical infection. Thus, biofilm formation may play an important role in the infection of women. The ability of N. gonorrhoeae to form membrane blebs is crucial to biofilm formation. Blebs contain DNA and outer membrane structures, which have been shown to be major constituents of the biofilm matrix. The organism expresses a DNA thermonuclease that is involved in remodeling of the biofilm matrix. Comparison of the transcriptional profiles of gonococcal biofilms and planktonic runoff indicate that genes involved in anaerobic metabolism and oxidative stress tolerance are more highly expressed in biofilm. The expression of aniA, ccp, and norB, which encode nitrite reductase, cytochrome c peroxidase, and nitric oxide reductase respectively, is required for mature biofilm formation over glass and human cervical cells. In addition, anaerobic respiration occurs in the substratum of gonococcal biofilms and disruption of the norB gene required for anaerobic respiration, results in a severe biofilm attenuation phenotype. It has been demonstrated that accumulation of nitric oxide (NO contributes to the phenotype of a norB mutant and can retard biofilm formation. However, NO can also enhance biofilm formation, and this is largely dependent on the concentration and donation rate or steady state kinetics of NO. The majority of the genes involved in gonococcal oxidative stress tolerance are also required for normal biofilm formation, as mutations in the following genes result in attenuated biofilm formation over cervical cells and/or glass: oxyR, gor, prx, mntABC, trxB, and estD. Overall, biofilm formation appears to be an adaptation for coping with the environmental stresses present in the female genitourinary tract. Therefore, this review will discuss the studies, which describe the composition and metabolic phenotype of gonococcal biofilms.

  18. Decontamination efficacy of antiseptic agents on in vivo grown biofilms on rough titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennhenn-Kirchner, Sabine; Wolff, Nadine; Klaue, Sören; Mergeryan, Hamparsum; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete

    2009-01-01

    Four common antimicrobial agents were evaluated for their efficacy in reduction of aerobic bacteria intraorally grown in biofilms on rough titanium samples. The solutions investigated contained chlorhexidine, essential oil, octenidine, or citric acid. Twenty volunteers wore splints with titanium sleeves intraorally for 10 days. Following irrigation with the antiseptics, the sleeves were removed and biofilm samples were taken by swabbing. The bacteria were first examined microscopically by Gram staining. These samples from the surfaces were then cultured under aerobic conditions to identify and quantify the colonizing bacteria. Compared to untreated controls, significant (P octenidine. The irrigation regimens studied in this investigation reduced bacterial colonization in a mature biofilm grown intraorally on rough titanium surfaces. The highest absolute reduction was achieved after 8 minutes, but only the 2-minute reduction rates are significant for clinical practice. Taking this into consideration, the distinct decontamination efficacy of octenidine and citric acid is evident.

  19. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Enrico; Beyenal, Haluk; Di Palma, Luca; Merli, Carlo; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2007-12-15

    Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 were used to reduce dissolved U(VI) and subsequently immobilize U(IV) in the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates. The biofilms were grown in three identically operated fixed bed reactors, filled with three types of minerals: one noncarbonate-bearing mineral (hematite) and two carbonate-bearing minerals (calcite and dolomite). The source of carbonates in the reactors filled with calcite and dolomite were the minerals, while in the reactor filled with hematite it was a 10 mM carbonate buffer, pH 7.2, which we added to the growth medium. Our five-month study demonstrated that the sulfate-reducing biofilms grown in all reactors were able to immobilize/reduce uranium efficiently, despite the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates.

  20. Effect of Biofilm on the Repair Bond Strengths of Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, M.; Ozcan, M.; Siswomihardjo, W.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Composite restorations degrade during wear, but it is unknown how wear affects the composite surface and influences composite-to-composite bonding in minimally invasive repair. Here, it is hypothesized that in vitro exposure of composites to oral biofilm yields clinically relevant degradation of com

  1. Spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman microscopic analysis of anode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Nikolai; Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M; Tender, Leonard M

    2014-02-03

    When grown on the surface of an anode electrode, Geobacter sulfurreducens forms a multi-cell thick biofilm in which all cells appear to couple the oxidation of acetate with electron transport to the anode, which serves as the terminal metabolic electron acceptor. Just how electrons are transported through such a biofilm from cells to the underlying anode surface over distances that can exceed 20 microns remains unresolved. Current evidence suggests it may occur by electron hopping through a proposed network of redox cofactors composed of immobile outer membrane and/or extracellular multi-heme c-type cytochromes. In the present work, we perform a spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman (CRR) microscopic analysis to investigate anode-grown Geobacter biofilms. The results confirm the presence of an intra-biofilm redox gradient whereby the probability that a heme is in the reduced state increases with increasing distance from the anode surface. Such a gradient is required to drive electron transport toward the anode surface by electron hopping via cytochromes. The results also indicate that at open circuit, when electrons are expected to accumulate in redox cofactors involved in electron transport due to the inability of the anode to accept electrons, nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm are oxidized. The same outcome occurs when a comparable potential to that measured at open circuit (-0.30 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode, whereas nearly all hemes are reduced when an exceedingly negative potential (-0.50 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode. These results suggest that nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm can be electrochemically accessed by the electrode, but most have oxidation potentials too negative to transport electrons originating from acetate metabolism. The results also reveal a lateral heterogeneity (x-y dimensions) in the type of c-type cytochromes within the biofilm that may affect electron transport to the

  2. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionella persistence and amplification in premise drinking water systems is a known contributor to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable eukaryotic hosts. Here we examined Legionella pneumophila behavior within drinking water biofilms grown on copper ...

  3. Monitoring of extracellular pH in young dental biofilms grown in vivo in the presence and absence of sucrose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Baelum, Vibeke; Nyvad, Bente

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: pH in dental biofilms is of central importance for the development of caries. We used the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in combination with digital image analysis to monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilms grown in situ with and without sucrose supply. DESIG...

  4. Impact of Chloramination on the Development of Laboratory-Grown Biofilms Fed with Filter-Pretreated Groundwater

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Fangqiong

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the continuous impact of monochloramine disinfection on laboratory-grown biofilms through the characterization of biofilm architecture and microbial community structure. Biofilm development and disinfection were achieved using CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) biofilm reactor systems with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coupons as the substratum and sand filter-pretreated groundwater as the source of microbial seeding and growth nutrient. After 2 weeks of growth, the biofilms were subjected to chloramination for 8 more weeks at concentrations of 7.5±1.4 to 9.1±0.4 mg Cl2 L-1. Control reactors received no disinfection during the development of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis indicated that chloramination could lead to 81.4-83.5% and 86.3-95.6% reduction in biofilm biomass and thickness, respectively, but could not eliminate biofilm growth. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis indicated that microbial community structures between chloraminated and non-chloraminated biofilms exhibited different successional trends. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis further revealed that chloramination could select members of Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria as the dominant populations, whereas natural development leads to the selection of members of Nitrospira and Bacteroidetes as dominant biofilm populations. Overall, chloramination treatment could alter the growth of multi-species biofilms on the PVC surface, shape the biofilm architecture, and select a certain microbial community that can survive or proliferate under chloramination.

  5. Impact of nutrient composition on a degradative biofilm community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Korber, Darren R.; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.;

    1997-01-01

    A microbial community was cultivated in flow cells with 2,4,6-trichlorobenzoic acid (2,4,6-TCB) as sole carbon and energy source and was examined with scanning confocal laser microscopy and fluorescent molecular probes. The biofilm community which developed under these conditions exhibited...... a characteristic architecture, including a basal cell layer and conspicuous mounds of bacterial cells and polymer (approximately 20 to 30 mu m high and 25 to 40 mu m in diameter) occurring at 20- to 200-mu m intervals. When biofilms grown on 2,4,6-TCB were shifted to a labile, nonchlorinated carbon source...... (Trypticase soy broth), the biofilms underwent an architectural change which included the loss of mound structures and the formation of a more homogeneous biofilm. Neutrally charged fluorescent dextrans, which upon hydration become cationic, were observed to bind to mounds, as well as to the basal cell layer...

  6. Differential internalin A levels in biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes grown on different surfaces and nutrient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Niamh; Gião, Maria S; Keevil, Charles W; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2016-02-16

    Listeria monoctyogenes is a foodborne pathogen containing the surface protein, internalin A (InlA). The expression of this protein permits the invasion of L. monocytogenes into intestinal epithelial cells expressing the receptor E-cadherin, thus crossing the intestinal barrier and resulting in listerosis. The main aim of this work was to investigate InlA levels in different L. monocytogenes strains in both planktonic and sessile states using an anti-InlA antibody. Biofilms were grown in high and low nutrient environments on glass, stainless steel and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This study demonstrated that InlA levels varied greatly between strains and serotypes of L. monocytogenes. However, the serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b and 4b, associated with the largest number of outbreaks of listerosis consistently showed the highest InlA levels, regardless of nutrient content or planktonic or sessile state. Differences in InlA levels were also observed in biofilms grown on different surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and PTFE, with a significant reduction in InlA levels observed in biofilms on PTFE. Interestingly, although a large number of the total cells observed in biofilms formed in tap-water were non-cultivable, the virulence factor, InlA, was expressed at levels between 78 and 85%, thus indicating that these cells may still be virulent. A greater understanding of the factors that affect the levels of InlA on the surface of L. monocytogenes, is essential in the appreciation of the role of InlA in the persistence of biofilms containing L. monocytogenes and their potential to cause food borne disease.

  7. Viable Compositional Analysis of an Eleven Species Oral Polymicrobial Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Leighann; Lappin, Gillian; O'Donnell, Lindsay E.; Millhouse, Emma; Millington, Owain R.; Bradshaw, David J.; Axe, Alyson S.; Williams, Craig; Nile, Christopher J.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Polymicrobial biofilms are abundant in clinical disease, particularly within the oral cavity. Creating complex biofilm models that recapitulate the polymicrobiality of oral disease are important in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In order to do this accurately we require the ability to undertake compositional analysis, in addition to determine individual cell viability, which is difficult using conventional microbiology. The aim of this study was to develop a defined multispecies denture biofilm model in vitro, and to assess viable compositional analysis following defined oral hygiene regimens. Methods: An in vitro multispecies denture biofilm containing various oral commensal and pathogenic bacteria and yeast was created on poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Denture hygiene regimens tested against the biofilm model included brushing only, denture cleansing only and combinational brushing and denture cleansing. Biofilm composition and viability were assessed by culture (CFU) and molecular (qPCR) methodologies. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were also employed to visualize changes in denture biofilms following treatment. Results: Combinational treatment of brushing and denture cleansing had the greatest impact on multispecies denture biofilms, reducing the number of live cells by more than 2 logs, and altering the overall composition in favor of streptococci. This was even more evident during the sequential testing, whereby daily sequential treatment reduced the total and live number of bacteria and yeast more than those treated intermittently. Bacteria and yeast remaining following treatment tended to aggregate in the pores of the PMMA, proving more difficult to fully eradicate the biofilm. Conclusions: Overall, we are the first to develop a method to enable viable compositional analysis of an 11 species denture biofilm following chemotherapeutic challenge. We were able to demonstrate viable cell

  8. Removal of naturally grown human biofilm with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Lukasz; Fricke, Katja; Matthes, Rutger; Holtfreter, Birte; Schlüter, Rabea; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kocher, Thomas

    2016-08-19

    The removal of biofilm is a prerequisite for a successful treatment of biofilm-associated diseases. In this study, we compared the feasibility of an atmospheric pressure plasma device with a sonic powered brush to remove naturally grown supragingival biofilm from extracted teeth. Twenty-four periodontally hopeless teeth were extracted. Argon jet plasma with an oxygen admixture of 1 vol% and a sonically driven brush were used to remove biofilm with application times of 60 s, 180 s and 300 s. The treatment efficiency was assessed with light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The highest biofilm removal rate was observed after an application time of 180 s/300 s with the sonic brush (80.4%/86.2%), plasma (75.5%/89.0%). These observations were confirmed by SEM. According to XPS analysis, plasma treatment decreased the amount of carbon and nitrogen, indicative of an extensive removal of proteins. Plasma treatment of naturally grown biofilm resulted in an effective cleaning of the tooth surface and was comparable to mechanical treatment. Treatment time had a significant influence on plaque reduction. These results showed that plasma could be a useful adjuvant treatment modality in cases where biofilm removal or reduction plays a decisive role, such as periodontitis and peri-implantitis. Plasma-treated biofilm on an extracted tooth.

  9. Efficacy of antibacterial bioactive glass S53P4 against S. aureus biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coraça-Huber, Débora C; Fille, Manfred; Hausdorfer, Johann; Putzer, David; Nogler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of different sizes of bioactive glass S53P4 against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms grown on metal discs in vitro. S. aureus biofilms were cultivated on titanium discs. BAG-S53P4 (0.5-0.8 mm and Glass beads (0.5 mm) were used as a control. After each interval, the pH from each sample was measured. Colony forming units were counted for the biofilm recovery verification. In parallel, we tested the activity of bioactive glass against S. aureus planktonic cells. We found that BAG-S53P4 can suppress S. aureus biofilm formation on titanium discs in vitro. The suppression rate of biofilm cells by BAG-S53P4 glass S53P4 has potential to be used as bone substitute for the resolution of infection complications in joint replacement surgeries and treatment of chronic osteomyelitis.

  10. Degradation in the Dentin-Composite Interface Subjected to Multi-Species Biofilm Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuping; Carrera, Carola; Chen, Ruoqiong; Li, Jianying; Patricia, Lenton; Rudney, Joel D.; Jones, Robert S.; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Oral biofilms can degrade the components in dental resin-based composite restorations, thus compromising marginal integrity and leading to secondary caries. In this study, we investigated the mechanical integrity of the dentin-composite interface challenged with multi-species oral biofilms. While most studies used single-species biofilms, we used a more realistic, diverse biofilm model produced directly from plaques collected from donors with a history of early childhood caries. Dentin–compos...

  11. Monitoring of extracellular pH in young dental biofilms grown in situ in the presence and absence of sucrose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Bælum, Vibeke; Schlafer, Sebastian;

    biofilms. Fluorescence emissions of C-SNARF-4 in deep layers of each biofilm were recorded ex-vivo with confocal microscopy for 15 min (3 sites) or for 1 h (6 sites) after exposure to a 100 µl salivary solution with 0.4% glucose in custom-made wells. The ratiometric pH data were analyzed using a mixed......pH in dental biofilms is of central importance for the development of caries. We used the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in combination with digital image analysis to monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilms grown in situ with and without sucrose supply. 48-h dental biofilms from 10......-effects linear regression procedure. Extracellular pH dropped rapidly in most examined sites after addition of glucose. Distinct pH microenvironments were observed within single biofilms. Variance components analyses showed similar variation between sites within the same biofilm (var=0.02-0.04 (se=0...

  12. Bacterial adhesion on direct and indirect dental restorative composite resins: An in vitro study on a natural biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derchi, Giacomo; Vano, Michele; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Both direct and indirect techniques are used for dental restorations. Which technique should be preferred or whether they are equivalent with respect to bacterial adhesion is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the affinity of bacterial biofilm to dental restorative composite resins placed directly and indirectly. Five direct composite resins for restorations (Venus Diamond, Adonis, Optifil, Enamel Plus HRi, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic) and 3 indirect composite resins (Gradia, Estenia, Signum) were selected. The materials were incubated in unstimulated whole saliva for 1 day. The biofilms grown were collected and their bacterial cells counted. In parallel, the composite resin surface morphology was analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Both bacterial cell count and surface topography parameters were subjected to statistical analysis (α=.05). Indirect composite resins showed significantly lower levels than direct composite resins for bacterial cell adhesion, (P.05). However, within the indirect composite resins a significantly lower level was found for Gradia than Estenia or Signum (Padhesion when the second and particularly the third-order statistical moments of the composite resin height distributions were considered. Indirect dental restorative composite resins were found to be less prone to biofilm adhesion than direct composite resins. A correlation of bacterial adhesion to surface morphology exists that is described by kurtosis; thus, advanced data analysis is required to discover possible insights into the biologic effects of morphology. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mineral composition of organically grown tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, consumer concerns on environmental and health issues related to food products have increased and, as a result, the demand for organically grown production has grown. Results indicate that consumers concerned about healthy diet and environmental degradation are the most likely to buy organic food, and are willing to pay a high premium. Therefore, it is important to ensure the quality of the produce, especially for highly consumed products. The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is one of the most widely consumed fresh vegetables in the world. It is also widely used by the food industries as a raw material for the production of derived products such as purees or ketchup. Consequently, many investigations have addressed the impact of plant nutrition on the quality of tomato fruit. The concentrations of minerals (P, Na, K, Ca and Mg) and trace elements (Cu, Zn and Mn) were determined in tomatoes grown organically in East Georgia, Marneuli District. The contents of minerals and Mn seem to be in the range as shown in literature. Cu and Zn were found in considerably high amounts in comparison to maximum permissible values established in Georgia. Some correlations were observed between the minerals and trace elements studied. K and Mg were strongly correlated with Cu and Zn. Statistically significant difference have shown also P, K and Mg based between period of sampling.

  14. Changes in the subgingival biofilm composition after coronally positioned flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadson Almeida Lima

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of coronally positioned flap (CPF on the subgingival biofilm composition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-two subjects with gingival recessions were treated with CPF. Clinical parameters were assessed before and at 6 months after surgery. Subgingival biofilms were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique for 40 bacterial species. RESULTS: Recession height, clinical attachment level and bleeding on probing improved significantly (p<0.05 at 6 months post-CPF. The proportions of 10 periodontal pathogens and the proportions of red and orange complexes decreased at 6 months. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, CPF can induce beneficial effects on the composition of the subgingival microbiota after 6 months.

  15. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  16. The effect of sodium hypochlorite on Enterococcus faecalis when grown on dentine as a single- and multi-species biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Benlee; Zilm, Peter S; Briggs, Nancy; Rogers, Anthony H; Cathro, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is often involved in the aetiology of apical periodontitis after endodontic treatment. This project aimed to establish, on dentine in vitro, a multi-species biofilm containing E. faecalis, and to determine if the organism had an increased resistance to sodium hypochlorite compared with an axenic biofilm. Biofilms were established on dentine discs in flow cells with either E. faecalis alone (axenic) or together with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus sanguinis. Following treatment with either 0.9% sodium hypochlorite or saline, the viability of E. faecalis was determined by serial plating and qualitative analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Viable counts indicated that 0.9% NaOCl is highly effective against E. faecalis grown alone and as part of a multi-species biofilm (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in its survival in the two biofilm types was found (P = 0.8276).

  17. Investigation of the characteristics of biofilms grown in gas-phase biofilters with and without ozone injection by CLSM technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saingam, Prakit; Xi, Jinying; Xu, Yang; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Recently, ozone injection technique was developed as a novel biomass control method to reduce bed clogging in biofilters treating volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, the effects of ozone on the characteristics of biofilms are still unknown. In this study, two identical lab-scale biofilters treating gaseous toluene were operated in parallel except that one was continuously injected with 200 mg/m(3) ozone. Four glass slides were placed inside each biofilter on day 57 and then were taken out sequentially after 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks of cultivation. The biofilms grown on the glass slides were stained by the ViaGram™ Red + Bacterial Gram Stain and Viability Kit and observed through the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). According to the CLSM images of 1, 2, and 4 weeks, the ozonated biofilm was significantly thinner than the control biofilm, which demonstrated that ozone could effectively control the biomass in the biofilter. For the biofilter without ozone injection, the ratios of viable cells (0.51~0.89) and the ratios of Gram-positive bacteria (0.22~0.57) both decreased within 4 weeks of cultivation. The CLSM image analysis results also demonstrated that a continuous injection of 200 mg/m(3) ozone was able to significantly enhance the ratio of viable cells to 0.77~0.97 and allow the dominance of Gram-positive bacteria in the biofilms with the ratio 0.46~0.88 instead of Gram-negative bacteria. For the 6-week samples, the biofilm thickness of the control system was reduced significantly which indicated the detachment of accumulated biofilms might occur in the samples without ozone.

  18. Biofilm inhibition by an experimental dental resin composite containing octenidine dihydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupf, Stefan; Balkenhol, Markus; Sahrhage, Tim O; Baum, Alexandra; Chromik, Julia N; Ruppert, Klaus; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Maurer, Hans H; Hannig, Matthias

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate an antimicrobial additive containing experimental resin composite with regards to its impact on biofilm formation under oral conditions. Biofilms were established in situ on composite specimens (n=192) which contained octenidine dihydrochloride (ODH, 3 wt.% or 6 wt.%). Samples without antimicrobial additive served as control (n=96). Composite specimens were fixed on custom made splints and exposed to the oral cavity of six healthy volunteers for three or seven days. Biofilm formation was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy (FM). The biofilm formation was significantly reduced on ODH containing samples compared to controls after three as well as after seven days in situ. FM evaluation additionally showed a lower viability of the reduced biofilms for both ODH concentrations. During this short term investigation, incorporation of ODH into resin based composite materials caused biofilm inhibiting effects in situ. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of incubation atmosphere on the production and composition of staphylococcal biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kentaro; Yamada, Keiko; Yagi, Tetsuya; Baba, Hisashi; Kawamura, Ichiro; Ohta, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are pathogenic bacteria that often cause invasive infections in humans. In this study, we characterized the composition and growth characteristics of staphylococcal biofilms under various incubation atmospheres. We assessed the effect of incubation atmosphere (aerobic, 5% CO2, anaerobic, and microaerobic) on the biofilm production capabilities of S. aureus strains isolated from healthy volunteers and from patients with catheter-related bloodstream infection. In addition, the composition of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms was determined by assessment of biofilm degradation after treatment with DNase I, proteinase K, and dispersin B. The strains obtained from healthy volunteers and patients showed similar biofilm formation capabilities. Biofilms of S. aureus were rich in proteins when developed under ambient atmospheric conditions, 5% CO2, and microaerobic condition, whereas S. epidermidis biofilms contained large amounts of poly-β (1, 6)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine when developed under ambient atmospheric conditions and microaerobic condition. The biofilm-producing capability of S. epidermidis was considerably higher than that of S. aureus under aerobic condition. Staphylococcal isolates obtained from healthy individuals and patients with catheter-related infections have similar biofilm-forming capabilities. Under microaerobic conditions, S. aureus and S. epidermidis form protein-rich and poly-β (1, 6)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-rich biofilms, respectively. These components may play an important role in the development of biofilms inside the body and may be the target molecules to prevent catheter-related infections caused by these organisms.

  20. Comparative proteomic and transcriptomic profile of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms grown in glucose-enriched medium

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalhais, V.; França, Ângela; Pier, Gerald B.; Vilanova, Manuel; Cerca, Nuno; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an important nosocomial agent among carriers of indwelling medical devices, due to its strong ability to form biofilms on inert surfaces. Contrary to some advances made in the transcriptomic field, proteome characterization of S. epidermidis biofilms is less developed. To highlight the relation between transcripts and proteins of S. epidermidis biofilms, we analyzed the proteomic profile obtained by two mechanical lysis methods (sonication and bead beating), asso...

  1. Biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species: quantification, structure and matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana; Martins, António; Oliveira, Rosário; Williams, David; Azeredo, Joana

    2009-11-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to C. albicans, but recently, non- Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species have been identified as common pathogens. The ability of Candida species to form biofilms has important clinical repercussions due to their increased resistance to antifungal therapy and the ability of yeast cells within the biofilms to withstand host immune defenses. Given this clinical importance of the biofilm growth form, the aim of this study was to characterize biofilms produced by three NCAC species, namely C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. The biofilm forming ability of clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata recovered from different sources, was evaluated by crystal violet staining. The structure and morphological characteristics of the biofilms were also assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the biofilm matrix composition analyzed for protein and carbohydrate content. All NCAC species were able to form biofilms although these were less extensive for C. glabrata compared with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. It was evident that C. parapsilosis biofilm production was highly strain dependent, a feature not evident with C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed structural differences for biofilms with respect to cell morphology and spatial arrangement. Candida parapsilosis biofilm matrices had large amounts of carbohydrate with less protein. Conversely, matrices extracted from C. tropicalis biofilms had low amounts of carbohydrate and protein. Interestingly, C. glabrata biofilm matrix was high in both protein and carbohydrate content. The present work demonstrates that biofilm forming ability, structure and matrix composition are highly species dependent with additional strain variability occurring with C. parapsilosis.

  2. Composition and architecture of biofilms on used voice prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijssen, Kevin J. D. A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van den Huijssen, Pauline; Busscher, Henk J.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Biofilms on medical devices are a frequent reason for failure of the device. Voice prostheses in laryngectomized patients deteriorate within 3 to 4 months due to adhering biofilms, impeding proper functioning. Recently, we showed that these biofilms are dominated by Candida and lactobacil

  3. Composition and architecture of biofilms on used voice prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijssen, Kevin J. D. A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van den Huijssen, Pauline; Busscher, Henk J.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    Background Biofilms on medical devices are a frequent reason for failure of the device. Voice prostheses in laryngectomized patients deteriorate within 3 to 4 months due to adhering biofilms, impeding proper functioning. Recently, we showed that these biofilms are dominated by Candida and

  4. Divergent composition of algal-bacterial biofilms developing under various external factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barranguet, C.; Veuger, B.; van Beusekom, S.A.M.; Marvan, P.; Sinke, J.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of external factors other than nutrients on biofilm development and composition was studied with a combination of optical (Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, PAM fluorometry) and chemical methods (EPS extraction, HPLC, TOC determination). The development of algal-bacterial biofilms wa

  5. Evaluation of antimicrobial efficacy of cetrimide and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. extract against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm grown on dentin discs in comparison with NaOCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldas, Hilmi Egemen; Kececi, Ayse Diljin; Cetin, Emel Sesli; Ozturk, Tuba; Kaya, Bulem Üreyen

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of NaOCl, cetrimide, and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. extract against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms on dentine discs. Broth microdilution method was used to determine minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the agents. A biofilm susceptibility assay was performed using E. faecalis biofilms grown on dentine discs. Minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of NaOCl (0.5%), cetrimide (0.015%), and G. glabra L. extract (0.25%) were applied for 1, 3, and 5 min, and the mean viable cell counts were recorded and statistically analyzed. There was no significant difference between cetrimide and NaOCl at 1 min (p>0.05). NaOCl was the most effective agent at 3 and 5 min (pglabra L. extract was the least (pglabra that eliminated the planktonic E. faecalis did not eradicate the biofilms grown on dentin discs.

  6. Transport properties of polymer-vapour grown carbon fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeyev, S. A.; Macedo, F. J.; Ferreira, J. A.; van Hattum, F. W. J.; Bernardo, C. A.

    2000-04-01

    DC electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of polypropylene (PP) filled with vapour grown carbon fibre (VGCF) was studied. This was done for a wide range of fibre content and compared to systems produced under the same conditions in which a conventional carbon fibre was used as filler. The composites studied exhibit characteristic percolating behaviour. Because of the low degree of graphite perfection in the VGCF used in this work, the fraction of VGCF required to achieve percolation was higher than expected. Non-linear I- V characteristics and time dependent electrical resistivity effects are only observed in PP filled with VGCF. Several mechanisms must be called upon to explain the observed electrical behaviour of the PP/VGCF composite. The thermal conductivity of the composites is in agreement with the effective medium theories.

  7. Tolerance of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 to metals, polychlorobiphenyls and chlorobenzoates: effects on chemotaxis-, biofilm- and planktonic-grown cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremaroli, Valentina; Vacchi Suzzi, Caterina; Fedi, Stefano; Ceri, Howard; Zannoni, Davide; Turner, Raymond J

    2010-11-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 is a polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) degrader, also tolerant to several toxic metals and metalloids. The work presented here examines for the first time the chemotactic response of P. pseudoalcaligenes KF707 to biphenyl and intermediates of the PCB biodegradation pathway in the presence and absence of metals. Chemotaxis analyses showed that biphenyl, benzoic acid and chlorobenzoic acids acted as chemoattractants for KF707 cells and that metal cations such as Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) strongly affected the chemotactic response. Toxicity profiles of various metals on KF707 cells grown on succinate or biphenyl as planktonic and biofilm were determined both in the presence and in the absence of PCBs. Notably, KF707 cells from both biofilms and planktonic cultures were tolerant to high amounts (up to 0.5 g L(-1)) of Aroclor 1242, a commercial mixture of PCBs. Together, the data show that KF707 cells are chemotactic and can form a biofilm in the presence of Aroclor 1242 and specific metals. These findings provide new perspectives on the effectiveness of using PCB-degrading bacterial strains in bioremediation strategies of metal-co-contaminated sites. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Degradation in the dentin-composite interface subjected to multi-species biofilm challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Carrera, C; Chen, R; Li, J; Lenton, P; Rudney, J D; Jones, R S; Aparicio, C; Fok, A

    2014-01-01

    Oral biofilms can degrade the components in dental resin-based composite restorations, thus compromising marginal integrity and leading to secondary caries. This study investigates the mechanical integrity of the dentin-composite interface challenged with multi-species oral biofilms. While most studies used single-species biofilms, the present study used a more realistic, diverse biofilm model produced directly from plaques collected from donors with a history of early childhood caries. Dentin-composite disks were made using bovine incisor roots filled with Z100(TM) or Filtek(TM) LS (3M ESPE). The disks were incubated for 72 h in paired CDC biofilm reactors, using a previously published protocol. One reactor was pulsed with sucrose, and the other was not. A sterile saliva-only control group was run with sucrose pulsing. The disks were fractured under diametral compression to evaluate their interfacial bond strength. The surface deformation of the disks was mapped using digital image correlation to ascertain the fracture origin. Fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to assess demineralization and interfacial degradation. Dentin demineralization was greater under sucrose-pulsed biofilms, as the pH dropped Biofilm growth with sucrose pulsing also caused preferential degradation of the composite-dentin interface, depending on the composite/adhesive system used. Specifically, Z100 specimens showed greater bond strength reduction and more frequent cohesive failure in the adhesive layer. This was attributed to the inferior dentin coverage by Z100 adhesive, which possibly led to a higher level of chemical and enzymatic degradation. The results suggested that factors other than dentin demineralization were also responsible for interfacial degradation. A clinically relevant in vitro biofilm model was therefore developed, which would effectively allow assessment of the degradation of the dentin-composite

  9. Intermicrobial Interactions as a Driver for Community Composition and Stratification of Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S

    2015-11-20

    The oral cavity is accessible to microorganisms, and biofilms are present throughout on hard and soft tissues. The shedding of epithelial cell layers is usually effective for controlling biofilm development on soft tissues. Innate immune mechanisms are not so effective against biofilms on tooth surfaces, and oral hygiene measures such as brushing and flossing are required for the periodic removal of dental plaque. Even with good oral hygiene, microbial communities accumulate on teeth in areas that are protected from mechanical abrasion forces. Changes in the composition of these biofilms are associated with oral diseases such as dental caries or periodontitis. Newly formed biofilms and more mature dental plaque each have a level of spatial organization in the horizontal and vertical planes. Communities are shaped by many varied interactions between different species and genera within the biofilm, which include physical cell-cell associations known as coaggregation, interspecies signaling, secretion and turnover of antimicrobial compounds and the sharing of an extracellular matrix. Central to these interactions is the selection for metabolic synergies and it is becoming clear that the ability of communities to extract the maximum energy from the available metabolites is a potent driver for biofilm structure and stratification. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of intermicrobial interactions in oral biofilms and the roles that they play in determining the spatial organization of biofilm communities.

  10. Structure, composition, and strength of nitrifying membrane-aerated biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs) are a novel technology based on the growth of biofilms on oxygen-permeable membranes. Hereby, MABRs combine all the advantages of biofilm growth with a more flexible and efficient control of the oxygen load. In the present work, flow cell operation...... had a higher content of proteins and a lower level of carbohydrates. Staining analyses revealed that the EPS in the stronger biofilm regions had hydrophilic nature and distributed around dense microbial aggregates, whereas it was homogeneously distributed in the weaker strata. Overall, the obtained...

  11. Intracellular proliferation of Legionella pneumophila in Hartmannella vermiformis in aquatic biofilms grown on plasticized polyvinyl chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, M.W.; Wullings, B.A.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Beumer, R.R.; Kooij, van der D.

    2004-01-01

    The need for protozoa for the proliferation of Legionella pneumophila in aquatic habitats is still not fully understood and is even questioned by some investigators. This study shows the in vivo growth of L. pneumophila in protozoa in aquatic biofilms developing at high concentrations on plasticized

  12. Comparative proteomic and transcriptomic profile of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms grown in glucose-enriched medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhais, Virginia; França, Angela; Pier, Gerald B; Vilanova, Manuel; Cerca, Nuno; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an important nosocomial agent among carriers of indwelling medical devices, due to its strong ability to form biofilms on inert surfaces. Contrary to some advances made in the transcriptomic field, proteome characterization of S. epidermidis biofilms is less developed. To highlight the relation between transcripts and proteins of S. epidermidis biofilms, we analyzed the proteomic profile obtained by two mechanical lysis methods (sonication and bead beating), associated with two distinct detergent extraction buffers, namely SDS and CHAPS. Based on gel electrophoresis-LC-MS/MS, we identified a total of 453 proteins. While lysis with glass beads provided greater amounts of protein, CHAPS extraction buffer allowed identification of a higher number of proteins compared to SDS. Our data shows the impact of different protein isolation methods in the characterization of the S. epidermidis biofilm proteome. Furthermore, the correlation between proteomic and transcriptomic profiles was evaluated. The results confirmed that proteomic and transcriptomic data should be analyzed simultaneously in order to have a comprehensive understanding of a specific microbiological condition.

  13. Effects of resource chemistry on the composition and function of hyporheic stream biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eHall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Stream ecosystems process large quantities of dissolved organic matter as it moves from the headwaters to the sea. Interstitial sediments in the hyporheic zone are centers of high biogeochemical reactivity due to their high levels of microbial biomass and activity. However, the interaction between organic matter and microbial dynamics of these systems remains poorly understood. We evaluated how variance in resource chemistry affected the microbial community and its associated activity in experimentally grown interstitial biofilms. Specifically, we fed beech leaf leachates that differed in chemical composition to a series of bioreactors filled with sediment from a sub-alpine stream. Differences in resource chemistry resulted in differences in diversity and phylogenetic origin of microbial proteins, enzyme activity, and microbial biomass stoichiometry. Specifically, increased lignin, phenolics and manganese in a single leachate resulted in increased phenoloxidase and peroxidase activity, elevated microbial biomass carbon:nitrogen ratio, and a greater proportion of proteins of beta-proteobacter origin. We use this model system to link microbial form, (community composition and proteome, with function, (enzyme activity, in an attempt to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms that link resource heterogeneity to ecosystem function in stream ecosystems.

  14. Effects of resource chemistry on the composition and function of stream hyporheic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E.K.; Besemer, K.; Kohl, L.; Preiler, C.; Reidel, K.; Schneider, T.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Fluvial ecosystems process large quantities of dissolved organic matter as it moves from the headwater streams to the sea. In particular, hyporheic sediments are centers of high biogeochemical reactivity due to their elevated residence time and high microbial biomass and activity. However, the interaction between organic matter and microbial dynamics in the hyporheic zone remains poorly understood. We evaluated how variance in resource chemistry affected the microbial community and its associated activity in experimentally grown hyporheic biofilms. To do this we fed beech leaf leachates that differed in chemical composition to a series of bioreactors filled with sediment from a sub-alpine stream. Differences in resource chemistry resulted in differences in diversity and phylogenetic origin of microbial proteins, enzyme activity, and microbial biomass stoichiometry. Specifically, increased lignin, phenolics, and manganese in a single leachate resulted in increased phenoloxidase and peroxidase activity, elevated microbial biomass carbon:nitrogen ratio, and a greater proportion of proteins of Betaproteobacteria origin. We used this model system to attempt to link microbial form (community composition and metaproteome) with function (enzyme activity) in order to better understand the mechanisms that link resource heterogeneity to ecosystem function in stream ecosystems.

  15. Microbial composition of biofilms associated with lithifying rubble of Acropora palmata branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Yislem; Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Taş, Neslihan; Thomé, Patricia E; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Falcón, Luisa I

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are among the most productive ecosystems on the planet, but are rapidly declining due to global-warming-mediated changes in the oceans. Particularly for the Caribbean region, Acropora sp. stony corals have lost ∼80% of their original coverage, resulting in vast extensions of dead coral rubble. We analyzed the microbial composition of biofilms that colonize and lithify dead Acropora palmata rubble in the Mexican Caribbean and identified the microbial assemblages that can persist under scenarios of global change, including high temperature and low pH. Lithifying biofilms have a mineral composition that includes aragonite and magnesium calcite (16 mole% MgCO(3)) and calcite, while the mineral phase corresponding to coral skeleton is basically aragonite. Microbial composition of the lithifying biofilms are different in comparison to surrounding biotopes, including a microbial mat, water column, sediments and live A. palmata microbiome. Significant shifts in biofilm composition were detected in samples incubated in mesocosms. The combined effect of low pH and increased temperature showed a strong effect after two-week incubations for biofilm composition. Findings suggest that lithifying biofilms could remain as a secondary structure on reef rubble possibly impacting the functional role of coral reefs.

  16. Biofilm Matrix Composition Affects the Susceptibility of Food Associated Staphylococci to Cleaning and Disinfection Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even; Mikkelsen, Maria I.; Møretrø, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride (BC)-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition, or BC efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2), S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2), and S. saprophyticus (2). The eight biofilm producing strains were characterized using whole genome sequencing. Three of these strains contained the ica operon responsible for production of a polysaccharide matrix, and formed a biofilm which was detached upon exposure to the polysaccharide degrading enzyme Dispersin B, but not Proteinase K or trypsin. These strains were more tolerant to the lethal effect of BC both in suspension and biofilm than the remaining five biofilm producing strains. The five BC susceptible strains were characterized by lack of the ica operon, and their biofilms were detached by Proteinase K or trypsin, but not Dispersin B, indicating that proteins were major structural components of their biofilm matrix. Several novel cell wall anchored repeat domain proteins with domain structures similar to that of MSCRAMM adhesins were identified in the genomes of these strains, potentially representing novel mechanisms of ica-independent biofilm accumulation. Biofilms from all strains showed similar levels of detachment after exposure to alkaline chlorine, which is used for cleaning in the food industry. Strains with qac genes encoding BC efflux pumps could grow at higher concentrations of BC than strains without these genes, but no differences were observed at biocidal concentrations. In conclusion, the biofilm matrix of food associated staphylococci varies with respect to protein or polysaccharide nature, and this may affect the sensitivity toward a commonly used disinfectant. PMID:27375578

  17. Biofilm matrix composition affects the susceptibility of food associated staphylococci to cleaning and disinfection agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette eFagerlund

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition or benzalkonium chloride efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2, S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2, and S. saprophyticus (2. The eight biofilm producing strains were characterized using whole genome sequencing. Three of these strains contained the ica operon responsible for production of a polysaccharide matrix, and formed a biofilm which was detached upon exposure to the polysaccharide degrading enzyme Dispersin B, but not Proteinase K or trypsin. These strains were more tolerant to the lethal effect of benzalkonium chloride both in suspension and biofilm than the remaining five biofilm producing strains. The five benzalkonium chloride susceptible strains were characterized by lack of the ica operon, and their biofilms were detached by Proteinase K or trypsin, but not Dispersin B, indicating that proteins were major structural components of their biofilm matrix. Several novel cell wall anchored repeat domain proteins with domain structures similar to that of MSCRAMM adhesins were identified in the genomes of these strains, potentially representing novel mechanisms of ica-independent biofilm accumulation. Biofilms from all strains showed similar levels of detachment after exposure to alkaline chlorine, which is used for cleaning in the food industry. Strains with qac genes encoding benzalkonium chloride efflux pumps could grow at higher concentrations of benzalkonium chloride than strains without these genes, but no differences were observed at biocidal concentrations. In conclusion, the biofilm matrix of food associated staphylococci varies with respect to protein or

  18. Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of biofilm communities colonizing drinking water distribution pipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Kelly

    Full Text Available Pipes that transport drinking water through municipal drinking water distribution systems (DWDS are challenging habitats for microorganisms. Distribution networks are dark, oligotrophic and contain disinfectants; yet microbes frequently form biofilms attached to interior surfaces of DWDS pipes. Relatively little is known about the species composition and ecology of these biofilms due to challenges associated with sample acquisition from actual DWDS. We report the analysis of biofilms from five pipe samples collected from the same region of a DWDS in Florida, USA, over an 18 month period between February 2011 and August 2012. The bacterial abundance and composition of biofilm communities within the pipes were analyzed by heterotrophic plate counts and tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, respectively. Bacterial numbers varied significantly based on sampling date and were positively correlated with water temperature and the concentration of nitrate. However, there was no significant relationship between the concentration of disinfectant in the drinking water (monochloramine and the abundance of bacteria within the biofilms. Pyrosequencing analysis identified a total of 677 operational taxonomic units (OTUs (3% distance within the biofilms but indicated that community diversity was low and varied between sampling dates. Biofilms were dominated by a few taxa, specifically Methylomonas, Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Xanthomonadaceae, and the dominant taxa within the biofilms varied dramatically between sampling times. The drinking water characteristics most strongly correlated with bacterial community composition were concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total chlorine and monochloramine, as well as alkalinity and hardness. Biofilms from the sampling date with the highest nitrate concentration were the most abundant and diverse and were dominated by Acinetobacter.

  19. Biofilm Matrix Composition Affects the Susceptibility of Food Associated Staphylococci to Cleaning and Disinfection Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Annette eFagerlund; Solveig eLangsrud; Even eHeir; Maria Ingeborg Mikkelsen; Trond eMøretrø

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition or benzalkonium chloride efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2), S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2), and S. saprophyticu...

  20. Biofilms produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia: influence of media and solid supports on composition of matrix exopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzoni, Elena; Ravalico, Fabio; Scaini, Denis; Delneri, Ambra; Rizzo, Roberto; Cescutti, Paola

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria usually grow forming biofilms, which are communities of cells embedded in a self-produced dynamic polymeric matrix, characterized by a complex three-dimensional structure. The matrix holds cells together and above a surface, and eventually releases them, resulting in colonization of other surfaces. Although exopolysaccharides (EPOLs) are important components of the matrix, determination of their structure is usually performed on samples produced in non-biofilm conditions, or indirectly through genetic studies. Among the Burkholderia cepacia complex species, Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and is generally more aggressive than other species. In the present investigation, B. cenocepacia strain BTS2, a CF isolate, was grown in biofilm mode on glass slides and cellulose membranes, using five growth media, one of which mimics the nutritional content of CF sputum. The structure of the matrix EPOLs was determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, while visualization of the biofilms on glass slides was obtained by means of confocal laser microscopy, phase-contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results confirmed that the type of EPOLs biosynthesized depends both on the medium used and on the type of support, and showed that mucoid conditions do not always lead to significant biofilm production, while bacteria in a non-mucoid state can still form biofilm containing EPOLs.

  1. Seasonal variation in the chemical composition and carbohydrate signature compounds of biofilm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, F.P.; Garg, A.; Bhosle, N.B.

    relationships with the OC and ON of the biofilm, implying that bacteria and microalgae were important sources for these compounds (Table 1). Carbohydrate and protein concentrations Concentrations of both TCHO SP and protein increased over the period of immersion... in the growth medium, are known to influence the relative distribution of carbohydrates and proteins in laboratory-grown bacteria and microalgae, as well as in natural populations of microorganisms (Corzo et al. 2000). Nitrate and phosphate concentrations...

  2. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on composite resins containing ursolic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohyeon; Song, Minju; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Park, Sung-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the inhibitory effect of ursolic acid (UA)-containing composites on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm. Materials and Methods Composite resins with five different concentrations (0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 wt%) of UA (U6753, Sigma Aldrich) were prepared, and their flexural strengths were measured according to ISO 4049. To evaluate the effect of carbohydrate source on biofilm formation, either glucose or sucrose was used as a nutrient source, and to investigate the effect of saliva treatment, the specimen were treated with either unstimulated whole saliva or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). For biofilm assay, composite disks were transferred to S. mutans suspension and incubated for 24 hr. Afterwards, the specimens were rinsed with PBS and sonicated. The colony forming units (CFU) of the disrupted biofilm cultures were enumerated. For growth inhibition test, the composites were placed on a polystyrene well cluster, and S. mutans suspension was inoculated. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was recorded by Infinite F200 pro apparatus (TECAN). One-way ANOVA and two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction were used for the data analyses. Results The flexural strength values did not show significant difference at any concentration (p > 0.01). In biofilm assay, the CFU score decreased as the concentration of UA increased. The influence of saliva pretreatment was conflicting. The sucrose groups exhibited higher CFU score than glucose group (p composite showed inhibitory effect on S. mutans biofilm formation and growth. PMID:23741708

  3. Influence of fluoride on the bacterial composition of a dual-species biofilm composed of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus oralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Cai, Jian-Na; Cho, Sung-Dae; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2016-10-01

    Despite the widespread use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries, few studies have demonstrated the effects of fluoride on the bacterial composition of dental biofilms. This study investigated whether fluoride affects the proportion of Streptococcus mutans and S. oralis in mono- and dual-species biofilm models, via microbiological, biochemical, and confocal fluorescence microscope studies. Fluoride did not affect the bacterial count and bio-volume of S. mutans and S. oralis in mono-species biofilms, except for the 24-h-old S. mutans biofilms. However, fluoride reduced the proportion and bio-volume of S. mutans but did not decrease those of S. oralis during both S. oralis and S. mutans dual-species biofilm formation, which may be related to the decrease in extracellular polysaccharide formation by fluoride. These results suggest that fluoride may prevent the shift in the microbial proportion to cariogenic bacteria in dental biofilms, subsequently inhibiting the cariogenic bacteria dominant biofilm formation.

  4. From biofilm ecology to reactors: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Joshua P; Smets, Barth F; Rittmann, Bruce E; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Daigger, Glen T

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are complex biostructures that appear on all surfaces that are regularly in contact with water. They are structurally complex, dynamic systems with attributes of primordial multicellular organisms and multifaceted ecosystems. The presence of biofilms may have a negative impact on the performance of various systems, but they can also be used beneficially for the treatment of water (defined herein as potable water, municipal and industrial wastewater, fresh/brackish/salt water bodies, groundwater) as well as in water stream-based biological resource recovery systems. This review addresses the following three topics: (1) biofilm ecology, (2) biofilm reactor technology and design, and (3) biofilm modeling. In so doing, it addresses the processes occurring in the biofilm, and how these affect and are affected by the broader biofilm system. The symphonic application of a suite of biological methods has led to significant advances in the understanding of biofilm ecology. New metabolic pathways, such as anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or complete ammonium oxidation (comammox) were first observed in biofilm reactors. The functions, properties, and constituents of the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance matrix are somewhat known, but their exact composition and role in the microbial conversion kinetics and biochemical transformations are still to be resolved. Biofilm grown microorganisms may contribute to increased metabolism of micro-pollutants. Several types of biofilm reactors have been used for water treatment, with current focus on moving bed biofilm reactors, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, membrane-supported biofilm reactors, and granular sludge processes. The control and/or beneficial use of biofilms in membrane processes is advancing. Biofilm models have become essential tools for fundamental biofilm research and biofilm reactor engineering and design. At the same time, the divergence between biofilm modeling and biofilm reactor

  5. Microbial community composition and dynamics of moving bed biofilm reactor systems treating municipal sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kristi; Turner, Susan J

    2012-02-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems are increasingly used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, yet in contrast to activated sludge (AS) systems, little is known about their constituent microbial communities. This study investigated the community composition of two municipal MBBR wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Wellington, New Zealand. Monthly samples comprising biofilm and suspended biomass were collected over a 12-month period. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was determined using a full-cycle community approach, including analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Differences in microbial community structure and abundance were observed between the two WWTPs and between biofilm and suspended biomass. Biofilms from both plants were dominated by Clostridia and sulfate-reducing members of the Deltaproteobacteria (SRBs). FISH analyses indicated morphological differences in the Deltaproteobacteria detected at the two plants and also revealed distinctive clustering between SRBs and members of the Methanosarcinales, which were the only Archaea detected and were present in low abundance (MBBR systems and indicates that this process selects for distinctive biofilm and planktonic communities, both of which differ from those found in conventional AS systems.

  6. Comparative lipid composition of heterotrophically and autotrophically grown Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langworthy, T A

    1977-06-01

    Complex lipids from the thermoacidophilic facultative autotroph Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as well as a strictly autotrophic isolate, were compared between cells grown on yeast extract and elemental sulfur. Lipids from both organisms grown autotrophically were nearly identical. Each contained about 15% neutral lipids, 35% glycolipids, and 50% acidic lipids. Glycolipids and acidic lipids contained C40H82-76-derived glycerol ether residues. Major glycolipids included the glycerol ether analogues of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride (5%) and glucosyl polyol diglyceride (75%). Acidic lipids were comprised mainly of the glycerol ether analogues of phosphatidyl inositol (7%), inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol diglyceride (72%), and a partially characterized sulfate- and phosphate-containing derivative of glucosyl polyol diglyceride (13%). The lipids from cells grown heterotrophically were similar to those from autotrophically grown cells, except that the partially characterized acidic lipid was absent. In addition, the two glycolipids as well as the respective inositolphosphoryl derivatives were each present in nearly equal proportions.

  7. Bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches for bacterial biofilm matrix composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-04-01

    The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in providing crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, formidable challenges exist in generating complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell assemblies. Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular bacterial communities protected by a slime-like extracellular matrix that confers protection to environmental stress and enhances resistance to antibiotics and host defenses. As a non-crystalline, insoluble, heterogeneous assembly, the biofilm extracellular matrix poses a challenge to compositional analysis by conventional methods. In this perspective, bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches are described for defining chemical composition in complex macrosystems. The "sum-of-the-parts" bottom-up approach was introduced to examine the amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by Escherichia coli and permitted the first determination of the composition of the intact extracellular matrix from a bacterial biofilm. An alternative top-down approach was developed to define composition in Vibrio cholerae biofilms and relied on an extensive panel of NMR measurements to tease out specific carbon pools from a single sample of the intact extracellular matrix. These two approaches are widely applicable to other heterogeneous assemblies. For bacterial biofilms, quantitative parameters of matrix composition are needed to understand how biofilms are assembled, to improve the development of biofilm inhibitors, and to dissect inhibitor modes of action. Solid-state NMR approaches will also be invaluable in obtaining parameters of matrix architecture.

  8. Polyethyleneimine nanoparticles incorporated into resin composite cause cell death and trigger biofilm stress in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyth, Nurit; Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Perez-Davidi, Michael; Domb, Abraham J; Weiss, Ervin I

    2010-12-21

    Incorporation of cross-linked quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles in dental resin composite has a long-lasting and wide antimicrobial effect with no measured impact on biocompatibility in vitro. We hypothesized that QPEI nanoparticles incorporated into a resin composite have a potent antibacterial effect in vivo and that this stress condition triggers a suicide module in the bacterial biofilm. Ten volunteers wore a removable acrylic appliance, in which two control resin composite specimens and two resin composite specimens incorporating 1% wt/wt QPEI nanoparticles were inserted to allow the buildup of intraoral biofilms. After 4 h, the specimens were removed and tested for bacterial vitality and biofilm thickness, using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The vitality rate in specimens incorporating QPEI was reduced by > 50% (p resin composite versus the resin composite incorporating QPEI. These results strongly suggest that QPEI nanoparticles incorporated at a low concentration in resin composite exert a significant in vivo antibiofilm activity and exhibit a potent broad spectrum antibacterial activity against salivary bacteria.

  9. Yield and Oil Composition of Thirty-Eight Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) Accessions Grown in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) has been grown as an essential oil crop in many countries; however, the herbage yield, oil content, composition, and bioactivity of basil grown in Mississippi and other Southern U.S. states has not been explored. The hypothesis of this study was that certain basil ...

  10. Exopolymer diversity and the role of levan in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iztok Dogsa

    Full Text Available Exopolymeric substances (EPS are important for biofilm formation and their chemical composition may influence biofilm properties. To explore these relationships the chemical composition of EPS from Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610 biofilms grown in sucrose-rich (SYM and sucrose-poor (MSgg and Czapek media was studied. We observed marked differences in composition of EPS polymers isolated from all three biofilms or from spent media below the biofilms. The polysaccharide levan dominated the EPS of SYM grown biofilms, while EPS from biofilms grown in sucrose-poor media contained significant amounts of proteins and DNA in addition to polysaccharides. The EPS polymers differed also in size with very large polymers (Mw>2000 kDa found only in biofilms, while small polymers (Mw<200 kD dominated in the EPS isolated from spent media. Biofilms of the eps knockout were significantly thinner than those of the tasA knockout in all media. The biofilm defective phenotypes of tasA and eps mutants were, however, partially compensated in the sucrose-rich SYM medium. Sucrose supplementation of Czapek and MSgg media increased the thickness and stability of biofilms compared to non-supplemented controls. Since sucrose is essential for synthesis of levan and the presence of levan was confirmed in all biofilms grown in media containing sucrose, this study for the first time shows that levan, although not essential for biofilm formation, can be a structural and possibly stabilizing component of B. subtilis floating biofilms. In addition, we propose that this polysaccharide, when incorporated into the biofilm EPS, may also serve as a nutritional reserve.

  11. In vitro phenotypic differentiation towards commensal and pathogenic oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Marleen M; Keijser, Bart J F; Bikker, Floris J; Exterkate, Rob A M; Crielaard, Wim; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2015-01-01

    Commensal oral biofilms, defined by the absence of pathology-related phenotypes, are ubiquitously present. In contrast to pathological biofilms commensal biofilms are rarely studied. Here, the effect of the initial inoculum and subsequent growth conditions on in vitro oral biofilms was studied. Biofilms were inoculated with saliva and grown anaerobically for up to 21 days in McBain medium with or without fetal calf serum (FCS) or sucrose. Pathology-related phenotypes were quantified and the community composition was determined. Biofilms inoculated with pooled saliva or individual inocula were similar. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis allowed differentiation of biofilms grown with sucrose, but not with FCS. Lactate production by biofilms was significantly increased by sucrose and protease activity by FCS. McBain grown biofilms showed low activity for both phenotypes. Three clinically relevant in vitro biofilm models were developed and could be differentiated based on pathology-related phenotypes but not DGGE analysis. These models allow analysis of health-to-disease shifts and the effectiveness of prevention measures.

  12. Chemical composition of Brazilian chia seeds grown in different places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; Anunciação, Pamella Cristine; Matyelka, Jessika Camila da Silva; Della Lucia, Ceres Mattos; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria

    2017-04-15

    This study investigated and compared the occurrence and concentration of macronutrients, moisture, ash, dietary fiber, fatty acids, minerals, carotenoids, vitamins, flavonoids, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity, phytate and tannin in Brazilian chia seeds grown in the states of Mato Grosso (MT) and Rio Grande do Sul (RS). High concentrations of lipids (31.2g.100g(-1), on average), proteins (18.9g.100g(-1), on average), dietary fiber (35.3g.100g(-1), on average), vitamin E (8,203.6μg.100g(-1), on average) were observed. Similar values for total phenolic compounds and phytic acid in chia seeds from both regions were observed. Chia grown in RS showed higher antioxidant activity than chia grown in MT, and the tannin concentrations were higher in chia seeds grown in Mato Grosso (19.08±1.08eq.catequina/gsample). In conclusion, Brazilian chia seeds showed high concentrations of lipids, proteins, total dietary fiber, minerals and vitamin E. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of aluminium and copper on biofilm development of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and P. fluorescens as a function of different media compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sean C; George, Iain F S; Zannoni, Davide; Cappelletti, Martina; Duggan, Gavin E; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-06-01

    Bioremediation efforts worldwide are faced with the problem of metals interfering with the degradation of organic pollutants. There has been little systematic investigation into how the important environmental factors of media composition, buffering agent, and carbon source affect the exertion of metal toxicity on bacteria. This study aimed to systematically separate and investigate the influence of these factors by examining planktonic and biofilm establishment and growth. Two Pseudomonads were chosen, the PCB degrader P. pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and P. fluorescens. The two strains were grown in the presence of Al(3+) and Cu(2+) under different media conditions of carbon source (Lysogeny broth, biphenyl, succinate, aspartic acid, butyric acid, oxaloacetic acid, putrescine and benzoic acid) and under different buffering conditions (high and low phosphate or MOPS). These experiments allowed for the elucidation of an effect of different metabolic conditions and metal speciation on planktonic bacteria growth and biofilm establishment and development under metal stress. Here we show that the nature of bacterial growth (planktonic and biofilm development) is dramatically affected by the interplay between toxic metals, carbon source and media composition. The capacity of a media to bind toxic metals as well as quality of carbon source greatly influences the amount of metal that bacteria can tolerate, depending on both the bacterium and metal. Future studies evaluating metal ion toxicity should consider these effects, as well as their interactions with specific environments into account in order to improve clean-up success.

  14. Microbial community diversity and composition varies with habitat characteristics and biofilm function in macrophyte-rich streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Peter S.; Starnawski, Piotr; Poulsen, Britta

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms in streams play an integral role in ecosystem processes and function yet few studies have investigated the broad diversity of these complex prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities. Physical habitat characteristics can affect the composition and abundance of microorganisms...

  15. Biofilm-grown Burkholderia cepacia complex cells survive antibiotic treatment by avoiding production of reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen Van Acker

    Full Text Available The presence of persister cells has been proposed as a factor in biofilm resilience. In the present study we investigated whether persister cells are present in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc biofilms, what the molecular basis of antimicrobial tolerance in Bcc persisters is, and how persisters can be eradicated from Bcc biofilms. After treatment of Bcc biofilms with high concentrations of various antibiotics often a small subpopulation survived. To investigate the molecular mechanism of tolerance in this subpopulation, Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilms were treated with 1024 µg/ml of tobramycin. Using ROS-specific staining and flow cytometry, we showed that tobramycin increased ROS production in treated sessile cells. However, approximately 0.1% of all sessile cells survived the treatment. A transcriptome analysis showed that several genes from the tricarboxylic acid cycle and genes involved in the electron transport chain were downregulated. In contrast, genes from the glyoxylate shunt were upregulated. These data indicate that protection against ROS is important for the survival of persisters. To confirm this, we determined the number of persisters in biofilms formed by catalase mutants. The persister fraction in ΔkatA and ΔkatB biofilms was significantly reduced, confirming the role of ROS detoxification in persister survival. Pretreatment of B. cenocepacia biofilms with itaconate, an inhibitor of isocitrate lyase (ICL, the first enzyme in the glyoxylate shunt, reduced the persister fraction approx. 10-fold when the biofilms were subsequently treated with tobramycin. In conclusion, most Bcc biofilms contain a significant fraction of persisters that survive treatment with high doses of tobramycin. The surviving persister cells downregulate the TCA cycle to avoid production of ROS and at the same time activate an alternative pathway, the glyoxylate shunt. This pathway may present a novel target for combination therapy.

  16. Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on composite resin surfaces after different finishing and polishing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, C A; Eskelson, E; Cavalli, V; Liporoni, P C S; Jorge, A O C; do Rego, M A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on the surface of three composite resins (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; nanohybrid, Vit-1-escence, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA; and microhybrid, Esthet X, Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA) following different finishing and polishing techniques. Sixty standardized samples (6 × 3 mm) of each composite were produced and randomly divided into three finishing and polishing treatments (n=20): 1) control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, 2) Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique (3M ESPE, and 3) carbide bur finishing and Astrobrush polishing technique (Ultradent). Half the samples of each group were incubated in human saliva for 1 hour, and all the samples were subjected to S mutans (ATCC 35688) biofilm development. The mean log of CFU/mL present in the S mutans biofilm was calculated, and data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (pcomposites' surfaces, regardless of the polishing treatment performed (pcomposite (Filtek Z350) had the lowest bacterial adherence with each of the finishing and polishing techniques despite the presence or absence of human saliva (padhesion on the surface of the microhybrid and nanofilled composites in the absence of human saliva.

  17. Comparing the chlorine disinfection of detached biofilm clusters with those of sessile biofilms and planktonic cells in single- and dual-species cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Sabrina; Parker, Albert E; Woodall, Dawn; Camper, Anne K

    2011-10-01

    Although the detachment of cells from biofilms is of fundamental importance to the dissemination of organisms in both public health and clinical settings, the disinfection efficacies of commonly used biocides on detached biofilm particles have not been investigated. Therefore, the question arises whether cells in detached aggregates can be killed with disinfectant concentrations sufficient to inactivate planktonic cells. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in standardized laboratory reactors as single species and in coculture. Cluster size distributions in chemostats and biofilm reactor effluent were measured. Chlorine susceptibility was assessed for planktonic cultures, attached biofilm, and particles and cells detached from the biofilm. Disinfection tolerance generally increased with a higher percentage of larger cell clusters in the chemostat and detached biofilm. Samples with a lower percentage of large clusters were more easily disinfected. Thus, disinfection tolerance depended on the cluster size distribution rather than sample type for chemostat and detached biofilm. Intact biofilms were more tolerant to chlorine independent of species. Homogenization of samples led to significantly increased susceptibility in all biofilm samples as well as detached clusters for single-species B. cepacia, B. cepacia in coculture, and P. aeruginosa in coculture. The disinfection efficacy was also dependent on species composition; coculture was advantageous to the survival of both species when grown as a biofilm or as clusters detached from biofilm but, surprisingly, resulted in a lower disinfection tolerance when they were grown as a mixed planktonic culture.

  18. Strain and plastic composite support (PCS) selection for vitamin K (Menaquinone-7) production in biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdinia, Ehsan; Demirci, Ali; Berenjian, Aydin

    2017-06-30

    Menaquinone-7 (MK-7), a subtype of vitamin K, has received a significant attention due to its effect on improving bone and cardiovascular health. Current fermentation strategies, which involve static fermentation without aeration or agitation, are associated with low productivity and scale-up issues and hardly justify the commercial production needs of this vitamin. Previous studies indicate that static fermentation is associated with pellicle and biofilm formations, which are critical for MK-7 secretion while posing significant operational issues. Therefore, the present study is undertaken to evaluate the possibility of using a biofilm reactor as a new strategy for MK-7 fermentation. Bacillus species, namely, Bacillus subtilis natto, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquifaciens as well as plastic composite, supports (PCS) were investigated in terms of MK-7 production and biofilm formation. Results show the possibility of using a biofilm reactor for MK-7 biosynthesis. Bacillus subtilis natto and soybean flour yeast extract PCS in glucose medium were found as the most potent combination for production of MK-7 as high as 35.5 mg/L, which includes both intracellular and extracellular MK-7.

  19. Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

  20. Differences in carbohydrate profiles in batch culture grown planktonic and biofilm cells of Amphora rostrata Wm. Sm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khodse, V.B.; Bhosle, N.B.

    modes of growth, the concentration of total carbohydrates, carbohydrate fractions, neutral carbohydrates, uronic acids and amino sugars in planktonic and biofilm cells of Amphora rostrata were measured. The results showed that the distribution...

  1. One-year water-ageing of calcium phosphate composite containing nano-silver and quaternary ammonium to inhibit biofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Cheng; Ke Zhang; Chen-Chen Zhou; Michael D Weir; Xue-Dong Zhou; Hockin HK Xu

    2016-01-01

    Dental composites are commonly used restorative materials; however, secondary caries due to biofilm acids remains a major problem. The objectives of this study were (1) to develop a composite containing quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM), nanoparticles of silver (NAg), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP), and (2) to conduct the first investigation of the mechanical properties, biofilm response and acid production vs water-ageing time from 1 day to 12 months. A 4 × 5 design was utilized, with four composites (NACP-QADM composite, NACP-NAg composite, NACP-QADM-NAg composite, and a commercial control composite), and five water-ageing time periods (1 day, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months). After each water-ageing period, the mechanical properties of the resins were measured in a three-point flexure, and antibacterial properties were tested via a dental plaque biofilm model using human saliva as an inoculum. After 12 months of water-ageing, NACP-QADM-NAg had a flexural strength and elastic modulus matching those of the commercial control (P40.1). Incorporation of QADM or NAg into the NACP composite greatly reduced biofilm viability, metabolic activity and acid production. A composite containing both QADM and NAg possessed a stronger antibacterial capability than one with QADM or NAg alone (Po0.05). The anti-biofilm activity was maintained after 12 months of water-ageing and showed no significant decrease with increasing time (P40.1). In conclusion, the NACP-QADM-NAg composite decreased biofilm viability and lactic acid production, while matching the load-bearing capability of a commercial composite. There was no decrease in its antibacterial properties after 1 year of water-ageing. The durable antibacterial and mechanical properties indicate that NACP-QADM-NAg composites may be useful in dental restorations to combat caries.

  2. Oxygen air enrichment through composite membrane: application to an aerated biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Cerqueira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A highly permeable composite hollow-fibre membrane developed for air separation was used in a membrane aerated biofilm reactor (MABR. The composite membrane consisted of a porous support layer covered with a thin dense film, which was responsible for oxygen enrichment of the permeate stream. Besides oxygen enrichment capability, dense membranes overcome major operational problems that occur when using porous membranes for oxygen transfer to biofilms. Air flow rate and oxygen partial pressure inside the fibres were the variables used to adjust the oxygen transfer rate. The membrane aerated biofilm reactor was operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT ranging from 1 to 4 hours. High organic load removal rates, like 6.5 kg.m-3.d-1, were achieved due to oxygen transfer rates as high as 107 kg.m-3.d-1. High COD removals, with improved oxygen transfer efficiency, indicate that a MABR is a compact alternative to the conventional activated sludge process and that the selected membrane is suitable for further applications.

  3. Microbial diversities (16S and 18S rDNA gene pyrosequencing) and environmental pathogens within drinking water biofilms grown on the common premise plumbing materials unplasticized polyvinylchloride and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water (DW) biofilm communities influence the survival of opportunistic pathogens, e.g. Legionella pneumophila, via parasitization of free-living amoebae such as Acanthamoebae. Yet knowledge about the microbial composition of DW biofilms developed on common in-premise pl...

  4. Microbial diversities (16S and 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing) and environmental pathogens within drinking water biofilms grown on the common premise plumbing materials unplasticized polyvinylchloride and copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Lu, Xinxin; Mou, Xiaozhen; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2014-05-01

    Drinking water (DW) biofilm communities influence the survival of opportunistic pathogens, yet knowledge about the microbial composition of DW biofilms developed on common in-premise plumbing material is limited. Utilizing 16S and 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, this study characterized the microbial community structure within DW biofilms established on unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (uPVC) and copper (Cu) surfaces and the impact of introducing Legionella pneumophila (Lp) and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Mature (> 1 year old) biofilms were developed before inoculation with sterilized DW (control, Con), Lp, or Lp and A. polyphaga (LpAp). Comparison of uPVC and Cu biofilms indicated significant differences between bacterial (P = 0.001) and eukaryotic (P 0.05) but did affect eukaryotic members (uPVC, P < 0.01; Cu, P = 0.001). Thus, established DW biofilms host complex communities that may vary based on substratum matrix and maintain consistent bacterial communities despite introduction of Lp, an environmental pathogen.

  5. Effect of finishing and polishing procedures on biofilm adhesion to composite surfaces: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Vyavahare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness allows plaque accumulation resulting in gingival inflammation, superficial staining and secondary caries. Proper surface finishing and polishing are critical clinical procedures which enhance esthetics and longevity of restorations. This study evaluated adhesion of Streptococcus mutans biofilm on the surface of composite resin discs (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA after finishing and polishing by different techniques. Methodology: Sixty samples of nanofilled composite resin were prepared in a circular shaped disc- 6 mm × 2 mm and divided randomly in three groups (n = 20 for surface treatments. Control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique and 30-blade tungsten carbide burs and silicon carbide brushes, Astrobrush. The samples were subjected to biofilm adhesion by inoculation in suitable media. The response variable was the mean CFU/mL present in the Streptococcus mutans biofilms formed on the composite resin surface. Data was statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The Mean adhesion found in Mylar matrix strip group at 10 dilution was 74.7 ± 3.5, in Sof-Lex group was 147.3 ± 7.0 and in Astrobrush group was 149.4 ± 8.1. This difference in the mean values between the groups was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Mylar matrix strips promoted the least bacterial adhesion, polishing with Sof-Lex aluminium oxide discs provided a smoother surface than Astrobrush and hence less bacterial adhesion than Astrobrush system.

  6. Characterization of composite biofilms of wheat gluten and cellulose acetate phthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Fakhouri

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to develop and characterize composite biofilms produced using wheat gluten and cellulose acetate phthalate. Biofilms act as barriers to moisture and oxygen diffusion through the film. The films were prepared with different thicknesses and component concentrations and were analyzed for water vapor and oxygen permeabilities, water and acid solubilities and mechanical properties. Results showed that the mixture improved film characteristics more than each of the individual components alone. The 1:1 mixture had properties of better permeability to water and oxygen. The composite films were completely soluble in water and acid, with the exception of the film with the highest gluten concentration, which was 50% soluble in water and acid. An increase in gluten concentration in the composite films resulted in a decrease in tensile strength. There was no significant difference in elongation at break between the composite films. No difference in thickness was detected either. Results showed that the mixture improved the characteristics more than of the individual components alone.

  7. One-year water-ageing of calcium phosphate composite containing nano-silver and quaternary ammonium to inhibit biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Chen-Chen; Weir, Michael D; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-09-29

    Dental composites are commonly used restorative materials; however, secondary caries due to biofilm acids remains a major problem. The objectives of this study were (1) to develop a composite containing quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM), nanoparticles of silver (NAg), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP), and (2) to conduct the first investigation of the mechanical properties, biofilm response and acid production vs water-ageing time from 1 day to 12 months. A 4 × 5 design was utilized, with four composites (NACP-QADM composite, NACP-NAg composite, NACP-QADM-NAg composite, and a commercial control composite), and five water-ageing time periods (1 day, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months). After each water-ageing period, the mechanical properties of the resins were measured in a three-point flexure, and antibacterial properties were tested via a dental plaque biofilm model using human saliva as an inoculum. After 12 months of water-ageing, NACP-QADM-NAg had a flexural strength and elastic modulus matching those of the commercial control (P>0.1). Incorporation of QADM or NAg into the NACP composite greatly reduced biofilm viability, metabolic activity and acid production. A composite containing both QADM and NAg possessed a stronger antibacterial capability than one with QADM or NAg alone (P0.1). In conclusion, the NACP-QADM-NAg composite decreased biofilm viability and lactic acid production, while matching the load-bearing capability of a commercial composite. There was no decrease in its antibacterial properties after 1 year of water-ageing. The durable antibacterial and mechanical properties indicate that NACP-QADM-NAg composites may be useful in dental restorations to combat caries.

  8. The effects of propidium monoazide treatment on the measured composition of polymicrobial biofilms after treatment with chlorhexidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M. Exterkate; E. Zaura; M.J. Buijs; J. Koopman; W. Crielaard; J.M. ten Cate

    2014-01-01

    Background: The treatment of polymicrobial biofilms with antimicrobial compounds results in not only an overall loss of viability, but also compositional shifts. While DNA-based technologies may be more appropriate for the assessment of bacterial composition than culturing, these techniques amplify

  9. Change in dry matter and nutritive composition of Brachiaria humidicola grown in Ban Thon soil series

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the change in dry matter and nutritive composition of Humidicola grass (Brachiaria humidicola) grown in Ban Thon soil series (infertility soil) as a function of growth age. One rai (0.16 ha) of two-year-old pasture of fertilised Humidicola grass was uniformly cut and the regrowth samples were collected every twenty days. The samples were subjected to analysis for dry matter content and nutritive composition, i.e. crude protein, ash, calcium, phosphor...

  10. Effects of Long-Term Water-Aging on Novel Anti-Biofilm and Protein-Repellent Dental Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to: (1 synthesize an anti-biofilm and protein-repellent dental composite by combining 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC with quaternary ammonium dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM; and (2 evaluate the effects of water-aging for 180 days on protein resistance, bacteria-killing ability, and mechanical properties of MPC-DMAHDM composite. MPC and DMAHDM were added into a resin composite. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 1, 30, 90, and 180 days. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. Protein attachment onto the composite was evaluated by a micro bicinchoninic acid approach. An oral plaque microcosm biofilm model was employed to evaluate oral biofilm viability vs. water-aging time. Mechanical properties of the MPC-DMAHDM composite after 180-day immersion matched those of the commercial control composite. The composite with 3% MPC + 1.5% DMAHDM had much stronger resistance to protein adhesion than control (p < 0.05. MPC + DMAHDM achieved much stronger biofilm-eradicating effects than MPC or DMAHDM alone (p < 0.05. Biofilm colony-forming units on the 3% MPC + 1.5% DMAHDM composite were three orders of magnitude lower than commercial control. The protein-repellent and antibacterial effects were durable and showed no loss in water-aging from 1 to 180 days. The novel MPC-DMAHDM composite possessed strong and durable resistance to protein adhesion and potent bacteria-eradicating function, while matching the load-bearing ability of a commercial dental composite. The novel MPC-DMAHDM composite represents a promising means of suppressing oral plaque growth, acid production, and secondary caries.

  11. Effects of Long-Term Water-Aging on Novel Anti-Biofilm and Protein-Repellent Dental Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Ke; Melo, Mary A. S.; Weir, Michael D.; Xu, David J.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) synthesize an anti-biofilm and protein-repellent dental composite by combining 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) with quaternary ammonium dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM); and (2) evaluate the effects of water-aging for 180 days on protein resistance, bacteria-killing ability, and mechanical properties of MPC-DMAHDM composite. MPC and DMAHDM were added into a resin composite. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 1, 30, 90, and 180 days. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. Protein attachment onto the composite was evaluated by a micro bicinchoninic acid approach. An oral plaque microcosm biofilm model was employed to evaluate oral biofilm viability vs. water-aging time. Mechanical properties of the MPC-DMAHDM composite after 180-day immersion matched those of the commercial control composite. The composite with 3% MPC + 1.5% DMAHDM had much stronger resistance to protein adhesion than control (p < 0.05). MPC + DMAHDM achieved much stronger biofilm-eradicating effects than MPC or DMAHDM alone (p < 0.05). Biofilm colony-forming units on the 3% MPC + 1.5% DMAHDM composite were three orders of magnitude lower than commercial control. The protein-repellent and antibacterial effects were durable and showed no loss in water-aging from 1 to 180 days. The novel MPC-DMAHDM composite possessed strong and durable resistance to protein adhesion and potent bacteria-eradicating function, while matching the load-bearing ability of a commercial dental composite. The novel MPC-DMAHDM composite represents a promising means of suppressing oral plaque growth, acid production, and secondary caries. PMID:28106774

  12. Comparison of Cronobacter sakazakii from Agra region grown in biofilms, agar surface associated and planktonic mode by proteomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cronobacter sakazakii is an emerging food borne pathogen that causes severe meningitis, meningoencephalitis, sepsis, and necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates and infants, with a high fatality rate. Aims: The present paper is for the rapid detection of C. sakazakii from milk and milk products of Agra region via PCR method and comparison of C. sakazakii in biofilm, on agar surface and planktonic cells by proteomic analysis. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 55 samples of milk and milk products of the Agra region were analyzed. 200 isolates were obtained of which 11 were biochemically detected as C. sakazakii. The PCR targeting the ompA gene was used to amplify a 496 bp DNA segment unique to C. sakazakii, in order to confirm C. sakazakii isolates. The proteome was investigated to study the differential protein pattern expressed by biofilm, agar surface-associated and planktonic bacteria employing SDS-PAGE. Statistical Analysis: UN-SCAN-6.1 gel analysis software. Results: The primer pair ESSF and ESSR was successfully used to amplify a 469 bp DNA unique to C. sakazakii. Whole cell protein profiles of planktonic, biofilm and agar surface associated were characteristic. Conclusion: The cultural procedure for detection of C. sakazakii is laborious, taking up to 7 days for completion, whereas PCR combined with enrichment culturing can detect C. sakazakii in about 12 hours and thus has the potential to be used as a rapid tool for detecting its presence. Differential protein pattern of C. sakazakii cultivated in biofilm versus agar-surface-associated and planktonic cells were observed. Further understanding the role of specific proteins during the biofilm development should permit a better understanding of the mechanisms sustaining the proliferation and the resistance of bacteria on biotic surfaces.

  13. Functional gene composition, diversity and redundancy in microbial stream biofilm communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Dopheide

    Full Text Available We surveyed the functional gene composition and diversity of microbial biofilm communities in 18 New Zealand streams affected by different types of catchment land use, using a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 3.0. A total of 5,371 nutrient cycling and energy metabolism genes within 65 gene families were detected among all samples (342 to 2,666 genes per stream. Carbon cycling genes were most common, followed by nitrogen cycling genes, with smaller proportions of sulphur, phosphorus cycling and energy metabolism genes. Samples from urban and native forest streams had the most similar functional gene composition, while samples from exotic forest and rural streams exhibited the most variation. There were significant differences between nitrogen and sulphur cycling genes detected in native forest and urban samples compared to exotic forest and rural samples, attributed to contrasting proportions of nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and sulphur reduction genes. Most genes were detected only in one or a few samples, with only a small minority occurring in all samples. Nonetheless, 42 of 65 gene families occurred in every sample and overall proportions of gene families were similar among samples from contrasting streams. This suggests the existence of functional gene redundancy among different stream biofilm communities despite contrasting taxonomic composition.

  14. Functional gene composition, diversity and redundancy in microbial stream biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopheide, Andrew; Lear, Gavin; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Lewis, Gillian D

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed the functional gene composition and diversity of microbial biofilm communities in 18 New Zealand streams affected by different types of catchment land use, using a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 3.0. A total of 5,371 nutrient cycling and energy metabolism genes within 65 gene families were detected among all samples (342 to 2,666 genes per stream). Carbon cycling genes were most common, followed by nitrogen cycling genes, with smaller proportions of sulphur, phosphorus cycling and energy metabolism genes. Samples from urban and native forest streams had the most similar functional gene composition, while samples from exotic forest and rural streams exhibited the most variation. There were significant differences between nitrogen and sulphur cycling genes detected in native forest and urban samples compared to exotic forest and rural samples, attributed to contrasting proportions of nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and sulphur reduction genes. Most genes were detected only in one or a few samples, with only a small minority occurring in all samples. Nonetheless, 42 of 65 gene families occurred in every sample and overall proportions of gene families were similar among samples from contrasting streams. This suggests the existence of functional gene redundancy among different stream biofilm communities despite contrasting taxonomic composition.

  15. Effects of Long-Term Water-Aging on Novel Anti-Biofilm and Protein-Repellent Dental Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Ke; Melo, Mary A S; Weir, Michael D; Xu, David J; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-01-18

    The aims of this study were to: (1) synthesize an anti-biofilm and protein-repellent dental composite by combining 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) with quaternary ammonium dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM); and (2) evaluate the effects of water-aging for 180 days on protein resistance, bacteria-killing ability, and mechanical properties of MPC-DMAHDM composite. MPC and DMAHDM were added into a resin composite. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 1, 30, 90, and 180 days. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. Protein attachment onto the composite was evaluated by a micro bicinchoninic acid approach. An oral plaque microcosm biofilm model was employed to evaluate oral biofilm viability vs. water-aging time. Mechanical properties of the MPC-DMAHDM composite after 180-day immersion matched those of the commercial control composite. The composite with 3% MPC + 1.5% DMAHDM had much stronger resistance to protein adhesion than control (p composite were three orders of magnitude lower than commercial control. The protein-repellent and antibacterial effects were durable and showed no loss in water-aging from 1 to 180 days. The novel MPC-DMAHDM composite possessed strong and durable resistance to protein adhesion and potent bacteria-eradicating function, while matching the load-bearing ability of a commercial dental composite. The novel MPC-DMAHDM composite represents a promising means of suppressing oral plaque growth, acid production, and secondary caries.

  16. Influence of matrix and filler fraction on biofilm formation on the surface of experimental resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Andrei; Brambilla, Eugenio; Wastl, Daniel S; Giessibl, Franz J; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Schneider-Feyrer, Sibylle; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of resin matrix chemistry and filler fraction on biofilm formation on the surface of experimental resin-based composites (RBCs). Specimens were prepared from eight experimental RBC formulations differing in resin matrix blend (BisGMA/TEGDMA in a 7:3 wt% ratio or UDMA/aliphatic dimethacrylate in a 1:1 wt% ratio) and filler fraction (no fillers; 65 wt% dental glass with an average diameter of 7 or 0.7 µm or 65 wt% SiO2 with an average diameter of 20 nm). Surface roughness, surface free energy, and chemical surface composition were determined; surface topography was visualized using atomic force microscopy. Biofilm formation was simulated under continuous flow conditions for a 48 h period using a monospecies Streptococcus mutans and a multispecies biofilm model. In the monospecies biofilm model, the impact of the filler fraction overruled the influence of the resin matrix, indicating lowest biofilm formation on RBCs with nano-scaled filler particles and those manufactured from the neat resin blends. The multispecies model suggested a more pronounced effect of the resin matrix blend, as significantly higher biofilm formation was identified on RBCs with a UDMA/dimethacrylate matrix blend than on those including a BisGMA/TEGDMA matrix blend but analogous filler fractions. Although significant differences in surface properties between the various materials were identified, correlations between the surface properties and biofilm formation were poor, which highlights the relevance of surface topography and chemistry. These results may help to tailor novel RBC formulations which feature reduced biofilm formation on their surface.

  17. Co-localized or randomly distributed? Pair cross correlation of in vivo grown subgingival biofilm bacteria quantified by digital image analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schillinger

    Full Text Available The polymicrobial nature of periodontal diseases is reflected by the diversity of phylotypes detected in subgingival plaque and the finding that consortia of suspected pathogens rather than single species are associated with disease development. A number of these microorganisms have been demonstrated in vitro to interact and enhance biofilm integration, survival or even pathogenic features. To examine the in vivo relevance of these proposed interactions, we extended the spatial arrangement analysis tool of the software daime (digital image analysis in microbial ecology. This modification enabled the quantitative analysis of microbial co-localization in images of subgingival biofilm species, where the biomass was confined to fractions of the whole-image area, a situation common for medical samples. Selected representatives of the disease-associated red and orange complexes that were previously suggested to interact with each other in vitro (Tannerella forsythia with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis with Prevotella intermedia were chosen for analysis and labeled with specific fluorescent probes via fluorescence in situ hybridization. Pair cross-correlation analysis of in vivo grown biofilms revealed tight clustering of F. nucleatum/periodonticum and T. forsythia at short distances (up to 6 µm with a pronounced peak at 1.5 µm. While these results confirmed previous in vitro observations for F. nucleatum and T. forsythia, random spatial distribution was detected between P. gingivalis and P. intermedia in the in vivo samples. In conclusion, we successfully employed spatial arrangement analysis on the single cell level in clinically relevant medical samples and demonstrated the utility of this approach for the in vivo validation of in vitro observations by analyzing statistically relevant numbers of different patients. More importantly, the culture-independent nature of this approach enables similar quantitative analyses for "as

  18. Antimicrobial targets localize to the extracellular vesicle-associated proteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in a biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber J Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are particularly resistant to antimicrobial therapies. These surface-attached communities are protected against host defenses’ and pharmacotherapy by a self-produced matrix that surrounds and fortifies them. Recent proteomic evidence also suggests that some bacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, undergo modifications within a biofilm that make them uniquely resistant compared to their planktonic (free-living counterparts. This study examines 50 proteins in the resistance subproteome of both surface-associated and free-living P. aeruginosa PAO1 over three time points. Proteins were grouped into categories based on their roles in antimicrobial: i binding, ii efflux, iii resistance, and iv susceptibility. In addition, the extracellular outer membrane vesicle-associated proteome is examined and compared between the two growth modes. We show that in whole cells between 12-24% of the proteins are present at significantly different abundance levels over time, with some proteins being unique to a specific growth mode; however, the total abundance levels in the four categories remain consistent. In contrast, marked differences are seen in the protein content of the outer membrane vesicles, which contain a greater number of drug-binding proteins in vesicles purified from late-stage biofilms. These results show how the method of analysis can impact the interpretation of proteomic data (i.e. individual proteins vs. systems, and highlight the advantage of using protein-based methods to identify potential antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in extracellular sample components. Furthermore, this information has the potential to inform the development of specific antipseudomonal therapies that quench possible drug-sequestering vesicle proteins. This strategy could serve as a novel approach for combating the high-level of antimicrobial resistance in P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  19. Analysis of black fungal biofilms occurring at domestic water taps. I: compositional analysis using Tag-Encoded FLX Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Guido; Hübner, Iris; Schmidt, Carsten K; de Hoog, G Sybren; Haase, Gerhard

    2013-06-01

    Mass growth of dark fungal biofilms on water taps and associated habitats was observed in various German drinking water distribution systems recently. Customers of affected drinking water systems are anxious about potential and unknown health risks. These environments are known to harbour a fungal flora also comprising a variety of fungal opportunists that are well known to cause superficial mycoses in humans (Exophiala equina, Exophiala lecanii-corni) but are not known to establish dark biofilms so far. To gain profound insight on composition of respective biofilms, a metagenomic approach using Tag-Encoded FLX Amplicon Pyrosequencing (TEFAP) of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 region in comparison with a classical cultivation approach using Sabouraud agar with chloramphenicol and erythritol-chloramphenicol-agar was performed. E. lecanii-corni was found to be the major component in 10 of 13 biofilms analysed independently of the method used. Alternaria sp., E. equina, Fusarium spp. and Ochroconis spp. were also relatively abundant. As expected, TEFAP usually revealed a higher diversity than the cultivation approaches. For example, opportunistic species like Candida albicans or Exophiala dermatitidis were detected in very low amounts. In conclusion, TEFAP turned out to be a promising and powerful tool for the semi-quantitative analysis of fungal biofilms. Referring to relevant literature, potential biological hazards caused by fungi of the dark biofilms can be regarded as low.

  20. Chemical composition and anti-biofilm activity of Thymus sipyleus BOISS. subsp. sipyleus BOISS. var. davisianus RONNIGER essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Ozgur; Ugur, Aysel

    2015-06-01

    In this study, antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities and the chemical composition of Thymus sipyleus BOISS. subsp. sipyleus BOISS. var. davisianus RONNIGER essential oil was evaluated. The essential oil was obtained by hydro-distillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fourteen compounds were characterized, having as major components thymol (38.31%) and carvacrol (37.95%). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of oil and the major components were calculated by serial dilution method, and anti-biofilm effects by microplate biofilm assay against five Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus MU 38, MU 40, MU 46, MU 47, Stahylococcus epidermidis MU 30) and five Gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa MU 187, MU 188, MU 189, Pseudomonas fluorescens MU 180, MU 181) bacteria. It was found that MICs for essential oil, thymol and carvacrol were between 5 and 50 µl/ml, 0.125-0.5 µg/ml and 0.125-05 µl/ml, respectively. The results showed that doses of MIC produced a greater anti-biofilm influence than 0.5, 0.25 and 0.125 MIC. In the presence of essential oil (MIC), the mean biofilm formation value was equal to 67 ± 5.5% for P. aeruginosa MU 188, and essential oil (MIC) inhibition exceeds 60% for P. aeruginosa biofilms. The results also showed that carvacrol (MIC) was able to induce an inhibition 72.9 ± 4.1% for S.aureus (MU 40) biofilm. In addition, thymol (MIC) showed 68.6 ± 5.3% reduction in biofilm formation of P. fluorescens MU 181. This study demonstrated the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of T. sipyleus BOISS. subsp. sipyleus BOISS. var. davisianus RONNIGER essential oil and points out the exceptional efficiency of thymol and carvacrol, which could represent candidates in the treatment of Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus biofilms.

  1. Effect of denture-coating composite on Candida albicans biofilm and surface degradation after disinfection protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Matheus Jacobina; de Oliveira, Denise G; Marcillo, Oscar O; Neppelenbroek, Karin H; Lara, Vanessa S; Porto, Vinícius C

    2016-04-01

    Denture stomatitis is the most common pathology affecting denture wearers and its main cause is colonisation of dentures with Candida albicans. This study investigated the effectiveness of two commercial composite surface sealants (Biscover(®) LV and Surface Coat(®)) to reduce C. albicans biofilm colonisation on denture resin, as well as their surface integrity after disinfection cycles with 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Heat-cured acrylic resin specimens were manufactured (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm). The specimen surfaces were mechanically polished to simulate rough or smooth denture surfaces. Four surface-treatment groups were tested: smooth surfaces [0.3 μm of mean roughness (Ra)]; rough surfaces (3 μm of Ra); rough surfaces treated with Biscover(®) LV; and rough surfaces treated with Surface Coat(®). Specimens of each group were randomly divided to undergo immersion in distilled water or 1% sodium hypochlorite for 30 or 90 cycles each. Specimens of all groups in each immersion solution were tested using a crystal violet (CV) staining assay for biofilm quantification and by scanning electron microscopy for visual analyses of surface integrity and biofilm structure. CV assay data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test (P < 0.05). The effectiveness and surface integrity of Biscover(®) LV-treated surfaces were similar to those of smooth surfaces, whereas Surface Coat(®) -treated surfaces presented a similar performance to rough surfaces in all solutions and cycles. These results suggest the possibility of clinical use of Biscover(®) LV for denture coating on surfaces in which mechanical polish is not indicated, such as the fitting surface. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  2. Influence of microleakage, surface roughness and biofilm control on secondary caries formation around composite resin restorations: an in situ evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Garcia Lima

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate in situ the influence of microleakage, surface roughness and biofilm control on caries formation around composite resin restorations. During 28 days, 12 volunteers wore palatal devices containing bovine enamel slabs restored with composite resin. Restorations were made without leakage, when the adhesive system was applied, or with leakage, when adhesive system was omitted. Half of the restorations in each group were finished and the remaining were finished and polished. In one side of the palatal device, biofilm was left to accumulate over the restored slabs, and in the other side dental slabs were brushed, to allow biofilm removal. There was an extraoral application of 20% sucrose solution (8x/day over the enamel slabs. The formation of caries lesions (white spots was evaluated by visual inspection under stereomicroscopy. Additionally, the dental slabs were sectioned and observed under polarized light microscopy. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman's correlation test at 5% significance level. Polishing and bonding were not significant factors regarding white spot formation (p>0.05. Biofilm control (brushing was associated with reduction of caries formation close to the restorations (p<0.01. Polarized light microscopy confirmed the visual inspection findings. These results suggest that while microleakage and surface roughness did not influence caries lesion formation, biofilm control may prevent the enamel demineralization.

  3. Influence of microleakage, surface roughness and biofilm control on secondary caries formation around composite resin restorations: an in situ evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Fábio Garcia; Romano, Ana Regina; Correa, Marcos Britto; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate in situ the influence of microleakage, surface roughness and biofilm control on caries formation around composite resin restorations. During 28 days, 12 volunteers wore palatal devices containing bovine enamel slabs restored with composite resin. Restorations were made without leakage, when the adhesive system was applied, or with leakage, when adhesive system was omitted. Half of the restorations in each group were finished and the remaining were finished and polished. In one side of the palatal device, biofilm was left to accumulate over the restored slabs, and in the other side dental slabs were brushed, to allow biofilm removal. There was an extraoral application of 20% sucrose solution (8x/day) over the enamel slabs. The formation of caries lesions (white spots) was evaluated by visual inspection under stereomicroscopy. Additionally, the dental slabs were sectioned and observed under polarized light microscopy. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman's correlation test at 5% significance level. Polishing and bonding were not significant factors regarding white spot formation (p>0.05). Biofilm control (brushing) was associated with reduction of caries formation close to the restorations (p<0.01). Polarized light microscopy confirmed the visual inspection findings. These results suggest that while microleakage and surface roughness did not influence caries lesion formation, biofilm control may prevent the enamel demineralization.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  5. Proximate composition of CELSS crops grown in NASA's Biomass Production Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.; Berry, W. L.

    Edible biomass from four crops of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), four crops of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), four crops of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), and three crops of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) grown in NASA's CELSS Biomass Production Chamber were analyzed for proximate composition. All plants were grown using recirculating nutrient (hydroponic) film culture with pH and electrical conductivity automatically controlled. Temperature and humidity were controlled to near optimal levels for each species and atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained near 100 Pa during the light cycles. Soybean seed contained the highest percentage of protein and fat, potato tubers and wheat seed contained the highest levels of carbohydrate, and lettuce leaves contained the highest level of ash. Analyses showed values close to data published for field-grown plants with several exceptions: In comparison with field-grown plants, wheat seed had higher protein levels; soybean seed had higher ash and crude fiber levels; and potato tubers and lettuce leaves had higher protein and ash levels. The higher ash and protein levels may have been a result of the continuous supply of nutrients (e.g., potassium and nitrogen) to the plants by the recirculating hydroponic culture.

  6. Proximate composition of CELSS crops grown in NASA's Biomass Production Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.; Berry, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    Edible biomass from four crops of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), four crops of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), four crops of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), and three crops of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) grown in NASA's CELSS Biomass Production Chamber were analyzed for proximate composition. All plants were grown using recirculating nutrient (hydroponic) film culture with pH and electrical conductivity automatically controlled. Temperature and humidity were controlled to near optimal levels for each species and atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained near 100 Pa during the light cycles. Soybean seed contained the highest percentage of protein and fat, potato tubers and wheat seed contained the highest levels of carbohydrate, and lettuce leaves contained the highest level of ash. Analyses showed values close to data published for field-grown plants with several exceptions: In comparison with field-grown plants, wheat seed had higher protein levels; soybean seed had higher ash and crude fiber levels; and potato tubers and lettuce leaves had higher protein and ash levels. The higher ash and protein levels may have been a result of the continuous supply of nutrients (e.g., potassium and nitrogen) to the plants by the recirculating hydroponic culture.

  7. Advanced imaging techniques for assessment of structure, composition and function in biofilm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Thomas R; Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Dynes, James J; Hitchcock, Adam P; Lawrence, John R

    2010-04-01

    Scientific imaging represents an important and accepted research tool for the analysis and understanding of complex natural systems. Apart from traditional microscopic techniques such as light and electron microscopy, new advanced techniques have been established including laser scanning microscopy (LSM), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These new techniques allow in situ analysis of the structure, composition, processes and dynamics of microbial communities. The three techniques open up quantitative analytical imaging possibilities that were, until a few years ago, impossible. The microscopic techniques represent powerful tools for examination of mixed environmental microbial communities usually encountered in the form of aggregates and films. As a consequence, LSM, MRI and STXM are being used in order to study complex microbial biofilm systems. This mini review provides a short outline of the more recent applications with the intention to stimulate new research and imaging approaches in microbiology.

  8. Structure and composition of biofilm communities in a moving bed biofilm reactor for nitritation-anammox at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Frank; Sultana, Razia; Suarez, Marco; Hermansson, Malte; Plaza, Elzbieta; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2014-02-01

    It is a challenge to apply anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) for nitrogen removal from wastewater at low temperatures. Maintenance of anammox- and aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppression of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are key issues. In this work, a nitritation-anammox moving bed biofilm pilot reactor was operated at 19-10°C for 300 d. Nitrogen removal was decreasing, but stable, at 19-13°C. At 10°C removal became unstable. Quantitative PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene sequencing showed that no major microbial community changes were observed with decreased temperature. Anammox bacteria dominated the biofilm (0.9-1.2 × 10(14) 16S rRNA copies m(-2)). Most anammox bacteria were similar to Brocadia sp. 40, but another smaller Brocadia population was present near the biofilm-water interface, where also the AOB community (Nitrosomonas) was concentrated in thin layers (1.8-5.3 × 10(12) amoA copies m(-2)). NOB (Nitrobacter, Nitrospira) were always present at low concentrations (<1.3 × 10(11) 16S rRNA copies m(-2)).

  9. Microbial dynamics during conversion from supragingival to subgingival biofilms in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurnheer, T; Bostanci, N; Belibasakis, G N

    2016-04-01

    The development of dental caries and periodontal diseases result from distinct shifts in the microbiota of the tooth-associated biofilm. This in vitro study aimed to investigate changes in biofilm composition and structure, during the shift from a 'supragingival' aerobic profile to a 'subgingival' anaerobic profile. Biofilms consisting of Actinomyces oris, Candida albicans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella dispar were aerobically grown in saliva-containing medium on hydroxyapatite disks. After 64 h, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus anginosus were further added along with human serum, while culture conditions were shifted to microaerophilic. After 96 h, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were finally added and the biofilm was grown anaerobically for another 64 h. At the end of each phase, biofilms were harvested for species-specific quantification and localization. Apart from C. albicans, all other species gradually increased during aerobic and microaerophilic conditions, but remained steady during anaerobic conditions. Biofilm thickness was doubled during the microaerophilic phase, but remained steady throughout the anaerobic phase. Extracellular polysaccharide presence was gradually reduced throughout the growth period. Biofilm viability was reduced during the microaerophilic conversion, but was recovered during the anaerobic phase. This in vitro study has characterized the dynamic structural shifts occurring in an oral biofilm model during the switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, potentially modeling the conversion of supragingival to subgingival biofilms. Within the limitations of this experimental model, the findings may provide novel insights into the ecology of oral biofilms.

  10. Compositional changes of Australia-grown Western Schley pecans [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] during maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singanusong, Riantong; Mason, Richard L; D'Arcy, Bruce R; Nottingham, Stephen M

    2003-01-15

    Changes in composition during the maturation of Western Schley pecans [Carya illinoinensis(Wangenh.) K. Koch] grown in Australia were investigated. Pecans of different maturity levels were collected at monthly intervals between March and June in 1999 and 2000 and analyzed for the concentrations of moisture, total lipid, sucrose, raffinose, protein, and the minerals aluminum, boron, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, sulfur, and zinc. Moisture, total lipid, and calcium contents changed significantly (p < 0.05) with harvest time and maturity, whereas the other components did not. Western Schley pecans grown in Australia should be harvested after the shuck has opened and it is either green or brown in color to maximize total lipid content and quality. This occurred after May 11 in 1999 and after May 17 in 2000.

  11. In situ characterization and analysis of Salmonella biofilm formation under meat processing environments using a combined microscopic and spectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huhu; Ding, Shijie; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2013-11-01

    Salmonella biofilm on food-contact surfaces present on food processing facilities may serve as a source of cross-contamination. In our work, biofilm formation by multi-strains of meat-borne Salmonella incubated at 20 °C, as well as the composition and distribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were investigated in situ by combining confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. A standard laboratory culture medium (tryptic soy broth, TSB) was used and compared with an actual meat substrate (meat thawing-loss broth, MTLB). The results indicated that Salmonella grown in both media were able to form biofilms on stainless steel surfaces via building a three-dimensional structure with multilayers of cells. Although the number of biofilm cells grown in MTLB was less than that in TSB, the cell numbers in MTLB was adequate to form a steady and mature biofilm. Salmonella grown in MTLB showed "cloud-shaped" morphology in the mature biofilm, whereas when grown in TSB appeared "reticular-shaped". The ATR-FTIR and Raman analysis revealed a completely different chemical composition between biofilms and the corresponding planktonic cells, and some important differences in biofilms grown in MTLB and in TSB. Importantly, our findings suggested that the progress towards a mature Salmonella biofilm on stainless steel surfaces may be associated with the production of the EPS matrix, mainly consisting of polysaccharides and proteins, which may serve as useful markers of biofilm formation. Our work indicated that a combination of these non-destructive techniques provided new insights into the formation of Salmonella biofilm matrix. © 2013.

  12. Biofilms as bioindicators of mercury exposure in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Faucheur, S.; Dranguet, P.; Freiburghaus, A.; Slaveykova, V. I.; Carmen, M.

    2016-12-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms living in shallow waters, which possess several interesting characteristics to be a good bioindicator, i.e. ubiquitous, easy to collect, integrator of the quality of their ambient environment and sensitive to pollutants. Our work investigated whether biofilm could be used as a bioindicator of Hg contamination in natural waters and explore the links between ambient Hg concentrations, its bioaccumulation and biofilm composition. To that end, field- and lab-based experiments were performed with biofilm grown on artificial substrata in either Hg-impacted waters and in microcosms spiked with Hg. The field experiments were performed in contrasted environments: the Olt River (Romania) impacted by chloro-alkali releases and the lagoon of Venice (Italy) affected by urban, industrial and agricultural activities. The field studies were complemented with microcosm experiments using Geneva Lake water enriched with Hg (13 pM to 1.4 nM). Bioaccumulated inorganic HgII and methylmercury (CH3Hg) in biofilms were measured w/o cysteine washing step to assess the total and intracellular Hg content. Biofilm composition was examined from gene to community levels using several techniques, notably qPCR, epifluorescent microscopy and pyrosequencing. In parallel the physico-chemical parameters of the ambient waters (pH, anion/cation and dissolved organic matter concentrations) were well characterized and dissolved Hg concentrations measured. Commercially available DGTs for Hg were additionally used in the lagoon of Venice. The main findings of the study can be summarized as follows: (i) accumulation of Hg in biofilms well correlates with ambient Hg concentration in a specific environment, but (ii) that bioaccumulation highly depends of biofilm composition, with bacterial-dominated biofilms having higher uptake rate constants than algal-dominated biofilms, and (iii) Hg exposure at environmental low concentrations (pM levels) strongly impacts algal

  13. The effect of carbon nanotubes and titanium dioxide incorporated in PDMS on biofilm community composition and subsequent mussel plantigrade settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Long; Li, Yi-Feng; Guo, Xing-Pan; Liang, Xiao; Xu, Yue-Feng; Ding, De-Wen; Bao, Wei-Yang; Dobretsov, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) incorporated in PDMS on biofilm formation and plantigrade settlement of Mytilus coruscus. TiO2 increased bacterial density, and CNTs also increased bacterial density but reduced diatom density in biofilms after 28 days. Further analysis was conducted between bacterial communities on glass, PDMS, CNTs (0.5 wt%) and TiO2 (7.5 wt%). ANOSIM analysis revealed significant differences (R > 0.9) between seven, 14, 21 and 28 day-old bacterial communities. MiSeq sequencing showed that CNTs and TiO2 impacted the composition of 28 day-old bacterial communities by increasing the abundance of Proteobacteria and decreasing the abundance of Bacteroidetes. The maximum decreased settlement rate in 28 day-old biofilms on CNTs and TiO2 was > 50% in comparison to those on glass and PDMS. Thus, CNTs and TiO2 incorporated in PDMS altered the biomass and community composition of biofilms, and subsequently decreased mussel settlement.

  14. Characteristics of cannabinoids composition of Cannabis plants grown in Northern Thailand and its forensic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipparat, Prapatsorn; Natakankitkul, Surapol; Chamnivikaipong, Pipop; Chutiwat, Sirot

    2012-02-10

    The Thai government has recognized the possibility for legitimate cultivation of hemp. Further study of certain cannabinoid characteristics is necessary in establishing criteria for regulation of cannabis cultivation in Thailand. For this purpose, factors affecting characteristics of cannabinoids composition of Thai-grown cannabis were investigated. Plants were cultivated from seeds derived from the previous studies under the same conditions. 372 cannabis samples from landraces, three different trial fields and seized marijuana were collected. 100g of each sample was dried, ground and quantitatively analyzed for THC, CBD and CBN contents by GC-FID. The results showed that cannabis grown during March-June which had longer vegetative stages and longer photoperiod exposure, had higher cannabinoids contents than those grown in August. The male plants grown in trial fields had the range of THC contents from 0.722% to 0.848% d.w. and average THC/CBD ratio of 1.9. Cannabis in landraces at traditional harvest time of 75 days had a range of THC contents from 0.874% to 1.480% d.w. and an average THC/CBD ratio of 2.6. The THC contents and THC/CBD ratios of cannabis in second generation crops grown in the same growing season were found to be lower than those grown in the first generation, unless fairly high temperatures and a lesser amount of rainfall were present. The average THC content in seized fresh marijuana was 2.068% d.w. while THC/CBD ratios were between 12.6 and 84.09, which is 10-45 times greater than those of similar studied cannabis samples from the previous study. However, most Thai cannabis in landraces and in trial fields giving a low log(10) value of THC/CBD ratio at below 1 may be classified as intermediate type, whereas seized marijuana giving a higher log(10) value at above 1 could be classified as drug type. Therefore, the expanded information provided by the current study will assist in the development of criteria for regulation of hemp cultivation in

  15. [Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Qiang, Zhang; Ruinan, Sun; Ting, Zhu; Jianhua, Ge; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt, and to measure its effect on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt was synthesized according to methods introduced in previous research. Samples of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were modified by a coupling agent and then added into resin composite at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% mass fractions; 0% composite was used as control. A flexural test was used to measure resin composite mechanical properties. Results showed that a dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was formed. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead assay of biofilm on the resin composite were calculated to test the effect of the resin composite on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. The incorporation of nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers with as much as 15% concentration into the resin composite showed no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resin composite (P > 0.05). Resin composite containing 5% or more nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers significantly inhibited the metabolic activity of dental plaque microcosm biofilm, suggesting its strong antibacterial potency (P resin composite exhibited a strong antibacterial property upon the addition of up to 5% nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers, thereby leading to effective caries inhibition in dental application.

  16. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, Martinus J.; Busscher, Henk J.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a sa

  17. Microbial composition and antibiotic resistance of biofilms recovered from endotracheal tubes of mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Coenye, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In critically ill patients, breathing is impaired and mechanical ventilation, using an endotracheal tube (ET) connected to a ventilator, is necessary. Although mechanical ventilation is a life-saving procedure, it is not without risk. Because of several reasons, a biofilm often forms at the distal end of the ET and this biofilm is a persistent source of bacteria which can infect the lungs, causing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). There is a link between the microbial flora of ET biofilms and the microorganisms involved in the onset of VAP. Culture dependent and independent techniques were already used to identify the microbial flora of ET biofilms and also, the antibiotic resistance of microorganisms obtained from ET biofilms was determined. The ESKAPE pathogens play a dominant role in the onset of VAP and these organisms were frequently identified in ET biofilms. Also, antibiotic resistant microorganisms were frequently present in ET biofilms. Members of the normal oral flora were also identified in ET biofilms but it is thought that these organisms initiate ET biofilm formation and are not directly involved in the development of VAP.

  18. Proximate composition, nutritional attributes and mineral composition of Peperomia pellucida L. (Ketumpangan Air) grown in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Der-Jiun; Iqbal, Shahid; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-09-17

    This study presents the proximate and mineral composition of Peperomia pellucida L., an underexploited weed plant in Malaysia. Proximate analysis was performed using standard AOAC methods and mineral contents were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicated Peperomia pellucida to be rich in crude protein, carbohydrate and total ash contents. The high amount of total ash (31.22%)suggests a high-value mineral composition comprising potassium, calcium and iron as the main elements. The present study inferred that Peperomia pellucida would serve as a good source of protein and energy as well as micronutrients in the form of a leafy vegetable for human consumption.

  19. Characterisation of the physical composition and microbial community structure of biofilms within a model full-scale drinking water distribution system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Fish

    Full Text Available Within drinking water distribution systems (DWDS, microorganisms form multi-species biofilms on internal pipe surfaces. A matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS is produced by the attached community and provides structure and stability for the biofilm. If the EPS adhesive strength deteriorates or is overcome by external shear forces, biofilm is mobilised into the water potentially leading to degradation of water quality. However, little is known about the EPS within DWDS biofilms or how this is influenced by community composition or environmental parameters, because of the complications in obtaining biofilm samples and the difficulties in analysing EPS. Additionally, although biofilms may contain various microbial groups, research commonly focuses solely upon bacteria. This research applies an EPS analysis method based upon fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM in combination with digital image analysis (DIA, to concurrently characterize cells and EPS (carbohydrates and proteins within drinking water biofilms from a full-scale DWDS experimental pipe loop facility with representative hydraulic conditions. Application of the EPS analysis method, alongside DNA fingerprinting of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities, was demonstrated for biofilms sampled from different positions around the pipeline, after 28 days growth within the DWDS experimental facility. The volume of EPS was 4.9 times greater than that of the cells within biofilms, with carbohydrates present as the dominant component. Additionally, the greatest proportion of EPS was located above that of the cells. Fungi and archaea were established as important components of the biofilm community, although bacteria were more diverse. Moreover, biofilms from different positions were similar with respect to community structure and the quantity, composition and three-dimensional distribution of cells and EPS, indicating that active colonisation of the pipe wall is

  20. Characterisation of the physical composition and microbial community structure of biofilms within a model full-scale drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Katherine E; Collins, Richard; Green, Nicola H; Sharpe, Rebecca L; Douterelo, Isabel; Osborn, A Mark; Boxall, Joby B

    2015-01-01

    Within drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), microorganisms form multi-species biofilms on internal pipe surfaces. A matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) is produced by the attached community and provides structure and stability for the biofilm. If the EPS adhesive strength deteriorates or is overcome by external shear forces, biofilm is mobilised into the water potentially leading to degradation of water quality. However, little is known about the EPS within DWDS biofilms or how this is influenced by community composition or environmental parameters, because of the complications in obtaining biofilm samples and the difficulties in analysing EPS. Additionally, although biofilms may contain various microbial groups, research commonly focuses solely upon bacteria. This research applies an EPS analysis method based upon fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with digital image analysis (DIA), to concurrently characterize cells and EPS (carbohydrates and proteins) within drinking water biofilms from a full-scale DWDS experimental pipe loop facility with representative hydraulic conditions. Application of the EPS analysis method, alongside DNA fingerprinting of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities, was demonstrated for biofilms sampled from different positions around the pipeline, after 28 days growth within the DWDS experimental facility. The volume of EPS was 4.9 times greater than that of the cells within biofilms, with carbohydrates present as the dominant component. Additionally, the greatest proportion of EPS was located above that of the cells. Fungi and archaea were established as important components of the biofilm community, although bacteria were more diverse. Moreover, biofilms from different positions were similar with respect to community structure and the quantity, composition and three-dimensional distribution of cells and EPS, indicating that active colonisation of the pipe wall is an important

  1. Chemical composition of leaf extracts of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni grown experimentally in Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA S. MARKOVIC

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of leaf extracts of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, grown for the first time on an experimental field near Zrenjanin, was examined by GC–MS. The tested plant material was harvested in September of 2002. To analyze the chemical composition of the lipophilic components of the plant leaves, essential oils and ethyl acetate extract were isolated. Qualitative analysis of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation showed that among the identified 88 compounds, the majority were mono- and sesquiterpenes (50 types identified. By analysing the ethyl acetate extract, the presence of fatty acids (present as free and as esters, n-alkanes, n-alkenes, cyclic alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, etc. was ascertained. Sesquiterpenes prevailed among the terpenes (50 types identified. Further constituents identified in ethyl acetate extract included sterols. Nerol, b-cyclocitral, safranal, aromadendrene, a-amorphene and T-muurolol were identified for the first time in this species, with match values over 90 %. Taking into consideration that these terpenes were identified for the first time in this species, it is obvious that Stevia rebaudiana grown in this area possesses certain specific characteristics that can be ascribed to cultivation on a domestic plantation.

  2. Improved thermoplastic composite by alignment of vapor-grown carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriger, Rex Jerrald

    2000-10-01

    Vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) is a new and inexpensive carbon fiber produced by vapor deposition of hydrocarbons on metal catalysts. Unlike continuous conventional PAN or pitch-derived carbon fibers, VGCF is discontinuous with diameters of about 200 nanometers and lengths ranging from 10 to 200 micrometers. The microscopic size and random entanglement of the fibers create several problems when processing VGCF composites. It is particularly difficult to disperse the entangled fibers in the matrix and orient them along a preferred axis to provide directional reinforcement. This work introduces a technique to produce an improved polymeric composite by alignment of vapor grown carbon nano-fibers in a polypropylene matrix. A twin-screw extruder was used to shear mix and disperse the fibers in the polymer matrix. The composite mixtures were extruded through a converging-annular die that generates flow-induced fiber alignment along the extrusion direction. The effect that the various extrusion conditions have on the bulk properties of the extrudate was investigated. It was found that the extrusion process is strongly dependent on the fiber content of the composite. The extrusion pressure increased and the flow rate decreased with fiber volume fraction. The tensile strength and modulus for the composite samples varied with extrusion temperature and screw speed, and the void content increased with fiber volume fraction. It was shown that fiber alignment could be improved by increasing the residence time in the die channel and was verified using x-ray diffraction. The mechanical properties of the aligned samples increased with fiber content. Also, the tensile strength improved with greater fiber orientation; however, more fiber alignment had little affect on the modulus. To better predict the strength of these partially aligned fiber composites, an experimental and theoretical approach was introduced. The experimental data correspond reasonably well when compared with the

  3. The effect of organic loading on bacterial community composition of membrane biofilms in a submerged polyvinyl chloride membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Siqing; Li, Jixiang; He, Shuying; Xie, Kang; Wang, Xiaojia; Zhang, Yanhao; Duan, Liang; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2010-09-01

    The effect of organic loading on bacterial community composition of membrane biofilms was investigated using a submerged polyvinyl chloride membrane bioreactor. The low and high loadings were set at 0.33 and 0.52 gCOD/(gVSSd), respectively. The results showed that membrane fouling occurred earlier and faster under the high loading conditions. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that the similarity of bacterial community in the membrane biofilms between the two loadings was 0.67, higher than that in the mixed liquors (0.52-0.55), which indicated that some specific bacteria were selected preferentially on the membranes. Clone library analysis of the membrane biofilms indicated that Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes under the high loading were 54.72% and 19.81%, respectively. Microarray results further confirmed that the two bacteria were the dominant microorganisms in the high loading biofilm. The severe membrane fouling may be aroused mainly by the enrichment of the two bacteria under the high loading.

  4. Effects of plastic composite support and pH profiles on pullulan production in a biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Demirci, Ali; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2010-04-01

    Pullulan is a linear homopolysaccharide which is composed of glucose units and often described as alpha-1, 6-linked maltotriose. The applications of pullulan range from usage as blood plasma substitutes to environmental pollution control agents. In this study, a biofilm reactor with plastic composite support (PCS) was evaluated for pullulan production using Aureobasidium pullulans. In test tube fermentations, PCS with soybean hulls, defatted soy bean flour, yeast extract, dried bovine red blood cells, and mineral salts was selected for biofilm reactor fermentation (due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and high biomass attachment). Three pH profiles were later applied to evaluate their effects on pullulan production in a PCS biofilm reactor. The results demonstrated that when a constant pH at 5.0 was applied, the time course of pullulan production was advanced and the concentration of pullulan reached 32.9 g/L after 7-day cultivation, which is 1.8-fold higher than its respective suspension culture. The quality analysis demonstrated that the purity of produced pullulan was 95.8% and its viscosity was 2.4 centipoise. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra also supported the supposition that the produced exopolysaccharide was mostly pullulan. Overall, this study demonstrated that a biofilm reactor can be successfully implemented to enhance pullulan production and maintain its high purity.

  5. Invasibility of resident biofilms by allochthonous communities in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Micol; Bernet, Nicolas; Harmand, Jérôme; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Milferstedt, Kim

    2015-09-15

    Invasion of non-native species can drastically affect the community composition and diversity of engineered and natural ecosystems, biofilms included. In this study, a molecular community fingerprinting method was used to monitor the putative establishment and colonization of allochthonous consortia in resident multi-species biofilms. To do this, biofilms inoculated with tap water or activated sludge were grown for 10 days in bubble column reactors W1 and W2, and S, respectively, before being exposed to non-native microbial consortia. These consortia consisted of fresh activated sludge suspensions for the biofilms inoculated with tap water (reactors W1 and W2) and of transplanted mature tap water biofilm for the activated sludge biofilm (reactor S). The introduction of virgin, unoccupied coupons into W1 and W2 enabled us to additionally investigate the competition for new resources (space) among the resident biofilm and the allochthonous consortia. CE-SSCP revealed that after the invasion event changes were mostly observed in the abundance of the dominant species in the native biofilms rather than their composition. This suggests that the resident communities within a bioreactor immediately outcompete the allochthonous microbes and shape the microbial community assemblage on both new coupons and already colonized surfaces for the short term. However, with time, latent members of the allochthonous community might grow up affecting the diversity and composition of the original biofilms.

  6. Bacterial Composition of Biofilms Collected From Two Service Areas in a Metropolitan Drinking Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development and succession of bacteria were examined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries generated from various biofilms within a metropolitan water distribution system. Biofilms were obtained from off-line devices using polycarbonate coupons from annular reactors incubated for ...

  7. Combination of microscopic techniques reveals a comprehensive visual impression of biofilm structure and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Liebrechts, Ramon; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Bacterial biofilms are imaged by various kinds of microscopy including confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One limitation of CLSM is its restricted magnification, which is resolved by the use of SEM that provides high-magnification spatial images of how the single bacteria are located and interact within the biofilm. However, conventional SEM is limited by the requirement of dehydration of the samples during preparation. As biofilms consist mainly of water, the specimen dehydration might alter its morphology. High magnification yet authentic images are important to understand the physiology of biofilms. We compared conventional SEM, Focused Ion Beam (FIB)-SEM and CLSM with SEM techniques [cryo-SEM and environmental-SEM (ESEM)] that do not require dehydration. In the case of cryo-SEM, the biofilm is not dehydrated but kept frozen to obtain high-magnification images closer to the native state of the sample. Using the ESEM technique, no preparation is needed. Applying these methods to biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed us that the dehydration of biofilms substantially influences its appearance and that a more authentic biofilm image emerges when combining all methods. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microbial composition and ecological features of phototrophic biofilms proliferating in the Moidons Caves (France): investigation at the single-cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderie, Fabien; Denis, Michel; Barani, Aude; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-06-01

    The authors investigated the microbial composition of phototrophic biofilms proliferating in a show cave using flow cytometry for the first time in such a context. Results are based on several biofilms sampled in the Moidons Caves (France) and concern both heterotrophic prokaryotes and autotrophic microorganisms. Heterotrophic microorganisms with low nucleic acid content were dominant in biofilms, as can be expected from the oligotrophic conditions prevailing within the cave. Analysis of the biofilm autotrophic components revealed the presence of several taxa, particularly the unicellular green algae Chlorella minutissima, specifically well adapted to this cave. Relationships between flow cytometry results and environmental variables determined in the cave were established and discussed so as to better understand biofilm proliferation processes in caves.

  9. Genetic and environmental effects on tannin composition in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars grown in different European locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josuttis, Melanie; Verrall, Susan; Stewart, Derek; Krüger, Erika; McDougall, Gordon J

    2013-01-30

    Strawberry cultivars grown at different locations in Europe showed genotype- and environment-dependent variation in total phenol and anthocyanin contents. This study focused on the compositional diversity of tannins from these cultivars using a high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LC-MS) technique. Cultivars grown in Germany showed differences in the relative amounts of proanthocyanidins (PACs) and ellagitannins (ETs). Cultivars grown at three different European locations showed differences in their PAC/ET balance. 'Elsanta' grown in Switzerland had higher levels of ET-derived than PAC-derived signals compared to 'Elsanta' grown in Germany and Denmark. The trend to increased ET-derived signals was also noted for 'Clery' grown in Switzerland over Germany and was apparent for 'Korona' grown in Denmark over Germany. The altered ET/PAC balance was confirmed by conventional LC-MS analysis, which highlighted specific changes in composition rather than a general increase in ET components. These findings are discussed with respect to the environmental conditions at the different European locations.

  10. Antibacterial activity of dental composites containing zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin Sevinç, Berdan; Hanley, Luke

    2010-07-01

    The resin-based dental composites commonly used in restorations result in more plaque accumulation than other materials. Bacterial biofilm growth contributes to secondary caries and failure of resin-based dental composites. Methods to inhibit biofilm growth on dental composites have been sought for several decades. It is demonstrated here that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) blended at 10% (w/w) fraction into dental composites display antimicrobial activity and reduce growth of bacterial biofilms by roughly 80% for a single-species model dental biofilm. Antibacterial effectiveness of ZnO-NPs was assessed against Streptococcus sobrinus ATCC 27352 grown both planktonically and as biofilms on composites. Direct contact inhibition was observed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy while biofilm formation was quantified by viable counts. An 80% reduction in bacterial counts was observed with 10% ZnO-NP-containing composites compared with their unmodified counterpart, indicating a statistically significant suppression of biofilm growth. Although, 20% of the bacterial population survived and could form a biofilm layer again, 10% ZnO-NP-containing composites maintained at least some inhibitory activity even after the third generation of biofilm growth. Microscopy demonstrated continuous biofilm formation for unmodified composites after 1-day growth, but only sparsely distributed biofilms formed on 10% ZnO-NP-containing composites. The minimum inhibitory concentration of ZnO-NPs suspended in S. sobrinus planktonic culture was 50 microg mL(-1). ZnO-NP-containing composites (10%) qualitatively showed less biofilm after 1-day-anaerobic growth of a three-species initial colonizer biofilm after being compared with unmodified composites, but did not significantly reduce growth after 3 days. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Inflorescence and leaves essential oil composition of hydroponically grown Ocimum basilicum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD BAGHER HASSANPOURAGHDAM

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the essential oils of leaves and inflorescences, water distilled volatile oils of hydroponically grown Ocimum basilicum L. were analyzed by GC/EI-MS. Fifty components were identified in the inflorescence and leaf essential oils of the basil plants, accounting for 98.8 and 99.9 % of the total quantified components respectively. Phenylpropanoids (37.7 % for the inflorescence vs. 58.3 % for the leaves were the predominant class of oil constituents, followed by sesquiterpenes (33.3 vs. 19.4 % and monoterpenes (27.7 vs. 22.1 %. Of the monoterpenoid compounds, oxygenated monoterpenes (25.2 vs. 18.9 % were the main subclass. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (25 vs. 15.9 % were the main subclass of sesquiterpenoidal compounds. Methyl chavicol, a phenylpropane derivative, (37.2 vs. 56.7 % was the principle component of both organ oils, with up to 38 and 57 % of the total identified components of the inflorescence and leaf essential oils, respectively. Linalool (21.1 vs. 13.1 % was the second common major component followed by α-cadinol (6.1 vs. 3 %, germacrene D (6.1 vs. 2.7 % and 1,8-cineole (2.4 vs. 3.5 %. There were significant quantitative but very small qualitative differences between the two oils. In total, considering the previous reports, it seems that essential oil composition of hydroponically grown O. basilicum L. had volatile constituents comparable with field grown counterparts, probably with potential applicability in the pharmaceutical and food industries.

  12. Sequence of Colonization Determines the Composition of Mixed Biofilms by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O111:H8 Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Bono, James L

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are one of the potential sources of cross-contamination in food processing environments. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 and O111:H8 are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming biofilms, and the coexistence of these two STEC serotypes has been detected in various food samples and in multiple commercial meat plants throughout the United States. Here, we investigated how the coexistence of these two STEC serotypes and their sequence of colonization could affect bacterial growth competition and mixed biofilm development. Our data showed that E. coli O157:H7 strains were able to maintain a higher cell percentage in mixed biofilms with the co-inoculated O111:H8 companion strains, even though the results of planktonic growth competition were strain dependent. On solid surfaces with preexisting biofilms, the sequence of colonization played a critical role in determining the composition of the mixed biofilms because early stage precolonization significantly affected the competition results between the E. coli O157:H7 and O111:H8 strains. The precolonizer of either serotype was able to outgrow the other serotype in both planktonic and biofilm phases. The competitive interactions among the various STEC serotypes would determine the composition and structure of the mixed biofilms as well as their potential risks to food safety and public health, which is largely influenced by the dominant strains in the mixtures. Thus, the analysis of mixed biofilms under various conditions would be of importance to determine the nature of mixed biofilms composed of multiple microorganisms and to help implement the most effective disinfection operations accordingly.

  13. Isoflavone composition and antioxidant capacity of modified-lipoxygenase soybeans grown in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whent, Monica; Lv, Junli; Luthria, Devanand L; Kenworthy, William; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2011-12-28

    Maryland-grown soybean lines modified for low lipoxygenase-1 (LOX-1) content and a traditional nonmodified cultivar were analyzed for fatty acid composition, total phenolic content (TPC), isoflavone composition, relative DPPH• scavenging capacity (RDSC), and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity (HOSC). Soybean lines included black, brown, and yellow soybeans. TPC of all soybean lines ranged from 2.84 to 4.74 mg gallic acid equiv (GAE)/g flour. Total isoflavones were between 2.78 and 8.66 μmol/g flour. RDSC of all lines was between 0.48 and 14.62 μmol Trolox equiv (TE)/g flour, and HOSC ranged from 53.57 to 135.52 μmol TE/g flour. Some modified-LOX genotypes demonstrated antioxidant capacity and/or isoflavone content similar to or higher than those of the nonmodified cultivar (P soybeans demonstrated higher TPC and RDSC than most yellow soybean lines, although they did not have higher isoflavone content. The results demonstrate that modification of the LOX trait did not necessarily alter the antioxidant capacity or chemical composition of the experimental soybean lines when compared with a nonmodified cultivar. These soybean lines may be studied further for nutraceutical properties and use in functional foods.

  14. Broad compositional tunability of indium tin oxide nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zervos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Indium tin oxide nanowires were grown by the reaction of In and Sn with O2 at 800 °C via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism on 1 nm Au/Si(001. We obtain Sn doped In2O3 nanowires having a cubic bixbyite crystal structure by using In:Sn source weight ratios > 1:9 while below this we observe the emergence of tetragonal rutile SnO2 and suppression of In2O3 permitting compositional and structural tuning from SnO2 to In2O3 which is accompanied by a blue shift of the photoluminescence spectrum and increase in carrier lifetime attributed to a higher crystal quality and Fermi level position.

  15. Biomass composition of a Candida pseudotropicalis new strain grown on crude sweet whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, A.; Poncet, S.; Jacob, F.; Perrier, J.

    1987-01-01

    A yeast strain isolated from whey and named Candida LY 496 was grown continuously on crude sweet whey. The obtained biomass had a crude protein content of 47%. The amino acid composition was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). All essential amino acids were present and among them lysine was predominant (11.8%). The total nucleic acids of the biomass was 6.4%. Lipids represented 5% and the fatty acids 2% of the dry matter; 75% of the fatty acids were unsaturated, and linoleic acid constituted only 1% of the total fatty acids. Niacin and vitamin B2 were the most abundant vitamins of the B group. Therefore Candida LY 496 biomass could be incorporated in animal food intakes. (Refs. 23).

  16. Lattice constant and substitutional composition of GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, Nupur; Coppinger, Matthew; Prakash Gupta, Jay; Kolodzey, James [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Wielunski, Leszek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2013-07-22

    Single crystal epitaxial Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} alloys with atomic fractions of tin up to x = 0.145 were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy on Ge (001) substrates. The Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} alloys formed high quality, coherent, strained layers at growth temperatures below 250 °C, as shown by high resolution X-ray diffraction. The amount of Sn that was on lattice sites, as determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling, was found to be above 90% substitutional in all alloys. The degree of strain and the dependence of the effective unstrained bulk lattice constant of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} alloys versus the composition of Sn have been determined.

  17. pH landscapes in a novel five-species model of early dental biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schlafer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite continued preventive efforts, dental caries remains the most common disease of man. Organic acids produced by microorganisms in dental plaque play a crucial role for the development of carious lesions. During early stages of the pathogenetic process, repeated pH drops induce changes in microbial composition and favour the establishment of an increasingly acidogenic and aciduric microflora. The complex structure of dental biofilms, allowing for a multitude of different ecological environments in close proximity, remains largely unexplored. In this study, we designed a laboratory biofilm model that mimics the bacterial community present during early acidogenic stages of the caries process. We then performed a time-resolved microscopic analysis of the extracellular pH landscape at the interface between bacterial biofilm and underlying substrate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Strains of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus downei and Actinomyces naeslundii were employed in the model. Biofilms were grown in flow channels that allowed for direct microscopic analysis of the biofilms in situ. The architecture and composition of the biofilms were analysed using fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both biofilm structure and composition were highly reproducible and showed similarity to in-vivo-grown dental plaque. We employed the pH-sensitive ratiometric probe C-SNARF-4 to perform real-time microscopic analyses of the biofilm pH in response to salivary solutions containing glucose. Anaerobic glycolysis in the model biofilms created a mildly acidic environment. Decrease in pH in different areas of the biofilms varied, and distinct extracellular pH-microenvironments were conserved over several hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The designed biofilm model represents a promising tool to determine the effect of potential therapeutic agents on biofilm growth

  18. Ratiometric imaging of extracellular pH in bacterial biofilms with C-SNARF-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier E; Greve, Matilde; Raarup, Merete K; Nyvad, Bente; Dige, Irene

    2015-02-01

    pH in the extracellular matrix of bacterial biofilms is of central importance for microbial metabolism. Biofilms possess a complex three-dimensional architecture characterized by chemically different microenvironments in close proximity. For decades, pH measurements in biofilms have been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit the monitoring of horizontal pH gradients in biofilms in real time. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy can overcome these problems, but none of the hitherto employed methods differentiated accurately between extracellular and intracellular microbial pH and visualized extracellular pH in all areas of the biofilms. Here, we developed a method to reliably monitor extracellular biofilm pH microscopically with the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4, choosing dental biofilms as an example. Fluorescent emissions of C-SNARF-4 can be used to calculate extracellular pH irrespective of the dye concentration. We showed that at pH values of biofilm and visualized the entire bacterial biomass in in vivo-grown dental biofilms with unknown species composition. We then employed digital image analysis to remove the bacterial biomass from the microscopic images and adequately calculate extracellular pH values. As a proof of concept, we monitored the extracellular pH drop in in vivo-grown dental biofilms fermenting glucose. The combination of pH ratiometry with C-SNARF-4 and digital image analysis allows the accurate monitoring of extracellular pH in bacterial biofilms in three dimensions in real time and represents a significant improvement to previously employed methods of biofilm pH measurement.

  19. Biocidal Silver and Silver/Titania Composite Films Grown by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Sheel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the growth and testing of highly active biocidal films based on photocatalytically active films of TiO2, grown by thermal CVD, functionally and structurally modified by deposition of nanostructured silver via a novel flame assisted combination CVD process. The resulting composite films are shown to be highly durable, highly photocatalytically active and are also shown to possess strong antibacterial behaviour. The deposition control, arising from the described approach, offers the potential to control the film nanostructure, which is proposed to be crucial in determining the photo and bioactivity of the combined film structure, and the transparency of the composite films. Furthermore, we show that the resultant films are active to a range of organisms, including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and viruses. The very high-biocidal activity is above that expected from the concentrations of silver present, and this is discussed in terms of nanostructure of the titania/silver surface. These properties are especially significant when combined with the well-known durability of CVD deposited thin films, offering new opportunities for enhanced application in areas where biocidal surface functionality is sought.

  20. Change in dry matter and nutritive composition of Brachiaria humidicola grown in Ban Thon soil series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeerasak Chobtang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to determine the change in dry matter and nutritive composition of Humidicola grass (Brachiaria humidicola grown in Ban Thon soil series (infertility soil as a function of growth age. One rai (0.16 ha of two-year-old pasture of fertilised Humidicola grass was uniformly cut and the regrowth samples were collected every twenty days. The samples were subjected to analysis for dry matter content and nutritive composition, i.e. crude protein, ash, calcium, phosphorus, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre, and acid detergent lignin. The results showed that while the yields of available forage and leaves increased curvilinearly (quadratic, p<0.05, the stem yield increased linearly (p<0.05 over sampling dates. The highest biomass accumulation rate was numerically observed between 40-60 days of regrowth. The concentrations of crude protein, ash, calcium and phosphorus decreased curvilinearly (quadratic, p<0.05 with advancing maturity and reached the lowest flat after 60 days of regrowth. The cell wall components, i.e. NDF, ADF and ADL, increased over the experimental period and reached the highest plateau at 40 days of regrowth. It was concluded that Humidicola grass should be grazed or preserved at the regrowth age of not over 60 days to maximise the utilisation of the grass.

  1. Neocartilage formation from mesenchymal stem cells grown in type II collagen-hyaluronan composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Ting-Yu; Lin, Chen-Huan; Yen, B Linju; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) collagen type II-hyaluronan (HA) composite scaffolds (CII-HA) which mimics the extracellular environment of natural cartilage were fabricated in this study. Rheological measurements demonstrated that the incorporation of HA increased the compression modulus of the scaffolds. An initial in vitro evaluation showed that scaffolds seeded with porcine chondrocytes formed cartilaginous-like tissue after 8 weeks, and HA functioned to promote the growth of chondrocytes into scaffolds. Placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMC) and gingival fibroblasts (GF) were seeded on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), CII-HA films, and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) sheets for comparing their chondrogenesis differentiation potentials with those of adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADAS) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC). Among different cells, PDMC showed the greatest chondrogenic differentiation potential on both CII-HA films and SIS sheets upon TGF-β3 induction, followed by GF. This was evidenced by the up-regulation of chondrogenic genes (Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II), which was not observed for cells grown on TCPS. This finding suggested the essential role of substrate materials in the chondrogenic differentiation of PDMC and GF. Neocartilage formation was more obvious in both PDMC and GF cells plated on CII-HA composite scaffolds vs. 8-layer SIS at 28 days in vitro. Finally, implantation of PDMC/CII-HA constructs into NOD-SCID mice confirmed the formation of tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  2. Theoretical analyses of In incorporation and compositional instability in coherently grown InGaN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yayama, Tomoe [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Koukitu, Akinori [Division of Applied Chemistry, Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 184-8588, Koganei (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    We performed thermodynamic analyses to calculate the relationship between the input indium molar ratio and solid composition of a coherently grown InGaN thin film that is subjected compressive or tensile stress. The theoretical approach incorporates energy loss of a thin film system due to lattice constraint from the substrate. The results show that the indium composition x of coherently grown InGaN is lower than that of stress-free InGaN. This represents the composition pulling effect. We also studied stable growth modes under various growth conditions. The results suggest the importance of control of partial pressure of NH{sub 3} to optimize growth conditions of InGaN with a unique composition. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Composition and physical properties of starch in microgravity-grown plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, O. A.; Brown, C. S.; Levine, H. G.; Piastuch, W. C.; Sanwo-Lewandowski, M. M.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of spaceflight on starch development in soybean ( Glycine max L., BRIC-03) and potato ( Solanum tuberosum, Astroculture-05) was compared with ground controls by biophysical and biochemical measurements. Starch grains from plants from both flights were on average 20-50% smaller in diameter than ground controls. The ratio Δκ/Δρ (Δκ - difference of magnetic susceptibilities, Δρ - difference of densities between starch and water) of starch grains was ca. 15% and 4% higher for space-grown soybean cotyledons and potato tubers, respectively, than in corresponding ground controls. Since the densities of particles were similar for all samples (1.36 to 1.38 g/cm 3), the observed difference in Δκ/Δρ was due to different magnetic susceptibilities and indicates modified composition of starch grains. In starch preparations from soybean cotyledons (BRIC-03) subjected to controlled enzymatic degradation with α-amylase for 24 hours, 77±6% of the starch from the flight cotyledons was degraded compared to 58±12% in ground controls. The amylose content in starch was also higher in space-grown tissues. The good correlation between the amylose content and Δκ/Δρ suggests, that the magnetic susceptibility of starch grains is related to their amylose content. Since the seedlings from the BRIC-03 experiment showed elevated post-flight ethylene levels, material from another flight experiment (GENEX) which had normal levels of ethylene was examined and showed no difference to ground controls in size distribution, density, Δκ/Δρ and amylose content. Therefore the role of ethylene appears to be more important for changes in starch metabolism than microgravity.

  4. Protein and metabolite composition of xylem sap from field-grown soybeans (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hari B; Natarajan, Savithiry S; Bennett, John O; Sicher, Richard C

    2011-05-01

    The xylem, in addition to transporting water, nutrients and metabolites, is also involved in long-distance signaling in response to pathogens, symbionts and environmental stresses. Xylem sap has been shown to contain a number of proteins including metabolic enzymes, stress-related proteins, signal transduction proteins and putative transcription factors. Previous studies on xylem sap have mostly utilized plants grown in controlled environmental chambers. However, plants in the field are subjected to high light and to environmental stress that is not normally found in growth chambers. In this study, we have examined the protein and metabolite composition of xylem sap from field-grown cultivated soybean plants. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis of xylem sap from determinate, indeterminate, nodulating and non-nodulating soybean cultivars revealed similar protein profiles consisting of about 8-10 prominent polypeptides. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of soybean xylem sap resulted in the visualization of about 60 distinct protein spots. A total of 38 protein spots were identified using MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS. The most abundant proteins present in the xylem sap were identified as 31 and 28 kDa vegetative storage proteins. In addition, several proteins that are conserved among different plant species were also identified. Diurnal changes in the metabolite profile of xylem sap collected during a 24-h cycle revealed that asparagine and aspartate were the two predominant amino acids irrespective of the time collected. Pinitol (D-3-O-methyl-chiro-inositol) was the most abundant carbohydrate present. The possible roles of xylem sap proteins and metabolites as nutrient reserves for sink tissue and as an indicator of biotic stress are also discussed.

  5. Leaf microbiota in an agroecosystem: spatiotemporal variation in bacterial community composition on field-grown lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Gurdeep; Sbodio, Adrian; Tech, Jan J; Suslow, Trevor V; Coaker, Gitta L; Leveau, Johan H J

    2012-10-01

    The presence, size and importance of bacterial communities on plant leaf surfaces are widely appreciated. However, information is scarce regarding their composition and how it changes along geographical and seasonal scales. We collected 106 samples of field-grown Romaine lettuce from commercial production regions in California and Arizona during the 2009-2010 crop cycle. Total bacterial populations averaged between 10(5) and 10(6) per gram of tissue, whereas counts of culturable bacteria were on average one (summer season) or two (winter season) orders of magnitude lower. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from 88 samples revealed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were the most abundantly represented phyla. At the genus level, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Massilia, Arthrobacter and Pantoea were the most consistently found across samples, suggesting that they form the bacterial 'core' phyllosphere microbiota on lettuce. The foliar presence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians, which is the causal agent of bacterial leaf spot of lettuce, correlated positively with the relative representation of bacteria from the genus Alkanindiges, but negatively with Bacillus, Erwinia and Pantoea. Summer samples showed an overrepresentation of Enterobacteriaceae sequences and culturable coliforms compared with winter samples. The distance between fields or the timing of a dust storm, but not Romaine cultivar, explained differences in bacterial community composition between several of the fields sampled. As one of the largest surveys of leaf surface microbiology, this study offers new insights into the extent and underlying causes of variability in bacterial community composition on plant leaves as a function of time, space and environment.

  6. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  7. Abundance of the multiheme c-type cytochrome OmcB increases in outer biofilm layers of electrode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille S Stephen

    Full Text Available When Geobacter sulfurreducens utilizes an electrode as its electron acceptor, cells embed themselves in a conductive biofilm tens of microns thick. While environmental conditions such as pH or redox potential have been shown to change close to the electrode, less is known about the response of G. sulfurreducens to growth in this biofilm environment. To investigate whether respiratory protein abundance varies with distance from the electrode, antibodies against an outer membrane multiheme cytochrome (OmcB and cytoplasmic acetate kinase (AckA were used to determine protein localization in slices spanning ∼25 µm-thick G. sulfurreducens biofilms growing on polished electrodes poised at +0.24 V (vs. Standard Hydrogen Electrode. Slices were immunogold labeled post-fixing, imaged via transmission electron microscopy, and digitally reassembled to create continuous images allowing subcellular location and abundance per cell to be quantified across an entire biofilm. OmcB was predominantly localized on cell membranes, and 3.6-fold more OmcB was detected on cells 10-20 µm distant from the electrode surface compared to inner layers (0-10 µm. In contrast, acetate kinase remained constant throughout the biofilm, and was always associated with the cell interior. This method for detecting proteins in intact conductive biofilms supports a model where the utilization of redox proteins changes with depth.

  8. Influence of nutrient inputs, hexadecane, and temporal variations on denitrification and community composition of river biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chénier, M R; Beaumier, D; Fortin, N; Roy, R; Driscoll, B T; Lawrence, J R; Greer, C W

    2006-01-01

    Biofilms were cultivated on polycarbonate strips in rotating annular reactors using South Saskatchewan River water during the fall of 1999 and the fall of 2001, supplemented with carbon (glucose), nitrogen (NH4Cl), phosphorus (KH2PO4), or combined nutrients (CNP), with or without hexadecane, a model compound representing aliphatic hydrocarbons used to simulate a pollutant. In fall 1999 and fall 2001, comparable denitrification activities and catabolic potentials were observed in the biofilms, implying that denitrifying populations showed similar activity patterns and catabolic potentials during the fall from year to year in this river ecosystem, when environmental conditions were similar. Both nirS and nirK denitrification genes were detected by PCR amplification, suggesting that both denitrifying bacterial subpopulations can potentially contribute to total denitrification. Between 91.7 and 99.8% of the consumed N was emitted in the form of N2, suggesting that emission of N2O, a major potent greenhouse gas, by South Saskatchewan River biofilms is low. Denitrification was markedly stimulated by the addition of CNP, and nirS and nirK genes were predominant only in the presence of CNP. In contrast, individual nutrients had no impact on denitrification and on the occurrence of nirS and nirK genes detected by PCR amplification. Similarly, only CNP resulted in significant increases in algal and bacterial biomass relative to control biofilms. Biomass measurements indicated a linkage between autotrophic and heterotrophic populations in the fall 1999 biofilms. Correlation analyses demonstrated a significant relationship (P < or = 0.05) between the denitrification rate and the biomass of algae and heterotrophic bacteria but not cyanobacteria. At the concentration assessed (1 ppb), hexadecane partially inhibited denitrification in both years, slightly more in the fall of 2001. This study suggested that the response of the anaerobic heterotrophic biofilm community may be

  9. Changes in bacterial composition of biofilm in a metropolitan drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revetta, R P; Gomez-Alvarez, V; Gerke, T L; Santo Domingo, J W; Ashbolt, N J

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the development of bacterial biofilms within a metropolitan distribution system. The distribution system is fed with different source water (i.e. groundwater, GW and surface water, SW) and undergoes different treatment processes in separate facilities. The biofilm community was characterized using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and functional potential analysis, generated from total DNA extracted from coupons in biofilm annular reactors fed with onsite drinking water for up to 18 months. Differences in the bacterial community structure were observed between GW and SW. Representatives that explained the dissimilarity were associated with the classes Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. After 9 months the biofilm bacterial community from both GW and SW were dominated by Mycobacterium species. The distribution of the dominant operational taxonomic unit (OTU) (Mycobacterium) positively correlated with the drinking water distribution system (DWDS) temperature. In this study, the biofilm community structure observed between GW and SW were dissimilar, while communities from different locations receiving SW did not show significant differences. The results suggest that source water and/or the water quality shaped by their respective treatment processes may play an important role in shaping the bacterial communities in the distribution system. In addition, several bacterial groups were present in all samples, suggesting that they are an integral part of the core microbiota of this DWDS. These results provide an ecological insight into biofilm bacterial structure in chlorine-treated drinking water influenced by different water sources and their respective treatment processes. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Composition of pecan cultivars Wichita and Western Schley [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.)K. Koch] grown in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeling, L T; Mason, R L; D'Arcy, B R; Caffin, N A

    2001-03-01

    Pecans from the cultivars Wichita and Western Schley [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] collected over three years were analyzed for the following constituents: total lipid content; fatty acid profiles; sucrose content; protein; total dietary fiber; the minerals magnesium, calcium, potassium, sulfur, phosphorus, boron, copper, iron, manganese, sodium, zinc, and aluminum; vitamin C; and lipase and lipoxygenase activities. Year of harvest and cultivar had little effect on the composition of the pecans. Overall, protein content was the only constituent that differed between pecans grown in Australia and those grown in the United States. This difference is probably related to differences in growing location and horticultural practices between the two countries.

  11. Ecological changes in oral microcosm biofilm during maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Seok; Kang, Si-Mook; Lee, Eun-Song; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Bo-Ra; Kim, Baek-Il

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ecological changes in the biofilm at different stages of maturation using 16S rDNA gene amplicon sequencing and to identify correlations between red/green (R/G) fluorescence ratio and ecological changes. An oral microcosm biofilm was initiated from the saliva of a single donor and grown anaerobically for up to 10 days in basal medium mucin. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence analysis was shown that the R/G ratio of the biofilm increased consistently, but the slope rapidly decreased after six days. The bacterial compositions of 10 species also consistently changed over time. However, there was no significant correlation between each bacteria and red fluorescence. The monitoring of the maturation process of oral microcosm biofilm over 10 days revealed that the R/G ratio and the bacterial composition within biofilm consistently changed. Therefore, the R/G fluorescence ratio of biofilm may be related with its ecological change rather than specific bacteria.

  12. Influence of medium composition on the characteristics of a denitrifying biofilm formed by Alcaligenes denitrificans in a fluidised bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, C. F.; Melo, L. F.; Vieira, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of the ratio carbon/nitrogen and phosphorus concentration on the performance of a biofilm fluidised bed reactor used for denitrification and on the properties of the biofilm was studied. Although the removal efficiencies of C and N reached steady-state values, the thickness of the biofilm steadily increased. The dry density of the biofilm did not seem to be dependent on the loading conditions, although a denser biofilm was obtained when there was no nutrient limitation ...

  13. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda;

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...

  14. Combination of microscopic techniques reveals a comprehensive visual impression of biofilm structure and composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Liebrechts, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are imaged by various kinds of microscopy including confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One limitation of CLSM is its restricted magnification, which is resolved by the use of SEM that provides high-magnification spatial images of h...... combining all methods....

  15. CHANGES IN BACTERIAL COMPOSITION OF BIOFILM IN A METROPOLITAN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the development of bacterial biofilms within a metropolitan distribution system. The distribution system is fed with different source water (i.e., groundwater, GW and surface water, SW) and undergoes different treatment processes in separate facilities. The b...

  16. CHANGES IN BACTERIAL COMPOSITION OF BIOFILM IN A METROPOLITAN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the development of bacterial biofilms within a metropolitan distribution system. The distribution system is fed with different source water (i.e., groundwater, GW and surface water, SW) and undergoes different treatment processes in separate facilities. The b...

  17. Abnormal physiological properties and altered cell wall composition in Streptococcus pneumoniae grown in the presence of clavulanic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, A; Severina, E; Tomasz, A

    1997-01-01

    Subinhibitory concentrations of clavulanate caused premature induction of stationary-phase autolysis, sensitization to lysozyme, and reductions in the MICs of deoxycholate and penicillin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the range of clavulanate concentrations producing these effects, this beta-lactam compound was selectively bound to PBP 3. Cell walls isolated from pneumococci grown in the presence of clavulanate showed increased sensitivity to the hydrolytic action of purified pneumococcal autolysin in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the peptidoglycan isolated from the clavulanate-grown cells showed major qualitative and quantitative changes in stem peptide composition, the most striking feature of which was the accumulation of peptide species carrying intact D-alanyl-D-alanine residues at the carboxy termini. The altered biological and biochemical properties of the clavulanate-grown pneumococci appear to be the consequences of suppressed D,D-carboxypeptidase activity. PMID:9055983

  18. A comparison of the response of two Burkholderia fungorum strains grown as planktonic cells versus biofilm to dibenzothiophene and select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoei, Nazanin Seyed; Andreolli, Marco; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-10-01

    In natural environments, bacteria often exist in close association with surfaces and interfaces by establishing biofilms. Here, we report on the ability of Burkholderia fungorum strains DBT1 and 95 to survive in high concentrations of hydrocarbons, and we compare their growth as a biofilm vs. planktonic cells. The 2 compounds tested were dibenzothiophene (DBT) and a mixture of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene (5:2:1) as representative compounds of thiophenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), respectively. The results showed that both strains were able to degrade DBT and to survive in the presence of up to a 2000 mg·L(-1) concentration of this compound both as a biofilm and as free-living cells. Moreover, B. fungorum DBT1 showed reduced tolerance towards the mixed PAHs (2000 mg·L(-1) naphthalene, 800 mg·L(-1) phenanthrene, and 400 mg·L(-1) pyrene) both as a biofilm and as free-living cells. Conversely, biofilms of B. fungorum 95 enhanced resistance against these toxic compounds compared with planktonic cells (P hydrocarbon-contaminated sites.

  19. Physical and chemical composition of some walnut ( Juglans regia L genotypes grown in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyuncu, M. Ali

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Walnut ( Juglans regia L. samples were collected during the 2000 and 2001 harvests from different selections of trees grown in Turkey . Important physical and biochemical properties of fruit were examined in these walnut types. At the end of this study, 10 types were selected and nut and kernel properties, fatty acid composition and the proximate composition of these selections which are commonly grown in Turkey were evaluated. Physical properties are attributed to the quality criteria of nuts. Investigated genotypes showed good quality according to the test results. The total oil content ranged from 61.97 to 70.92 % while the crude protein ranged from 15.17 to 19.24 %. Ash ranged from 1.26 to 2.06 % while the moisture was found between 3.25-3.91 % of the kernel. The total carbohydrate was calculated as between 8.05-13.23 %. The oleic acid content of the oils ranged from 21.18 to 40.20% of the total fatty acids, while the linoleic acid content ranged from 43.94 to 60.12 % and the linolenic contents from 6.91 to11.52 %. It was found that palmitic acid was between 5.24 and 7.62 %, while stearic acid ranged from 2.56 to 3.67 %Las nueces ( Juglans regia L. fueron recolectadas durante los años 2000 y 2001 en diversos nogales seleccionados de Turquía y analizadas para determinar sus propiedades físicas y bioquímicas. Se seleccionaron 10 genotipos en los que fueron determinadas las propiedades de la cáscara y la semilla, la composición en ácidos grasos, así como su composición general. Las propiedades físicas son un atributo de calidad de las nueces. Los genotipos investigados mostraron una buena calidad de acuerdo a los resultados. El contenido total en aceite varió entre el 61.97 y el 70.92 % mientras que la proteína cruda fue del 15.17-19.24 %. La ceniza fue del 1.26-2.06 % y la humedad fue del 3.25-3.91 % de la semilla. Los carbohidratos totales fueron el 8.05-13.23 %. El contenido en ácido oleico fue del 21.18-40.20 % de los

  20. Chemical Composition and Allelopathic Potential of Essential Oils from Citharexylum spinosum L. Grown in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ayeb-Zakhama, Asma; Sakka-Rouis, Lamia; Flamini, Guido; Ben Jannet, Hichem; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2017-04-01

    Citharexylum spinosum L. (Verbenaceae) also known as Citharexylum quadrangulare Jacq. or Citharexylum fruticosum L. is an exotic tree introduced many years ago in Tunisia, specially used as a street and park ornamental tree. Essential oils (EOs) were obtained by hydrodistillation of the different parts (roots, stems, leaves, flowers and fruits; drupes) collected from trees grown in the area of Monastir (Tunisia). In total, 84 compounds, representing 90.1 - 98.4% of the whole oil composition, were identified by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The root EO was distinguished by its high content in monoterpene hydrocarbons (α-phellandrene; 30.8%) whereas that obtained from stems was dominated by sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (cuparene; 16.4%). The leaf oil was rich in an apocarotenoid derivative (hexahydrofarnesylacetone; 26%) and an aliphatic hydrocarbon (nonadecane; 14.5%). Flowers oil was rich in esters (2-phenylethyl benzoate; 33.5%). Finally, drupes oil was rich in oxygenated sesquiterpenes (β-eudesmol; 33.1%). Flowers oil showed a significant phytotoxic effect against lettuce seeds germination, it induces a total inhibition when tested at 1 mg/ml. Root and shoot elongation seemed to be more affected than germination. The inhibition of the shoot length varied from 3.6% to 100% and that of the root from 16.1% to 100%. The highest inhibition of 100% was detected for flower oil tested at 1 mg/ml. Our in vitro studies suggest a possible and new alternative use of C. spinosum EOs in herbicidal formulations, further experiments involving field conditions are necessary to confirm its herbicidal potential. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  1. High frequency ultrasound imaging of a single-species biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shemesh, H.; Goertz, D. E.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; de Jong, N.; Wu, M. K.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the feasibility of a high frequency ultrasound scan to examine the 3D morphology of Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown in vitro. Methods: Six 2-day S. mutans biofilms and six 7-day biofilms were grown on tissue culture membranes and on bovine dentine discs. A sterile

  2. Sub-Inhibitory Concentrations of Rifampicin Strongly Stimulated Biofilm Production in S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-E-Silva, Agostinho Alves; Silva-Filho, Renato Geraldo; Fernandes, Henry Marcel Zalona; Saramago, Carmen Soares Meirelles; Viana, Alice Slotfeldt; Souza, Maria José; Nogueira, Eduardo Matos

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen and a frequent cause of infections associated with biofilm production in implantable medical devices. Biofilm production can be induced by sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of certain antibiotics, but few studies have researched this occurrence in S. aureus. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-MICs of rifampicin and minocycline on biofilm production by five clinical and five non-clinical S. aureus isolates. Microtiter Plate assay and Congo Red Agar Test were used to analyze the biofilm production. The biofilm composition was evaluated by the detachment assay with sodium metaperiodate and proteinase K. Rifampicin sub-MICs induced very high biofilm formation in seven isolates that were non-producers in Tryptic Soy Broth. In one producer isolate, the biofilm formation level was not affected by sub-MICs of this drug. Sub-MICs of minocycline did not induce biofilm production in all isolates tested and in two producer isolates, instead, MIC/2 and MIC/4 inhibited biofilm production. The results of the drugs in combination were similar to those with rifampicin alone. The biofilm matrix was identified as polysaccharide, except for one producer isolate, classified as proteinaceous. Polysaccharide biofilm producer isolates, when grown on Congo Red Agar without sucrose, but with sub-MICs of rifampicin, showed results in agreement with those obtained in Microtiter Plate Test. The high biofilm production induced by sub-MICs of rifampicin has potential clinical relevance, because this is one of the drugs commonly used in the impregnation of catheters. In addition, it is used adjunctively to treat certain S. aureus infections.

  3. Composition of microbial oral biofilms during maturation in young healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Langfeldt

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to analyze the bacterial community structure of oral biofilms at different maturation stages in young healthy adults. Oral biofilms established on membrane filters were collected from 32 human subjects after 5 different maturation intervals (1, 3, 5, 9 and 14 days and the respective phylogenetic diversity was analyzed by 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing. Our analyses revealed highly diverse entire colonization profiles, spread into 8 phyla/candidate divisions and in 15 different bacterial classes. A large inter-individual difference in the subjects' microbiota was observed, comprising 35% of the total variance, but lacking conspicuous general temporal trends in both alpha and beta diversity. We further obtained strong evidence that subjects can be categorized into three clusters based on three differently occurring and mutually exclusive species clusters.

  4. Composition of microbial oral biofilms during maturation in young healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfeldt, Daniela; Neulinger, Sven C; Heuer, Wieland; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Künzel, Sven; Baines, John F; Eberhard, Jörg; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to analyze the bacterial community structure of oral biofilms at different maturation stages in young healthy adults. Oral biofilms established on membrane filters were collected from 32 human subjects after 5 different maturation intervals (1, 3, 5, 9 and 14 days) and the respective phylogenetic diversity was analyzed by 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing. Our analyses revealed highly diverse entire colonization profiles, spread into 8 phyla/candidate divisions and in 15 different bacterial classes. A large inter-individual difference in the subjects' microbiota was observed, comprising 35% of the total variance, but lacking conspicuous general temporal trends in both alpha and beta diversity. We further obtained strong evidence that subjects can be categorized into three clusters based on three differently occurring and mutually exclusive species clusters.

  5. Community Composition of Bacterial Biofilms Formed on Simple Soil Based Bioelectrochemical Cell Anodes and Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    systems hold promise as a sus- tainable source of energy for use in novel ways and in novel environments. Metagenomics studies of anodic biofilms have...chamber was filled with deionized sterile water and continuously sparged with air. The electrode was then suspended in the water between the glass...jar and the CEM. A small portion of the anodic soil, ~ 0.1 g, was added to the ca- thodic water as inocula. Voltage was measured across the two

  6. Effect of Veillonella parvula on the antimicrobial resistance and gene expression of Streptococcus mutans grown in a dual-species biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppens, S.B.I.; Kara, D.; Bandounas, L.; Jonker, M.J.; Wittink, F.R.A.; Bruning, O.; Breit, T.M.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Our previous studies showed that Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella parvula dual-species biofilms have a different acid production profile and a higher resistance to chlorhexidine than their single-species counterparts. The aim of the current study was to test whether the susceptibil

  7. Start-up and bacterial community compositions of partial nitrification in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Mao, Yan-Jun; Shi, Yan-Ping; Quan, Xie

    2017-03-01

    Partial nitrification (PN) has been considered as one of the promising processes for pretreatment of ammonium-rich wastewater. In this study, a kind of novel carriers with enhanced hydrophilicity and electrophilicity was implemented in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to start up PN process. Results indicated that biofilm formation rate was higher on modified carriers. In comparison with the reactor filled with traditional carriers (start-up period of 21 days), it took only 14 days to start up PN successfully with ammonia removal efficiency and nitrite accumulation rate of 90 and 91%, respectively, in the reactor filled with modified carriers. Evident changes of spatial distributions and community structures had been detected during the start-up. Free-floating cells existed in planktonic sludge, while these microorganisms trended to form flocs in the biofilm. High-throughput pyrosequencing results indicated that Nitrosomonas was the predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) in the PN system, while Comamonas might also play a vital role for nitrogen oxidation. Additionally, some other bacteria such as Ferruginibacter, Ottowia, Saprospiraceae, and Rhizobacter were selected to establish stable footholds. This study would be potentially significant for better understanding the microbial features and developing efficient strategies accordingly for MBBR-based PN operation.

  8. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This chapter on biofilm risks deals with biofilm formation of pathogenic microbes, sampling and detection methods, biofilm removal, and prevention of biofilm formation. Several common pathogens produce sticky and/or slimy structures in which the cells are embedded, that is, biofilms, on various s...

  9. Mentha spicata Essential Oil: Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities against Planktonic and Biofilm Cultures of Vibrio spp. Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoussi, Mejdi; Noumi, Emira; Trabelsi, Najla; Flamini, Guido; Papetti, Adele; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2015-08-07

    Chemical composition, antioxidant and anti-Vibrio spp. activities of the essential oil isolated from the aerial parts of Mentha spicata L. (spearmint) are investigated in the present study. The effect of the essential oil on Vibrio spp. biofilm inhibition and eradication was tested using the XTT assay. A total of 63 chemical constituents were identified in spearmint oil using GC/MS, constituting 99.9% of the total identified compounds. The main components were carvone (40.8% ± 1.23%) and limonene (20.8% ± 1.12%). The antimicrobial activity against 30 Vibrio spp. strains (16 species) was evaluated by disc diffusion and microdilution assays. All microorganisms were strongly affected, indicating an appreciable antimicrobial potential of the oil. Moreover, the investigated oil exhibited high antioxidant potency, as assessed by four different tests in comparison with BHT. The ability of the oil, belonging to the carvone chemotype, to inhibit or reduce Vibrio spp. biofilm warrants further investigation to explore the use of natural products in antibiofilm adhesion and reinforce the possibility of its use in the pharmaceutical or food industry as a natural antibiotic and seafood preservative against Vibrio contamination.

  10. Mentha spicata Essential Oil: Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities against Planktonic and Biofilm Cultures of Vibrio spp. Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejdi Snoussi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition, antioxidant and anti-Vibrio spp. activities of the essential oil isolated from the aerial parts of Mentha spicata L. (spearmint are investigated in the present study. The effect of the essential oil on Vibrio spp. biofilm inhibition and eradication was tested using the XTT assay. A total of 63 chemical constituents were identified in spearmint oil using GC/MS, constituting 99.9% of the total identified compounds. The main components were carvone (40.8% ± 1.23% and limonene (20.8% ± 1.12%. The antimicrobial activity against 30 Vibrio spp. strains (16 species was evaluated by disc diffusion and microdilution assays. All microorganisms were strongly affected, indicating an appreciable antimicrobial potential of the oil. Moreover, the investigated oil exhibited high antioxidant potency, as assessed by four different tests in comparison with BHT. The ability of the oil, belonging to the carvone chemotype, to inhibit or reduce Vibrio spp. biofilm warrants further investigation to explore the use of natural products in antibiofilm adhesion and reinforce the possibility of its use in the pharmaceutical or food industry as a natural antibiotic and seafood preservative against Vibrio contamination.

  11. The Microfloral Analysis of Secondary Caries Biofilm around Class I and Class II Composite and Amalgam Fillings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Si-su

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary caries is responsible for 60 percent of all replacement restorations in the typical dental practice. The diversity of the bacterial sources and the different types of filling materials could play a role in secondary caries. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the microbial spectrum of secondary caries biofilms around amalgam and composite resin restorations. Methods Clinical samples were collected from freshly extracted teeth diagnosed with clinical secondary caries. Samples were categorized into four groups according to the types of restoration materials and the classification of the cavity. Biofilms were harvested from the tooth-restoration interface using a dental explorer and after dilution were incubated on special agars. The bacteria were identified using the biochemical appraisal system. Statistical calculations were carried out using SPSS11.5 software to analyze the prevalence of the bacteria involved in secondary caries. Results Samples from a total of four groups were collected: two groups were collected from amalgam restorations, each had 21 samples from both Class I and Class II caries; and the other two groups were from composite resin restorations, each had 13 samples from both class I and class II caries. Our results showed: (1 Anaerobic species were dominant in both restoration materials. (2 In terms of the types of individual bacteria, no significant differences were found among the four groups according to the geometric mean of the detected bacteria (P > 0.05. However, there were significant differences among the detected bacteria within each group (P 0.05, but showed significant differences among the detected bacteria in each group (P 0.05, however, the detection rate of each bacterium within each group was statistically different among the detected bacteria (P Conclusions The proportion of obligatory anaerobic species was much greater than the facultative anaerobic species in the

  12. Dominance of sphingomonads in a copper-exposed biofilm community for groundwater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vílchez, R; Pozo, C; Gómez, M A; Rodelas, B; González-López, J

    2007-02-01

    The structure, biological activity and microbial biodiversity of a biofilm used for the removal of copper from groundwater were studied and compared with those of a biofilm grown under copper-free conditions. A laboratory-scale submerged fixed biofilter was fed with groundwater (2.3 l h(-1)) artificially polluted with Cu(II) (15 mg l(-1)) and amended with sucrose (150 mg l(-1)) as carbon source. Between 73 and 90 % of the Cu(II) was removed from water during long-term operation (over 200 days). The biofilm was a complex ecosystem, consisting of eukaryotic and prokaryotic micro-organisms. Scanning electron microscopy revealed marked structural changes in the biofilm induced by Cu(II), compared to the biofilm grown in absence of the heavy metal. Analysis of cell-bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) demonstrated a significant modification of the composition of cell envelopes in response to Cu(II). Transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) showed that copper bioaccumulated in the EPS matrix by becoming bound to phosphates and/or silicates, whereas copper accumulated only intracytoplasmically in cells of eukaryotic microbes. Cu(II) also decreased sucrose consumption, ATP content and alkaline phosphatase activity of the biofilm. A detailed study of the bacterial community composition was conducted by 16S rRNA-based temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) profiling, which showed spatial and temporal stability of the species diversity of copper-exposed biofilms during biofilter operation. PCR reamplification and sequencing of 14 TGGE bands showed the prevalence of alphaproteobacteria, with most sequences (78 %) affiliated to the Sphingomonadaceae. The major cultivable colony type in plate counts of the copper-exposed biofilm was also identified as that of Sphingomonas sp. These data confirm a major role of these organisms in the composition of the Cu(II)-removing community.

  13. Critical review on biofilm methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Joana; Azevedo, Nuno F; Briandet, Romain; Cerca, Nuno; Coenye, Tom; Costa, Ana Rita; Desvaux, Mickaël; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Hébraud, Michel; Jaglic, Zoran; Kačániová, Miroslava; Knøchel, Susanne; Lourenço, Anália; Mergulhão, Filipe; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Nychas, George; Simões, Manuel; Tresse, Odile; Sternberg, Claus

    2017-05-01

    Biofilms are widespread in nature and constitute an important strategy implemented by microorganisms to survive in sometimes harsh environmental conditions. They can be beneficial or have a negative impact particularly when formed in industrial settings or on medical devices. As such, research into the formation and elimination of biofilms is important for many disciplines. Several new methodologies have been recently developed for, or adapted to, biofilm studies that have contributed to deeper knowledge on biofilm physiology, structure and composition. In this review, traditional and cutting-edge methods to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages and limitations of several methods. Accordingly, this review aims at helping scientists in finding the most appropriate and up-to-date methods to study their biofilms.

  14. COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR CONTROLLING MICROBIAL ADHESION AND BIOFILM FORMATION OF SURFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    in a large range of areas. The reduced numbers of adhered, attached or colonized microbial organisms is not due to a general growth inhibitory effect and therefore the anti-adhesive effect may not be caused by the presence of antimicrobials (antibiotics or non-antibiotics) in the fish extract.......The present invention describes how coating of surfaces with an extract, particularly a fish extract, can significantly reduce microbial adhesion, attachment, colonization and biofilm formation on surfaces. Such reduction of microbial adherence, attachment and colonization will be applicable...

  15. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  16. ZnO films grown by pulsed-laser deposition on soda lime glass substrates for the ultraviolet inactivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosnier, Jean-Paul; O' Haire, Richard J; McGlynn, Enda; Henry, Martin O [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology and School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); McDonnell, Stephen J [Surface and Interface Research Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Boyle, Maria A; McGuigan, Kevin G, E-mail: jean-paul.mosnier@dcu.i [Department of Physiology and Medical Physics, The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, St Stephen' s Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2009-08-15

    We found that a ZnO film of 2 {mu}m thickness which was laser-deposited at room temperature onto a plain soda lime glass substrate, exhibits notable antibacterial activity against a biofilm of Staphylococcus epidermidis when back-illuminated by a UVA light source with a peak emission wavelength of about 365 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the ZnO films before and after the interactions with the biofilm and the ultraviolet light, respectively. The as-deposited film was highly textured with the wurtzite (0002) in-plane orientation (c-axis perpendicular to ZnO surface) and had a surface rms roughness of 49.7 nm. In the as-deposited film, the Zn to O ratio was 1 to 0.95. After the UV and biofilm treatments, the ZnO film surface had become rougher (rms roughness 68.1 nm) and presented uniform micron-sized pitting randomly distributed, while the zinc to oxygen ratio had become 1 to 2.2. In this case, both the UV-visible and Raman spectra pointed to degradation of the structural quality of the material. On the strength of these data, we propose a model for the mediation of the bactericidal activity in which the photogeneration of highly oxidizing species and the presence of active surface defect sites both play an important role. This study is of particular interest for the acute problem of disinfection of pathogenic biofilms which form on medical device/implant surfaces.

  17. ZnO films grown by pulsed-laser deposition on soda lime glass substrates for the ultraviolet inactivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Mosnier, Richard J O'Haire, Enda McGlynn, Martin O Henry, Stephen J McDonnell, Maria A Boyle and Kevin G McGuigan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We found that a ZnO film of 2 μm thickness which was laser-deposited at room temperature onto a plain soda lime glass substrate, exhibits notable antibacterial activity against a biofilm of Staphylococcus epidermidis when back-illuminated by a UVA light source with a peak emission wavelength of about 365 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS were used to characterize the ZnO films before and after the interactions with the biofilm and the ultraviolet light, respectively. The as-deposited film was highly textured with the wurtzite (0002 in-plane orientation (c-axis perpendicular to ZnO surface and had a surface rms roughness of 49.7 nm. In the as-deposited film, the Zn to O ratio was 1 to 0.95. After the UV and biofilm treatments, the ZnO film surface had become rougher (rms roughness 68.1 nm and presented uniform micron-sized pitting randomly distributed, while the zinc to oxygen ratio had become 1 to 2.2. In this case, both the UV-visible and Raman spectra pointed to degradation of the structural quality of the material. On the strength of these data, we propose a model for the mediation of the bactericidal activity in which the photogeneration of highly oxidizing species and the presence of active surface defect sites both play an important role. This study is of particular interest for the acute problem of disinfection of pathogenic biofilms which form on medical device/implant surfaces.

  18. The use of microsensors to study the role of the loading rate and surface velocity on the growth and the composition of nitrifying biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, B C; Spinola, A L G; Lamon, A W; Araujo, J C; Campos, J R

    2011-01-01

    The good composition and activity of biofilms are very important for successful operation and control of fixed-film biological reactors employed in liquid effluents treatment. During the last decade, microsensors have been applied to study microbial ecology. These sensors could provide information regarding the microbial activity concerning nitrification and denitrification that occur inside biofilms. Other techniques of molecular biology, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have also contributed to this matter because their application aids in the identification of the bacterial populations that compose the biofilms. The focus of this paper was to study the loading rate and surface velocity to promote the development of nitrifying biofilms in three distinct flow cells that were employed in the post treatment of a synthetic wastewater simulating the effluent from a UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket) reactor. Using the FISH technique, it was found that the population of ammonia-oxidizing-bacteria was greater than that of nitrite-oxidizing-bacteria; this was also supported by the lower production of nitrate determined by physicochemical and microsensor analyses. It was verified that the loading rate and surface velocity that promoted the greatest nitrogen removal were 0.25 g N-amon m(-2)biofilm day(-1) and 1 m h(-1), respectively.

  19. Phenolic compounds and fatty acid composition of organic and conventional grown pecan kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, differences in contents of phenolic compounds and fatty acids in pecan kernels of organically versus conventionally grown pecan cultivars (‘Desirable’, ‘Cheyenne’, and ‘Wichita’) were evaluated. Although we were able to identify nine phenolic compounds (gallic acid, catechol, catechin...

  20. Yield and Composition of Ocimum basilicum L. and Ocimum sanctum L. Grown at Four Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and holy basil (Ocimum sanctum L.) are the most widely grown basil species in the world, either for the fresh market or for essential oil production. Both species are considered as promising essential oil crops in the Southeastern US, however, research on oil produ...

  1. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  2. Development of a multispecies biofilm community by four root canal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez de Paz, Luis E

    2012-03-01

    The development of multispecies biofilm models are needed to explain the interactions that take place in root canal biofilms during apical periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of 4 root canal bacteria to establish a multispecies biofilm community and to characterize the main structural, compositional, and physiological features of this community. Four clinical isolates isolated from infected root canals, Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus salivarius, Streptococcus gordonii, and Enterococcus faecalis, were grown together in a miniflow cell system. Simultaneous detection of the 4 species in the biofilm communities was achieved by fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with confocal microscopy at different time points. The LIVE/DEAD BacLight technique (Molecular Probes, Carlsbad, CA) was used to assess cell viability and to calculate 3-dimensional architectural parameters such as biovolume (μm(3)). Redox fluorescence dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride was used to assess the metabolic activity of biofilm bacteria. The 4 species tested were able to form stable and reproducible biofilm communities. The biofilms formed in rich medium generally showed continuous growth over time, however, in the absence of glucose biofilms showed significantly smaller biovolumes. A high proportion of viable cells (>90%) were generally observed, and biofilm growth was correlated with high metabolic activity of cells. The community structure of biofilms formed in rich medium did not change considerably over the 120-hour period, during which E. faecalis, L. salivarius, and S. gordonii were most abundant. The ability of 4 root canal bacteria to form multispecies biofilm communities shown in this study give insights into assessing the community lifestyle of these microorganisms in vivo. This multispecies model could be useful for further research simulating stresses representative of in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2012 American

  3. In Situ Identification and Stratification of Monochloramine Inhibition Effects on Nitrifying Biofilms as Determined by the Use of Microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nitrifying biofilm grown in an annular biofilm reactor and the microbial deactivation achieved after monochloramine treatment were investigated using microelectrodes. The nitrifying biofilm ammonium microprofile was measured and the effect of monochloramine on nitrifying bio...

  4. Biofilms Benefiting Plants Exposed to ZnO and CuO Nanoparticles Studied with a Root-Mimetic Hollow Fiber Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonebrake, Michelle; Anderson, Kaitlyn; Valiente, Jonathan; Jacobson, Astrid; McLean, Joan E; Anderson, Anne; Britt, David W

    2017-10-02

    Plants exist with a consortium of microbes that influence plant health, including responses to biotic and abiotic stress. While nanoparticle (NP)-plant interactions are increasingly studied, the effect of NPs on the plant microbiome is less researched. Here a root-mimetic hollow fiber membrane (HFM) is presented for generating biofilms of plant-associated microbes nurtured by artificial root exudates (AREs) to correlate exudate composition with biofilm formation and response to NPs. Two microbial isolates from field-grown wheat, a bacillus endophyte and a pseudomonad root surface colonizer, were examined on HFMs fed with AREs varying in N and C composition. Bacterial morphology and biofilm architecture were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and responses to CuO and ZnO NP challenges of 300 mg/L evaluated. The bacillus isolate sparsely colonized the HFM. In contrast, the pseudomonad formed robust biofilms within 3 days. Dependent on nutrient sources, the biofilm cells produced extensive extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and large intracellular granules. Pseudomonad biofilms were minimally affected by ZnO NPs. CuO NPs, when introduced before biofilm maturation, strongly reduced biofilm formation. The findings demonstrate the utility of the HFM root-mimetic to study rhizoexudate influence on biofilms of root-colonizing microbes but without active plant metabolism. The results will allow better understanding of how microbe-rhizoexudate-NP interactions affect microbial and plant health.

  5. Power scaling of directly dual-end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser using grown-together composite crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, XuDong; Yu, Xin; Chen, Fei; Yan, RenPeng; Luo, Ming; Yu, JunHua; Chen, DeYing

    2010-03-29

    Power scaling of end-pumped Nd:GdVO(4) laser was realized by direct pumping, grown-together composite crystal and dual-end-pumping. A maximum CW output power of 46.0W with M(2)switch operation, peak power of 304.1kW, 58.6kW and 23.8kW, pulse width of 7.2ns, 11.3ns and 16.2ns were obtained at the repetition rates of 10kHz, 50kHz and 100kHz, respectively.

  6. Composition control of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4}-based solar cells grown by coevaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampo, Hitoshi, E-mail: tampo-21@aist.go.jp; Makita, Kikuo; Komaki, Hironori; Yamada, Akimasa; Furue, Shigenori; Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime; Matsubara, Koji; Niki, Shigeru

    2014-01-31

    The relationship between the composition and conversion efficiency of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe)-based solar cells was investigated. CZTSe films were grown by thermal deposition using a coevaporation method. It was found that the composition of CZTSe and Na concentration [Na] have strong correlations to the conversion efficiency, and higher-efficiency samples were obtained with the composition ratios closer to Zn/Sn ∼ 1.6, Cu/(Zn + Sn) ∼ 0.8, and [Na] ∼ 2%. The highest conversion efficiency (η = 2.1%) was obtained in the composition region, and the composition was significantly nonstoichiometric. The CZTSe composition was automatically fixed on a tie line between Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} and ZnSe, and it was demonstrated that this composition can be expressed by one parameter. The structural and electrical properties of the high- and low-efficiency samples were also investigated. No significant differences in such properties were observed between the high- and low-efficiency samples by surface, x-ray diffraction, and Raman measurements. However, the low-efficiency sample showed a high carrier concentration. - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe). • The CZTSe composition and Na concentration strongly affected the efficiency of CZTSe. • The composition of CZTSe was automatically determined on a special tie line. • There were no structural differences between high- and low-efficiency samples. • Low-efficiency samples showed a higher carrier concentration.

  7. Removal of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE) in a composite membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Vercruyssen, Aline; Dewulf, Jo; Lens, Piet; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2012-01-01

    A membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was investigated for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) vapors inoculated by Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4. Toluene (TOL) was used as the primary substrate. The MBfR was loaded sequentially with TOL, TCE (or both) during 110 days. In this study, a maximum steady-state TCE removal efficiency of 23% and a maximum volumetric elimination capacity (EC) of 2.1 g m(-3) h(-1) was achieved. A surface area based maximum elimination capacity (EC(m)) of 4.2 × 10(-3) g m(-2) h(-1) was observed, which is 2-10 times higher than reported in other gas phase biological treatment studies. However, further research is needed to optimize the TCE feeding cycle and to evaluate the inhibiting effects of TCE and its intermediates on TOL biodegradation.

  8. Composition control of quinary GaInNAsSb alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Islam, Muhammad Monirul [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    In order to precisely control the composition of quinary GaInNAsSb alloy, we investigated the incorporation behavior of constituent atoms during atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxial growth. The nitrogen (N) composition, in comparison of GaNAs and GaNAsSb, increased by the supply of antimony (Sb). However, addition of indium (In) decreases the N composition during Sb mediated growth of GaInNAsSb, which enables obtaining the same N composition when an adequate In composition is chosen. It was revealed that Sb incorporation was increased when (i) In composition decreased, (ii) Sb flux increased, (iii) growth temperature decreased, and (iv) growth rate increased. These results are thought to be related to the effect of competitive role among strain, coverage, desorption, and segregation. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Design of step composition gradient thin film transistor channel layers grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Cheol Hyoun; Hee Kim, So; Gu Yun, Myeong; Koun Cho, Hyung

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we proposed the artificially designed channel structure in oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) called a "step-composition gradient channel." We demonstrated Al step-composition gradient Al-Zn-O (AZO) channel structures consisting of three AZO layers with different Al contents. The effects of stacking sequence in the step-composition gradient channel on performance and electrical stability of bottom-gate TFT devices were investigated with two channels of inverse stacking order (ascending/descending step-composition). The TFT with ascending step-composition channel structure (5 → 10 → 14 at. % Al composition) showed relatively negative threshold voltage (-3.7 V) and good instability characteristics with a reduced threshold voltage shift ( Δ 1.4 V), which was related to the alignment of the conduction band off-set within the channel layer depending on the Al contents. Finally, the reduced Al composition in the initial layer of ascending step-composition channel resulted in the best field effect mobility of 4.5 cm2/V s. We presented a unique active layer of the "step-composition gradient channel" in the oxide TFTs and explained the mechanism of adequate channel design.

  10. Preparation of Polyester-Based Metal-Cross Linked Polymeric Composites as Novel Materials Resistant to Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem O. Taha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms constitute an extremely resistant form of bacterial colonization with dire health and economical implications. Towards achieving polymeric composites capable of resisting bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, we prepared five 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylate-based polyesters employing five different diol monomers. The resulting polyesters were complexed with copper (II or silver (I. The new polymers were characterized by proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, inherent viscosity, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The corresponding metal complexes were characterized by differential scanning calorimery and infrared spectroscopy. The amounts of complexed copper and silver were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Finally, the resulting composites were tested for their antibacterial potential and were found to effectively resist bacterial attachment and growth.

  11. Critical review on biofilm methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Joana; F. Azevedo, Nuno; Briandet, Romain;

    2017-01-01

    into the formation and elimination of biofilms is important for many disciplines. Several new methodologies have been recently developed for, or adapted to, biofilm studies that have contributed to deeper knowledge on biofilm physiology, structure and composition. In this review, traditional and cutting-edge methods...... to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages...... and limitations of several methods. Accordingly, this review aims at helping scientists in finding the most appropriate and up-to-date methods to study their biofilms....

  12. Critical review on biofilm methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Joana; F. Azevedo, Nuno; Briandet, Romain;

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are widespread in nature and constitute an important strategy implemented by microorganisms to survive in sometimes harsh environmental conditions. They can be beneficial or have a negative impact particularly when formed in industrial settings or on medical devices. As such, research...... into the formation and elimination of biofilms is important for many disciplines. Several new methodologies have been recently developed for, or adapted to, biofilm studies that have contributed to deeper knowledge on biofilm physiology, structure and composition. In this review, traditional and cutting-edge methods...... to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages...

  13. Effect of organic carbon on nitrification efficiency and community composition of nitrifying biofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jie; LI Daping; LIU Qiang; TAO Yong; HE Xiaohong; WANG Xiaomei; LI Xudong; GAO Ping

    2009-01-01

    The effects of organic carbon/inorganic nitrogen (C/N) ratio on the nitrification processes and the community shifts of nitrifying biofilms were investigated by kinetic comparison and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The results showed that the nitrification rate decreased with an increasing organic concentration. However, the effect became weak when the carbon concentration reached sufficiently high level. Denitrification was detected after organic carbon was added. The 12 h ammonium removal rate ranged from 85% to 30% at C/N = 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 compare to control (C/N = 0). The loss of nitrogen at C/N = 0.5, 1, 2, 4, (8 and 16 was 31%, 18%, 24%, 65%, 59% and 62% respectively, after 24 h. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the dominant populations changed from nitrifying bacteria (Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter sp.) to denitrifying bacteria (Pseudomonas sp., Acidovorax sp. and Comamonas sp.) with C/N ratio increase. Although at high C/N ratio the denitrifying bacteria were the dominant populations, nitrifying bacteria grew simultaneously. Conrrespondingly, nitrification process coexisted with denitrification.

  14. Baccharis dracunculifolia-based mouthrinse alters the exopolysaccharide structure in cariogenic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Carolina P; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Santana-Filho, Arquimedes P; Spadaro, Augusto C C; Cury, Jaime A

    2016-03-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia is a native plant from Brazil with antimicrobial activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a B. dracunculifolia-based mouthrinse (Bd) changes the structure of insoluble exopolysaccharides (IEPS) in Streptococcus mutans UA159 cariogenic biofilm. Biofilms were grown on glass slides and treated with Bd, its vehicle (VC), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), or saline solution (NaCl). Among the treatments, only CHX significantly reduced the biofilm biomass and bacterial viability (pIEPS from the four biofilm samples were α- glucans containing different proportions of (1→6) and (1→3) glycosidic linkages. The structural differences among the four IEPS were compared by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA analysis indicated that IEPS from VC- and NaCl-treated biofilms were structurally similar to each other. Compared with the control, IEPS from Bd- and CHX-treated biofilms were structurally different and had distinct chemical profiles. In summary, the fact that Bd changed the IEPS chemical composition indicates that this mouthrinse may affect the cariogenic properties of the S. mutans biofilm formed.

  15. Evaluation of microbial biofilm communities from an Alberta oil sands tailings pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golby, Susanne; Ceri, Howard; Gieg, Lisa M; Chatterjee, Indranil; Marques, Lyriam L R; Turner, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    Bitumen extraction from the oil sands of Alberta has resulted in millions of cubic meters of waste stored on-site in tailings ponds. Unique microbial ecology is expected in these ponds, which may be key to their bioremediation potential. We considered that direct culturing of microbes from a tailings sample as biofilms could lead to the recovery of microbial communities that provide good representation of the ecology of the tailings. Culturing of mixed species biofilms in vitro using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) under aerobic, microaerobic, and anaerobic growth conditions was successful both with and without the addition of various growth nutrients. Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene pyrotag sequencing revealed that unique mixed biofilm communities were recovered under each incubation condition, with the dominant species belonging to Pseudomonas, Thauera, Hydrogenophaga, Rhodoferax, and Acidovorax. This work used an approach that allowed organisms to grow as a biofilm directly from a sample collected of their environment, and the biofilms cultivated in vitro were representative of the endogenous environmental community. For the first time, representative environmental mixed species biofilms have been isolated and grown under laboratory conditions from an oil sands tailings pond environment and a description of their composition is provided.

  16. Terrestrial runoff controls the bacterial community composition of biofilms along a water quality gradient in the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Verena; Wild, Christian; Uthicke, Sven

    2012-11-01

    16S rRNA gene molecular analysis elucidated the spatiotemporal distribution of bacterial biofilm communities along a water quality gradient. Multivariate statistics indicated that terrestrial runoff, in particular dissolved organic carbon and chlorophyll a concentrations, induced shifts of specific bacterial communities between locations and seasons, suggesting microbial biofilms could be suitable bioindicators for water quality.

  17. Effects of Tween 80 on Growth and Biofilm Formation in Laboratory Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christina K.; Kjems, Jørgen; Mygind, Tina;

    2016-01-01

    the total biomass when S. aureus was grown as biofilms. In contrast, Tween 80 had no effect on batch cultures of L. monocytogenes, it slowed the growth rate of P fluorescens, and it led to formation of less biofilm by both L. monocytogenes and P fluorescens. Furthermore, Tween 80 lowered the antibacterial...... are applied in food matrixes that include emulsifiers. Furthermore, the species-specific effects on microbial growth suggests that Tween 80 in cosmetics and food products could affect the composition of skin and gut microbiota, and the effect of emulsifiers on the human microbiome should therefore be explored...

  18. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  19. Chemical composition of hazelnuts (Corylus avellana L.) grown in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, G P; McNeil, D L

    1998-05-01

    Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) samples were collected from all replications of six different cultivars of trees grown in an experimental orchard at Lincoln University. Five cultivars were originally imported from overseas, three from the USA and two from Europe, and one cultivar was selected locally. Representative samples of nuts were harvested from 12-year-old trees in autumn 1995. The total oil content of the hazelnuts ranged from 54.6 to 63.2% while the crude protein ranged from 14.3 to 18.2%. Dietary fibre ranged from 9.8 to 13.2% while the starch and free glucose content together made up no more than 5% of the remaining portion of the kernel. The amino acid content of the hazelnuts was similar between each cultivar and the pattern of essential amino acids was characteristic of a high quality protein.

  20. Complete genome sequence of the biofilm-forming Microbacterium sp. strain BH-3-3-3, isolated from conventional field-grown lettuce (Lactuca sativa) in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Merete Wiken; Brurberg, May Bente; Lysøe, Erik

    2017-03-01

    The genus Microbacterium contains bacteria that are ubiquitously distributed in various environments and includes plant-associated bacteria that are able to colonize tissue of agricultural crop plants. Here, we report the 3,508,491 bp complete genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. strain BH-3-3-3, isolated from conventionally grown lettuce (Lactuca sativa) from a field in Vestfold, Norway. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into NCBI GenBank under the accession CP017674.

  1. Enhancement of minority carrier lifetime of GaInP with lateral composition modulation structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. W.; Ravindran, Sooraj; Kang, S. J.; Hwang, H. Y.; Jho, Y. D. [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. Y. [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Y. R.; Kim, B. J. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. T., E-mail: ytlee@gist.ac.kr [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-28

    We report the enhancement of the minority carrier lifetime of GaInP with a lateral composition modulated (LCM) structure grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The structural and optical properties of the grown samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence, which reveal the formation of vertically aligned bright and dark slabs corresponding to Ga-rich and In-rich GaInP regions, respectively, with good crystal quality. With the decrease of V/III ratio during LCM GaInP growth, it is seen that the band gap of LCM GaInP is reduced, while the PL intensity remains high and is comparable to that of bulk GaInP. We also investigate the minority carrier lifetime of LCM structures made with different flux ratios. It is found that the minority carrier lifetime of LCM GaInP is ∼37 times larger than that of bulk GaInP material, due to the spatial separation of electrons and holes by In-rich and Ga-rich regions of the LCM GaInP, respectively. We further demonstrate that the minority carrier lifetime of the grown LCM GaInP structures can easily be tuned by simply adjusting the V/III flux ratio during MBE growth, providing a simple yet powerful technique to tailor the electrical and optical properties at will. The exceptionally high carrier lifetime and the reduced band gap of LCM GaInP make them a highly attractive candidate for forming the top cell of multi-junction solar cells and can enhance their efficiency, and also make them suitable for other optoelectronics devices, such as photodetectors, where longer carrier lifetime is beneficial.

  2. Effect of annealing on composition, structure and electrical properties of Au layers grown on different thickness Cr layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Huang; Hong Qiu; Liqing Pan; Yue Tian; Fengping Wang; Ping Wu

    2004-01-01

    110 nm-thick Au layers were sputter-deposited on unheated glasses coated about a 10 nm-thick and a 50 nm-thick Cr layer respectively. The Au/Cr bilayer films were annealed in a vacuum of 1 mPa at 300℃ for 2, 5 and 30 min, respectively. Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to analyze the composition and structure of the Au layers. The resistivity of the bilayer films was measured by using four-point probe technique. The adhesion of the bilayer films to the substrate was tested using tape tests. The amount of Cr atoms diffusing into the Au layer increases with increasing the annealing time, resulting in a decrease in lattice constant and an increase in resistivity of the Au layer. The content of Cr inside the Au layer grown on the thinner Cr layer is less than that grown on the thicker Cr layer. For the Au/Cr bilayer films, the lower resistivity and the good adhesion to the glass substrate can be obtained at a shorter annealing time for a thinner Cr layer.

  3. Compositional variability in conventional and glyphosate-tolerant soybean (Glycine max L.) varieties grown in different regions in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Berman, Kristina H; Breeze, Matthew L; Nemeth, Margaret A; Oliveira, Wladecir S; Braga, Daniella P V; Berger, Geraldo U; Harrigan, George G

    2011-11-09

    The compositions of a diverse range of commercially available conventional and genetically modified (GM; glyphosate-tolerant) soybean varieties from maturity groups 8 and 5, respectively, grown in the northern and southern soybean regions of Brazil during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 growing seasons were compared. Compositional analyses included measurement of essential macro- and micronutrients, antinutrients, and selected secondary metabolites in harvested seed as well as measurement of proximates in both forage and harvested seed. Statistical comparisons utilized a mixed analysis of variance model to evaluate the relative contributions of growing season, soybean growing region, production site, phenotype (GM or conventional), and variety. The study highlighted extensive variability in the overall data set particularly for components such as fatty acids, vitamin E, and isoflavones. There were few differences between the GM and non-GM populations, and most of the variability in the data set could be attributed to regional and variety differences. Overall, the results were consistent with the expanding literature on the lack of any meaningful impact of transgene insertion on crop composition.

  4. Characterization of MBE-grown InAlN/GaN heterostructure valence band offsets with varying In composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Wenyuan, E-mail: wyjiaonju@gmail.com; Kong, Wei; Li, Jincheng; Kim, Tong-Ho; Brown, April S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708 (United States); Collar, Kristen [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708 (United States); Losurdo, Maria [CNR-NANOTEC, Istituto di Nanotecnologia, via Orabona, 4-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used in this work to experimentally determine the valence band offsets of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown InAlN/GaN heterostructures with varying indium composition. We find that the internal electric field resulting from polarization must be taken into account when analyzing the XPS data. Valence band offsets of 0.12 eV for In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N, 0.15 eV for In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N, and 0.23 eV for In{sub 0.098}Al{sub 0.902}N with GaN are obtained. The results show that a compositional-depended bowing parameter is needed in order to estimate the valence band energies of InAlN as a function of composition in relation to those of the binary endpoints, AlN and InN.

  5. Enzymatic cleaning of biofouled thin-film composite reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operated in a biofilm membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohiuddin; Danielsen, Steffen; Johansen, Katja; Lorenz, Lindsey; Nelson, Sara; Camper, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Application of environmentally friendly enzymes to remove thin-film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis (RO) membrane biofoulants without changing the physico-chemical properties of the RO surface is a challenging and new concept. Eight enzymes from Novozyme A/S were tested using a commercially available biofouling-resistant TFC polyamide RO membrane (BW30, FilmTech Corporation, Dow Chemical Co.) without filtration in a rotating disk reactor system operated for 58 days. At the end of the operation, the accumulated biofoulants on the TFC RO surfaces were treated with the three best enzymes, Subtilisin protease and lipase; dextranase; and polygalacturonase (PG) based enzymes, at neutral pH (~7) and doses of 50, 100, and 150 ppm. Contact times were 18 and 36 h. Live/dead staining, epifluorescence microscopy measurements, and 5 μm thick cryo-sections of enzyme and physically treated biofouled membranes revealed that Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzymes at 100 ppm and 18 h contact time were optimal for removing most of the cells and proteins from the RO surface. Culturable cells inside the biofilm declined by more than five logs even at the lower dose (50 ppm) and shorter incubation period (18 h). Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme cleaning at 100 ppm and for 18 h contact time restored the hydrophobicity of the TFC RO surface to its virgin condition while physical cleaning alone resulted in a 50° increase in hydrophobicity. Moreover, at this optimum working condition, the Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme treatment of biofouled RO surface also restored the surface roughness measured with atomic force microscopy and the mass percentage of the chemical compositions on the TFC surface estimated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to its virgin condition. This novel study will encourage the further development and application of enzymes to remove biofoulants on the RO surface without changing its surface properties.

  6. Seasonal Variation of Essential Oil Yield and Composition of Sage (Salvia officinalis L. Grown in Castilla - La Mancha (Central Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. ARRAIZA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Links between phenology, yield and composition of the essential oil of common sage, Salvia officinalis L., grown in Guadalajara (Central Spain were determined in the different phases of the biological cycle during one year. Data showed an average yield about 1.0%. The analysis of the oil components was carried out by GC-FID and GC/MS. The main oil constituent was alpha thujone (40.1-46.5%. Other identified compounds are beta pinene (2.6-4.5%, cineole (3.5-8.7%, beta thujone (4.1-5.6%, camphor (4.1-8.0%, borneol (1.3-3.7%, alpha humulene (3.8-7.3%, viridiflorol (3.4-12.6% and manool (0.1-4.5%. The highest yield of oil was obtained in the period of full flowering and the highest concentration of alpha thujone in the period of initial flowering.

  7. Robust optical properties of sandwiched lateral composition modulation GaInP structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwangwook; Kang, Seokjin; Ravindran, Sooraj; Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Jho, Young-Dahl; Lee, Yong Tak

    2016-12-26

    Double-hetero structure lateral composition modulated (LCM) GaInP and sandwiched LCM GaInP having the same active layer thickness were grown and their optical properties were compared. Sandwiched LCM GaInP showed robust optical properties due to periodic potential nature of the LCM structure, and the periodicity was undistorted even for thickness far beyond the critical layer thickness. A thick LCM GaInP structure with undistorted potential that could preserve the properties of native LCM structure was possible by stacking thin LCM GaInP structures interspaced with strain compensating GaInP layers. The sandwiched structure could be beneficial in realizing the LCM structure embedded high efficiency solar cells.

  8. Compositional variations in In(0.5)Ga(0.5)N nanorods grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherns, D; Webster, R F; Novikov, S V; Foxon, C T; Fischer, A M; Ponce, F A; Haigh, S J

    2014-05-30

    The composition of InxGa1 - xN nanorods grown by molecular beam epitaxy with nominal x = 0.5 has been mapped by electron microscopy using Z-contrast imaging and x-ray microanalysis. This shows a coherent and highly strained core-shell structure with a near-atomically sharp boundary between a Ga-rich shell (x ∼ 0.3) and an In-rich core (x ∼ 0.7), which itself has In- and Ga-rich platelets alternating along the growth axis. It is proposed that the shell and core regions are lateral and vertical growth sectors, with the core structure determined by spinodal decomposition.

  9. Compositional dependence of Raman scattering and photoluminescence emission in Cu-Ga-Se films grown by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossberg, M., E-mail: mgross@staff.ttu.e [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krustok, J. [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Siebentritt, S. [Universite du Luxembourg, 162a avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Albert, J. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) analysis of polycrystalline Cu-Ga-Se films grown epitaxially on the GaAs substrate. In the compositional dependence of the Raman spectra of the CuGaSe{sub 2} films, the appearance of the ordered vacancy compounds (OVCs) CuGa{sub 3}Se{sub 5} and CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 8} was observed. The dominating A{sub 1} Raman modes were detected at 185, 166 and 159 cm{sup -1}, respectively. The PL bands of CuGaSe{sub 2}, CuGa{sub 3}Se{sub 5} and CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 8} at T=10 K were detected at 1.615, 1.72 and 1.76 eV, respectively. The dominating PL emission channel is the band-to-tail (BT) type recombination.

  10. Kinetics of nitrification in a fixed biofilm reactor using dewatered sludge-fly ash composite ceramic particle as a supporting medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mong-Chuan; Lin, Yen-Hui; Yu, Huang-Wei

    2014-11-01

    A mathematical model system was derived to describe the kinetics of ammonium nitrification in a fixed biofilm reactor using dewatered sludge-fly ash composite ceramic particle as a supporting medium. The model incorporates diffusive mass transport and Monod kinetics. The model was solved using a combination of the orthogonal collocation method and Gear's method. A batch test was conducted to observe the nitrification of ammonium-nitrogen ([Formula: see text]-N) and the growth of nitrifying biomass. The compositions of nitrifying bacterial community in the batch kinetic test were analyzed using PCR-DGGE method. The experimental results show that the most staining intensity abundance of bands occurred on day 2.75 with the highest biomass concentration of 46.5 mg/L. Chemostat kinetic tests were performed independently to evaluate the biokinetic parameters used in the model prediction. In the column test, the removal efficiency of [Formula: see text]-N was approximately 96 % while the concentration of suspended nitrifying biomass was approximately 16 mg VSS/L and model-predicted biofilm thickness reached up to 0.21 cm in the steady state. The profiles of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of different microbial communities demonstrated that indigenous nitrifying bacteria (Nitrospira and Nitrobacter) existed and were the dominant species in the fixed biofilm process.

  11. The effect of chemotherapeutic agents on titanium-adherent biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ntrouka, V.; Hoogenkamp, M.; Zaura, E.; van der Weijden, F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of different chemotherapeutic agents on biofilm-contaminated titanium surfaces. Material and methods: This study used a recently described biofilm model. In experiment 1, Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown on titanium discs were treated with (1) EDTA, (2) citr

  12. Composition, ileal amino acid digestibility and nutritive value of organically grown legume seeds and conventional rapeseed cakes for pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PARTANEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight white-flowered pea (Pisum sativum and two white-flowered field bean (Vicia faba cultivars grown organically were analysed for proximate composition and amino acid content. In vivo ileal amino acid digestibilities and faecal energy digestibility were predicted from the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of nitrogen and organic matter, respectively. The crude protein (CP content of the pea and field bean cultivars ranged from 244 to 279 and from 320 to 347 g/kg dry matter (DM, respectively. The concentrations of several essential amino acids in protein decreased as the CP content increased. In peas, predicted in vivo digestibilities did not correlate with chemical composition, and in field beans were lower than in peas. A digestibility trial was carried out on six cannulated barrows according to a 6 ´ 5 cyclic change-over design to determine the faecal and ileal nutrient digestibilities of organically grown leafed peas (cv. Sohvi, 199 g CP/kg DM, semileafless peas (cv. Karita, 240 g CP/kg DM, field beans (cv. Kontu, 320 g CP/kg DM, narrow-leafed lupins (Lupinus angustifolius cv. Pershatsvet, 220 g CP/kg DM, and conventional warm- and cold-pressed rapeseed cakes (360 and 313 g CP/kg DM, respectively. The net energy contents of the leafed and semileafed peas, field beans, lupins, and cold- and warm-pressed rape seed cakes were 10.8, 11.2, 9.8, 9.7, 9.4 and 12.3 MJ/kg DM, respectively. The apparent ileal digestibilities of lysine and threonine were similar, but the digestibility of methionine was poor in all legume seeds. Cystine digestibility was highest in lupins and lowest in field beans. With the exception of phenylalanine, there was no difference in apparent ileal amino acid digestibilities between rapeseed cakes.;

  13. Permeabilizing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas,; Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  14. Density functional theory predictions of the composition of atomic layer deposition-grown ternary oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ciaran; Elliott, Simon D

    2013-05-01

    The surface reactivity of various metal precursors with different alkoxide, amide, and alkyl ligands during the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ternary oxides was determined using simplified theoretical models. Quantum chemical estimations of the Brønsted reactivity of a metal complex precursor at a hydroxylated surface are made using a gas-phase hydrolysis model. The geometry optimized structures and energies for a large suite of 17 metal precursors (including cations of Mg, Ca, Sr, Sc, Y, La, Ti, Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Al, and Ga) with five different anionic ligands (conjugate bases of tert-butanol, tetramethyl heptanedione, dimethyl amine, isopropyl amidine, and methane) and the corresponding hydrolyzed complexes are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) methods. The theoretically computed energies are used to determine the energetics of the model reactions. These DFT models of hydrolysis are used to successfully explain the reactivity and resulting stoichiometry in terms of metal cation ratios seen experimentally for a variety of ALD-grown ternary oxide systems.

  15. Critical review on biofilm methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Joana; F. Azevedo, Nuno; Briandet, Romain

    2017-01-01

    to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages...

  16. Essential oil composition of two myrtus communis L. varieties grown in North Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidi Wannes, Wissem; Mhamdi, Baya; Marzouk, Brahim

    2007-06-01

    Two Myrtus communis varieties (var. italica and baetica) were studied in order to investigate their essential oil yield and composition. Essential oil yield varied in leaves, fruits and stems. So, in leaves, it was 0.5% for italica and 0.3% for baetica and was higher than in fruits and stems with respectively 0.1% and 0.04% for italica and 0.07% and 0.03% for baetica. The essential oil analysis performed by GC and GC/MS showed a composition characterized by a high percentage of monoterpene hydrocarbons in leaves, largely due to alpha-pinene with 51.3% for italica and 27.7% for baetica; 1,8-cineole, the alone compound of ether class, was predominant in fruits and stems with respectively 31.6% and 34.7% for italica and 19.8% and 25.8% for baetica.

  17. Physiochemical analysis and centesimal composition of Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom grown in residues from the Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceci Sales-Campos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to evaluate the nutritional composition of mushrooms produced in alternative substrates in agricultural and agro-industrial residues from the Amazon. C, N, pH, moisture, soluble solids, protein, lipids, total fibers, ashes, carbohydrates and energy were determined. Substrates were formulated from Simarouba amara Aubl. and Ochroma piramidale Cav. ex. Lam. Sawdust and from Bactris gasipaes Kunth and Saccharum officinarum stipe. Results showed that the nutritional composition of P. ostreatus varied according to the cultivation substrate and that it can be considered important food due to its nutritional characteristics such as: high protein content; metabolizable carbohydrates and fiber; and low lipids and calories contents.

  18. Essential oil composition of diploid and tetraploid clones of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) grown in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmuth, Hans; Smith, Mike K; Brooks, Lyndon O; Myers, Stephen P; Leach, David N

    2006-02-22

    Ginger oil, obtained by steam distillation of the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe, is used in the beverage and fragrance industries. Ginger oil displays considerable compositional diversity, but is typically characterized by a high content of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, including zingiberene, ar-curcumene, beta-bisabolene, and beta-sesquiphellandrene. Australian ginger oil has a reputation for possessing a particular "lemony" aroma, due to its high content of the isomers neral and geranial, often collectively referred to as citral. Fresh rhizomes of 17 clones of Australian ginger, including commercial cultivars and experimental tetraploid clones, were steam distilled 7 weeks post-harvest, and the resulting oils were analyzed by GC-MS. The essential oils of 16 of the 17 clones, including the tetraploid clones and their parent cultivar, were found to be of substantially similar composition. These oils were characterized by very high citral levels (51-71%) and relatively low levels of the sesquiterpene hydrocarbons typical of ginger oil. The citral levels of most of these oils exceeded those previously reported for ginger oils. The neral-to-geranial ratio was shown to be remarkably constant (0.61 +/- 0.01) across all 17 clones. One clone, the cultivar "Jamaican", yielded oil with a substantially different composition, lower citral content and higher levels of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons. Because this cultivar also contains significantly higher concentrations of pungent gingerols, it possesses unique aroma and flavor characteristics, which should be of commercial interest.

  19. Layered spherical carbon composites with nanoparticles of different metals grown simultaneously inside and outside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaochun; Vongehr, Sascha; Meng, Xiangkang

    2012-03-01

    We report a general one-step route to place nanoparticles (NPs) of different noble metals controllably into interior or surface locations of submicron nanoporous carbon spheres (CSs). In particular, Pd and Au NPs can be easily put either inside or outside of the CSs by selecting these metals' differently charged precursor ions. Employing mixed precursor solutions, the method allows different metals to grow simultaneously yet selectively in the separate locations, thus resulting in composites with a complex layered structure, for example Pd or Au outside and Ag inside, Au or Pt outside and Pd inside, and other combinations. The synthesis is fast and needs no additional steps like a functionalization of surfaces. It crucially involves microwave heating, the power setting of which further influences the locations and sizes of the NPs especially in the interior of the amorphous carbon matrix. The three-dimensional composite structures are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersed x-ray spectroscopy combined with quantitative analysis by comparison with simulation. The UV-visible absorption of monometallic and layered composites is compared. The involved mechanisms leading to the selective decoration are discussed; important aspects being the charge of the precursor ions and selective microwave absorption.

  20. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    -overproducing (mucA22) and alginate-defective (algD) variants in order to discern the role of alginate in biofilm formation. These strains, PAO1, Alg(+) PAOmucA22 and Alg(-) PAOalgD, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were grown in a continuous flow cell system to characterize the developmental cycles...... of their biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...

  1. New Dimensions of Moving Bed Biofilm Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Piculell, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) is a biological wastewater treatment process in which microorganisms grow as biofilms on suspended carriers. Conventionally, MBBRs are mainly designed and optimized based on the carrier surface area, neglecting the dynamic relationship between carrier design, reactor operation and biofilm characteristics, such as biofilm thickness and the composition of the microbial community. The purpose of this research project was to learn more about the roles of the ...

  2. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  3. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisia J Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  4. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  5. Chemical composition and nutritive value of hot pepper seed (Capsicum annuum grown in Northeast Region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu ZOU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition and nutritive value of hot pepper seeds (Capsicum annuum grown in Northeast Region of China were investigated. The proximate analysis showed that moisture, ash, crude fat, crude protein and total dietary fiber contents were 4.48, 4.94, 23.65, 21.29 and 38.76 g/100 g, respectively. The main amino acids were glutamic acid and aspartic acid (above 2 g/100 g, followed by histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, arginine, cysteine, leucine, tryptophan, serine, glycine, methionine, threonine and tyrosine (0.8-2 g/100 g. The contents of proline, alanine, valine and isoleucine were less than 0.8 g/100 g. The fatty acid profile showed that linoleic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid and linolenic acid (above 0.55 g/100 g as the most abundant fatty acids followed lauric acid, arachidic acid, gondoic acid and behenic acid (0.03-0.15 g/100 g. Analyses of mineral content indicated that the most abundant mineral was potassium, followed by magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, sodium and manganese. The nutritional composition of hot pepper seeds suggested that they could be regarded as good sources of food ingredients and as new sources of edible oils.

  6. High compositional homogeneity of CdTexSe1−x crystals grown by the Bridgman method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. N. Roy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We obtained high-quality CdTexSe1−x (CdTeSe crystals from ingots grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. The compositional uniformity of the ingots was evaluated by X-ray fluorescence at BNL’s National Synchrotron Light Source X27A beam line. The compositional homogeneity was highly uniform throughout the ingot, and the effective segregation coefficient of Se was ∼1.0. This high uniformity offers potential opportunity to enhance the yield of the materials for both infrared substrate and radiation-detector applications, so greatly lowering the cost of production and also offering us the prospect to grow large-diameter ingots for use as large-area substrates and for producing higher efficiency gamma-ray detectors. The concentration of secondary phases was found to be much lower, by eight- to ten fold compared to that of conventional CdxZn1−xTe (CdZnTe or CZT.

  7. Achieving Uniform Carriers Distribution in MBE Grown Compositionally Graded InGaN Multiple-Quantum-Well LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2015-05-06

    We investigated the design and growth of compositionally-graded InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQW) based light-emitting diode (LED) without an electron-blocking layer (EBL). Numerical investigation showed uniform carrier distribution in the active region, and higher radiative recombination rate for the optimized graded-MQW design, i.e. In0→xGa1→(1-x)N / InxGa(1-x)N / Inx→0Ga(1-x)→1N, as compared to the conventional stepped-MQW-LED. The composition-grading schemes, such as linear, parabolic, and Fermi-function profiles were numerically investigated for comparison. The stepped- and graded-MQW-LED were then grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) through surface-stoichiometry optimization based on reflection high-energy electron-diffraction (RHEED) in-situ observations. Stepped- and graded-MQW-LED showed efficiency roll over at 160 A/cm2 and 275 A/cm2, respectively. The extended threshold current density roll-over (droop) in graded-MQW-LED is due to the improvement in carrier uniformity and radiative recombination rate, consistent with the numerical simulation.

  8. Growth, photosynthetic efficiency, and biochemical composition of Tetraselmis suecica F&M-M33 grown with LEDs of different colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiusi, Fabian; Sampietro, Giacomo; Marturano, Giovanni; Biondi, Natascia; Rodolfi, Liliana; D'Ottavio, Massimo; Tredici, Mario R

    2014-05-01

    The effect of light quality on cell size and cell cycle, growth rate, productivity, photosynthetic efficiency and biomass composition of the marine prasinophyte Tetraselmis suecica F&M-M33 grown in 2-L flat panel photobioreactors illuminated with light emitting diodes (LEDs) of different colors was investigated. Biomass productivity and photosynthetic efficiency were comparable between white and red light, while under blue and green light productivity decreased to less than half and photosynthetic efficiency to about one third. Differences in cell size and number correlated with the cell cycle phase. Under red light cells were smaller and more motile. Chlorophyll content was strongly reduced with red and enhanced with blue light, while carotenoids and gross biomass composition were not affected by light quality. The eicosapentaenoic acid content increased under red light. Red light can substitute white light without affecting productivity of T. suecica F&M-M33, leading to smaller and more motile cells and increased eicosapentaenoic acid content. Red LEDs can thus be profitably used for the production of this microalga for aquaculture.

  9. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil of Launaea lanifera Pau grown in Algerian arid steppes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tarek Benmeddour; Hocine Laouer; Salah Akkal; Guido Flamini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the essential oil composition and the antibacterial activity of an Algerian endemic plant, Launaea lanifera Pau (L. lanifera), grown in arid steppe regions. Methods:L. lanifera essential oil was isolated from aerial parts by steam distillation and its chemical composition was evaluated by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector and gas chromatography with electron impact mass spectrometry. Furthermore, its in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacterial strains was tested following the agar disk diffusion method. Results: This species had a very low essential oil yield (0.005%). Twenty-four (92.6%) individual components were identified. The main constituents were hexahydrofarnesyl acetone (31.6%), (E)-β-ionone (8.5%), (E)-β-damascenone (7.0%), 2-methyltetradecane (3.8%), n-heptadecane (3.8%), limonene (2.8%) andβ-caryophyllene (2.8%). No noteworthy antimicrobial activity was observed on the tested bacteria, neither Gram negative nor Gram positive. Conclusions:This is the first report on the volatile constituents and antibacterial activity of L. lanifera. The studied essential oil does not possess significant activity against the tested microorganisms.

  10. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil of Launaea lanifera Pau grown in Algerian arid steppes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tarek; Benmeddour; Hocine; Laouer; Salah; Akkal; Guido; Flamini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the essential oil composition and the antibacterial activity of an Algerian endemic plant, Launaea lanifera Pau(L. lanifera), grown in arid steppe regions.Methods: L. lanifera essential oil was isolated from aerial parts by steam distillation and its chemical composition was evaluated by gas chromatographyflame ionization detector and gas chromatography with electron impact mass spectrometry. Furthermore, its in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacterial strains was tested following the agar disk diffusion method.Results: This species had a very low essential oil yield(0.005%). Twenty-four(92.6%)individual components were identified. The main constituents were hexahydrofarnesyl acetone(31.6%),(E)-b-ionone(8.5%),(E)-b-damascenone(7.0%), 2-methyltetradecane(3.8%), n-heptadecane(3.8%), limonene(2.8%) and b-caryophyllene(2.8%). No noteworthy antimicrobial activity was observed on the tested bacteria, neither Gram negative nor Gram positive.Conclusions: This is the first report on the volatile constituents and antibacterial activity of L. lanifera. The studied essential oil does not possess significant activity against the tested microorganisms.

  11. Effect of trellising system on grape and wine composition of Syrah vines grown in the cerrado region of Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Vieira da Mota

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the concept that the trellising system affects not only sunlight interception and carbon assimilation, but also the fruitzone microclimate, which has a great impact on fruit composition and consequently on wine quality, the effect of two trellising systems - Vertical Shoot Position (VSP and modified Geneva Double Curtain (GDC - on wine and berry composition of Syrah grapes grown in João Pinheiro, Northeast region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil was investigated. The parameters such as pH, berry size and weight, and seeds total phenolic contents were not affected by the training system. The GDC system produced fruits with the highest Brix and lowest titratable acidity. Berries from the VSP system presented lower anthocyanin concentration than those from the GDC system. Similar results were found for the total phenolic content of the skin of grape berries from the VSP system. GDC wines were characterized by high anthocyanin content and red color, resulting in wines with high color intensity. These data suggest that in the tropical region of Minas Gerais state, with high temperature and high sunlight intensity, the trellising system, which protects bunches against excessive radiation, should be chosen.

  12. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of green algae Scenedesmus obliquus grown in a constant cell density apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K. J.; Nakhost, Z.; Barzana, E.; Karel, M.

    1987-01-01

    The lipids of alga Scenedesmus obliquus grown under controlled conditions were separated and fractionated by column and thin-layer chromatography, and fatty acid composition of each lipid component was studied by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). Total lipids were 11.17%, and neutral lipid, glycolipid and phospholipid fractions were 7.24%, 2.45% and 1.48% on a dry weight basis, respectively. The major neutral lipids were diglycerides, triglycerides, free sterols, hydrocarbons and sterol esters. The glycolipids were: monogalactosyl diglyceride, digalactosyl diglyceride, esterified sterol glycoside, and sterol glycoside. The phospholipids included: phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Fourteen fatty acids were identified in the four lipid fractions by GLC. The main fatty acids were C18:2, C16:0, C18:3(alpha), C18:1, C16:3, C16:1, and C16:4. Total unsaturated fatty acid and essential fatty acid compositions of the total algal lipids were 80% and 38%, respectively.

  13. Evaluation of Fatty Acid and Amino Acid Compositions in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Grown in Different Geographical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokayya Sami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Okra has different uses as a food and a remedy in traditional medicine. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quite easy. Although seed oil yield is low (4.7%, since the linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67.5%, it can still be used as a source of (UNSAT unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, samples of okra grown in four different locations were analyzed to measure fatty acid and amino acid compositions. The content of the lipid extraction ranged from 4.34% to 4.52% on a dry weight basis. Quantitatively, the main okra fatty acids were palmitic acid (29.18–43.26%, linoleic acid (32.22–43.07%, linolenic acid (6.79–12.34%, stearic acid (6.36–7.73%, oleic acid (4.31–6.98%, arachidic acid (ND–3.48%, margaric acid (1.44–2.16%, pentadecylic acid (0.63–0.92%, and myristic acid (0.21–0.49%. Aspartic acid, proline, and glutamic acids were the main amino acids in okra pods, while cysteine and tyrosine were the minor amino acids. Statistical methods revealed how the fatty acid and amino acid contents in okra may be affected by the sampling location.

  14. Beneficial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara R Robertson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface-adherent biofilm growth is a common trait of bacteria and other microorganisms in nature. Within biofilms, organisms are present in high density and are enmeshed in an organic matrix containing polysaccharides and other molecules. The close proximity of organisms within biofilms facilitates microbial interactions and signaling, including many metabolic processes in which consortia rather than individual organisms participate. Biofilm growth also enables microorganisms to withstand chemical and biological stresses. Here, we review some current literature and document representative beneficial aspects of biofilms using examples from wastewater treatment, microbial fuel cells, biological repair (biocementation of stonework, and biofilm protection against Candida albicans infections. Finally, we address a chemical ecology strategy whereby desired microbial succession and beneficial biofilm formation can be encouraged via manipulation of culture conditions and bacterial signaling.

  15. Proximate composition, minerals and fatty acid composition of Juglans Regia L. genotypes and cultivars grown in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemile Yerlikaya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The proximate composition of eleven walnut (Juglans regia L. genotypes (28 ŞK 010, 28 ŞK 055, 28 ŞK 041, 28 ŞK 601, 28 ŞK 925, 28 ŞK 028, 28 ŞK 118, 28 ŞK 350, 28 ŞK 930, 28 ŞK 850, 28 ŞK 036 and three walnut cultivars (Şebin, Bilecik, Kaman 1 produced in Turkey were determined. The oil content of the samples ranged from 61.32 to 69.35%, corresponding to an energy value of approximately 710 kcal per 100 g of kernel. The protein content ranged from 10.58 to 18.19%, and the carbohydrate composition was between 9.05 and 18.92%. The ash content ranged from 1.53 to 1.99%, and the moisture content of the kernels was between 1.91 and 4.48% the oleic acid content of the oils ranged from 17.90 to 33.35% of the total fatty acids. The linoleic acid content ranged from 43.15 to 60.20%. The linolenic acid content ranged from 9.98 to 13.00%. The palmitic acid content was between 5.21 and 8.40%. Stearic acid ranged from 2.36 to 4.25%. Potassium was the major mineral in all the samples, ranging from 359.73 to 482.97 mg/100 g. Calcium was the next most abundant mineral, ranging from 109.45 to 335.97 mg/100 g, followed by magnesium, ranging from 126.01 to 165.15 mg/100 g.

  16. Surface morphology and composition studies in InGaN/GaN film grown by MOCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Tao; Han Ping; Shi Yi; Zheng Youdou; Zhang Zhao; Liu Lian; Su Hui; Xie Zili; Zhang Rong; Liu Bin; Xiu Xiangqian; Li Yi

    2011-01-01

    InGaN filmsweredepositedon(0001)sapphiresubstrates with GaN buffer layers under different growth temperatures by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.The In-composition of InGaN film was approximately controlled by changing the growth temperature.The connection between the growth temperature,In content,surface morphology and defect formation was obtained by X-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM).Meanwhile,by comparing the SEM and AFM surface morphology images,we proposed several models of three different defects and discussed the mechanism of formation.The prominent effect of higher growth temperature on the quality of the InGaN films and defect control were found by studying InGaN films at various growth temperatures.

  17. Coryneform bacteria in human semen: inter-assay variability in species composition detection and biofilm production ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silver Türk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coryneform bacteria constitute an important segment of male urogenital microbiota. They have been generally considered as saprophytes, although some species have been associated with prostatitis as well. At the same time, biofilm infections have been suspected as a cause of prostatitis. Objective: To identify a set of coryneform bacteria isolated from semen of either healthy men or prostatitis patients applying different methods to reveal inter-assay variability and to determine their ability of adhesion and biofilm production. Design: Coryneform bacteria were identified by API Coryne 2.0 biochemical identification system and 16S rDNA sequencing using different primer sets. Quantitative assessment of biofilm production was performed using crystal violet binding assay method. Results: The most common species were Corynebacterium seminale, C. minutissimum, and Dermabacter hominis. Altogether 14 species and related genera were found. We observed the best inter-assay agreement when identifying C. seminale. Biofilm was observed in 7 out of 24 strains. The biofilm-producing strains belonged to Arthrobacter cumminsii, Dermabacter hominis, C. minutissimum, and Actinomyces neuii. No differences were found between the strains originating from prostatitis patients and healthy men. Dermabacter hominis strains were more potent biofilm producers than C. seminale strains (p=0.048. Conclusions: We can conclude that a wide variety of coryneform bacteria can be found from the male genital tract, although their exact identification is problematic due to insufficient representation in databases. Nearly one third of the strains are able to form biofilm that may give them an advantage for surviving several host- and treatment-related conditions.

  18. Biogas crops grown in energy crop rotations: Linking chemical composition and methane production characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Christiane; Idler, Christine; Heiermann, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Methane production characteristics and chemical composition of 405 silages from 43 different crop species were examined using uniform laboratory methods, with the aim to characterise a wide range of crop feedstocks from energy crop rotations and to identify main parameters that influence biomass quality for biogas production. Methane formation was analysed from chopped and over 90 days ensiled crop biomass in batch anaerobic digestion tests without further pre-treatment. Lignin content of crop biomass was found to be the most significant explanatory variable for specific methane yields while the methane content and methane production rates were mainly affected by the content of nitrogen-free extracts and neutral detergent fibre, respectively. The accumulation of butyric acid and alcohols during the ensiling process had significant impact on specific methane yields and methane contents of crop silages. It is proposed that products of silage fermentation should be considered when evaluating crop silages for biogas production. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Volatile Composition of Essential Oils from Different Aromatic Herbs Grown in Mediterranean Regions of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein El-Zaeddi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Volatile composition of essential oils from dill, parsley, coriander, and mint were investigated at different harvest dates to determine the most suitable harvest time for each these herbs. Hydrodistillation (HD, using a Deryng system, was used for isolating the essential oils. Isolation and identification of the volatile compounds were performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS instrument. The results of gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID analysis (quantification showed that the main components in the essential oil of dill shoots were α-phellandrene, dill ether, and β-phellandrene, and the optimal harvest date was D2 (second harvest, fourth week of February 2015. For parsley shoots, the main compounds were 1,3,8-p-menthatriene, β-phellandrene, and P1 (first harvest, third week of November 2014 was the sample with the highest essential oil. For coriander, the main compounds were E-2-dodecenal, dodecanal, and octane and the highest contents were found at C2 (second harvest, 5 February 2015; while, the main two components of mint essential oil were carvone and limonene, and the highest contents were found at M1 (first harvest, second week of December 2014. The present study was the first one reporting data on descriptive sensory analysis of aromatic herbs at this optimal harvest date according to the content of volatile compounds of their essential oils.

  20. Electroactive mixed culture biofilms in microbial bioelectrochemical systems: the role of temperature for biofilm formation and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil A; Harnisch, Falk; Kapadnis, Balasaheb; Schröder, Uwe

    2010-10-15

    In this paper we investigate the temperature dependence and temperature limits of waste water derived anodic microbial biofilms. We demonstrate that these biofilms are active in a temperature range between 5°C and 45°C. Elevated temperatures during initial biofilm growth not only accelerate the biofilm formation process, they also influence the bioelectrocatalytic performance of these biofilms when measured at identical operation temperatures. For example, the time required for biofilm formation decreases from above 40 days at 15°C to 3.5 days at 35°C. Biofilms grown at elevated temperatures are more electrochemically active at these temperatures than those grown at lower incubation temperature. Thus, at 30°C current densities of 520 μA cm(-2) and 881 μA cm(-2) are achieved by biofilms grown at 22°C and 35°C, respectively. Vice versa, and of great practical relevance for waste water treatment plants in areas of moderate climate, at low operation temperatures, biofilms grown at lower temperatures outperform those grown at higher temperatures. We further demonstrate that all biofilms possess similar lower (0°C) and upper (50°C) temperature limits--defining the operational limits of a respective microbial fuel cell or microbial biosensor--as well as similar electrochemical electron transfer characteristics.

  1. Antibacterial activity of Baccharis dracunculifolia in planktonic cultures and biofilms of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cristiane A; Costa, Anna Carolina B Pereira; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane S; Rego, Marcos A; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is an important cariogenic microorganism, and alternative methods for its elimination are required. Different concentrations of Baccharis dracunculifolia essential oil (EO) were tested to determine its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in planktonic cultures, and this concentration was used in S. mutans biofilms. Additionally, we assessed the effect of a 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) and saline solution in S. mutans biofilms. The biofilms were grown in discs of composite resin for 48h and exposed to B. dracunculifolia, CHX or saline solution for 5min. The viability of the biofilms was determined by counting the colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml) in agar, which was statistically significant (P<0.05). The MIC of the B. dracunculifolia EO to planktonic growth of S. mutans was 6%. In biofilms of S. mutans clinical isolates, B. dracunculifolia EO (6%) and CHX resulted in reductions of 53.3-91.1% and 79.1-96.6%, respectively. For the biofilm formed by the S. mutans reference strain, the reductions achieved with B. dracunculifolia EO and CHX were, respectively, 39.3% and 88.1%. It was concluded that B. dracunculifolia EO showed antibacterial activity and was able to control this oral microorganism, which otherwise causes dental caries.

  2. NUTRITIONAL COMPOSITION AND EFFECTIVE DEGRADABILITY OF FOUR FORAGE TREES GROWN FOR PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. GUSHA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and ruminal degradability of dry matter (DM and nitrogen (N of four browse legumes (Gliricidia sepium, C. calothyrsus, A. angustissima and Leucaena. pallida were evaluated. The in sacco degradability of protein and DM of the four browse legumes were determined using four mature Friesian- Holstein rumen-cannulated steers (440=20kg live weight. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the browse legumes using the nylon bag technique. Nylon bags with 3g samples of dried ground legumes (3mm screen were incubated in the rumen. The incubation times were 0, 6, 12, 48, 72 and 120 hours in four cannulated Friesian- Holstein steers. The browse legumes were analysed for nutritive value in terms of dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, acid detergent fibre (ADF, neutral detergent fibre (NDF, Ash, condensed tannin (CT, calcium (Ca2+ and Phosphorus (P. Dry matter degradability was significantly different (P<0.05 and Gliricidia was highest, followed by L. pallida then A. angustissima and C. calothyrsus in descending order. Crude protein degradability was significantly (P<0.05 lower than that of DM and was highest in L. pallida, G. sepium, A. angustissima and finally C. calothyrsus at the bottom. Effective degradability of DM in the rumen of the steers was highest with G. sepium (880g/kg DM at rumen outflow rate of 0.02/h and least with C. calothyrsus (504g/kg DM (P<0.001. Effective degradability of nitrogen was highest with L. pallida (645g/kg DM at outflow rate of 0.02/h and least with C. calothyrsus (103g/kg DM (P<0.001. The degradability profiles of these browse indicated that they can be used as alternative protein supplements.

  3. Use of a high-throughput in vitro microfluidic system to develop oral multi-species biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarian, Derek S; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Luo, Ting L; Rickard, Alexander H

    2014-12-01

    There are few high-throughput in vitro systems which facilitate the development of multi-species biofilms that contain numerous species commonly detected within in vivo oral biofilms. Furthermore, a system that uses natural human saliva as the nutrient source, instead of artificial media, is particularly desirable in order to support the expression of cellular and biofilm-specific properties that mimic the in vivo communities. We describe a method for the development of multi-species oral biofilms that are comparable, with respect to species composition, to supragingival dental plaque, under conditions similar to the human oral cavity. Specifically, this methods article will describe how a commercially available microfluidic system can be adapted to facilitate the development of multi-species oral biofilms derived from and grown within pooled saliva. Furthermore, a description of how the system can be used in conjunction with a confocal laser scanning microscope to generate 3-D biofilm reconstructions for architectural and viability analyses will be presented. Given the broad diversity of microorganisms that grow within biofilms in the microfluidic system (including Streptococcus, Neisseria, Veillonella, Gemella, and Porphyromonas), a protocol will also be presented describing how to harvest the biofilm cells for further subculture or DNA extraction and analysis. The limits of both the microfluidic biofilm system and the current state-of-the-art data analyses will be addressed. Ultimately, it is envisioned that this article will provide a baseline technique that will improve the study of oral biofilms and aid in the development of additional technologies that can be integrated with the microfluidic platform.

  4. Evaluation of MBEC™‐HTP biofilm model for studies of implant associated infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coraça‐Hubér, Debora C; Fille, Manfred; Hausdorfer, Johann; Pfaller, Kristian; Nogler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    .... Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms were grown on MBEC™‐HTP. To ensure the biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out...

  5. Characterization of starvation-induced dispersion in Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Sternberg, Claus;

    2005-01-01

    that they must be able to regulate their ability to form biofilm and to dissolve biofilm. We present an investigation of a biofilm dissolution process occurring in flow-chamber-grown Pseudomonas putida biofilms. Local starvation-induced biofilm dissolution appears to be an integrated part of P. putida biofilm...... development that causes characteristic structural rearrangements. Rapid global dissolution of entire P. putida biofilms was shown to occur in response to carbon starvation. Genetic analysis suggested that the adjacent P. putida genes PP0164 and PP0165 play a role in P. putida biofilm formation and dissolution....... PP0164 encodes a putative periplasmic protein of previously unknown function, and PP0164 mutant bacteria are sticky, and unable to reduce their adhesiveness and dissolve their biofilm in response to carbon starvation. PP0165 encodes a putative transmembrane protein containing GGDEF and EAL domains...

  6. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  7. Defects, strain relaxation, and compositional grading in high indium content InGaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazioti, C.; Papadomanolaki, E.; Kehagias, Th.; Walther, T.; Smalc-Koziorowska, J.; Pavlidou, E.; Komninou, Ph.; Karakostas, Th.; Iliopoulos, E.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the structural properties of a series of high alloy content InGaN epilayers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, employing the deposition temperature as variable under invariant element fluxes. Using transmission electron microscopy methods, distinct strain relaxation modes were observed, depending on the indium content attained through temperature adjustment. At lower indium contents, strain relaxation by V-pit formation dominated, with concurrent formation of an indium-rich interfacial zone. With increasing indium content, this mechanism was gradually substituted by the introduction of a self-formed strained interfacial InGaN layer of lower indium content, as well as multiple intrinsic basal stacking faults and threading dislocations in the rest of the film. We show that this interfacial layer is not chemically abrupt and that major plastic strain relaxation through defect introduction commences upon reaching a critical indium concentration as a result of compositional pulling. Upon further increase of the indium content, this relaxation mode was again gradually succeeded by the increase in the density of misfit dislocations at the InGaN/GaN interface, leading eventually to the suppression of the strained InGaN layer and basal stacking faults.

  8. Chemical composition of glyphosate-tolerant soybean 40-3-2 grown in Europe remains equivalent with that of conventional soybean (Glycine max L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, George G; Ridley, William P; Riordan, Susan G; Nemeth, Margaret A; Sorbet, Roy; Trujillo, William A; Breeze, Matthew L; Schneider, Ronald W

    2007-07-25

    The composition of glyphosate-tolerant (Roundup Ready) soybean 40-3-2 was compared with that of conventional soybean grown in Romania in 2005 as part of a comparative safety assessment program. Samples were collected from replicated field trials, and compositional analyses were performed to measure proximates (moisture, fat, ash, protein, and carbohydrates by calculation), fiber, amino acids, fatty acids, isoflavones, raffinose, stachyose, phytic acid, trypsin inhibitor, and lectin in grain as well as proximates and fiber in forage. The mean values for all biochemical components assessed for Roundup Ready soybean 40-30-2 were similar to those of the conventional control and were within the published range observed for commercial soybean. The compositional profile of Roundup Ready soybean 40-3-2 was also compared to that of conventional soybean varieties grown in Romania by calculating a 99% tolerance interval to describe compositional variability in the population of traditional soybean varieties already on the marketplace. These comparisons, together with the history of the safe use of soybean as a common component of animal feed and human food, lead to the conclusion that Roundup Ready soybean 40-3-2 is compositionally equivalent to and as safe and nutritious as conventional soybean varieties grown commercially.

  9. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular polymers can facilitate the non-specific attachment of bacteria to surfaces and hold together developing biofilms. This study was undertaken to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the architecture of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 and its alginate......-overproducing (mucA22) and alginate-defective (algD) variants in order to discern the role of alginate in biofilm formation. These strains, PAO1, Alg(+) PAOmucA22 and Alg(-) PAOalgD, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were grown in a continuous flow cell system to characterize the developmental cycles...... of their biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...

  10. Vertical composition fluctuations in (Ga,In)(N,As) quantum wells grown on vicinal (1 1 1) B GaAs

    OpenAIRE

    Luna García de la Infanta, Esperanza; Trampert, Achim; Miguel-Sanchez, J.; Fernández González, Alvaro de Guzmán; Ploog, K.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we present a detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis of the interfacial structure and composition uniformity of (Ga,In)(N,As) quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy on vicinal GaAs(1 1 1)B substrates. Vertical composition fluctuations inside the (Ga,In)(N,As) quantum well are detected depending on the growth conditions, in particular the V/III flux ratio and the growth rate. This vertical composition fluctuation due to the phase separation tendency is in contra...

  11. Influence of MDPB-containing primer on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation in simulated Class I restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei; Fadini, Luigi; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Imazato, Satoshi; Pashley, David; Breschi, Lorenzo; Gagliani, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the activity of a methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB)-containing self-etching primer (Clearfil Protect Bond) against Streptococcus mutans and its ability to reduce biofilm formation on standardized experimental Class I restorations in vitro. Forty experimental Class I round restorations were prepared on enamel-dentin slabs using different adhesive strategies: group 1 = MDPB-containing adhesive system (Clearfil Protect Bond); group 2 = MDPB-free self-etching adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond); group 3: MDPB-containing self-etching primer in combination with a fluoride-free bonding agent; group 4: MDPB-free self-etching primer in combination with a fluoride-containing bonding agent; group 5: a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose). A Streptococcus mutans biofilm was grown for 48 h on the restoration surfaces and subsequently evaluated using scanning electron microscopy on three different areas: enamel, composite, and interface surfaces. Statistical analysis was performed by multiple ANOVA after data transformation. Specimens in groups 2, 4 and 5 showed greater biofilm formation than those in groups 1 and 3 (p composite, and interface areas). Specimens prepared with an MDPB-containing primer exhibited significant decreases in biofilm formation on Class I restorations in vitro. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are required to clarify the role of quaternary ammonium compounds in reducing bacterial biofilm formation on restoration surfaces.

  12. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-10-01

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions in a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.

  13. Studies on the biofilm produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in different metal fatty acid salt media and its application in biodegradation of fatty acids and bioremediation of heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abinaya Sindu, P; Gautam, Pennathur

    2017-01-01

    Metal fatty acid salts (MFAS) in untreated industrial effluents cause environmental pollution. The use of biocompatible agents for remediation may help in reducing the harm caused to the ambient aquatic organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that thrives under harsh conditions and is resistant to toxic metal ions. The present study shows a proof-of-concept of using this organism in the biodegradation of MFAS. MFAS were prepared and we studied their effect on the growth of the planktonic form and the formation of biofilm by P. aeruginosa. We observed biofilm formation in the presence of all the MFAS when used as the sole carbon source, albeit the quantity of biofilm formed in the presence of cadmium and copper was less. There was no effect on the planktonic form of the organism but the formation of biofilm increased in the presence of magnesium palmitate. This study shows that metal ions play a pivotal role in the formation of biofilm. HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) analysis of the biofilm polysaccharide showed that hexose sugar was a major component when compared with pentose sugar. The structure of biofilm polysaccharide and the coordination of the metal ion with the biofilm polysaccharide were confirmed by FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and Raman spectroscopy.

  14. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Janus, Marleen M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; de Soet, Johannes J.; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries. PMID:27997567

  15. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  16. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G induce biofilm formation by field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathroubi, S; Fontaine-Gosselin, S-È; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2015-09-30

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. This is a highly contagious disease that causes important economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Penicillins are extensively used in swine production and these antibiotics are associated with high systemic clearance and low oral bioavailability. This may expose A. pleuropneumoniae to sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G when the antibiotic is administered orally. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of penicillin G on the biofilm formation of A. pleuropneumoniae. Biofilm production of 13 field isolates from serotypes 1, 5a, 7 and 15 was tested in the presence of sub-MIC of penicillin G using a polystyrene microtiter plate assay. Using microscopy techniques and enzymatic digestion, biofilm architecture and composition were also characterized after exposure to sub-MIC of penicillin G. Sub-MIC of penicillin G significantly induced biofilm formation of nine isolates. The penicillin G-induced biofilms contained more poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA), extracellular DNA and proteins when compared to control biofilms grown without penicillin G. Additionally, penicillin G-induced biofilms were sensitive to DNase which was not observed with the untreated controls. Furthermore, sub-MIC of penicillin G up-regulated the expression of pgaA, which encodes a protein involved in PGA synthesis, and the genes encoding the envelope-stress sensing two-component regulatory system CpxRA. In conclusion, sub-MICs of penicillin G significantly induce biofilm formation and this is likely the result of a cell envelope stress sensed by the CpxRA system resulting in an increased production of PGA and other matrix components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic variation in yield and chemical composition of wide range of sorghum accessions grown in north-west China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.S.; Wang, M.L.; Spiertz, J.H.J.; Liu, Z.; Han, L.; Xie, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Sorghum can be grown on marginal and waste lands as a versatile feedstock for biofuel production in the vast areas of north-west China. Fifty-six sorghum accessions were grown in 2009 at the experimental station of Xinjiang Agricultural University, located at Urumchi, Xinjiang, China. A total of 31

  18. From Mouth to Model: Combining in vivo and in vitro Oral Biofilm Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Barbara; Santigli, Elisabeth; Westendorf, Christian; Tangl, Stefan; Wimmer, Gernot; Grube, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral biofilm studies based on simplified experimental setups are difficult to interpret. Models are limited mostly by the number of bacterial species observed and the insufficiency of artificial media. Few studies have attempted to overcome these limitations and to cultivate native oral biofilm. Aims: This study aimed to grow oral biofilm in vivo before transfer to a biofilm reactor for ex situ incubation. The in vitro survival of this oral biofilm and the changes in bacterial composition over time were observed. Methods: Six human enamel-dentin slabs embedded buccally in dental splints were used as biofilm carriers. Fitted individually to the upper jaw of 25 non-smoking male volunteers, the splints were worn continuously for 48 h. During this time, tooth-brushing and alcohol-consumption were not permitted. The biofilm was then transferred on slabs into a biofilm reactor and incubated there for 48 h while being nourished in BHI medium. Live/dead staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to observe bacterial survival over four points in time: directly after removal (T0) and after 1 (T1), 24 (T2), and 48 h (T3) of incubation. Bacterial diversity at T0 and T3 was compared with 454-pyrosequencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to show specific taxa. Survival curves were calculated with a specially designed MATLAB script. Acacia and QIIME 1.9.1 were used to process pyrosequencing data. SPSS 21.0 and R 3.3.1 were used for statistical analysis. Results: After initial fluctuations at T1, survival curves mostly showed approximation of the bacterial numbers to the initial level at T3. Pyrosequencing analysis resulted in 117 OTUs common to all samples. The genera Streptococcus and Veillonella (both Firmicutes) dominated at T0 and T3. They make up two thirds of the biofilm. Genera with lower relative abundance had grown significantly at T3. FISH analysis confirmed the pyrosequencing results, i.e., the predominant staining

  19. From Mouth to Model: Combining in vivo and in vitro Oral Biofilm Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Barbara; Santigli, Elisabeth; Westendorf, Christian; Tangl, Stefan; Wimmer, Gernot; Grube, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral biofilm studies based on simplified experimental setups are difficult to interpret. Models are limited mostly by the number of bacterial species observed and the insufficiency of artificial media. Few studies have attempted to overcome these limitations and to cultivate native oral biofilm. Aims: This study aimed to grow oral biofilm in vivo before transfer to a biofilm reactor for ex situ incubation. The in vitro survival of this oral biofilm and the changes in bacterial composition over time were observed. Methods: Six human enamel-dentin slabs embedded buccally in dental splints were used as biofilm carriers. Fitted individually to the upper jaw of 25 non-smoking male volunteers, the splints were worn continuously for 48 h. During this time, tooth-brushing and alcohol-consumption were not permitted. The biofilm was then transferred on slabs into a biofilm reactor and incubated there for 48 h while being nourished in BHI medium. Live/dead staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to observe bacterial survival over four points in time: directly after removal (T0) and after 1 (T1), 24 (T2), and 48 h (T3) of incubation. Bacterial diversity at T0 and T3 was compared with 454-pyrosequencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to show specific taxa. Survival curves were calculated with a specially designed MATLAB script. Acacia and QIIME 1.9.1 were used to process pyrosequencing data. SPSS 21.0 and R 3.3.1 were used for statistical analysis. Results: After initial fluctuations at T1, survival curves mostly showed approximation of the bacterial numbers to the initial level at T3. Pyrosequencing analysis resulted in 117 OTUs common to all samples. The genera Streptococcus and Veillonella (both Firmicutes) dominated at T0 and T3. They make up two thirds of the biofilm. Genera with lower relative abundance had grown significantly at T3. FISH analysis confirmed the pyrosequencing results, i.e., the predominant staining

  20. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm formation. A collectio

  1. Protocols to study the physiology of oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline; Koo, Hyun; Marquis, Robert E; Burne, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    The oral cavity harbors several hundred different bacterial species that colonize both hard (teeth) and soft tissues, forming complex populations known as microbial biofilms. It is widely accepted that the phenotypic characteristics of bacteria grown in biofilms are substantially different from those grown in suspensions. Because biofilms are the natural habitat for the great majority of oral bacteria, including those contributing to oral diseases, a better understanding of the physiology of adherent populations is clearly needed to control oral microbes in health and disease. In this chapter, we use oral streptococci as examples for studying the physiology of oral biofilms.

  2. Impact of Denture Cleaning Method and Overnight Storage Condition on Denture Biofilm Mass and Composition: A Cross-Over Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Duyck

    Full Text Available Appropriate oral hygiene is required to maintain oral health in denture wearers. This study aims to compare the role of denture cleaning methods in combination with overnight storage conditions on biofilm mass and composition on acrylic removable dentures.In a cross-over randomized controlled trial in 13 older people, 4 conditions with 2 different mechanical cleaning methods and 2 overnight storage conditions were considered: (i brushing and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, (ii brushing and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet, (iii ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, and (iv ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet. Each test condition was performed for 5 consecutive days, preceded by a 2-days wash-out period. Biofilm samples were taken at baseline (control and at the end of each test period from a standardized region. Total and individual levels of selected oral bacteria (n = 20, and of Candida albicans were identified using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR technique. Denture biofilm coverage was scored using an analogue denture plaque score. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used to compare the test conditions. The level of significance was set at α< 5%.Overnight denture storage in water with a cleansing tablet significantly reduced the total bacterial count (p<0.01. The difference in total bacterial level between the two mechanical cleaning methods was not statistically significant. No significant effect was observed on the amount of Candida albicans nor on the analogue plaque scores.The use of cleansing tablets during overnight denture storage in addition to mechanical denture cleaning did not affect Candida albicans count, but reduced the total bacterial count on acrylic removable dentures compared to overnight storage in water. This effect was more pronounced when combined with ultrasonic cleaning compared to brushing

  3. Subinhibitory concentrations of azithromycin decrease nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilm formation and Diminish established biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starner, Timothy D; Shrout, Joshua D; Parsek, Matthew R; Appelbaum, Peter C; Kim, GunHee

    2008-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) commonly causes otitis media, chronic bronchitis in emphysema, and early airway infections in cystic fibrosis. Long-term, low-dose azithromycin has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in chronic lung diseases, although the mechanism of action remains unclear. The inhibition of bacterial biofilms by azithromycin has been postulated to be one mechanism mediating these effects. We hypothesized that subinhibitory concentrations of azithromycin would affect NTHi biofilm formation. Laboratory strains of NTHi expressing green fluorescent protein and azithromycin-resistant clinical isolates were grown in flow-cell and static-culture biofilm models. Using a range of concentrations of azithromycin and gentamicin, we measured the degree to which these antibiotics inhibited biofilm formation and persistence. Large biofilms formed over 2 to 4 days in a flow cell, displaying complex structures, including towers and channels. Subinhibitory concentrations of azithromycin significantly decreased biomass and maximal thickness in both forming and established NTHi biofilms. In contrast, subinhibitory concentrations of gentamicin had no effect on biofilm formation. Furthermore, established NTHi biofilms became resistant to gentamicin at concentrations far above the MIC. Biofilm formation of highly resistant clinical NTHi isolates (azithromycin MIC of > 64 microg/ml) was similarly decreased at subinhibitory azithromycin concentrations. Clinically obtainable azithromycin concentrations inhibited biofilms in all but the most highly resistant isolates. These data show that subinhibitory concentrations of azithromycin have antibiofilm properties, provide mechanistic insights, and supply an additional rationale for the use of azithromycin in chronic biofilm infections involving H. influenzae.

  4. Role of biofilm roughness and hydrodynamic conditions in Legionella pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-04-07

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control L. pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections.

  5. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  6. Biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction or terminat......During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction...... or termination of biofilm matrix production via the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP. In between initiation and termination of biofilm formation we have defined specific biofilm stages, but the currently available evidence suggests that these transitions are mainly governed by adaptive responses......, and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  7. Microbial communities in bulk fluids and biofilms of an oil facility have similar composition but different structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Bradley S; Drilling, Heather S; Lawson, Paul A; Duncan, Kathleen E; Parisi, Victoria A; Suflita, Joseph M

    2011-04-01

    The oil-water-gas environments of oil production facilities harbour abundant and diverse microbial communities that can participate in deleterious processes such as biocorrosion. Several molecular methods, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA libraries, were used to characterize the microbial communities from an oil production facility on the Alaskan North Slope. The communities in produced water and a sample from a 'pig envelope' were compared in order to identify specific populations or communities associated with biocorrosion. The 'pigs' are used for physical mitigation of pipeline corrosion and fouling and the samples are enriched in surface-associated solids (i.e. paraffins, minerals and biofilm) and coincidentally, microorganisms (over 10(5) -fold). Throughout the oil production facility, bacteria were more abundant (10- to 150-fold) than archaea, with thermophilic members of the phyla Firmicutes (Thermoanaerobacter and Thermacetogenium) and Synergistes (Thermovirga) dominating the community. However, the structure (relative abundances of taxa) of the microbial community in the pig envelope was distinct due to the increased relative abundances of the genera Thermacetogenium and Thermovirga. The data presented here suggest that bulk fluid is representative of the biofilm communities associated with biocorrosion but that certain populations are more abundant in biofilms, which should be the focus of monitoring and mitigation strategies.

  8. A novel protein-repellent dental composite containing 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhang; Chen Chen; Mary AS Melo; Yu-Xing Bai; Lei Cheng; Hockin HK Xu

    2015-01-01

    Secondary caries due to biofilm acids is a primary cause of dental composite restoration failure. To date, there have been no reports of dental composites that can repel protein adsorption and inhibit bacteria attachment. The objectives of this study were to develop a protein-repellent dental composite by incorporating 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and to investigate for the first time the effects of MPC mass fraction on protein adsorption, bacteria attachment, biofilm growth, and mechanical properties. Composites were synthesized with 0 (control), 0.75%, 1.5%, 2.25%, 3%, 4.5%and 6%of MPC by mass. A commercial composite was also tested as a control. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. Protein adsorption onto the composite was determined by the microbicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm biofilm model was used. Early attachment at 4 h, biofilm at 2 days, live/dead staining and colony-forming units (CFUs) of biofilms grown on the composites were investigated. Composites with MPC of up to 3%had mechanical properties similar to those without MPC and those of the commercial control, whereas 4.5%and 6%MPC decreased the mechanical properties (P,0.05). Increasing MPC from 0 to 3%reduced the protein adsorption on composites (P,0.05). The composite with 3%MPC had protein adsorption that was 1/12 that of the control (P,0.05). Oral bacteria early attachment and biofilm growth were also greatly reduced on the composite with 3%MPC, compared to the control (P,0.05). In conclusion, incorporation of MPC into composites at 3%greatly reduced protein adsorption, bacteria attachment and biofilm CFUs, without compromising mechanical properties. Protein-repellent composites could help to repel bacteria attachment and plaque build-up to reduce secondary caries. The protein-repellent method might be applicable to other dental materials.

  9. Changes in biofilm structure during the colonization of chalcopyrite by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Meza, J V; Fernández, J J; Lara, R H; González, I

    2013-07-01

    Biofilms of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans were grown on the surface of massive chalcopyrite electrodes (MCE) where different secondary sulfur phases were previously formed by potentiostatic oxidation of MCE at 0.780≤Ean≤0.965 V (electrooxidized MCE, eMCE). The formation of mainly S⁰ and minor amounts of CuS and Sn²⁻ were detected on eMCEs. The eMCEs were incubated with A. thiooxidans cells for 1, 12, 24, 48, and 120 h in order to temporally monitor changes in eMCE's secondary phases, biofilm structure, and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition (lipids, proteins, and polysaccharides) using microscopic, spectroscopic, electrochemical, and biochemical techniques. The results show significant cell attachments with stratified biofilm structure since the first hour of incubation and EPS composition changes, the most important being production after 48-120 h when the highest amount of lipids and proteins were registered. During 120 h, periodic oxidation/formation of S⁰/Sn²⁻ was recorded on biooxidized eMCEs, until a stable CuS composition was formed. In contrast, no evidence of CuS formation was observed on the eMCEs of the abiotic control, confirming that CuS formation results from microbial activity. The surface transformation of eMCE induces a structural transformation of the biofilm, evolving directly to a multilayered biofilm with more hydrophobic EPS and proteins after 120 h. Our results suggest that A. thiooxidans responded to the spatial and temporal distribution and chemical reactivity of the Sn²⁻/S⁰/CuS phases throughout 120 h. These results suggested a strong correlation between surface speciation, hydrophobic domains in EPS, and biofilm organization during chalcopyrite biooxidation by A. thiooxidans.

  10. Enamel and dentine demineralization by a combination of starch and sucrose in a biofilm – caries model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Nunes BOTELHO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sucrose is the most cariogenic dietary carbohydrate and starch is considered non-cariogenic for enamel and moderately cariogenic for dentine. However, the cariogenicity of the combination of starch and sucrose remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of this combination on Streptococcus mutans biofilm composition and enamel and dentine demineralization. Biofilms of S. mutans UA159 were grown on saliva-coated enamel and dentine slabs in culture medium containing 10% saliva. They were exposed (8 times/day to one of the following treatments: 0.9% NaCl (negative control, 1% starch, 10% sucrose, or 1% starch and 10% sucrose (starch + sucrose. To simulate the effect of human salivary amylase on the starch metabolization, the biofilms were pretreated with saliva before each treatment and saliva was also added to the culture medium. Acidogenicity of the biofilm was estimated by evaluating (2 times/day the culture medium pH. After 4 (dentine or 5 (enamel days of growth, biofilms (n = 9 were individually collected, and the biomass, viable microorganism count, and polysaccharide content were quantified. Dentine and enamel demineralization was assessed by determining the percentage of surface hardness loss. Biofilms exposed to starch + sucrose were more acidogenic and caused higher demineralization (p < 0.0001 on either enamel or dentine than those exposed to each carbohydrate alone. The findings suggest that starch increases the cariogenic potential of sucrose.

  11. Effects of high energy electrons on the properties of polyethylene / multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites: Comparison of as-grown and oxygen-functionalised MWCNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, B., E-mail: krause-beate@ipfdd.de, E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de, E-mail: gohs@ipfdd.de; Pötschke, P., E-mail: krause-beate@ipfdd.de, E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de, E-mail: gohs@ipfdd.de; Gohs, U., E-mail: krause-beate@ipfdd.de, E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de, E-mail: gohs@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Str. 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Polymer modification with high energy electrons (EB) is well established in different applications for many years. It is used for crosslinking, curing, degrading, grafting of polymeric materials and polymerisation of monomers. In contrast to this traditional method, electron induced reactive processing (EIReP) combines the polymer modification with high energy electrons and the melt mixing process. This novel reactive method was used to prepare polymer blends and composites. In this study, both methods were used for the preparation of polyethylene (PE)/ multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) composites in the presence of a coupling agent. The influence of MWCNT and type of electron treatment on the gel content, the thermal conductivity, rheological, and electrical properties was investigated whereby as-grown and oxidised MWCNT were used. In the presence of a coupling agent and at an absorbed dose of 40 kGy, the gel content increased from 57 % for the pure PE to 74 % or 88 % by the addition of as-grown (Baytubes® C150P) or oxidised MWCNT, respectively. In comparison to the composites containing the as-grown MWCNTs, the use of the oxidised MWCNTs led to higher melt viscosity and higher storage modulus due to higher yield of filler polymer couplings. The melt viscosity increased due to the addition of MWCNT and crosslinking of PE. The thermal conductivity increased to about 150 % and showed no dependence on the kind of MWCNT and the type of electron treatment. In contrast, the lowest value of electrical volume resistivity was found for the non-irradiated samples and after state of the art electron treatment without any influence of the type of MWCNT. In the case of EIReP, the volume resistivity increased by 2 (as-grown MWCNT) or 3 decades (oxidised MWCNT) depending on the process parameters.

  12. Enhanced performance of microbial fuel cell with a bacteria/multi-walled carbon nanotube hybrid biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Jia; Qu, Youpeng; Zhang, Jian; Zhong, Yingjuan; Feng, Yujie

    2017-09-01

    The biofilm on the anode of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a vital component in system, and its formation and characteristic determines the performance of the system. In this study, a bacteria/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT) hybrid biofilm is fabricated by effectively inserting the MWCNTs into the anode biofilm via an adsorption-filtration method. This hybrid biofilm has been demonstrated to be an efficient structure for improving an anode biofilm performance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results show that the hybrid biofilm takes advantage of the conductivity and structure of MWCNT to enhance the electron transfer and substrate diffusion of the biofilm. With this hybrid biofilm, the current density, power density and coulombic efficiency are increased by 46.2%, 58.8% and 84.6%, respectively, relative to naturally grown biofilm. Furthermore, the start-up time is reduced by 53.8% compared with naturally grown biofilm. The perturbation test demonstrates that this type of hybrid biofilm exhibits strong adsorption ability and enhances the biofilm's resistance to a sudden change of substrate concentration. The superior performance of the hybrid biofilm with MWCNT ;nanowire; matrix compared with naturally grown biofilm demonstrates its great potential for boosting the performance of MFCs.

  13. A novel protein-repellent dental composite containing 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Chen; Melo, Mary As; Bai, Yu-Xing; Cheng, Lei; Xu, Hockin Hk

    2015-06-26

    Secondary caries due to biofilm acids is a primary cause of dental composite restoration failure. To date, there have been no reports of dental composites that can repel protein adsorption and inhibit bacteria attachment. The objectives of this study were to develop a protein-repellent dental composite by incorporating 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and to investigate for the first time the effects of MPC mass fraction on protein adsorption, bacteria attachment, biofilm growth, and mechanical properties. Composites were synthesized with 0 (control), 0.75%, 1.5%, 2.25%, 3%, 4.5% and 6% of MPC by mass. A commercial composite was also tested as a control. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. Protein adsorption onto the composite was determined by the microbicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm biofilm model was used. Early attachment at 4 h, biofilm at 2 days, live/dead staining and colony-forming units (CFUs) of biofilms grown on the composites were investigated. Composites with MPC of up to 3% had mechanical properties similar to those without MPC and those of the commercial control, whereas 4.5% and 6% MPC decreased the mechanical properties (Prepellent composites could help to repel bacteria attachment and plaque build-up to reduce secondary caries. The protein-repellent method might be applicable to other dental materials.

  14. The influence of growth parameters on the structure and composition of CuGaS{sub 2} epilayers grown by MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, M.S. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)]. E-mail: Matthew.Branch@nmmu.ac.za; Berndt, P.R. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Leitch, A.W.R. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Botha, J.R. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Weber, J. [Institute for Low Temperature Physics, University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-04-01

    The influence of various growth parameters on the composition and structure of MOVPE-grown CuGaS{sub 2} is presented. The Cu content of the grown layers is shown to decrease in the direction of the carrier gas flow, whilst the Ga and S content are shown to increase. Changing the flow of Cu(hfac){sub 2}.Et{sub 3}N to vary the I/III ratio in the vapour phase has a greater effect on the composition of grown epilayers than changing the flow of TEGa. This is indicative of Cu being the minority species present at the growth interface. A larger rate of decrease in the Cu content with an increase in both TEGa and DtBS flows suggests pre-reactions between Cu(hfac){sub 2}.Et{sub 3}N and both TEGa and DtBS precursors. Lower substrate temperatures are suggested to be thermodynamically unfavourable for the growth of CuGaS{sub 2}, yet enhance the formation of Ga{sub x}S{sub y} phases. The surface morphology of Cu-rich layers are typically inferior with a high density of crystallites, whilst Cu-poor epilayers are characteristically smooth with a single XRD reflection attributed to the (004) plane of c-axis-orientated epitaxial material.

  15. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms.

  16. Difference in initial dental biofilm accumulation between night and day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Schlafer, Sebastian; Nyvad, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The study of initial microbial colonization on dental surfaces is a field of intensive research because of the aetiological role of biofilms in oral diseases. Most previous studies of de novo accumulation and composition of dental biofilms in vivo do not differentiate between biofilms ...

  17. Chemical composition of olive oils from Arbequina and Empeltre varieties grown in irrigation; Composicion quimica de aceites de las variedades Arbequina y Empeltre cultivadas en regadio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracia, M. S.; Royo, A.; Guillen, M.

    2009-07-01

    This study examines the composition of oils extracted from young olive trees of the Arbequina and Empeltre varieties grown with irrigation in the same farm throughout a period of three seasons. Quality parameters, Fatty acid composition, sterols, waxes and aliphatic alcohols were analyzed. Although the quality of oils of both varieties was that of extra virgin, varietal differences were found. The peroxide value and the content of total polyphenols were much higher in Empeltre, whereas stability was higher in Arbequina. The monounsaturated acids were higher in Arbequina containing more stearic, oleic, arachidic and behenic acids than Empeltre, while this variety surpassed Arbequina in palmitic, margaroleic, linoleic, linolenic, gad oleic and lignoceric acids. The sterol composition was also different in the two varieties with higher contents of 24-methylencholesterol, campesterol and, especially, {delta}-5 avena sterol in Arbequina, and campestanol, {delta}-7 stigmastanol, {delta}-7 Avena sterol in Empeltre. The contents of both waxes and aliphatic alcohols were higher in Arbequina. (Author) 23 refs.

  18. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancl, Kimberly A; Kirsner, Robert S; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque, are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible; thus, biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attention to the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction, and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields and future therapies are also discussed.

  19. Application of an active attachment model as a high-throughput demineralization biofilm model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, T.C.; Pereira, A.F.F.; Exterkate, R.A.M.; Bagnato, V.S.; Buzalaf, M.A.R.; de A.M. Machado, M.A.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.; Deng, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the potential of an active attachment biofilm model as a high-throughput demineralization biofilm model for the evaluation of caries-preventive agents. Methods Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms were grown on bovine dentine discs in a high-throughput active attachment mode

  20. Acute and substantive action of antimicrobial toothpastes and mouthrinses on oral biofilm in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Marieke P. T.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; van Hoogmoed, Chris G.; Abbas, Frank; Hoogmoed, G.G. van

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare acute action by killing or disrupting oral biofilms through the use of antimicrobial toothpastes and mouthrinses in vitro and to investigate substantive action by absorption of antimicrobials in a biofilm. Biofilms from freshly collected human saliva were grown i

  1. Acute and substantive action of antimicrobial toothpastes and mouthrinses on oral biofilm in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Marieke P. T.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; van Hoogmoed, Chris G.; Abbas, Frank; Hoogmoed, G.G. van

    The aim of this study was to compare acute action by killing or disrupting oral biofilms through the use of antimicrobial toothpastes and mouthrinses in vitro and to investigate substantive action by absorption of antimicrobials in a biofilm. Biofilms from freshly collected human saliva were grown

  2. Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida Biofilms: Unique Efficacy of Amphotericin B Lipid Formulations and Echinocandins

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, D M; T. George; CHANDRA, J; P. K. Mukherjee; Ghannoum, M A

    2002-01-01

    Biofilms, likely the predominant mode of device-related microbial infection, exhibit resistance to antimicrobial agents. Evidence suggests that Candida biofilms have dramatically reduced susceptibility to antifungal drugs. We examined antifungal susceptibilities of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms grown on a bioprosthetic model. In addition to conventional agents, we determined if new antifungal agents (triazoles, amphotericin B lipid formulations, and echinocandins) have ac...

  3. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne;

    2016-01-01

    , on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose...

  4. Linking nitrifying biofilm characteristics and nitrification performance in moving-bed biofilm reactors for polluted raw water pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangfu; Wang, Yayi; He, Weitao; Xing, Meiyan; Wu, Min; Yang, Jian; Gao, Naiyun; Sheng, Guangyao; Yin, Daqiang; Liu, Shanhu

    2013-10-01

    Biofilm physiology was characterized by four biofilm constituents, i.e., polysaccharides, proteins (PN), humic-like substances and phospholipids (PL), for the first time to explore the relationships between biofilm characteristics and nitrification performance in moving-bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) designed for pretreatment of polluted raw surface water for potable supply. The biofilm compositions depended highly on the balance of microbial decay and nitrification processes. The increased ammonia loading greatly regulated the community structure, promoting the dominance of nitrifiers and their proportions in the nitrifying biofilm. Nitrification rate and activity correlated linearly with the fractions of volatile solids (VS), PN and PL, which were related to nitrification processes in the biofilm. The specific biofilm activity demonstrated an exponential-asymptotic relationship with ratios of PN/VS and PL/VS. Thus, analyzing biofilm characteristics can be valid for estimating nitrification performance in MBBRs, and may offer engineers with basis to optimize MBBR design and operation.

  5. Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Dawei

    between plasmid host range and composition of the recipient community was investigated in Manuscript 5 by comparing plasmid permissiveness in single populations and in a microbial community composed of 15 soil strains. By use of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the IncP1 plasmid, pKJK10...... bacterial species, the study to elucidate the impact of interaction networks on the multispecies biofilms in natural ecosystems, especially in soil, is still at an early stage. The diverse patterns of interactions within the mixed communities as well as the predatorprey relationship between protozoa...... interactions in this four-species biofilm model community. Manuscript 2 presents the further application of this developed approach on evaluating the synergistic/antagonistic interactions in multispecies biofilms composed of seven soil isolates. 63% of the four-species biofilms were found to interact...

  6. Polymicrobial biofilm formation by Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus mutans is Candida albicans strain and medium dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzmi, Mohd Hafiz; Alnuaimi, Ali D; Dashper, Stuart; Cirillo, Nicola; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Oral biofilms comprise of extracellular polysaccharides and polymicrobial microorganisms. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of polymicrobial interactions of Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus mutans on biofilm formation with the hypotheses that biofilm biomass and metabolic activity are both C. albicans strain and growth medium dependent. To study monospecific biofilms, C. albicans, A. naeslundii, and S. mutans were inoculated into artificial saliva medium (ASM) and RPMI-1640 in separate vials, whereas to study polymicrobial biofilm formation, the inoculum containing microorganisms was prepared in the same vial prior inoculation into a 96-well plate followed by 72 hours incubation. Finally, biofilm biomass and metabolic activity were measured using crystal violet and XTT assays, respectively. Our results showed variability of monospecies and polymicrobial biofilm biomass between C. albicans strains and growth medium. Based on cut-offs, out of 32, seven RPMI-grown biofilms had high biofilm biomass (HBB), whereas, in ASM-grown biofilms, 14 out of 32 were HBB. Of the 32 biofilms grown in RPMI-1640, 21 were high metabolic activity (HMA), whereas in ASM, there was no biofilm had HMA. Significant differences were observed between ASM and RPMI-grown biofilms with respect to metabolic activity (P biofilm biomass and metabolic activity were both C. albicans strain and growth medium dependent. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Functional recovery of biofilm bacterial communities after copper exposure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, Marie-Elène Y; Massieux, Boris; Breure, Anton M; Greve, Gerdit D; Rutgers, Michiel; Admiraal, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Potential of bacterial communities in biofilms to recover after copper exposure was investigated. Biofilms grown outdoor in shallow water on glass dishes were exposed in the laboratory to 0.6, 2.1, 6.8 micromol/l copper amended surface water and a reference and subsequently to un-amended surface wat

  8. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation.

  9. Potential of calcium to scaffold an endodontic biofilm, thus protecting the micro-organisms from disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, S.V.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms in the root canal of a tooth (endodontic biofilm) can induce and sustain apical periodontitis which is an oral inflammatory disease. Still, little is known about the composition of the endodontic biofilm. Studies on biofilms in root canals focus on the identification of the microbial specie

  10. Optical interference probe of biofilm hydrology: label-free characterization of the dynamic hydration behavior of native biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Richard T.; Zheng, Hewen; Alila, Mercy A.; Goodisman, Jerry; Chaiken, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    Biofilm produced by Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) on quartz or polystyrene is removed from the culture medium and drained. Observed optical interference fringes indicate the presence of a layer of uniform thickness with refractive index different from air-dried biofilm. Fringe wavelengths indicate that layer optical thickness is biofilm as measured by confocal Raman microscopy or fluorescence imaging of the bacteria. Raman shows that films have an alginate-like carbohydrate composition. Fringe amplitudes indicate that the refractive index of the interfering layer is higher than dry alginate. Drying and rehydration nondestructively thins and restores the interfering layer. The strength of the 1451-nm near infrared water absorption varies in unison with thickness. Absorption and layer thickness are proportional for films with different bacteria, substrates, and growth conditions. Formation of the interfering layer is general, possibly depending more on the chemical nature of alginate-like materials than bacterial processes. Films grown during the exponential growth phase produce no observable interference fringes, indicating requirements for layer formation are not met, possibly reflecting bacterial activities at that stage. The interfering layer might provide a protective environment for bacteria when water is scarce.

  11. Formation of hydroxyl radicals contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Briales, Alejandra; Brochmann, Rikke Prejh

    2014-01-01

    induction of cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals (OH˙) during antibiotic treatment of planktonically grown cells may contribute to action of the commonly used antibiotic ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa biofilms. For this purpose, WT PAO1, a catalase deficient ΔkatA and a ciprofloxacin resistant mutant of PAO1 (gyr......A), were grown as biofilms in microtiter plates and treated with ciprofloxacin. Formation of OH˙ and total amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and viability was estimated. Formation of OH˙ and total ROS in PAO1 biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin was shown but higher levels were measured...... in ΔkatA biofilms, and no ROS production was seen in the gyrA biofilms. Treatment with ciprofloxacin decreased the viability of PAO1 and ΔkatA biofilms but not of gyrA biofilms. Addition of thiourea, a OH˙ scavenger, decreased the OH˙ levels and killing of PAO1 biofilm. Our study shows that OH...

  12. Transferrin Impacts Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Garner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the impact of transferrin on Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms. Three commercial strains, an environmental strain (33679, the type strain (10792, and an isolate from a diseased insect (700872, were cultured in iron restricted minimal medium. All strains produced biofilm when grown in vinyl plates at 30°C. B. thuringiensis 33679 had a biofilm biomass more than twice the concentration exhibited by the other strains. The addition of transferrin resulted in slightly increased growth yields for 2 of the 3 strains tested, including 33679. In contrast, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin resulted in an 80% decrease in biofilm levels for strain 33679. When the growth temperature was increased to 37°C, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin increased culture turbidity for only strain 33679. Biofilm levels were again decreased in strain 33679 at 37°C. Growth of B. thuringiensis cultures in polystyrene resulted in a decrease in overall growth yields at 30°C, with biofilm levels significantly decreased for 33679 in the presence of transferrin. These findings demonstrate that transferrin impacts biofilm formation in select strains of B. thuringiensis. Identification of these differences in biofilm regulation may be beneficial in elucidating potential virulence mechanisms among the differing strains.

  13. Graphene/biofilm composites for enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production in a biocathode microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tian-shun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jiangsu Branch of China Academy of Science & Technology Development, Nanjing (China); Jin, Yuejuan; Bao, Jingjing [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Kang, Dongzhou, E-mail: kangdz@ybu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji 133002 (China); Xie, Jingjing, E-mail: xiej@njtech.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jiangsu Branch of China Academy of Science & Technology Development, Nanjing (China); College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji 133002 (China); Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Graphene/biofilm was microbially fabricated to cathode of a Cr(VI)-reducing MFC. • High Cr(VI) reduction rate was generated by self-assembled graphene biocathode MFC. • Graphene biocathode improves the electricity production of Cr(VI)-reducing MFC. • High surface area of the graphene provides more adsorption sites for Cr(VI). • Graphene biocathode improves the electron transfer rate in the MFC. - Abstract: In this study, a simple method of biocathode fabrication in a Cr(VI)-reducing microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated. A self-assembling graphene was decorated onto the biocathode microbially, constructing a graphene/biofilm, in situ. The maximum power density of the MFC with a graphene biocathode is 5.7 times that of the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, resulting in 100% removal of Cr(VI) within 48 h, at 40 mg/L Cr(VI), compared with only 58.3% removal of Cr(VI) in the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cyclic voltammogram analyses showed that the graphene biocathode had faster electron transfer kinetics than the graphite felt version. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analysis revealed a possible adsorption-reduction mechanism for Cr(VI) reduction via the graphene biocathode. This study attempts to improve the efficiency of the biocathode in the Cr(VI)-reducing MFC, and provides a useful candidate method for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater, under neutral conditions.

  14. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  15. Advancement of the 10-species subgingival Zurich Biofilm model by examining different nutritional conditions and defining the structure of the in vitro biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammann Thomas W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is caused by a highly complex consortium of bacteria that establishes as biofilms in subgingival pockets. It is a disease that occurs worldwide and its consequences are a major health concern. Investigations in situ are not possible and the bacterial community varies greatly between patients and even within different loci. Due to the high complexity of the consortium and the availability of samples, a clear definition of the pathogenic bacteria and their mechanisms of pathogenicity are still not available. In the current study we addressed the need of a defined model system by advancing our previously described subgingival biofilm model towards a bacterial composition that reflects the one observed in diseased sites of patients and analysed the structure of these biofilms. Results We further developed the growth media by systematic variation of key components resulting in improved stability and the firm establishment of spirochetes in the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model. A high concentration of heat-inactivated human serum allowed the best proliferation of the used species. Therefore we further investigated these biofilms by analysing their structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The species showed mutual interactions as expected from other studies. The abundances of all organisms present in this model were determined by microscopic counting following species-specific identification by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunofluorescence. The newly integrated treponemes were the most abundant organisms. Conclusions The use of 50% of heat-inactivated human serum used in the improved growth medium resulted in significantly thicker and more stable biofilms, and the quantitative representation of the used species represents the in vivo community of periodontitis patients much closer than in biofilms grown in the two media with less or no

  16. Advancement of the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model by examining different nutritional conditions and defining the structure of the in vitro biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Thomas W; Gmür, Rudolf; Thurnheer, Thomas

    2012-10-05

    Periodontitis is caused by a highly complex consortium of bacteria that establishes as biofilms in subgingival pockets. It is a disease that occurs worldwide and its consequences are a major health concern. Investigations in situ are not possible and the bacterial community varies greatly between patients and even within different loci. Due to the high complexity of the consortium and the availability of samples, a clear definition of the pathogenic bacteria and their mechanisms of pathogenicity are still not available. In the current study we addressed the need of a defined model system by advancing our previously described subgingival biofilm model towards a bacterial composition that reflects the one observed in diseased sites of patients and analysed the structure of these biofilms. We further developed the growth media by systematic variation of key components resulting in improved stability and the firm establishment of spirochetes in the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model. A high concentration of heat-inactivated human serum allowed the best proliferation of the used species. Therefore we further investigated these biofilms by analysing their structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The species showed mutual interactions as expected from other studies. The abundances of all organisms present in this model were determined by microscopic counting following species-specific identification by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunofluorescence. The newly integrated treponemes were the most abundant organisms. The use of 50% of heat-inactivated human serum used in the improved growth medium resulted in significantly thicker and more stable biofilms, and the quantitative representation of the used species represents the in vivo community of periodontitis patients much closer than in biofilms grown in the two media with less or no human serum. The appearance of T. denticola, P. gingivalis, and

  17. Effect of calcium on moving-bed biofilm reactor biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, C; Allen, D G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of calcium concentration on the biofilm structure, microbiology, and treatment performance was evaluated in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. Three experiments were conducted in replicate laboratory-scale reactors to determine if wastewater calcium is an important variable for the design and optimization of these reactors. Biofilm structural properties, such as thickness, oxygen microprofiles, and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were affected by increasing calcium concentrations. Above a threshold concentration of calcium between 1 and 50 mg/L, biofilms became thicker and denser, with a shift toward increasingly proteinaceous EPS at higher calcium concentrations up to 200 mgCa2+/L. At 300 mgCa2+/L, biofilms were found to become primarily composed of inorganic calcium precipitates. Microbiology was assessed through microscopy, denaturing grade gel electrophoresis, and enumeration of higher organisms. Higher calcium concentrations were found to change the bacterial community and promote the abundant growth of filamentous organisms and various protazoa and metazoan populations. The chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was improved for reactors at calcium concentrations of 50 mg/L and above. Reactor effluents for the lowest calcium concentration (1 mgCa2+/L) were found to be turbid (>50 NTU), as a result of the detachment of small and poorly settling planktonic biomass, whereas higher concentrations promoted settling of the suspended phase. In general, calcium was found to be an important variable causing significant changes in biofilm structure and reactor function.

  18. Structural Properties and Antifungal Activity against Candida albicans Biofilm of Different Composite Layers Based on Ag/Zn Doped Hydroxyapatite-Polydimethylsiloxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Groza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern medicine is still struggling to find new and more effective methods for fighting off viruses, bacteria and fungi. Among the most dangerous and at times life-threatening fungi is Candida albicans. Our work is focused on surface and structural characterization of hydroxyapatite, silver doped hydroxyapatite and zinc doped hydroxyapatite deposited on a titanium substrate previously coated with polydimethylsiloxane (HAp-PDMS, Ag:HAp-PDMS, Zn:HAp-PDMS by different techniques: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. The morphological studies revealed that the use of the PDMS polymer as an interlayer improves the quality of the coatings. The structural characterizations of the thin films revealed the basic constituents of both apatitic and PDMS structure. In addition, the GD depth profiles indicated the formation of a composite material as well as the successful embedding of the HAp, Zn:HAp and Ag:HAp into the polymer. On the other hand, in vitro evaluation of the antifungal properties of Ag:HAp-PDMS and Zn:HAp-PDMS demonstrated the fungicidal effects of Ag:HAp-PDMS and the potential antifungal effect of Zn:HAp-PDMS composite layers against C. albicans biofilm. The results acquired in this research complete previous research on the potential use of new complex materials produced by nanotechnology in biomedicine.

  19. The influence of In composition on properties of InxGa1-xAs/GaAs structures grown by MOVPE and in situ monitored by spectral reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoui, M.; Habchi, M. M.; Moussa, I.; Rebey, A.

    2017-01-01

    Series of InxGa1-xAs/GaAs structures with indium vapor composition ranging from 13 to 100%, denoted samples A, B, C and D, were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) at 450 °C and in situ monitored by spectral reflectance (SR). In order to contribute to the enhancement of crystal quality and to understand growth kinetic of InxGa1-xAs/GaAs structures, the dependence of structural and morphological properties on indium composition x was studied. Basing on high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements, solid indium compositions x of samples A, B, C and D were determined. Also, the evolution of structural quality (dislocations density, grain size, etc.) as a function of indium composition x was quantified. Besides, morphological properties (hatching and islands formations, densities, sizes and uniformities, RMS surface roughness, etc.) and growth process (growth anisotropy, etc.) versus indium composition x were examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. Also, reflectance three-dimensional plot as function of time and wavelength was recorded to quantify the evolution of reflectivity in the wavelength range from 400 to 1000 nm and to determine some growth parameters such as growth rates and thicknesses of InxGa1-xAs samples. A good correlation between experimental results issued from different characterizations tools was obtained.

  20. Effects of Zn amount on the properties of Zn-Zu2O composite films grown for PEC photoelectrodes by using electrochemical deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gyoum; Lee, Hu Joong; Ryu, Hyukhyun; Lee, Won-Jae

    2015-10-01

    In this study, Zn-Cu2O composite films were grown on fluorine-doped tin-oxide (FTO) substrates by using the electrochemical deposition method. Various amounts of Zinc (Zn) were added to grow the Zn-Cu2O composite films. We analyzed the morphological, structural, optical energy band gap and photocurrent density properties of the Zn-Cu2O composite films by using various measurements such as field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectrophotometry and potentiostat/galvanostat measurements, respectively. As a result, the highest photocurrent density value of -4.04 mA/cm2 was obtained for the 30-wt% sample, which had the lowest Cu2O (111)/ ZnO (101) XRD peak intensity ratio. The highest photocurrent density value from the 30-wt% sample was approximately 2.35 times higher than that from the non-composite Cu2O film (0-wt% sample). From this study, we found that adding Zn could improve the photocurrent values of Zn-Cu2O composite films.

  1. Compositionally graded InGaN layers grown on vicinal N-face GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestroffer, Karine; Lund, Cory; Koksaldi, Onur; Li, Haoran; Schmidt, Gordon; Trippel, Max; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Lu, Ning; Wang, Qingxiao; Christen, Jürgen; Kim, Moon J.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Keller, Stacia

    2017-05-01

    This work reports on compositionally graded (0 0 0 1 bar) N-polar InxGa1-xN layers. The InGaN grades with different final In compositions xf up to 0.25 were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on vicinal GaN base layers with a miscut angle of 4° towards the m-direction. When increasing xf the surface morphology evolved from an interlacing finger structure, attributed to the Ehrlich-Schwöbel effect, towards fully strain-relaxed columnar features. Regardless of the crystal morphology and the strain state each graded sample exhibited a bright photoluminescence signal at room temperature spanning the whole visible range. Cross-sectional nanoscale cathodoluminescence evidenced a red-shift of the luminesced signal from 420 to 580 nm along the grade and also showed strong lateral emission inhomogeneities.

  2. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Biofilm Formation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris Growth under Two Metabolic Modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase Kernan

    Full Text Available We examined biofilms formed by the metabolically versatile bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown via different metabolic modes. R. palustris was grown in flow cell chambers with identical medium conditions either in the presence or absence of light and oxygen. In the absence of oxygen and the presence of light, R. palustris grew and formed biofilms photoheterotrophically, and in the presence of oxygen and the absence of light, R. palustris grew and formed biofilms heterotrophically. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis software to quantitatively analyze and compare R. palustris biofilm formation over time in these two metabolic modes. We describe quantifiable differences in structure between the biofilms formed by the bacterium grown heterotrophically and those grown photoheterotrophically. We developed a computational model to explore ways in which biotic and abiotic parameters could drive the observed biofilm architectures, as well as a random-forest machine-learning algorithm based on structural differences that was able to identify growth conditions from the confocal imaging of the biofilms with 87% accuracy. Insight into the structure of phototrophic biofilms and conditions that influence biofilm formation is relevant for understanding the generation of biofilm structures with different properties, and for optimizing applications with phototrophic bacteria growing in the biofilm state.

  3. The Essential Oils of Rhaponticum carthamoides Hairy Roots and Roots of Soil-Grown Plants: Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Skała

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation from the hairy roots (HR and roots of soil-grown plants (SGR of Rhaponticum carthamoides and were analyzed by GC-MS method. In the both essential oils 62 compounds were identified. The root essential oils showed the differences in the qualitative and quantitative composition. The sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (55–62% dominated in both essential oils. The major compounds of HR essential oil were cyperene, 13-norcypera-1(5,11(12-diene, and cadalene while aplotaxene, nardosina-1(10,11-diene, and dauca-4(11,8-diene dominated in SGR essential oil. Both essential oils showed antibacterial activity especially against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853 (MIC value = 125 µg/mL. HR and SGR essential oils also decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α and the ROS level in LPS-treatment astrocytes. This is the first report to describe the chemical composition of R. carthamoides essential oil from hairy roots, its protective effect against LPS-induced inflammation and ROS production in astrocytes, and its antimicrobial potential. The results show that R. carthamoides hairy roots may be a valuable source of the essential oil and may be an alternative to the roots of soil-grown plants.

  4. The Essential Oils of Rhaponticum carthamoides Hairy Roots and Roots of Soil-Grown Plants: Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Antioxidant Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijo, Patrícia; Garcia, Catarina; Kalemba, Danuta; Toma, Monika; Szemraj, Janusz; Pytel, Dariusz; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation from the hairy roots (HR) and roots of soil-grown plants (SGR) of Rhaponticum carthamoides and were analyzed by GC-MS method. In the both essential oils 62 compounds were identified. The root essential oils showed the differences in the qualitative and quantitative composition. The sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (55–62%) dominated in both essential oils. The major compounds of HR essential oil were cyperene, 13-norcypera-1(5),11(12)-diene, and cadalene while aplotaxene, nardosina-1(10),11-diene, and dauca-4(11),8-diene dominated in SGR essential oil. Both essential oils showed antibacterial activity especially against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) (MIC value = 125 µg/mL). HR and SGR essential oils also decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α and the ROS level in LPS-treatment astrocytes. This is the first report to describe the chemical composition of R. carthamoides essential oil from hairy roots, its protective effect against LPS-induced inflammation and ROS production in astrocytes, and its antimicrobial potential. The results show that R. carthamoides hairy roots may be a valuable source of the essential oil and may be an alternative to the roots of soil-grown plants. PMID:28074117

  5. The Essential Oils of Rhaponticum carthamoides Hairy Roots and Roots of Soil-Grown Plants: Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Antioxidant Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skała, Ewa; Rijo, Patrícia; Garcia, Catarina; Sitarek, Przemysław; Kalemba, Danuta; Toma, Monika; Szemraj, Janusz; Pytel, Dariusz; Wysokińska, Halina; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation from the hairy roots (HR) and roots of soil-grown plants (SGR) of Rhaponticum carthamoides and were analyzed by GC-MS method. In the both essential oils 62 compounds were identified. The root essential oils showed the differences in the qualitative and quantitative composition. The sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (55-62%) dominated in both essential oils. The major compounds of HR essential oil were cyperene, 13-norcypera-1(5),11(12)-diene, and cadalene while aplotaxene, nardosina-1(10),11-diene, and dauca-4(11),8-diene dominated in SGR essential oil. Both essential oils showed antibacterial activity especially against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) (MIC value = 125 µg/mL). HR and SGR essential oils also decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α and the ROS level in LPS-treatment astrocytes. This is the first report to describe the chemical composition of R. carthamoides essential oil from hairy roots, its protective effect against LPS-induced inflammation and ROS production in astrocytes, and its antimicrobial potential. The results show that R. carthamoides hairy roots may be a valuable source of the essential oil and may be an alternative to the roots of soil-grown plants.

  6. Microscope-based imaging platform for large-scale analysis of oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karygianni, L; Follo, M; Hellwig, E; Burghardt, D; Wolkewitz, M; Anderson, A; Al-Ahmad, A

    2012-12-01

    A microscopic method for noninvasively monitoring oral biofilms at the macroscale was developed to describe the spatial distribution of biofilms of different bacterial composition on bovine enamel surfaces (BES). For this purpose, oral biofilm was grown in situ on BES that were fixed at approximal sites of individual upper jaw acrylic devices worn by a volunteer for 3 or 5 days. Eubacteria, Streptococcus spp., and Fusobacterium nucleatum were stained using specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The resulting fluorescence signals were subsequently tested by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and monitored by an automated wide-field microscope-based imaging platform (Scan∧R). Automated image processing and data analysis were conducted by microscope-associated software and followed by statistical evaluation of the results. The full segmentation of biofilm images revealed a random distribution of bacteria across the entire area of the enamel surfaces examined. Significant differences in the composition of the microflora were recorded across individual as well as between different enamel surfaces varying from sparsely colonized (47.26%) after 3 days to almost full surface coverage (84.45%) after 5 days. The enamel plates that were positioned at the back or in the middle of the oral cavity were found to be more suitable for the examination of biofilms up to 3 days old. In conclusion, automated microscopy combined with the use of FISH can enable the efficient visualization and meaningful quantification of bacterial composition over the entire sample surface. Due to the possibility of automation, Scan∧R overcomes the technical limitations of conventional CLSM.

  7. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Singh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs carbon fiber (CF fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz. The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE from −29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to −51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  8. 食源性金黄色葡萄球菌的生物被膜形成能力及其基质组成研究%Formation ability and matrix composition of food-borne Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石文琪; 桑亚新; 于宏伟; 孙纪录

    2015-01-01

    为了控制食品生产环境中金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜污染,对分离自河北省不同食物样品的33株金黄色葡萄球菌的生物被膜形成能力及其基质组成进行了研究。首先,使用微效价板培养生物被膜,结果表明,在培养24和48 h后,分别有13和16个菌株形成了强弱不同的生物被膜,其中,生牛乳来源的菌株产生物被膜能力较强。然后,分别使用蛋白酶K和DNase Ⅰ处理不同菌株的生物被膜,结果表明,在所有菌株的生物被膜基质中,都含有蛋白质和DNA组分,但是在大多数菌株的生物被膜基质中,蛋白质是一种重要的组分,而DNA不是一种主要组分。%In order to make scientific strategies to control the pollution of Staphylococcus au‐reus biofilm in the environment of food production ,the biofilm formation ability and matrix composition of 33 S .aureus isolates from food samples of Hebei province were studied .First‐ly ,the strains were cultivated in microtiter plates to form biofilms ,and it was found that 13 and 16 strains formed biofilms after cultivation for 24 h and 48 h ,respectively .Among them , the strains from raw milk had stronger biofilm forming ability .Then ,the preformed biofilms were treated with proteinase K and DNase I ,respectively .The results showed that there were protein and DNA components in the biofilm matrix of all the strains .However ,protein was an important component but DNA was not a major component in the biofilm matrix of most strains .

  9. Diffusion of antimicrobials in multispecies biofilms evaluated in a new biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, S V; de Almeida, J; Krom, B P; de Soet, J J; Crielaard, W

    2017-04-01

    To describe the application of a newly-developed in vitro model in which the diffusion of antimicrobials in oral biofilms can be studied. In a flow chamber consisting of three parallel feeding channels connected with each other by eight perpendicular side channels, multispecies biofilms were grown from saliva of a single donor for 48 h. The dimensions of the side channels were 100 μm × 100 μm × 5130 μm (H × W × L). When one or more side channels were filled with biofilm, the biofilms were stained with fluorescent stains. Then, one side-channel biofilm was selected and treated with phosphate buffered saline, 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 17% ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) or modified salt solution (MSS). Diffusion of the irrigants was observed by acquiring fluorescence images at 10× objective every 15 s for 30 min. It was possible to culture biofilms in the narrow (100 μm) channels. The biofilms varied in phenotype. In this model, no diffusion of NaOCl into the biofilms was seen after its application. Seventeen-percentage EDTA only diffused into the biofilm up to 200 μm in 30 min. MSS did diffuse in the biofilm over a distance of 450 μm within 2 min after a single application. This new model enables the investigation of the diffusion of antimicrobials in biofilms. Other applications to improve our understanding of the characteristics of biofilms are now possible. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Removal of Dental Biofilms with an Ultrasonically Activated Water Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, R P; Fabbri, S; Offin, D G; Symonds, N; Kiang, K S; Knee, R J; Yoganantham, D C; Webb, J S; Birkin, P R; Leighton, T G; Stoodley, P

    2015-09-01

    Acidogenic bacteria within dental plaque biofilms are the causative agents of caries. Consequently, maintenance of a healthy oral environment with efficient biofilm removal strategies is important to limit caries, as well as halt progression to gingivitis and periodontitis. Recently, a novel cleaning device has been described using an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS) to generate a cavitation cloud of bubbles in a freely flowing water stream that has demonstrated the capacity to be effective at biofilm removal. In this study, UAS was evaluated for its ability to remove biofilms of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans UA159, as well as Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811, grown on machine-etched glass slides to generate a reproducible complex surface and artificial teeth from a typodont training model. Biofilm removal was assessed both visually and microscopically using high-speed videography, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by CSLM demonstrated a statistically significant 99.9% removal of S. mutans biofilms exposed to the UAS for 10 s, relative to both untreated control biofilms and biofilms exposed to the water stream alone without ultrasonic activation (P biofilm removal. The UAS was also highly effective at S. mutans, A. naeslundii, and S. oralis biofilm removal from machine-etched glass and S. mutans from typodont surfaces with complex topography. Consequently, UAS technology represents a potentially effective method for biofilm removal and improved oral hygiene.

  11. Graphene/biofilm composites for enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production in a biocathode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tian-Shun; Jin, Yuejuan; Bao, Jingjing; Kang, Dongzhou; Xie, Jingjing

    2016-11-05

    In this study, a simple method of biocathode fabrication in a Cr(VI)-reducing microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated. A self-assembling graphene was decorated onto the biocathode microbially, constructing a graphene/biofilm, in situ. The maximum power density of the MFC with a graphene biocathode is 5.7 times that of the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, resulting in 100% removal of Cr(VI) within 48h, at 40mg/L Cr(VI), compared with only 58.3% removal of Cr(VI) in the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cyclic voltammogram analyses showed that the graphene biocathode had faster electron transfer kinetics than the graphite felt version. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analysis revealed a possible adsorption-reduction mechanism for Cr(VI) reduction via the graphene biocathode. This study attempts to improve the efficiency of the biocathode in the Cr(VI)-reducing MFC, and provides a useful candidate method for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater, under neutral conditions.

  12. Streptococci biofilm decontamination on teeth by low-temperature air plasma of dc corona discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalóvá, Z.; Zahoran, M.; Zahoranová, A.; Machala, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric pressure air direct current corona discharges were investigated for potential applications in dental medicine. The objective of this ex vivo study was to apply cold plasmas for the decontamination of Streptococci biofilm grown on extracted human teeth, and to estimate their antimicrobial efficiency and the plasma's impact on the enamel and dentine of the treated tooth surfaces. The results show that both positive streamer and negative Trichel pulse coronas can reduce bacterial population in the biofilm by up to 3 logs in a 10 min exposure time. This bactericidal effect can be reached faster (within 5 min) by electrostatic spraying of water through the discharge onto the treated tooth surface. Examination of the tooth surface after plasma exposure by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy did not show any significant alteration in the tooth material composition or the tooth surface structures.

  13. Esp-independent biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristich, Christopher J; Li, Yung-Hua; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G; Dunny, Gary M

    2004-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a gram-positive opportunistic pathogen known to form biofilms in vitro. In addition, this organism is often isolated from biofilms on the surfaces of various indwelling medical devices. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating biofilm formation in these clinical isolates are largely unknown. Recent work has suggested that a specific cell surface protein (Esp) of E. faecalis is critical for biofilm formation by this organism. However, in the same study, esp-deficient strains of E. faecalis were found to be capable of biofilm formation. To test the hypothesis that Esp is dispensable for biofilm formation by E. faecalis, we used microtiter plate assays and a chemostat-based biofilm fermentor assay to examine biofilm formation by genetically well-defined, non-Esp-expressing strains. Our results demonstrate that in vitro biofilm formation occurs, not only in the absence of esp, but also in the absence of the entire pathogenicity island that harbors the esp coding sequence. Using scanning electron microscopy to evaluate biofilms of E. faecalis OG1RF grown in the fermentor system, biofilm development was observed to progress through multiple stages, including attachment of individual cells to the substratum, microcolony formation, and maturation into complex multilayered structures apparently containing water channels. Microtiter plate biofilm analyses indicated that biofilm formation or maintenance was modulated by environmental conditions. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that expression of a secreted metalloprotease, GelE, enhances biofilm formation by E. faecalis. In summary, E. faecalis forms complex biofilms by a process that is sensitive to environmental conditions and does not require the Esp surface protein.

  14. Effects of lithium (Li) on lithium-cuprous-oxide (Li-Cu2O) composite films grown by using electrochemical deposition for a PEC photoelectrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gyoum; Ryu, Hyukhyun; Lee, Won-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Li-Cu2O composite films were grown on fluorine-doped tin-oxide (FTO) substrates by using the electrochemical deposition method. Various amounts of lithium (Li) were added to grow the Li-Cu2O composite films. We analyzed the morphology, structure, photocurrent density and photo-stability of the Li-Cu2O composite films by using various measurements such as field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and potentiostat/galvanostat measurements, respectively. As a result, the highest XRD Cu2O (111)/ LiO (011) peak intensity ratio was obtained for the 10-wt% sample, which also had the highest photocurrent density value of -5.00 mA/cm2. The highest photocurrent density value for the 10-wt% sample was approximately 5 times greater than that of the 0-wt% sample. As shown by this result, we found that adding Li could improve the photocurrent values of Li-Cu2O composite films.

  15. Schottky barrier height of Ni to β-(AlxGa1‑x)2O3 with different compositions grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Oshima, Yuichi; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.

    2017-03-01

    Coherent β-(AlxGa1‑x)2O3 films (x = 0, 0.038, 0.084, 0.164) were grown successfully on a Sn-doped β-Ga2O3 (010) substrate using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atom probe tomography, transmission electron microscopy, and high resolution x-ray diffraction were used to verify the alloy composition and high quality of the films. Schottky diodes were then fabricated using Ni as the Schottky metal. Capacitance–voltage measurements revealed a very low (current–voltage (I–V) measurements performed at temperatures varying from 300 K to 500 K on the Schottky diodes. These measurements revealed that the apparent Schottky barrier height could have similar values for different compositions of β-(AlxGa1‑x)2O3. We believe this is attributed to the lateral fluctuation in the alloy’s composition. This results in a lateral variation in the barrier height. Therefore, the average Schottky barrier height extracted from I–V measurements could be similar for β-(AlxGa1‑x)2O3 films with different compositions.

  16. Investigation of Ge1-xSnx/Ge with high Sn composition grown at low-temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Yu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on experimental investigations of the growth of Ge1-xSnx film with thickness above the critical thickness using Molecular Beam Epitaxy. A series of Ge1-xSnx films with various Sn compositions up to 14% are deposited on a Ge buffer layer for growth at low temperatures close to the melting point of Sn. Analysis of various measurements shows that the Ge1-xSnx film is defect free in the XTEM image and that Sn is distributed almost uniformly in the film for Sn compositions up to 9.3%. The Sn composition of the films is higher than the Sn composition that is theoretically predicted to cause the energy band of Ge to change from an indirect to a direct bandgap; thus, the present investigation provides a method for growing direct bandgap GeSn film, which is desired for use in applications involving optoelectronic devices.

  17. BIOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF WINE MATERIALS FROM INTRODUCED GRAPE VARIETIES GROWN IN THE TEMRIUK DISTRICT OF THE KRASNODAR REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guguchkina T. I.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduced grape varieties such as Ancelotti, Bachka, Johanniter, Morava and Solaris which were grown in the conditions of Taman provided production of high yields of grapes with standard conditions of sweetness and acidity of grape juice that were useful for the technical processing of not only tableware, but also for special wines, in particular, dessert. Organoleptic properties of all the studied wine materials from grapes of these varieties were of high quality, which was con-firmed by their tasting evaluation. They are recom-mended for the preparation of organic (bio wines. The "Biologik" wine in 2012 received a certificate of the high points at the international exhibition in Italy (Rome, and the wine from red grape variety Ancelotti for several years, winning awards from international wine competitions ("Yalta. Gold Griffon", "Gold au-tumn"

  18. Ingredient selection for plastic composite supports for L-(+)-lactic acid biofilm fermentation by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, K L; Pometto, A L; Hinz, P. N.; Dickson, J S; Demirci, A.

    1997-01-01

    Plastic composite supports containing 50% agricultural products (oat hulls, soybean hulls, yeast extract, soybean flour, dried bovine erythrocytes, bovine albumin, and/or mineral salts) and 50% (wt/wt) polypropylene were produced by high-temperature twin-screw extrusion. The research employed two half sets of a five-factorial fractional design (2(5 - 1)) to evaluate the effects of different agricultural components on the properties of the plastic composite supports and to select the best plas...

  19. Aging biofilm from a full-scale moving bed biofilm reactor: characterization and enzymatic treatment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Geng, Jinju; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan

    2014-02-01

    Effective removal of aging biofilm deserves to receive more attention. This study aimed to characterized aging biofilm from a full-scale moving bed biofilm reactor treating pharmaceutical wastewater and evaluate the hydrolysis effects of biofilm by different enzymatic treatments. Results from FTIR and biochemical composition analyses showed that it was a predominately organic-based biofilm with the ratio of total protein (PN) to polysaccharide (PS) of 20.17. A reticular structure of extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM) with filamentous bacteria as the skeleton was observed on the basal layer through SEM-EDS test. Among the four commercial proteases and amylases from Genencor®, proteases were shown to have better performances than amylases either on the removal of MLSS and PN/MLSS or on DOC (i.e., dissolved organic carbon)/MLSS raising of biofilm pellets. Difference of dynamic fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matters after treated by the two proteases indicated distinguishing mechanisms of the treating process.

  20. Raman imaging of biofilms using gold sputtered fiber optic probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Christina Grace Charlet; Manoharan, Hariharan; Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Sai, V. V. Raghavendra

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report characterization of bacterial biofilm using gold sputtered optical fiber probe as substrates for confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements. The chemical composition and the heterogeneity of biofilms in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was evaluated. The spatial distribution of bacterial biofilm on the substrates during their growth phase was studied using Raman imaging. Further, the influence of substrate's surface on bacterial adhesion was investigated by studying growth of biofilms on surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This study validates the use of gold sputtered optical fiber probes as SERS substrates in confocal microscopic configuration to identify and characterize clinically relevant biofilms.

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of Streptococcus suis biofilms and planktonic cells that identified biofilm infection-related immunogenic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Yi, Li; Wu, Zongfu; Shao, Jing; Liu, Guangjin; Fan, Hongjie; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chengping

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is a zoonotic pathogen that causes severe disease symptoms in pigs and humans. Biofilms of SS bind to extracellular matrix proteins in both endothelial and epithelial cells and cause persistent infections. In this study, the differences in the protein expression profiles of SS grown either as planktonic cells or biofilms were identified using comparative proteomic analysis. The results revealed the existence of 13 proteins of varying amounts, among which six were upregulated and seven were downregulated in the Streptococcus biofilm compared with the planktonic controls. The convalescent serum from mini-pig, challenged with SS, was applied in a Western blot assay to visualize all proteins from the biofilm that were grown in vitro and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A total of 10 immunoreactive protein spots corresponding to nine unique proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Of these nine proteins, five (Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, phosphoglycerate kinase, Hypothetical protein SSU05_0403) had no previously reported immunogenic properties in SS to our knowledge. The remaining four immunogenic proteins (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hemolysin, pyruvate dehydrogenase and DnaK) were identified under both planktonic and biofilm growth conditions. In conclusion, the protein expression pattern of SS, grown as biofilm, was different from the SS grown as planktonic cells. These five immunogenic proteins that were specific to SS biofilm cells may potentially be targeted as vaccine candidates to protect against SS biofilm infections. The four proteins common to both biofilm and planktonic cells can be targeted as vaccine candidates to protect against both biofilm and acute infections.

  2. Reconstruction of biofilm images: combining local and global structural parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resat, Haluk; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-20

    Digitized images can be used for quantitative comparison of biofilms grown under different conditions. Using biofilm image reconstruction, it was previously found that biofilms with a completely different look can have nearly identical structural parameters and that the most commonly utilized global structural parameters were not sufficient to uniquely define these biofilms. Here, additional local and global parameters are introduced to show that these parameters considerably increase the reliability of the image reconstruction process. Assessment using human evaluators indicated that the correct identification rate of the reconstructed images increased from 50% to 72% with the introduction of the new parameters into the reconstruction procedure. An expanded set of parameters especially improved the identification of biofilm structures with internal orientational features and of structures in which colony sizes and spatial locations varied. Hence, the newly introduced structural parameter sets helped to better classify the biofilms by incorporating finer local structural details into the reconstruction process.

  3. Dynamic approaches of mixed species biofilm formation using modern technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Kim; Linossier, Isabelle; Fay, Fabienne; Yong, Julius; Abd Wahid, Effendy; Hadjiev, Dimitre; Bourgougnon, Nathalie

    2012-07-01

    Bacteria and diatoms exist in sessile communities and develop as biofilm on all surfaces in aqueous environments. The interaction between these microorganisms in biofilm was investigated with a bacterial genus Pseudoalteromonas sp. (strain 3J6) and two benthic diatoms Amphora coffeaeformis and Cylindrotheca closterium. Each biofilm was grown for 22 days. Images from the confocal microscopy show a difference of adhesion between Pseudoalteromonas 3J6 and diatoms. Indeed, a stronger adhesion is found with C. closterium suggesting cohabitation between Pseudoalteromonas 3J6 and C. closterium compared at an adaptation for bacteria and A. coffeaeformis. The cellular attachment and the growth evolution in biofilm formation depend on each species of diatoms in the biofilm. Behaviour of microalgae in presence of bacteria demonstrates the complexity of the marine biofilm.

  4. Characterization of nanostructured photosensitive (NiS){sub x}(CdS){sub (1-x)} composite thin films grown by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubale, A.U., E-mail: ashokuu@yahoo.com [Nanostructured Thin Film Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Govt. Vidarbha Institute of Science and Humanities, Amravati 444604, Maharashtra (India); Bargal, A.N. [Nanostructured Thin Film Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Govt. Vidarbha Institute of Science and Humanities, Amravati 444604, Maharashtra (India)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Thin films of (NiS){sub x}(CdS){sub (1-x)} with variable composition (x = 1 to 0) were deposited onto glass substrates by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. {yields} The structural, surface morphological and electrical characterizations of the as deposited and annealed films were studied. {yields} The bandgap and activation energy of annealed (NiS){sub x}(CdS){sub (1-x)} film decrease with improvement in photosensitive nature. -- Abstract: Recently ternary semiconductor nanostructured composite materials have attracted the interest of researchers because of their photovoltaic applications. Thin films of (NiS){sub x}(CdS){sub (1-x)} with variable composition (x = 1-0) had been deposited onto glass substrates by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. As grown and annealed films were characterised by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and EDAX to investigate structural and morphological properties. The (NiS){sub x}(CdS){sub (1-x)} films were polycrystalline in nature having mixed phase of rhombohedral and hexagonal crystal structure due to NiS and CdS respectively. The optical and electrical properties of (NiS){sub x}(CdS){sub (1-x)} thin films were studied to determine compsition dependent bandgap, activation energy and photconductivity. The bandgap and activation energy of annealed (NiS){sub x}(CdS){sub (1-x)} film decrease with improvement in photosensitive nature.

  5. In vitro digestibility, protein composition and techno-functional properties of Saskatchewan grown yellow field peas (Pisum sativum L.) as affected by processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen; Boye, Joyce I; Hu, Xinzhong

    2017-02-01

    Saskatchewan grown yellow field pea was subjected to different processing conditions including dehulling, micronization, roasting, conventional/microwave cooking, germination, and combined germination and conventional cooking/roasting. Their nutritional and antinutritional compositions, functional properties, microstructure, thermal properties, in vitro protein and starch digestibility, and protein composition were studied. Processed field peas including conventional cooked yellow peas (CCYP), microwave cooked yellow peas (MCYP), germinated-conventional cooked yellow peas (GCCYP), and germinated-roasted yellow peas (GRYP) exhibited the significantly higher in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD), which was in accordance with their significantly lower trypsin inhibitor activity and tannin content. The SDS-PAGE and size exclusion HPLC profiles of untreated pea proteins and their hydrolysates also confirmed the IVPD result that these four treatments facilitated the hydrolysis of pea proteins to a greater extent. The CCYP, MCYP, GCCYP, and GRYP also exhibited significantly higher starch digestibility which was supported by their lower onset (To), peak (Tp), and conclusion (Tc) temperatures obtained from DSC thermogram, their lower pasting properties and starch damage results, as well as their distinguished amorphous flakes' configuration observed on the scanning electron microscopic image. LC/ESI-MS/MS analysis following in-gel digests of SDS-PAGE separated proteins allowed detailed compositional characterization of pea proteins. The present study would provide fundamental information to help to better understand the functionality of field peas as ingredients, and particularly in regards to agri-food industry to improve the process efficiency of field peas with enhanced nutritional and techno-functional qualities.

  6. Partially polycrystalline GaN1- x As x alloys grown on GaAs in the middle composition range achieving a smaller band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong-Ming; Lin, Kuang-I.; Liu, Yu-Xuan; Lin, Hao-Hsiung; Cheng, Yung-Chen

    2017-08-01

    GaN1- x As x alloys have been successfully grown on (100) GaAs substrates over a wide composition range (0.15 gap and the As-affected spin-orbit band to conduction-band minimum transition, photomodulated reflectance is utilized. The band gap energies range from 0.78 to 2.15 eV (3.4 eV for end-point compounds GaN). Finally, the original and modified band anticrossing (BAC) models for GaNAs alloys were thoroughly verified over the entire composition range. Remarkably, the band gap energies of the partially polycrystalline GaNAs alloys agree well with those obtained using the original BAC model in the middle composition range because the model has been developed for crystalline materials. These results improve the growth of highly mismatched GaNAs alloys with different substrates and should expedite studies of high-efficiency multijunction solar cells fabricated using such a single ternary alloy system.

  7. Magnetic and Optical Properties of the TiO2-Co-TiO2 Composite Films Grown by Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fa-min; DING Peng; SHI Wei-mei; WANG Tian-min

    2007-01-01

    The TiO2-Co-TiO2 sandwich films were successfully grown on glass and silicon substrata making alternate use of radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering and direct current magnetron sputtering. The structures and properties of these films were identified with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra and X-ray photoemission spectra (XPS). It is shown that the sandwich film consists of two anatase TiO2 films with an embedded Co nano-film. The fact that, when the Co nano-film thickens, varied red shifts appear in optical absorption spectra may well be explained by the quantum confinement and tunnel effects. As for magnetic properties, the saturation magnetization, remnant magnetic induction and coercivity vary with the thickness of the Co nano-films. Moreover, the Co nano-film has a critical thickness of about 8.6 nm, which makes the coercivity of the composite film reach the maximum of about 1413 Oe.

  8. Carbon nanotubes grown by catalytic CO 2 laser-induced chemical vapor deposition on core-shell Fe/C composite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morjan, I.; Soare, I.; Alexandrescu, R.; Gavrila-Florescu, L.; Morjan, R.-E.; Prodan, G.; Fleaca, C.; Sandu, I.; Voicu, I.; Dumitrache, F.; Popovici, E.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by catalytic laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (C-LCVD) was investigated. C-LCVD uses both ex situ synthesized catalyst nanoparticles and the controlled decomposition of gas-phase hydrocarbon mixtures. As catalysts, Fe/C composites of the core-shell type were used. A continuous-wave CO 2 laser was employed to irradiate the ethylene/acetylene hydrocarbon precursors and to simultaneously heat a silicon substrate on which the carbon nanotubes were grown. The effects on carbon nanotube growth of both the iron-based nanocomposite particles and of the ethylene concentration were studied. The analysis suggests the feasibility of the C-LCVD process, in which the core-shell Fe/C catalysts comply with the prerequisite conditions of the CNT growth namely dispersion and supersaturation.

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yashuan; Marks, Laura R; Pettigrew, Melinda M; Hakansson, Anders P

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over one million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease is not yet clear. Pneumococci in biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and this phenotype can be recapitulated when pneumococci are grown on respiratory epithelial cells under conditions found in the nasopharyngeal environment. Pneumococcal biofilms display lower levels of virulence in vivo and provide an optimal environment for increased genetic exchange both in vitro and in vivo, with increased natural transformation seen during co-colonization with multiple strains. Biofilms have also been detected on mucosal surfaces during pneumonia and middle ear infection, although the role of these biofilms in the disease process is debated. Recent studies have shown that changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by concomitant virus infection, changes in the microflora, inflammation, or other host assaults trigger active release of pneumococci from biofilms. These dispersed bacteria have distinct phenotypic properties and transcriptional profiles different from both biofilm and broth-grown, planktonic bacteria, resulting in a significantly increased virulence in vivo. In this review we discuss the properties of pneumococcal biofilms, the role of biofilm formation during pneumococcal colonization, including their propensity for increased ability to exchange genetic material, as well as mechanisms involved in transition from asymptomatic biofilm colonization to dissemination and disease of otherwise sterile sites. Greater understanding of pneumococcal biofilm

  10. Genetic variability in apple fruit polyphenol composition in Malus × domestica and Malus sieversii germplasm grown in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Richard K; McGhie, Tony K

    2011-11-09

    Variations in the concentrations of flavan-3-ol, oligomeric procyanidin, chlorogenic acid, dihydrochalcone, flavonol, and anthocyanin polyphenol groups and total polyphenols were examined in the fruit peel and cortical flesh of 93 (80 Malus × domestica and 13 Malus sieversii) apple genotypes in at least 1 year between 2003 and 2005 grown at one site in New Zealand (NZ). Differences among genotypes accounted for 46-97% of the total variation in the concentrations of total polyphenols and each of the individual phenol groups in the flesh and peel in both species, whereas effects of year and genotype × year were minimal, except for peel flavonols in M. × domestica and flesh flavonols in both species. In these cases, differences among genotypes accounted for less than 30% of the total variation, which was less than the variation found for the interaction between genotype and year. Total polyphenol concentrations among genotypes were spread over a 7- and 9-fold range in the flesh and a 4- and 3-fold range in the peel of M. sieversii and M. × domestica, respectively, with the spread in concentrations of individual polyphenol groups in each tissue and within each species varying from a 2-fold to over a 500-fold range. Higher concentrations were generally found in M. sieversii. In M. × domestica, cultivars and breeding selections originating in NZ had lower average flesh and peel total polyphenols and chlorogenic acid than older cultivars previously imported into NZ from overseas countries.

  11. Biofilm formation on dental restorative and implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, H J; Rinastiti, M; Siswomihardjo, W; van der Mei, H C

    2010-07-01

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on smooth surfaces. Oral biofilms mostly consist of multiple bacterial strains, but Candida species are found on acrylic dentures. Biofilms on gold and amalgam in vivo are thick and fully covering, but barely viable. Biofilms on ceramics are thin and highly viable. Biofilms on composites and glass-ionomer cements cause surface deterioration, which enhances biofilm formation again. Residual monomer release from composites influences biofilm growth in vitro, but effects in vivo are less pronounced, probably due to the large volume of saliva into which compounds are released and its continuous refreshment. Similarly, conflicting results have been reported on effects of fluoride release from glass-ionomer cements. Finally, biomaterial-associated infection of implants and devices elsewhere in the body is compared with oral biofilm formation. Biomaterial modifications to discourage biofilm formation on implants and devices are critically discussed for possible applications in dentistry. It is concluded that, for dental applications, antimicrobial coatings killing bacteria upon contact are more promising than antimicrobial-releasing coatings.

  12. Effect of packaging materials on the chemical composition and microbiological quality of edible mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) grown on cassava peels

    OpenAIRE

    Ajayi, Oluwakemi; Obadina, Adewale; Idowu, Micheal; Adegunwa, Mojisola; Kajihausa, Olatundun; Sanni, Lateef; Asagbra, Yemisi; Ashiru, Bolanle; Tomlins, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Edible fungi such as mushrooms are highly perishable and deteriorate few days after harvest due to its high moisture content and inability to maintain their physiological status. In this study, the effect of packaging materials on the nutritional composition of mushroom cultivated from cassava peels was investigated. Mushroom samples were dried at 50°C in a cabinet dryer for 8 h. The dried mushroom samples packaged in four different packaging materials; high density polyethylene (HDPE), polyp...

  13. Threshold character of temperatures on deuterium thermal desorption in Mg-V composite grown atom-by-atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neklyudov, I. M.; Morozov, O. M.; Kulish, V. G.; Zhurba, V. I.; Galitskiy, A. G.; Lomino, N. S.; Kuprin, A. S.; Ovcharenko, V. D.; Reshetnyak, E. N.

    2012-08-01

    The plasma evaporation-sputtering method was applied to make composite materials of the Mg-V system. The ion-implanted deuterium desorption temperature variations as a function of the component concentration were studied. It has been established that, by introducing vanadium into magnesium, the deuterium desorption temperature can be appreciably decreased (to 300-330 K) in comparison with the case of deuterium desorption from magnesium (~800 K). A step-like form of the curve of deuterium desorption temperature evidences on the presence of two different structure states of the Mg-V system depending on the ratio of components. The deuterium temperature decrease can be caused by filamentary inclusions formed, in the process of composite making and annealing, by the insoluble component (vanadium) atoms providing the deuterium diffusion from the sample at a lower temperature (channels for deuterium diffusion through the surface barrier). A necessary high diffusion mobility of deuterium is provided by the amorphous state of Mg83+xVx samples. The deuterium desorption data obtained on the example of Mg-V and Mg-Zr composites provide support for further research into hydrogen storage materials containing low-soluble chemical elements in the alloy components.

  14. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    in wounds. However, the impact of biofilms is often debated, because infected wounds were also treated before the concept of biofilms was coined. In this short review, we will address the significance of biofilms and their role in wounds, and discuss the future tasks of the biofilm challenge....

  15. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  16. Dental diagnostics: molecular analysis of oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyari, Sarah; Bennett, Katie M

    2011-01-01

    Dental biofilms are complex, multi-species bacterial communities that colonize the mouth in the form of plaque and are known to cause dental caries and periodontal disease. Biofilms are unique from planktonic bacteria in that they are mutualistic communities with a 3-dimensional structure and complex nutritional and communication pathways. The homeostasis within the biofilm colony can be disrupted, causing a shift in the bacterial composition of the colony and resulting in proliferation of pathogenic species. Because of this dynamic lifestyle, traditional microbiological techniques are inadequate for the study of biofilms. Many of the bacteria present in the oral cavity are viable but not culturable, which severely limits laboratory analysis. However, with the advent of new molecular techniques, the microbial makeup of oral biofilms can be better identified. Some of these techniques include DNA-DNA hybridization, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and pyrosequencing. This review provides an overview of biofilm formation and examines the major molecular techniques currently used in oral biofilm analysis. Future applications of the molecular analysis of oral biofilms in the diagnosis and treatment of caries and periodontal disease are also discussed.

  17. Experimental model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis to test combination biomaterials using biofilms as initial inocula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dustin L; Haymond, Bryan S; Woodbury, Kassie L; Beck, J Peter; Moore, David E; Epperson, R Tyler; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2012-07-01

    Currently, the majority of animal models that are used to study biofilm-related infections use planktonic bacterial cells as initial inocula to produce positive signals of infection in biomaterials studies. However, the use of planktonic cells has potentially led to inconsistent results in infection outcomes. In this study, well-established biofilms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were grown and used as initial inocula in an animal model of a Type IIIB open fracture. The goal of the work was to establish, for the first time, a repeatable model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis, wherein biofilms were used as initial inocula to test combination biomaterials. Results showed that 100% of animals that were treated with biofilms developed osteomyelitis, whereas 0% of animals not treated with biofilm developed infection. The development of this experimental model may lead to an important shift in biofilm and biomaterials research by showing that when biofilms are used as initial inocula, they may provide additional insights into how biofilm-related infections in the clinic develop and how they can be treated with combination biomaterials to eradicate and/or prevent biofilm formation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  19. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The concept of biofilms has emerged in the clinical setting during the last decade. Infections involving biofilms have been documented in all parts of the human body, and it is currently believed that the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria is equivalent to chronic infection. A quick Pubmed search...... reveals the significance of biofilms, as evidenced by a dramatic increase in scientific publications on the topic, as well as in publications concerning wounds with biofilms, which reached 600 publications in 2013. Judged from the number of publications, it appears that biofilms play a significant role...... in wounds. However, the impact of biofilms is often debated, because infected wounds were also treated before the concept of biofilms was coined. In this short review, we will address the significance of biofilms and their role in wounds, and discuss the future tasks of the biofilm challenge....

  20. Nitrogen, Phosphor, and Potassium Level in Soil and Oil Palm Tree at various Composition of plant species mixtures grown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanum, C.; Rauf, A.; Fazrin, D. A.; Habibi, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    In productive oil palm plantation areas, poor vegetation is generally caused by low light intensity. This condition causes excessive erosion and decreases soil fertility. One of the efforts for soil and water conservation at oil palm plantations is through increased vegetation diversity. The changes of soil and plant nitrogen, phosporus, and potassium content, observed by planting two types of herbs under oil palm tree, with different compositions. Vegetation composition was set as: Arachis glabrata 100%; Stenotaprum secundatum 100%; Arachis glabrata 50% + Stenotaprum secundatum 50%; Arachis glabrata 75% + Stenotaprum secundatum 25%; Arachis glabrata 25% + Stenotaprum secundatum 75%. The shoot and root fresh/dry weight, nutrient content (nitrogen, phosphor, and potassium) of each cutting were measured at the end of the experiment. Ten of treatment plant were harvested and divided shoots and roots after washing out of soil. Biomass samples were dried at 70 °C for 48 h and weighed. The total N and its proportional concentration (N%) were analyzed with the micro- Kjeldahl method. Potasium analyzing with flamephotometry, and phosphor and from samples was determined by analyzing with spectrophotometry method. The results showed the highest shoot growth of A.glabarata if planting was mixed with S. secundatum, but the result was different with S.secundatum being superior if planted with monoculture system. Combination of interrow cultivation is more recommended for soil conservation and nutrient maintenance in palm oil trees were A. Glabarata 75% + S.secundatum 25%.

  1. Selective reactivity of monochloramine with extracellular matrix components affects the disinfection of biofilm and detached clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng; Lee, Woo Hyoung; Coburn, Kimberly M; Seo, Youngwoo

    2014-04-01

    The efficiency of monochloramine disinfection was dependent on the quantity and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilms, as monochloramine has a selective reactivity with proteins over polysaccharides. Biofilms with protein-based (Pseudomonas putida) and polysaccharide based EPS (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), as well as biofilms with varied amount of polysaccharide EPS (wild-type and mutant P. aeruginosa), were compared. The different reactivity of EPS components with monochloramine influenced disinfectant penetration, biofilm inactivation, as well as the viability of detached clusters. Monochloramine transport profiling measured by a chloramine-sensitive microelectrode revealed a broader diffusion boundary layer between bulk and biofilm surface in the P. putida biofilm compared to those of P. aeruginosa biofilms. The reaction with proteins in P. putida EPS multiplied both the time and the monochloramine mass required to achieve a full biofilm penetration. Cell viability in biofilms was also spatially influenced by monochloramine diffusion and reaction within biofilms, showing a lower survival in the surface section and a higher persistence in the middle section of the P. putida biofilm compared to the P. aeruginosa biofilms. While polysaccharide EPS promoted biofilm cell viability by obstructing monochloramine reactive sites on bacterial cells, protein EPS hindered monochloramine penetration by reacting with monochloramine and reduced its concentration within biofilms. Furthermore, the persistence of bacterial cells detached from biofilm (over 70% for P. putida and ∼40% for polysaccharide producing P. aeruginosa) suggested that currently recommended monochloramine residual levels may underestimate the risk of water quality deterioration caused by biofilm detachment.

  2. Chemical Composition and Anti-Inflammatory, Cytotoxic and Antioxidant Activities of Essential Oil from Leaves of Mentha piperita Grown in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenliang Sun

    Full Text Available The chemical composition, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities of essential oil from leaves of Mentha piperita (MEO grown in China were investigated. Using GC-MS analysis, the chemical composition of MEO was characterized, showing that it was mainly composed of menthol, menthone and menthy acetate. MEO exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activities in a croton oil-induced mouse ear edema model. It could also effectively inhibit nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The cytotoxic effect was assessed against four human cancer cells. MEO was found to be significantly active against human lung carcinoma SPC-A1, human leukemia K562 and human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells, with an IC50 value of 10.89, 16.16 and 38.76 µg/ml, respectively. In addition, MEO had moderate antioxidant activity. The results of this study may provide an experimental basis for further systematic research, rational development and clinical utilization of peppermint resources.

  3. Effects of graphene oxide (GO) on GO-Cu2O composite films grown by using electrochemical deposition for a PEC photoelectrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gyoum; Ryu, Hyukhyun; Lee, Won-Jae; Yoon, Jang-Hee

    2015-05-01

    In this study, GO-Cu2O composite films were grown on fluorine-doped tin-oxide (FTO) substrates with various amounts of GO by using an electrochemical deposition. We investigated the effects of the GO content on the morphological, structural, optical, and photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of the GO-Cu2O composite film and on its XPS spectrum. The highest XRD (111) peak intensity was obtained for the 10-wt% sample, which had an optical energy band gap of 2.15 eV. However, the highest photocurrent density was -4.74 mA/cm2 for the 1-wt% sample, which had an optical energy band gap of 1.94 eV. The photocurrent density for the 1-wt% sample was approximately 1.75 times greater than that for the 0-wt% sample. From the XPS measurements, we observed that the oxygen concentration for the sample with 1-wt% GO was higher than it was for the 0-wt% GO, which may have improved the photocurrent density of the sample with 1-wt% GO.

  4. Seasonal Variation in the Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Volatile Oils of Three Species of Leptospermum (Myrtaceae Grown in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lelis Pinheiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the seasonal variation of three species of Leptospermum (Myrtaceae grown in Brazil. The chemical composition of the volatile oils of L. flavescens and L. petersonii did not show any significant seasonal variation in the major components, while for Leptospermum madidum subsp. sativum the levels of major constituents of the volatile oils varied with the harvest season. Major fluctuations in the composition of L. madidum subsp. sativum oil included α-pinene (0–15.2%, β-pinene (0.3–18.5%, α-humulene (0.8–30%, 1,8-cineole (0.4–7.1% and E-caryophyllene (0.4–11.9%. Levels of β-pinene (0.3–5.6%, terpinen-4-ol (4.7–7.2% and nerolidol (55.1–67.6% fluctuated seasonally in the L. flavescens oil. In L. petersonii, changes were noted for geranial (29.8–32.8%, citronellal (26.5–33.9% and neral (22.7–23.5%. The activity of the volatile oils against the tested bacteria differed, depending on season the oils were obtained. In general, the volatile oils were more active against Gram-positive bacteria.

  5. Hybrid Composite Ni(OH)(2)@NiCo2O4 Grown on Carbon Fiber Paper for High-Performance Supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, L; Chen, DC; Ding, Y; Wang, ZL; Zeng, ZZ; Liu, ML

    2013-11-13

    We have successfully fabricated and tested the electrochemical performance of supercapacitor electrodes consisting of Ni(OH)(2) nanosheets coated on NiCo2O4 nanosheets grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) current collectors. When the NiCo2O4 nanosheets are replaced by Co3O4 nanosheets, however, the energy and power density as well as the rate capability of the electrodes are significantly reduced, most likely due to the lower conductivity of Co3O4 than that of NiCo2O4. The 3D hybrid composite Ni(OH)(2)/ NiCo2O4/CFP electrodes demonstrate a high areal capacitance of 5.2 F/cm(2) at a cycling current density of 2 rnA/cm(2), with a capacitance retention of 79% as the cycling current density was increased from 2 to 50 mA/cm(2). The remarkable performance of these hybrid composite electrodes implies that supercapacitors based on them have potential for many practical applications.

  6. Spectroscopic investigation of strain induced by compositional variation in bulk In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As crystal grown by MCZM method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M.S.; Islam, M.R. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Khulna University of Engineering and Technoogy, Khulna-920300 (Bangladesh); Yamada, M. [Department of Electronics and Information Science, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Kyoto-606-8585 (Japan)

    2006-04-15

    Raman scattering (RS), photoluminescence (PL) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) experiments have been carried out to investigate residual strain and hence to understand breakage issue in bulk In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As crystal grown by multi component zone melting (MCZM) method. It is found from a comparison that there is a large discrepancy among the RS, PL and EDX results due to the strain induced by compositional variation in the crystal. The strain induced changes in TO{sub GaAs} and PL peak positions are found to be 4.04 cm{sup -1} and 0.097 eV, respectively, for the variation of composition from 0.06 to 0.29 from the seed-end to the tail-end of the crystal. By assuming a simple one-dimensional strain distribution, the strain value corresponding to 4.04 cm{sup -1}/0.097 eV can be obtained of the order of 10{sup -2}, which is large enough for understanding the breakage issue in the crystal investigated here. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Chemical Composition and Anti-Inflammatory, Cytotoxic and Antioxidant Activities of Essential Oil from Leaves of Mentha piperita Grown in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenliang; Wang, Huiyan; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Lianming; Yang, Peiming

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities of essential oil from leaves of Mentha piperita (MEO) grown in China were investigated. Using GC-MS analysis, the chemical composition of MEO was characterized, showing that it was mainly composed of menthol, menthone and menthy acetate. MEO exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activities in a croton oil-induced mouse ear edema model. It could also effectively inhibit nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The cytotoxic effect was assessed against four human cancer cells. MEO was found to be significantly active against human lung carcinoma SPC-A1, human leukemia K562 and human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells, with an IC50 value of 10.89, 16.16 and 38.76 µg/ml, respectively. In addition, MEO had moderate antioxidant activity. The results of this study may provide an experimental basis for further systematic research, rational development and clinical utilization of peppermint resources.

  8. Physical properties of nanostructured (PbSx(CuS1−x composite thin films grown by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.U. Ubale

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured ternary semiconducting (PbSx(CuS1−x thin films were grown on glass substrates by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR technique at room temperature. The structural, morphological and optical characterizations of the films were carried out by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and UV–Vis spectrophotometer respectively. The structural studies revealed that, (PbSx(CuS1−x films are nanocrystalline in nature and have mixed phase of cubic PbS and hexagonal CuS. The optical absorption measurements showed that band gap energy of (PbSx(CuS1−x can be engineered between 2.57 and 2.28 eV by varying compositional parameter ‘x’. The room temperature dc dark electrical resistivity of PbS film is found to be 28.85 Ωcm and it decreases when content of Cu in composite increases and becomes 0.05 Ωcm for pure CuS. The thermo-emf measurements showed that the as deposited (PbSx(CuS1−x films are of n-type. The water angle contact measurements of (PbSx(CuS1−x, revealed that, films are hydrophilic in nature and it could be advantageous in electrochemical application.

  9. Hybrid composite Ni(OH)2@NiCo2O4 grown on carbon fiber paper for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Chen, Dongchang; Ding, Yong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Zeng, Zhengzhi; Liu, Meilin

    2013-11-13

    We have successfully fabricated and tested the electrochemical performance of supercapacitor electrodes consisting of Ni(OH)2 nanosheets coated on NiCo2O4 nanosheets grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) current collectors. When the NiCo2O4 nanosheets are replaced by Co3O4 nanosheets, however, the energy and power density as well as the rate capability of the electrodes are significantly reduced, most likely due to the lower conductivity of Co3O4 than that of NiCo2O4. The 3D hybrid composite Ni(OH)2/NiCo2O4/CFP electrodes demonstrate a high areal capacitance of 5.2 F/cm(2) at a cycling current density of 2 mA/cm(2), with a capacitance retention of 79% as the cycling current density was increased from 2 to 50 mA/cm(2). The remarkable performance of these hybrid composite electrodes implies that supercapacitors based on them have potential for many practical applications.

  10. Chemical Composition of Vegetative Parts and Flowers Essential Oils of Wild Anvillea garcinii Grown in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merajuddin Khan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The flowers and vegetative parts essential oils of Anvillea garcinii were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS using polar and nonpolar columns which led to the identification of total 140 compounds from both oils, among which 130 compounds were identified for the first time in the genus Anvillea. In the flowers oil 126 compounds were identified, whereas 119 compounds were identified in the vegetative parts oil of A. garcinii representing 95.7% and 94.9% of the total oil composition, respectively. The major components in the flowers oil were bornyl acetate (33.7%, cis-nerolidol (7.3% and camphene (6.1%. In contrast, the major compounds in the vegetative parts oil were cis-nerolidol (16.0%, terpine n-4-ol (10.4% and cabreuva oxide B (6.4%.

  11. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of Juniperus excelsa Bieb. (Cupressaceae grown in R. Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floresha Sela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are no information of the yield, chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of berries (EOB or leaves (EOL of Juniperus excelsa Bieb. (Cupressaceae growing wild in R. Macedonia. Materials and Methods: Plant material was collected from two localities during two seasons. Essential oil composition was analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detector/mass spectrometry (GC/FID/MS and antimicrobial screening was made by disc diffusion and broth dilution method. Results and Discussion: EOB yield ranged from 1.6-9.4 ml/kg and from 8.9-13.9 ml/kg for EOL. Two chemotypes of essential oil were differentiated, α-pinene-type (with 70.81% α-pinene in EOB and 33.83% in EOL, also containing limonene, β-pinene and β-myrcene while the sabinene-type (with 58.85-62.58% sabinene in EOB and 28.52-29.49% in EOL, was rich in α-pinene, β-myrcene, limonene, cis-thujone, terpinolene and α-thujene. The most sensitive bacteria to the antimicrobial activity of EOB was Haemophilus influenzae (MIC = 31 μl/ml. EOL have showed high activity towards: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Haemophilus influenzae (MIC = 125 μl/ml. The pinene-type of essential oil showed moderate activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Corynebacterium spp. and Campylobacter jejuni (MIC >50%. The sabinene-type of the oil showed moderate activity to Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemopilus influenzae, Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli (MIC >50%. No activity was observed toward Candida albicans. Conclusion : The analysis of EOB and EOL revealed two chemotypes (α-pinene and sabinene type clearly depended on the geographical origin of the Macedonian Juniperus excelsa which also affected the antimicrobial activity of these oils.

  12. Thermodynamic modeling to analyse composition of carbonaceous coatings of MnO and other oxides of manganese grown by MOCVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sukanya Dhar; A Varade; S A Shivashankar

    2011-02-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic analysis has been applied to the low-pressure MOCVD process using manganese acetylacetonate as the precursor. ``CVD phase stability diagrams” have been constructed separately for the processes carried out in argon and oxygen ambient, depicting the compositions of the resulting films as functions of CVD parameters. For the process conduced in argon ambient, the analysis predicts the simultaneous deposition of MnO and elemental carbon in 1:3 molar proportion, over a range of temperatures. The analysis predicts also that, if CVD is carried out in oxygen ambient, even a very low flow of oxygen leads to the complete absence of carbon in the film deposited oxygen, with greater oxygen flow resulting in the simultaneous deposition of two different manganese oxides under certain conditions. The results of thermodynamic modeling have been verified quantitatively for lowpressure CVD conducted in argon ambient. Indeed, the large excess of carbon in the deposit is found to constitute a MnO/C nanocomposite, the associated cauliflower-like morphology making it a promising candidate for electrode material in supercapacitors. CVD carried out in oxygen flow, under specific conditions, leads to the deposition of more than one manganese oxide, as expected from thermodynamic analysis (and forming an oxide–oxide nanocomposite). These results together demonstrate that thermodynamic analysis of the MOCVD process can be employed to synthesize thin films in a predictive manner, thus avoiding the inefficient trial-and-error method usually associated with MOCVD process development. The prospect of developing thin films of novel compositions and characteristics in a predictive manner, through the appropriate choice of CVD precursors and process conditions, emerges from the present work.

  13. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of Juniperus excelsa Bieb. (Cupressaceae) grown in R. Macedonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Floresha; Karapandzova, Marija; Stefkov, Gjose; Cvetkovikj, Ivana; Kulevanova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are no information of the yield, chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of berries (EOB) or leaves (EOL) of Juniperus excelsa Bieb. (Cupressaceae) growing wild in R. Macedonia. Materials and Methods: Plant material was collected from two localities during two seasons. Essential oil composition was analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detector/mass spectrometry (GC/FID/MS) and antimicrobial screening was made by disc diffusion and broth dilution method. Results and Discussion: EOB yield ranged from 1.6-9.4 ml/kg and from 8.9-13.9 ml/kg for EOL. Two chemotypes of essential oil were differentiated, α-pinene-type (with 70.81% α-pinene in EOB and 33.83% in EOL), also containing limonene, β-pinene and β-myrcene while the sabinene-type (with 58.85-62.58% sabinene in EOB and 28.52-29.49% in EOL), was rich in α-pinene, β-myrcene, limonene, cis-thujone, terpinolene and α-thujene. The most sensitive bacteria to the antimicrobial activity of EOB was Haemophilus influenzae (MIC = 31 μl/ml). EOL have showed high activity towards: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Haemophilus influenzae (MIC = 125 μl/ml). The pinene-type of essential oil showed moderate activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Corynebacterium spp. and Campylobacter jejuni (MIC >50%). The sabinene-type of the oil showed moderate activity to Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemopilus influenzae, Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli (MIC >50%). No activity was observed toward Candida albicans. Conclusion: The analysis of EOB and EOL revealed two chemotypes (α-pinene and sabinene type) clearly depended on the geographical origin of the Macedonian Juniperus excelsa which also affected the antimicrobial activity of these oils. PMID:25598638

  14. Bacteriophage Lysin CF-301, a Potent Antistaphylococcal Biofilm Agent

    KAUST Repository

    Schuch, Raymond

    2017-05-02

    Biofilms pose a unique therapeutic challenge because of the antibiotic tolerance of constituent bacteria. Treatments for biofilm-based infections represent a major unmet medical need, requiring novel agents to eradicate mature biofilms. Our objective was to evaluate bacteriophage lysin CF-301 as a new agent to target Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used minimum biofilm-eradicating concentration (MBEC) assays on 95 S. aureus strains to obtain a 90% MBEC (MBEC90) value of <= 0.25 mu g/ml for CF-301. Mature biofilms of coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae were also sensitive to disruption, with MBEC90 values ranging from 0.25 to 8 mu g/ml. The potency of CF-301 was demonstrated against S. aureus biofilms formed on polystyrene, glass, surgical mesh, and catheters. In catheters, CF-301 removed all biofilm within 1 h and killed all released bacteria by 6 h. Mixed-species biofilms, formed by S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis on several surfaces, were removed by CF-301, as were S. aureus biofilms either enriched for small-colony variants (SCVs) or grown in human synovial fluid. The antibacterial activity of CF-301 was further demonstrated against S. aureus persister cells in exponential-phase and stationary-phase populations. Finally, the antibiofilm activity of CF-301 was greatly improved in combinations with the cell wall hydrolase lysostaphin when tested against a range of S. aureus strains. In all, the data show that CF-301 is highly effective at disrupting biofilms and killing biofilm bacteria, and, as such, it may be an efficient new agent for treating staphylococcal infections with a biofilm component.

  15. Recent patents on physical, mineral & organic Acid composition of golden delicious and red delicious apples (malus×domestica borkh) grown in the west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Amir H K; Falahi, Ebrahim; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Apple is one of the fruits that has beneficial effects on human healthy diet and life. The aim of this study is to determine some physical, mineral and organic acids composition of apple cultivars grown in different locations throughout Lorestan province. Apple cultivars had been harvested from different locations throughout Lorestan province of Iran. Analyses for 3 elements (Iron, Zinc, and calcium) were conducted by the flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Phosphorus was measured by the UV-Vis spectrophotometer and Sodium and Potassium were measured by the flame photometer. Organic acids were determined by Titration method using NaOH and phenolphethalein indicator. Weight was measured by scale based on 0.1 g and length and diameters were measured by caliper. The mean weight of Red Delicious and Golden Delicious apples was 173.7 g and 146.7 g, respectively. The amount of iron, zinc, calcium, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium for the red variety was 0.24, 0.14, 28, 8.9, 4.7 and 63.8 respectively; values for the Golden variety were 0.23, 0.14, 27.9, 8.8, 4.5, and 66.3 mg/100g fresh weight, respectively. The amount of ascorbic acid, malic acid, and citric acid for Golden delicious was 9.09, 0.27 and 0.28, respectively; for Red delicious apples, the amount was 9.47, 0.26 and 0.28 mg/100 g, respectively. Acidities for Golden delicious and Red delicious were 3.7 and 4, respectively. One hundred gram of apple fruit grown in Lorestan would provide 3% of iron, 1.5% of zinc, 2.8% of calcium and 1.4% of potassium requirements. The amount of organic acid in apples of Lorestan province was lower than some other countries.

  16. Chlorine dioxide disinfection of single and dual species biofilms, detached biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Sabrina; Camper, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    Disinfection efficacy testing is usually done with planktonic cells or more recently, biofilms. While disinfectants are much less effective against biofilms compared to planktonic cells, questions regarding the disinfection tolerance of detached biofilm clusters remain largely unanswered. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in chemostats and biofilm tubing reactors, with the tubing reactor serving as a source of detached biofilm clusters. Chlorine dioxide susceptibility was assessed for B. cepacia and P. aeruginosa in these three sample types as monocultures and binary cultures. Similar doses of chlorine dioxide inactivated samples of chemostat and tubing reactor effluent and no statistically significant difference between the log(10) reductions was found. This contrasts with chlorine, shown previously to be generally less effective against detached biofilm particles. Biofilms were more tolerant and required chlorine dioxide doses ten times higher than chemostat and tubing reactor effluent samples. A second species was advantageous in all sample types and resulted in lower log(10) reductions when compared to the single species cultures, suggesting a beneficial interaction of the species.

  17. Effect of packaging materials on the chemical composition and microbiological quality of edible mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) grown on cassava peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oluwakemi; Obadina, Adewale; Idowu, Micheal; Adegunwa, Mojisola; Kajihausa, Olatundun; Sanni, Lateef; Asagbra, Yemisi; Ashiru, Bolanle; Tomlins, Keith

    2015-07-01

    Edible fungi such as mushrooms are highly perishable and deteriorate few days after harvest due to its high moisture content and inability to maintain their physiological status. In this study, the effect of packaging materials on the nutritional composition of mushroom cultivated from cassava peels was investigated. Mushroom samples were dried at 50°C in a cabinet dryer for 8 h. The dried mushroom samples packaged in four different packaging materials; high density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), laminated aluminum foil (LAF), high density polyethylene under vacuum (HDPEV) were stored at freezing (0°C) temperatures for 12 weeks. Samples were collected at 2-week intervals and analyzed for proximate composition (carbohydrate, protein, fat, fiber, ash, moisture), mineral content (calcium, potassium), vitamin C content, and microbiological qualities (total aerobic count, Pseudomonal count, Coliform count, Staphylococcal count, Salmonella count) using the standard laboratory procedures. Carbohydrate, protein, fat content of dried mushrooms packaged in HDPE at freezing temperature ranged from 45.2% to 53.5%, 18.0% to 20.3%, and 3.2% to 4.3%, while mushrooms in polypropylene ranged from 45.2% to 53.5%, 18.5% to 20.3%, 2.6% to 4.3%. Carbohydrate, protein, fat of mushroom in LAF ranged from 47.8% to 53.5%, 17.3% to 20.3%, and 3.3% to 4.3%, respectively, while carbohydrate, protein, fat of mushroom in HDPEV ranged from 51.1% to 53.5%, 19.5% to 20.3%, and 3.5% to 4.3%. Microbiological analysis showed that total aerobic count, Pseudomonal count, and Staphyloccocal count of dried mushroom ranged from 2.3 to 3.8 log cfu/g, 0.6 to 1.1 log cfu/g, and 0.4 to 0.5 log cfu/g, respectively. In conclusion, dried mushroom in HDPE packaged under vacuum at freezing temperature retained the nutritional constituents than those packaged with other packaging materials.

  18. Proximate Composition, Nutritional Attributes and Mineral Composition of Peperomia pellucida L. (Ketumpangan Air Grown in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maznah Ismail

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the proximate and mineral composition of Peperomia pellucida L., an underexploited weed plant in Malaysia. Proximate analysis was performed using standard AOAC methods and mineral contents were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicated Peperomia pellucida to be rich in crude protein, carbohydrate and total ash contents. The high amount of total ash (31.22% suggests a high-value mineral composition comprising potassium, calcium and iron as the main elements. The present study inferred that Peperomia pellucida would serve as a good source of protein and energy as well as micronutrients in the form of a leafy vegetable for human consumption.

  19. Composite Electrode using Graphite and Opuntia imbricata to Develop an Anodophilic Biofilm in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Guerrrero-Rangel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the use of a composite electrode in the anodic compartment to increase energy output and reduce the cost of Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC. In order to transfer electrons by conduction by electrogenic microorganisms to the electrode this have to be in direct contact with the electrode, being this a limitation to MFC due to limited surface area available in electrode. A two-chamber MFC was used, with graphite electrodes, anodic electrode was inserted in a small piece of coyonoztle (Opuntia imbricata. MFC was operated in fedbatch mode during a period of 60 days, using glucose as carbon source glucose (3 g/L, three external loads were used (5.5 KΩ, 1 KΩ and 560 Ω. Maximum voltage, current and power density was obtained for the case of 1 KΩ; 205.88 mV, 139.33 A y 3.43 W.cm2, respectably.

  20. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of berry essential oil of Juniperus oxycedrus L. (Cupressaceae grown wild in Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floresha Sela

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oil isolated from berries from 2 different samples of Juniperus oxycedrus L. (Cupressaceae, growing wild in Republic of Macedonia was investigated. Performing GC/FID/MS analysis, one hundred components were identified, representing 96.0-98.95% of the oil. The major components were α-pinene (22.54- 27.12%, myrcene (11.26- 15.13% and limonene (2.78-18.06%. Antimicrobial screening of the J. oxycedrus essential oils was made by disc diffusion and broth dilution method against 16 bacterial isolates of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and one strain of Candida albicans. The most sensitive bacteria was Haemophilus influenzae (MIC = 125 ml/ml. The essential oils showed moderate antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Corynebacterium spp., Escherichia coli and Campilobacter jejuni (MIC > 500 ml/ml and no activity against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Acinetobacter spp., Salmonella enteritidis, Shigella flexnery, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus and Proteus mirabilis.

  1. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of leaves essential oil of Juniperus communis (Cupressaceae grown in Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floresha Sela

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils isolated from leaves of three different samples of wild growing Juniperus communis L. (Cupressaceae from R. Macedonia was investigated. Essential oil yield ranged from 7.3 to 9.0 ml/kg. Performing GC/ FID/MS analysis, ninety components were identified, representing 86.07-93.31% of the oil. The major components of the leaves essential oil (LEO were α-pinene (21.37-28.68% and sabinene (2.29-16.27%, followed by limonene, terpinen-4-ol, β-elemene, trans-(E-caryophyllene, germacrene D and δ-cadinene. Antimicrobial screening of the LEO was made by disc diffusion and broth dilution method against 16 bacterial isolates of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and one strain of Candida albicans. Two bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes were sensitive to antimicrobial activity of LEO (MIC = 125 µl/ml. Additionally, LEO showed moderate antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus agalactiae, Haemophilus influnzae, Corynebacterium spp. and Campylobacter jejuni (MIC > 500 µl/ml. Candida albicans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Acinetobacter spp., Salmonella enteritidis, Shigella flexneri, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis were completely resistant to the antimicrobial effects of this.

  2. Chemical composition and anticancer activity of essential oils of Mediterranean sage (Salvia officinalis L.) grown in different environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Alessandra; Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Senatore, Felice; Delfine, Sebastiano; Cardile, Venera; Rosselli, Sergio; Bruno, Maurizio

    2013-05-01

    Salvia officinalis L. can be found worldwide and its leaves are commonly used as ingredient in food industry. Sage essential oil is applied in the treatment of a range of diseases and has been shown to possess different biological activities. The objectives of our research were to study the effects of environment on crop, chemical composition and anticancer activity on S. officinalis essential oil. Sage was cultivated at eighteen experimental sites in south-central Italy (Molise) in different growing environments. The essential oils (S1-S18), extracted by hydrodistillation, were analyzed by GC and CG/MS. Results show that the main components were α-thujone, camphor, borneol, γ-muurolene and sclareol for all the samples, but the percentages of these compounds varied depending on environmental factors such as altitude, water availability and pedo-climatic conditions. The growth-inhibitory and proapoptotic effects of the eighteen sage essential oils were evaluated in three human melanoma cell lines, A375, M14, and A2058.

  3. Morphology, composition and electrical properties of SnO{sub 2}:Cl thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hsyi-En, E-mail: sean@mail.stust.edu.tw; Wen, Chia-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Ming [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan 71005, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-15

    Chlorine doped SnO{sub 2} thin films were prepared using atomic layer deposition at temperatures between 300 and 450 °C using SnCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O as the reactants. Composition, structure, surface morphology, and electrical properties of the as-deposited films were examined. Results showed that the as-deposited SnO{sub 2} films all exhibited rutile structure with [O]/[Sn] ratios between 1.35 and 1.40. The electrical conductivity was found independent on [O]/[Sn] ratio but dependent on chlorine doping concentration, grain size, and surface morphology. The 300 °C-deposited film performed a higher electrical conductivity of 315 S/cm due to its higher chlorine doping level, larger grain size, and smoother film surface. The existence of Sn{sup 2+} oxidation state was demonstrated to minimize the effects of chlorine on raising the electrical conductivity of films.

  4. Structure and composition of zirconium carbide thin-film grown by ion beam sputtering for optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Amol, E-mail: modimh@rrcat.gov.in; Modi, Mohammed H., E-mail: modimh@rrcat.gov.in; Dhawan, Rajnish, E-mail: modimh@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: modimh@rrcat.gov.in [X-ray Optics Section, ISU Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Thin film of compound material ZrC was deposited on Si (100) wafer using ion beam sputtering method. The deposition was carried out at room temperature and at base pressure of 3×10{sup −5} Pa. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were performed for determining the surface chemical compositions. Grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity (GIXRR) measurements were performed to study the film thickness, roughness and density. From GIXRR curve roughness value of the film was found less than 1 nm indicating smooth surface morphology. Films density was found 6.51 g/cm{sup 3}, which is close to bulk density. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were performed to check the surface morphology. AFM investigation showed that the film surface is smooth, which corroborate the GIXRR data. Figure 2 of the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, contained a PDF processing error. This article was updated on 12 May 2014 to correct that error.

  5. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  6. Rapid depletion of dissolved oxygen in 96-well microtiter plate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm assays promotes biofilm development and is influenced by inoculum cell concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, John J; O'Gara, James P; Casey, Eoin

    2009-08-01

    Biofilm-related research using 96-well microtiter plates involves static incubation of plates indiscriminate of environmental conditions, making oxygen availability an important variable which has not been considered to date. By directly measuring dissolved oxygen concentration over time we report here that dissolved oxygen is rapidly consumed in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm cultures grown in 96-well plates irrespective of the oxygen concentration in the gaseous environment in which the plates are incubated. These data indicate that depletion of dissolved oxygen during growth of bacterial biofilm cultures in 96-well plates may significantly influence biofilm production. Furthermore higher inoculum cell concentrations are associated with more rapid consumption of dissolved oxygen and higher levels of S. epidermidis biofilm production. Our data reveal that oxygen depletion during bacterial growth in 96-well plates may significantly influence biofilm production and should be considered in the interpretation of experimental data using this biofilm model.

  7. Chemical composition and nutritive value of four varieties of cassava leaves grown in South-Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, A O; Onwuka, C F I; Arigbede, O M; Anele, U Y; Oduguwa, O O; Onifade, O S; Tan, Z L

    2011-10-01

    The nutritive value of leaves of four varieties of cassava - MS 6, TMS 30555, Idileruwa and TMS 30572 was evaluated based on their chemical composition and in vitro fermentation. Crude protein (CP) contents of cassava leaves ranged from 177 to 240 g/kg dry matter (DM), with TMS 30555 showing the highest CP contents. Neutral detergent fibre (NDFom) and acid detergent fibre (ADFom) contents of cassava leaves ranged from 596 to 662 and 418 to 546 g/kg DM respectively. Condensed tannin (CT) and hydrocyanic acid contents ranged from 1.0 to 3.8 g/kg and 58.5 to 86.7 mg/kg DM respectively. The range of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the supernatant after in vitro incubation of the cassava varieties was: acetate (14.7-31.5 mmol/l); propionate (4.5-6.3 mmol/l); butyrate (3.1-3.9 mmol/l); valerate (0.4-0.6 mmol/l); iso-butyrate (0.6-1.3 mmol/l); iso-valerate (1.1-1.9 mmol/l). The acetate:propionate ratio resulting from fermentation of TMS 30555 was higher(p leaves. The highest in vitro gas production of 50.5 ml/200 mg DM was recorded for MS6 being higher (p cassava leaves were positively correlated with gas production, while CT content was negatively correlated with gas production. The study showed that leaves of the varieties MS 6 and TMS 30555 are superior to the others in terms of CP and gas production indicating a higher digestibility and energy content and thus nutritive potential. They may therefore serve as supplements for ruminants fed on poor roughages.

  8. Tracking the autochthonous carbon transfer in stream biofilm food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risse-Buhl, Ute; Trefzger, Nicolai; Seifert, Anne-Gret; Schönborn, Wilfried; Gleixner, Gerd; Küsel, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Food webs in the rhithral zone rely mainly on allochthonous carbon from the riparian vegetation. However, autochthonous carbon might be more important in open canopy streams. In streams, most of the microbial activity occurs in biofilms, associated with the streambed. We followed the autochthonous carbon transfer toward bacteria and grazing protozoa within a stream biofilm food web. Biofilms that developed in a second-order stream (Thuringia, Germany) were incubated in flow channels under climate-controlled conditions. Six-week-old biofilms received either ¹³C- or ¹²C-labeled CO₂, and uptake into phospholipid fatty acids was followed. The dissolved inorganic carbon of the flow channel water became immediately labeled. In biofilms grown under 8-h light/16-h dark conditions, more than 50% of the labeled carbon was incorporated in biofilm algae, mainly filamentous cyanobacteria, pennate diatoms, and nonfilamentous green algae. A mean of 29% of the labeled carbon reached protozoan grazer. The testate amoeba Pseudodifflugia horrida was highly abundant in biofilms and seemed to be the most important grazer on biofilm bacteria and algae. Hence, stream biofilms dominated by cyanobacteria and algae seem to play an important role in the uptake of CO₂ and transfer of autochthonous carbon through the microbial food web.

  9. Enhancement of anodic biofilm formation and current output in microbial fuel cells by composite modification of stainless steel electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuxiang; Feng, Huajun; Shen, Dongsheng; Li, Na; Guo, Kun; Zhou, Yuyang; Xu, Jing; Chen, Wei; Jia, Yufeng; Huang, Bin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we first systematically investigate the current output performance of stainless steel electrodes (SS) modified by carbon coating (CC), polyaniline coating (PANI), neutral red grafting (NR), surface hydrophilization (SDBS), and heat treatment (HEAT). The maximum current density of 13.0 A m-2 is obtained on CC electrode (3.0 A m-2 of the untreated anode). Such high performance should be attributed to its large effective surface area, which is 2.3 times that of the unmodified electrode. Compared with SS electrode, about 3-fold increase in current output is achieved with PANI. Functionalization with hydrophilic group and electron medium result in the current output rising to 1.5-2 fold, through enhancing bioadhesive and electron transport rate, respectively. CC modification is the best choice of single modification for SS electrode in this study. However, this modification is not perfect because of its poor hydrophilicity. So CC electrode is modified by SDBS for further enhancing the current output to 16 A m-2. These results could provide guidance for the choice of suitable single modification on SS electrodes and a new method for the perfection of electrode performance through composite modification.

  10. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  11. Corrosion of the intra-oral magnets by multi-species biofilms in the presence and absence of sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M; Patel, H; Kpendema, H; Noar, J H; Hunt, N P; Mordan, N J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the corrosive effects of multi-species biofilms on intra-oral magnets in the presence and absence of sucrose. Using pooled human saliva as an inoculum, biofilms were grown on the surfaces of 90 neodymium-iron-boron (Nd2Fe14B) magnets in a constant depth film fermentor under aerobic conditions at 37 degrees C. The fluid phase was a mucin-containing artificial saliva (delivered at a rate of 0.72/litres day-1), and, after 15 days, 100 ml of 10% (w/v) sucrose was added (as three pulses of 33.3 ml) each day for a further 15 days. Six magnets with attached biofilms were removed periodically. On each sampling occasion the numbers of aerobes, anaerobes, streptococci, veillonellae and actinomyces in each biofilm, the pH of the fermentor effluent and the dry mass of the magnets were determined. Addition of sucrose to the fermentor resulted in a fall in pH (from a mean of 6.94 to a mean of 4.96), an increase in the proportion of streptococci and a decrease in the proportion of veillonellae comprising the biofilms. The decrease in mass of the magnets was 28-fold greater in the presence of sucrose than in its absence. The results of this study have shown that the presence of sucrose affects the microbial composition of multi-species biofilms growing on Nd2Fe14B magnets and results in a marked increase in corrosion of the magnets.

  12. Evaluation of intraspecies interactions in biofilm formation by Methylobacterium species isolated from pink-pigmented household biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang-Fang; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Wang, Wen-Zhao; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Liang, Yan; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Concern regarding household biofilms has grown due to their widespread existence and potential to threaten human health by serving as pathogen reservoirs. Previous studies identified Methylobacterium as one of the dominant genera found in household biofilms. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying biofilm formation by using the bacterial consortium found in household pink slime. A clone library analysis revealed that Methylobacterium was the predominant genus in household pink slime. In addition, 16 out of 21 pink-pigmented bacterial isolates were assigned to the genus Methylobacterium. Although all of the Methylobacterium isolates formed low-level biofilms, the amount of the biofilms formed by Methylobacterium sp. P-1M and P-18S was significantly increased by co-culturing with other Methylobacterium strains that belonged to a specific phylogenetic group. The single-species biofilm was easily washed from the glass surface, whereas the dual-species biofilm strongly adhered after washing. A confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis showed that the dual-species biofilms were significantly thicker and tighter than the single-species biofilms.

  13. Raman mapping of intact biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Julie K.; Heighton, Lynne; Xu, Yunfeng; Nou, Xiangwu; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2016-05-01

    Many issues occur when microbial bacteria contaminates human food or water; it can be dangerous to the public. Determining how the microbial are growing, it can help experts determine how to prevent the outbreaks. Biofilms are a tightly group of microbial cells that grow on living surfaces or surrounding themselves. Though biofilms are not necessarily uniform; when there are more than one type of microbial bacteria that are grown, Raman mapping is performed to determine the growth patterns. Depending on the type of microbial bacteria, they can grow in various patterns such as symmetrical or scattered on the surface. The biofilms need to be intact in order to preclude and potentially figuring out the relative intensity of different components in a biofilm mixture. In addition, it is important to determine whether one biofilms is a substrate for another biofilm to be detected. For example, it is possible if layer B appears above layer A, but layer A doesn't appear above layer B. In this case, three types of biofilms that are grown includes Listeria(L), Ralstonia(R), and a mixture of the two (LR). Since microbe deposits on metal surfaces are quite suitable, biofilms were grown on stainless steel surface slides. Each slide was viewed under a Raman Microscope at 100X and using a 532nm laser to provide great results and sharp peaks. The mapping of the laser helps determine how the bacteria growth, at which intensity the bacteria appeared in order to identify specific microbes to signature markers on biofilms.

  14. Methods for studying biofilm formation: flow cells and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter methods for growing and analyzing biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions in flow cells are described. Use of flow cells allows for direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The flow in these chambers is essentially laminar, which means that the biofilms can be grown u......, inoculation of the flow cells, running of the system, confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis, and disassembly and cleaning of the system.......In this chapter methods for growing and analyzing biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions in flow cells are described. Use of flow cells allows for direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The flow in these chambers is essentially laminar, which means that the biofilms can be grown...

  15. Identification of different bacterial species in biofilms using confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is used to discriminate between different species of bacteria grown in biofilms. Tests are performed using two bacterial species, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans, which are major components of oral plaque and of particular interest due to their association with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Dehydrated biofilms of these species are studied as a simplified model of dental plaque. A prediction model based on principal component analysis and logistic regression is calibrated using pure biofilms of each species and validated on pure biofilms grown months later, achieving 96% accuracy in prospective classification. When biofilms of the two species are partially mixed together, Raman-based identifications are achieved within ~2 μm of the boundaries between species with 97% accuracy. This combination of spatial resolution and predication accuracy should be suitable for forming images of species distributions within intact two-species biofilms.

  16. Propionibacterium acnes biofilm - A sanctuary for Staphylococcus aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Harmony; Patel, Robin

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of combined culture of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus on biofilm formation under different oxygen concentrations. We measured planktonic growth and biofilm formation of P. acnes and S. aureus alone and together under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both P. acnes and S. aureus grew under anaerobic conditions. When grown under anaerobic conditions, P. acnes with or without S. aureus formed a denser biomass biofilm than did S. aureus alone. Viable S. aureus was recovered from a16-day old combined P. acnes and S. aureus biofilm, but not a monomicrobial S. aureus biofilm.

  17. In vitro anaerobic biofilms of human colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule-Willoughby, K M; Stanton, M Mark; Rioux, K P; McKay, D M; Buret, A G; Ceri, H

    2010-12-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complex community of microorganisms that grow as biofilms on the intestinal mucosa. These bacterial communities are not well characterized, although they are known to play an important role in human health. This study aimed to develop a model for culturing biofilms (surface-adherent communities) of intestinal microbiota. The model utilizes adherent mucosal bacteria recovered from colonic biopsies to create multi-species biofilms. Culture on selective media and confocal microscopy indicated the biofilms were composed of a diverse community of bacteria. Molecular analyses confirmed that several phyla were represented in the model, and demonstrated stability of the community over 96 h when cultured in the device. This model is novel in its use of a multi-species community of mucosal bacteria grown in a biofilm mode of growth. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Visualizing biofilm formation in endotracheal tubes using endoscopic three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Andrew E.; Moghaddam, Samer; Troung, Kimberly K.; Chou, Lidek; Genberg, Carl; Brenner, Matthew; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm formation has been linked to ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is a prevalent infection in hospital intensive care units. Currently, there is no rapid diagnostic tool to assess the degree of biofilm formation or cellular biofilm composition. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally invasive, nonionizing imaging modality that can be used to provide high-resolution cross-sectional images. Biofilm deposited in critical care patients' endotracheal tubes was analyzed in vitro. This study demonstrates that OCT could potentially be used as a diagnostic tool to analyze and assess the degree of biofilm formation and extent of airway obstruction caused by biofilm in endotracheal tubes.

  19. High Nutrient Load Increases Biostabilization of Sediment by Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, K.; Mariotti, G.

    2016-12-01

    Benthic biofilms, matrixes of microbial cells and their secretions, have been shown to stabilize sediment in coastal environments. While there have been numerous studies on the effects of nutrients on the ability of vascular plants to stabilize sediment, few studies have investigated how nutrients affect biofilm growth and their ability to stabilize sediment. Diatom-based biofilms were grown in laboratory experiments on a settled bed of bentonite clay, under a saline water column with varying amounts of nutrients. Erodibility at different stages of biofilm growth was measured using a Gust Erosion Microcosm System, which applied shear stresses from 0.05 to 0.6 Pa. Biofilms more than one week old decreased the erodibility of the sediments in all nutrient treatments compared to abiotic experiments. With high nutrients, the biofilm grew the fastest; the erodibility decreased within two weeks of biofilm growth and remained low for all applied shear stresses. After four weeks of biofilm growth, no erosion of sediment occurred even at the highest applied shear stress (0.6 Pa). With low nutrients the erodibility decreased within three weeks. With no nutrients the biofilms grew similarly to those with low nutrients; the erodibility decreased within three weeks under shear stresses 0.05-0.45 Pa, but the sediments were eroded under high shear stresses. Under low to moderate shear stresses (0.05-0.45 Pa), the total mass eroded by all experiments with biofilms was similar, suggesting that any amount of biofilm decreases erodibility at low shear stresses. In summary, high nutrients allow for faster biostabilization and for resistance to extreme shear stresses. These results suggest that eutrophication would not decrease the biofilm ability to stabilize muddy sediments in coastal environment.

  20. Characterization of Fatty Acid, Amino Acid and Volatile Compound Compositions and Bioactive Components of Seven Coffee (Coffea robusta Cultivars Grown in Hainan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjiang Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Compositions of fatty acid, amino acids, and volatile compound were investigated in green coffee beans of seven cultivars of Coffea robusta grown in Hainan Province, China. The chlorogenic acids, trigonelline, caffeine, total lipid, and total protein contents as well as color parameters were measured. Chemometric techniques, principal component analysis (PCA, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA, and analysis of one-way variance (ANOVA were performed on the complete data set to reveal chemical differences among all cultivars and identify markers characteristic of a particular botanical origin of the coffee. The major fatty acids of coffee were linoleic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, and arachic acid. Leucine (0.84 g/100 g DW, lysine (0.63 g/100 g DW, and arginine (0.61 g/100 g DW were the predominant essential amino acids (EAAs in the coffee samples. Seventy-nine volatile compounds were identified and semi-quantified by HS-SPME/GC-MS. PCA of the complete data matrix demonstrated that there were significant differences among all cultivars, HCA supported the results of PCA and achieved a satisfactory classification performance.

  1. Characterization of Fatty Acid, Amino Acid and Volatile Compound Compositions and Bioactive Components of Seven Coffee (Coffea robusta) Cultivars Grown in Hainan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjiang; Tan, Lehe; Zhao, Jianping; Hu, Rongsuo; Lu, Minquan

    2015-09-14

    Compositions of fatty acid, amino acids, and volatile compound were investigated in green coffee beans of seven cultivars of Coffea robusta grown in Hainan Province, China. The chlorogenic acids, trigonelline, caffeine, total lipid, and total protein contents as well as color parameters were measured. Chemometric techniques, principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and analysis of one-way variance (ANOVA) were performed on the complete data set to reveal chemical differences among all cultivars and identify markers characteristic of a particular botanical origin of the coffee. The major fatty acids of coffee were linoleic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, and arachic acid. Leucine (0.84 g/100 g DW), lysine (0.63 g/100 g DW), and arginine (0.61 g/100 g DW) were the predominant essential amino acids (EAAs) in the coffee samples. Seventy-nine volatile compounds were identified and semi-quantified by HS-SPME/GC-MS. PCA of the complete data matrix demonstrated that there were significant differences among all cultivars, HCA supported the results of PCA and achieved a satisfactory classification performance.

  2. Volatile composition in raspberry cultivars grown in the Pacific Northwest determined by stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malowicki, Sarah M M; Martin, Robert; Qian, Michael C

    2008-06-11

    Twenty-nine volatile compounds in 'Chilliwack', 'Tulameen', 'Willamette', 'Yellow Meeker', and 'Meeker' raspberries were quantified using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) paired with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Good correlation coefficients were obtained with most aroma-active compounds in raspberry, with quantification limits of 1 microg/kg. However, poor recoveries were observed for raspberry ketone and zingerone. Quantitative data showed that volatile concentrations varied for different cultivars. Large variations for alpha-ionone, beta-ionone, geraniol, linalool, and ( Z)-3-hexenol were observed in different raspberry cultivars. In addition, the volatile compositions in 'Meeker' raspberry grown at different locations also varied. The chiral isomeric ratios of raspberry ketone, alpha-ionone, alpha-pinene, linalool, terpinen-4-ol, delta-octalactone, delta-decalactone, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol were studied using a CyclosilB column. alpha-Ionone, alpha-pinene, delta-octalactone, and delta-decalactone had strong chiral isomeric preference, with more than 96% for one isomeric form. Much weaker chiral isomeric preference was observed for terpinen-4-ol, while linalool was almost a racemic mixture. Both growing locations and cultivars affect the isomeric ratio of linalool with a range of 37-51% for ( R)-linalool.

  3. Effects of irrigation regimes on fatty acid composition, antioxidant and antifungal properties of volatiles from fruits of Koroneiki cultivar grown under Tunisian conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Faten; Chehab, Hechmi; Flamini, Guido; Dhibi, Madiha; Issaoui, Manel; Mastouri, Maha; Hammami, Mohamed

    2013-11-15

    The olive tree is generally grown under rain-fed conditions. However, since the yield response to irrigation is great, even with low amounts of water, there is increasing interest in irrigated agriculture. The main goal of this study was, therefore, to investigate the effect of irrigation regimes on olive (Olea europaea L., cv. Koroneiki) obtained from an intensively-managed orchard in a semi-arid area with a Mediterranean climate in Tunisia. Different irrigation treatments 50% ETc, 75% ETc and 100% ETc were applied to the olive orchard. Accordingly, the effects of three irrigation regimes on volatile compounds, fatty acid composition and biological activities of Koroneiki cultivar were studied. The total profile of the volatile constituents of all samples revealed the predominance of 3-ethenylpyridine (from 14.9-19.6%), phenylethyl alcool (from 7.8-19.2%) and benzaldehyde (from 9.0 to 13.8%). During watering level treatments studied, the major fatty acids were oleic, palmitic and linoleic. Antioxidant activity of the fresh fruit volatiles cultivated at a watering level of 100% ETc was higher than that obtained under 50 and 75% Etc. The results of antifungal activity showed that the fruits volatiles of the three irrigation treatments had varying degrees of growth inhibition against the microorganisms tested.

  4. Chemical composition and bioactive compounds of grape pomace (Vitis vinifera L., Benitaka variety, grown in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldina Castro Sousa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Grape pomace (Vitis vinifera L., Benitaka variety, grown in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil was evaluated in relation to chemical composition, and content of minerals and functional properties. Its microbiological quality and toxic potential, using Artemia salina sp, were also investigated. The results showed that the flour obtained from these residues had below neutral pH (3.82, moisture (3.33g/100g, acidity of (0.64g of citric acid/100g, and ash (4.65 g/100g. The amount of total dietary fiber (46.17g/100g stood out quantitatively compared to the content of carbohydrate (29.2g/100 g, protein (8.49g/100g, and lipids (8.16g/100g. The total energy was 224Kcal/100g. With regard to the compounds with functional properties, higher values of insoluble fiber 79% (36.4 g/100 g; vitamin C (26.25 mg of acid ascorbic/100g, and anthocyanins (131mg/100g were found. The minerals iron, potassium, zinc, manganese, and calcium were present in higher concentrations. There were no significant copper values. The results showed that the grape residues are an important source of nutrients and compounds with functional properties suggesting that they can be incorporated as an ingredient in the diet and/or used as a dietary supplement aiming at health benefits. The residues did not show microbiological contamination and were considered nontoxic.

  5. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe A. Lemire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR carriers (biofilm support materials, allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that mixed-species biofilms can be harvested from an industrial wastewater inoculum [oil sands process water (OSPW] using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD. Moreover, the resultant biofilm communities had the capacity to degrade organic toxins (naphthenic acids—NAs that are found in OSPW. Therefore, we hypothesized that harnessing microbial communities from industrial wastewater, as biofilms, on MBBR carriers may be an effective method to bioremediate industrial wastewater.Here, we detail our methodology adapting the workflow employed for using the CBD, to generate inoculant carriers to seed an MBBR.In this study, OSPW-derived biofilm communities were successfully grown, and their efficacy evaluated, on commercially available MBBR carriers affixed within a modified CBD system. The resultant biofilms demonstrated the capacity to transfer biomass to recipient carriers within a scaled MBBR. Moreover, MBBR systems inoculated in this manner were fully active 2 days post-inoculation, and readily degraded a select population of NAs. Together, these findings suggest that harnessing microbial communities on carriers affixed within a modified CBD system may represent a facile and rapid method for obtaining functional inoculants for use in wastewater MBBR treatment systems.

  6. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  7. Quorum sensing-regulated chitin metabolism provides grazing resistance to Vibrio cholerae biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuyang; Tay, Qi Xiang Martin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A; McDougald, Diane

    2015-08-01

    Association of Vibrio cholerae with chitinous surfaces of zooplankton is important for its persistence in marine environments, as it provides accessibility to nutrients and resistance to stresses. Predation by heterotrophic protists has a major impact on the survival of V. cholerae. V. cholerae forms biofilms as its main defensive strategy, and quorum sensing (QS) additionally regulates the production of antiprotozoal factors. The role of chitin and QS regulation in V. cholerae grazing resistance was investigated by exposing V. cholerae wild-type (WT) and QS mutant biofilms grown on chitin flakes to the bacteriotrophic, surface-feeding flagellate Rhynchomonas nasuta. V. cholerae formed more biofilm biomass on chitin flakes compared with nonchitinous surfaces. The growth of R. nasuta was inhibited by WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes, whereas the inhibition was attenuated in QS mutant biofilms. The chitin-dependent toxicity was also observed when the V. cholerae biofilms were developed under continuous flow or grown on a natural chitin source, the exoskeleton of Artemia. In addition, the antiprotozoal activity and ammonium concentration of V. cholerae biofilm supernatants were quantified. The ammonium levels (3.5 mM) detected in the supernatants of V. cholerae WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes were estimated to reduce the number of R. nasuta by >80% in add-back experiments, and the supernatant of QS mutant biofilms was less toxic owing to a decrease in ammonium production. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of genes involved in chitin metabolism and chemotaxis were significantly downregulated in QS mutant biofilms when grown on chitin compared with the WT biofilms.

  8. Quorum sensing-regulated chitin metabolism provides grazing resistance to Vibrio cholerae biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuyang; Tay, Qi Xiang Martin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A; McDougald, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Association of Vibrio cholerae with chitinous surfaces of zooplankton is important for its persistence in marine environments, as it provides accessibility to nutrients and resistance to stresses. Predation by heterotrophic protists has a major impact on the survival of V. cholerae. V. cholerae forms biofilms as its main defensive strategy, and quorum sensing (QS) additionally regulates the production of antiprotozoal factors. The role of chitin and QS regulation in V. cholerae grazing resistance was investigated by exposing V. cholerae wild-type (WT) and QS mutant biofilms grown on chitin flakes to the bacteriotrophic, surface-feeding flagellate Rhynchomonas nasuta. V. cholerae formed more biofilm biomass on chitin flakes compared with nonchitinous surfaces. The growth of R. nasuta was inhibited by WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes, whereas the inhibition was attenuated in QS mutant biofilms. The chitin-dependent toxicity was also observed when the V. cholerae biofilms were developed under continuous flow or grown on a natural chitin source, the exoskeleton of Artemia. In addition, the antiprotozoal activity and ammonium concentration of V. cholerae biofilm supernatants were quantified. The ammonium levels (3.5 mM) detected in the supernatants of V. cholerae WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes were estimated to reduce the number of R. nasuta by >80% in add-back experiments, and the supernatant of QS mutant biofilms was less toxic owing to a decrease in ammonium production. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of genes involved in chitin metabolism and chemotaxis were significantly downregulated in QS mutant biofilms when grown on chitin compared with the WT biofilms. PMID:25615438

  9. Endodontic Biofilm: Quo Vadis?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatiana Ramírez Mora

    2016-01-01

    .... However, the evidence of biofilm along the root canal system and the inability of current instruments and irrigants to eliminate bacterial biofilm have built a barrier toward a higher favorable...

  10. Biofilms of Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaléon, Véronique; Bouttier, Sylvie; Soavelomandroso, Anna Philibertine; Janoir, Claire; Candela, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The biofilm is a microbial community embedded in a synthesized matrix and is the main bacterial way of life. A biofilm adheres on surfaces or is found on interfaces. It protects bacteria from the environment, toxic molecules and may have a role in virulence. Clostridium species are spread throughout both environments and hosts, but their biofilms have not been extensively described in comparison with other bacterial species. In this review we describe all biofilms formed by Clostridium species during both industrial processes and in mammals where biofilms may be formed either during infections or associated to microbiota in the gut. We have specifically focussed on Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens biofilms, which have been studied in vitro. Regulatory processes including sporulation and germination highlight how these Clostridium species live in biofilms. Furthermore, biofilms may have a role in the survival and spreading of Clostridium species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Red fluorescent biofilm: the thick, the old, and the cariogenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M.C. Volgenant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some dental plaque fluoresces red. The factors involved in this fluorescence are yet unknown. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess systematically the effect of age, thickness, and cariogenicity on the extent of red fluorescence produced by in vitro microcosm biofilms. Design: The effects of biofilm age and thickness on red fluorescence were tested in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF by growing biofilms of variable thicknesses that received a constant supply of defined mucin medium (DMM and eight pulses of sucrose/day. The influence of cariogenicity on red fluorescence was tested by growing biofilm on dentin disks receiving DMM, supplemented with three or eight pulses of sucrose/day. The biofilms were analyzed at different time points after inoculation, up to 24 days. Emission spectra were measured using a fluorescence spectrophotometer (λexc405 nm and the biofilms were photographed with a fluorescence camera. The composition of the biofilms was assessed using 454-pyrosequecing of the 16S rDNA gene. Results: From day 7 onward, the biofilms emitted increasing intensities of red fluorescence as evidenced by the combined red fluorescence peaks. The red fluorescence intensity correlated with biofilm thickness but not in a linear way. Biofilm fluorescence also correlated with the imposed cariogenicity, evidenced by the induced dentin mineral loss. Increasing the biofilm age or increasing the sucrose pulsing frequency led to a shift in the microbial composition. These shifts in composition were accompanied by an increase in red fluorescence. Conclusions: The current study shows that a thicker, older, or more cariogenic biofilm results in a higher intensity of red fluorescence.

  12. Red fluorescent biofilm: the thick, the old, and the cariogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M.C.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Buijs, Mark J.; Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob (Bob) M.; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Some dental plaque fluoresces red. The factors involved in this fluorescence are yet unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to assess systematically the effect of age, thickness, and cariogenicity on the extent of red fluorescence produced by in vitro microcosm biofilms. Design The effects of biofilm age and thickness on red fluorescence were tested in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF) by growing biofilms of variable thicknesses that received a constant supply of defined mucin medium (DMM) and eight pulses of sucrose/day. The influence of cariogenicity on red fluorescence was tested by growing biofilm on dentin disks receiving DMM, supplemented with three or eight pulses of sucrose/day. The biofilms were analyzed at different time points after inoculation, up to 24 days. Emission spectra were measured using a fluorescence spectrophotometer (λexc405 nm) and the biofilms were photographed with a fluorescence camera. The composition of the biofilms was assessed using 454-pyrosequecing of the 16S rDNA gene. Results From day 7 onward, the biofilms emitted increasing intensities of red fluorescence as evidenced by the combined red fluorescence peaks. The red fluorescence intensity correlated with biofilm thickness but not in a linear way. Biofilm fluorescence also correlated with the imposed cariogenicity, evidenced by the induced dentin mineral loss. Increasing the biofilm age or increasing the sucrose pulsing frequency led to a shift in the microbial composition. These shifts in composition were accompanied by an increase in red fluorescence. Conclusions The current study shows that a thicker, older, or more cariogenic biofilm results in a higher intensity of red fluorescence. PMID:27060056

  13. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm and planktonic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissel J Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival dental plaque, as part of a mature biofilm, has been strongly implicated in the onset and progression of chronic periodontitis. In this study using DNA microarray we compared the global gene expression of a P. gingivalis biofilm with that of its planktonic counterpart grown in the same continuous culture. Results Approximately 18% (377 genes, at 1.5 fold or more, P-value P. gingivalis genome was differentially expressed when the bacterium was grown as a biofilm. Genes that were down-regulated in biofilm cells, relative to planktonic cells, included those involved in cell envelope biogenesis, DNA replication, energy production and biosynthesis of cofactors, prosthetic groups and carriers. A number of genes encoding transport and binding proteins were up-regulated in P. gingivalis biofilm cells. Several genes predicted to encode proteins involved in signal transduction and transcriptional regulation were differentially regulated and may be important in the regulation of biofilm growth. Conclusion This study analyzing global gene expression provides insight into the adaptive response of P. gingivalis to biofilm growth, in particular showing a down regulation of genes involved in growth and metabolic activity.

  14. Filifactor alocis - involvement in periodontal biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göbel Ulf B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria in periodontal pockets develop complex sessile communities that attach to the tooth surface. These highly dynamic microfloral environments challenge both clinicians and researchers alike. The exploration of structural organisation and bacterial interactions within these biofilms is critically important for a thorough understanding of periodontal disease. In recent years, Filifactor alocis, a fastidious, Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic rod was repeatedly identified in periodontal lesions using DNA-based methods. It has been suggested to be a marker for periodontal deterioration. The present study investigated the epidemiology of F. alocis in periodontal pockets and analysed the spatial arrangement and architectural role of the organism in in vivo grown subgingival biofilms. Results A species-specific oligonucleotide probe, FIAL, was designed and evaluated. A total of 490 subgingival plaque samples were submitted to PCR and subsequent dot blot hybridization to compare the prevalence of F. alocis in patients suffering from generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP, chronic periodontitis (CP, and control subjects resistant to periodontitis. Moreover, a specially designed carrier system was used to collect in vivo grown subgingival biofilms from GAP patients. Subsequent topographic analysis was performed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. While the majority of patients suffering from GAP or CP harboured F. alocis, it was rarely detected in the control group. In the examined carrier-borne biofilms the organism predominantly colonized apical parts of the pocket in close proximity to the soft tissues and was involved in numerous structures that constitute characteristic architectural features of subgingival periodontal biofilms. Conclusions F. alocis is likely to make a relevant contribution to the pathogenetic structure of biofilms accounting for periodontal inflammation and can be considered an excellent marker

  15. Biofilms: A microbial home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  16. Biofilms: A microbial home

    OpenAIRE

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms.

  17. Pattern differentiation in co-culture biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Markussen, Trine;

    2011-01-01

    important for understanding of biofilm physiology and the treatment of biofilm-related infectious diseases. Here, we have investigated interactions of two of the major bacterial species of cystic fibrosis lung microbial communities -Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus- when grown in co...

  18. Pyoverdine and PQS Mediated Subpopulation Interactions Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Nilsson, Martin; Gjermansen, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    Using flow chamber-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms as model system, we show in the present study that formation of heterogeneous biofilms may occur through mechanisms that involve complex subpopulation interactions. One example of this phenomenon is expression of the iron...

  19. Effect of biofilm formation on virulence factor secretion via the general secretory pathway in Streptococcus mutans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, M.; Meng, L.; Fan, M.; Hu, P.; Bian, Z.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the role of SecA in protein secretion, and to evaluate the effect of biofilm formation on protein secretion in Streptococcus mutans. DESIGN: S. mutans strains UA159 and GS-5 were used in this study. Cells grown in biofilm and planktonic conditions were observed using immun

  20. Biofilm formation on the Provox ActiValve: Composition and ingrowth analyzed by Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, A.J.; Harmsen, H.J.M.; Bus-Spoor, C.; Buijssen, K.J.D.A.; van As-Brooks, C.; de Goffau, M.C.; Tonk, R.H.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; van der Laan, B.F.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most frequent cause of voice prosthesis failure is microbial biofilm formation on the silicone valve, leading to destruction of the material and transprosthetic leakage. The Provox ActiValve valve is made of fluoroplastic, which should be insusceptible to destruction. Aim: determinin

  1. Biofilm formation on the Provox ActiValve : Composition and ingrowth analyzed by Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Adriana J; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Bus-Spoor, Carien; Buijssen, Kevin J D A; van As-Brooks, Corina; de Goffau, Marcus C; Tonk, Rudi H; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Hilgers, Frans J M; van der Laan, Bernard F A M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most frequent cause of voice prosthesis failure is microbial biofilm formation on the silicone valve, leading to destruction of the material and transprosthetic leakage. The Provox ActiValve valve is made of fluoroplastic, which should be insusceptible to destruction. The purpose of

  2. Characterization of biofilm-forming cyanobacteria for biomass and lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, L; Di Pippo, F; Antonaroli, S; Gismondi, A; Valentini, C; Albertano, P

    2012-11-01

    This work reports on one of the first attempts to use biofilm-forming cyanobacteria for biomass and lipid production. Three isolates of filamentous cyanobacteria were obtained from biofilms at different Italian sites and characterized by a polyphasic approach, involving microscopic observations, ecology and genetic diversity (studying the 16S rRNA gene). The isolates were grown in batch systems and in a semi-continuous flow incubator, specifically designed for biofilms development. Culture system affected biomass and lipid production, but did not influence the fatty acid profile. The composition of fatty acids was mainly palmitic acid (>50%) and less amounts of other saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Only two isolates contained two polyunsaturated fatty acids. Data obtained from the flow-lane incubator system would support a more economical and sustainable use of the benthic micro-organisms for biomass production. The produced lipids contained fatty acids suitable for a high-quality biodiesel production, showing high proportions of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Data seem promising when taking into account the savings in cost and time derived from easy procedures for biomass harvesting, especially when being able to obtain the co-production of other valuable by-products. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Zheng

    2014-07-15

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  4. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng; Lu, Huijie; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    an efficient dosing regimen and to minimize the development of antimicrobial tolerance and resistance in biofilm infections. Unfortunately, most previous PK/PD studies of antibiotics have been done on planktonic cells, and extrapolation of the results on biofilms is problematic as bacterial biofilms differ......Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish...... from planktonic grown cells in the growth rate, gene expression, and metabolism. Here, we set up several protocols for the studies of PK/PD of antibiotics in biofilm infections of P. aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. It should be underlined that none of the protocols in biofilms have yet been...

  6. Evaluation of MBEC™-HTP biofilm model for studies of implant associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coraça-Hubér, Debora C; Fille, Manfred; Hausdorfer, Johann; Pfaller, Kristian; Nogler, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The bacteria in implant-related infections can evade host defenses by forming biofilms. The more we understand biofilm behavior, the better we can fight against then clinically. In vitro models for biofilms allow tests simulating in vivo conditions. In this study we evaluated the Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration-High Throughput Plates (MBEC™-HTP) as biofilm in vitro model for studies of implant associated infections. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms were grown on MBEC™-HTP. To ensure the biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out. Susceptibility tests were carried out using gentamicin, vancomycin, rifampicin, fosfomycin, clindamycin, and linezolid. Colony forming units counting were carried out. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and biofilm inhibitory concentration (BIC) were estimated. The CFU counting showed potency of rifampicin and daptomycin against S. epidermidis biofilms and rifampicin against S. aureus biofilms. SEM images showed proteic material in contact with cells. The differences between BIC and MIC demonstrated the biofilm formation as well as the SEM images. Rifampicin and daptomycin are good choices against biofilm related infections. Moreover, after suggested modifications, the model used in this study is eligible to further studies of implant associated infections. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  7. Role of the nuclease of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in dispersal of organisms from biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Christine; Chande, Aroon; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ketterer, Margaret; Shao, Jian; Gotoh, Kenji; Foster, Eric; Hunt, Jason; O'Brien, Erin; Apicella, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) forms biofilms in the middle ear during human infection. The biofilm matrix of NTHI contains extracellular DNA. We show that NTHI possesses a potent nuclease, which is a homolog of the thermonuclease of Staphylococcus aureus. Using a biofilm dispersal assay, studies showed a biofilm dispersal pattern in the parent strain, no evidence of dispersal in the nuclease mutant, and a partial return of dispersion in the complemented mutant. Quantitative PCR of mRNA from biofilms from a 24-h continuous flow system demonstrated a significantly increased expression of the nuclease from planktonic organisms compared to those in the biofilm phase of growth (P < 0.042). Microscopic analysis of biofilms grown in vitro showed that in the nuclease mutant the nucleic acid matrix was increased compared to the wild-type and complemented strains. Organisms were typically found in large aggregates, unlike the wild-type and complement biofilms in which the organisms were evenly dispersed throughout the biofilm. At 48 h, the majority of the organisms in the mutant biofilm were dead. The nuclease mutant formed a biofilm in the chinchilla model of otitis media and demonstrated a propensity to also form similar large aggregates of organisms. These studies indicate that NTHI nuclease is involved in biofilm remodeling and organism dispersal.

  8. Does dental biofilm accumulation differ between night and day?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Nyvad, Bente

    Objective: The initial microbial colonization of dental surfaces has been studied thoroughly by classical ultrastructural and microbiological studies and further analysed by fluorescent methods. Most of these studies, however, do not differentiate between biofilms formed during night and day....... The purpose of the study was to perform a quantitative and qualitative analysis of in situ dental biofilms collected during night and day, respectively. We hypothesised that there is a circadian rhythm in the accumulation of bacteria during initial biofilm formation. Methods: Biofilms were collected....... The qualitative analysis confirmed this difference within all individuals but with large inter-individual variation in the degree of microbial coverage and bacterial composition. Conclusions: The study provides firm evidence that initial biofilm formation decreases during night. Low biofilm accumulation during...

  9. Modelling of the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, J.-P.; Arvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    . It indicated that the most influential factors were those related to the biofilm (i.e. density; solid volume fraction; thickness). This suggests that in order to improve the model, further research is needed in the field of biofilm structure and composition. (C) 1997 IAWQ. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.......A model describing the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm is presented. This model involves simultaneous growth of methanotrophs, heterotrophs and nitrifiers. Heterotrophic biomass grows on soluble polymers which arise from the hydrolysis of dead biomass entrapped in the biofilm. Nitrifiers develop...... because of the presence of ammonia in the mineral medium. A comparison of this model with experimental data showed that the biofilm growth, methane removal, oxygen consumption, product formation and biofilm detachment could be fitted well. Parameter estimation yielded a maximum growth rate...

  10. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    plasmids* in*populations*of* Gram > negative *bacteria*grown*in*biofilms*and*well>mixed*liquid*cultures.** * Task2:*Characterize*the*evolution*of*plasmid...R.! Edwards.! 2005.! Overview! of! nosocomial! infections! caused! by! gramP negative ! bacilli .!Clin.!Infect.!Dis.!41:848P854.! LoftiePEaton,!W.,!A... negative ! interaction!between!one!of! its!chromosomal!segments!and!the!plasmid! by!simply!deleting!the!appropriate!chromosomal!segment.!! 7. None

  11. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended culture batch kinetic experiments were not representative of drinking water distribution systems where bacteria grow predominantly as biofilm attached to pipe walls or sediments and physiological differences may exist between suspension and biofilm growth. Therefore, the current research was an important next step in extending the previous results to investigate monochloramine cometabolism by biofilm grown in annular reactors under drinking water relevant conditions. Estimated monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism was a significant loss mechanism (25–40% of the observed monochloramine loss). These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in drinking water relevant nitrifying biofilm; thus, cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in distribution systems. Investigate whether or not nitrifying biofilm can biologically transform monochloramine under drinking water relevant conditions.

  12. Effect of different 1% chlorhexidine varnish regimens on biochemical composition of the dental biofilm = Efeito de diferentes posologias do verniz de clorexidina a 1% na composição bioquímica do biofilme dentário

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Luciana Gazaniga Maia; Maltz,Marisa; Hashizume,Lina Naomi

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo: Este estudo avaliou o efeito de diferentes posologias do verniz de clorexidina a 1% (V-CHX1%) na composição bioquímica do biofilme dental Metodologia: Voluntários com níveis de Streptococcus mutans = 105 UFC/mL saliva, foram divididos em 4 grupos: A - uma única aplicação do V-CHX1%; B - aplicações de 1x/dia do V-CHX1% durante 3 dias consecutivos; C - 3 aplicações de 1x/dia do V-CHX1% com intervalos de 4 dias entre elas; D - aplicações de 1x/dia do verniz placebo durante 3 dias co...

  13. In situ molecular imaging of hydrated biofilm in a microfluidic reactor by ToF-SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Li; Liu, Bingwen; Zhu, Zihua; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Songqin; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2014-02-26

    The first results of using a novel single channel microfluidic reactor to enable Shewanella biofilm growth and in situ characterization using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in the hydrated environment are presented. The new microfluidic interface allows direct probing of the liquid surface using ToF-SIMS, a vacuum surface technique. The detection window is an aperture of 2 m in diameter on a thin silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and it allows direct detection of the liquid surface. Surface tension of the liquid flowing inside the microchannel holds the liquid within the aperture. ToF-SIMS depth profiling was used to drill through the SiN membrane and the biofilm grown on the substrate. In situ 2D imaging of the biofilm in hydrated state was acquired, providing spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in the biofilm system. This data was compared with a medium filled microfluidic reactor devoid of biofilm and dried biofilm samples deposited on clean silicon wafers. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate these observations. Our results show that imaging biofilms in the hydrated environment using ToF-SIMS is possible using the unique microfluidic reactor. Moreover, characteristic biofilm fatty acids fragments were observed in the hydrated biofilm grown in the microfluidic channel, illustrating the advantage of imaging biofilm in its native environment.

  14. Antifungal susceptibility of Candida biofilms: unique efficacy of amphotericin B lipid formulations and echinocandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, D M; George, T; Chandra, J; Mukherjee, P K; Ghannoum, M A

    2002-06-01

    Biofilms, likely the predominant mode of device-related microbial infection, exhibit resistance to antimicrobial agents. Evidence suggests that Candida biofilms have dramatically reduced susceptibility to antifungal drugs. We examined antifungal susceptibilities of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms grown on a bioprosthetic model. In addition to conventional agents, we determined if new antifungal agents (triazoles, amphotericin B lipid formulations, and echinocandins) have activities against Candida biofilms. We also explored effects of preincubation of C. albicans cells with subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of drugs to see if they could modify subsequent biofilm formation. Finally, we used confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) to image planktonic- and biofilm-exposed blastospores to examine drug effects on cell structure. Candida biofilms were formed on silicone elastomer and quantified by tetrazolium and dry weight (DW) assays. Susceptibility testing of fluconazole, nystatin, chlorhexidine, terbenafine, amphotericin B (AMB), and the triazoles voriconazole (VRC) and ravuconazole revealed resistance in all Candida isolates examined when grown as biofilms, compared to planktonic forms. In contrast, lipid formulations of AMB (liposomal AMB and AMB lipid complex [ABLC]) and echinocandins (caspofungin [Casp] and micafungin) showed activity against Candida biofilms. Preincubation of C. albicans cells with sub-MIC levels of antifungals decreased the ability of cells to subsequently form biofilm (measured by DW; P formulations.

  15. Assessing the dynamic biofilm removal of sulfonated phenolics using CP-OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, K.; Nikrad, J.; Jones, R.

    2017-02-01

    Examining the physical mechanisms related to biofilm removal of sulfonated phenolics (SP) is difficult using conventional microscopy techniques. A custom flow cell system integrated with a real time cross polarization optical coherence tomography system investigated the dynamic speed of biofilm removal when oral multi-species biofilms are exposed to SP under sheer stress. The Near infrared 1310-nm CP-OCT system non-destructively imaged fluid immersed oral biofilms at nearly 30 frames/s. This dynamic imaging was able to determine the cohesive and adhesion related disruption of SP on oral biofilms adhering to tooth like surfaces. For multi-species biofilms that are initially grown without the presence of sucrose, the disruption of biofilms on saliva coated hydroxyapatite (HA) is dominated as a adhesive failure at the HA-biofilm interface. For multi-species biofilms that are grown in the presence of sucrose, the disruption is dominated by cohesive disruption followed by adhesive failure. This novel CP-OCT flow cell assay has the potential to examine rapid interactions between anti-biofilm agents and tooth like surfaces.

  16. Characterization of extracellular polymeric matrix, and treatment of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms with DNase I and proteinase K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Mansoor Ali Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are organized communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM, often with great phylogenetic variety. Bacteria in the subgingival biofilm are key factors that cause periodontal diseases; among these are the Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The objectives of this study were to characterize the major components of the EPM and to test the effect of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I and proteinase K. Methods: F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis bacterial cells were grown in dynamic and static biofilm models. The effects of DNase I and proteinase K enzymes on the major components of the EPM were tested during biofilm formation and on mature biofilm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used in observing biofilm structure. Results: Proteins and carbohydrates were the major components of the biofilm matrix, and extracellular DNA (eDNA was also present. DNase I and proteinase K enzymes had little effect on biofilms in the conditions used. In the flow cell, F. nucleatum was able to grow in partially oxygenated conditions while P. gingivalis failed to form biofilm alone in similar conditions. F. nucleatum supported the growth of P. gingivalis when they were grown together as dual species biofilm. Conclusion: DNase I and proteinase K had little effect on the biofilm matrix in the conditions used. F. nucleatum formed biofilm easily and supported the growth of P. gingivalis, which preferred anaerobic conditions.

  17. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Aspects on Campylobacter jejuni Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta T. Melo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm represents a way of life that allows greater survival of microorganisms in hostile habitats. Campylobacter jejuni is able to form biofilms in vitro and on surfaces at several points in the poultry production chain. Genetic determinants related to their formation are expressed differently between strains and external conditions are decisive in this respect. Our approach combines phylogenetic analysis and the presence of seven specific genes linked to biofilm formation in association with traditional microbiology techniques, using Mueller Hinton and chicken juice as substrates in order to quantify, classify, determine the composition and morphology of the biomass of simple and mixed biofilms of 30 C. jejuni strains. It also evaluates the inhibition of its formation by biocides commonly used in industry and also by zinc oxide nanoparticles. Genetic analysis showed high heterogeneity with the identification of 23 pulsotypes. Despite the diversity, the presence of flaA, cadF, luxS, dnaJ, htrA, cbrA, and sodB genes in all strains shows the high potential for biofilm formation. This ability was only expressed in chicken juice, where they presented phenotype of a strong biofilm producer, with a mean count of 7.37 log CFU/mL and an ultrastructure characteristic of mature biofilm. The composition of simple and mixed biofilms was predominantly composed by proteins. The exceptions were found in mixed biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which includes a carbohydrate-rich matrix, lower ability to sessile form in chicken juice and compact architecture of the biofilm, this aspects are intrinsic to this species. Hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, and peracetic acid were more effective in controlling viable cells of C. jejuni in biofilm, but the existence of tolerant strains indicates exposure to sublethal concentrations and development of adaptation mechanisms. This study shows that in chicken juice C. jejuni presents greater potential in producing mature

  18. Functional Relationship between Sucrose and a Cariogenic Biofilm Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Na Cai

    Full Text Available Sucrose is an important dietary factor in cariogenic biofilm formation and subsequent initiation of dental caries. This study investigated the functional relationships between sucrose concentration and Streptococcus mutans adherence and biofilm formation. Changes in morphological characteristics of the biofilms with increasing sucrose concentration were also evaluated. S. mutans biofilms were formed on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs in culture medium containing 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, or 40% (w/v sucrose. The adherence (in 4-hour biofilms and biofilm composition (in 46-hour biofilms of the biofilms were analyzed using microbiological, biochemical, laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic methods. To determine the relationships, 2nd order polynomial curve fitting was performed. In this study, the influence of sucrose on bacterial adhesion, biofilm composition (dry weight, bacterial counts, and water-insoluble extracellular polysaccharide (EPS content, and acidogenicity followed a 2nd order polynomial curve with concentration dependence, and the maximum effective concentrations (MECs of sucrose ranged from 0.45 to 2.4%. The bacterial and EPS bio-volume and thickness in the biofilms also gradually increased and then decreased as sucrose concentration increased. Furthermore, the size and shape of the micro-colonies of the biofilms depended on the sucrose concentration. Around the MECs, the micro-colonies were bigger and more homogeneous than those at 0 and 40%, and were surrounded by enough EPSs to support their structure. These results suggest that the relationship between sucrose concentration and cariogenic biofilm formation in the oral cavity could be described by a functional relationship.

  19. Hydrothermally grown and self-assembled modified titanium and nickel oxide composite nanosheets on Nitinol-based fibers for efficient solid phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiju; Song, Wenlan; Zhang, Min; Zhen, Qi; Guo, Mei; Zhang, Yida; Du, Xinzhen

    2016-10-14

    A novel titanium and nickel oxide composite nanosheets (TiO2/NiOCNSs) coating was in situ grown on a Nitinol (NiTi) wire by direct hydrothermal treatment and modified by self-assembly of trichlorophenylsilane for solid phase microextraction (SPME). TiO2/NiOCNSs were radially oriented and chemically bonded to the NiTi substrate with double-faced open access sites. Moreover the phenyl modified TiO2/NiOCNSs (TiO2/NiOCNSs-Ph) coating exhibited original surface supporting framework favorable for effective SPME. The extraction performance of TiO2/NiOCNSs-Ph coated NiTi (NiTi-TiO2/NiOCNSs-Ph) fiber was investigated for the concentration and detection of ultraviolet (UV) filters, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalate acid esters and polychlorinated biphenyls coupled to HPLC with UV detection. The novel fiber exhibited better selectivity for UV filters and PAHs and presented greater extraction capability compared to commercial polydimethylsiloxane and polyacrylate fibers. Under the optimized conditions for SPME of UV filters, the proposed method presented linear ranges from 0.1 to 300μg/L with correlation coefficients of higher than 0.999 and limits of detection from 0.030μg/L to 0.064μg/L. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) were below 7.16% and 8.42% for intra-day and inter-day measurements with the single fiber, respectively. Furthermore RSDs for fiber-to-fiber reproducibility from 6.57% to 8.93% were achieved. The NiTi-TiO2/NiOCNSs-Ph fiber can be used up to 200 times. The proposed method was successfully applied to the preconcentration and determination of trace target UV filters in different environmental water samples. The relative recoveries from 87.3% to 104% were obtained with RSDs less than 8.7%.

  20. Stress relaxation analysis facilitates a quantitative approach towards antimicrobial penetration into biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Peterson, Brandon W; Jongsma, Marije A; Ren, Yijin; Sharma, Prashant K; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections can develop everywhere in the human body and are rarely cleared by the host immune system. Moreover, biofilms are often tolerant to antimicrobials, due to a combination of inherent properties of bacteria in their adhering, biofilm mode of growth and poor physical penetration of antimicrobials through biofilms. Current understanding of biofilm recalcitrance toward antimicrobial penetration is based on qualitative descriptions of biofilms. Here we hypothesize that stress relaxation of biofilms will relate with antimicrobial penetration. Stress relaxation analysis of single-species oral biofilms grown in vitro identified a fast, intermediate and slow response to an induced deformation, corresponding with outflow of water and extracellular polymeric substances, and bacterial re-arrangement, respectively. Penetration of chlorhexidine into these biofilms increased with increasing relative importance of the slow and decreasing importance of the fast relaxation element. Involvement of slow relaxation elements suggests that biofilm structures allowing extensive bacterial re-arrangement after deformation are more open, allowing better antimicrobial penetration. Involvement of fast relaxation elements suggests that water dilutes the antimicrobial upon penetration to an ineffective concentration in deeper layers of the biofilm. Next, we collected biofilms formed in intra-oral collection devices bonded to the buccal surfaces of the maxillary first molars of human volunteers. Ex situ chlorhexidine penetration into two weeks old in vivo formed biofilms followed a similar dependence on the importance of the fast and slow relaxation elements as observed for in vitro formed biofilms. This study demonstrates that biofilm properties can be derived that quantitatively explain antimicrobial penetration into a biofilm.

  1. Experimental study of cadmium interaction with periphytic biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, O.S., E-mail: oleg@lmtg.obs-mip.fr [Geochimie et Biogeochimie Experimentale, UMR 5563, CNRS-OMP-Universite Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Feurtet-Mazel, A. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Martinez, R.E. [Center for Applied Geosciences, Universitat Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Morin, S. [Unite de Recherche Reseaux, Epuration et Qualite des Eaux REQE, Cemagref, 50 Avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Baudrimont, M. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Duong, T. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)] [Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Coste, M. [Unite de Recherche Reseaux, Epuration et Qualite des Eaux REQE, Cemagref, 50 Avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    This study addresses the interaction of Cd with natural biofilms of periphytic diatoms grown during different seasons in metal-contaminated and metal-non-contaminated streams, along a tributary of the Lot River, France. Specifically, it aims to test whether the biofilms from contaminated sites have developed a protective mechanism due to high Cd exposure. Towards this goal, reversible adsorption experiments on untreated biofilms were performed in 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} with a pH ranging from 2 to 8, Cd concentration from 0.5 to 10,000 {mu}g/L and exposure time from 1 to 24 h. Two types of experiments, pH-dependent adsorption edge and constant-pH 'Langmuirian'-type isotherms were conducted. Results were adequately modeled using a Linear Programming Model. It was found that the adsorption capacities of natural biofilm consortia with respect to Cd do not depend on season and are not directly linked to the growth environment. The biofilms grown in non-contaminated (4.6 ppb Cd in solid) and contaminated (570 ppb Cd in solid) settings exhibit similar adsorption capacities in the Cd concentration range in solution of 100-10,000 {mu}g/L but quite different capacities at low Cd concentration (0.5-100 {mu}g/L); unexpectedly, the non-contaminated biofilm adsorbs approximately 10 times more Cd than the contaminated one. It is therefore possible that the strong low-abundant ligands (for example, phosphoryl or sulfhydryls) are already metal-saturated on surfaces of biofilm grown in the contaminated site whereas these sites are still available for metal adsorption in samples grown in non-contaminated sites.

  2. Interspecies interactions result in enhanced biofilm formation by co-cultures of bacteria isolated from a food processing environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Raghupathi, Prem Krishnan; Herschend, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    examined for multispecies biofilm formation. Eight strains from each sampling site were chosen and all possible combinations of four member co-cultures were tested for enhanced biofilm formation at 15°C and 24°C. In approximately 20% of the multispecies consortia grown at 15°C, the biofilm formation......Bacterial attachment and biofilm formation can lead to poor hygienic conditions in food processing environments. Furthermore, interactions between different bacteria may induce or promote biofilm formation. In this study, we isolated and identified a total of 687 bacterial strains from seven...... different locations in a meat processing environment and evaluated their biofilm formation capability. A diverse group of bacteria was isolated and most were classified as poor biofilm producers in a Calgary biofilm device assay. Isolates from two sampling sites, the wall and the meat chopper, were further...

  3. Incorporation of Listeria monocytogenes strains in raw milk biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Christiane; Ifland, Andrea; Naumann, Annette; Kleta, Sylvia; Noll, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms develop successively on devices of milk production without sufficient cleaning and originate from the microbial community of raw milk. The established biofilm matrices enable incorporation of pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause a continuous contamination of food processing plants. L. monocytogenes is frequently found in raw milk and non-pasteurized raw milk products and as part of a biofilm community in milk meters and bulk milk tanks. The aim of this study was to analyze whether different L. monocytogenes strains are interacting with the microbial community of raw milk in terms of biofilm formation in the same manner, and to identify at which stage of biofilm formation a selected L. monocytogenes strain settles best. Bacterial community structure and composition of biofilms were analyzed by a cloning and sequencing approach and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) based on the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The chemical composition of biofilms was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while settled L. monocytogenes cells were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Addition of individual L. monocytogenes strains to raw milk caused significant shifts in the biofilm biomass, in the chemical as well as in the bacterial community composition. Biofilm formation and attachment of L. monocytogenes cells were not serotype but strain specific. However, the added L. monocytogenes strains were not abundant since mainly members of the genera Citrobacter and Lactococcus dominated the bacterial biofilm community. Overall, added L. monocytogenes strains led to a highly competitive interaction with the raw milk community and triggered alterations in biofilm formation.

  4. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E. A.; Huq, N. Laila; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge. PMID:27589264

  5. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashper, Stuart G; Catmull, Deanne V; Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E A; Huq, N Laila; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge.

  6. Appreciating the role of carbon nanotube composites in preventing biofouling and promoting biofilms on material surfaces in environmental engineering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K K; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana

    2010-01-01

    The ability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to undergo surface modification allows them to form nanocomposites (NCs) with materials such as polymers, metal nanoparticles, biomolecules, and metal oxides. The biocidal nature, protein fouling resistance, and fouling release properties of CNT-NCs render them the perfect material for biofouling prevention. At the same time, the cytotoxicity of CNT-NCs can be reduced before applying them as substrates to promote biofilm formation in environmental biotechnology applications. This paper reviews the potential prospects of CNT-NCs to accomplish two widely varying objectives in environmental engineering applications: (i) preventing biofouling, and (ii) promoting the formation of desirable biofilms on materials surface. This paper addresses practical issues such as costs, risks to human health, and ecological impacts that are associated with the application, development and commercialization of CNT-NC technology.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes-carrying consortia in food industry. Composition, subtyping and numerical characterisation of mono-species biofilm dynamics on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Pedro; Saá-Ibusquiza, Paula; Mosquera-Fernández, Maruxa; López-Cabo, Marta

    2015-08-03

    In order to find out how real Listeria monocytogenes-carrying biofilms are in industrial settings, a total of 270 environmental samples belonging to work surfaces from fish (n = 123), meat (n = 75) and dairy industries (n = 72) were analysed in order to detect L. monocytogenes. 12 samples were positive for L. monocytogenes and a total of 18 different species were identified as accompanying microbiota in fish and meat industry. No L. monocytogenes was found in samples from dairy industry. Molecular characterisation combining results of AscI and ApaI macrorestriction PFGE assays yielded 7 different subtypes of L. monocytogenes sharing in 71.43% of cases the same serogroup (1/2a-3a). Results from dynamic numerical characterisation between L. monocytogenes monospecies biofilms on stainless steel (SS) using MATLAB-based tool BIOFILMDIVER demonstrated that except in isolate A1, in which a significant increase in the percentage of covered area (CA), average diffusion distance (ADD) and maximum diffusion distance (MDD) was observed after 120 h of culture, no significant differences were observed in the dynamics of the rest of the L. monocytogenes isolates. Quantitative dual-species biofilm association experiments performed on SS indicated that L. monocytogenes cell counts presented lower values in mixed-species cultures with certain species at 24 and 48 h compared with mono-species culture. However, they remained unaltered after 72 h except when co-cultured with Serratia fonticola which presented differences in all sampling times and was also the dominant species within the dual-species biofilm. When considering frequency of appearance of accompanying species, an ecological distribution was demonstrated as Escherichia coli appeared to be the most abundant in fish industry and Carnobacterium spp. in meat industry.

  8. Roles of curli, cellulose and BapA in Salmonella biofilm morphology studied by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kader Abdul

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curli, cellulose and the cell surface protein BapA are matrix components in Salmonella biofilms. In this study we have investigated the roles of these components for the morphology of bacteria grown as colonies on agar plates and within a biofilm on submerged mica surfaces by applying atomic force microscopy (AFM and light microscopy. Results AFM imaging was performed on colonies of Salmonella Typhimurium grown on agar plates for 24 h and on biofilms grown for 4, 8, 16 or 24 h on mica slides submerged in standing cultures. Our data show that in the wild type curli were visible as extracellular material on and between the cells and as fimbrial structures at the edges of biofilms grown for 16 h and 24 h. In contrast to the wild type, which formed a three-dimensional biofilm within 24 h, a curli mutant and a strain mutated in the global regulator CsgD were severely impaired in biofilm formation. A mutant in cellulose production retained some capability to form cell aggregates, but not a confluent biofilm. Extracellular matrix was observed in this mutant to almost the same extent as in the wild type. Overexpression of CsgD led to a much thicker and a more rapidly growing biofilm. Disruption of BapA altered neither colony and biofilm morphology nor the ability to form a biofilm within 24 h on the submerged surfaces. Besides curli, the expression of flagella and pili as well as changes in cell shape and cell size could be monitored in the growing biofilms. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that atomic force microscopy can efficiently be used as a tool to monitor the morphology of bacteria grown as colonies on agar plates or within biofilms formed in a liquid at high resolution.

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilm growth in vitro and in vivo and its role in colonization, virulence, and genetic exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Federle, Michael J; Hakansson, Anders P

    2014-07-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) commonly colonizes the oropharynx and nonintact skin. However, colonization has been little studied and the role of biofilm formation is unclear, as biofilm experiments to date have not been conducted under conditions that mimic the host environment. In this study we grew GAS biofilms on human keratinocytes under various environmental conditions and used this model to evaluate colonization, invasive disease and natural transformation. GAS grown on epithelial cells, but not biofilms grown on abiotic surfaces, produced biofilms with characteristics similar to in vivo colonization. These biofilm bacteria showed a 100-fold higher bacterial burden of nasal-associated lymphoid tissue in mice than broth-grown bacteria, and were not virulent during septic infection, which was attributed in part to down-regulation of genes typically involved in localized and invasive disease. We also showed for the first time that GAS were naturally transformable when grown in biofilms and during colonization of NALT in vivo. These findings provide novel model systems to study biofilm formation of GAS in vitro and in vivo, suggest an important role for biofilm formation during GAS colonization, and provide an explanation for the known genome diversity within the GAS population.

  10. Investigation of biofilm formation on contact eye lenses caused by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-20

    Apr 20, 2014 ... and 10 microbial surface components that recognize adhesive matrix molecule .... composition on biofilm production diluted overnight ..... A three‑phase in‑vitro system for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion and.

  11. Yield, morphological characteristics, and chemical composition of European- and Mediterranean-derived birdsfoot trefoil cultivars grown in the colder continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commonly grown North American birdsfoot trefoil (BFT, Lotus corniculatus L.) varieties, such as Norcen,0 produce forage with insufficient condensed tannin (CT) concentrations to maximize ruminant livestock performance. Our objective was to identify European and Mediterranean genotypes with higher CT...

  12. Contribution of alginate and levan production to biofilm formation by Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laue, H.; Schenk, A.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    and in blebs. No binding of ConA was observed in biofilms of the levan-deficient mutants or in wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose as confirmed by an enzyme-linked lectin-sorbent assay using peroxidase-linked ConA. Time-course studies revealed that expression of the levan-forming enzyme...... by binding of the lectin from Naja mossambica to a fibrous structure in biofilms of all P. syringae derivatives. Production of the as yet uncharacterized additional EPS might be more important for biofilm formation than the syntheses of levan and alginate....

  13. Contribution of alginate and levan production to biofilm formation by Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laue, H.; Schenk, A.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    , levansucrase, occurred mainly during early exponential growth of both planktonic and sessile cells. Thus, accumulation of levan in biofilm voids hints to a function as a nutrient storage source for later stages of biofilm development. The presence of a third EPS besides levan and alginate was indicated...... and in blebs. No binding of ConA was observed in biofilms of the levan-deficient mutants or in wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose as confirmed by an enzyme-linked lectin-sorbent assay using peroxidase-linked ConA. Time-course studies revealed that expression of the levan-forming enzyme...

  14. In vitro study of biofilm growth on biologic prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Charles; Smith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Biologic prosthetics are increasingly used for the repair of abdominal wall hernia defects but can become infected as a result of peri- or early post-operative bacterial contamination. Data evaluating biofilm formation on biologic prosthetics is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different biologic prosthetics on the growth behavior of two different bacterial species and their ability to form biofilms. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomrnonas aeruginosa were incubated on disks of two biologic prosthetics-human acellular dermis (ADM), and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The bacteria were allowed to attach to the prosthetics and propagate into mature biofilms for 24 hours at 370C. Images of biofilms were obtained using confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of viable cells and the biofilm biomass were quantified by colony forming units (CFUs) and crystal violet staining respectively. Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean values for the different prosthetics. Each biologic matrix had a distinct surface characteristic. SEM visualized mature biofilms characterized by highly organized multi-cellular structures on surface of both biologic prosthetics. Quantification of bacterial growth over time showed that ADM had the lowest CFUs and biofilm biomass at 24 hours post-inoculation compared to SIS for both bacterial strains. MRSA and P. aeruginosa can form mature biofilms on biologic prosthetics but the relative abundance of the biofilm varies on different prosthetic constructs. Biologic material composition and manufacturing methods may influence bacterial adherence.

  15. Designing Multiagent Dental Materials for Enhanced Resistance to Biofilm Damage at the Bonded Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary Anne; Orrego, Santiago; Weir, Michael D; Xu, Huakun H K; Arola, Dwayne D

    2016-05-11

    The oral environment is considered to be an asperous environment for restored tooth structure. Recurrent dental caries is a common cause of failure of tooth-colored restorations. Bacterial acids, microleakage, and cyclic stresses can lead to deterioration of the polymeric resin-tooth bonded interface. Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge anticaries agents for the design of new, long-lasting, bioactive resin-based dental materials is demanding and provoking work. Released antibacterial agents such as silver nanoparticles (NAg), nonreleased antibacterial macromolecules (DMAHDM, dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate), and released acid neutralizer amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (NACP) have shown potential as individual and dual anticaries approaches. In this study, these agents were synthesized, and a prospective combination was incorporated into all the dental materials required to perform a composite restoration: dental primer, adhesive, and composite. We focused on combining different dental materials loaded with multiagents to improve the durability of the complex dental bonding interface. A combined effect of bacterial acid attack and fatigue on the bonding interface simulated the harsh oral environment. Human saliva-derived oral biofilm was grown on each sample prior to the cyclic loading. The oral biofilm viability during the fatigue performance was monitored by the live-dead assay. Damage of the samples that developed during the test was quantified from the fatigue life distributions. Results indicate that the resultant multiagent dental composite materials were able to reduce the acidic impact of the oral biofilm, thereby improving the strength and resistance to fatigue failure of the dentin-resin bonded interface. In summary, this study shows that dental restorative materials containing multiple therapeutic agents of different chemical characteristics can be beneficial toward improving resistance to mechanical and acidic challenges in oral

  16. Assessing the influence of biofilm surface roughness on mass transfer by combining optical coherence tomography and two-dimensional modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Wagner, Michael; Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Imaging and modeling are two major approaches in biofilm research to understand the physical and biochemical processes involved in biofilm development. However, they are often used separately. In this study we combined these two approaches to investigate substrate mass transfer and mass flux. Cross-sectional biofilm images were acquired by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for biofilms grown on carriers. A 2D biofilm model was developed incorporating OCT images as well as a simplified biofilm geometry serving as structural templates. The model incorporated fluid flow, substrate transfer and biochemical conversion of substrates and simulated the hydrodynamics surrounding the biofilm structure as well as the substrate distribution. The method allowed detailed analysis of the hydrodynamics and mass transfer characteristics at the micro-scale. Biofilm activity with respect to substrate fluxes was compared among different combinations of flow, substrate availability and biomass density. The combined approach revealed that higher substrate fluxes at heterogeneous biofilm surface under two conditions: pure diffusion and when high flow velocity along the biofilms surface renders the whole liquid-biofilm interface to be highly active. In-between the two conditions the substrate fluxes across the surface of smooth biofilm geometry were higher than that of the heterogeneous biofilms.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  18. Role of mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim C R Conibear

    Full Text Available The survival of bacteria in nature is greatly enhanced by their ability to grow within surface-associated communities called biofilms. Commonly, biofilms generate proliferations of bacterial cells, called microcolonies, which are highly recalcitrant, 3-dimensional foci of bacterial growth. Microcolony growth is initiated by only a subpopulation of bacteria within biofilms, but processes responsible for this differentiation remain poorly understood. Under conditions of crowding and intense competition between bacteria within biofilms, microevolutionary processes such as mutation selection may be important for growth; however their influence on microcolony-based biofilm growth and architecture have not previously been explored. To study mutation in-situ within biofilms, we transformed Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells with a green fluorescent protein gene containing a +1 frameshift mutation. Transformed P. aeruginosa cells were non-fluorescent until a mutation causing reversion to the wildtype sequence occurs. Fluorescence-inducing mutations were observed in microcolony structures, but not in other biofilm cells, or in planktonic cultures of P. aeruginosa cells. Thus microcolonies may represent important foci for mutation and evolution within biofilms. We calculated that microcolony-specific increases in mutation frequency were at least 100-fold compared with planktonically grown cultures. We also observed that mutator phenotypes can enhance microcolony-based growth of P. aeruginosa cells. For P. aeruginosa strains defective in DNA fidelity and error repair, we found that microcolony initiation and growth was enhanced with increased mutation frequency of the organism. We suggest that microcolony-based growth can involve mutation and subsequent selection of mutants better adapted to grow on surfaces within crowded-cell environments. This model for biofilm growth is analogous to mutation selection that occurs during neoplastic progression and tumor

  19. Tobacco smoke augments Porphyromonas gingivalis-Streptococcus gordonii biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Bagaitkar

    Full Text Available Smoking is responsible for the majority of periodontitis cases in the US and smokers are more susceptible than non-smokers to infection by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. P. gingivalis colonization of the oral cavity is dependent upon its interaction with other plaque bacteria, including Streptococcus gordonii. Microarray analysis suggested that exposure of P. gingivalis to cigarette smoke extract (CSE increased the expression of the major fimbrial antigen (FimA, but not the minor fimbrial antigen (Mfa1. Therefore, we hypothesized that CSE promotes P. gingivalis-S. gordonii biofilm formation in a FimA-dependent manner. FimA total protein and cell surface expression were increased upon exposure to CSE whereas Mfa1 was unaffected. CSE exposure did not induce P. gingivalis auto-aggregation but did promote dual species biofilm formation, monitored by microcolony numbers and depth (both, p<0.05. Interestingly, P. gingivalis biofilms grown in the presence of CSE exhibited a lower pro-inflammatory capacity (TNF-α, IL-6 than control biofilms (both, p<0.01. CSE-exposed P. gingivalis bound more strongly to immobilized rGAPDH, the cognate FimA ligand on S. gordonii, than control biofilms (p<0.001 and did so in a dose-dependent manner. Nevertheless, a peptide representing the Mfa1 binding site on S. gordonii, SspB, completely inhibited dual species biofilm formation. Thus, CSE likely augments P. gingivalis biofilm formation by increasing FimA avidity which, in turn, supports initial interspecies interactions and promotes subsequent high affinity Mfa1-SspB interactions driving biofilm growth. CSE induction of P. gingivalis biofilms of limited pro-inflammatory potential may explain the increased persistence of this pathogen in smokers. These findings may also be relevant to other biofilm-induced infectious diseases and conditions.

  20. Enterocin B3A-B3B produced by LAB collected from infant faeces: potential utilization in the food industry for Listeria monocytogenes biofilm management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Seraih, Alaa; Belguesmia, Yanath; Baah, John; Szunerits, Sabine; Boukherroub, Rabah; Drider, Djamel

    2017-02-01

    Enterococcus faecalis B3A-B3B produces the bacteriocin B3A-B3B with activity against Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium perfringens, but apparently not against fungi or Gram-negative bacteria, except for Salmonella Newport. B3A-B3B enterocin has two different nucleotides but similar amino acid composition to the class IIb MR10A-MR10B enterocin. B3A-B3B consists of two peptides of predicted molecular mass of 5176.31 Da (B3A) and 5182.21 Da (B3B). Importantly, B3A-B3B impeded biofilm formation of the foodborne pathogen L. monocytogenes 162 grown on stainless steel. The antimicrobial treatment of stainless steel with nisin (1 or 16 mg ml(-1)) decreased the cell numbers by about 2 log CFU ml(-1), thereby impeding the biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes 162 or its nisin-resistant derivative strain L. monocytogenes 162R. Furthermore, the combination of nisin and B3A-B3B enterocin reduced the MIC required to inhibit this pathogen grown in planktonic or biofilm cultures.

  1. Drinking water and biofilm disinfection by Fenton-like reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, F; Madeira, L M; Juhna, T; Block, J C

    2013-10-01

    A Fenton-like disinfection process was conducted with Fenton's reagent (H2O2) at pH 3 or 5 on autochthonous drinking water biofilms grown on corroded or non-corroded pipe material. The biofilm disinfection by Fenton-like oxidation was limited by the low content of iron and copper in the biomass grown on non-corroded plumbing. It was slightly improved by spiking the distribution system with some additional iron source (soluble iron II or ferrihydrite particles appeared as interesting candidates). However successful in situ disinfection of biofilms was only achieved in fully corroded cast iron pipes using H2O2 and adjusting the pH to 5. These new results provide additional support for the use of Fenton's processes for cleaning drinking water distribution systems contaminated with biological agents or organics.

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of honokiol against Staphylococcus aureus in biofilm mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Li; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Zhao, Zi-Wen; Huang, Yan-Jun; Zhu, Xuan-Zhi; Meng, Ri-Zeng; Shi, Ce; Yu, Lu; Guo, Na

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) can attach to food, host tissues and the surfaces of medical implants and form a biofilm, which makes it difficult to eliminate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of honokiol on biofilm-grown S. aureus. In this report, honokiol showed effective antibacterial activity against S. aureus in biofilms. S. aureus isolates are capable of producing distinct types of biofilms mediated by polysaccharide intercellular adhesion (PIA) or extracellular DNA (eDNA). The biofilms' susceptibility to honokiol was evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis. The transcript levels of the biofilm-related genes, the expression of PIA, and the amount of eDNA of biofilm-grown S. aureus exposed to honokiol were also investigated. The results of this study show that honokiol can detach existing biofilms, kill bacteria in biofilms, and simultaneously inhibit the transcript levels of sarA, cidA and icaA, eDNA release, and the expression of PIA.

  3. Forming of a functional biofilm on wood surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sailer, M.F.; Nieuwenhuijzen, E.J. van; Knol, W.

    2010-01-01

    The protecting and staining properties of biofilms grown on oil-treated surfaces of Pinus sylvestris L. sapwood were investigated with respect to their potential to create homogeneous coloured surfaces. Linseed oil pressure-treated blocks of P. sylvestris L. were evaluated after 36 months of outdoor

  4. Biofilm-forming activity of bacteria isolated from toilet bowl biofilms and the bactericidal activity of disinfectants against the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Miho; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Matsumune, Norihiko; Niizeki, Kazuma; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the sanitary conditions of toilets, the bacterial counts of the toilet bowl biofilms in 5 Kansai area and 11 Kansai and Kanto area homes in Japan were measured in winter and summer seasons, respectively. Isolates (128 strains) were identified by analyzing 16S ribosomal RNA sequences. The number of colonies and bacterial species from biofilms sampled in winter tended to be higher and lower, respectively, than those in summer. Moreover, the composition of bacterial communities in summer and winter samples differed considerably. In summer samples, biofilms in Kansai and Kanto areas were dominated by Blastomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp., respectively. Methylobacterium sp. was detected in all toilet bowl biofilms except for one sample. Methylobacterium sp. constituted the major presence in biofilms along with Brevundimonas sp., Sphingomonas sp., and/or Pseudomonas sp. The composition ratio of the sum of their genera was 88.0 from 42.9% of the total bacterial flora. The biofilm formation abilities of 128 isolates were investigated, and results suggested that Methylobacterium sp. and Sphingomonas sp. were involved in biofilm formation in toilet bowls. The biofilm formation of a mixed bacteria system that included bacteria with the highest biofilm-forming ability in a winter sample was greater than mixture without such bacteria. This result suggests that isolates possessing a high biofilm-forming activity are involved in the biofilm formation in the actual toilet bowl. A bactericidal test against 25 strains indicated that the bactericidal activities of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) tended to be higher than those of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) and N-benzyl-N,N-dimethyldodecylammonium chloride (ADBAC). In particular, DDAC showed high bactericidal activity against approximately 90% of tested strains under the 5 h treatment.

  5. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial communities...... at the microscale of complex communities, including biofilms.Studies of multispecies biofilms and the interactions shaping these are conducted in traditional approaches used for single-species biofilms with some adjustments; but a crucial point for consideration is which strains to combine and where these should...

  6. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klare, William; Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies.

  7. Biofilm Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Aerosols without Nitrogen Purge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung

    2016-11-06

    Biofilms can cause serious concerns in many applications. Not only can they cause economic losses, but they can also present a public health hazard. Therefore, it is highly desirable to remove biofilms from surfaces. Many studies on CO2 aerosol cleaning have employed nitrogen purges to increase biofilm removal efficiency by reducing the moisture condensation generated during the cleaning. However, in this study, periodic jets of CO2 aerosols without nitrogen purges were used to remove Pseudomonas putida biofilms from polished stainless steel surfaces. CO2 aerosols are mixtures of solid and gaseous CO2 and are generated when high-pressure CO2 gas is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle. These high-speed aerosols were applied to a biofilm that had been grown for 24 hr. The removal efficiency ranged from 90.36% to 98.29% and was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the biofilm as the treatment time was varied from 16 sec to 88 sec. We also performed experiments to compare the removal efficiencies with and without nitrogen purges; the measured biofilm removal efficiencies were not significantly different from each other (t-test, p > 0.55). Therefore, this technique can be used to clean various bio-contaminated surfaces within one minute.

  8. In situ environment rather than substrate type dictates microbial community structure of biofilms in a cold seep system

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O.O.

    2014-01-08

    Using microscopic and molecular techniques combined with computational analysis, this study examined the structure and composition of microbial communities in biofilms that formed on different artificial substrates in a brine pool and on a seep vent of a cold seep in the Red Sea to test our hypothesis that initiation of the biofilm formation and spreading mode of microbial structures differs between the cold seep and the other aquatic environments. Biofilms on different substrates at two deployment sites differed morphologically, with the vent biofilms having higher microbial abundance and better structural features than the pool biofilms. Microbes in the pool biofilms were more taxonomically diverse and mainly composed of various sulfate-reducing bacteria whereas the vent biofilms were exclusively dominated by sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira. These results suggest that the redox environments at the deployment sites might have exerted a strong selection on microbes in the biofilms at two sites whereas the types of substrates had limited effects on the biofilm development.

  9. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Frere, Jacques; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  10. Rapid evaluation of the antibiotic susceptibility of fuel ethanol contaminant biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Joseph O; Leathers, Timothy D; Nunnally, Melinda S; Bischoff, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial contaminants from commercial fuel ethanol production facilities were previously shown to form biofilms as mixed cultures under laboratory conditions. In this study, a rapid assay was developed to simultaneously compare isolates for their ability to form biofilms as pure cultures. A total of 10 strains were isolated from a dry-grind fuel ethanol plant that routinely doses with virginiamycin. These were identified by sequence analysis as six strains of Lactobacillus fermentum, two strains of L. johnsonii, and one strain each of L. mucosae and L. amylovorus. Isolates exhibited a range of susceptibility to virginiamycin in a planktonic assay, with MIC's (minimum inhibitory concentration) of ≤0.5-16 μg/ml. Even though all strains were isolated from a mixed culture biofilm, they varied greatly in their ability to form biofilms as pure cultures. Surprisingly, growth as biofilms did not appear to provide resistance to virginiamycin, even if biofilms were grown for 144 h prior to antibiotic challenge.

  11. Mechanistic stratification in electroactive biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediated by pilus nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Rebecca J.; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-08-01

    Electricity generation by Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms grown on electrodes involves matrix-associated electron carriers, such as c-type cytochromes. Yet, the contribution of the biofilm's conductive pili remains uncertain, largely because pili-defective mutants also have cytochrome defects. Here we report that a pili-deficient mutant carrying an inactivating mutation in the pilus assembly motor PilB has no measurable defects in cytochrome expression, yet forms anode biofilms with reduced electroactivity and is unable to grow beyond a threshold distance (~10 μm) from the underlying electrode. The defects are similar to those of a Tyr3 mutant, which produces poorly conductive pili. The results support a model in which the conductive pili permeate the biofilms to wire the cells to the conductive biofilm matrix and the underlying electrode, operating coordinately with cytochromes until the biofilm reaches a threshold thickness that limits the efficiency of the cytochrome pathway but not the functioning of the conductive pili network.

  12. Environmental and centrifugal factors influencing the visco-elastic properties of oral biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brandon W; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K; van der Mei, Henny C

    2012-01-01

    Centrifugal compaction causes changes in the surface properties of bacterial cells. It has been shown previously that the surface properties of planktonic cells change with increasing centrifugal compaction. This study aimed to analyze the influences of centrifugal compaction and environmental conditions on the visco-elastic properties of oral biofilms. Biofilms were grown out of a layer of initially adhering streptococci, actinomyces or a combination of these. Different uni-axial deformations were induced on the biofilms and the load relaxations were measured over time. Linear-Regression-Analysis demonstrated that both the centrifugation coefficient for streptococci and induced deformation influenced the percentage relaxation. Centrifugal compaction significantly influenced relaxation only upon compression of the outermost 20% of the biofilm (p centrifugal compaction of initially adhering, centrifuged bacteria extend to the visco-elastic properties of biofilms, indicating that the initial bacterial layer influences the structure of the entire biofilm.

  13. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Bigot

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  14. Streptokinase Treatment Reverses Biofilm-Associated Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Zobek, Natalia; Dreier, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    by combining antibiotic treatment with a fibrinolytic drug. We quantified S. aureus USA300 biofilms grown on peg-lids in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth with 0%–50% human plasma. Young (2 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms were then treated with streptokinase to determine if this lead to dispersal. Then......, the minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of 24 h old biofilms was measured for vancomycin and daptomycin alone or in combination with 10 µg/mL rifampicin in the presence or absence of streptokinase in the antibiotic treatment step. Finally, biofilms were visualized by confocal laser scanning...... or daptomycin, which are commonly used antibiotics for treatment of S. aureus infections. Fibronolytic drugs have been used to treat thromboembolic events for decades, and our findings suggest that their use against biofilm infections has the potential to improve the efficacy of antibiotics in treatment of S...

  15. Extracellular electron transfer mechanism in Shewanella loihica PV- 4 biofilms formed at indium tin oxide and graphite electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electroactive biofilms are capable of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble metal oxides and electrodes; such biofilms are relevant to biogeochemistry, bioremediation, and bioelectricity production. We investigated the extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in Shewanella loihica PV-4 viable biofilms grown at indium tin oxide (ITO) and graphite electrodes in potentiostat-controlled electrochemical cells poised at 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Chronoamperometry and confocal microscopy showed hi...

  16. Tobacco smoking affects bacterial acquisition and colonization in oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Purnima S; Matthews, Chad R; Joshi, Vinayak; de Jager, Marko; Aspiras, Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that smoking affects the composition of the disease-associated subgingival biofilm, yet little is known about its effects during the formation of this biofilm. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the contributions of smoking to the composition and proinflammatory characteristics of the biofilm during de novo plaque formation. Marginal and subgingival plaque and gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from 15 current smokers and from 15 individuals who had never smoked (nonsmokers) following 1, 2, 4, and 7 days of undisturbed plaque formation. 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used for bacterial identification, and multiplex bead-based flow cytometry was used to quantify the levels of 27 immune mediators. Smokers demonstrated a highly diverse, relatively unstable initial colonization of both marginal and subgingival biofilms, with lower niche saturation than that seen in nonsmokers. Periodontal pathogens belonging to the genera Fusobacterium, Cardiobacterium, Synergistes, and Selenomonas, as well as respiratory pathogens belonging to the genera Haemophilus and Pseudomonas, colonized the early biofilms of smokers and continued to persist over the observation period, suggesting that smoking favors early acquisition and colonization of pathogens in oral biofilms. Smokers also demonstrated an early proinflammatory response to this colonization, which persisted over 7 days. Further, a positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokine levels and commensal bacteria was observed in smokers but not in nonsmokers. Taken together, the data suggest that smoking influences both the composition of the nascent biofilm and the host response to this colonization.

  17. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC. In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell

  18. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  19. Destruction of Bacterial Biofilms Using Gas Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramzon, Nina

    2005-03-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities embedded in an exopolysaccharidic matrix with a complex architectural structure. Bacteria in biofilms show different properties from those in free life thus, conventional methods of killing bacteria are often ineffective with biofilms. The use of plasmas potentially offers an alternative to conventional sterilization methods since plasmas contain a mixture of charged particles, chemically reactive species, and UV radiation. 4 and 7 day-old biofilms were produced using two bacterial species: Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum. Gas discharge plasma was produced by using an AtomfloTM reactor (Surfx Technologies) and bacterial biofilms were exposed to it for different periods of time. Our results show that a 10-minute plasma treatment was able to kill 100% of the cells in most cases. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study plasma composition which is then correlated with the effectiveness of killing. These results indicate the potentiality of plasma as an alternative sterilization method. Supported by CSuperb.

  20. Oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, R; Kirakodu, S S; Novak, K F; Ebersole, J L

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. Only the Sg/Actinomyces naeslundii (An)/Fn multispecies biofilms elicited IL-6 levels above those of control. IL-8 was a primary response to the Sg/An/Fn biofilms, albeit the level was not enhanced compared with a predicted composite level from the monospecies challenges. These results represent some of the first data documenting alterations in profiles of oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies biofilms.

  1. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchun Ge

    Full Text Available Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation.

  2. Streptokinase Treatment Reverses Biofilm-Associated Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nis Pedersen Jørgensen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus is a serious complication to the use of medical implants. A central part of the pathogenesis relies on S. aureus’ ability to adhere to host extracellular matrix proteins, which adsorb to medical implants and stimulate biofilm formation. Being coagulase positive, S. aureus furthermore induces formation of fibrin fibers from fibrinogen in the blood. Consequently, we hypothesized that fibrin is a key component of the extracellular matrix of S. aureus biofilms under in vivo conditions, and that the recalcitrance of biofilm infections can be overcome by combining antibiotic treatment with a fibrinolytic drug. We quantified S. aureus USA300 biofilms grown on peg-lids in brain heart infusion (BHI broth with 0%–50% human plasma. Young (2 h and mature (24 h biofilms were then treated with streptokinase to determine if this lead to dispersal. Then, the minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC of 24 h old biofilms was measured for vancomycin and daptomycin alone or in combination with 10 µg/mL rifampicin in the presence or absence of streptokinase in the antibiotic treatment step. Finally, biofilms were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Addition of human plasma stimulated biofilm formation in BHI in a dose-dependent manner, and biofilms could be partially dispersed by streptokinase. The biofilms could be eradicated with physiologically relevant concentrations of streptokinase in combination with rifampicin and vancomycin or daptomycin, which are commonly used antibiotics for treatment of S. aureus infections. Fibronolytic drugs have been used to treat thromboembolic events for decades, and our findings suggest that their use against biofilm infections has the potential to improve the efficacy of antibiotics in treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections.

  3. Streptokinase Treatment Reverses Biofilm-Associated Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Zobek, Natalia; Dreier, Cindy; Haaber, Jakob; Ingmer, Hanne; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus is a serious complication to the use of medical implants. A central part of the pathogenesis relies on S. aureus’ ability to adhere to host extracellular matrix proteins, which adsorb to medical implants and stimulate biofilm formation. Being coagulase positive, S. aureus furthermore induces formation of fibrin fibers from fibrinogen in the blood. Consequently, we hypothesized that fibrin is a key component of the extracellular matrix of S. aureus biofilms under in vivo conditions, and that the recalcitrance of biofilm infections can be overcome by combining antibiotic treatment with a fibrinolytic drug. We quantified S. aureus USA300 biofilms grown on peg-lids in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth with 0%–50% human plasma. Young (2 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms were then treated with streptokinase to determine if this lead to dispersal. Then, the minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of 24 h old biofilms was measured for vancomycin and daptomycin alone or in combination with 10 µg/mL rifampicin in the presence or absence of streptokinase in the antibiotic treatment step. Finally, biofilms were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Addition of human plasma stimulated biofilm formation in BHI in a dose-dependent manner, and biofilms could be partially dispersed by streptokinase. The biofilms could be eradicated with physiologically relevant concentrations of streptokinase in combination with rifampicin and vancomycin or daptomycin, which are commonly used antibiotics for treatment of S. aureus infections. Fibronolytic drugs have been used to treat thromboembolic events for decades, and our findings suggest that their use against biofilm infections has the potential to improve the efficacy of antibiotics in treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections. PMID:27681928

  4. Characterization, Microbial Community Structure, and Pathogen Occurrence in Urban Faucet Biofilms in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huirong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition and microbial community structure of the drinking water system biofilms were investigated using microstructure analysis and 454 pyrosequencing technique in Xiamen city, southeast of China. SEM (scanning electron microscope results showed different features of biofilm morphology in different fields of PVC pipe. Extracellular matrix material and sparse populations of bacteria (mainly rod-shaped and coccoid were observed. CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscope revealed different distributions of attached cells, extracellular proteins, α-polysaccharides, and β-polysaccharides. The biofilms had complex bacterial compositions. Differences in bacteria diversity and composition from different tap materials and ages were observed. Proteobacteria was the common and predominant group in all biofilms samples. Some potential pathogens (Legionellales, Enterobacteriales, Chromatiales, and Pseudomonadales and corrosive microorganisms were also found in the biofilms. This study provides the information of characterization and visualization of the drinking water biofilms matrix, as well as the microbial community structure and opportunistic pathogens occurrence.

  5. Effects of Nutrient and NaCl Salinity on Growth, Yield, Quality and Composition of Pepper Grown in Soilless Closed System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuffrida, F.; Graziani, G.; Fogliano, V.; Scuderia, D.; Romano, D.; Leonardi, C.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of nutrient or sodium chloride (NaCl) salinity on pepper grown in closed soilless culture systems were studied. A control (2 dS m-1) and two saline nutrient solutions (4 dS m-1) differing in the salt sources (fertilizers or NaCl) were studied. Shoot biomass production as well as total an

  6. Blue light dose–responses of leaf photosynthesis, morphology, and chemical composition of Cucumis sativus grown under different combinations of red and blue light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, S.W.; Trouwborst, G.; Maljaars, H.; Poorter, H.; Ieperen, van W.; Harbinson, J.

    2010-01-01

    The blue part of the light spectrum has been associated with leaf characteristics which also develop under high irradiances. In this study blue light dose–response curves were made for the photosynthetic properties and related developmental characteristics of cucumber leaves that were grown at an eq

  7. Effects of Nutrient and NaCl Salinity on Growth, Yield, Quality and Composition of Pepper Grown in Soilless Closed System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuffrida, F.; Graziani, G.; Fogliano, V.; Scuderia, D.; Romano, D.; Leonardi, C.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of nutrient or sodium chloride (NaCl) salinity on pepper grown in closed soilless culture systems were studied. A control (2 dS m-1) and two saline nutrient solutions (4 dS m-1) differing in the salt sources (fertilizers or NaCl) were studied. Shoot biomass production as well as total an

  8. Charge collection efficiency in SI GaAs grown from melts with variable composition as a material for solar neutrino detection

    CERN Document Server

    Verbitskaya, E; Ivanov, A; Strokan, N; Vasilev, V; Markov, A; Polyakov, A; Gavrin, V; Kozlova, Y; Veretenkin, E; Bowles, T J

    2000-01-01

    The results on electrical characteristics and charge collection efficiency in the detectors from bulk SI GaAs developed as a material for solar neutrino spectroscopy are presented. SI GaAs crystals were grown by the Czochralski method. The changes in the stoichiometric components are permanently controlled. It is shown that the performance of GaAs p sup + -i-n sup + structures provided the range of operational reverse voltage up to 1 kV. Measurement of deep level spectra and their analysis reveal the dominant deep levels - hole traps E sub v +0.51 and +0.075 eV in GaAs grown from stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric melts, respectively. Investigation of carrier transport properties and bulk homogeneity evinced in charge collection efficiency has shown advantageous results for SI GaAs grown from stoichiometric melt. The reduction of carrier transport parameters and charge collection efficiency in GaAs grown from nonstoichiometric melt is analyzed taking into consideration formation of the hole trap E sub v +0....

  9. Experimental toxicity and bioaccumulation of cadmium in freshwater periphytic diatoms in relation with biofilm maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duong, Thi Thuy, E-mail: duongthuy0712@yahoo.com [Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Morin, Soizic, E-mail: soizic.morin@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Coste, Michel [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Herlory, Olivier; Feurtet-Mazel, Agnes; Boudou, Alain [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine cadmium accumulation in freshwater biofilm, its effects on biofilm development and on diatom community structure in laboratory experimental conditions. A suspension of a biofilm originated from the Riou-Mort River (South West France) was inoculated into three experimental units containing clean glass substrates under laboratory conditions. Settling and already developed biofilms were exposed to a Cd concentration of 100 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Metal accumulation (total and intracellular metal content) in biofilms, dry weight and ash-free dry mass, diatom cell density and diatom community composition were analyzed. Both total and intracellular Cd accumulated by the biofilm throughout the experiment increased with duration of metal exposure. Biofilms in the course of maturation were showed higher Cd content and less effective development than settled biofilms. However diatom communities in younger biofilms exposed to Cd increased their tolerance to Cd by a highly significant development of Nitzschia palea. In contrast, Cd exposure had different effect in installed biofilm and taxonomic composition. These results indicate that mature biofilm may limit Cd accumulation into its architecture and protect diatom communities from the effects of metals.

  10. Reduced Efficiency of Chlorine Disinfection of Naegleria fowleri in a Drinking Water Distribution Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Haylea C; Wylie, Jason; Dejean, Guillaume; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sutton, David; Braun, Kalan; Puzon, Geoffrey J

    2015-09-15

    Naegleria fowleri associated with biofilm and biological demand water (organic matter suspended in water that consumes disinfectants) sourced from operational drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) had significantly increased resistance to chlorine disinfection. N. fowleri survived intermittent chlorine dosing of 0.6 mg/L for 7 days in a mixed biofilm from field and laboratory-cultured Escherichia coli strains. However, N. fowleri associated with an attached drinking water distribution biofilm survived more than 30 times (20 mg/L for 3 h) the recommended concentration of chlorine for drinking water. N. fowleri showed considerably more resistance to chlorine when associated with a real field biofilm compared to the mixed laboratory biofilm. This increased resistance is likely due to not only the consumption of disinfectants by the biofilm and the reduced disinfectant penetration into the biofilm but also the composition and microbial community of the biofilm itself. The increased diversity of the field biofilm community likely increased N. fowleri's resistance to chlorine disinfection compared to that of the laboratory-cultured biofilm. Previous research has been conducted in only laboratory scale models of DWDSs and laboratory-cultured biofilms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating how N. fowleri can persist in a field drinking water distribution biofilm despite chlorination.

  11. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Ohsumi

    Full Text Available Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  12. Effects of Chlorine Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Analysis of Related Gene Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekeç, Özge; Gökalsın, Barış; Karaltı, İskender; Kayhan, Figen Esin; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine is deployed worldwide to clean waters and prevent water-originated illnesses. However, chlorine has a limited disinfection capacity against biofilms. Microorganisms form biofilms to protect themselves from biological threats such as disinfectant chemicals. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and its biofilm form attaches to surfaces, living buried into exopolysaccharides, can be present in all watery environments including tap water and drinking water. This research aimed to study the biofilm trigger mechanism of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which is known to form biofilm in water supply systems and human body, under chlorine stress levels. In addition to biofilm staining, certain genes that are relevant to the stress condition were selected for gene expression analysis. The bacteria cultures were grown under chlorine stress with concentrations of 0.5, 0.7 and 1 mg/l. Six gene regions were determined related to biofilm and stress response: rpoS, bifA, migA, katB, soxR, and algC. Biofilm formation was analyzed by basic fuchsin staining, and gene expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. According to the results, highest biofilm production was observed in P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild strain under no stress conditions. Higher biofilm amounts were observed for bacteria under 0.5 and 0.7 mg/l chlorine stress compared to 1 mg/l chlorine stress.

  13. Multi-species biofilms defined from drinking water microorganisms provide increased protection against chlorine disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwering, Monika; Song, Joanna; Louie, Marie; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard

    2013-09-01

    A model biofilm, formed of multiple species from environmental drinking water, including opportunistic pathogens, was created to explore the tolerance of multi-species biofilms to chlorine levels typical of water-distribution systems. All species, when grown planktonically, were killed by concentrations of chlorine within the World He