WorldWideScience

Sample records for component water gap

  1. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  2. Water limits to closing yield gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle Frankel; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Garrassino, Francesco; Chiarelli, Davide; Seveso, Antonio; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is often seen as a suitable approach to meet the growing demand for agricultural products and improve food security. It typically entails the use of fertilizers, new cultivars, irrigation, and other modern technology. In regions of the world affected by seasonal or chronic water scarcity, yield gap closure is strongly dependent on irrigation (blue water). Global yield gap assessments have often ignored whether the water required to close the yield gap is locally available. Here we perform a gridded global analysis (10 km resolution) of the blue water consumption that is needed annually to close the yield gap worldwide and evaluate the associated pressure on renewable freshwater resources. We find that, to close the yield gap, human appropriation of freshwater resources for irrigation would have to increase at least by 146%. Most study countries would experience at least a doubling in blue water requirement, with 71% of the additional blue water being required by only four crops - maize, rice, soybeans, and wheat. Further, in some countries (e.g., Algeria, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen) the total volume of blue water required for yield gap closure would exceed sustainable levels of freshwater consumption (i.e., 40% of total renewable surface and groundwater resources).

  3. Reactor Safety Gap Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Components and Severe Accident Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, Mitchell T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bunt, R. [Southern Nuclear, Atlanta, GA (United States); Corradini, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ellison, Paul B. [GE Power and Water, Duluth, GA (United States); Francis, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gabor, John D. [Erin Engineering, Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Gauntt, R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Henry, C. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Linthicum, R. [Exelon Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Luangdilok, W. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Lutz, R. [PWR Owners Group (PWROG); Paik, C. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Plys, M. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rempe, J. [Rempe and Associates LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Robb, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wachowiak, R. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knovville, TN (United States)

    2015-01-31

    The overall objective of this study was to conduct a technology gap evaluation on accident tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist, given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research, and additionally augmented by insights obtained from the Fukushima accident. The ultimate benefit of this activity is that the results can be used to refine the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Reactor Safety Technology (RST) research and development (R&D) program plan to address key knowledge gaps in severe accident phenomena and analyses that affect reactor safety and that are not currently being addressed by the industry or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  4. Research gaps and technology needs in development of PHM for passive AdvSMR components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henagar, Chuck H., Jr.

    2014-02-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts, may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors and near-term small modular reactors (SMRs), which are based on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) concepts. SMRs are challenged economically because of losses in economy of scale; thus, there is increased motivation to reduce the controllable operations and maintenance costs through automation technologies including prognostics health management (PHM) systems. In this regard, PHM systems have the potential to play a vital role in supporting the deployment of AdvSMRs and face several unique challenges with respect to implementation for passive AdvSMR components. This paper presents a summary of a research gaps and technical needs assessment performed for implementation of PHM for passive AdvSMR components.

  5. Research gaps and technology needs in development of PHM for passive AdvSMR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Henagar, Chuck H. Jr.; Coble, Jamie B.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts, may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors and near-term small modular reactors (SMRs), which are based on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) concepts. SMRs are challenged economically because of losses in economy of scale; thus, there is increased motivation to reduce the controllable operations and maintenance costs through automation technologies including prognostics health management (PHM) systems. In this regard, PHM systems have the potential to play a vital role in supporting the deployment of AdvSMRs and face several unique challenges with respect to implementation for passive AdvSMR components. This paper presents a summary of a research gaps and technical needs assessment performed for implementation of PHM for passive AdvSMR components

  6. Review of water footprint components of grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Wan Amiza Amneera Wan; Meriam Nik Sulaiman, Nik; Zalina Mahmood, Noor

    2017-06-01

    Burgeoning global population, economic development, agriculture and prevailing climate pattern are among aspects contributed to water scarcity. In low and middle income countries, agriculture takes the highest share among water user sector. Demand for grain is widespread all over the globe. Hence, this study review published papers regarding quantification of water footprint of grain. Review shows there are various methods in quantifying water footprint. In ascertaining water footprint, three (green, blue, grey) or two (green, blue) components of water footprint involved. However, there was a study introduced new term in evaluating water footprint, white water footprint. The vulnerability of varying methods is difficulty in conducting comparative among water footprint. Salient source in contributing high water footprint also varies. In some studies, green water footprint play major role. Conversely, few studies found out blue water footprint most contributing component in water footprint. This fluctuate pattern influenced by various aspects, namely, regional climatic characteristics, crop yield and crop types.

  7. Impact of climate forcing uncertainty and human water use on global and continental water balance components

    OpenAIRE

    Müller Schmied, Hannes; Adam, Linda; Eisner, Stephanie; Fink, Gabriel; Flörke, Martina; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan; Portmann, Felix Theodor; Reinecke, Robert; Riedel, Claudia; Song, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Döll, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of water balance components using global hydrological models is subject to climate forcing uncertainty as well as to an increasing intensity of human water use within the 20th century. The uncertainty of five state-of-the-art climate forcings and the resulting range of cell runoff that is simulated by the global hydrological model WaterGAP is presented. On the global land surface, about 62 % of precipitation evapotranspires, whereas 38 % discharges into oceans...

  8. Assessment of the terrestrial water balance using the global water availability and use model WaterGAP - status and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller Schmied, Hannes; Döll, Petra

    2017-04-01

    The estimation of the World's water resources has a long tradition and numerous methods for quantification exists. The resulting numbers vary significantly, leaving room for improvement. Since some decades, global hydrological models (GHMs) are being used for large scale water budget assessments. GHMs are designed to represent the macro-scale hydrological processes and many of those models include human water management, e.g. irrigation or reservoir operation, making them currently the first choice for global scale assessments of the terrestrial water balance within the Anthropocene. The Water - Global Assessment and Prognosis (WaterGAP) is a model framework that comprises both the natural and human water dimension and is in development and application since the 1990s. In recent years, efforts were made to assess the sensitivity of water balance components to alternative climate forcing input data and, e.g., how this sensitivity is affected by WaterGAP's calibration scheme. This presentation shows the current best estimate of terrestrial water balance components as simulated with WaterGAP by 1) assessing global and continental water balance components for the climate period 1971-2000 and the IPCC reference period 1986-2005 for the most current WaterGAP version using a homogenized climate forcing data, 2) investigating variations of water balance components for a number of state-of-the-art climate forcing data and 3) discussing the benefit of the calibration approach for a better observation-data constrained global water budget. For the most current WaterGAP version 2.2b and a homogenized combination of the two WATCH Forcing Datasets, global scale (excluding Antarctica and Greenland) river discharge into oceans and inland sinks (Q) is assessed to be 40 000 km3 yr-1 for 1971-2000 and 39 200 km3 yr-1 for 1986-2005. Actual evapotranspiration (AET) is close to each other with around 70 600 (70 700) km3 yr-1 as well as water consumption with 1000 (1100) km3 yr-1. The

  9. Narrow gap mechanised arc welding in nuclear components manufactured by AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peigney, A.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear components require welds of irreproachable and reproducible quality. Moreover, for a given welding process, productivity requirements lead to reduce the volume of deposited metal and thus to use narrow gap design. In the shop, narrow gap Submerged Arc Welding process (SAW) is currently used on rotating parts in flat position for thicknesses up to 300 mm. Welding is performed with one or two wires in two passes per layer. In Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW), multiple applications can be found because this process presents the advantage of allowing welding in all positions. Welding is performed in one or two passes per layer. The process is used in factory and on the nuclear sites for assembling new components but also for replacing components and for repairs. Presently, an increase of productivity of the process is sought through the use of hot wire and/or two wires. Concerning Gas Metal Arc Welding process (GMAW), its use is growing for nuclear components, including narrow gap applications. This process, limited in its applications in the past on account of the defects it generated, draws benefit from the progress of the welding generators. Then it is possible to use this efficient process for high security components such as those of nuclear systems. It is to be noted that the process is applicable in the various welding positions as it is the case for GTAW, while being more efficient than the latter. This paper presents the state of the art in the use of narrow gap mechanised arc welding processes by AREVA NP units. (author) [fr

  10. Impact of climate forcing uncertainty and human water use on global and continental water balance components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Müller Schmied

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of water balance components using global hydrological models is subject to climate forcing uncertainty as well as to an increasing intensity of human water use within the 20th century. The uncertainty of five state-of-the-art climate forcings and the resulting range of cell runoff that is simulated by the global hydrological model WaterGAP is presented. On the global land surface, about 62 % of precipitation evapotranspires, whereas 38 % discharges into oceans and inland sinks. During 1971–2000, evapotranspiration due to human water use amounted to almost 1 % of precipitation, while this anthropogenic water flow increased by a factor of approximately 5 between 1901 and 2010. Deviation of estimated global discharge from the ensemble mean due to climate forcing uncertainty is approximately 4 %. Precipitation uncertainty is the most important reason for the uncertainty of discharge and evapotranspiration, followed by shortwave downward radiation. At continental levels, deviations of water balance components due to uncertain climate forcing are higher, with the highest discharge deviations occurring for river discharge in Africa (−6 to 11 % from the ensemble mean. Uncertain climate forcings also affect the estimation of irrigation water use and thus the estimated human impact of river discharge. The uncertainty range of global irrigation water consumption amounts to approximately 50 % of the global sum of water consumption in the other water use sector.

  11. Water recycling and desalination by air gap membrane distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meindersma, G.W.; Guijt, C.M.; de Haan, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Because salt and other small components are the most common compounds in wastewater from the process industry, desalination techniques are likely to be suitable as treatment processes in many cases. Although membrane distillation (MD) is a well-known technology for desalination and water treatment,

  12. Formation of deuterium-carbon inventories in gaps of plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, K.; Jacob, W.; Rudakov, D. L.; Bastasz, R.; Federici, G.; Litnovsky, A.; Maier, H.; Rohde, V.; Strohmayer, G.; West, W. P.; Whaley, J.; Wong, C. P. C.; Asdex Upgrade; Diii-D Teams

    2007-06-01

    Plasma facing components for ITER will be manufactured as macro brush structures or with castellated surfaces. Material samples with gaps of similar geometry as intended for ITER were exposed to different plasma conditions in TEXTOR, DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade. In all devices a decrease of both carbon and deuterium inventories at the side faces from the gap entrance into the gap with scale-lengths in the mm range is found. The fraction of D retained at the gap surfaces is in the range of 0.4-4% of the incident flux. Main parameters determining the retained D-fraction are the temperature of the respective surfaces and the carbon fraction in the incident flux. Extrapolation of tritium inventory growth rates to ITER dimensions assuming the measured retention fractions at T > 200 °C and using a D/T-flux distribution with a carbon fraction of ≈1% from B2/EIRENE simulations of an ITER H-mode discharge yields a contribution to the increase of the total in-vessel tritium inventory in the range of 0.5-5 g T/discharge.

  13. Engineering an Insulating Ferroelectric Superlattice with a Tunable Band Gap from Metallic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saurabh; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2017-10-01

    The recent discovery of "polar metals" with ferroelectriclike displacements offers the promise of designing ferroelectrics with tunable energy gaps by inducing controlled metal-insulator transitions. Here we employ first-principles calculations to design a metallic polar superlattice from nonpolar metal components and show that controlled intermixing can lead to a true insulating ferroelectric with a tunable band gap. We consider a 2 /2 superlattice made of two centrosymmetric metallic oxides, La0.75 Sr0.25 MnO3 and LaNiO3 , and show that ferroelectriclike displacements are induced. The ferroelectriclike distortion is found to be strongly dependent on the carrier concentration (Sr content). Further, we show that a metal-to-insulator (MI) transition is feasible in this system via disproportionation of the Ni sites. Such a disproportionation and, hence, a MI transition can be driven by intermixing of transition metal ions between Mn and Ni layers. As a result, the energy gap of the resulting ferroelectric can be tuned by varying the degree of intermixing in the experimental fabrication method.

  14. Trends in water balance components across the Brazilian Cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brazilian Cerrado (Savanna) is considered one of the most important biomes for Brazilian water resources; however, little is known about the components of the water balance in this biome. In this study, we reviewed the available literature on the water balance components in the Brazilian Cerrado...

  15. Closing the 21st century global water gap: costs and effectiveness of adaptation measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Droogers, P.; Hunink, J.; Buitink, J.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Karssenberg, D.; Van Beek, L. P.; Straatsma, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    Water scarcity affects a major part of the globe, and is expected to increase significantly until 2100 as a result of climate change and socioeconomic developments. Yet, global projections are unavailable on the effectiveness and costs of adaptation measures to close the future water gap under global change. Here, we present a 21st century projection of the closure of the water gap under two contrasting climate and socio-economic scenarios: RCP2.6/SSP1(s1) and RCP8.5/SSP5(s5). We coupled a global hydrological model to water demand and redistribution model, and forced them with five General Circulation Models (GCMs) to assess the future water gap for 1604 water provinces covering most of the global land mass. Subsequently, using so-called water availability cost curves, we determined the water gap reduction that could be achieved by increasingly aggressive and expensive sets of adaptation measures, respectively aimed at improving agriculture, increasing water supply, and reducing water demands. Our results show that for s1, the water gap peaks around 2050 and declines towards 2100. Contrastingly, for s5, the gap increases linearly. Hotspots in water scarcity are found in the USA, India, and China. The proposed adaptation sets reduce the water gap, but for the majority of the hotspots are not sufficient to close the water gap completely. The median annual adaptation costs for the proposed measures amount to less than 2% of the GDP of the affected water provinces. Although these costs are already substantial, they do leave room for additional unorthodox adaptation measures.

  16. Material gap membrane distillation: A new design for water vapor flux enhancement

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2013-08-19

    A new module design for membrane distillation, namely material gap membrane distillation (MGMD), for seawater desalination has been proposed and successfully tested. It has been observed that employing appropriate materials between the membrane and the condensation plate in an air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) module enhanced the water vapor flux significantly. An increase in the water vapor flux of about 200-800% was observed by filling the gap with sand and DI water at various feed water temperatures. However, insulating materials such as polypropylene and polyurethane have no effect on the water vapor flux. The influence of material thickness and characteristics has also been investigated in this study. An increase in the water gap width from 9. mm to 13. mm increases the water vapor flux. An investigation on an AGMD and MGMD performance comparison, carried out using two different commercial membranes provided by different manufacturers, is also reported in this paper. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Bridging the Gap: Ideas for water sustainability in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, V. C.; Passell, H. D.; Roach, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Incremental improvements in water sustainability in the western U.S. may not be able to close the growing gap between increasing freshwater demand, climate driven variability in freshwater supply, and growing environmental consciousness. Incremental improvements include municipal conservation, improvements to irrigation technologies, desalination, water leasing, and others. These measures, as manifest today in the western U.S., are successful in themselves but limited in their ability to solve long term water scarcity issues. Examples are plainly evident and range from the steady and long term decline of important aquifers and their projected inability to provide water for future agricultural irrigation, projected declines in states' abilities to meet legal water delivery obligations between states, projected shortages of water for energy production, and others. In many cases, measures that can close the water scarcity gap have been identified, but often these solutions simply shift the gap from water to some other sector, e.g., economics. Saline, brackish or produced water purification, for example, could help solve western water shortages in some areas, but will be extremely expensive, and so shift the gap from water to economics. Transfers of water out of agriculture could help close the water scarcity gap in other areas; however, loss of agriculture will shift the gap to regional food security. All these gaps, whether in water, economics, food security, or other sectors, will have a negative impact on the western states. Narrowing these future gaps requires both technical and policy solutions as well as tools to understand the tradeoffs. Here we discuss several examples from across the western U.S. that span differing scales and decision spaces. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  18. The endothelial component of cannabinoid-induced relaxation in rabbit mesenteric artery depends on gap junctional communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaytor, A T; Martin, P E M; Evans, W H; Randall, M D; Griffith, T M

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that the endocannabinoid anandamide and its stable analogue methanandamide relax rings of rabbit superior mesenteric artery through endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms that are unaffected by blockade of NO synthase and cyclooxygenase. The endothelium-dependent component of the responses was attenuated by the gap junction inhibitor 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18α-GA; 50 μm), and a synthetic connexin-mimetic peptide homologous to the extracellular Gap 27 sequence of connexin 43 (43Gap 27, SRPTEKTIFII; 300 μm). By contrast, the corresponding connexin 40 peptide (40Gap 27, SRPTEKNVFIV) was inactive. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (10 μm) also attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxations but this inhibition was not observed with the CB1 receptor antagonist LY320135 (10 μm). Furthermore, SR141716A mimicked the effects of 43Gap 27 peptide in blocking Lucifer Yellow dye transfer between coupled COS-7 cells (a monkey fibroblast cell line), whereas LY320135 was without effect, thus suggesting that the action of SR141716A was directly attributable to effects on gap junctions. The endothelium-dependent component of cannabinoid-induced relaxation was also attenuated by AM404 (10 μm), an inhibitor of the high-affinity anandamide transporter, which was without effect on dye transfer. Taken together, the findings suggest that cannabinoids derived from arachidonic acid gain access to the endothelial cytosol via a transporter mechanism and subsequently stimulate relaxation by promoting diffusion of an to adjacent smooth muscle cells via gap junctions. Relaxations of endothelium-denuded preparations to anandamide and methanandamide were unaffected by 43Gap 27 peptide, 18α-GA, SR141716A, AM404 and indomethacin and their genesis remains to be established. PMID:10523421

  19. Water quality of the Chhoti Gandak River using principal component ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The principal components of water quality are controlled by lithology, gentle slope gradient, poor drainage, long residence of water, ion exchange, weathering of minerals, heavy use of fertilizers, and domestic wastes. At some stations water is hard with an excess alkalinity and is not suitable for drinking and irrigation ...

  20. Air-bone gap component of inner-ear origin in audiograms of cochlear implant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Joseph; Ulanovski, David; Shemesh, Rafael; Kornreich, Liora; Nageris, Benny; Preis, Michal; Peled, Miriam; Efrati, Michal; Raveh, Eyal

    2012-06-01

    Experimental studies have shown that creating a window in the bony cover of the cochlea and vestibular parts of the inner ear, with preservation of membranous and middle-ear functions, induces an air-bone gap (ABG). This study sought to determine if a similar mechanism explains the ABG frequently observed in audiograms of cochlear implant candidates. The study group included 47 candidates for a cochlear implant (94 ears) attending a university-affiliated tertiary medical center who had an ABG component in the audiogram in the absence of external or middle-ear abnormalities. Air- and bone-conduction thresholds on pure-tone audiometry were analyzed for 250 to 8,000 Hz and 250 to 4,000 Hz, respectively. In the 25 patients operated on during the study period, differences in the ABG and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak were compared between those with and without anomalies on computed tomography. Imaging revealed an abnormal inner-ear structure in 46% of cases, mostly a large vestibular aqueduct, alone or combined with other cochlear or vestibular malformations. ABG was evident over high and low frequencies and was significantly larger at low frequencies and in ears with structural anomalies. A high rate of CSF leak was observed in patients with an ABG and structural anomalies imaging as well as in those with an ABG and normal imaging findings. In cochlear implant candidates, the presence of a third window could cause an ABG because of stapes motion-induced shunting of acoustic energy outside the cochlear duct in response to air-conducted stimuli while bone conduction is preserved.

  1. Transport of Antarctic bottom water through the Kane Gap, tropical NE Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozov, E.G.; Tarakanov, R.Y.; van Haren, H.

    2013-01-01

    We study low-frequency properties of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) flow through the Kane Gap (9° N) in the Atlantic Ocean. The measurements in the Kane Gap include five visits with CTD (Conductivity-Temperature-Depth) sections in 2009–2012 and a year-long record of currents on a mooring using

  2. Water footprint components required to address the water-energy-food nexus, with the recent Urban Water Atlas for Europe as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanham, Davy

    2017-04-01

    The first part of this presentation analyses which water footprint (WF) components are necessary in WF accounting to provide relevant information to address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG's) water security (SDG 6), food security (SDG 2) and energy security (SDG 7) in a nexus setting. It is strongly based on the publication Vanham (2016) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2015.08.003. First, the nexus links between (1) the planetary boundary freshwater resources (green and blue water resources) and (2) food, energy and blue water security are discussed. Second, it is shown which water uses are mostly represented in WF accounting. General water management and WF studies only account for the water uses agriculture, industry and domestic water. Important water uses are however mostly not identified as separate entities or even included, i.e. green and blue water resources for aquaculture, wild foods, biofuels, hydroelectric cooling, hydropower, recreation/tourism, forestry (for energy and other biomass uses) and navigation. Third, therefore a list of essential separate components to be included within WF accounting is presented. The latter would be more coherent with the water-food-energy-ecosystem nexus. The second part of the presentation gives a brief overview of the recently published Urban Water Atlas for Europe. It shows for a selected city which WF components are represented and which not. As such, it also identifies research gaps.

  3. Assessment of drinking water quality using principal component ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) model showed a high correlation matrix of analysis for physicochemical quality of two types of water with 99.43% significant value. The classification matrix accuracy of the principal component analysis (PCA) highlighted 13 significant physico-chemical water quality ...

  4. Managing Uncertainty in Water Infrastructure Design Using Info-gap Robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irias, X.; Cicala, D.

    2013-12-01

    Info-gap theory, a tool for managing deep uncertainty, can be of tremendous value for design of water systems in areas of high seismic risk. Maintaining reliable water service in those areas is subject to significant uncertainties including uncertainty of seismic loading, unknown seismic performance of infrastructure, uncertain costs of innovative seismic-resistant construction, unknown costs to repair seismic damage, unknown societal impacts from downtime, and more. Practically every major earthquake that strikes a population center reveals additional knowledge gaps. In situations of such deep uncertainty, info-gap can offer advantages over traditional approaches, whether deterministic approaches that use empirical safety factors to address the uncertainties involved, or probabilistic methods that attempt to characterize various stochastic properties and target a compromise between cost and reliability. The reason is that in situations of deep uncertainty, it may not be clear what safety factor would be reasonable, or even if any safety factor is sufficient to address the uncertainties, and we may lack data to characterize the situation probabilistically. Info-gap is a tool that recognizes up front that our best projection of the future may be wrong. Thus, rather than seeking a solution that is optimal for that projection, info-gap seeks a solution that works reasonably well for all plausible conditions. In other words, info-gap seeks solutions that are robust in the face of uncertainty. Info-gap has been used successfully across a wide range of disciplines including climate change science, project management, and structural design. EBMUD is currently using info-gap to help it gain insight into possible solutions for providing reliable water service to an island community within its service area. The island, containing about 75,000 customers, is particularly vulnerable to water supply disruption from earthquakes, since it has negligible water storage and is

  5. The gender education gap in China: the power of water

    OpenAIRE

    Maimaiti, Yasheng; Siebert, William Stanley

    2009-01-01

    We investigate girls' school dropout rates, bringing forward a novel variable: access to water. We hypothesise that a girl's education suffers when her greater water need for female hygiene purposes after menarche is not met because her household has poor access to water. For testing we use data from rural villages in the China Health and Nutrition Survey. We find that menarche is associated with an increase in the school dropout rate, and indeed the effect is weaker for girls who have good a...

  6. Vulnerability Assessment of Water Supply Systems: Status, Gaps and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Conventional frameworks for assessing the impacts of climate change on water resource systems use cascades of climate and hydrological models to provide 'top-down' projections of future water availability, but these are subject to high uncertainty and are model and scenario-specific. Hence there has been recent interest in 'bottom-up' frameworks, which aim to evaluate system vulnerability to change in the context of possible future climate and/or hydrological conditions. Such vulnerability assessments are generic, and can be combined with updated information from top-down assessments as they become available. While some vulnerability methods use hydrological models to estimate water availability, fully bottom-up schemes have recently been proposed that directly map system vulnerability as a function of feasible changes in water supply characteristics. These use stochastic algorithms, based on reconstruction or reshuffling methods, by which multiple water supply realizations can be generated under feasible ranges of change in water supply conditions. The paper reports recent successes, and points to areas of future improvement. Advances in stochastic modeling and optimization can address some technical limitations in flow reconstruction, while various data mining and system identification techniques can provide possibilities to better condition realizations for consistency with top-down scenarios. Finally, we show that probabilistic and Bayesian frameworks together can provide a potential basis to combine information obtained from fully bottom-up analyses with projections available from climate and/or hydrological models in a fully integrated risk assessment framework for deep uncertainty.

  7. Estimation of GRACE water storage components by temporal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Robert; Guan, Huade; Batelaan, Okke

    2017-09-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has been in operation since 2002. Water storage estimates are calculated from gravity anomalies detected by the operating satellites and although not the true resolution, can be presented as 100 km × 100 km data cells if appropriate scaling functions are applied. Estimating total water storage has shown to be highly useful in detecting hydrological variations and trends. However, a limitation is that GRACE does not provide information as to where the water is stored in the vertical profile. We aim to partition the total water storage from GRACE into water storage components. We use a wavelet filter to decompose the GRACE data and partition it into various water storage components including soil water and groundwater. Storage components from the Australian Water Resources Assessment (AWRA) model are used as a reference for the decompositions of total storage data across Australia. Results show a clear improvement in using decomposed GRACE data instead of raw GRACE data when compared against total water storage outputs from the AWRA model. The method has potential to improve GRACE applications including a means to test various large scale hydrological models as well as helping to analyse floods, droughts and other hydrological conditions.

  8. Storm Water Management Model (SWMM): Performance Review and Gap Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is a widely used tool for urban drainage design and planning. Hundreds of peer-reviewed articles and conference proceedings have been written describing applications of SWMM. This review focused on collecting information on model performanc...

  9. Desalination and Water Recycling by Air Gap Membrane Distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meindersma, G.W.; Guijt, C.M.; de Haan, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for desalination. Membrane distillation differs from other membrane technologies in that the driving force for desalination is the difference in vapour pressure of water across the membrane, rather than total pressure. The membranes for MD are

  10. Exergy Analysis of Air-Gap Membrane Distillation Systems for Water Purification Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Woldemariam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Exergy analyses are essential tools for the performance evaluation of water desalination and other separation systems, including those featuring membrane distillation (MD. One of the challenges in the commercialization of MD technologies is its substantial heat demand, especially for large scale applications. Identifying such heat flows in the system plays a crucial role in pinpointing the heat loss and thermal integration potential by the help of exergy analysis. This study presents an exergetic evaluation of air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD systems at a laboratory and pilot scale. A series of experiments were conducted to obtain thermodynamic data for the water streams included in the calculations. Exergy efficiency and destruction for two different types of flat-plate AGMD were analyzed for a range of feed and coolant temperatures. The bench scale AGMD system incorporating condensation plate with more favorable heat conductivity contributed to improved performance parameters including permeate flux, specific heat demand, and exergy efficiency. For both types of AGMD systems, the contributions of the major components involved in exergy destruction were identified. The result suggested that the MD modules caused the highest fraction of destructions followed by re-concentrating tanks.

  11. Direct measurements of particle flux along gap sides in castellated plasma facing component in COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejarnac, Renaud; Dimitrova, Miglena; Komm, Michael; Schweer, B.; Terra, A.; Martin, A.; Boizante, G.; Gunn, J. P.; Pánek, Radomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, 9-10 (2014), s. 2220-2224 ISSN 0920-3796. [International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology -11 (ISFNT-11). Barcelona, 15.09.2013-20.09.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * COMPASS * plasma deposition * Gap * castellation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.152, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092037961400009X#

  12. Integrated crop water management might sustainably halve the global food gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägermeyr, J.; Gerten, D.; Schaphoff, S.; Heinke, J.; Lucht, W.; Rockström, J.

    2016-02-01

    As planetary boundaries are rapidly being approached, humanity has little room for additional expansion and conventional intensification of agriculture, while a growing world population further spreads the food gap. Ample evidence exists that improved on-farm water management can close water-related yield gaps to a considerable degree, but its global significance remains unclear. In this modeling study we investigate systematically to what extent integrated crop water management might contribute to closing the global food gap, constrained by the assumption that pressure on water resources and land does not increase. Using a process-based bio-/agrosphere model, we simulate the yield-increasing potential of elevated irrigation water productivity (including irrigation expansion with thus saved water) and optimized use of in situ precipitation water (alleviated soil evaporation, enhanced infiltration, water harvesting for supplemental irrigation) under current and projected future climate (from 20 climate models, with and without beneficial CO2 effects). Results show that irrigation efficiency improvements can save substantial amounts of water in many river basins (globally 48% of non-productive water consumption in an ‘ambitious’ scenario), and if rerouted to irrigate neighboring rainfed systems, can boost kcal production significantly (26% global increase). Low-tech solutions for small-scale farmers on water-limited croplands show the potential to increase rainfed yields to a similar extent. In combination, the ambitious yet achievable integrated water management strategies explored in this study could increase global production by 41% and close the water-related yield gap by 62%. Unabated climate change will have adverse effects on crop yields in many regions, but improvements in water management as analyzed here can buffer such effects to a significant degree.

  13. Water quality of the Chhoti Gandak River using principal component ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Water quality of the Chhoti Gandak River using principal component analysis, Ganga Plain, India. Vikram Bhardwaj1,∗, Dhruv Sen Singh1 and A K Singh. 2. 1. Centre of Advanced Study in Geology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226 007, India. 2. Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Barwa Road, Dhanbad 826 ...

  14. Identifying the Gaps in Practice for Combating Lead in Drinking Water in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Ling Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Excessive lead has been found in drinking water in Hong Kong in tests carried out in 2015. Investigations have identified that the problem in public rental housing estates was caused by the problematic solders used in the plumbing, and recommendations on enhancing the quality control system and strengthening the relevant water quality standards have been proposed. The cause for the same problem happening in other premises where soldering has not been adopted for water pipe connections is left unidentified. Considering the unidentified cause and the recommendations made, this study aims to identify the gaps in practice followed in Hong Kong for safeguarding the water quality of new installations. A holistic review of governing ordinances and regulations, products and materials used and the testing and commissioning requirements adopted in Hong Kong and elsewhere in the world were conducted. Based on international practices and parametric analysis, it was found that there are gaps in practices followed in Hong Kong, which are directly and indirectly leading to the lead-in-water crisis. Recommendations for improvement in the quality control system, and the water quality standards including the allowable lead content and leaching limit for products and materials and the testing and commissioning requirements on plumbing installations have been made. The review and the identified gaps would become useful reference for countries in strengthening their relevant water quality standards.

  15. Identifying the Gaps in Practice for Combating Lead in Drinking Water in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wai Ling; Jia, Jie; Bao, Yani

    2016-01-01

    Excessive lead has been found in drinking water in Hong Kong in tests carried out in 2015. Investigations have identified that the problem in public rental housing estates was caused by the problematic solders used in the plumbing, and recommendations on enhancing the quality control system and strengthening the relevant water quality standards have been proposed. The cause for the same problem happening in other premises where soldering has not been adopted for water pipe connections is left unidentified. Considering the unidentified cause and the recommendations made, this study aims to identify the gaps in practice followed in Hong Kong for safeguarding the water quality of new installations. A holistic review of governing ordinances and regulations, products and materials used and the testing and commissioning requirements adopted in Hong Kong and elsewhere in the world were conducted. Based on international practices and parametric analysis, it was found that there are gaps in practices followed in Hong Kong, which are directly and indirectly leading to the lead-in-water crisis. Recommendations for improvement in the quality control system, and the water quality standards including the allowable lead content and leaching limit for products and materials and the testing and commissioning requirements on plumbing installations have been made. The review and the identified gaps would become useful reference for countries in strengthening their relevant water quality standards. PMID:27706062

  16. Modelling raster-based monthly water balance components for Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmen, C.

    2000-11-01

    The terrestrial runoff component is a comparatively small but sensitive and thus significant quantity in the global energy and water cycle at the interface between landmass and atmosphere. As opposed to soil moisture and evapotranspiration which critically determine water vapour fluxes and thus water and energy transport, it can be measured as an integrated quantity over a large area, i.e. the river basin. This peculiarity makes terrestrial runoff ideally suited for the calibration, verification and validation of general circulation models (GCMs). Gauging stations are not homogeneously distributed in space. Moreover, time series are not necessarily continuously measured nor do they in general have overlapping time periods. To overcome this problems with regard to regular grid spacing used in GCMs, different methods can be applied to transform irregular data to regular so called gridded runoff fields. The present work aims to directly compute the gridded components of the monthly water balance (including gridded runoff fields) for Europe by application of the well-established raster-based macro-scale water balance model WABIMON used at the Federal Institute of Hydrology, Germany. Model calibration and validation is performed by separated examination of 29 representative European catchments. Results indicate a general applicability of the model delivering reliable overall patterns and integrated quantities on a monthly basis. For time steps less then too weeks further research and structural improvements of the model are suggested. (orig.)

  17. Effect of cooling water on stability of NLC linac components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Le Pimpec et al.

    2003-02-11

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  18. Effect of Cooling Water on Stability of NLC Linac Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, Frederic

    2002-11-01

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  19. Aging management of major light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P.; Ware, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    Review of technical literature and field experience has identified stress corrosion cracking as one of the major degradation mechanisms for the major light water reactor components. Three of the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms of current concern are (a) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactors, and (b) intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in boiling water reactors. Effective aging management of stress corrosion cracking mechanisms includes evaluation of interactions between design, materials, stressors, and environment; identification and ranking of susceptible sites; reliable inspection of any damage; assessment of damage rate; mitigation of damage; and repair and replacement using corrosion-resistant materials. Management of PWSCC includes use of lower operating temperatures, reduction in residual tensile stresses, development of reliable inspection techniques, and use of Alloy 690 as replacement material. Management of IGSCC of nozzle and attachment welds includes use of Alloy 82 as weld material, and potential use of hydrogen water chemistry. Management of IASCC also includes potential use of hydrogen water chemistry

  20. Sustainable Water Infrastructure Asset Management: A Gap Analysis of Customer and Service Provider Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjong Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of urban water infrastructure asset management may be sustainable water supply with satisfaction for customers. In this work, we attempted to evaluate the gaps between the perspectives of customers and service providers in Korea’s water infrastructure asset management. To evaluate the customers’ perspective, a hierarchical questionnaire survey was conducted to estimate the weights of influence for six customer values and their attributes on Korean water utility management. To evaluate the service providers’ perspective, an AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process analysis was performed to estimate the weights of influence for the customer values and their PIs (performance indicators. The gap analysis results show that customers place higher value on customer service satisfaction (emotion and information than do the service providers (managers, whereas the managers place more value on affordability than do the customers. The findings from this work imply that improving customer service is effective in satisfying the desirable water LOS (level of service for customers. Recommendations have also been provided for administrators and engineers to develop integrated decision-making systems that can reflect customer needs regarding the improvement of their water infrastructure asset management. The findings from this work may be helpful for the Korean government and water supply utilities in improving the sustainability of their water infrastructure asset management.

  1. Reactor materials program process water component failure probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W. L.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum rate loss of coolant accident for the Savannah River Production Reactors is presently specified as the abrupt double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a large process water pipe. This accident is not considered credible in light of the low applied stresses and the inherent ductility of the piping materials. The Reactor Materials Program was initiated to provide the technical basis for an alternate, credible maximum rate LOCA. The major thrust of this program is to develop an alternate worst case accident scenario by deterministic means. In addition, the probability of a DEGB is also being determined; to show that in addition to being mechanistically incredible, it is also highly improbable. The probability of a DEGB of the process water piping is evaluated in two parts: failure by direct means, and indirectly-induced failure. These two areas have been discussed in other reports. In addition, the frequency of a large bread (equivalent to a DEGB) in other process water system components is assessed. This report reviews the large break frequency for each component as well as the overall large break frequency for the reactor system

  2. Federal policy documentation and geothermal water consumption: Policy gaps and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, J. N.; Harto, C. B.; Clark, C. E.

    2015-09-01

    With U.S. geothermal power production expected to more than triple by 2040, and the majority of this growth expected to occur in arid and water-constrained areas, it is imperative that decision-makers understand the potential long-term limitations to and tradeoffs of geothermal development due to water availability. To this end, water consumption data, including documentation triggered by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, production and injection data, and water permit data, were collected from state and federal environmental policy sources in an effort to determine water consumption across the lifecycle of geothermal power plants. Values extracted from these sources were analyzed to estimate water usage during well drilling; to identify sourcing of water for well drilling, well stimulation, and plant operations; and to estimate operational water usage at the plant level. Nevada data were also compared on a facility-by-facility basis with other publicly available water consumption data, to create a complete picture of water usage and consumption at these facilities. This analysis represents a unique method of capturing project-level water data for geothermal projects; however, a lack of statutory and legal requirements for such data and data quality result in significant data gaps, which are also explored

  3. Water balance components and climate change in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetic, V.

    2009-09-01

    The openness of the continental part of Croatia towards the north and the separation of the Pannonian flatland from coastline by relative high mountain barrier of the Dinaric Alps produce a continental, mountain and Mediterranean climate in Croatia. Climate change has become an important issue for agriculture in recent years since agricultural production is highly sensitive to weather and water scarcity and consequently to climate change. The special problem with drought and difficulties in water supply and water management exist in the eastern and southern Croatia in the summer. The soil with karst porous base and unsuitable annual distribution of precipitation amount make the mid-Adriatic coast and islands the driest region in Croatia. Therefore, the main goal is to research the secular variations of water balance components using the Palmer method in the most vulnerable dry region in Croatia vs. wet region. The results have been established the intensity of regional impact of climate change on regime of precipitation, evapotranspiration and soil moisture. The increase in potential evapotranspiration and decrease in runoff and soil water content were observed in both regions which mostly became significant in the 1980s. However, contrary linear trends (negative in the dry region and positive in the wet region) were noticed in actual evapoptranspiration, moisture loss from the soil and recharge. The reason of that is a significant and faster decrease in annual precipitation and deficit of rainfall in dry region than in wet region in warmer season. Thus, combined influence of precipitation and air temperature affects the decrease in soil water content and runoff that it could have negative consequences on vegetation and agricultural production, particularly in the driest and most vulnerable region in Croatia - in the mid-Adriatic area.

  4. Data gaps in evidence-based research on small water enterprises in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opryszko, Melissa C; Huang, Haiou; Soderlund, Kurt; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2009-12-01

    Small water enterprises (SWEs) are water delivery operations that predominantly provide water at the community level. SWEs operate beyond the reach of piped water systems, selling water to households throughout the world. Their ubiquity in the developing world and access to vulnerable populations suggests that these small-scale water vendors may prove valuable in improving potable water availability. This paper assesses the current literature on SWEs to evaluate previous studies and determine gaps in the evidence base. Piped systems and point-of-use products were not included in this assessment. Results indicate that SWES are active in urban, peri-urban and rural areas of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Benefits of SWEs include: no upfront connection fees; demand-driven and flexible to local conditions; and service to large populations without high costs of utility infrastructure. Disadvantages of SWEs include: higher charges for water per unit of volume compared with infrastructure-based utilities; lack of regulation; operation often outside legal structures; no water quality monitoring; increased potential for conflict with local utilities; and potential for extortion by local officials. No rigorous, evidence-based, peer-reviewed scientific studies that control for confounders examining the effectiveness of SWEs in providing potable water were identified.

  5. Bone-femoral component interface gap after sagittal mechanical axis alignment is filled with new bone after cementless total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Shinichi; Hyakuna, Katsufumi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawai, Yasutsugu; Tamaki, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hiromu; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2018-05-01

    This study retrospectively evaluated the fate of mismatch between an uncemented femoral component and each femoral cut surface (i.e., wedge-shaped gap) relative to sagittal mechanical alignment in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Primary TKA was performed on 99 consecutive knees. The femoral components were aligned to the sagittal mechanical axis with CT-based navigation. All patients were assessed with postoperative true lateral radiographs. Bone-side surfaces of the uncemented femoral component were divided into five zones: anterior flange, anterior chamfer, posterior chamfer, posterior part, and distal part, which were defined as zones 1 to 5, respectively. Bone filling of wedge-shaped gaps in each zone was evaluated after 1 year. Femoral anterior notching did not occur. However, wedge-shaped gaps were observed in at least one zone in 23 of 99 knees (23%), most frequently in zone 5 (18%). There were 9 and 7 gaps in zones 1 and 2, respectively. The femoral component showed malpositioning of approximately 3° of flexion in cases with wedge-shaped gaps in zones 2 and/or 5. After one year, 67% (6/9) of zone 1, 100% (7/7) of zone 2, and 94% (17/18) of zone 5 wedge-shaped gaps were filled in with new bone. Femoral alignment relative to sagittal mechanical axis caused wedge-shaped gaps due to unstable anterior bone cutting through hard bone, but the small gaps were not clinically significant and filled in within one year. Sagittal setting of the femoral component should aim for the anatomical axis rather than the mechanical axis. IV.

  6. Seismic Design of ITER Component Cooling Water System-1 Piping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya P.; Jadhav, Mahesh; Sharma, Lalit K.; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Patel, Nirav; Ranjan, Rakesh; Gohil, Guman; Patel, Hiren; Dangi, Jinendra; Kumar, Mohit; Kumar, A. G. A.

    2017-04-01

    The successful performance of ITER machine very much depends upon the effective removal of heat from the in-vessel components and other auxiliary systems during Tokamak operation. This objective will be accomplished by the design of an effective Cooling Water System (CWS). The optimized piping layout design is an important element in CWS design and is one of the major design challenges owing to the factors of large thermal expansion and seismic accelerations; considering safety, accessibility and maintainability aspects. An important sub-system of ITER CWS, Component Cooling Water System-1 (CCWS-1) has very large diameter of pipes up to DN1600 with many intersections to fulfill the process flow requirements of clients for heat removal. Pipe intersection is the weakest link in the layout due to high stress intensification factor. CCWS-1 piping up to secondary confinement isolation valves as well as in-between these isolation valves need to survive a Seismic Level-2 (SL-2) earthquake during the Tokamak operation period to ensure structural stability of the system in the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) event. This paper presents the design, qualification and optimization of layout of ITER CCWS-1 loop to withstand SSE event combined with sustained and thermal loads as per the load combinations defined by ITER and allowable limits as per ASME B31.3, This paper also highlights the Modal and Response Spectrum Analyses done to find out the natural frequency and system behavior during the seismic event.

  7. Understanding the drivers of the future water gap in the Indus-Ganges-Brahmaputra basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerzeel, W. W.; Wijngaard, R. R.; Biemans, H.; Lutz, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Indus, Ganges, and Brahmaputra (IGB) river systems provide water resources for the agricultural, domestic and industrial sectors sustaining the lives of about 700 million people. The region is globally a hotspot for climate change as the headwaters of these rivers are fed by melt water from snow and glaciers, both strongly influenced by temperature change. In addition, the hydrology in the region is determined by the monsoon and its future dynamics as a results of climate change remains very uncertain. Simultaneously, the population is projected to grow rapidly over the coming decades, which in combination with strong economic developments, will likely result in a rapid increase in water demand. In this study we attempt to quantify the future water gap in the IGB and attribute this water gap to climate change and socio-economic growth. For the upstream mountainous parts of the basins we use the SPHY model, which is calibrated based on historical streamflow and glacier mass balance data and forced by the latest CMIP5 future climate model data for RCP4.5 and 8.5. Output of this model feeds into the downstream LPJmL model, which allows assessment of downstream climate change impacts and projected changes in water demand as a result of socio-economic developments. The LPJmL model is run for different combinations of RCPs and Shared Socio Economic Pathways (SSPs). Our results show that for the IGB as a whole climate change will increase water availability in the coming decades, due to an overall, albeit uncertain, increase in monsoon precipitation in combination with a sustained melt water supply from the upstream parts of the basins. However, irrespective of the SSP and RCP, the water demand as a result of socio-economic growth is expected to increase extremely fast in the near future and this is likely to be the main adaptation challenge for the IGB as far as water shortages are concerned. Our results also show that regional and temporal variation in the water gap

  8. Water Resources: the Central Component of the WEF Nexus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, K.; Gunda, T.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    Increasing population growth, consumption of natural resources, and deterioration of the environment coupled with climate change impacts (such as increased variability in precipitation) will challenge our abilities to provide water, energy and food (WEF) to the global populace. Less developed areas, such as the countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, are particularly vulnerable to such resource issues due to immature governance and management structures and strategies. We introduce an integrated approach to resource security analysis, which traditionally has focused on the WEF components separately and apply the methods to a suite of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Specifically, we evaluate the inter-connected nature of WEF securities by considering physical, demographic, socioeconomic, health, and institutional parameters related to each of the resource securities and by analyzing the relationships among the metrics. For example, reported food deficits for countries are strongly correlated with reported levels of access to safe drinking water. Multivariate statistical analyses are applied to identify relationships among resources and to develop indices that robustly and comprehensively capture the WEF nexus. Our results indicate that water plays the central role in the WEF nexus, due to its extensive use for both food and energy production in these countries. This approach provides a framework for analyzing the WEF nexus in other regions of the world.

  9. Performance of materials in the component cooling water systems of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The component cooling water (CCW) system provides cooling water to several important loads throughout the plant under all operating conditions. An aging assessment CCW systems in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was conducted as part of Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program (NPAR) instituted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper presents some of the results on the performances of materials in respect of their application in CCW Systems. All the CCW system failures reported to the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) from January 1988 to June 1990 were reviewed; it is concluded that three of the main contributors to CCW system failures are valves, pumps, and heat exchangers. This study identified the modes and causes of failure for these components; most of the causes for the aging-related failures could be related to the performance of materials. Also, in this paper the materials used for these components are reviewed, and there aging mechanisms under CCW system conditions are discussed

  10. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintentance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessonslearned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  11. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  12. Evaluating the hydrological consistency of satellite based water cycle components

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez Valencia, Oliver Miguel

    2016-06-15

    Advances in multi-satellite based observations of the earth system have provided the capacity to retrieve information across a wide-range of land surface hydrological components and provided an opportunity to characterize terrestrial processes from a completely new perspective. Given the spatial advantage that space-based observations offer, several regional-to-global scale products have been developed, offering insights into the multi-scale behaviour and variability of hydrological states and fluxes. However, one of the key challenges in the use of satellite-based products is characterizing the degree to which they provide realistic and representative estimates of the underlying retrieval: that is, how accurate are the hydrological components derived from satellite observations? The challenge is intrinsically linked to issues of scale, since the availability of high-quality in-situ data is limited, and even where it does exist, is generally not commensurate to the resolution of the satellite observation. Basin-scale studies have shown considerable variability in achieving water budget closure with any degree of accuracy using satellite estimates of the water cycle. In order to assess the suitability of this type of approach for evaluating hydrological observations, it makes sense to first test it over environments with restricted hydrological inputs, before applying it to more hydrological complex basins. Here we explore the concept of hydrological consistency, i.e. the physical considerations that the water budget impose on the hydrologic fluxes and states to be temporally and spatially linked, to evaluate the reproduction of a set of large-scale evaporation (E) products by using a combination of satellite rainfall (P) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations of storage change, focusing on arid and semi-arid environments, where the hydrological flows can be more realistically described. Our results indicate no persistent hydrological

  13. Water2Invest: Global facility for calculating investments needed to bridge the climate-induced water gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straatsma, Menno; Droogers, Peter; Brandsma, Jairus; Buytaert, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek; Meijer, Karen; van Aalst, Maaike; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Decision makers responsible for climate change adaptation investments are confronted with large uncertainties regarding future water availability and water demand, as well as the investment cost required to reduce the water gap. Moreover, scientists have worked hard to increase fundamental knowledge on climate change and its impacts (climate services), while practical use of this knowledge is limited due to a lack of tools for decision support under uncertain long term future scenarios (decision services). The Water2Invest project aims are to (i) assess the joint impact of climate change and socioeconomic change on water scarcity, (ii) integrate impact and potential adaptation in one flow, (iii) prioritize adaptation options to counteract water scarcity on their financial, regional socio-economic and environmental implications, and (iv) deliver all this information in an integrated user-friendly web-based service. Global water availability is computed between 2006 and 2100 using the PCR-GLOBWB water resources model at a 6 minute spatial resolution. Climate change scenarios are based on the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the IPCC Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) that defines four CO2 emission scenarios as representative concentration pathways. Water demand is computed for agriculture, industry, domestic, and environmental requirements based on socio-economic scenarios of increase in population and gross domestic product. Using a linear programming algorithm, water is allocated on a monthly basis over the four sectors. Based on these assessments, the user can evaluate various technological and infrastructural adaptation measures to assess the investments needed to bridge the future water gap. Regional environmental and socioeconomic effects of these investments are evaluated, such as environmental flows or downstream effects. A scheme is developed to evaluate the strategies on robustness and flexibility under climate change and scenario uncertainty

  14. Detecting and mitigating aging in component cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofaro, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The time-dependent effects of aging on component cooling water (CCW) systems in nuclear power plants has been studied and documented as part of a research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It was found that age related degradation leads to failures in the CCW system which can result in an increase in system unavailability, if not properly detected and mitigated. To identify effective methods of managing this degradation, information on inspection, monitoring, and maintenance practices currently available was obtained from various operating plants and reviewed. The findings were correlated with the most common aging mechanisms and failure modes and a compilation of aging detection and mitigation practices was formulated. This paper discusses the results of this work

  15. Detecting and mitigating aging in component cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofaro, R.J.; Aggarwal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The time-dependent effects of aging on component cooling water (CCW) systems in nuclear power plants has been studied and documented as part of a research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It was found that age related degradation leads to failures in the CCW system which can result in an increase in system unavailability, if not properly detected and mitigated. To identify effective methods of managing this degradation, information on inspection, monitoring, and maintenance practices currently available was obtained from various operating plants and reviewed. The findings were correlated with the most common aging mechanisms and failure modes, and a compilation of aging detection and mitigation practices was formulated. This paper discusses the results of this work

  16. Water desalination by air-gap membrane distillation using meltblown polypropylene nanofiber membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalam, S.; Chiam, C. K.; Widyaparamitha, S.; Chang, Y. W.; Lee, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a study of air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) using meltblown polypropylene (PP) nanofiber membrane to produce fresh water via desalination process. PP nanofiber membranes with the effective area 0.17 m2 are tested with NaCl solutions (0.5 - 4.0 wt.%) and seawater as the feed solutions (9400 - 64800 μS/cm) in a tubular membrane module. Results show that the flux decreases with increasing the membrane thickness from 547 to 784 μm. The flux increases with the feed flow rate and temperature difference across the membrane. The feed concentration affects the flux insignificantly. The AGMD system can reject the salts at least 96%. Water vapor permeation rate is relatively higher than solute permeation rate resulting in the conductivity value of permeate decreases when the corresponding flux increases. The AGMD system produces the fresh water (200 - 1520 μS/cm) that is suitable for drinking, fisheries or irrigation.

  17. A geo-informatics approach for estimating water resources management components and their interrelationships

    KAUST Repository

    Liaqat, Umar Waqas

    2016-09-21

    A remote sensing based geo-informatics approach was developed to estimate water resources management (WRM) components across a large irrigation scheme in the Indus Basin of Pakistan. The approach provides a generalized framework for estimating a range of key water management variables and provides a management tool for the sustainable operation of similar schemes globally. A focus on the use of satellite data allowed for the quantification of relationships across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Variables including actual and crop evapotranspiration, net and gross irrigation, net and gross groundwater use, groundwater recharge, net groundwater recharge, were estimated and then their interrelationships explored across the Hakra Canal command area. Spatially distributed remotely sensed estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) rates were determined using the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model and evaluated against ground-based evaporation calculated from the advection-aridity method. Analysis of ETa simulations across two cropping season, referred to as Kharif and Rabi, yielded Pearson correlation (R) values of 0.69 and 0.84, Nash-Sutcliffe criterion (NSE) of 0.28 and 0.63, percentage bias of −3.85% and 10.6% and root mean squared error (RMSE) of 10.6 mm and 12.21 mm for each season, respectively. For the period of study between 2008 and 2014, it was estimated that an average of 0.63 mm day−1 water was supplied through canal irrigation against a crop water demand of 3.81 mm day−1. Approximately 1.86 mm day−1 groundwater abstraction was estimated in the region, which contributed to fulfil the gap between crop water demand and canal water supply. Importantly, the combined canal, groundwater and rainfall sources of water only met 70% of the crop water requirements. As such, the difference between recharge and discharge showed that groundwater depletion was around −115 mm year−1 during the six year study period. Analysis indicated that

  18. Effect of nitrogen and water deficit type on the yield gap between the potential and attainable wheat yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit and N fertilizer are the two primary limiting factors for wheat yield in the North China plain, the most important winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. production area in China. Analyzing the yield gap between the potential yield and the attainable yield can quantify the potential for increasing wheat production and exploring the limiting factors to yield gap in the high-yielding farming region of North China Plain. The Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT model was used to identify methods to increase the grain yield and decrease the gap. In order to explore the impact of N and cultivars on wheat yield in the different drought types, the climate conditions during 1981 to 2011 growing seasons was categorized into low, moderate, and severe water deficit classes according to the anomaly percentage of the water deficit rate during the entire wheat growing season. There are differences (P < 0.0001 in the variations of the potential yields among three cultivars over 30 yr. For all three water deficit types, the more recent cultivars Jimai22 and Shijiazhuang8 had higher yields compared to the older 'Jinan17'. As the N fertilizer rate increased, the yield gap decreased more substantially during the low water deficit years because of the significant increase in attainable yield. Overall, the yield gaps were smaller with less water stress. Replacement of cultivars and appropriate N fertilizer application based on the forecasted drought types can narrow the yield gap effectively.

  19. Identifying Gaps in the Cultural Competence/Sensitivity Components of an Undergraduate Medical School Curriculum: A Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loue, Sana; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy; Limbach, Kristen

    2015-10-01

    Physicians and other health care workers are increasingly being called upon to bridge the cultural differences that may exist between themselves and their patients. Adequate cross-cultural education is essential if existing health care disparities are to be reduced. We conducted a needs assessment to identify gaps in the cultural competence/sensitivity components of the undergraduate medical school curriculum at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The 2011 study was designed (1) to assess how first and second year medical school students perceive the adequacy of the medical school curriculum with respect to issues of diversity and (2) the extent to which first and second year medical students believe that an understanding of issues relating to patient culture are important to the provision of effective patient care. Student perspectives were assessed through a web-based anonymous survey of all first year (n = 167) and all second year (n = 166) medical school students, two focus groups (total n = 14) and a Problem-based Case Inquiry Group exercise (n = 6), both with second year students. A substantial proportion of participating first and second year medical students do not believe that self-reflection regarding one's own cultural biases is important to one's performance as a physician, do not view an understanding of diverse patient cultural beliefs as important or very important in the provision of effective patient care, and are uncomfortable with and unsure about how to approach culture-related issues arising in patient care. The inclusion of specified elements--increased contact with diverse patients, more comprehensive resources, increased opportunities to practice communication skills and engage in self-reflection--may be critical to heighten student awareness of and comfort in interacting with diverse populations. Our findings are relevant to the development of medical school curricula designed to improve physician understanding of and

  20. Morphology and anatomy of physical dormancy in Ipomoea lacunosa: identification of the water gap in seeds of Convolvulaceae (Solanales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasuriya, K M G Gehan; Baskin, Jerry M; Geneve, Robert L; Baskin, Carol C

    2007-07-01

    Convolvulaceae is the most advanced plant family (asterid clade) that produces seeds with physical dormancy (water-impermeable seed coat). There are several different opinions about the nature of the specialized structure ('water gap') in the seed coat through which water initially enters seeds of Convolvulaceae, but none of them has been documented clearly. The primary aim of the study was to identify the water gap in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae) and to describe its morphology, anatomy and function. Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tissue-sectioning, dye-tracking and blocking experiments were used to describe the morphology, anatomy and function of the water gap in seeds of I. lacunosa. Dormancy-breaking treatments caused slits to form around the two bulges on the seed coat adjacent to the hilum, and dye entered the seed only via the disrupted bulges. Bulge anatomy differs from that of the rest of the seed coat. Sclereid cells of the bulges are more compacted and elongated than those in the hilum pad and in the rest of the seed coat away from the bulges. The transition area between elongated and square-shaped sclereid cells is the place where the water gap opens. Morphology/anatomy of the water gap in Convolvulaceae differs from that of taxa in the other 11 angiosperm plant families that produce seeds with physical dormancy for which it has been described.

  1. Fitting probability distributions to component water quality data from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of water is carried out to make the available water meet the standards for its intended use. Such use may be for drinking and other household needs, industries,livestock rearing or fisheries etc. poor quality water is commonly treated to ensure potability. Potable water should be free from unpleasant tastes and ...

  2. Urban water metabolism indicators derived from a water mass balance - Bridging the gap between visions and performance assessment of urban water resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, M A; Serrao-Neumann, S; Kenway, S J; Morgan, E A; Low Choy, D

    2017-10-01

    Improving resource management in urban areas has been enshrined in visions for achieving sustainable urban areas, but to date it has been difficult to quantify performance indicators to help identify more sustainable outcomes, especially for water resources. In this work, we advance quantitative indicators for what we refer to as the 'metabolic' features of urban water management: those related to resource efficiency (for water and also water-related energy and nutrients), supply internalisation, urban hydrological performance, sustainable extraction, and recognition of the diverse functions of water. We derived indicators in consultation with stakeholders to bridge this gap between visions and performance indicators. This was done by first reviewing and categorising water-related resource management objectives for city-regions, and then deriving indicators that can gauge performance against them. The ability for these indicators to be quantified using data from an urban water mass balance was also examined. Indicators of water efficiency, supply internalisation, and hydrological performance (relative to a reference case) can be generated using existing urban water mass balance methods. In the future, indicators for water-related energy and nutrient efficiencies could be generated by overlaying the urban water balance with energy and nutrient data. Indicators of sustainable extraction and recognising diverse functions of water will require methods for defining sustainable extraction rates and a water functionality index. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Robust Decision Making and Info-Gap Decision Theory for water resource system planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosov, Evgenii S.; Woods, Ashley M.; Harou, Julien J.

    2013-06-01

    Stationarity assumptions of linked human-water systems are frequently invalid given the difficult-to-predict changes affecting such systems. In this case water planning occurs under conditions of deep or severe uncertainty, where the statistical distributions of future conditions and events are poorly known. In such situations predictive system simulation models are typically run under different scenarios to evaluate the performance of future plans under different conditions. Given that there are many possible plans and many possible futures, which simulations will lead to the best designs? Robust Decision Making (RDM) and Info-Gap Decision Theory (IGDT) provide a structured approach to planning complex systems under such uncertainty. Both RDM and IGDT make repeated use of trusted simulation models to evaluate different plans under different future conditions. Both methods seek to identify robust rather than optimal decisions, where a robust decision works satisfactorily over a broad range of possible futures. IGDT efficiently charts system performance with robustness and opportuneness plots summarising system performance for different plans under the most dire and favourable sets of future conditions. RDM samples a wider range of dire, benign and opportune futures and offers a holistic assessment of the performance of different options. RDM also identifies through ‘scenario discovery' which combinations of uncertain future stresses lead to system vulnerabilities. In our study we apply both frameworks to a water resource system planning problem: London's water supply system expansion in the Thames basin, UK. The methods help identify which out of 20 proposed water supply infrastructure portfolios is the most robust given severely uncertain future hydrological inflows, water demands and energy prices. Multiple criteria of system performance are considered: service reliability, storage susceptibility, capital and operating cost, energy use and environmental flows

  4. Effect of Model Selection on Computed Water Balance Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhorar, R.K.; Smit, A.A.M.F.R.; Roest, C.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Soil water flow modelling approaches as used in four selected on-farm water management models, namely CROPWAT. FAIDS, CERES and SWAP, are compared through numerical experiments. The soil water simulation approaches used in the first three models are reformulated to incorporate ail evapotranspiration

  5. Plasma treatment of polyethersulfone membrane for benzene removal from water by air gap membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedram, Sara; Mortaheb, Hamid Reza; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2018-01-01

    In order to obtain a durable cost-effective membrane for membrane distillation (MD) process, flat sheet polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were modified by an atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma generated using a dielectric barrier discharge in a mixture of argon and hexamethyldisiloxane as the organosilicon precursor. The surface properties of the plasma-modified membranes were characterized by water contact angle (CA), liquid entry pressure, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The water CA of the membrane was increased from 64° to 104° by depositing a Si(CH 3 )-rich thin layer. While the pristine PES membrane was not applicable in the MD process, the modified PES membrane could be applied for the first time in an air gap membrane distillation setup for the removal of benzene as a volatile organic compound from water. The experimental design using central composite design and response surface methodology was applied to study the effects of feed temperature, concentration, and flow rate as well as their binary interactions on the overall permeate flux and separation factor. The separation factor and permeation flux of the modified PES membrane at optimum conditions were comparable with those of commercial polytetrafluoroethylene membrane.

  6. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of gap crossings in castellated plasma-facing components in tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gunn, J. P.; Pekarek, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2013), 025006-025006 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1467; GA ČR GAP205/11/2341; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma * tokamak * PIC divertor * castellation gaps Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.386, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/55/2/025006/pdf/0741-3335_55_2_025006.pdf

  7. Heavy water: a distinctive and essential component of CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.I.; van Alstyne, H.M.

    1994-06-01

    The exceptional properties of heavy water as a neutron moderator provide one of the distinctive features of CANDU reactors. Although most of the chemical and physical properties of deuterium and protium (mass 1 hydrogen) are appreciably different, the low terrestrial abundance of deuterium makes the separation of heavy water a relatively costly process, and so of considerable importance to the CANDU system. World heavy-water supplies are currently provided by the Girdler-Sulphide process or processes based on ammonia-hydrogen exchange. Due to cost and hazard considerations, new processes will be required for the production of heavy water in and beyond the next decade. Through AECL's development and refinement of wetproofed catalysts for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between water and hydrogen, a family of new processes is expected to be deployed. Two monothermal processes, CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange, using water-to-hydrogen conversion by electrolysis) and CIRCE (Combined Industrially Reformed hydrogen and Catalytic Exchange, based on steam reforming of hydrocarbons), are furthest advanced. Besides its use for heavy-water production, the CECE process is a highly effective technology for heavy-water upgrading and for tritium separation from heavy (or light) water. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  8. Long Term Resource Monitoring Program Water Quality Component Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soballe, David M; Houser, Jeffrey N

    2006-01-01

    ...) adequacy and suitability of the water quality procedures manual, (4) adequacy and efficiency of procedures for quality assurance and quality control in data collection and laboratory analyses, (5...

  9. Effects of electrode gap and electric current on chlorine generation of electrolyzed deep ocean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Guoo-Shyng Wang; Hsu, Shun-Yao

    2018-04-01

    Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmental friendly. A two-factor central composite design was adopted for studying the effects of electrode gap and electric current on chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzed deep ocean water. Deep ocean water was electrolyzed in a glass electrolyzing cell equipped with platinum-plated titanium anode and cathode in a constant-current operation mode. Results showed that current density, chlorine concentration, and electrolyte temperature increased with electric current, while electric efficiency decreased with electric current and electrode gap. An electrode gap of less than 11.7 mm, and a low electric current appeared to be a more energy efficient design and operation condition for the electrolysis system. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Modeling the soil system: Bridging the gap between pedology and soil-water physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braudeau, Erik; Mohtar, Rabi H.

    2009-05-01

    The biological and geochemical processes in soil such as organic matter mineralization, microbiological activity, and plant alimentation can be accurately assessed and modeled only with the knowledge of the thermodynamic status of the soil medium where these processes take place. However, current soil water models do not define and characterize the soil structure or the thermodynamic state of the soil water interacting with this structure. This article presents a new paradigm in characterizing and modeling the organized soil medium and the physical properties resulting from this organization. It describes a framework of the modeling approach as a contribution to the General Systems theory. The basic concept of Representative Elementary Volume (REV) in soil physics and hydrology was transformed into the concept of Structure Representative Volume (SREV) which takes into account the hierarchical organization of the structured soil medium. The pedostructure is defined as the SREV of the soil medium and this concept is at the basis of the new paradigm including variables, equations, parameters, and units in soil physics, in a similar way that the REV is at the basis of the continuous porous media mechanics applied to soils. The paradigm allows for a thermodynamic characterization of the structured soil medium with respect to soil water content then bridging the gap between pedology and soil physics. We show that the two points of view (REV and SREV) are complementary and must be used in the scaling of information. This approach leads to a new dimension in soil-water properties characterization that ensures a physically based modeling of processes in soil and the transfer of information from the physical scale of processes (pedostructure or laboratory measurements scale) to the application scale of the other disciplines (modeling and mapping scale).

  11. Mind the gaps: a state-space model for analysing the dynamics of North Sea herring spawning components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Mark

    2010-01-01

    , the sum of the fitted abundance indices across all components proves an excellent proxy for the biomass of the total stock, even though the model utilizes information at the individual-component level. The Orkney–Shetland component appears to have recovered faster from historic depletion events than...... the other components, whereas the Downs component has been the slowest. These differences give rise to changes in stock composition, which are shown to vary widely within a relatively short time. The modelling framework provides a valuable tool for studying and monitoring the dynamics of the individual...

  12. Effect Of Conjunctive Use Of Water On Yield Components And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Availability of irrigation water at reasonable cost is one of the most important factors for agricultural development. Conjunctive use of fresh and sewage water can successfully be adopted for cultivation. An experiment was laid out at the research plot of Allahabad Agricultural Institute-Deemed University, Allahabad, India in a ...

  13. Water quality assessment using SVD-based principal component ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SVD) of hydrological data was tested for water quality assessment. Using two case studies of waste- and drinking water, PCA via SVD was able to find latent variables which explain 80.8% and 83.7% of the variance, respectively. By means of ...

  14. Water Resource Assessment, Gaps, and Constraints of Vegetable Production in Robit and Dangishta Watersheds, Upper Blue Nile Basin, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worqlul, A. W.; Dile, Y.; Jeong, J.; Schmitter, P.; Bizimana, J. C.; Gerik, T.; Srinivasan, R.; Richardson, J. W.; Clarke, N.

    2017-12-01

    Rainfed agriculture supports the majority of the poor in sub-Saharan Africa. However, rainfall variability, land degradation and low soil fertility lessen their effectiveness for feeding the growing population. This study aims to estimate the water resources potential to sustain small-scale irrigation (SSI) in Ethiopia into the dry season to expand the food supply by growing vegetable and to understand the gaps and constraints of irrigated vegetable production. The case studies were located in Robit and Dangishta watersheds of the Ethiopian highlands near Lake Tana, where detailed field-level data were collected. The study focused on data from 18 households who have been cultivating tomato and onion during the dry season using irrigation in each watershed. The two components of the Integrated Decision Support System (IDSS) - the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Agricultural Policy Environmental eXtender (APEX) - were used to assess impacts of SSI at multiple scales. Results suggest that there is a substantial amount of surface runoff and shallow groundwater recharge at watershed scale. The field-scale analysis within the Robit watershed indicated that optimal tomato yield could be obtained with 450 mm of irrigation and 200 to 250 kg/ha of urea with 50 kg/ha of diammonium phosphate (DAP). In Dangishta, optimum onion yield can be obtained by applying 550 mm irrigation and 120 to 180 kg/ha of urea with 50 kg/ha of DAP. Studying field scale water balance, the average shallow groundwater recharge (after accounting other groundwater users such as household and livestock uses) was not sufficient to meet tomato and onion water demand. The field-scale analysis also indicated that soil evaporation attributed a significant proportion of evapotranspiration (i.e. 60% of the evapotranspiration for onion and 40% for tomato). Use of mulching or other soil and water conservation interventions could increase water for cropping by reducing soil evaporation thereby enhancing

  15. Minding the Gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Millicent Anne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Neutron & X-ray scattering provides nano- to meso-scale details of complex fluid structure; 1D electronic density maps dervied from SAXS yield molecular level insights; Neutron reflectivity provides substructure details of substrate supported complex fluids; Complex fluids composition can be optimized to support a wide variety of both soluble and membrane proteins; The water gap dimensions can be finely tuned through polymer component.

  16. Estimation of the amount of water removed by gap and atomization air streams during pelletization in a rotary processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertommen, J; Rombaut, P; Michoel, A; Kinget, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the amount of water removed by the gap and atomization air streams during pelletization by the wet granulation technique in a rotary processor and to test the hypothesis that the influence of the water addition rate on the pellet size (1,7) mainly originates from differences in the amount of water removed by these air streams. Estimations from flow, temperature, and relative humidity measurements of the air streams, and estimations from moisture content measurements, indicated that approximately 3.6 g of water/min was removed during spheronization. The estimations from the air streams' characteristics obtained for the water loss during the water addition phase (2.6 g/min) reflected the water removal during the later stages and did not reflect the overall rate of water removal during the total water addition phase as estimated from moisture content measurements (2.0 g/min). This was attributed to the fact that estimations from the air streams' characteristics could not take into account the early stages of the water addition phase. In these early stages, the amount of water removed was very limited. Using the foregoing estimations, differences in amount of water removed by the air streams could be compensated by adding more water when the water addition rate was decreased. This resulted in similar pellet sizes (geometric mean diameter of 800-850 microns) using different water addition rates. Thus, the hypothesis that the major influence of the water addition rate on the pellet size mainly originates from differences in the amount of water removed by the gap and atomization air streams was confirmed.

  17. Cumulative human threats on fish biodiversity components in Tunisian waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. BEN RAIS LASRAM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human activities are increasingly impacting biodiversity. To improve conservation planning measures in an ecosystem-based management context, we need to explore how the effects of these activities interact with different biodiversity components. In this study, we used a semi-quantitative method to assess the cumulative impacts of human activities on three biodiversity components (species richness, phylogenetic diversity, and functional diversity in Tunisia’s exclusive economic zone. For each of the nine activities considered, we developed an understanding of their effects from local studies and the expert opinion of stakeholders with country-specific experience. We mapped the cumulative effects and the three biodiversity components and then assessed the degree to which these elements overlapped using an overlap index. This is the first time such an assessment has been made for Tunisia’s marine ecosystems and our assessment highlight the inappropriateness of current conservation measures. The results of this study have specific application for the prioritization of future management actions.

  18. A study of water hammer phenomena in a one-component two-phase bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Terushige; Akagawa, Koji

    2000-01-01

    Water hammer phenomena caused by a rapid valve closure, that is, shock phenomena in two-phase flows, are an important problem for the safety assessment of a hypothetical LOCA. This paper presents the results of experimental and analytical studies of the water hammer phenomena in a one-component tow-phase bubbly flow. In order to clarify the characteristics of water hammer phenomena, experiments for a one-component two-phase flow of Freon R-113 were conducted and a numerical simulation of pressure transients was developed. An overall picture of the water hammer phenomena in a one-component two-phase flow is presented an discussed. (author)

  19. Efficient propagation of TM polarized light in photonic crystal components exhibiting band gaps for TE polarized light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Thorhauge, Morten

    2003-01-01

    D finite-difference-time-domain method. The simulated spectra are in excellent agreement with the experimental results, which show a propagation loss as low as 2.5±4 dB/mm around 1525 nm and bend losses at 2.9±0.2 dB for TM polarized light. We demonstrate a high coupling for TM polarized light......We have investigated the properties of TM polarized light in planar photonic crystal waveguide structures, which exhibit photonic band gaps for TE polarized light. Straight and bent photonic crystal waveguides and couplers have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material and modelled using a 3...

  20. Component failures at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisinger, M.F.

    1980-10-01

    Objectives of this study were to identify those systems having major impact on safety and availability (i.e. to identify those systems and components whose failures have historically caused the greatest number of challenges to the reactor protective systems and which have resulted in greatest loss of electric generation time). These problems were identified for engineering solutions and recommendations made for areas and programs where research and development should be concentrated. The program was conducted in three major phases: Data Analysis, Engineering Evaluation, Cost Benefit Analysis

  1. Component failures at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisinger, M.F.

    1980-10-01

    Objectives of this study were to identify those systems having major impact on safety and availability (i.e. to identify those systems and components whose failures have historically caused the greatest number of challenges to the reactor protective systems and which have resulted in greatest loss of electric generation time). These problems were identified for engineering solutions and recommendations made for areas and programs where research and development should be concentrated. The program was conducted in three major phases: Data Analysis, Engineering Evaluation, Cost Benefit Analysis.

  2. Spatial attenuation of different sound field components in a water layer and shallow-water sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A. I.; Kuznetsov, G. N.

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of spatial attenuation of low-frequency vector-scalar sound fields in shallow water. The experiments employed a towed pneumatic cannon and spatially separated four-component vector-scalar receiver modules. Narrowband analysis of received signals made it possible to estimate the attenuation coefficients of the first three modes in the frequency of range of 26-182 Hz and calculate the frequency dependences of the sound absorption coefficients in the upper part of bottom sediments. We analyze the experimental and calculated (using acoustic calibration of the waveguide) laws of the drop in sound pressure and orthogonal vector projections of the oscillation velocity. It is shown that the vertical projection of the oscillation velocity vector decreases significantly faster than the sound pressure field.

  3. Filling Gaps in Biogeochemical Understanding of Wildfire Effects on Watersheds and Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Charles; Covino, Timothy; Chow, Alex

    2017-04-01

    Large, high-severity wildfires alter the biogeochemical conditions that determine how watersheds retain and release nutrients and influence stream water quality. These effects are commonly expected to abate within a few years, but recent studies show that post-fire watershed changes can have persistent, but poorly-understood biogeochemical consequences. Owing to the increased frequency and extent of high-severity wildfires predicted for western North America, and the growing awareness of the links between wildfire and clean water supply, there is a need to address these knowledge gaps. For the past 15 years we have tracked stream nutrients, chemistry, temperature, and sediment after the 2002 Hayman Fire, the largest wildfire in Colorado history. Our earlier work showed that headwater catchments that experienced extensive, high-severity forest fires had elevated stream nitrate, temperature, and turbidity for five post-fire years. Recent sampling, conducted 13 and 14 years after the fire, found that turbidity had largely returned to pretreatment levels, but that stream nitrate remained an order of magnitude above pre-fire levels in catchments with extensive high-severity wildfire. Stream temperature and total dissolved nitrogen concentration also remained higher in those catchments compared to unburned streams. Decreased plant demand is the mechanism commonly credited for post-fire nutrient losses, though our current work is evaluating the implications of soil and stream nutrient uptake and supply on persistent nitrogen (N) export from severely-burned catchments. For example, we have measured higher total soil N and higher net N mineralization in severely-burned portions of the Hayman Fire compared to moderately or unburned areas, indicating that higher soil N supply may contribute to N losses from upland soils. Conversely, using a nutrient tracer approach we found reduced N uptake in burned streams, which suggests a switch from the N-limited conditions typical of

  4. Examination of water phase transitions in Loblolly pine and cell wall components by differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Michael J. Lambrecht; Samuel V. Glass; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Daniel J. Yelle

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines phase transformations of water in wood and isolated wood cell wall components using differential scanning calorimetry with the purpose of better understanding "Type II water" or "freezable bound water" that has been reported for cellulose and other hydrophilic polymers. Solid loblolly pine (Pinus taeda...

  5. [Analysis on water-soluble components in roots of Changium smyrnioides among different populations by HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changlin; Guo, Qiaosheng; Cheng, Boxing; Yang, Liwen; Zhou, Tinghui

    2010-12-01

    To analyze water-soluble components in the roots of Ch. smyrnioides among different populations that distributed in the main areas and give a reference for germplasm evaluation and quality control. Water-soluble components were extracted with the cold-soaking method and analyzed by HPLC, similarity coefficient was calculated by included angle cosine method according to relative content of major water-soluble components, and systematic relationships were constructed based on UPGMA method. There was significant difference in water-soluble components in root among population. Jiuhuashan population had the highest content of water-soluble extract. The content of water-soluble extract was below the pharmacopoeia standard in the root of Dalongshan population and Fushan population. There was significant difference in the HPLC chromatogram of water-soluble components in the root of Ch. smyrnioides from different populations, and the number of common peak was small. Similarity coefficient significantly ranged from 0.0306 to 0.9995 among 10 populations of Ch. smymrnioides. Water-soluble components in the root of Zijinshan population was the most unique, similarity coefficients were relatively small among Zijinshan population and the other seven populations except Hongshan population, and similarity coefficient was in a higher level of 0.9697 between Zijinshan population and Hongshan population. Water-soluble components were extremely similar in four populations that were Laoshan, Maoshan, Qinglongshan and Langyashan, and similarity coefficients among them were in a high level exceeded 0.99. 10 populations were divided into 3 groups according to clustering results. Water-soluble components show a high diversity in the roots of Ch. smyrnioides among different populations, and can be clearly divided into 3 types.

  6. Thermal properties of ration components as affected by moisture content and water activity during freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Chinachoti, P; Wang, D; Hallberg, L M; Sun, X S

    2008-11-01

    Beef roast with vegetables is an example of a meal, ready-to-eat (MRE) ration entrée. It is a mixture of meat, potato, mushroom, and carrot with a gravy sauce. The thermal properties of each component were characterized in terms of freezing point, latent heat, freezable and unfreezable water contents, and enthalpy during freezing using differential scanning calorimetry. Freezing and thawing curves and the effect of freezing and thawing cycles on thermal properties were also evaluated. The freezing points of beef, potato, mushroom, and sauce were all in the range of -5.1 to -5.6 degrees C, but moisture content, water activity, latent heat, freezable and unfreezable water contents, and enthalpy varied among these components. Freezing temperature greatly affected the unfrozen water fraction. The unfreezable water content (unfrozen water fraction at -50 degrees C) of ration components was in the range of 8.2% to 9.7%. The freezing and thawing curves of vegetables with sauce differed from those of beef but took similar time to freeze or thaw. Freezing and thawing cycles did not greatly affect the thermal properties of each component. Freezing point and latent heat were reduced by decreasing moisture content and water activity of each component. Water activity was proportionally linear to freezing point at a(w) > 0.88, and moisture content was proportionally linear to freezable water content in all ration components. Water was not available for freezing when moisture content was reduced to 28.8% or less. This study indicates that moisture content and water activity are critical factors affecting thermal behavior of ration components during freezing.

  7. GENERIC, COMPONENT FAILURE DATA BASE FOR LIGHT WATER AND LIQUID SODIUM REACTOR PRAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. A. Eide; S. V. Chmielewski; T. D. Swantz

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive generic component failure data base has been developed for light water and liquid sodium reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) . The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) and the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) data bases were used to generate component failure rates . Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather than existing estimates .

  8. The Key Components of Job Satisfaction in Malaysian Water Utility Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Khalizani Khalid; Hanisah M. Salim; Siew-Phaik Loke; Khalisanni Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: This study aimed to examine the impacts of employees rewards and employees motivation on employees job satisfaction between public and private water utility organization in Malaysia. Approach: A total of 689 employees from both sectors participated. While hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to test the relationship between employees rewards, employees motivation and employees job satisfaction, gap analysis was utilized to determine the si...

  9. A microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for the detection of toxic components in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    In a microbial fuel cell bacteria produce electricity. When water with a constant quality is lead passed the bacteria, a constant current will be measured. When toxic components enter the cell with the water, the bacteria are affected

  10. Dynamics of leaf water relations components in co-occurring iso- and anisohydric conifer species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick Meinzer; David Woodruff; Danielle Marias; Katherine McCulloh; Sanna Sevanto

    2014-01-01

    Because iso- and anisohydric species differ in stomatal regulation of the rate and magnitude of fluctuations in shoot water potential, they may be expected to show differences in the plasticity of their shoot water relations components, but explicit comparisons of this nature have rarely been made. We subjected excised shoots of co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus...

  11. IRRIGATION WITH SALINE WATER AND NITROGEN IN PRODUCTION COMPONENTS AND YIELD OF SUNFLOWER

    OpenAIRE

    JOÃO BATISTA DOS SANTOS; DOROTEU HONÓRIO GUEDES FILHO; HANS RAJ GHEYI; GEOVANI SOARES DE LIMA; LOURIVAL FERREIRA CAVALCANTE

    2016-01-01

    Due to the quantitative and qualitative limitation of water resources, saline water irrigation and nitrogen (N) fertilisation can contribute positively to the expansion of sunflower cultivation in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate production components and yield of sunflower, cv. „Embrapa 122 - V2000‟, irrigated with waters of different salinity levels (electrical conductivity – ECw) and fertilised with varying amounts of N in a field experiment ...

  12. Retrieval Accuracy Assessment with Gap Detection for Case 2 Waters Chla Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, S. I.; Higa, H.; Kim, H.; Oki, K.; Oki, T.

    2016-12-01

    Inland lakes and coastal regions types of Case 2 Waters should be continuously and accurately monitored as the former contain 90% of the global liquid freshwater storage, while the latter provide most of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which is an important link in the global carbon cycle. The optical properties of Case 2 Waters are dominated by three optically active components: phytoplankton, non-algal particles (NAP) and color dissolved organic matter (CDOM). During the last three decades, researchers have proposed several algorithms to retrieve Chla concentration from the remote sensing reflectance. In this study, seven algorithms are assessed with various band combinations from multi and hyper-spectral data with linear, polynomial and power regression approaches. To evaluate the performance of the 43 algorithm combination sets, 500,000 remote sensing reflectance spectra are simulated with a wide range of concentrations for Chla, NAP and CDOM. The concentrations of Chla and NAP vary from 1-200 (mg m-3) and 1-200 (gm m-3), respectively, and the absorption of CDOM at 440 nm has the range of 0.1-10 (m-1). It is found that the three-band algorithm (665, 709 and 754 nm) with the quadratic polynomial (3b_665_QP) indicates the best overall performance. 3b_665_QP has the least error with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.2 (mg m-3) and a mean absolute relative error (MARE) of 0.7 %. The less accurate retrieval of Chla was obtained by the synthetic chlorophyll index algorithm with RMSE and MARE of 35.8 mg m-3 and 160.4 %, respectively. In general, Chla algorithms which incorporates 665 nm band or band tuning technique performs better than those with 680 nm. In addition, the retrieval accuracy of Chla algorithms with quadratic polynomial and power regression approaches are consistently better than the linear ones. By analyzing Chla versus NAP concentrations, the 3b_665_QP outperforms the other algorithms for all Chla concentrations and NAP concentrations above 40

  13. The `seafood gap' in the food-water nexus literature-issues surrounding freshwater use in seafood production chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Troell, Max; Henriksson, Patrik J. G.; Beveridge, Malcolm C. M.; Verdegem, Marc; Metian, Marc; Mateos, Lara D.; Deutsch, Lisa

    2017-12-01

    Freshwater use for food production is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades with population growth, changing demographics, and shifting diets. Ensuring joint food-water security has prompted efforts to quantify freshwater use for different food products and production methods. However, few analyses quantify freshwater use for seafood production, and those that do use inconsistent water accounting. This inhibits water use comparisons among seafood products or between seafood and agricultural/livestock products. This 'seafood gap' in the food-water nexus literature will become increasingly problematic as seafood consumption is growing globally and aquaculture is one of the fastest growing animal food sectors in the world. Therefore, the present study 1) reviews freshwater use concepts as they relate to seafood production; 2) provides three cases to highlight the particular water use concerns for aquaculture, and; 3) outlines future directions to integrate seafood into the broader food-water nexus discussion. By revisiting water use concepts through a focus on seafood production systems, we highlight the key water use processes that should be considered for seafood production and offer a fresh perspective on the analysis of freshwater use in food systems more broadly.

  14. Climate Change and European Water Bodies, a Review of Existing Gaps and Future Research Needs: Findings of the ClimateWater Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Monica; Harper, David M; Blaskovicova, Lotta; Hancz, Gabriella; Janauer, Georg A; Jolánkai, Zsolt; Lanz, Eva; Lo Porto, Antonio; Mándoki, Monika; Pataki, Beata; Rahuel, Jean-Luc; Robinson, Victoria J; Stoate, Chris; Tóth, Eszter; Jolánkai, Géza

    2015-08-01

    There is general agreement among scientists that global temperatures are rising and will continue to increase in the future. It is also agreed that human activities are the most important causes of these climatic variations, and that water resources are already suffering and will continue to be greatly impaired as a consequence of these changes. In particular, it is probable that areas with limited water resources will expand and that an increase of global water demand will occur, estimated to be around 35-60% by 2025 as a consequence of population growth and the competing needs of water uses. This will cause a growing imbalance between water demand (including the needs of nature) and supply. This urgency demands that climate change impacts on water be evaluated in different sectors using a cross-cutting approach (Contestabile in Nat Clim Chang 3:11-12, 2013). These issues were examined by the EU FP7-funded Co-ordination and support action "ClimateWater" (bridging the gap between adaptation strategies of climate change impacts and European water policies). The project studied adaptation strategies to minimize the water-related consequences of climate change and assessed how these strategies should be taken into consideration by European policies. This article emphasizes that knowledge gaps still exist about the direct effects of climate change on water bodies and their indirect impacts on production areas that employ large amounts of water (e.g., agriculture). Some sectors, such as ecohydrology and alternative sewage treatment technologies, could represent a powerful tool to mitigate climate change impacts. Research needs in these still novel fields are summarized.

  15. Climate Change and European Water Bodies, a Review of Existing Gaps and Future Research Needs: Findings of the ClimateWater Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Monica; Harper, David M.; Blaskovicova, Lotta; Hancz, Gabriella; Janauer, Georg A.; Jolánkai, Zsolt; Lanz, Eva; Porto, Antonio Lo; Mándoki, Monika; Pataki, Beata; Rahuel, Jean-Luc; Robinson, Victoria J.; Stoate, Chris; Tóth, Eszter; Jolánkai, Géza

    2015-08-01

    There is general agreement among scientists that global temperatures are rising and will continue to increase in the future. It is also agreed that human activities are the most important causes of these climatic variations, and that water resources are already suffering and will continue to be greatly impaired as a consequence of these changes. In particular, it is probable that areas with limited water resources will expand and that an increase of global water demand will occur, estimated to be around 35-60 % by 2025 as a consequence of population growth and the competing needs of water uses. This will cause a growing imbalance between water demand (including the needs of nature) and supply. This urgency demands that climate change impacts on water be evaluated in different sectors using a cross-cutting approach (Contestabile in Nat Clim Chang 3:11-12, 2013). These issues were examined by the EU FP7-funded Co-ordination and support action "ClimateWater" (bridging the gap between adaptation strategies of climate change impacts and European water policies). The project studied adaptation strategies to minimize the water-related consequences of climate change and assessed how these strategies should be taken into consideration by European policies. This article emphasizes that knowledge gaps still exist about the direct effects of climate change on water bodies and their indirect impacts on production areas that employ large amounts of water (e.g., agriculture). Some sectors, such as ecohydrology and alternative sewage treatment technologies, could represent a powerful tool to mitigate climate change impacts. Research needs in these still novel fields are summarized.

  16. Bridging the climate-induced water gap in the twenty-first century: adaptation support based on water supply, demand, adaptation and financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straatsma, Menno; Droogers, Peter; Brandsma, Jaïrus; Buytaert, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek; Van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Vitolo, Claudia; Schmitz, Oliver; Meijer, Karen; Van Aalst, Maaike; Bierkens, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Water scarcity affects large parts of the world. Over the course of the twenty-first century, water demand is likely to increase due to population growth and associated food production, and increased economic activity, while water supply is projected to decrease in many regions due to climate change. Despite recent studies that analyze the effect of climate change on water scarcity, e.g. using climate projections under representative concentration pathways (RCP) of the fifth assessment report of the IPCC (AR5), decision support for closing the water gap between now and 2100 does not exist at a meaningful scale and with a global coverage. In this study, we aimed (i) to assess the joint impact of climatic and socio-economic change on water scarcity, (ii) to integrate impact and potential adaptation in one workflow, (iii) to prioritize adaptation options to counteract water scarcity based on their financial, regional socio-economic and environmental implications, and (iv) to deliver all this information in an integrated user-friendly web-based service. To enable the combination of global coverage with local relevance, we aggregated all results for 1604 water provinces (food producing units) delineated in this study, which is five times smaller than previous food producing units. Water supply was computed using the PCR-GLOBWB hydrological and water resources model, parameterized at 5 arcminutes for the whole globe, excluding Antarctica and Greenland. We ran PCR-GLOBWB with a daily forcing derived from five different GCM models from the CMIP5 (GFDL-ESM2M, Hadgem2-ES, IPSL-CMA5-LR, MIROC-ESM-CHEM, NorESM1-M) that were bias corrected using observation-based WATCH data between 1960-1999. For each of the models all four RCPs (RCP 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5) were run, producing the ensemble of 20 future projections. The blue water supply was aggregated per month and per water province. Industrial, domestic and irrigation water demands were computed for a limited number of

  17. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  18. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Bore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  19. Influences of organic component on mechanical property of cortical bone with different water content by nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingdong; Li, Lijia; Guo, Yue; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Shizhong; Yu, Yang; Wu, Di; Liu, Hang; Yu, Miao; Shi, Dong; Liu, Zeyang; Zhou, Mingxing; Ren, Luquan; Fu, Lu

    2018-03-01

    The phenomenon that water in bone has important influences on mechanical properties of cortical bone has been known. However, the detail of the influence mechanism is not clear, especially in the component hierarchy. The main objective of this paper is to investigate the mechanical properties of deproteinization bone and cortical bone with different water content by nanoindentation experiments. The deproteinization bone is cortical bone removed organic component, and demineralization bone is cortical bone removed inorganic component. The experiments results showed that the elastic modulus and hardness all increased with the decreasing of water content in both cortical bone and deproteinization bone. However, variations of deproteinization bone were more significant than the normal one. Without organic component, the shape and size of inorganic component (hydroxyapatite particles) turned to irregular. The plastic energy of both cortical bone and deproteinization bone all decreased with the decreasing of water content and the variations range of deproteinization bone was wider than cortical bone. This research may give some deeply understanding for the studies of influence of water on mechanical properties of cortical bone.

  20. Bridging Water Issue Knowledge Gaps between the General Public and Opinion Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Kevan W.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Carter, Hannah S.

    2015-01-01

    Global conflicts have rapidly made water the most contentious issue in the world today. Considering water drives health, industry, recreation, and the agricultural food system it is no surprise that it has become such a hot topic. As a result, the general public has an increased interest in water-focused policy; policy that can have a large impact…

  1. Reliability analysis of nuclear component cooling water system using semi-Markov process model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeramany, Arun; Pandey, Mahesh D.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Semi-Markov process (SMP) model is used to evaluate system failure probability of the nuclear component cooling water (NCCW) system. → SMP is used because it can solve reliability block diagram with a mixture of redundant repairable and non-repairable components. → The primary objective is to demonstrate that SMP can consider Weibull failure time distribution for components while a Markov model cannot → Result: the variability in component failure time is directly proportional to the NCCW system failure probability. → The result can be utilized as an initiating event probability in probabilistic safety assessment projects. - Abstract: A reliability analysis of nuclear component cooling water (NCCW) system is carried out. Semi-Markov process model is used in the analysis because it has potential to solve a reliability block diagram with a mixture of repairable and non-repairable components. With Markov models it is only possible to assume an exponential profile for component failure times. An advantage of the proposed model is the ability to assume Weibull distribution for the failure time of components. In an attempt to reduce the number of states in the model, it is shown that usage of poly-Weibull distribution arises. The objective of the paper is to determine system failure probability under these assumptions. Monte Carlo simulation is used to validate the model result. This result can be utilized as an initiating event probability in probabilistic safety assessment projects.

  2. Development of the interactive model between Component Cooling Water System and Containment Cooling System using GOTHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Choong Sup; Song, Dong Soo; Jun, Hwang Yong

    2006-01-01

    In a design point of view, component cooling water (CCW) system is not full-interactively designed with its heat loads. Heat loads are calculated from the CCW design flow and temperature condition which is determined with conservatism. Then the CCW heat exchanger is sized by using total maximized heat loads from above calculation. This approach does not give the optimized performance results and the exact trends of CCW system and the loads during transient. Therefore a combined model for performance analysis of containment and the component cooling water(CCW) system is developed by using GOTHIC software code. The model is verified by using the design parameters of component cooling water heat exchanger and the heat loads during the recirculation mode of loss of coolant accident scenario. This model may be used for calculating the realistic containment response and CCW performance, and increasing the ultimate heat sink temperature limits

  3. Managing Water for African Cities Johannesburg City Implementation Plan Environmental Component Appraisal Report

    OpenAIRE

    Damhaug, T.

    2000-01-01

    Årsliste 2000 This is an appraisal of the environmental component of the Johannesburg City Implementation Plan under the Habitat guided programme "Managing Water for African Cities". The objective of this appraisal was to ensure the conformity of the plan with the objectives of the Regional Project and South Africa's needs and to explore the availability of domestic resources (human, institutional, and financial) required for efficient project implementation. The environmental component wi...

  4. Application of principal component regression and partial least squares regression in ultraviolet spectrum water quality detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangtong; Luo, Yongdao; Dai, Honglin

    2018-01-01

    Water is the source of life and the essential foundation of all life. With the development of industrialization, the phenomenon of water pollution is becoming more and more frequent, which directly affects the survival and development of human. Water quality detection is one of the necessary measures to protect water resources. Ultraviolet (UV) spectral analysis is an important research method in the field of water quality detection, which partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis method is becoming predominant technology, however, in some special cases, PLSR's analysis produce considerable errors. In order to solve this problem, the traditional principal component regression (PCR) analysis method was improved by using the principle of PLSR in this paper. The experimental results show that for some special experimental data set, improved PCR analysis method performance is better than PLSR. The PCR and PLSR is the focus of this paper. Firstly, the principal component analysis (PCA) is performed by MATLAB to reduce the dimensionality of the spectral data; on the basis of a large number of experiments, the optimized principal component is extracted by using the principle of PLSR, which carries most of the original data information. Secondly, the linear regression analysis of the principal component is carried out with statistic package for social science (SPSS), which the coefficients and relations of principal components can be obtained. Finally, calculating a same water spectral data set by PLSR and improved PCR, analyzing and comparing two results, improved PCR and PLSR is similar for most data, but improved PCR is better than PLSR for data near the detection limit. Both PLSR and improved PCR can be used in Ultraviolet spectral analysis of water, but for data near the detection limit, improved PCR's result better than PLSR.

  5. Static and dynamic superheated water extraction of essential oil components from Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Rado, Ewelina; Wianowska, Dorota

    2009-09-01

    Superheated water extraction (SWE) performed in both static and dynamic condition (S-SWE and D-SWE, respectively) was applied for the extraction of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris L. The influence of extraction pressure, temperature, time, and flow rate on the total yield of essential oil and the influence of extraction temperature on the extraction of some chosen components are discussed in the paper. The SWE extracts are related to PLE extracts with n-hexane and essential oil obtained by steam distillation. The superheated water extraction in dynamic condition seems to be a feasible option for the extraction of essential oil components from T. vulgaris L.

  6. Capacity building in water demand management as a key component for attaining millennium development goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; Forster, Laura; Arntzen, Jaap

    Successful water demand management (WDM) implementation as a component of integrated water resource management (IWRM) can play a significant role in the alleviation of poverty through more efficient use of available water resources. The urban population in Southern African cities is characterised by so-called ‘water poor’ communities who typically expend a high percentage of their household income on poor quality water. Usually they have no access to an affordable alternative source. Although WDM as a component of IWRM is not a panacea for poverty, it can help alleviate poverty by facilitating water services management by municipal water supply agencies (MWSAs) in the region. WDM is a key strategy for achieving the millennium development goals (MDGs) and, as such, should be given due attention in the preparation of national IWRM and water efficiency plans. Various studies in the Southern African region have indicated that capacity building is necessary for nations to develop IWRM and water-use efficiency plans to meet the targets set out in the MDGs. WDM education and training of water professionals and end-users is particularly important in developing countries, which are resource and information-access poor. In response to these findings, The World Conservation Union (IUCN) and its consulting partners, the Training and Instructional Design Academy of South Africa (TIDASA), and Centre for Applied Research (CAR) designed, developed and presented a pilot WDM Guideline Training Module for MWSAs as part of Phase II of IUCN’s Southern Africa regional WDM project. Pilot training was conducted in July 2004 in Lusaka, Zambia for a group of 36 participants involved in municipal water supply from nine Southern African countries. This paper looks at the links between building the capacity of professionals, operational staff and other role-players in the municipal water supply chain to implement WDM as part of broader IWRM strategies, and the subsequent potential for

  7. Modeling of the water gap in BWR fuel elements using SCALE/TRITON; Modellierung des Wasserspalts bei SWR-BE mit SCALE/TRITON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittelbach, S.; Chernykh, M. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The authors show that an adequate modeling of the water gap in BWR fuel element models using the code TRITON requires an explicit consideration of the Dancoff factors. The analysis of three modeling options reveals that considering the moderating effects of the water gap coolant for the peripheral fuel elements the resulting deviations of the U-235 and Pu-239 concentrations are significantly reduced. The increased temporal calculation efforts are justified with respect to the burnup credits for criticality safety analyses.

  8. Study on the extraction of AP components in HTPB solid propellant by water/ethanol recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingqi; Du, Shiguo; Yan, Jun

    2017-10-01

    In order to improve the recovery of ammonium perchlorate (AP) components in scrapped HTPB solid propellants, the AP in HTPB solid propellants were extracted by water/ethanol mixed solvent system. The effects of extraction time, extraction temperature, volume ratio of water/ethanol, ratio of liquid to material, thickness of sample and extraction rate on AP extraction rate were discussed. The extraction results were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the best process parameter for extracting AP components from HTPB solid propellants: the extraction temperature was 70°C, the extraction time was 6h, the volume ratio of water/ethanol was 1:1, the ratio of liquid to material was 6:1(water/ethanol volume and sample mass ratio, ml/g) and the extraction frequency was 2 times. Under this condition, the recovery of AP was 90.5% and the purity of AP was 91.1%.

  9. A study on the establishment of component/equipment performance criteria considering Heavy Water Reactor characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Keun Sun; Kwon, Young Chul; Lee, Min Kyu; Lee, Yun Soo [Sunmoon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Seong Hoong; Ryo, Chang Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soong Pyung; Hwnag, Jung Rye; Chung, Chul Kee [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Foreign and domestic technology trends, regulatory requirements, design and researches for heavy water reactors are analyzed. Safety design guides of Canada industry and regulatory documents and consultative documents of Canada regulatory agency are reviewed. Applicability of MOST guidance 16 Revision 'guidance for technical criteria of nuclear reactor facility' is reviewed. Specific performance criteria are established for components and facilities for heavy water reactor.

  10. Spatial Trends in Evapotranspiration Components over Africa between 1979 and 2012 and Their Relative Influence on Crop Water Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, L. D.; Chaney, N.; Herrera-Estrada, J.; Caylor, K. K.; Sheffield, J.; Wood, E. F.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how climate change will affect crop water use (evapotranspiration) is fundamental to understanding food security. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa, where crops are largely grown in dryland systems, and agricultural production is expected to expand dramatically this century. Yet analyzing how climate change has impacted crop evapotranspiration (ET) has been hampered by the lack of long-term and spatially continuous meteorological data. Here we use a newly developed, spatio-temporally corrected meteorological dataset to 1) identify trends in individual ET components [rainfall (RF), temperature (T), specific humidity (SH), windspeed (WS), long- and shortwave radiation (LWR, SWR)] in Africa since 1979 and 2) determine the impact of these trends on crop water use. The meteorological data was developed from the Princeton University global meteorological dataset (PGF), which merges gridded station data, satellite retrievals and reanalysis to create a 1.0° resolution, 3-hourly weather dataset for the years 1948-2012. The PGF was downscaled to 0.25° resolution using bilinear interpolation, correcting T, SH, and LWR for elevation, and then merged (using state-space estimation) with meteorological station data (~1000, obtained from the Global Summary of Day database) and corrected for temporal inhomogeneities (due to instrument changes, etc) and gap-filled for missing days. This resulted in a bias-corrected gridded set of daily observations for the variables of interest over southern, East, and West Africa (Central Africa was excluded because of insufficient station observations) for the period 1979-2012, focusing on the satellite period. Using Kendall-Theil Robust line and Mann-Kendall tests, we identify and map significant (p<0.05) trends in ET components in each 0.25° cell over the time period. To estimate the crop water use impact of significant changes in ET components, we undertook a series of crop modeling experiments to isolate the

  11. Bridging the Gap: The 'Soft Path' for Improving Resilience and Adaptability of Water Systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    The failure of traditional water management systems in the 20th century -- what I call the "hard path for water" -- is evident in several ways, including the persistent inability to meet basic human needs for safe water and adequate sanitation for vast populations, ongoing and accelerating aquatic ecosystem collapses , and growing political disputes over water allocation, management, and use, even in regions where substantial investment in water has been made. Progress in resolving these problems, especially in the face of unavoidable climate changes, growing populations, and constrained financial systems, will require bridging hydrologic and social sciences in new ways. Integrating social and cultural knowledge with new economic and technological tools and classical hydrologic and climatological sciences can produce a new “soft path for water” that offers the opportunity to move toward sustainable water systems. This talk will define the soft path for water and offer examples of innovative steps already being taken along that path in the western United States, South Africa, India, and elsewhere.

  12. Analysis of Removal Alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, M.B.

    1996-08-01

    This engineering study was developed to evaluate different options for decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) at the Savannah River Site. This document will be placed in the DOE-SRS Area reading rooms for a period of 30 days in order to obtain public input to plans for the demolition of HWCTR

  13. Effect of water stress on yield and yield components of sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment during year 2009 was conducted in the research station of the University of Tehran, College of Abouraihan in Pakdasht region, Iran. The study was aimed to investigate the effect of water stress on seed yield, yield component and some quantitative traits of four sunflower hybrids namely Azargol, Alstar, ...

  14. Using containment analysis to improve component cooling water heat exchanger limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, H.C.; Tajbakhsh, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station design requires that exit temperatures from the Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger remain below 330.37 K during the Emergency Core Cooling System recirculation stage, following a hypothetical Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Due to measurements indicating a higher than expected combination of: (a) high fouling factor in the Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger with (b) high ultimate heat sink temperatures, that might lead to temperatures in excess of the 330.37 K limit, if a LOCA were to occur, TUElectric adjusted key flow rates in the Component Cooling Water network. This solution could only be implemented with improvements to the containment analysis methodology of record. The new method builds upon the CONTEMPT-LT/028 code by: (a) coupling the long term post-LOCA thermohydraulics with a more detailed analytical model for the complex Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger network and (b) changing the way mass and energy releases are calculated after core reflood and steam generator energy is dumped to the containment. In addition, a simple code to calculate normal cooldowns was developed to confirm RHR design bases were met with the improved limits

  15. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS AND CLUSTER ANALYSIS IN MULTIVARIATE ASSESSMENT OF WATER QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Radzka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the use of multivariate methods in drinking water analysis. During a five-year project, from 2008 to 2012, selected chemical parameters in 11 water supply networks of the Siedlce County were studied. Throughout that period drinking water was of satisfactory quality, with only iron and manganese ions exceeding the limits (21 times and 12 times, respectively. In accordance with the results of cluster analysis, all water networks were put into three groups of different water quality. A high concentration of chlorides, sulphates, and manganese and a low concentration of copper and sodium was found in the water of Group 1 supply networks. The water in Group 2 had a high concentration of copper and sodium, and a low concentration of iron and sulphates. The water from Group 3 had a low concentration of chlorides and manganese, but a high concentration of fluorides. Using principal component analysis and cluster analysis, multivariate correlation between the studied parameters was determined, helping to put water supply networks into groups according to similar water quality.

  16. A gap analysis of the South African innovation system for water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    building activity with participants in the water sector. ... environment within universities; strengthening support for entrepreneurs; and creating centres of competency with strong industrialdesign and economic- and market analysis capabilities.

  17. Water and sanitation hygiene in South Sudan: What needs to be done to bridge the gap?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Vuni Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Water, and sanitation hygiene (WASH is a major public health challenge, not only globally, but also in the Republic of South Sudan. It is estimated that 1 in 10 (768 million of the world’s population do not have access to safe drinking water, most of whom are in developing countries, while a third of the world’s population (2.5 billion people do not have access to adequate sanitation

  18. Simplifying and upscaling water resources systems models that combine natural and engineered components

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, N.; Keir, G.

    2014-12-01

    Water supply systems typically encompass components of both natural systems (e.g. catchment runoff, aquifer interception) and engineered systems (e.g. process equipment, water storages and transfers). Many physical processes of varying spatial and temporal scales are contained within these hybrid systems models. The need to aggregate and simplify system components has been recognised for reasons of parsimony and comprehensibility; and the use of probabilistic methods for modelling water-related risks also prompts the need to seek computationally efficient up-scaled conceptualisations. How to manage the up-scaling errors in such hybrid systems models has not been well-explored, compared to research in the hydrological process domain. Particular challenges include the non-linearity introduced by decision thresholds and non-linear relations between water use, water quality, and discharge strategies. Using a case study of a mining region, we explore the nature of up-scaling errors in water use, water quality and discharge, and we illustrate an approach to identification of a scale-adjusted model including an error model. Ways forward for efficient modelling of such complex, hybrid systems are discussed, including interactions with human, energy and carbon systems models.

  19. Estimating the water budget components and their variability in a pre-alpine basin with JGrass-NewAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, Wuletawu; Formetta, Giuseppe; Borga, Marco; Rigon, Riccardo

    2017-06-01

    The estimation of water resources at basin scale requires modelling of all components of the hydrological system. Because of the great uncertainties associated with the estimation of each water cycle component and the large error in budget closure that results, water budget is rarely carried out explicitly. This paper fills the gap in providing a methodology for obtaining it routinely at daily and subdaily time scales. In this study, we use various strategies to improve water budget closure in a small basin of Italian Prealps. The specific objectives are: assessing the predictive performances of different Kriging methods to determine the most accurate precipitation estimates; using MODIS imagery data to assist in the separation of snowfall and rainfall; combining the Priestley-Taylor evapotranspiration model with the Budyko hypothesis to estimate at high resolution (in time and space) actual evapotranspiration (ET); using an appropriate calibration-validation strategy to forecast discharge spatially. For this, 18 years of spatial time series of precipitation, snow water equivalent, rainfall-runoff and ET at hourly time steps are simulated for the Posina River basin (Northeast Italy) using the JGrass-NewAGE system. Among the interpolation methods considered, local detrended kriging is seen to give the best performances in forecasting precipitation distribution. However, detrended Kriging gives better results in simulating discharges. The parameters optimized at the basin outlet over a five-year period show acceptable performances during the validation period at the outlet and at interior points of the basin. The use of the Budyko hypothesis to guide the ET estimation shows encouraging results, with less uncertainty than the values reported in literature. Aggregating at a long temporal scale, the mean annual water budget for the Posina River basin is about 1269 ± 372 mm (76.4%) runoff, 503.5 ± 35.5 mm (30%) evapotranspiration, and - 50 ± 129 mm (-4.2%) basin

  20. Water stage component analysis in an estuary using the Hilbert Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chang Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applies a novel concept to decompose water stages to understand the factors that affect an estuary. The estuary water stages vary due to different complex, often nonlinear and non-stationary factors. Therefore, it is very difficult for researchers to break down water stages into contributing factors with single integrated methods. The Hilbert Huang transform (HHT is an easy to use, efficient and powerful method of processing non-stationary, non-linear signals to optimize a complicated data process. The HHT is composed of empirical mode decomposition (EMD and Hilbert transform. EMD decomposes the water stages into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs. Through the Hilbert transform, IMFs could obtain amplitude and instantaneous frequency with time. Those IMFs with amplitude and frequency can be used to represent those factors that affect the water stages in an estuary. However, the physical meanings represented by IMFs should be inferred in conjunction with the other hydrological data. This study uses Tanshui River estuary water stages to show HHT applied to determining the factors that affect the water stages. HHT application provides a methodology for others to follow to identify the water stage components in an estuary.

  1. A study of electric field components in shallow water and water half-space models in seabed logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Amir; Soleimani, Hassan; Yahya, Noorhana; Nyamasvisva, Tadiwa Elisha; Rauf, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Seabed logging (SBL) is an electromagnetic (EM) method to detect hydrocarbon (HC) laid beneath the seafloor, which is a development of marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method. CSEM is a method to show resistivity log of geological layers, transmitting ultra-low frequency EM wave. In SBL a net of receivers, placed on the seafloor, detect reflected and refracted EM wave by layers with different resistivity. Contrast of electrical resistivity of layers impacts on amplitude and phase of the EM wave response. The most indispensable concern in SBL is to detect guided wave via high resistive layer under the seafloor that can be an HC reservoir. Guided wave by HC creates a remarkable difference in received signal when HC reservoir does not exist. While the major contribution of received EM wave in large offset, especially in shallow water environment, is airwave, which is refracted by sea surface due to extremely high resistivity of atmosphere, airwave can affect received guided wave, dramatically. Our objective for this work is to compare HC delineation of tangential and normal components of electric field in shallow water area, using finite element method simulation. Will be reported that, in shallow water environment, minor contribution of air wave in normal component of E field (Ey) versus its major contribution in the tangential component (Ex), causes a considerable contrast on HC delineation of Ey for deeply buried reservoirs (more than 3000 m), while Ex is unable to show different contrasts of received data for with and without HC media at the same condition.

  2. Research of application of new material to light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Tanetoyo

    1992-01-01

    Advanced Nuclear Equipment Research Institute (ANERI) has been doing the research to apply the new material including metal, fine ceramics and high polymer which were developed and applied in other industries to components and parts of light water reactor for the purpose of Improvement of reliability of components, improvement of efficiency of periodic inspection, improvement of repair and reduction of radiation exposure of worker. This project started upon the sponsorship of Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) by the schedule of FY1985-FY1993 (9 years) and effective results has been obtained. (author)

  3. Association of type 1 diabetes and concentrations of drinking water components in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafe, Roger; Aslanov, Rana; Sarkar, Atanu; Gregory, Peter; Comeau, Alex; Newhook, Leigh Anne

    2018-01-01

    To determine the association between drinking water quality and rates of type 1 diabetes in the Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) population, which has one of the highest incidences of type 1 diabetes reported globally. The study used a community-based, case-control design. We first calculated incidence rates of type 1 diabetes at the provincial, regional and community levels. The connection between incidence rates and components in public water supplies were then analyzed in three ways: to evaluate differences in water quality between communities with and without incident cases of type 1 diabetes, and to analyze the relationship between water quality and incidence rates of type 1 diabetes at both the community and regional levels. The provincial incidence of type 1 diabetes was 51.7/100 000 (0-14 year age group) for the period studied. In the community-based analysis, there were significant associations found between higher concentrations of arsenic (β=0.268, P=0.013) and fluoride (β=0.202, P=0.005) in drinking water and higher incidence of type 1 diabetes. In the regional analysis, barium (β=-0.478, P=0.009) and nickel (β=-0.354, P=0.050) concentrations were negatively associated with incidence of type 1 diabetes. We confirmed the high incidence of type 1 diabetes in NL. We also found that concentrations of some components in drinking water were associated with higher incidence of type 1 diabetes, but no component was found to have a significant association across the three different levels of analysis performed.

  4. Measurement of the accumulation of water ice on optical components in cryogenic vacuum environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Trevor M.; Montgomery Smith, L.; Collins, Frank G.; Labello, Jesse M.; Rogers, James P.; Lowry, Heard S.; Crider, Dustin H.

    2012-11-01

    Standard vacuum practices mitigate the presence of water vapor and contamination inside cryogenic vacuum chambers. However, anomalies can occur in the facility that can cause the accumulation of amorphous water ice on optics and test articles. Under certain conditions, the amorphous ice on optical components shatters, which leads to a reduction in signal or failure of the component. An experiment was performed to study and measure the deposition of water (H2O) ice on optical surfaces under high-vacuum cryogenic conditions. Water was introduced into a cryogenic vacuum chamber, via a hydrated molecular sieve zeolite, through an effusion cell and impinged upon a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and first-surface gold-plated mirror. A laser and photodiode setup, external to the vacuum chamber, monitored the multiple-beam interference reflectance of the ice-mirror configuration while the QCM measured the mass deposition. Data indicates that water ice, under these conditions, accumulates as a thin film on optical surfaces to thicknesses over 45 microns and can be detected and measured by nonintrusive optical methods which are based upon multiple-beam interference phenomena. The QCM validated the interference measurements. This experiment established proof-of-concept for a miniature system for monitoring ice accumulation within the chamber.

  5. Assessing Variation in Water Balance Components in Mountainous Inland River Basin Experiencing Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenliang Yin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of the changes of water balance components is significant for water resource assessment and management. This paper employed the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model to estimate the water balance in a mountainous watershed in northwest China at different spatial scales over the past half century. The results showed that both Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE and determination coefficient (R2 were over 0.90 for the calibration and validation periods. The water balance components presented rising trends at the watershed scale, and the total runoff increased by 30.5% during 1964 to 2013 period. Rising surface runoff and rising groundwater flow contributed 42.7% and 57.3% of the total rising runoff, respectively. The runoff coefficient was sensitive to increasing precipitation and was not significant to the increase of temperature. The alpine meadow was the main landscape which occupied 51.1% of the watershed and contributed 55.5% of the total runoff. Grass land, forest land, bare land, and glacier covered 14.2%, 18.8%, 15.4%, and 0.5% of the watershed and contributed 8.5%, 16.9%, 15.9%, and 3.2% of the total runoff, respectively. The elevation zone from 3500 to 4500 m occupied 66.5% of the watershed area, and contributed the majority of the total runoff (70.7%. The runoff coefficients in the elevation zone from 1637 to 2800 m, 2800 to 3500 m, 3500 to 4000 m, 4000 to 4500 m, and 4500 to 5062 m were 0.20, 0.27, 0.32, 0.43, and 0.78, respectively, which tend to be larger along with the elevation increase. The quantities and change trends of the water balance components at the watershed scale were calculated by the results of the sub-watersheds. Furthermore, we characterized the spatial distribution of quantities and changes in trends of water balance components at the sub-watershed scale analysis. This study provides some references for water resource management and planning in inland river basins.

  6. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Robertson, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies on wear mechanisms of nuclear power plant components have shown that depending on the operating conditions and the environment, different wear mechanisms could occur during a wear process. There is also evidence that in an environment of pressurized high temperature water the wear rate could be significantly different from those obtained from room temperature studies. An experimental facility that is capable of performing tests in pressurized high temperature water environment with feedback controlled impact and reciprocating sliding motion has been built. A research project aimed at gaining better understanding of the mechanisms and mechanics involved in vibratory wear in such environment has been carried out

  7. Spatial and temporal variations of water balance components due to a bottomland hedgerow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Z.; Ghazavi, G.; Merot, P.

    2009-04-01

    Wooded linear structures in general, and hedgerows in particular, were formerly very abundant in the European landscape, but have undergone a considerable decline in their density in the past decades, before being stabilized. Currently, we observe locally an increase due to the multiple advantages offered by these structures and the effect of agricultural policies. The aim of the present study was to quantify spatially and temporally the impact of an oak hedgerow (Quercus robur) on the various terms of the water balance. This study was carried out at the plot scale by focusing on aspects related to water transfer in the soil and aquifer. From the results obtained on a local scale, we proposed a functional scheme that allowed us to represent the role of hedge trees in water cycle. In this study, groundwater level and soil-water potential were monitored continually at various distances from the hedgerow along two 28 m length transects, at a spacing of 10 m, enabling us to obtain fine-scale information on the functioning of the soil-groundwater system. We evaluate tree transpiration from sap flow density measurements. Functional scheme were proposed illustrating the role of hedgerow, which can then be used for integrating the impact of the hedge trees into hydrological models. For the period when oak trees had their leaves (leafed period), the determining processes that need to be represented are the rainfall interception, tree transpiration and capillary rise. Other terms of the water balance, such as drainage, are directly affected by the presence of the hedgerow. Drainage is strongly reduced under the hedgerow, and decreases significantly at a certain distance from the hedgerow, when capillary rise increased under the hedgerow and decreased far away. Our results show that the impact of a bottomland hedgerow on water balance components can be highly variable according to the climatic conditions. Hedge tree transpiration increased for a wet year when soil-water

  8. Effects of Water Content Levels on Yield Components of Some Peanut Mutant Lines (Arachis Hypogaea L)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carkum; Kumala Dewi; Parno; Sobrizal

    2004-01-01

    Study about effects of water content levels on yield components of peanut mutant lines has been conducted. Mutant lines tested were A20/3/PsJ, B30/12/10 and D25/3/2. The original varieties/lines of the mutants were, AH1781Si, Kidang and Pelanduk was included as control. The treatments for levels of water application were 100%, 75%, 50% and 25%, where 100% water available means a difference between water content at field capacity and at content in permanent wilting point. Based on the data of parameters observed, to interaction between varieties/lines and water content levels was not found except for dry matter weight. For this parameter, the highest dry matter was observed when B30/12/10 mutant line was watered by 100% water available. Nevertheless, based on relative values of number of mature pod, dry pod weight and 50 nut weight the A20/3/PsJ mutant line seems tolerant to drought. (author)

  9. Effects of seawater components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Tachibana, Masahiko; Ishida, Kazushige; Ota, Nobuyuki; Shigenaka, Naoto; Inagaki, Hiromitsu; Noda, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Effects of seawater components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature have been studied with a radiolysis model in order to evaluate influence on integrity of materials used in an ABWR. In 2011, seawater flowed into a wide part of the nuclear power plant system of the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Reactor No. 5 owned by Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. after condenser tubes broke during the plant shutdown operation. The reactor water temperature was 250°C and its maximum Cl − concentration was ca. 450 ppm when seawater was mixed with reactor water. In order to clarify effects of the sea water components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature, a radiolysis model calculation was conducted with Hitachi's radiolysis analysis code 'SIMFONY'. For the calculation, the temperature range was set from 50 to 250°C with 50°C increments and the gamma dose rate was set at 60 Gys −1 to see the effect of gamma irradiation from fuels under shutdown conditions. Concentrations of radiolytic species were calculated for 10 5 s. Dilution ratio of seawater was changed to see the effects of concentration of seawater components. Reaction rate constants of the Cl − , Br − , HCO 3 − , and SO 4 2− systems were considered. The main radiolytic species were predicted to be hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide of low concentration was produced in seawater-mixed water at elevated temperatures. Compared with these main products, concentrations of radiolytic products originating from chloride ion and other seawater components were found to be rather low. The dominant product among them was ClO 3 − and its concentration was found to be below 0.01ppm at 10 5 s. Then, during the plant shutdown operation, the harmful influence from radiolytic species originating from seawater components on integrity of fuel materials must be smaller than that of chloride ion which is the main ionic species in seawater. (author)

  10. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Zbinden, M.; Taponat, M.C.; Robertson, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is part of a series of papers aiming to present the friction and wear results of a collaborative study on nuclear power plant components tested in pressurized high temperature water. The high temperature test facilities and the methodology in presenting the kinetics and wear results are described in detail. The results of the same material combinations obtained from two very different high temperature test facilities (NRCC and EDF) are presented and discussed. (K.A.)

  11. The water balance components of undisturbed tropical woodlands in the Brazilian cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, P. T. S.; Wendland, E.; Nearing, M. A.; Scott, R. L.; Rosolem, R.; da Rocha, H. R.

    2015-06-01

    Deforestation of the Brazilian cerrado region has caused major changes in hydrological processes. These changes in water balance components are still poorly understood but are important for making land management decisions in this region. To better understand pre-deforestation conditions, we determined the main components of the water balance for an undisturbed tropical woodland classified as "cerrado sensu stricto denso". We developed an empirical model to estimate actual evapotranspiration (ET) by using flux tower measurements and vegetation conditions inferred from the enhanced vegetation index and reference evapotranspiration. Canopy interception, throughfall, stemflow, surface runoff, and water table level were assessed from ground measurements. We used data from two cerrado sites, Pé de Gigante (PDG) and Instituto Arruda Botelho (IAB). Flux tower data from the PDG site collected from 2001 to 2003 were used to develop the empirical model to estimate ET. The other hydrological processes were measured at the field scale between 2011 and 2014 at the IAB site. The empirical model showed significant agreement (R2 = 0.73) with observed ET at the daily timescale. The average values of estimated ET at the IAB site ranged from 1.91 to 2.60 mm day-1 for the dry and wet seasons, respectively. Canopy interception ranged from 4 to 20 % and stemflow values were approximately 1 % of the gross precipitation. The average runoff coefficient was less than 1 %, while cerrado deforestation has the potential to increase that amount up to 20-fold. As relatively little excess water runs off (either by surface water or groundwater), the water storage may be estimated by the difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration. Our results provide benchmark values of water balance dynamics in the undisturbed cerrado that will be useful to evaluate past and future land-cover and land-use changes for this region.

  12. Results of an aging-related failure survey of light water safety systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meale, B.M.; Satterwhite, D.G.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The collection and evaluation of operating experience data are necessary in determining the effects of aging on the safety of operating nuclear plants. This paper presents the final results of a two-year research effort evaluating aging impacts on components in light water reactor systems. This research was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two unique types of data analyses were performed. In the first, an aging-survey study, aging-related failure data for fifteen light water reactor systems were obtained from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). These included safety, support, and power conversion systems. A computerized sort of these records classified each record into one of five generic categories, based on the utility's choice of the failure's NPRDS cause category. Systems and components within the systems that were most affected by aging were identified. In the second analysis, information on aging-related reported causes of failures was evaluated for component failures reported to NPRDS for auxiliary feedwater, high pressure injection, service water, and Class 1E electrical power distribution systems. 3 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Conserved glycine at position 45 of major cochlear connexins constitutes a vital component of the Ca²⁺ sensor for gating of gap junction hemichannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanping; Hao, Hongxia

    2013-07-05

    Mutations in gap junction (GJ) family of proteins, especially in the connexin (Cx) 26, are responsible for causing severe congenital hearing loss in a significant portion of patients (30-50% in various ethnic groups). Substitution of glycine at the position 45 of Cx26 to glutamic acid (p.G45E mutation) causes the Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome. Previous studies have suggested that this point mutation caused a gain-of-function defect. However, the molecular mechanism of KID syndrome remains unclear. Since glycine at this position is conserved in many Cxs expressed in the cochlea, we tested the hypothesis that glycine at position 45 is an important component of the sensor regulating the Ca(2+) gating of GJ hemichannels. Using reconstituted Cx30, 32 and 43 expressed in the HEK 293 cells, we compared the functions of wild type and p.G45E mutant Cxs. We found that G45E in Cx30 resulted in similar deleterious cellular effects as Cx26 did. Cell death occurred within 24h of transfection, which was rescued by increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]o). Dye loading assay showed that Cx30 G45E, similar to Cx26 G45E, had leaky hemichannels at physiological [Ca(2+)]o (1.2 mM). Higher [Ca(2+)]o reduced the dye loading in a dose-dependent manner. Whole cell membrane current recordings also indicated that G45E caused increased hemichannel activities. p.G45E mutations of Cx32 and 43 also resulted in leaky hemichannels compared to their respective wild types in lower [Ca(2+)]o. Our data in this study provided further support for the hypothesis that glycine at position 45 is a conserved Ca(2+) sensor for the gating of GJ hemichannels among multiple Cx subtypes expressed in the cochlea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. XHM-1 alloy as a promising structural material for water-cooled fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.; Alekseev, A.B.; Kazennov, Yu.I.; Khramtsov, V.F.; Kondrat'ev, V.P.; Krasina, T.A.; Rechitsky, V.N.; Stepankov, V.N.; Votinov, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    Experience gained in utilizing austenitic stainless steel components in water-cooled power reactors indicates that the main cause of their failure is the steel's propensity for corrosion cracking. In search of a material immune to this type of corrosion, different types of austenitic steels and chromium-nickel alloys were investigated and tested at VNIINM. This paper presents the results of studying physical and mechanical properties, irradiation and corrosion resistance in a water coolant at <350 C of the alloy XHM-1 as compared with austenitic stainless steels 00Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, 00Cr20Ni25Nb and alloy 00Cr20Ni40Mo5Nb. Analysis of the results shows that, as distinct from the stainless steels studied, the XHM-1 alloy is completely immune to corrosion cracking (CC). Not a single induced damage was encountered within 50 to 350 C in water containing different amounts of chlorides and oxygen under tensile stresses up to the yield strength of the material. One more distinctive feature of the alloy compared to steels is that no change in the strength or total elongation is encountered in the alloy specimens irradiated to 32 dpa at 350 C. The XHM-1 alloy has adequate fabricability and high weldability characteristics. As far as its properties are concerned, the XHM-1 alloy is very promising as a material for water-cooled fusion reactor components. (orig.)

  15. Introduction. [usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques for studying components of California water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Since May 1970, personnel on several campuses of the University of California have been conducting investigations which seek to determine the usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques for studying various components of California's earth resources complex. Emphasis has been given to California's water resources as exemplified by the Feather River project and other aspects of the California Water Plan. This study is designed to consider in detail the supply, demand, and impact relationships. The specific geographic areas studied are the Feather River drainage in northern California, the Chino-Riverside Basin and Imperial Valley areas in southern California, and selected portions of the west side of San Joaquin Valley in central California. An analysis is also given on how an effective benefit-cost study of remote sensing in relation to California's water resources might best be made.

  16. Export of nutrient rich Northern Component Water preceded early Oligocene Antarctic glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxall, Helen K.; Huck, Claire E.; Huber, Matthew; Lear, Caroline H.; Legarda-Lisarri, Alba; O'Regan, Matt; Sliwinska, Kasia K.; van de Flierdt, Tina; de Boer, Agatha M.; Zachos, James C.; Backman, Jan

    2018-03-01

    The onset of the North Atlantic Deep Water formation is thought to have coincided with Antarctic ice-sheet growth about 34 million years ago (Ma). However, this timing is debated, in part due to questions over the geochemical signature of the ancient Northern Component Water (NCW) formed in the deep North Atlantic. Here we present detailed geochemical records from North Atlantic sediment cores located close to sites of deep-water formation. We find that prior to 36 Ma, the northwestern Atlantic was stratified, with nutrient-rich, low-salinity bottom waters. This restricted basin transitioned into a conduit for NCW that began flowing southwards approximately one million years before the initial Antarctic glaciation. The probable trigger was tectonic adjustments in subarctic seas that enabled an increased exchange across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge. The increasing surface salinity and density strengthened the production of NCW. The late Eocene deep-water mass differed in its carbon isotopic signature from modern values as a result of the leakage of fossil carbon from the Arctic Ocean. Export of this nutrient-laden water provided a transient pulse of CO2 to the Earth system, which perhaps caused short-term warming, whereas the long-term effect of enhanced NCW formation was a greater northward heat transport that cooled Antarctica.

  17. Improved water balance component estimates through joint assimilation of GRACE water storage and SMOS soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Siyuan; Tregoning, Paul; Renzullo, Luigi J.; van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Allgeyer, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    The accuracy of global water balance estimates is limited by the lack of observations at large scale and the uncertainties of model simulations. Global retrievals of terrestrial water storage (TWS) change and soil moisture (SM) from satellites provide an opportunity to improve model estimates through data assimilation. However, combining these two data sets is challenging due to the disparity in temporal and spatial resolution at both vertical and horizontal scale. For the first time, TWS observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and near-surface SM observations from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) were jointly assimilated into a water balance model using the Ensemble Kalman Smoother from January 2010 to December 2013 for the Australian continent. The performance of joint assimilation was assessed against open-loop model simulations and the assimilation of either GRACE TWS anomalies or SMOS SM alone. The SMOS-only assimilation improved SM estimates but reduced the accuracy of groundwater and TWS estimates. The GRACE-only assimilation improved groundwater estimates but did not always produce accurate estimates of SM. The joint assimilation typically led to more accurate water storage profile estimates with improved surface SM, root-zone SM, and groundwater estimates against in situ observations. The assimilation successfully downscaled GRACE-derived integrated water storage horizontally and vertically into individual water stores at the same spatial scale as the model and SMOS, and partitioned monthly averaged TWS into daily estimates. These results demonstrate that satellite TWS and SM measurements can be jointly assimilated to produce improved water balance component estimates.

  18. Filling environmental data gaps with QSPR for ionic liquids: Modeling n-octanol/water coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybinska, Anna; Sosnowska, Anita; Grzonkowska, Monika; Barycki, Maciej; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2016-02-13

    Ionic liquids (ILs) form a wide group of compounds characterized by specific properties that allow using ILs in different fields of science and industry. Regarding that the growing production and use of ionic liquids increase probability of their emission to the environment, it is important to estimate the ability of these compounds to spread in the environment. One of the most important parameters that allow evaluating environmental mobility of compound is n-octanol/water partition coefficient (KOW). Experimental measuring of the KOW values for a large number of compounds could be time consuming and costly. Instead, computational predictions are nowadays being used more often. The paper presents new Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) model that allows predicting the logarithmic values of KOW for 335 ILs, for which the experimentally measured values had been unavailable. We also estimated bioaccumulation potential and point out which group of ILs could have negative impact on environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of climatic noise on global estimates of terrestrial water balance components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasonova, Olga; Gusev, Yeugeniy; Semenov, Vladimir; Kovalev, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Estimates of water balance components performed by different authors in climate impact studies are characterized by a large scatter or uncertainty associated, in particular, with application of different meteorological forcing data (simulated by climate models), different estimates of model parameters, and different hydrological models. In the present work, the objective uncertainty, which cannot be reduced by means of better physical description of the processes under study or by means of improvement of the quality of input data for model simulations, and which is an internal feature of the atmosphere - hydrosphere - land surface system, is considered. This uncertainty is caused by a chaotic character of atmospheric processes (i.e. by so-called climatic noise), their instability with respect to small errors in determination of initial conditions for modeling the evolution of meteorological variables. Our study is devoted to investigating the impact of climatic noise on the estimates of terrestrial water balance components (precipitation, runoff and evapotranspiration) on a global scale. To achieve the effect of climatic noise 45 simulations were performed by the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 under identical lower boundary conditions (including sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations) and constant external forcing parameters. The only differences between the simulations were initial conditions of the atmosphere. Meteorological fields simulated by ECHAM5 for the period of 1979-2012 were used as forcing data (with 6-hour temporal resolution and one-degree spatial one) by the land surface model Soil Water - Atmosphere - Plants (SWAP) for hydrological simulations on a global scale. As a result, 45-member ensemble of the water balance components for the land surface of the Earth excluding Antarctica was obtained. Analysis of the obtained results allowed us to estimate the lowest level of uncertainty which can be achieved in climate impact

  20. Rivers and Floodplains as Key Components of Global Terrestrial Water Storage Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getirana, Augusto; Kumar, Sujay; Girotto, Manuela; Rodell, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    This study quantifies the contribution of rivers and floodplains to terrestrial water storage (TWS) variability. We use state-of-the-art models to simulate land surface processes and river dynamics and to separate TWS into its main components. Based on a proposed impact index, we show that surface water storage (SWS) contributes 8% of TWS variability globally, but that contribution differs widely among climate zones. Changes in SWS are a principal component of TWS variability in the tropics, where major rivers flow over arid regions and at high latitudes. SWS accounts for 22-27% of TWS variability in both the Amazon and Nile Basins. Changes in SWS are negligible in the Western U.S., Northern Africa, Middle East, and central Asia. Based on comparisons with Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment-based TWS, we conclude that accounting for SWS improves simulated TWS in most of South America, Africa, and Southern Asia, confirming that SWS is a key component of TWS variability.

  1. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Ross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mixed oxide (MOX fuel of plutonium in depleted uranium, within the enhanced CANDU-6 (EC-6 reactor. This work proposes an alternative heterogeneous fuel concept based on the same reactor and CANFLEX fuel bundle, with eight large-diameter fuel elements loaded with natural thorium oxide and 35 small-diameter fuel elements loaded with a MOX of plutonium and reprocessed uranium stocks from UK MAGNOX and AGR reactors. Indicative neutronic calculations suggest that such a fuel would be neutronically feasible. A similar MOX may alternatively be fabricated from reprocessed <5% enriched light water reactor fuel, such as the fuel of the AREVA EPR reactor, to consume newly produced plutonium from reprocessing, similar to the DUPIC (direct use of PWR fuel in CANDU process.

  2. PRODUCTION COMPONENTS OF Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp IRRIGATED WITH BRACKISH WATER UNDER DIFFERENT LEACHING FRACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ FRANCISCO DE CARVALHO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the production components of cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp subjected to irrigation with brackish water and different leaching fractions. The experiment was conducted in a lysimeter system of the Department of Agricultural Engineering of the Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife campus. The treatments, consisting of two water salinity levels (ECw (1.2 and 3.3 dS m - 1 and five leaching fractions (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%, were evaluated using a completely randomized design in a 2x5 factorial arrangement with four replications. The variables evaluated were: number of pods per plant, 100 - grain weight, number of grains per pod, grain and shoot dry weight, grain yield and harvest index. The soil salinity increased with increasing salinity of the water used for irrigation, and reduced with increasing leaching fraction. The salinity of the water used for irrigation influenced only the variables number of pods per plant and grain yield. The estimated leaching fractions of 9.1% and 9.6% inhibited the damage caused by salinity on the number of pods per plant and grain yield, respectively. Therefore, the production of V. unguiculata irrigated with brackish water, leaching salts from the plant root environment, is possible under the conditions evaluated.

  3. Water-cooling system of the W7-X plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelevitch, B.; Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de; Peacock, A.; Smirnow, M.; Stadler, R.

    2015-10-15

    The water-cooling system of the plasma facing components of the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator was originally conceived for long pulse plasma operation of up to 30 min duration based on an input plasma power of 10 MW. The cooling circuits have been adapted to the intermediate machine operation phases introduced prior to the completion of the full long pulse capability: a first phase with a plasma operation duration <1 s and 2 MW input power, a second phase with a plasma duration of 5–10 s. and up to 8 MW input power. In the first operation phase, 10 cooling circuits will be water-cooled, and in the second phase, 36 cooling circuits. The circuits which have not been completed are vacuum sealed inside the plasma vessel. During these phases, some of the first wall heat shields will be filled with air and the first wall panels with Neon gas. For the full long pulse operation with all water-cooled in-vessel components, a total of about 430 cooling circuits will need to be put into service.

  4. Determining water balance components at a lysimeter site in north-eastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolz, Reinhard; Kammerer, Gerhard; Cepuder, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The water balance of a certain soil profile in a certain time interval is subjected to changes of soil water content within the respective profile, and fluxes at its upper and lower boundary such as evapotranspiration and percolation, respectively. Weighing lysimeters are valuable instruments for water balance studies. Typically, mass changes - thus, changes of soil profile water content - are detected by a weighing system, while percolating water is measured by a tipping bucket or a weighed storage tank, and precipitation is measured by a rain gauge. Consequently, evapotranspiration can be determined by solving a simple water balance equation. However, a typical problem is that using separately measured precipitation data may cause implausible (negative) evapotranspiration. As a solution, the quantities can be determined directly from lysimeter mass changes, which are assumed to be positive due to precipitation and negative due to evapotranspiration. This method requires short measuring intervals and precise data. In this regard, data management of primarily older lysimeter facilities may be improved to fulfil these criteria. At an experimental site in north-eastern Austria hourly water balance components were determined using a reference lysimeter that was installed 1983 and equipped with lever-arm-counterbalance weighing system. A disadvantage of such systems is their sensitivity to external disturbances, mainly forces exerted by wind, which can significantly decrease measuring accuracy. Hence, we firstly studied the mechanical performance of the system regarding wind effects and oscillation behavior, and tested averaging procedures on noisy raw data to enhance measurement accuracy. The measurement accuracy for a wind velocity piecewise sigmoid function was easy to fit and gave proper results of typical diurnal variation of evapotranspiration on single days without rainfall. However, on a longer time period with rainfall events, a polynomial spline function

  5. Relevance between SV and components based on water quality inspection by gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, A.; Aoyama, C.; Fukuoka, H.; Tajima, H.; Kumagai, H.; Takahashi, A.

    2017-12-01

    Gas and hydrate seeping from the seafloor into ocean water can be monitored on board, as images on echogram (acoustic equipment display inboard) by utilizing acoustic measurement equipment such as multi-beam sonars. Colors and shades of these images displayed on the monitor vary depending on the acoustic impedance. Backscattering strength (hereinafter referred as SV) depends on the type and density of plume components. Therefore, plume components should not be determined only by examining volume scattering density. By standardizing the relevance between gas plume SV and the components, types of plume components can be presumed just by calculating plume SV based on multi-beam data.Data from the following explorations will be utilized to perform the analysis of metal sensor, CTD measurement, and sampling. July, 2017 KAIYO-MARU2 (KAIYO ENGINEERING CO., LTD) @ Sea of Japan July, 2017 SIHNYO MARU (Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology) @ Sea of Japan. And Chemical data obtained through YK16-07 cruise is also to be discussed.

  6. The Langat River water quality index based on principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Ali, Zalina; Ibrahim, Noor Akma; Mengersen, Kerrie; Shitan, Mahendran; Juahir, Hafizan

    2013-04-01

    River Water Quality Index (WQI) is calculated using an aggregation function of the six water quality sub-indices variables, together with their relative importance or weights respectively. The formula is used by the Department of Environment to indicate a general status of the rivers in Malaysia. The six elected water quality variables used in the formula are, namely: suspended solids (SS), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), ammoniacal nitrogen (AN), chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH. The sub-indices calculations, determined by quality rating curve and their weights, were based on expert opinions. However, the use of sub-indices and the relative importance established in the formula is very subjective in nature and does not consider the inter-relationships among the variables. The relationships of the variables are important due to the nature of multi-dimensionality and complex characteristics found in river water. Therefore, a well-known multivariate technique, i.e. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was proposed to re-calculate the waterquality index specifically in Langat River based on the inter-relationship approach. The application of this approach is not well-studied in river water quality index development studies in Malaysia. Hence, the approach in the study is relevant and important since the first river water quality development took place in 1981. The PCA results showed that the weights obtained indicate the difference in ranking of the relative importance for particular variables compared to the classical approaches used in WQI-DOE. Based on the new weights, the Langat River water quality index was calculated and the comparison between both indexes was also discussed in this paper.

  7. Assessment of climate change impacts on water balance components of Heeia watershed in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkeba Tolessa Leta

    2016-12-01

    New hydrological insights for the study region: Compared to continental watersheds, the Heeia watershed showed high rainfall initial abstraction due to high initial infiltration capacity of the soils. The simulated and observed streamflows generally showed a good agreement and satisfactory model performance demonstrating the applicability of SWAT for small island watersheds with large topographic, precipitation, and land-use gradients. The study also demonstrates methods to resolve data scarcity issues. Predicted climate change scenarios showed that the decrease in rainfall during wet season and marginal increase in dry season are the main factors for the overall decrease in water balance components. Specifically, the groundwater flow component may consistently decrease by as much as 15% due to predicted rainfall and temperature changes by 2100, which may have serious implications on groundwater availability in the watershed.

  8. Colonization of components of a model hot water system by Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, G M; Locci, R

    1985-02-01

    A model hot water distribution network was seeded with a virulent strain of Legionella pneumophila serotype 1. Ten weeks after inoculation, components of the system, which include aluminium discs, copper, stainless steel, silicone tubing, rubber and glass beads, were examined for colonization by L. pneumophila. The samples were stained with fluorescein-labelled antibodies to the strain and were examined with scanning electron microscopy. Colonization, which was accompanied by copious quantities of a slime-like debris, was heaviest on the rubber and least on the copper. Adherence to silicone tubing and stainless steel was observed.

  9. Transient two-phase two-component water-steam-air flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model of a transient one-dimensional two-phase flow consisting of water, steam, and air is described. In the general case, a system of four partial differential equations of hyperbolic type was derived. The expression obtained for the velocity of sound is in good agreement with the results of the experiment. There is also good agreement with existing theories for the limiting cases of a missing phase or component. A numerical example demonstrating the application of the theory is shown

  10. Formation of the Innovation Component of Marketing Technologies of Enterprises That Produce Mineral Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golodniuk Olena S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers main marketing technologies of building competitive advantages by enterprises that produce Ukrainian mineral waters. It considers individual innovations of the conceptual (eco-marketing and applied (branding, benchmarking and competitive reconnaissance nature with consideration of their significance for participants of this market. It offers directions of increasing the innovation component of topical marketing technologies with the aim of implementation of their results into management of competitive advantages of enterprises. It draws a conclusion about a necessity of: reducing evident and growth of a number of latent competitive advantages, based on intellectual technologies, and also development and realisation of a conceptual model of providing marketing innovations in the system of managing competitive advantages of enterprises; and formation of the system of monitoring marketing innovations with the aim of development of additional services and means of building competitive advantages of enterprises that produce mineral waters.

  11. Separation of cosmic-ray components in a single water Cherenkov detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, H. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, BUAP, Puebla Pue. 72570 (Mexico); Villasenor, L. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, BUAP, Puebla Pue. 72570 (Mexico)]. E-mail: villasen@ifm.umich.mx

    2005-11-11

    We describe the use of a water Cherenkov detector to study in detail the signals associated to secondary cosmic rays. In particular we describe a direct way to identify some of the components of secondary cosmic rays. It consists of a polyethylene tank of 1.54 m of diameter filled with water up to a height of 1.2 with one 8'' phototube looking downwards in the center of the tank at the level of the water. By collecting data using three different types of triggers, namely, vertical non-central muons, vertical central muons and arbitrary muons, we show the existence of very strong correlations among the voltage amplitudes, charge depositions, and rise times from 10% to 90% for isolated electrons, isolated muons and extended air showers using a single detector. The simple technique described also allows a clear identification of the muon interaction with the PMT glass envelope. We discuss a way in which our results can be used, in conjunction with a classification scheme such as neural networks, to form artificial signals for extensive air showers with the purpose to estimate the muon/EM ratio of air showers measured with large ground arrays of water Cherenkov detectors such as in the case of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  12. The effects of gaseous bubble composition and gap distance on the characteristics of nanosecond discharges in distilled water

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Ahmad

    2016-05-17

    Electric discharge in liquids with bubbles can reduce the energy consumption, which increases treatment efficiency. We present an experimental study of nanosecond discharges in distilled water bubbled with the monoatomic gas argon and with the polyatomic gases methane, carbon dioxide, and propane. We monitor the time evolution of the voltage and current waveforms, and calculate the injected charges to characterize the discharge. We establish a relationship between the injected charges and the shape of the plasma by time-resolved imaging to find that increasing the size of the gap reduces the injected charges. Moreover, we determine the plasma characteristics, including electron density, excitation temperatures (for atoms and ions), and rotational temperature of the OH and C2 radicals found in the plasma. Our space- and time-averaged measurements allow us to propose a spatial distribution of the plasma that is helpful for understanding the plasma dynamics necessary to develop and optimize applications based on nanosecond discharges in bubbled liquids. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. Effect of operating parameters and membrane characteristics on air gap membrane distillation performance for the treatment of highly saline water

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jingli

    2016-04-07

    In this study, ten different commercially available PTFE, PP and PVDF membranes were tested in desalination of highly saline water by air gap membrane distillation (AGMD). Process performance was investigated under different operating parameters, such as feed temperatures, feed flow velocities and salt concentrations reaching 120 g/L, and different membrane characteristics, such as membrane material, thickness, pore size and support layer, using a locally designed and fabricatd AGMD module and spacer. Results showed that increasing feed temperature increases permeate flux regardless of the feed concentration. However, feed flow velocity does not significantly affect the flux, especially at low feed temperatures. The PP membrane showed a better performance than the PVDF and PTFE membranes. Permeate flux decreases with the increase of salt concentration of feed solution, especially at higher concentrations above 90 g/L. The existence of membrane support layer led to a slight decrease of permeate flux. Membranes with pore sizes of 0.2 and 0.45 μm gave the best performance. Smaller pore size led to lower flux and larger pore size led to pore wetting due to lower LEP values. The effect of concentration polarization and temperature polarization has also been studied and compared.

  14. Influence of hydrazine primary water chemistry on corrosion of fuel cladding and primary circuit components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iourmanov, V.; Pashevich, V.; Bogancs, J.; Tilky, P.; Schunk, J.; Pinter, T.

    1999-01-01

    Earlier at Paks 1-4 NPP standard ammonia chemistry was in use. The following station performance indicators were improved when hydrazine primary water chemistry was introduced: occupational radiation exposures of personnel; gamma-radiation dose rates near primary system components during refuelling and maintenance outages. The reduction of radiation exposures and radiation fields were achieved without significant expenses. Recent results of experimental studies allowed to explain the mechanism of hydrazine dosing influence on: corrosion rate of structure materials in primary coolant; behaviour of soluble and insoluble corrosion products including long-life corrosion-induced radionuclides in primary system during steady-state and transient operation modes; radiolytic generation of oxidising radiolytic products in core and its corrosion activity in primary system; radiation situation during refuelling and maintenance outages; foreign material degradation and removal (including corrosion active oxidant species) from primary system during abnormal events. Operational experience and experimental data have shown that hydrazine primary water chemistry allows to reduce corrosion wear and thereby makes it possible to extend the life-time of plant components in primary system. (author)

  15. Characterization of the water soluble component of inedible residue from candidate CELSS crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Jay

    1992-01-01

    Recycling of inorganic nutrients required for plant growth will be a necessary component of a fully closed, bioregenerative life support system. This research characterized the recovery of plant nutrients from the inedible fraction of three crop types (wheat, potato, and soybean) by soaking, or leaching, in water. A considerable portion of the dry weight of the inedible biomass was readily soluble (29 percent for soybean, 43 percent for wheat, and 52 percent for potato). Greater weight loss from potato was a result of higher tissue concentrations of potassium, nitrate, and phosphate. Approximately 25 percent of the organic content of the biomass was water soluble, while the majority of most inorganic nutrients, except for calcium and iron, were recovered in the leachate. Direct use of the leachates in hydroponic media could provide between 40-90 percent of plant nutrient demands for wheat, and 20-50 percent of demand for soybean and potato. Further evaluation of leaching as a component of resource recovery scheme in a bioregenerative system requires study of (1) utilization of plant leachates in hydroponic plant culture; and (2) conversion of organic material (both soluble and insoluble) into edible, or other useful, products.

  16. The Rheology of a Three Component System: COAL/WATER/#4 Oil Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Barbara Jean

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the rheology of a three component system, coal/water/#4 oil emulsions (COW), in which the third component, water, was present in a significant concentration, and to determine the applicability of existing theories from suspension rheology to the three component system studied. In a coal/water/oil emulsion, free coal particles adhere to the surface of the water droplets, preventing their coagulation, while the larger coal particles reside in the matrix of stabilized water droplets. The use of liquid fuels containing coal is a means of utilizing our nation's coal reserves while conserving oil. These fuels can be burned in conventional oil-fired furnaces. In this investigation, a high sulfur, high ash, bituminous coal was used, along with a heavy #4 oil to prepare the emulsions. The coal was ground to a log-normal distribution with an average particle size of 62 microns. A Haake RV3 concentric cylinder viscometer, with a ribbed measuring system, was used to determine the viscosity of the emulsions. A physical pendulum settling device measured the shift in center of mass of the COW as a function of time. The flow behavior of the fuel in pipes was also tested. In interpreting the data from the viscometer and the pipe flow experiments, a power law analysis was used in the region from 30 s('-1) to 200 s('-1). Extrapolation methods were used to obtain the low and high shear behavior of the emulsions. In the shear rate region found in boiler feed systems, COW are shear thinning with a flow behavior index of 0.7. The temperature dependent characteristic of the emulsions studied were similar and followed an Arrhenius type relationship. The viscosity of the COW decreases with increasing coal average particle size and is also a function of the width of the size distribution used. The type of coal used strongly influences the rheology of the fuel. The volatile content and the atomic oxygen to nitrogen ratio of the coal are the most

  17. Clustering analysis of water distribution systems: identifying critical components and community impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, K; Farmani, R; Fu, G; Astaraie-Imani, M; Ward, S; Butler, D

    2014-01-01

    Large water distribution systems (WDSs) are networks with both topological and behavioural complexity. Thereby, it is usually difficult to identify the key features of the properties of the system, and subsequently all the critical components within the system for a given purpose of design or control. One way is, however, to more explicitly visualize the network structure and interactions between components by dividing a WDS into a number of clusters (subsystems). Accordingly, this paper introduces a clustering strategy that decomposes WDSs into clusters with stronger internal connections than external connections. The detected cluster layout is very similar to the community structure of the served urban area. As WDSs may expand along with urban development in a community-by-community manner, the correspondingly formed distribution clusters may reveal some crucial configurations of WDSs. For verification, the method is applied to identify all the critical links during firefighting for the vulnerability analysis of a real-world WDS. Moreover, both the most critical pipes and clusters are addressed, given the consequences of pipe failure. Compared with the enumeration method, the method used in this study identifies the same group of the most critical components, and provides similar criticality prioritizations of them in a more computationally efficient time.

  18. Swelling in light water reactor internal components: Insights from computational modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, Roger E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barashev, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Golubov, Stanislav I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A modern cluster dynamics model has been used to investigate the materials and irradiation parameters that control microstructural evolution under the relatively low-temperature exposure conditions that are representative of the operating environment for in-core light water reactor components. The focus is on components fabricated from austenitic stainless steel. The model accounts for the synergistic interaction between radiation-produced vacancies and the helium that is produced by nuclear transmutation reactions. Cavity nucleation rates are shown to be relatively high in this temperature regime (275 to 325°C), but are sensitive to assumptions about the fine scale microstructure produced under low-temperature irradiation. The cavity nucleation rates observed run counter to the expectation that void swelling would not occur under these conditions. This expectation was based on previous research on void swelling in austenitic steels in fast reactors. This misleading impression arose primarily from an absence of relevant data. The results of the computational modeling are generally consistent with recent data obtained by examining ex-service components. However, it has been shown that the sensitivity of the model s predictions of low-temperature swelling behavior to assumptions about the primary damage source term and specification of the mean-field sink strengths is somewhat greater that that observed at higher temperatures. Further assessment of the mathematical model is underway to meet the long-term objective of this research, which is to provide a predictive model of void swelling at relevant lifetime exposures to support extended reactor operations.

  19. Separation and Fixation of Toxic Components in Salt Brines Using a Water-Based Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, Carrie J.; Quach, Anh P.; Birnie, Dunbar P.; Ela, Wendell P.; Saez, Avelino E.; Zelinski, Brian J.; Smith, Harry D.; Smith, Gary Lynn L.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to implement new water quality standards, increase water reuse and reclamation, and minimize the cost of waste storage motivate the development of new processes for stabilizing waste water residuals that minimize waste volume, water content and the long-term environmental risk from related by products. This work explores the use of an aqueous-based emulsion process to create an epoxy/rubber matrix for separating and encapsulating waste components from salt laden, arsenic contaminated, amorphous iron hydrate sludges. Such sludges are generated from conventional water purification precipitation/adsorption processes, used to convert aqueous brine streams to semi-solid waste streams, such as ion exchange/membrane separation, and from other precipitative heavy metal removal operations. In this study, epoxy and polystyrene butadiene (PSB) rubber emulsions are mixed together and then combined with a surrogate sludge. The surrogate sludge consists of amorphous iron hydrate with 1 part arsenic fixed to the surface of the hydrate per 10 parts iron mixed with sodium nitrate and chloride salts and water. The resulting emulsion is cured and dried at 80 C to remove water. Microstructure characterization by electron microscopy confirms that the epoxy/PSB matrix surrounds and encapsulates the arsenic laden amorphous iron hydrate phase while allowing the salt to migrate to internal and external surfaces of the sample. Salt extraction studies indicate that the porous nature of the resulting matrix promotes the separation and removal of as much as 90% of the original salt content in only one hours time. Long term leaching studies based on the use of the infinite slab diffusion model reveal no evidence of iron migration or, by inference, arsenic migration, and demonstrate that the diffusion coefficients of the unextracted salt yield leachability indices within regulations for non-hazardous landfill disposal. Because salt is the most mobile species, it is inferred that arsenic

  20. IRRIGATION WITH SALINE WATER AND NITROGEN IN PRODUCTION COMPONENTS AND YIELD OF SUNFLOWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOÃO BATISTA DOS SANTOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the quantitative and qualitative limitation of water resources, saline water irrigation and nitrogen (N fertilisation can contribute positively to the expansion of sunflower cultivation in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate production components and yield of sunflower, cv. „Embrapa 122 - V2000‟, irrigated with waters of different salinity levels (electrical conductivity – ECw and fertilised with varying amounts of N in a field experiment in an eutrophic Quartzarenic Neosol from November 2012 to February 2013. The experiment was performed in a completely randomised block design in split plots, in a 5 x 4 factorial scheme, which corresponded to five ECw levels (0.15, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 dS m - 1 and four N levels (60, 80, 100 and 120 kg ha - 1 , with three replicates and 30 plants per plot. The interaction between water salinity levels and N did not have significant effects on the studied variables; irrigation water salinity had isolated negative effects on the total number of achenes, number of viable achenes, productivity and oil yield of achenes. The increase in N levels stimulated the total number and the number of viable achenes, the mass of 1,000 achenes, capitulum diameter and productivity of achenes of sunflower, cv. „Embrapa 122 - V2000‟, but had no effect on the oil content of achenes. N levels of up to 100 kg ha - 1 promoted adequate oil content in the achenes of sunflower, cv „Embrapa 122 - V2000‟.

  1. Analysis of water hammer in two-component two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, H.; Marzouk, E.; Ibrahim, S.

    1989-01-01

    The water hammer phenomena caused by a sudden valve closure in air-water two-phase flows must be clarified for the safety analysis of LOCA in reactors and further for the safety of boilers, chemical plants, pipe transport of fluids such as petroleum and natural gas. In the present work water hammer phenomena caused by sudden valve closure in two-component two-phase flows are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The phenomena are more complicated than in single phase-flows due to the fact of the presence of compressible component. Basic partial differential equations based on a one-dimensional homogeneous flow model are solved by the method of characteristic. The analysis is extended to include friction in a two-phase mixture depending on the local flow pattern. The profiles of the pressure transients, the propagation velocity of pressure waves and the effect of valve closure on the transient pressure are found. Different two-phase flow pattern and frictional pressure drop correlations were used including Baker, Chesholm and Beggs and Bril correlations. The effect of the flow pattern on the characteristic of wave propagation is discussed primarily to indicate the effect of void fraction on the velocity of wave propagation and on the attenuation of pressure waves. Transient pressure in the mixture were recorded at different air void fractions, rates of uniform valve closure and liquid flow velocities with the aid of pressure transducers, transient wave form recorders interfaced with an on-line pc computer. The results are compared with computation, and good agreement was obtained within experimental accuracy

  2. Dynamical electron-phonon coupling, G W self-consistency, and vertex effect on the electronic band gap of ice and liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We study the impact of dynamical electron-phonon (el-ph) effects on the electronic band gap of ice and liquid water by accounting for frequency-dependent Fan contributions in the el-ph mediated self-energy within the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). We find that the dynamical el-ph coupling effects greatly reduce the static el-ph band-gap correction of the hydrogen-rich molecular ice crystal from-2.46 to -0.23 eV in great contrast to the result of Monserrat et al. [Phys. Rev. B 92, 140302 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.140302]. This is of particular importance as otherwise the static el-ph gap correction would considerably reduce the electronic band gap, leading to considerable underestimation of the intense peaks of optical absorption spectra of ice which would be in great disagreement to experimental references. By contrast, the static el-ph gap correction of liquid water is very moderate (-0.32 eV), and inclusion of dynamical effects slightly reduces the gap correction to -0.19 eV. Further, we determine the diverse sensitivity of ice and liquid water to the G W self-consistency and show that the energy-only self-consistent approach (GnWn ) exhibits large implicit vertex character in comparison to the quasiparticle self-consistent approach, for which an explicit calculation of vertex corrections is necessary for good agreement with experiment.

  3. Interaction of water components in the semi-arid Huasco and Limarí river basins, North Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Strauch

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available For sustainable water resource management in semi-arid regions, sound information is required about interactions between the different components of the water system: rain/snow precipitation, surface/subsurface run-off, groundwater recharge. Exemplarily, the Huasco and Limarí river basins as water stressed river catchments have been studied by isotope and hydrochemical methods for (i the origin of water, (ii water quality, (iii relations of surface and groundwater.

    Applying the complex multi-isotopic and hydrochemical methodology to the water components of the Huasco and Limarí basins, a differentiation of water components concerning subsurface flow and river water along the catchment area and by anthropogenic impacts are detected. Sulphate and nitrate concentrations indicate remarkable input from mining and agricultural activities along the river catchment.

    The 2H-18O relations of river water and groundwater of both catchments point to the behaviour of river waters originated in an arid to semi-arid environment.

    Consequently, the groundwater from several production wells in the lower parts of the catchments is related to the rivers where the wells located, however, it can be distinguished from the river water. Using the hydrological water balance and the isotope mixing model, the interaction between surface and subsurface flows and river flow is estimated.

  4. Prediction of radionuclide accumulation in main ecosystem components of NPP cooling water reservoirs and assessment of acceptable radionuclide disposal into water reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu.A.; Kazakov, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of prediction of radionuclide accumulation in ecosystem main components of NPP cooling water-reservoirs (CWR) and assessment of radionuclide acceptable disposal into water reservoir are considered. Two models are nessecary for the calculation technique: model of radionuclide migration and accumulation in CWR ecosystem components and calculation model of population dose commitment due to water consumption (at the public health approach to the normalization of the NPP radioactive effect on CWC) or calculation model of dose commitment on hydrocenosis components (at the ecological approach to the normalization). Analytical calculations and numerical calculation results in the model CWC, located in the USSR middle region, are presented

  5. Yield components and water use efficiency in coriander under irrigation and nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline P. Angeli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Among the determining factors of yield, nitrogen (N fertilization and the correct supply of water play an important role in the quality and yield aspects of coriander. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the yield components and the water use efficiency (WUE in coriander subjected to different depths and N doses. A completely randomized design in split plot was used. Water depths were applied in the plots at the rates of 25, 50, 75, 100 and 125% of the Required Real Irrigation (RRI. N doses were distributed within the subplots at the following proportions: 50, 100 and 150% of the recommendation for the crop (70 kg ha-1. The N dose of 94 kg ha-1 and irrigation depth of 115% of RRI promoted the greatest yield (29.0 t ha-1 and number of bunches (29 bunches m-2. The highest number of leaves per plant was obtained with the N dose of 103.2 kg ha-1 and irrigation depth of 68% of the RRI. The maximum plant height (43 cm was obtained with N dose of 105 kg ha-1 and irrigation depth of 121% of RRI. The highest WUE in coriander (71 kg m-3 occurred at the irrigation depth of 26% of RRI and N dose of 105 kg ha-1.

  6. ESTIMATION OF INHERENT OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND THE WATER QUALITY COMPONENTS IN THE NEUSE RIVER-PAMLICO SOUND ESTUARINE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field observations carried out in the Neuse River-Pamlico Sound Estuarine System (NRE-PS), North Carolina, USA were used to develop optical algorithms for assessing inherent optical properties, IOPs (absorption and backscattering) associated with water quality components (WQC).

  7. The Landlab OverlandFlow component: a Python library for computing shallow-water flow across watersheds

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Jordan M.; Gasparini, Nicole M.; Hobley, Daniel E. J.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Hutton, Eric W. H.; Nudurupati, Sai S.; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Hydrologic models and modeling components are used in a wide range of applications. Rainfall-runoff models are used to investigate the evolution of hydrologic variables, such as soil moisture and surface water discharge, throughout one or more rainfall events. Longer-term landscape evolution models also include aspects of hydrology, albeit in a highly simplified manner, in order to approximate how flowing water shapes landscapes. Here we illustrate how the OverlandFlow hydrologic component co...

  8. A procedure for evaluating residual life of major components in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, S.; Fujimori, H.; Ibe, E.; Kuniya, J.; Hayashi, M.; Fuse, M.; Yamauchi, K.

    1995-01-01

    A computer program for evaluating residual life of major components in boiling water reactors is proposed. It divides the stress corrosion cracking process into two stages; a probabilistic crack generation stage and a deterministic crack propagation one. The minimum period of the crack generation stage is evaluated assuming an exponential distribution of the stage. The crack propagation rate is calculated by the slip-dissolution/film-rupture model. The neutron flux and fluence dependence of the neutron radiation effects on material properties was evaluated by using theoretical models of radiation damage. The computer program works on an engineering work station. Evaluated results are displayed as a map of the residual life, or as graphs of crack length evolution

  9. Finite-volume component-wise TVD schemes for 2D shallow water equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gwo-Fong; Lai, Jihn-Sung; Guo, Wen-Dar

    Four finite-volume component-wise total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are proposed for solving the two-dimensional shallow water equations. In the framework of the finite volume method, a proposed algorithm using the flux-splitting technique is established by modifying the MacCormack scheme to preserve second-order accuracy in both space and time. Based on this algorithm, four component-wise TVD schemes, including the Liou-Steffen splitting (LSS), van Leer splitting, Steger-Warming splitting and local Lax-Friedrichs splitting schemes, are developed. These schemes are verified through the simulations of the 1D dam-break, the oblique hydraulic jump, the partial dam-break and circular dam-break problems. It is demonstrated that the proposed schemes are accurate, efficient and robust to capture the discontinuous shock waves without any spurious oscillations in the complex flow domains with dry-bed situation, bottom slope or friction. The simulated results also show that the LSS scheme has the best numerical accuracy among the schemes tested.

  10. Field test results for nitrogen removal by the constructed wetland component of an agricultural water recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetland Reservoir Subirrigation Systems (WRSIS) are innovative agricultural water recycling systems that can provide economic and environmental benefits. A constructed wetland is a main component of WRSIS, and an important function of this constructed wetland is drainage water treatment of nitrog...

  11. Assessing regional crop water demand using a satellite-based combination equation with a land surface temperature component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Maria Carmen; Garcia, Monica; Tornos, Lucia; Recuero, Laura; Palacios-Orueta, Alicia; Juana, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of daily evapotranspiration at regional levels is fundamental for improving agricultural and hydrological management, especially in water-scarce and climatic change vulnerable regions, like the Mediterranean basin. Regional estimates of daily crop evapotranspiration (ET) have been historically based on combination equations, such as Penman-Monteith or Priestley-Taylor, forced with weather-data inputs. However, the requirements for long term in-situ data, limit the application of such traditional approaches and algorithms using satellite-data without field calibrations bridge this gap by estimating long-term ET at the pixel level from local to global scales. Land surface temperature is a key variable tracking land surface moisture status. However, it has not been included in satellite ET approaches based on combination equations. In this study, a land surface temperature component was used to estimate soil surface conductance based on an apparent thermal inertia index. A process-based model was applied to estimate surface energy fluxes including daily ET based on a modified version of the Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model at 1km pixel resolution during a chrono-sequence spanning for more than a decade (2002-2013). The thermal-PT-JPL model was forced with vegetation, albedo, reflectance and temperature products from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from both Aqua and Terra satellites. The study region, B-XII Irrigation District of the Lower Guadalquivir, is one of the largest irrigated areas in Spain but it has scarce in-situ micrometeorological or eddy covariance data. The final aim of this study is to evaluate the thermal version of PT-JPL model versus a lumped hydrological model to assess crop evapotranspiration deficits and long-term water consumption trends in the area. The results showed that the thermal-PT-JPL model is a suitable and simple tool requiring only air temperature and incoming solar

  12. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  13. Fourier component imaging of water resonance in the human breast provides markers for malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medved, Milica; Newstead, Gillian M.; Fan, Xiaobing; Du, Yiping P.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Shimauchi, Akiko; Zamora, Marta A.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that voxels with inhomogeneously broadened water resonances, as revealed by high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI, correlate with underlying tumor pathology findings, and thus carry diagnostically useful information. Thirty-four women with mammographically suspicious breast lesions were imaged at 1.5 T, using high-resolution echo-planar spectroscopic imaging. Fourier component images (FCIs) of the off-peak spectral signal were generated, and clusters of voxels with significant inhomogeneous broadening (broadened clusters) were identified and correlated to biopsy results. Inhomogeneously broadened clusters were found significantly more frequently in malignant than in benign lesions. A larger percentage of broadened cluster voxels were found inside the malignant versus benign lesions. The high statistical significance for separation of benign and malignant lesions was robust over a large range of post-processing parameters, with a maximum ROC area under curve of 0.83. In the human breast, an inhomogeneously broadened water resonance can serve as a correlate marker for malignancy and is likely to reflect the underlying anatomy or physiology.

  14. Effect of water-table fluctuation on dissolution and biodegradation of a multi-component, light nonaqueous-phase liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Richard; Schroth, Martin H.; Zeyer, Josef

    2007-12-01

    Light nonaqueous-phase liquids (LNAPLs) such as gasoline and diesel fuel are among the most common causes of soil and groundwater contamination. Dissolution and subsequent advective transport of LNAPL components can negatively impact water supplies, while biodegradation is thought to be an important sink for this class of contaminants. We present a laboratory investigation of the effect of a water-table fluctuation on dissolution and biodegradation of a multi-component LNAPL (85% hexadecane, 5% toluene, 5% ethylbenzene, and 5% 2-methylnapthalene on a molar basis) in a pair of similar model aquifers (80 cm × 50 cm × 3 cm), one of which was subjected to a water-table fluctuation. Water-table fluctuation resulted in LNAPL and air entrapment below the water table, an increase in the vertical extent of the LNAPL source zone (by factor 6.7), and an increase in the volume of water passing through the source zone (by factor ˜ 18). Effluent concentrations of dissolved LNAPL components were substantially higher and those of dissolved nitrate lower in the model aquifer where a fluctuation had been induced. Thus, water-table fluctuation led to enhanced biodegradation activity (28.3 mmol of nitrate consumed compared to 16.3 mmol in the model without fluctuation) as well as enhanced dissolution of LNAPL components. Despite the increased biodegradation, fluctuation led to increased elution of dissolved LNAPL components from the system (by factors 10-20). Hence, water-table fluctuations in LNAPL-contaminated aquifers might be expected to result in increased exposure of downgradient receptors to LNAPL components. Accordingly, water-table fluctuations in contaminated aquifers are probably undesirable unless the LNAPL is of minimal solubility or the dissolved-phase plume is not expected to reach a receptor due to distance or the presence of some form of containment.

  15. Residual radioactivity guidelines for the heavy water components test reactor at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, M.B. Smith, R.; McNeil, J.

    1997-04-01

    Guidelines were developed for acceptable levels of residual radioactivity in the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility at the conclusion of its decommissioning. Using source terms developed from data generated in a detailed characterization study, the RESRAD and RASRAD-BUILD computer codes were used to calculate derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the radionuclides that will remain in the facility. The calculated DCGLs, when compared to existing concentrations of radionuclides measured during a 1996 characterization program, indicate that no decontamination of concrete surfaces will be necessary. Also, based on the results of the calculations, activated concrete in the reactor biological shield does not have to be removed, and imbedded radioactive piping in the facility can remain in place. Viewed in another way, the results of the calculations showed that the present inventory of residual radioactivity in the facility (not including that associated with the reactor vessel and steam generators) would produce less than one millirem per year above background to a hypothetical individual on the property. The residual radioactivity is estimated to be approximately 0.04 percent of the total inventory in the facility as of March, 1997. According to the results, the only radionuclides that would produce greater than 0.0.1-millirem per year are Am-241 (0.013 mrem/yr at 300 years), C-14 (0.022 mrem/yr at 1000 years) and U-238 (0.034 mrem/yr at 6000 years). Human exposure would occur only through the groundwater pathways, that is, from water drawn from, a well on the property. The maximum exposure would be approximately one percent of the 4 millirem per year ground water exposure limit established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 11 refs., 13 figs., 15 tabs

  16. Application of SWAT99.2 to sensitivity analysis of water balance components in unique plots in a hilly region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-feng Dai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although many sensitivity analyses using the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT in a complex watershed have been conducted, little attention has been paid to the application potential of the model in unique plots. In addition, sensitivity analysis of percolation and evapotranspiration with SWAT has seldom been undertaken. In this study, SWAT99.2 was calibrated to simulate water balance components for unique plots in Southern China from 2000 to 2001, which included surface runoff, percolation, and evapotranspiration. Twenty-one parameters classified into four categories, including meteorological conditions, topographical characteristics, soil properties, and vegetation attributes, were used for sensitivity analysis through one-at-a-time (OAT sampling to identify the factor that contributed most to the variance in water balance components. The results were shown to be different for different plots, with parameter sensitivity indices and ranks varying for different water balance components. Water balance components in the broad-leaved forest and natural grass plots were most sensitive to meteorological conditions, less sensitive to vegetation attributes and soil properties, and least sensitive to topographical characteristics. Compared to those in the natural grass plot, water balance components in the broad-leaved forest plot demonstrated higher sensitivity to the maximum stomatal conductance (GSI and maximum leaf area index (BLAI.

  17. A tunnel and a traffic jam: How transition disks maintain a detectable warm dust component despite the presence of a large planet-carved gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, P.; Klarmann, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Benisty, M.; Dominik, C.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transition disks are circumstellar disks that show evidence of a dust cavity, which may be related to dynamical clearing by embedded planet(s). Most of these objects show signs of significant accretion, indicating that the inner disks are not truly empty, but that gas is still streaming through to the star. A subset of transition disks, sometimes called pre-transition disks, also shows a strong near-infrared excess, interpreted as an optically thick dusty belt located close to the dust sublimation radius within the first astronomical unit. Aims: We study the conditions for the survival and maintenance of such an inner disk in the case where a massive planet opens a gap in the disk. In this scenario, the planet filters out large dust grains that are trapped at the outer edge of the gap, while the inner regions of the disk may or may not be replenished with small grains. Methods: We combined hydrodynamical simulations of planet-disk interactions with dust evolution models that include coagulation and fragmentation of dust grains over a large range of radii and derived observational properties using radiative transfer calculations. We studied the role of the snow line in the survival of the inner disk of transition disks. Results: Inside the snow line, the lack of ice mantles in dust particles decreases the sticking efficiency between grains. As a consequence, particles fragment at lower collision velocities than in regions beyond the snow line. This effect allows small particles to be maintained for up to a few Myr within the first astronomical unit. These particles are closely coupled to the gas and do not drift significantly with respect to the gas. For lower mass planets (1 MJup), the pre-transition appearance can be maintained even longer because dust still trickles through the gap created by the planet, moves invisibly and quickly in the form of relatively large grains through the gap, and becomes visible again as it fragments and gets slowed down

  18. Prediction of suitable amounts of water in fluidized bed granulation of pharmaceutical formulations using corresponding values of components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Akio; Yajima, Toshio; Ikuta, Hiroshi; Makado, Kouji

    2008-03-20

    This study describes application of a newly developed method to the fluidized bed granulation. The method is based on predicting suitable amounts of water to be added to multi-component formulations using the corresponding values of components prior to granulation trials. The range of appropriate amount of water for each component in a model formulation was estimated in our previous studies with a refractive near-infrared (NIR) moisture sensor. Using those values, we calculated the range of suitable amount of water to add for the model pharmaceutical formulation. In this study, we examined the relationship between the amount of water added to the model formulation and the NIR sensor output value. Then, we performed fluidized bed granulation of the model formulation at steady-state moisture content levels under monitoring with NIR sensor, within and beyond the suitable range of added water that was calculated from the corresponding range of each component. For the model formulation, we found that the predicted values for suitable amounts of added water well corresponded to those in the granulation trials, suggesting that this predictive method may be useful in estimating suitable amounts of water to be added to formulations before fluidized bed granulation trials.

  19. Water data to answer urgent water policy questions: Monitoring design, available data, and filling data gaps for determining whether shale gas development activities contaminate surface water or groundwater in the Susquehanna River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betanzo, Elin A.; Hagen, Erik R.; Wilson, John T.; Reckhow, Kenneth H.; Hayes, Laura; Argue, Denise M.; Cangelosi, Allegra A.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout its history, the United States has made major investments in assessing natural resources, such as soils, timber, oil and gas, and water. These investments allow policy makers, the private sector and the American public to make informed decisions about cultivating, harvesting or conserving these resources to maximize their value for public welfare, environmental conservation and the economy. As policy issues evolve, new priorities and challenges arise for natural resource assessment, and new approaches to monitoring are needed. For example, new technologies for oil and gas development or alternative energy sources may present new risks for water resources both above and below ground. There is a need to evaluate whether today’s water monitoring programs are generating the information needed to answer questions surrounding these new policy priorities. The Northeast-Midwest Institute (NEMWI), in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, initiated this project to explore the types and amounts of water data needed to address water-quality related policy questions of critical concern to today’s policy makers and whether those data are currently available. The collaborating entities identified two urgent water policy questions and conducted case studies in the Northeast-Midwest region to determine the water data needed, water data available, and the best ways to fill the data gaps relative to those questions. This report details the output from one case study and focuses on the Susquehanna River Basin, a data-rich area expected to be a best-case scenario in terms of water data availability.

  20. Water Balance of the Eğirdir Lake and the Influence of Budget Components, Isparta,Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşen DAVRAZ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Water budget of lakes must be determined regarding to their sustainable usage as for all water resources. One of the major problems in the management of lakes is the estimation of water budget components. The lack of regularly measured data is the biggest problem in calculation of hydrological balance of a lake. A lake water budget is computed by measuring or estimating all of the lake’s water gains and losses and measuring the corresponding changes in the lake volume over the same time period. Eğirdir Lake is one of the most important freshwater lakes in Turkey and is the most important surface water resources in the region due to different usages. Recharge of the Eğirdir Lake is supplied from especially precipitation, surface and subsurface water inflow. The discharge components of the lake are evaporation and water intake for irrigation, drinking and energy purposes. The difference between recharge and discharge of the lake was calculated as 7.78 hm3 for 1970-2010 period. According to rainfall, evaporation and the lake water level relations, rainfall is dominantly effective on the lake water level such as direct recharge to the lake and indirect recharge with groundwater flow

  1. Impacts of deforestation on water balance components of a watershed on the Brazilian East Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donizete dos Reis Pereira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian East coast was intensely affected by deforestation, which drastically cut back the original biome. The possible impacts of this process on water resources are still unknown. The purpose of this study was an evaluation of the impacts of deforestation on the main water balance components of the Galo creek watershed, in the State of Espírito Santo, on the East coast of Brazil. Considering the real conditions of the watershed, the SWAT model was calibrated with data from 1997 to 2000 and validated for the period between 2001 and 2003. The calibration and validation processes were evaluated by the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient and by the statistical parameters (determination coefficient, slope coefficient and F test of the regression model adjusted for estimated and measured flow data. After calibration and validation of the model, new simulations were carried out for three different land use scenarios: a scenario in compliance with the law (C1, assuming the preservation of PPAs (permanent preservation areas; an optimistic scenario (C2, which considers the watershed to be almost entirely covered by native vegetation; and a pessimistic scenario (C3, in which the watershed would be almost entirely covered by pasture. The scenarios C1, C2 and C3 represent a soil cover of native forest of 76, 97 and 0 %, respectively. The results were compared with the simulation, considering the real scenario (C0 with 54 % forest cover. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients were 0.65 and 0.70 for calibration and validation, respectively, indicating satisfactory results in the flow simulation. A mean reduction of 10 % of the native forest cover would cause a mean annual increase of approximately 11.5 mm in total runoff at the watershed outlet. Reforestation would ensure minimum flows in the dry period and regulate the maximum flow of the main watercourse of the watershed.

  2. Application of the integrated safety assessment methodology to sequences with loss of component cooling water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queral, C.; Ibanez, L.; Hortal, J.; Izquierdo, J.M.; Sanchez-Perea, M.; Melendez, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Safety Assessment (ISA) methodology, developed by the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Spanish Nuclear Regulatory Body, has been applied to a thermo-hydraulic analysis of Zion NPP for sequences with loss of the Component Cooling Water System (CCWS) in the context of the NEA application exercise SM2A (Safety Margin Application and Assessment). The ISA methodology allows among others to obtain the damage domain (the region where the PCT limit is exceeded) for each sequence of the dynamic event tree as a function of the uncertain times of operator actuations (secondary side cooling and recovery of CCWS). Sequences with available and unavailable accumulators (ACC) have been analyzed in order to distinguish all the possibilities (ACC demanded and successful, ACC demanded and failed and ACC not demanded). In this work, this damage domain and some parameters of every sequence have been obtained from the results of the simulations performed with TRACE code, these data as well as the time-density probability distributions of the considered uncertain parameters (manual actions) are used to obtain the exceedance frequency of the particular safety limit or damage limit. . The results show the feasibility of ISA methodology in order to obtain accurate enough regions of uncertain parameters (time delays or physical parameters) where the particular safety limit of interest is exceeded, as well as the frequency of exceeding this limit. (author)

  3. Application of the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology to Sequences with Loss of Component Cooling Water System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queral, C.; Ibanez, L.; Hortal, J.; Izquierdo, J.M.; Sanchez-Perea, M.; Melendez, E.; Gil, J.; Fernandez, I.; Gomez, J.; Marrao, H.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Safety Assessment (ISA) methodology, developed by the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Spanish Nuclear Regulatory Body, has been applied to a thermo-hydraulic analysis of Zion NPP for sequences with loss of the Component Cooling Water System (CCWS). The ISA methodology allows obtaining the damage domain (the region where the PCT limit is exceeded) for each sequence of the dynamic event tree as a function of the operator actuations times (secondary side cooling and recovery of CCWS) and the time of occurrence of stochastic phenomena (seal LOCA), and computing from it the exceedance frequency by integrating the dynamic reliability equations proposed by ISA. For every sequence, several data are necessary in order to obtain its contribution to the global exceedance damage frequency. These data consist of the results of the simulations performed with MAAP and TRACE codes that are inside of the damage domain and the time-density probability distributions of the manual actions and the time of seal LOCA occurrence. Reported results show an slight increment of the exceedance damage frequency for this kind of sequences in a power up-rate from 100% to 110%. (authors)

  4. Measuring CO 2 and N 2 O Mass Transfer into GAP-1 CO 2 –Capture Solvents at Varied Water Loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Zwoster, Andy; Zheng, Feng; Perry, Robert J.; Wood, Benjamin R.; Spiry, Irina; Freeman, Charles J.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2017-04-12

    This paper investigates the CO2 and N2 O absorption behavior in the water-lean gamma amino propyl (GAP)-1/TEG solvent system using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed on a blend of GAP-1 aminosilicone in triethylene glycol at varied water loadings in the solvent. Measurements were made with CO2 and N2 O at representative lean (0.04 mol CO2/mol alkalinity), middle (0.13 mol CO2 /mol alkalinity) and rich (0.46 mol CO2 /mol alkalinity) solvent loadings at 0, 5, 10 and 15 wt% water loadings at 40, 60 and 80C° and N2 O at (0.08-0.09 mol CO2 /mol alkalinity) at 5 wt% water at 40, 60 and 80C°. CO2 flux was found to be non-linear with respect to log mean pressure driving force (LMPD). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (k'g) were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance (determined from a correlation from literature) from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting k'g values for CO2 and N2 O in GAP-1/TEG mixtures were found to be higher than that of 5M aqueous monoethanolamine under comparable driving force albeit at higher solvent viscosities. The k'g values for CO2 were also found to decrease with increasing solvent water content and increase with a decrease in temperature. These observations indicate that mass transfer of CO2 in GAP-1/TEG is linked to the physical solubility of CO2 , which is higher in organic solvents compared to water. This paper expands on the understanding of the unique mass transfer behavior and kinetics of CO2 capture in water-lean solvents.

  5. Knowledge Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Marjorie; Pedersen, Torben; Petersen, Bent

    2003-01-01

    , assimilating, and utilizing knowledge - are crucial determinants ofknowledge gap elimination. In contrast, the two factors deemed essential in traditionalinternationalization process theory - elapsed time of operations and experientiallearning - are found to have no or limited effect.Key words......: Internationalization, knowledge gap, absorptive capacity, learning box....

  6. Gap Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-25

    Gap Resolution is a software package that was developed to improve Newbler genome assemblies by automating the closure of sequence gaps caused by repetitive regions in the DNA. This is done by performing the follow steps:1) Identify and distribute the data for each gap in sub-projects. 2) Assemble the data associated with each sub-project using a secondary assembler, such as Newbler or PGA. 3) Determine if any gaps are closed after reassembly, and either design fakes (consensus of closed gap) for those that closed or lab experiments for those that require additional data. The software requires as input a genome assembly produce by the Newbler assembler provided by Roche and 454 data containing paired-end reads.

  7. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  8. Social Position Influencing the Water Perception Gap Between Local Leaders and Constituents in a Socio-Hydrological System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffner, Melissa; Jackson-Smith, Douglas; Flint, Courtney G.

    2018-02-01

    How well city leaders represent their constituents and meet their needs are key concerns in transitioning to local sustainable water governance. To date, however, there is little research documenting the influence of social position between elected leaders who make policy, career staff water managers who design and operate systems and implement policies, and the members of the public whose individual water use behaviors are important drivers of water sustainability outcomes. In this study, we ask: "How does social position explain variation in water perceptions and concerns between different actors in a socio-hydrological system?" Using a mixed method approach with survey and interview data, we explore the ways that positioning within the governance system, geographic context, and citizen engagement in local government mediate perceptions of the urban water system. Regardless of local biophysical water supply conditions, residents showed most concern about future water shortages and high water costs, while their leaders were consistently most concerned about deteriorating local water infrastructure. Further, constituents who received water-related information directly from public utility mailings or served on community committees and boards had perceptions that were more aligned with leaders' concerns. The importance of social structure over natural and built environments in shaping water issue perceptions underscores the value of social analysis in socio-hydrology studies. Further, practitioners looking to increase consensus for a transition to sustainable water governance might work to develop institutional mechanisms to increase opportunities for water user involvement in local water system governance.

  9. Bridging the Gaps in Obstetric Care: Perspectives of Service Delivery Providers on Challenges and Core Components of Care in Rural Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Meredith; Rochat, Roger; Hennink, Monique; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Spelke, Bridget

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2011, a workforce assessment conducted by the Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group found that 52 % of Primary Care Service Areas outside metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, had an overburdened or complete lack of obstetric care services. In response to that finding, this study's aim was twofold: to describe challenges faced by providers who currently deliver or formerly delivered obstetric care in these areas, and to identify essential core components that can be integrated into alternative models of care in order to alleviate the burden placed on the remaining obstetric providers. Methods We conducted 46 qualitative in-depth interviews with obstetricians, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, certified nurse midwives, and maternal and infant health leaders in Georgia. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, uploaded into MAXQDA software, and analyzed using a Grounded Theory Approach. Results Providers faced significant financial barriers in service delivery, including low Medicaid reimbursement, high proportions of self-pay patients, and high cost of medical malpractice insurance. Further challenges in provision of obstetric care in this region were related to patient's late initiation of prenatal care and lacking collaboration between obstetric providers. Essential components of effective models of care included continuity, efficient use of resources, and risk-appropriate services. Conclusion Our analysis revealed core components of improved models of care that are more cost effective and would expand coverage. These components include closer collaboration among stakeholder populations, decentralization of services with effective use of each type of clinical provider, improved continuity of care, and system-wide changes to increase Medicaid benefits.

  10. Towards quantification of the water fooptprint of paper: a first estimate of its consumptive component

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oel, P.R.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2012-01-01

    For a hardcopy of this article, printed in the Netherlands, an estimated 100 l of water have been used. Most of the water is required in the forestry stage, due to evapotranspiration (green and blue water). In addition, the water footprint during the industrial stage, as accounted for in this study,

  11. Assessing adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on Rhizopus oryzae cell wall components with water-methanol cosolvent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Lv, Xiaofei; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming

    2016-03-01

    The contribution of different fungal cell wall components in adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is still unclear. We isolated Rhizopus oryzae cell walls components with sequential extraction, characterized functional groups with NEXAFS spectra, and determined partition coefficients of PAHs on cell walls and cell wall components with cosolvent model. Spectra of NEXAFS indicated that isolated cell walls components were featured with peaks at ~532.7 and ~534.5eV energy. The lipid cosolvent partition coefficients were approximately one order of magnitude higher than the corresponding carbohydrate cosolvent partition coefficients. The partition coefficients for four tested carbohydrates varied at approximate 0.5 logarithmic units. Partition coefficients between biosorbents and water calculated based cosolvent models ranged from 0.8 to 4.2. The present study proved the importance of fungal cell wall components in adsorption of PAHs, and consequently the role of fungi in PAHs bioremediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of Principal Components Analysis and Kriging to Predict Groundwater-Sourced Rural Drinking Water Quality in Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Lianne; Bharadwaj, Lalita; Epp, Tasha; Waldner, Cheryl L

    2017-09-15

    Groundwater drinking water supply surveillance data were accessed to summarize water quality delivered as public and private water supplies in southern Saskatchewan as part of an exposure assessment for epidemiologic analyses of associations between water quality and type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Arsenic in drinking water has been linked to a variety of chronic diseases and previous studies have identified multiple wells with arsenic above the drinking water standard of 0.01 mg/L; therefore, arsenic concentrations were of specific interest. Principal components analysis was applied to obtain principal component (PC) scores to summarize mixtures of correlated parameters identified as health standards and those identified as aesthetic objectives in the Saskatchewan Drinking Water Quality Standards and Objective. Ordinary, universal, and empirical Bayesian kriging were used to interpolate arsenic concentrations and PC scores in southern Saskatchewan, and the results were compared. Empirical Bayesian kriging performed best across all analyses, based on having the greatest number of variables for which the root mean square error was lowest. While all of the kriging methods appeared to underestimate high values of arsenic and PC scores, empirical Bayesian kriging was chosen to summarize large scale geographic trends in groundwater-sourced drinking water quality and assess exposure to mixtures of trace metals and ions.

  13. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP): linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Pfrang, C.; Koop, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP) that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007), and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system and the computational constraints, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds. In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity (Winkler et al., 2006). Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative aging of organic aerosol

  14. Water-quality data from 2002 to 2003 and analysis of data gaps for development of total maximum daily loads in the Lower Klamath River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Lorraine E.; Flint, Alan L.; Curry, Debra S.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Doyle, Micelis C.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected water-quality data during 2002 and 2003 in the Lower Klamath River Basin, in northern California, to support studies of river conditions as they pertain to the viability of Chinook and Coho salmon and endangered suckers. To address the data needs of the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board for the development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs), water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and pH were continuously monitored at sites on the Klamath, Trinity, Shasta, and Lost Rivers. Water-quality samples were collected and analyzed for selected nutrients, organic carbon, chlorophyll-a, pheophytin-a, and trace elements. Sediment oxygen demand was measured on the Shasta River. Results of analysis of the data collected were used to identify locations in the Lower Klamath River Basin and periods of time during 2002 and 2003 when river conditions were more likely to be detrimental to salmonid or sucker health because of occasional high water temperatures, low dissolved oxygen, and conditions that supported abundant populations of algae and aquatic plants. The results were also used to assess gaps in data by furthering the development of the conceptual model of water flow and quality in the Lower Klamath River Basin using available data and the current understanding of processes that affect water quality and by assessing needs for the develoment of mathematical models of the system. The most notable gap in information for the study area is in sufficient knowledge about the occurrence and productivity of algal communities. Other gaps in data include vertical water-quality profiles for the reservoirs in the study area, and in an adequate understanding of the chemical oxygen demands and the sediment oxygen demands in the rivers and of the influence of riparian shading on the rivers. Several mathematical models are discussed in this report for use in characterizing the river systems in the study area; also

  15. Highly efficient one-pot three-component synthesis of naphthopyran derivatives in water catalyzed by hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    An expeditious and efficient protocol for the synthesis of naphthopyrans has been developed that proceeds via one-pot three-component sequential reaction in water catalyzed by hydroxyapatite or sodium-modified-hydroxyapatite. The title compounds have been obtained in high yield a...

  16. Multi-Component Remediation System for Generating Potable Water Onboard Spacecrafts, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fractal Systems Inc. proposes to develop an innovative, energy-efficient water purification system to enable humans to live and work permanently in space. Water...

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni-based alloys in PWR primary water. Component surface control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucault, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the PWR plant primary circuit, FRAMATOME-ANP uses several nickel-base alloys or austenitic stainless steels for the manufacture of safety components. The experience feedback of the last twenty years allows us to point out the major role played by the surface state of the components in their life duration. In this paper, we present two examples of problems encountered and solved by a surface study and the definition and implementation of a process for the surface control of the repair components. Then, we propose some ideas about the present needs in terms of analysis methods to improve the surface knowledge and the control of the manufactured components. (author)

  18. Simulating the potential yield and yield gaps of sugar beet due to water and nitrogen limitations in Khorasan province using SUCROS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Deihimfard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Crop productivity is highly constrained by water and nitrogen limitations in many areas of the world (Kalra et al., 2007. Therefore, there is a need to investigate more on nitrogen and water management to achieve higher production as well as quality. Irrigated sugar beet in the cropping systems of Khorasan province in northeastern of Iran accounts for about 34% of the land area under sugar beet production (~115,000 ha with an average yield of around 36 t.ha-1 (Anonymous, 2009. However, there is a huge yield gap (the difference between potential and water and nitrogen-limited yield mainly due to biotic and abiotic factors causing major reduction in farmers’ yield. Accordingly, yield gap analysis should be carried out to reduce the yield reduction and reach the farmer’s yield to the potential yield. The current study aimed to simulate potential yield as well as yield gap related to water and nitrogen shortage in the major sugar beet-growing areas of Khorasan province of Iran. Materials and methods This study was carried out in 6 locations across Khorasan province, which is located in the northeast of Iran. Long term weather data for 1986 to 2009 were obtained from Iran Meteorological Organization for 6 selected locations. The weather data included daily sunshine hours (h, daily maximum and minimum temperatures (◦C, and daily rainfall (mm. Daily solar radiation was estimated using the Goudriaan (1993 method. The validated SUCROSBEET model (Deihimfard, 2011; Deihimfard et al., 2011 was then used to estimate potential, water and nitrogen-limited yield and yield gap of sugar beet for 6 selected locations across the Khorasan province in the northeast of Iran. This model simulates the impacts of weather, genotype and management factors on crop growth and development, soil water and nitrogen balance on a daily basis and finally it predicts crop yield. The model requires input data, including local weather and soil conditions, cultivar

  19. Analysis of environmental setting, surface-water and groundwater data, and data gaps for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, Oklahoma, through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, William J.; Harich, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Lewis, Jason M.; Shivers, Molly J.; Seger, Christian H.; Becker, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    in more urbanized areas. Much of the water in the area is of good quality, though some parts of this area have water quality impaired by very hard surface water and groundwater; large chloride concentrations in some smaller streams; relatively large concentrations of nutrients and counts of fecal-indicator bacteria in the North Canadian River; and chloride, iron, manganese, and uranium concentrations that exceed primary or secondary drinking-water standards in water samples collected from small numbers of wells. Substantial amounts of hydrologic and water-quality data have been collected in much of this area, but there are gaps in those data caused by relatively few streamflow-gaging stations, uneven distribution of surface-water quality sampling sites, lack of surface-water quality sampling at high-flow and low-flow conditions, and lack of a regularly measured and sampled groundwater network. This report summarizes existing water-use, climatic, geographic, hydrologic, and water-quality data and describes several means of filling gaps in hydrologic data for this area.

  20. Independent principal component analysis for simulation of soil water content and bulk density in a Canadian Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaba Boluwade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of soil properties such as soil water content (SWC and bulk density (BD is vital for hydrologic processes and thus, it is importance to estimate θ (water content and ρ (soil bulk density among other soil surface parameters involved in water retention and infiltration, runoff generation and water erosion, etc. The spatial estimation of these soil properties are important in guiding agricultural management decisions. These soil properties vary both in space and time and are correlated. Therefore, it is important to find an efficient and robust technique to simulate spatially correlated variables. Methods such as principal component analysis (PCA and independent component analysis (ICA can be used for the joint simulations of spatially correlated variables, but they are not without their flaws. This study applied a variant of PCA called independent principal component analysis (IPCA that combines the strengths of both PCA and ICA for spatial simulation of SWC and BD using the soil data set from an 11 km2 Castor watershed in southern Quebec, Canada. Diagnostic checks using the histograms and cumulative distribution function (cdf both raw and back transformed simulations show good agreement. Therefore, the results from this study has potential in characterization of water content variability and bulk density variation for precision agriculture.

  1. Demand Supply Gap in Urban Water Supply and Sanitary Services- A Case Study of Mangalore City Corporation Area

    OpenAIRE

    Nagendra; Suresh

    2009-01-01

    Today, some 1.1 billion people in developing countries have inadequate access to water, and 2.6 billion lack basic sanitations. These twin deficits were rooted in institutions and political choices, not in water’s availability. Household water requirements represent a tiny fraction of water use, usually less than 5% of the total, but there is tremendous inequality in access to clean water and to sanitation at a household level. In high-income areas of cities in Asia, Latin America and Sub-Sah...

  2. The Impact of Urbanization on the Precipitation Component of the Water Cycle: A New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, J. Marshal

    2002-01-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world s population will live in cities (UNFP, 1999). As cities continue to grow, urban sprawl (e.g., the expansion of urban surfaces outward into rural surroundings) creates unique problems related to land use, transportation, agriculture, housing, pollution, and development. Urban expansion also has measurable impacts on environmental processes. Urban areas modify boundary layer processes through the creation of an urban heat island (UHI). The literature indicates that the signature of the urban heat island effect may be resolvable in rainfall patterns over and downwind of metropolitan areas. However, a recent U.S. Weather Research Program panel concluded that more observational and modeling research is needed in this area (Dabberdt et al. 2000). NASA and other agencies initiated programs such as the Atlanta Land-use Analysis: Temperature and Air Quality Project (ATLANTA) (Quattrochi et al. 1998) which aimed to identify and understand how urban heat islands impact the environment. However, a comprehensive assessment of the role of urban-induced rainfall in the global water and energy cycle (GWEC) and cycling of freshwater was not a primary focus of these efforts. NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) seeks to develop a scientific understanding of the Earth system and its response to natural or human-induced changes to enable improved prediction capability for climate, weather, and natural hazards (NASA, 2000). Within this mission, the ESE has three basic thrusts: science research to increase Earth system knowledge; an applications program to transfer science knowledge to practical use in society; and a technology program to enable new, better, and cheaper capabilities for observing the earth. Within this framework, a research program is underway to further address the co-relationship between land cover use and change (e.g. urban development) and its impact on key components of the GWEC (e.g., precipitation). This

  3. Financial Management: Measurement of Water Usage by DoD Components Serviced by the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    Who Should Read This Report and Why? This report should be read by DoD managers who have a direct interest in, or are in need of information about the accuracy of the measurement of water usage by DoD Components serviced by the District...

  4. Application of principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses in the classification of Serbian bottled waters and a comparison with waters from some European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvejanov Jelena Đ.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The contents of major ions in bottled waters were analyzed by principal component (PCA and hierarchical cluster (HCA analysis in order to investigate if these techniques could provide the information necessary for classifications of the water brands marketed in Serbia. Data on the contents of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, Cl-, SO4 2-, HCO3 - and total dissolved solids (TDS of 33 bottled waters was used as the input data set. The waters were separated into three main clusters according to their levels of TDS, Na+ and HCO3 -; sub-clustering revealed a group of soft waters with the lowest total hardness. Based on the determined chemical parameters, the Serbian waters were further compared with available literature data on bottled waters from some other European countries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report applying chemometric classification of bottled waters from different European countries, thereby representing a unique attempt in contrast to previous studies reporting the results primarily on a country-to-country scale. The diverse character of Serbian bottled waters was demonstrated as well as the usefulness of PCA and HCA in the fast classification of the water brands based on their main chemical parameters. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 172050

  5. Evaluation of material integrity on electricity generator water steam cycles component (Main Steam Pipe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudardjo; Histori; Triyadi, Ari

    1998-01-01

    The evaluation of material integrity on electricity generator component has been done. That component was main steam pipe of Unit II Suralaya Coal Fired Power Plant. evaluation was done by replication technique. The damage was found are two porosity's, from two point samples of six points sample population. Based on cavity evaluation in steels, which proposed by Neubauer and Wedel that porosity's still at class A damage. For class A damage, its means no remedial action would be required until next major scheduled maintenance outage. That porosity's was grouped on isolated cavities and not need ti repair that main steam pipe component less than three year after replication test

  6. A multivariate analysis of intrinsic soil components influencing the mean-weight diameter of water-stable aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.; Chukwu, W.I.E.

    1994-06-01

    A knowledge of the soil properties influencing the water-stability of soil aggregates is needed for selecting those more easily-determined properties that would be useful in areas where lack of facilities makes its direct determination impossible. In this laboratory study we evaluated the main soil physical, chemical and mineralogical properties influencing the stability of macro aggregates of some Italian surface soils in water. The objective is to select a subset of soil properties which predict optimally, soil aggregate stability. The index of stability used is the mean weight diameter of water-stable aggregates whereas the method of evaluation is the principal component analysis (PCA). The range in coefficients of variation (CV) among the properties was least in the physical (12.0-61.0%), medium in the mineralogical (28.0-116.2%) and highest in the chemical (8.2-110.8%) properties. The wider the range in CV in each subset of properties, the greater the number of components extracted by the PCA. The component defining variables, i.e. those with the highest loadings on each component and therefore, provide the best relationship between the variables and aggregate stability, revealed the ratio of total sand/clay and plastic limit as the significant physical properties. The significant chemical properties are Al 2 O 3 , FeO, MgO and MnO which contribute positively to aggregate stability. Feldspar, quartz and muscovite are the significant mineralogical properties each of which is negatively related to aggregate stability. These soil components are useful for developing empirical models for estimating the stability of aggregates of these soils in water. (author). 38 refs, 7 tabs

  7. Identification of Water Quality Significant Parameter with Two Transformation/Standardization Methods on Principal Component Analysis and Scilab Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Putranda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Water quality monitoring is prone to encounter error on its recording or measuring process. The monitoring on river water quality not only aims to recognize the water quality dynamic, but also to evaluate the data to create river management policy and water pollution in order to maintain the continuity of human health or sanitation requirement, and biodiversity preservation. Evaluation on water quality monitoring needs to be started by identifying the important water quality parameter. This research objected to identify the significant parameters by using two transformation or standardization methods on water quality data, which are the river Water Quality Index, WQI (Indeks Kualitas Air, Sungai, IKAs transformation or standardization method and transformation or standardization method with mean 0 and variance 1; so that the variability of water quality parameters could be aggregated with one another. Both of the methods were applied on the water quality monitoring data which its validity and reliability have been tested. The PCA, Principal Component Analysis (Analisa Komponen Utama, AKU, with the help of Scilab software, has been used to process the secondary data on water quality parameters of Gadjah Wong river in 2004-2013, with its validity and reliability has been tested. The Scilab result was cross examined with the result from the Excel-based Biplot Add In software. The research result showed that only 18 from total 35 water quality parameters that have passable data quality. The two transformation or standardization data methods gave different significant parameter type and amount result. On the transformation or standardization mean 0 variances 1, there were water quality significant parameter dynamic to mean concentration of each water quality parameters, which are TDS, SO4, EC, TSS, NO3N, COD, BOD5, Grease Oil and NH3N. On the river WQI transformation or standardization, the water quality significant parameter showed the level of

  8. Estimating Water Balance Components of Lakes and Reservoirs Using Various Open Access Satellite Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, Z.

    2014-01-01

    There are millions of lakes and ten thousands of reservoirs in the world. The number of reservoirs is still increasing through the construction of large dams to meet the growing demand for water resources, hydroelectricity and economic development. Accurate information on the water balance

  9. Water chemistry and corrosion control of cladding and primary circuit components. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    Corrosion is the principal life limiting degradation mechanism in nuclear steam supply systems, especially taking into account the trends to increase fuel burnup, thermal rate and cycle length. Primary circuit components of water cooled power reactors have an impact on Zr-based alloys behaviour due to crud (primary circuit corrosion products) formation, transport and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. Crud deposits influence water chemistry, radiation and thermal hydraulic conditions near cladding surface, and by this way-Zr-based alloy corrosion. During the last decade, significant improvements were achieved in the reduction of the corrosion and dose rates by changing the cladding material for one more resistant to corrosion or by the improvement of water chemistry conditions. However, taking into account the above mentioned tendency for heavier fuel duties, corrosion and water chemistry, control will remain a serious task to work with for nuclear power plant operators and scientists, as well as development of generally accepted corrosion model of Zr-based alloys in a water environment in a new millennium. Upon the recommendation of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, water chemistry and corrosion of cladding and primary circuit components are in the focus of the IAEA activities in the area of fuel technology and performance. At present the IAEA performs two co-ordinated research projects (CRPs): on On-line High Temperature Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion (WACOL) and on Activity Transport in Primary Circuits. Two CRPs deal with hydrogen and hydride degradation of the Zr-based alloys. A state-of-the-art review entitled: 'Waterside Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants' was published in 1998. Technical Committee meetings on the subject were held in 1985 (Cadarache, France), 1989 (Portland, USA), 1993 (Rez, Czech Republic). During the last few years extensive exchange of experience in

  10. Application of a technique for scenario prediction of climate change impact on the water balance components of northern river basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusev Yeugeniy M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The scenario forecasting technique for assessing changes of water balance components of the northern river basins due to possible climate change was developed. Three IPCC global emission scenarios corresponding to different possible scenarios for economic, technological, political and demographic development of the human civilization in the 21st century were chosen for generating climate change projections by an ensemble of 16 General Circulation Models with a high spatial resolution. The projections representing increments of monthly values of meteorological characteristics were used for creating 3-hour meteorological time series up to 2063 for the Northern Dvina River basin, which belongs to the pan-Arctic basin and locates at the north of the European part of Russia. The obtained time series were applied as forcing data to drive the land surface model SWAP to simulate possible changes in the water balance components due to different scenarios of climate change for the Northern Dvina River basin

  11. Experience of partial dismantling and large component removal of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg, M.

    1987-01-01

    Not any of the French PWR reactors need to be decommissioned before the next decade or early 2000. However, feasibility studies of decommissioning have been undertaken and several dismantling scenarios have been considered including the dismantling of four PWR units and the on-site entombment of the active components into a reactor building for interim disposal. In addition to theoretical evaluation of radwaste volume and activity, several operations of partial dismantling of active components and decontamination activities have been conducted in view of dismantling for both PWR and BWR units. By analyzing the concept of both 900 and 1300 MWe PWR's, it appears that the design improvements taken into account for reducing occupational dose exposure of maintenance personnel and the development of automated tools for performing maintenance and repairs of major components, contribute to facilitate future dismantling and decommissioning operations

  12. Components of variance involved in estimating soil water content and water content change using a neutron moisture meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, D.F.; Williams, J.

    1979-01-01

    There have been significant developments in the design and use of neutron moisture meters since Hewlett et al.(1964) investigated the sources of variance when using this instrument to estimate soil moisture. There appears to be little in the literature, however, which updates these findings. This paper aims to isolate the components of variance when moisture content and moisture change are estimated using the neutron scattering method with current technology and methods

  13. Simulating crop phenological responses to water stress using the phenology mms software component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop phenology is fundamental for understanding crop growth and development, and increasingly influences many agricultural management practices. Water deficits are one environmental factor that can influence crop phenology through shortening or lengthening the developmental phase, yet the phenologic...

  14. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system and the computational constraints, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity (Winkler et al., 2006. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative

  15. The 'seafood gap' in the food-water nexus literature-issues surrounding freshwater use in seafood production chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Troell, Max; Henriksson, Patrik J.G.; Beveridge, Malcolm C.M.; Verdegem, Marc; Metian, Marc; Mateos, Lara D.; Deutsch, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Freshwater use for food production is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades with population growth, changing demographics, and shifting diets. Ensuring joint food-water security has prompted efforts to quantify freshwater use for different food products and production methods.

  16. A Comparative Analysis of Yield Gaps and Water Productivity on Smallholder Farms in Ethiopia, South Africa and Tunisia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jovanovic, Nebo; Musvoto, Constansia; Clercq, De Willem; Pienaar, Cou; Petja, Brilliant; Zairi, Abdelaziz; Hanafi, Salia; Ajmi, Tarek; Mailhol, Jean Claude; Cheviron, Bruno; Albasha, Rami; Habtu, Solomon; Yazew, Eyasu; Kifle, Muluberhan; Fissahaye, Degol; Aregay, Gebremeskel; Habtegebreal, Kiros; Gebrekiros, Abreha; Woldu, Yirga; Froebrich, Jochen

    2018-01-01

    Agriculture in developing countries will have to transform and increase production by an estimated 70% in order to meet demands by 2050. Although well-managed commercial farms offer little manoeuvring space for increasing agricultural water productivity, smallholder farms usually operate at low

  17. UV Photocatalytic Activity for Water Decomposition of SrxBa1−xNb2O6 Nanocrystals with Different Components and Morphologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strontium barium niobate SrxBa1-xNb2O6 (SBN nanocrystals with different components (x=0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 were synthesized by Molten Salt Synthesis (MSS method at various reaction temperatures (T = 950°C, 1000°C, 1050°C, and 1100°C. The SBN nanocrystals yielded through flux reactions possess different morphologies and sizes with a length of about ~100 nm~7 μm and a diameter of about ~200~500 nm. The Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray Diffraction (XRD techniques were used to study the compositions, structures, and morphologies of the nanocrystals. The absorption edges of the SBN nanocrystals are at a wavelength region of approximate 390 nm, which corresponds to band-gap energy of ~3.18 eV. The SBN nanocrystals with different sizes display different photocatalytic activity under ultraviolet light in decomposition of water. The SBN60 nanocrystals exhibit stable photocatalytic rates (~100~130 μmol of H2·g−1·h−1 for hydrogen production. The SBN nanocrystals can be a potential material in the application of photocatalysis and micro/nanooptical devices.

  18. Efficacy of various chemical disinfectants on biofilms formed in spacecraft potable water system components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wing C; Dudinsky, Lynn A; Garcia, Veronica M; Ott, Charlie M; Castro, Victoria A

    2010-07-01

    As the provision of potable water is critical for successful habitation of the International Space Station (ISS), life support systems were installed in December 2008 to recycle both humidity from the atmosphere and urine to conserve available water in the Station. In-flight pre-consumption testing from the dispensing needle at the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) indicated that bacterial concentrations exceeded the current ISS specifications of 50 colony-forming units (CFU) ml(-1). Subsequent investigations revealed that a corrugated stainless steel flex hose upstream of the dispensing needle in the PWD was filled with nonsterile water and left at room temperature for more than 1 month before launch. To simulate biofilm formation that was suspected in the flight system, sterile flex hoses were seeded with a consortium of bacterial isolates previously recovered from other ISS water systems, including Ralstonia pickettii, Burkholderia multivorans, Caulobacter vibrioides, and Cupriavidus pauculus. After incubation for 5 days, the hoses were challenged with various chemical disinfectants including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), colloidal silver, and buffered pH solutions to determine the ability of the disinfectants to decrease and maintain bacterial concentrations below ISS specifications. The disinfection efficacy over time was measured by collecting daily heterotrophic plate counts after exposure to the disinfectants. A single flush with either 6% H2O2 solution or a mixture of 3% H2O2 and 400 ppb colloidal silver effectively reduced the bacterial concentrations to <1 CFU ml(-1) for a period of up to 3 months.

  19. Efficacy of Various Chemical Disinfectants on Biofilms Formed in Spacecraft Potable Water System Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Willy; Garcia, Veronica; Castro, Victoria; Ott, Mark; Duane

    2009-01-01

    As the provision of potable water is critical for successful habitation of the International Space Station (ISS), life support systems were installed in December 2008 to recycle both humidity from the atmosphere and urine to conserve available water in the vehicle. Pre-consumption testing from the dispensing needle at the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) indicated that bacterial concentrations exceeded the current ISS specifications of 50 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Subsequent investigations revealed that a corrugated stainless steel flex hose upstream of the dispensing needle in the PWD was filled with non-sterile water and left at room temperature for over one month before launch. To simulate biofilm formation that was suspected in the flight system, sterile flex hoses were seeded with a consortium of bacterial isolates previously recovered from other ISS water systems, which included Ralstonia pickettii, Burkholderia multivorans, Caulobacter vibrioides., and Cupriavidus pauculus. After 5 days of incubation, these hoses were challenged with various chemical disinfectants including hydrogen peroxide, colloidal silver, and buffered pH solutions to determine the ability of the disinfectants to decrease and maintain bacterial concentrations below ISS specifications. Disinfection efficacy over time was measured by collecting daily heterotrophic plate counts following exposure to the disinfectants. A single flush with either 6% hydrogen peroxide solution or a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide and 400 ppb colloidal silver effectively reduced the bacterial concentrations to less than 1 CFU/ml for a period of up to 2 months. Testing results indicated that hydrogen peroxide and mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and colloidal silver have tremendous potential as alternative disinfectants for ISS water systems.

  20. Hands-on repair of component with a lowered pool water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfect, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The repair of a broken positioner mechanism on a TRIGA Reactor neutron collimator, with a lowered pool water level, presented a unique challenge. Radiation dose measurements were made which indicated the repair could be done safetly with only 3 feet of water providing shielding over the reactor core. The entire repair project went quite well, due in large part to extensive preplanning. Repair was done safely and radiation exposures were kept well below allowable levels. Savings were significant using this method of repair compared to the alternative of dismantling the facility

  1. Hands-on repair of component with a lowered pool water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfect, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The repair of a broken positioner mechanism on a TRIGA Reactor neutron collimator, with a lowered pool water level, presented a unique challenge. Radiation dose measurements were made which indicated the repair could be done safely with only 3 feet of water providing shielding over the reactor core. The entire repair project went quite well, due in large part to extensive preplanning. Repair was done safely and radiation exposures were kept well below allowable levels. Savings were significant using this method of repair compared to the alternative of dismantling the facility. (author)

  2. Geodatabase compilation of hydrogeologic, remote sensing, and water-budget-component data for the High Plains aquifer, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Natalie A.; Gonzales-Bradford, Sophia L.; Flynn, Amanda T.; Qi, Sharon L.; Peterson, Steven M.; Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Sohl, Terry L.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2013-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer underlies almost 112 million acres in the central United States. It is one of the largest aquifers in the Nation in terms of annual groundwater withdrawals and provides drinking water for 2.3 million people. The High Plains aquifer has gained national and international attention as a highly stressed groundwater supply primarily because it has been appreciably depleted in some areas. The U.S. Geological Survey has an active program to monitor the changes in groundwater levels for the High Plains aquifer and has documented substantial water-level changes since predevelopment: the High Plains Groundwater Availability Study is part of a series of regional groundwater availability studies conducted to evaluate the availability and sustainability of major aquifers across the Nation. The goals of the regional groundwater studies are to quantify current groundwater resources in an aquifer system, evaluate how these resources have changed over time, and provide tools to better understand a systems response to future demands and environmental stresses. The purpose of this report is to present selected data developed and synthesized for the High Plains aquifer as part of the High Plains Groundwater Availability Study. The High Plains Groundwater Availability Study includes the development of a water-budget-component analysis for the High Plains completed in 2011 and development of a groundwater-flow model for the northern High Plains aquifer. Both of these tasks require large amounts of data about the High Plains aquifer. Data pertaining to the High Plains aquifer were collected, synthesized, and then organized into digital data containers called geodatabases. There are 8 geodatabases, 1 file geodatabase and 7 personal geodatabases, that have been grouped in three categories: hydrogeologic data, remote sensing data, and water-budget-component data. The hydrogeologic data pertaining to the northern High Plains aquifer is included in three separate

  3. Flaw evaluation methodology for class 2, 3 components in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Naoki; Kashima, Koichi; Miyazaki, Katsumasa; Hasegawa, Kunio; Oritani, Naohiko

    2006-01-01

    It is quite important to validate the structural integrity of operating plant components as aged LWR plants are gradually increasing in Japan. The rules on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants constituted by the JSME provides flaw evaluation methodology. They are mainly focused on Class 1 components, while flaw evaluation criteria for Class 2, 3 components are not consolidated. As such, they also required from the viewpoints of in-service inspection request, reduction of operating cost and systematization of consistent code/standard. In this study, basic concept of flaw evaluation for Class 2, 3 piping was considered, and it is concluded that the same evaluation procedure as Class 1 piping in the current rules is applicable. Some technical issues on practical flaw evaluation for Class 2, 3 piping were listed up, and a countermeasure for each issue was devised. Especially, both allowable flaw sizes in acceptance standards and critical flaw sizes in acceptance criteria have to be determined in consideration of degraded fracture toughness. (author)

  4. Regulatory instrument review: Management of aging of LWR [light water reactor] major safety-related components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, E.V.

    1990-10-01

    This report comprises Volume 1 of a review of US nuclear plant regulatory instruments to determine the amount and kind of information they contain on managing the aging of safety-related components in US nuclear power plants. The review was conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Eight selected regulatory instruments, e.g., NRC Regulatory Guides and the Code of Federal Regulations, were reviewed for safety-related information on five selected components: reactor pressure vessels, steam generators, primary piping, pressurizers, and emergency diesel generators. Volume 2 will be concluded in FY 1991 and will also cover selected major safety-related components, e.g., pumps, valves and cables. The focus of the review was on 26 NPAR-defined safety-related aging issues, including examination, inspection, and maintenance and repair; excessive/harsh testing; and irradiation embrittlement. The major conclusion of the review is that safety-related regulatory instruments do provide implicit guidance for aging management, but include little explicit guidance. The major recommendation is that the instruments be revised or augmented to explicitly address the management of aging

  5. 76 FR 74831 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... inhibitor in place of other aging management activities. As a result, aging effects such as loss of material... of the Water Chemistry Program to manage loss of material and cracking of stainless steel structures... this extension will allow stakeholders a chance to better prepare their responses to LR-ISG-2011-01...

  6. Cornstarch complexed with a soybean oil component imparts water resistance to paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing trend of using paper instead of plastic for many products for environmental and sustainability reasons has generated much interest new technologies for making paper water resistant. Most of the widely used methods and recent reports involve the use of non-biobased, synthetic materials...

  7. Dynamics of inorganic components in lake waters from Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conca, E; Malandrino, M; Giacomino, A; Buoso, S; Berto, S; Verplanck, P L; Magi, E; Abollino, O

    2017-09-01

    Water and Suspended Particulate Material (SPM) samples analysed in this work were collected in the austral summer 2011/12 from six shallow Antarctic lakes (Carezza, Edmonson Point 14 and 15a, Gondwana, Inexpressible Island 10b and Tarn Flat 20) of Terra Nova Bay (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica). The total concentrations of a large suite of inorganic analytes were determined, in order to gain insight into the natural processes regulating species distribution, define natural background values and detect possible present or future local and/or global anthropogenic contamination. Lake water composition was found to be influenced by marine spray, lake geographical position and meltwater input. Seasonal variability was also evaluated for each analyte, and explained considering the natural transport processes involving each species. Multivariate chemometric techniques were used in order to identify groups of samples with similar characteristics and find out similarities and correlations among variables. The variability observed within the water samples is closely connected to the marine aerosol input; hence, it is primarily a consequence of geographical and meteorological factors, such as distance from the ocean and period of year. Higher element concentrations have been found in SPM than in water, suggesting that weathering plays an important role on the chemistry of these lakes or that adsorption processes take place. SPM samples were also examined with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and many diatoms belonging to different species were detected. No clear evidence of a relevant metal contamination was found in the investigated area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiner, S.R.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Smith LaRue, J.; Elliott, P.E.; Nylund, W.E.; Fridrich, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    component of 0.5 foot, is estimated to be about 6,000 acre-feet. Annual subsurface outflow from Oasis Valley into the Amargosa Desert is estimated to be between 30 and 130 acre-feet. Estimates of total annual ground-water withdrawal from Oasis Valley by municipal and non-municipal users in 1996 and 1999 are 440 acre-feet and 210 acre-feet, respectively. Based on these values, natural annual ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley is about 6,100 acre-feet. Total annual discharge was 6,500 acre-feet in 1996 and 6,300 acre-feet in 1999. This quantity of natural ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley exceeds the previous estimate made in 1962 by a factor of about 2.5. Water levels were measured in Oasis Valley to gain additional insight into the ET process. In shallow wells, water levels showed annual fluctuations as large as 7 feet and daily fluctuations as large as 0.2 foot. These fluctuations may be attributed to water loss associated with evapotranspiration. In shallow wells affected by E T, annual minimum depths to water generally occurred in winter or early spring shortly after daily ET reached minimum rates. Annual maximum depths to water generally occurred in late summer or fall shortly after daily ET reached maximum rates. The magnitude of daily water-level fluctuations generally increased as ET increased and decreased as depth to water increased

  9. Effect of Water Content Components on Desiccation and Recovery in Sphagnum Mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájek, Tomáš; Beckett, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The basic parameters of water relations were measured in Sphagnum mosses. The relationships of these parameters to the photosynthetic response to desiccation and the ecology of these mosses were then tested. Methods The water relations parameters of six Sphagnum species (mosses typical of wet habitats) and Atrichum androgynum (a moss more typical of mesophytic conditions) were calculated from pressure–volume isotherms. Photosynthetic properties during and after moderate desiccation were monitored by chlorophyll fluorescence. Key Results When desiccated, the hummock-forming species S. fuscum and S. magellanicum lost more water before turgor started dropping than other sphagna inhabiting less exposed habitats (73 % compared with 56 % on average). Osmotic potentials at full turgor were similar in all species, with an average value of −1·1 MPa. Hummock sphagna had clearly more rigid cell walls than species of wet habitats (ε = 3·55 compared with 1·93 MPa). As a result, their chlorophyllous cells lost turgor at higher relative water contents (RWCs) than species of wet habitats (0·61 compared with 0·46) and at less negative osmotic potentials (–2·28 compared with −3·00 MPa). During drying, ΦPSII started declining earlier in hummock species (at an RWC of 0·65 compared with 0·44), and Fv/Fm behaved similarly. Compared with other species, hummock sphagna desiccated to −20 or −40 MPa recovered more completely after rehydration. Atrichum androgynum responded to desiccation similarly to hummock sphagna, suggesting that their desiccation tolerance may have a similar physiological basis. Conclusions Assuming a fixed rate of desiccation, the higher water-holding capacities of hummock sphagna will allow them to continue metabolism for longer than other species. While this could be viewed as a form of ‘desiccation avoidance’, hummock species also recover faster than other species during rehydration, suggesting that they have higher

  10. Online Monitoring of Water-Quality Anomaly in Water Distribution Systems Based on Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis by UV-Vis Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibo Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a probabilistic principal component analysis- (PPCA- based method for online monitoring of water-quality contaminant events by UV-Vis (ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The purpose of this method is to achieve fast and sound protection against accidental and intentional contaminate injection into the water distribution system. The method is achieved first by properly imposing a sliding window onto simultaneously updated online monitoring data collected by the automated spectrometer. The PPCA algorithm is then executed to simplify the large amount of spectrum data while maintaining the necessary spectral information to the largest extent. Finally, a monitoring chart extensively employed in fault diagnosis field methods is used here to search for potential anomaly events and to determine whether the current water-quality is normal or abnormal. A small-scale water-pipe distribution network is tested to detect water contamination events. The tests demonstrate that the PPCA-based online monitoring model can achieve satisfactory results under the ROC curve, which denotes a low false alarm rate and high probability of detecting water contamination events.

  11. Initial development and chemical components of sugarcane under water stress associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem C. M. de Sousa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of water stress levels in the soil and a mix (or: a mixed inoculum of four species: Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Gigasporas rosea, Acaulospora longula, Fuscutata heterogama of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on initial vegetative growth, fresh and dry biomass production, root colonization, phosphorus, proteins, enzymes and amino acid of the sugarcane variety RB 857515 under greenhouse conditions. The experiment was set in a randomized block design in a 2 x 2 factorial scheme with four treatments (T1 - 50% PC - pot capacity, with AMF; T2 - 100% PC with AMF; T3 - 50% PC without AMF; T4 - 100% PC without AMF with 16 replicates. The water stress level of 50% PC decreased stem diameter and shoot and root fresh weight of sugarcane plants, as well as AMF in the soil and in plant roots. However, AMF and the water stress level of 50% PC, separately or combined, did not affect plant height, number of leaves, dry matter and contents of phosphorus, total soluble proteins, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase and proline of the sugarcane variety RB857515.

  12. Data report of tight-lattice rod bundle thermal-hydraulic tests (2). Gap-width effect test using 37-rod bundle simulated water-cooled breeder reactor (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Liu, Wei; Akimoto, Hajime; Sato, Takashi; Watanabe, Hironori; Ohnuki, Akira

    2006-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been performing tight-lattice rod bundle thermal-hydraulic tests to realize essential technologies for the technological and engineering feasibility of super high burn-up water-cooled breeder reactor featured by a high breeding ratio and super high burn-up by reducing the core water volume in water-cooled reactor. The tests are performing to make clear the fundamental subjects related to the boiling transition (BT) (Subjects: BT criteria under a highly tight-lattice rod bundle, effects of gap-width between rods and of rod-bowing) using 37-rod bundles (Base case test section (1.3mm gap-width), Two parameter effect test sections (Gap-width effect one (1.0mm) and Rod-bowing one)). In the present report, we summarize the test results from the gap-width effect test section. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics were obtained for the critical power under the steady-state and transient conditions, the pressure drop and the wall heat transfer within a wide range of pressure, flow rate, etc. including normal operational conditions of the designed reactor. Then the gap-width effects were also obtained from the comparison between the results using the base case test section and the gap-width effect one. (author)

  13. Mapping the Gap of Water and Erosion Control Measures in the Rapidly Urbanizing Mbezi River Catchment of Dar es Salaam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhina Given Justin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In rapidly urbanizing catchments, increase in stormwater runoff may cause serious erosion and frequent floods if stormwater management systems are improper and dysfunctional. Through GIS-based modelling, field investigations, resident’s questionnaire survey, and interviews with officials, the study set out to assesses the coverage and efficiency of drainage infrastructure in Mbezi River catchment basin in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Between 2003 and 2016, the catchment imperviousness increased by 41%, causing flood incidents, massive erosion, and numerous pollution sources. Residents strive to address stormwater hazards using terraces, hedges, and physical barriers; however, the problems persist, indicating lack of coordination and poor causality understanding between land-use changes and catchment impacts. Small-scale stormwater harvesting was exercised by 75% of the households, pointing to water supply challenges. Municipal stormwater management efforts was limited to roadside drains covering 17% of road lengths in the catchment, and 65% of those did not meet their design standards. Interviews with officials revealed a need for improved co-understanding and collaborative initiatives to bolster integrated water management. The study suggests a need to adopt a new urban stormwater management paradigm, appropriate for both residents and authorities. Without this new discourse, the urbanization led stormwater increase might jeopardize the liveability of the entire catchment.

  14. Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    Base-line and long-term monitoring of water resources of the National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap in south-central Pennsylvania began in 2002. Results of continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity and monthly and stormflow water-quality samples from two continuous-record long-term stream sites, periodic collection of water-quality samples from five miscellaneous stream sites, and annual collection of biological data from 2002 to 2005 at 27 sites are discussed. In addition, results from a stream-geomorphic analysis and classification and a regional groundwater-flow model are included. Streamflow at the facility was above normal for the 2003 through 2005 water years and extremely high-flow events occurred in 2003 and in 2004. Water-quality samples were analyzed for nutrients, sediments, metals, major ions, pesticides, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, and explosives. Results indicated no exceedances for any constituent (except iron) above the primary and secondary drinking-water standards or health-advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Iron concentrations were naturally elevated in the groundwater within the watershed because of bedrock lithology. The majority of the constituents were at or below the method detection limit. Sediment loads were dominated by precipitation due to the remnants of Hurricane Ivan in September 2004. More than 60 percent of the sediment load measured during the entire study was transported past the streamgage in just 2 days during that event. Habitat and aquatic-invertebrate data were collected in the summers of 2002-05, and fish data were collected in 2004. Although 2002 was a drought year, 2003-05 were above-normal flow years. Results indicated a wide diversity in invertebrates, good numbers of taxa (distinct organisms), and on the basis of a combination of metrics, the majority of the 27 sites indicated no or slight impairment. Fish-metric data from 25 sites indicated results

  15. Water data to answer urgent water policy questions: Monitoring design, available data and filling data gaps for determining the effectiveness of agricultural management practices for reducing tributary nutrient loads to Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentanzo, Elin A.; Choquette, Anne F.; Reckhow, Kenneth H.; Hayes, Laura; Hagan, Erik R; Argue, Denise M.; Cangelosi, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout its history, the United States has made major investments in assessing natural resources, such as soils, timber, oil and gas, and water. These investments allow policy makers, the private sector and the American public to make informed decisions about cultivating, harvesting or conserving these resources to maximize their value for public welfare, environmental conservation and the economy. As policy issues evolve, new priorities and challenges arise for natural resource assessment, and new approaches to monitoring are needed. For example, informed conservation and use of the nation’s finite fresh water resources in the context of increasingly intensive land development is a priority for today’s policy decisionmakers. There is a need to evaluate whether today’s water monitoring programs are generating the information needed to answer questions surrounding these new policy priorities. The Northeast-Midwest Institute (NEMWI), in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, initiated this project to explore the types and amounts of water data needed to address water-quality related policy questions of critical concern to today’s policy makers. The collaborating entities identified two urgent water policy questions and conducted case studies in the Northeast-Midwest region to determine the water data needed, water data available, and the best ways to fill the data gaps relative to those questions. This report details the output from one case study and focuses on the Lake Erie drainage basin, a data-rich area expected to be a best-case scenario in terms of water data availability.

  16. Potential of Aerosol Liquid Water to Facilitate Organic Aerosol Formation: Assessing Knowledge Gaps about Precursors and Partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Neha; Waxman, Eleanor M; Turpin, Barbara J; Volkamer, Rainer; Carlton, Annmarie G

    2017-03-21

    Isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX), glyoxal, and methylglyoxal are ubiquitous water-soluble organic gases (WSOGs) that partition to aerosol liquid water (ALW) and clouds to form aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). Recent laboratory-derived Setschenow (or salting) coefficients suggest glyoxal's potential to form aqSOA is enhanced by high aerosol salt molality, or "salting-in". In the southeastern U.S., aqSOA is responsible for a significant fraction of ambient organic aerosol, and correlates with sulfate mass. However, the mechanistic explanation for this correlation remains elusive, and an assessment of the importance of different WSOGs to aqSOA is currently missing. We employ EPA's CMAQ model to the continental U.S. during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to compare the potential of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and IEPOX to partition to ALW, as the initial step toward aqSOA formation. Among these three studied compounds, IEPOX is a dominant contributor, ∼72% on average in the continental U.S., to potential aqSOA mass due to Henry's Law constants and molecular weights. Glyoxal contributes significantly, and application of the Setschenow coefficient leads to a greater than 3-fold model domain average increase in glyoxal's aqSOA mass potential. Methylglyoxal is predicted to be a minor contributor. Acid or ammonium - catalyzed ring-opening IEPOX chemistry as well as sulfate-driven ALW and the associated molality may explain positive correlations between SOA and sulfate during SOAS and illustrate ways in which anthropogenic sulfate could regulate biogenic aqSOA formation, ways not presently included in atmospheric models but relevant to development of effective control strategies.

  17. Water extract of Ashwagandha leaves has anticancer activity: identification of an active component and its mechanism of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Wadhwa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer is a leading cause of death accounting for 15-20% of global mortality. Although advancements in diagnostic and therapeutic technologies have improved cancer survival statistics, 75% of the world population live in underdeveloped regions and have poor access to the advanced medical remedies. Natural therapies hence become an alternative choice of treatment. Ashwagandha, a tropical herb used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine, has a long history of its health promoting and therapeutic effects. In the present study, we have investigated an anticancer activity in the water extract of Ashwagandha leaves (ASH-WEX. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anticancer activity in the water extract of Ashwagandha leaves (ASH-WEX was detected by in vitro and in vivo assays. Bioactivity-based size fractionation and NMR analysis were performed to identify the active anticancer component(s. Mechanism of anticancer activity in the extract and its purified component was investigated by biochemical assays. We report that the ASH-WEX is cytotoxic to cancer cells selectively, and causes tumor suppression in vivo. Its active anticancer component was identified as triethylene glycol (TEG. Molecular analysis revealed activation of tumor suppressor proteins p53 and pRB by ASH-WEX and TEG in cancer cells. In contrast to the hypophosphorylation of pRB, decrease in cyclin B1 and increase in cyclin D1 in ASH-WEX and TEG-treated cancer cells (undergoing growth arrest, normal cells showed increase in pRB phosphorylation and cyclin B1, and decrease in cyclin D1 (signifying their cell cycle progression. We also found that the MMP-3 and MMP-9 that regulate metastasis were down regulated in ASH-WEX and TEG-treated cancer cells; normal cells remained unaffected. CONCLUSION: We provide the first molecular evidence that the ASH-WEX and TEG have selective cancer cell growth arrest activity and hence may offer natural and economic resources for anticancer medicine.

  18. Fabrication and Characterizations of Materials and Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells and Water Electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Prag, Carsten Brorson; Li, Qingfeng

    The worldwide development of fuel cells and electrolysers has so far almost exclusively addressed either the low temperature window (20-200 °C) or the high temperature window (600-1000 °C). This work concerns the development of key materials and components of a new generation of fuel cells...... and electrolysers for operation in the intermediate temperature range from 200 to 400 °C. The intermediate temperature interval is of importance for the use of renewable fuels. Furthermore electrode kinetics is significantly enhanced compared to when operating at low temperature. Thus non-noble metal catalysts...... might be used. One of the key materials in the fuel cell and electrolyser systems is the electrolyte. Proton conducting materials such as cesium hydrogen phosphates, zirconium hydrogen phosphates and tin pyrophosphates have been investigated by others and have shown interesting potential....

  19. Scenario forecasting changes in the water balance components of the Olenek and Iindigirka river basins due to possible climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. M. Gusev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scenario projections of the dynamics of meteorological characteristics for the basins of the Olenek and Indigirka rivers (the Republic of Sakha in the XXI century have been obtained for four IPCC global climate change scenarios of SRES family which correspond to specified scenarios of economic, technological, political, and demographic development of human civilization. The projections have been used to calculate scenarios of possible changes in water balance components for the basins under consideration up to the year of 2063. The calculation procedure involves a physically-based model for heat and mass exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere SWAP and climate scenario generator MAGICC/SCENGEN.

  20. Using 'component multiplication' in MONK to reduce pessimism in the dose rate assessment for water-filled (ullaged) transport packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    The external dose rates from spent fuel packages consist of gamma ray and neutron components. The source of gamma rays is from fission products and actinides in the spent fuel and from activation products in structural components of the fuel element. Neutrons originate from spontaneous fission in actinides (for example from curium isotopes) within the spent fuel and from (alpha, n) reactions in oxide fuel. However, a significant number of neutrons are produced due to further fission within the fuel. This is known as neutron enhancement or multiplication (M). To treat the effects of enhancement, the neutron source may be scaled within the dose rate calculation. In a wet package, it has been customary to determine k effective (k eff ) for a completely water-filled package or a package with a defined water level (for the horizontal transport condition). The irradiation of the fuel is normally taken into account in calculating k eff for this purpose. The neutron enhancement is then obtained by calculating M=1/(1-k eff ), which is then applied as a source scaling factor throughout each fuel assembly. In a wet package, there is normally an ullage volume above the water level, the package only being partially flooded. The ullage volume is designed to accommodate pressure build-up within the package. Typically the top row of fuel assemblies may be partially covered and partially uncovered by water. When the above value of M is used for fuel within the dry part of the package, dose rates above the package tend to be overestimated and can limit the carrying capability of the package. (Also, a single value of M will tend to over-predict dose rate contributions from all assemblies around the periphery). Use of component multiplication (a new feature available in the MONK computer code) enables two separate values of 'k eff ' to be determined for the wet and dry parts of the package. These typically differ by a factor of three, leading to differences in the enhancement, M. Use

  1. Association of blood pressure and metabolic syndrome components with magnesium levels in drinking water in some Serbian municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasic-Milutinovic, Zorica; Perunicic-Pekovic, Gordana; Jovanovic, Dragana; Gluvic, Zoran; Cankovic-Kadijevic, Milce

    2012-03-01

    Chronic exposure to insufficient levels of magnesium (Mg) in drinking water increases the risk of magnesium deficiency and its association with hypertension, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the study was to assess the potential association of mineral contents in drinking water with blood pressure and other components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) (BMI as measure of obesity, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin resistance, index-HOMA IR), in a healthy population. This study was conducted in three randomly selected municipalities (Pozarevac, Grocka and Banovci), and recruited 90 healthy blood donors, aged 20-50 years. The Pozarevac area had a four times higher mean Mg level in drinking water (42 mg L(-1)) than Grocka (11 mg L(-1)). Diastolic blood pressure was lowest in subjects from Pozarevac. Serum Mg (sMg) was highest, and serum Ca(2+)/Mg (sCa/Mg) lowest in subjects from Pozarevac, and after adjustment for confounders (age, gender, BMI), only total cholesterol and sMg levels were independent predictors of diastolic blood pressure, sMg levels were independent predictors of triglycerides, and sCa/Mg predicted glucose levels. These results suggest that Mg supplementation in areas of lower magnesium levels in drinking water may be an important measure in the prevention of hypertension and MetS in general.

  2. Insights for aging management of light water reactor components: Metal containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P.; Smith, S.K.

    1994-03-01

    This report evaluates the available technical information and field experience related to management of aging damage to light water reactor metal containments. A generic aging management approach is suggested for the effective and comprehensive aging management of metal containments to ensure their safe operation. The major concern is corrosion of the embedded portion of the containment vessel and detection of this damage. The electromagnetic acoustic transducer and half-cell potential measurement are potential techniques to detect corrosion damage in the embedded portion of the containment vessel. Other corrosion-related concerns include inspection of corrosion damage on the inaccessible side of BWR Mark I and Mark II containment vessels and corrosion of the BWR Mark I torus and emergency core cooling system piping that penetrates the torus, and transgranular stress corrosion cracking of the penetration bellows. Fatigue-related concerns include reduction in the fatigue life (a) of a vessel caused by roughness of the corroded vessel surface and (b) of bellows because of any physical damage. Maintenance of surface coatings and sealant at the metal-concrete interface is the best protection against corrosion of the vessel

  3. Thermalhydraulic calculation for boiling water reactor and its natural circulation component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trianti, Nuri, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com; Nurjanah,; Su’ud, Zaki; Arif, Idam; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Thermalhydraulic of reactor core is the thermal study on fluids within the core reactor, i.e. analysis of the thermal energy transfer process produced by fission reaction from fuel to the reactor coolant. This study include of coolant temperature and reactor power density distribution. The purposes of this analysis in the design of nuclear power plant are to calculate the coolant temperature distribution and the chimney height so natural circulation could be occurred. This study was used boiling water reactor (BWR) with cylinder type reactor core. Several reactor core properties such as linear power density, mass flow rate, coolant density and inlet temperature has been took into account to obtain distribution of coolant density, flow rate and pressure drop. The results of calculation are as follows. Thermal hydraulic calculations provide the uniform pressure drop of 1.1 bar for each channels. The optimum mass flow rate to obtain the uniform pressure drop is 217g/s. Furthermore, from the calculation it could be known that outlet temperature is 288°C which is the saturated fluid’s temperature within the system. The optimum chimney height for natural circulation within the system is 14.88 m.

  4. Integrative field scale phenotyping for investigating metabolic components of water stress within a vineyard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gago

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a high requirement for field phenotyping methodologies/technologies to determine quantitative traits related to crop yield and plant stress responses under field conditions. Methods We employed an unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with a thermal camera as a high-throughput phenotyping platform to obtain canopy level data of the vines under three irrigation treatments. High-resolution imagery (< 2.5 cm/pixel was employed to estimate the canopy conductance (g c via the leaf energy balance model. In parallel, physiological stress measurements at leaf and stem level as well as leaf sampling for primary and secondary metabolome analysis were performed. Results Aerial g c correlated significantly with leaf stomatal conductance (g s and stem sap flow, benchmarking the quality of our remote sensing technique. Metabolome profiles were subsequently linked with g c and g s via partial least square modelling. By this approach malate and flavonols, which have previously been implicated to play a role in stomatal function under controlled greenhouse conditions within model species, were demonstrated to also be relevant in field conditions. Conclusions We propose an integrative methodology combining metabolomics, organ-level physiology and UAV-based remote sensing of the whole canopy responses to water stress within a vineyard. Finally, we discuss the general utility of this integrative methodology for broad field phenotyping.

  5. EVOLUTION OF SOME COMPONENTS OF AGROECOSYSTEMS PRODUCTIVITY FROM VINGA PLAIN IN WATER STRESS SITUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dicu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The researches are inscribed on line of substantiation of durable agricultural system, having as main objective the prominence of quantitative and qualitative modifications made on agro-system level under the effect of no-tillage system for wheat, maize and soybeans. The experimental field is placed on a cambic chernozem, with a medium content of clay, dominant in the Prodagro West Arad agro-centre and representative for a large surface in the Banat-Crisana Plain. The passing to no-till system change the structure of technological elements, through less soil works, so the impact on agro-system is different comparing with conventional tillage, first less the intervention pressure on agro-system ant secondly appear new interactions, new equilibriums and disequilibriums. Considering the evolution of soil humidity, the observations made monthly (by taking soil samples and laboratory determinations for the three cultures showed that in the no-till system, there are more uniform values in the soil profile, and in the variants where the deep work of soil was made it could be observed a low increase of the water volume in the soil.

  6. Insights for aging management of light water reactor components: Metal containments. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, S.K. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report evaluates the available technical information and field experience related to management of aging damage to light water reactor metal containments. A generic aging management approach is suggested for the effective and comprehensive aging management of metal containments to ensure their safe operation. The major concern is corrosion of the embedded portion of the containment vessel and detection of this damage. The electromagnetic acoustic transducer and half-cell potential measurement are potential techniques to detect corrosion damage in the embedded portion of the containment vessel. Other corrosion-related concerns include inspection of corrosion damage on the inaccessible side of BWR Mark I and Mark II containment vessels and corrosion of the BWR Mark I torus and emergency core cooling system piping that penetrates the torus, and transgranular stress corrosion cracking of the penetration bellows. Fatigue-related concerns include reduction in the fatigue life (a) of a vessel caused by roughness of the corroded vessel surface and (b) of bellows because of any physical damage. Maintenance of surface coatings and sealant at the metal-concrete interface is the best protection against corrosion of the vessel.

  7. Evaluation of Yield and Yield Components of Some Pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Genotypes under Late Season Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    somayyeh soheili movahhed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Drought or water deficit stress is the most important environmental factor which has severe negative impacts on crop yields, especially when the water stress occurs in the flowering stage. Iran is located in arid and semi-arid areas, therefore, attention to the effects of water deficit stress in different stages of plants growth seems necessary. Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is one of the most important legumes that has a major contribution to human diet and provides an important part of the human protein. According to studies, cultivation areas of legumes in Iran are about 97300 hectares and its total production is about 208350 tons of grain. Bean is a fast-growing plant (Tran and Singh, 2002, thus soil water must be sufficiently available to ensure its desirable growth and yield. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of drought stress on yield and yield components of some pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivated in Zanjan province. Materials and methods An experiment was conducted as spilt plot based on randomized complete block design with four replications in Zanjan university research farm. Irrigation levels (control and drought stress and genotypes (Local khomein, Sadri, Ks21193 and Ks21189 were set in the main and subplot, respectively. Water deficit stress was applied during flowering stage (50% of the plants were at anthesis. Sampling was performed to measure yield and yield components at the end of the growth period and final maturity. In this experiment number of pod per Plant, numberof grain per pod, 100 grain weight, grain yield, biological yield and harvest index were measured. Results and Discussion In this experiment it was observed that drought stress, genotype and interact irrigation×genotyps were significantly for all traits except biological yield. Drought stress reduced number of pod perplant, number of grain per pod, 100 grain weight, grain yield, biological yield and Harvest Index. Results

  8. Effect of Mycorrhizal Fungus (Glomus spp on Wheat (Triticumaestivum Yield and Yield Components with Regard to Irrigation Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Habibi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Decrease in water quality affected by salinization of the water resources due to the drought is one of the limiting factors of plant production. Using mycorrhizal fungi is an important approach to deal with damaging effects during stress conditions. The symbiosis of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM with the host plant and hence, the production of a very extensive network of hypha, enhances nutrient acquisition and improves water uptake in the host plant. The specialized network of hypha raises the uptake and translocation of nutrients to the plant, whereas it inhibits high uptake of Na and Cl and their transport to plant shoots compared with plant roots. Hence, AM can alleviate the stress of salinity on plant growth and increases their tolerance to the stresses. Materials and Methods In order to evaluate the influence of mycorrhizal fungi on yield and yield components of wheat, a greenhouse experiment was conducted in research farm of Shahid Chamran Ahvaz University. Experimental design was a randomized complete block design arranged in split factorial with three replications. The factors were water salinity (water quality including filtered water (EC ≥ 1 dS m-1, tap water (EC = 1/7-3 ds m-1, tap water plus NaCl and filtered water plus NaCl (EC = 8 ds m-1. Soil sterilization included sterilized and non-sterilized soil and mycorrhizal inoculation were in five levels (non-inoculated, inoculated with ‌Glomusmosseae, G. intraradices, G. geosporum and mixture of them. Yield and yield components were measured at crop maturity and colonization percentage of root was determined at flowering stage. Root colonization by AM was determined through preparing root samples at 1 g in each experimental unit, and roots were stained using the Gridline- Intersect Method. The harvest index and mycorrhizal dependency were also measured. Salinity levels determined approximate the threshold of wheat –tolerate- salinity before the results would rather

  9. Impact of climate change on water balance components in Mediterranean rainfed olive orchards under tillage or cover crop soil management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Carretero, María Teresa; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Dosio, Alessandro; Gómez, José A.

    2013-04-01

    The rainfed olive orchards in Southern Spain constitute the main socioeconomic system of the Mediterranean Spanish agriculture. These systems have an elevated level of complexity and require the accurate characterization of crop, climate and soil components for a correct management. It is common the inclusion of cover crops (usually winter cereals or natural cover) intercalated between the olive rows in order to reduce water erosion. Saving limited available water requires specific management, mowing or killing these cover crops in early spring. Thus, under the semi-arid conditions in Southern Spain the management of the cover crops in rainfed olive orchards is essential to avoid a severe impact to the olive orchards yield through depletion of soil water. In order to characterize this agricultural system, a complete water balance model has been developed, calibrated and validated for the semi-arid conditions of Southern Spain, called WABOL (Abazi et al., 2013). In this complex and fragile system, the climate change constitutes a huge threat for its sustainability, currently limited by the availability of water resources, and its forecasted reduction for Mediterranean environments in Southern Spain. The objective of this study was to simulate the impact of climate change on the different components of the water balance in these representative double cropping systems: transpiration of the olive orchard and cover crop, runoff, deep percolation and soil water content. Four climatic scenarios from the FP6 European Project ENSEMBLES were first bias corrected for temperatures and precipitation (Dosio and Paruolo, 2011; Dosio et al., 2012) and, subsequently, used as inputs for the WABOL model for five olive orchard fields located in Southern Spain under different conditions of crop, climate, soils and management, in order to consider as much as possible of the variability detected in the Spanish olive orchards. The first results indicate the significant effect of the cover

  10. The chronic toxicity of sodium bicarbonate, a major component of coal bed natural gas produced waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Aïda M.; Harper, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is the principal salt in coal bed natural gas produced water from the Powder River Structural Basin, Wyoming, USA, and concentrations of up to 3000 mg NaHCO3/L have been documented at some locations. No adequate studies have been performed to assess the chronic effects of NaHCO3 exposure. The present study was initiated to investigate the chronic toxicity and define sublethal effects at the individual organism level to explain the mechanisms of NaHCO3 toxicity. Three chronic experiments were completed with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), 1 with white suckers (Catostomus commersoni), 1 with Ceriodaphnia dubia, and 1 with a freshwater mussel, (Lampsilis siliquoidea). The data demonstrated that approximately 500 mg NaHCO3/L to 1000 mg NaHCO3/L affected all species of experimental aquatic animals in chronic exposure conditions. Freshwater mussels were the least sensitive to NaHCO3 exposure, with a 10-d inhibition concentration that affects 20% of the sample population (IC20) of 952 mg NaHCO3/L. The IC20 for C. dubia was the smallest, at 359 mg NaHCO3/L. A significant decrease in sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+ ATPase) together with the lack of growth effects suggests that Na+/K+ ATPase activity was shut down before the onset of death. Several histological anomalies, including increased incidence of necrotic cells, suggested that fish were adversely affected as a result of exposure to >450 mg NaHCO3/L.

  11. Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

  12. Selected approaches to estimate water-budget components of the High Plains, 1940 through 1949 and 2000 through 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Qi, Sharon L.; Ryter, Derek W.; Falk, Sarah E.; Houston, Natalie A.; Peterson, Steven M.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.; Christenson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer, underlying almost 112 million acres in the central United States, is one of the largest aquifers in the Nation. It is the primary water supply for drinking water, irrigation, animal production, and industry in the region. Expansion of irrigated agriculture throughout the past 60 years has helped make the High Plains one of the most productive agricultural regions in the Nation. Extensive withdrawals of groundwater for irrigation have caused water-level declines in many parts of the aquifer and increased concerns about the long-term sustainability of the aquifer. Quantification of water-budget components is a prerequisite for effective water-resources management. Components analyzed as part of this study were precipitation, evapotranspiration, recharge, surface runoff, groundwater discharge to streams, groundwater fluxes to and from adjacent geologic units, irrigation, and groundwater in storage. These components were assessed for 1940 through 1949 (representing conditions prior to substantial groundwater development and referred to as "pregroundwater development" throughout this report) and 2000 through 2009. Because no single method can perfectly quantify the magnitude of any part of a water budget at a regional scale, results from several methods and previously published work were compiled and compared for this study when feasible. Results varied among the several methods applied, as indicated by the range of average annual volumes given for each component listed in the following paragraphs. Precipitation was derived from three sources: the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model, data developed using Next Generation Weather Radar and measured precipitation from weather stations by the Office of Hydrologic Development at the National Weather Service for the Sacramento-Soil Moisture Accounting model, and precipitation measured at weather stations and spatially distributed using an inverse-distance-weighted interpolation

  13. Effect of irrigation water salinity and zinc application on yield, yield components and zinc accumulation of wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohamad ahmadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Salinity stress is one of the most important problems of agriculture in crop production in arid and semi arid regions. Under these conditions, in addition to management strategies, proper and adequate nutrition also has an important role in crop improvement. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effect of 4 different irrigation water salinities (blank, 4, 8 and 12 dS m-1, prepared with 1:1 molar ratio of chlorides of calcium and sodium and magnesium sulphate salts. and 5 different zinc applications (0, 10, 20, 30 mg Kg-1 soil and foliar application of salt of zinc sulphate on yield, yield components and zinc concentration of wheat, using a completely randomized design, factorial with three replications. Plant height, spike length, 1000 grain weight, number of grain per spike, grain and straw yield was decreased by Irrigation water salinity. And all of these parameters were improved by zinc application except 1000 grain weight. Zinc absorption and concentration in straw and grain was decreased by Saline water compared to blank. And concentration of zinc significantly was increased in straw and grain by increase zinc application. The results indicated that, zinc application under low to medium salinity conditions improved growth and yield of wheat due to decreasing the impacts salinity.

  14. Effect of water chemistry on the planktonic communities and relationships among food web components across a freshwater ecotone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczan T.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most ecological research on the food web has been focused more on the pelagic zone than on the transitional zone - ecotones between lentic and lotic habitats. The specific goals of this study were to determine whether the contact zone of waters differs in hydrochemical and biological terms from the waters of the canal and the open water zone, and to evaluate the influence of particular macro-habitats on the interactions between components of the planktonic food web. The distribution of samples in ordination space led us to conclude that the studied habitats are distributed along the rising gradient of total organic carbon and nutrients. Assemblages of all investigated groups showed a strong compositional gradient correlated with conductivity and total phosphorus, while a second strong gradient in species composition was explained by nitrate nitrogen and/or phosphate concentrations. The analysis of trophic relationships in the system bacteriaciliates- crustaceans reveals a clear differentiation and strength of mutual relations between the analyzed zones. The highest number of significant correlations was determined in the contact zone. It can also be a place of very efficient matter and energy flow in freshwater ecosystems.

  15. Geochemistry of the Adige River water from the Eastern Alps to the Adriatic Sea (Italy): evidences for distinct hydrological components and water-rock interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, C; Bianchini, G; Marchina, C; Knöller, K

    2016-06-01

    The Adige River flows from the Eastern Alps to the Adriatic Sea and the understanding of its fluvial dynamics can be improved by geochemical and O-H isotopic investigation. The most negative isotopic compositions are recorded close to the source (δ(18)O between -14.1 and -13.8 ‰, δD between -100.3 and -97.0 ‰), and δD and δ(18)O values generally increase downstream through the upper part (UP, the mountainous sector), stabilizing along the lower part (LP, the alluvial plain) of the river with δ(18)O between -12.4 and -11.8 ‰, δD between -86.9 and -83.7 ‰. The isotopic variations along the stream path (δ(18)O-δD vs distance from the source) depict subparallel distributions for all the investigated periods, with less negative values recorded in winter. Total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration shows the lowest value (<100 mg/l) at the river source, jumping to 310 mg/l at the Rio Ram inflow, then decreasing down to the Isarco River confluence; from here, we observed an increase toward the river mouth, with different values in the distinct sampling periods. The lowest values (140-170 mg/l) were recorded during high discharge in spring, whereas higher TDS values (up to 250 mg/l) were recorded during winter low flow conditions. Extreme TDS values were observed in the estuarine samples (up to 450 mg/l), as result of mixing with seawater. The results allow for the identification of distinct water end-members: glacio-nival component(s) characterized by the most negative isotopic composition and extremely low TDS, a rainfall component characterized by intermediate isotopic and elemental composition and groundwater characterized by the less negative isotopic composition and comparatively higher TDS. An additional component is represented by seawater, which is recorded at the lowest reach of the river during drought periods. These contributions variously mix along the stream path in the distinct hydrological periods, and the presented data are a

  16. Mass transfer in fuel cells. [electron microscopy of components, thermal decomposition of Teflon, water transport, and surface tension of KOH solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of experiments on electron microscopy of fuel cell components, thermal decomposition of Teflon by thermogravimetry, surface area and pore size distribution measurements, water transport in fuel cells, and surface tension of KOH solutions are described.

  17. Annual Estimates of Water-Budget Components Based on Hydrograph Separation and PRISM Precipitation for Gaged Basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, estimates of annual water-budget components were...

  18. Average Estimates of Water-Budget Components Based on Hydrograph Separation and PRISM Precipitation for Gaged Basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, estimates of annual water-budget components were...

  19. Differences in the water-balance components of four lakes in the southern-central Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskop, S.; Maussion, F.; Krause, P.; Fink, M.

    2016-01-01

    The contrasting patterns of lake-level fluctuations across the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are indicators of differences in the water balance over the TP. However, little is known about the key hydrological factors controlling this variability. The purpose of this study is to contribute to a more quantitative understanding of these factors for four selected lakes in the southern-central part of the TP: Nam Co and Tangra Yumco (increasing water levels), and Mapam Yumco and Paiku Co (stable or slightly decreasing water levels). We present the results of an integrated approach combining hydrological modeling, atmospheric-model output and remote-sensing data. The J2000g hydrological model was adapted and extended according to the specific characteristics of closed-lake basins on the TP and driven with High Asia Refined analysis (HAR) data at 10 km resolution for the period 2001-2010. Differences in the mean annual water balances among the four basins are primarily related to higher precipitation totals and attributed runoff generation in the Nam Co and Tangra Yumco basins. Precipitation and associated runoff are the main driving forces for inter-annual lake variations. The glacier-meltwater contribution to the total basin runoff volume (between 14 and 30 % averaged over the 10-year period) plays a less important role compared to runoff generation from rainfall and snowmelt in non-glacierized land areas. Nevertheless, using a hypothetical ice-free scenario in the hydrological model, we indicate that ice-melt water constitutes an important water-supply component for Mapam Yumco and Paiku Co, in order to maintain a state close to equilibrium, whereas the water balance in the Nam Co and Tangra Yumco basins remains positive under ice-free conditions. These results highlight the benefits of linking hydrological modeling with atmospheric-model output and satellite-derived data, and the presented approach can be readily transferred to other data-scarce closed lake basins, opening new

  20. Estimation of available water capacity components of two-layered soils using crop model inversion: Effect of crop type and water regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelash, K.; Buis, Samuel; Sekhar, M.; Ruiz, Laurent; Kumar Tomer, Sat; Guérif, Martine

    2017-03-01

    Characterization of the soil water reservoir is critical for understanding the interactions between crops and their environment and the impacts of land use and environmental changes on the hydrology of agricultural catchments especially in tropical context. Recent studies have shown that inversion of crop models is a powerful tool for retrieving information on root zone properties. Increasing availability of remotely sensed soil and vegetation observations makes it well suited for large scale applications. The potential of this methodology has however never been properly evaluated on extensive experimental datasets and previous studies suggested that the quality of estimation of soil hydraulic properties may vary depending on agro-environmental situations. The objective of this study was to evaluate this approach on an extensive field experiment. The dataset covered four crops (sunflower, sorghum, turmeric, maize) grown on different soils and several years in South India. The components of AWC (available water capacity) namely soil water content at field capacity and wilting point, and soil depth of two-layered soils were estimated by inversion of the crop model STICS with the GLUE (generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation) approach using observations of surface soil moisture (SSM; typically from 0 to 10 cm deep) and leaf area index (LAI), which are attainable from radar remote sensing in tropical regions with frequent cloudy conditions. The results showed that the quality of parameter estimation largely depends on the hydric regime and its interaction with crop type. A mean relative absolute error of 5% for field capacity of surface layer, 10% for field capacity of root zone, 15% for wilting point of surface layer and root zone, and 20% for soil depth can be obtained in favorable conditions. A few observations of SSM (during wet and dry soil moisture periods) and LAI (within water stress periods) were sufficient to significantly improve the estimation of AWC

  1. Development of Procedures for the Analysis of Components of Dumped Chemical Weapons and Their Principal Transformation Products in Sea Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveleva, E. I.; Koryagina, N. L.; Radilov, A. S.; Khlebnikova, N. S.; Khrustaleva, V. S.

    2007-01-01

    A package of chemical analytical procedures was developed for the detection of products indicative of the presence of damped chemical weapons in the Baltic Sea. The principal requirements imposed upon the procedures were the following: high sensitivity, reliable identification of target compounds, wide range of components covered by survey analysis, and lack of interferences from sea salts. Thiodiglycol, a product of hydrolysis of sulfur mustard reportedly always detected in the sites of damping chemical weapons in the Baltic Sea, was considered the principal marker. We developed a high-sensitivity procedure for the determination of thiodiglycol in sea water, involving evaporation of samples to dryness in a vacuum concentrator, followed by tert-butyldimethylsilylation of the residue and GCMS analysis in the SIM mode with meta-fluorobenzoic acid as internal reference. The detection limit of thiodiglycol was 0.001 mg/l, and the procedure throughput was up to 30 samples per day. The same procedure, but with BSTFA as derivatizing agent instead of MTBSTFA, was used for preparing samples for survey analysis of nonvolatile components. In this case, full mass spectra were measured in the GCMS analysis. The use of BSTFA was motivated by the fact that trimethylsilyl derivatives are much wider represented in electronic mass spectral databases. The identification of sulfur mustard, volatile transformation products of sulfur mustard and lewisite, as well as chloroacetophenone in sea water was performed by means of GCMS in combination with SPME. The survey GC-MS analysis was focused on the identification of volatile and nonvolatile toxic chemicals whose mass spectra are included in the OPCW database (3219 toxic chemicals, precursors, and transformation products) with the use of AMDIS software (version 2.62). Using 2 GC-MS instruments, we could perform the survey analysis for volatile and nonvolatile components of up to 20 samples per day. Thus, the package of three procedures

  2. Synoptic sampling and principal components analysis to identify sources of water and metals to an acid mine drainage stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Patrick; Runkel, Robert L; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2017-07-01

    Combining the synoptic mass balance approach with principal components analysis (PCA) can be an effective method for discretising the chemistry of inflows and source areas in watersheds where contamination is diffuse in nature and/or complicated by groundwater interactions. This paper presents a field-scale study in which synoptic sampling and PCA are employed in a mineralized watershed (Lion Creek, Colorado, USA) under low flow conditions to (i) quantify the impacts of mining activity on stream water quality; (ii) quantify the spatial pattern of constituent loading; and (iii) identify inflow sources most responsible for observed changes in stream chemistry and constituent loading. Several of the constituents investigated (Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn) fail to meet chronic aquatic life standards along most of the study reach. The spatial pattern of constituent loading suggests four primary sources of contamination under low flow conditions. Three of these sources are associated with acidic (pH water (trace metal and major ion) chemistry using PCA suggests a hydraulic connection between many of the left bank inflows and mine water in the Minnesota Mine shaft located to the north-east of the river channel. In addition, water chemistry data during a rainfall-runoff event suggests the spatial pattern of constituent loading may be modified during rainfall due to dissolution of efflorescent salts or erosion of streamside tailings. These data point to the complexity of contaminant mobilisation processes and constituent loading in mining-affected watersheds but the combined synoptic sampling and PCA approach enables a conceptual model of contaminant dynamics to be developed to inform remediation.

  3. Analysis of drought and desertification by means of aridity indices and the estimation of water gap in Baja California Sur, Northwest Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Troyo Diéguez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In Baja California Sur (BCS, Mexico, dry-semi warm and warm climates prevail associated to an extreme trend of diurnal temperatures and the environmental dryness. In this State, the maximum summer t exceeds 40° C and the minimum varies from 5 to 12° C, with a minimal for the State of 2° C in winter, at the top of the Sierra de La Laguna; only Los Cabos region has a warm humid climate. Because precipitation in the state is low, oscillating from 310 mm in the southern area of the state to 120 mm per year in the northern portion, predictions and scenarios under climate conditions point to an intensification of droughts. The aim of this work was to carry out a comparative analysis of trends of temperature, precipitation and hydro-environmental aridity among contrasting localities of BCS, by means of the application of Aridity Indexes and the determination of the Standardized Water Gap (BHE, through a numerical scale modification of the De Martonne Index. With the values of temperature and precipitation for the different climate change scenarios for four weather stations, the indicators Hydro Environmental Availability Index (IDHA and Hydro Environmental Drought Index (ISHA were calculated to determine their trend and the consequent BHE, an innovative quantification of wáter deficit, which is proposed in this paper. The máximum value of BHE (10 units, indicating prevalence of drought, is observed from February to June in almost the entire state.

  4. Atmospheric Correction Based on Principal Component Analysis in Highly Turbid Waters of the Río de la Plata Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossn, J. I.; Frouin, R.; Dogliotti, A. I.; Grings, F. M.

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring of water quality by satellite ocean color data requires accurate atmospheric correction. The treatment of the atmospheric signal becomes more complicated in turbid coastal regions, where the usual black pixel assumption in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) correction bands is oftenly invalid due to high backscattering from suspended substances present in the water. One of the usually proposed solutions is to assign correction bands further apart in the spectrum: the Short-Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) bands, where the black pixel assumption still holds in turbid waters due to higher water absorption. But in exceptionally turbid regions, such as in the Río de la Plata estuary, where suspended particulate matter concentration can surpass 400 mg/L, the marine signal at 1240 nm may exceed 0.2%, that is, not black for the purpose of atmospheric correction. Moreover, as the spectral distances between the correction bands and the NIR region increases, the correlation between the atmospheric signals of the former with the latter ones usually worsens, threatening the accuracy of the atmospheric correction. In this work, an atmospheric correction scheme based on Principal Component Analysis of the TOA signal and a simple expression for the transmission coefficient was proposed to estimate water reflectance in the NIR region using four different sets of SWIR correction bands present in MODIS and in the Argentinian-Brazilian future sensor SABIA-Mar. Two factors changed between the four sets: the amount of bands used (2 or 3 bands) and the spectral distance to the NIR, which regulates simultaneously the degree of correlation and the validity of the black pixel assumption. The atmospheric correction performances were evaluated from a set of simulations of TOA signals using the CNES-SOS radiative transfer code and in situ data available for the Río de la Plata region. All four schemes present better performances when low observation and solar zenith angles (i.e. at low air masses

  5. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E., E-mail: evsin@plasma.mephi.ru; Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  6. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E.; Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.

    2015-12-01

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  7. Modeling the performance of water- and liquid-gallium-cooled x-ray optical components - a comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrzas, J.; Khounsary, A.M.; Mills, D.M.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal and structural analyses of a water- or liquid-gallium-cooled silicon crystal X-ray monochromator subjected to high heat loads have been carried out using a finite-element method. Rocking curves were produced from the computed strain distributions in the crystal and compared with experimentally measured rocking curves. Good agreement between the general width and shape of the calculated and measured rocking curve profiles was obtained. This agreement provides a foundation for extending our modeling to the prediction of X-ray optical component performance with more-complex cooling schemes. Such elaborate cooling techniques may be required for the increased power load that will be produced by insertion devices in the next generation of low-emittance storage ring sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to be constructed at Argonne National Laboratory

  8. Investigation of Tolerance, Yield and Yield Components of Wheat Cultivars to Salinity of Irrigation Water at Sensitive Stages of Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Saadatian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research in order to study of tolerance ability of wheat cultivates yield and yield components to salinity of irrigation water at sensitive stages of growth, was carried out as a factorial based on a randomized complete block design with 3 replications at greenhouse of Agricultural Faculty of Bu-Ali Sina University, in 2009. Treatments were included wheat cultivars of Alvand, Tous, Sayson and Navid and salinity of irrigation water induced by sodium chloride at five levels of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 dS m-1. The results showed that percentage and rate of emergence, plant height, 1000-grain weight, number of seed per spike, number of spike per pot, biological and grain yield reduced by increasing salinity level. At all stress levels Navid cv. had highest emergence percentage. In non-stress and 4 dS m-1, Alvand cv. and at higher levels of stress, Tous cv. had high height in reproductive phase. At control and 4 dS m-1, Sayson cv. and at 8, 12 and 16 dS m-1, Tous cv. in majority of yield and yield components traits had significant superior than other cultivars. Tolerance index of Sayson cv. at 4 and 8 dS m-1 was more than other cultivars but at 12 and 16 dS m-1, maximum value of this index was belonged to Tous cv. At all salinity levels, Alvand cv. had least tolerance index to stress. Number of spike per pot had maximum direct effect on grain yield of wheat cultivars in stress condition. Also indirect effect of biological yield via number of spike per pot than other its indirect effects, had maximum share in wheat seed yield.

  9. The Gap Within the Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Michelmore

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaps in educational achievement between high- and low-income children are growing. Administrative data sets maintained by states and districts lack information about income but do indicate whether a student is eligible for subsidized school meals. We leverage the longitudinal structure of these data sets to develop a new measure of economic disadvantage. Half of eighth graders in Michigan are eligible for a subsidized meal, but just 14% have been eligible for subsidized meals in every grade since kindergarten. These children score 0.94 standard deviations below those who are never eligible for meal subsidies and 0.23 below those who are occasionally eligible. There is a negative, linear relationship between grades spent in economic disadvantage and eighth-grade test scores. This is not an exposure effect; the relationship is almost identical in third-grade, before children have been exposed to varying years of economic disadvantage. Survey data show that the number of years that a child will spend eligible for subsidized lunch is negatively correlated with her or his current household income. Years eligible for subsidized meals can therefore be used as a reasonable proxy for income. Our proposed measure can be used to estimate heterogeneous effects in program evaluations, to improve value-added calculations, and to better target resources.

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Dryout and Post-Dryout Heat Transfer of Steam-Water Two-Phase Flow in the Annular Channel with Narrow Gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aye Myint

    2004-10-01

    Two-phase annular flow with heat transfer is prevalent in many processes such as industrial and energy reformation processes. Recently, advances in high performance electronic chips and the miniaturisation of electronic circuits in which high heat flux will be created and other compact systems such as Integrated Nuclear Power Device (INPD), the refrigeration/air conditioning, automobile environment control systems have resulted in a great demand for developing efficient heat transfer techniques to accommodate these high heat fluxes. It has been studied by many researchers because of its successful application in many areas, but its influence factor and mechanism of heat transfer remain somewhat unknown yet. In order to understand the heat transfer and flow mechanism in the narrow annular channel, experimental and theoretical study of dryout and post-dryout heat transfer of steam-water two-phase flow in annular channel with narrow gap (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) have been carried out. The working fluid is deionized water. The range of experimental pressure is 1.0 ∼ 6.OMPa. In correspondence with two different narrow gaps, two kinds of test sections were designed. The test sections were made of specially processed straight stainless steel tubes with linearity error less than 0.01% to form narrow concentric annuli. It also needs a good sealed performance at high pressure and high temperature. The experiments were carried out to investigate the characteristics and occurring conditions of the dryout point. The former Soviet researcher Kutateladse's correlation, based on round tube, was quoted and modified to apply barrow annuli under low flow conditions. At full conditions of the influencing factors, such as geometry of test section, pressure, mass flux, heat flux etc., an empirical correlation was developed to apply to bilaterally heated annuli and it had a good agreement with the experimental data A new analytical model for the dryout point of critical quality in

  11. Focus on adsorptive equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic components of petroleum produced water biocoagulation using novel Tympanotonos Fuscatus extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Menkiti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adsorptive component of produced water (PW coagulation using Tympanotonos Fuscatus coagulant (TFC was studied. Influence of the following parameters: pH, coagulant dose, settling time, and temperature were investigated. The functional group, crystalline nature, morphological observation and thermal characteristics of the sample were evaluated. Equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Frumkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R adsorption isotherms. The kinetics data were fitted to reversible first order, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, elovich, intra-particle diffusion and Boyd kinetic models. Adsorption Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy were evaluated. Equilibrium data best fitted the Langmuir isotherm (R2 > 0.99; X2 < 1.6; SSE < 1.6. Reversible first order model correlated best to the kinetics data. The values of process average Gibb's free energy, enthalpy and entropy were 30.35, 27.88 and 0.1891 kJ/mol, respectively. The process was spontaneous, feasible and endothermic in nature. The maximum efficiency of 83.1% was favored at pH 2.0. This study indicated significant adsorptive component, while using Tympanotonos Fuscatus extract as readily available, renewable, ecofriendly bio – coagulant for efficient treatments of PW.

  12. Discrete Fractional Component Monte Carlo Simulation Study of Dilute Nonionic Surfactants at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Brian; Marin-Rimoldi, Eliseo; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Jusufi, Arben; Maginn, Edward J

    2017-09-26

    We present a newly developed Monte Carlo scheme to predict bulk surfactant concentrations and surface tensions at the air-water interface for various surfactant interfacial coverages. Since the concentration regimes of these systems of interest are typically very dilute (≪10 -5 mol. frac.), Monte Carlo simulations with the use of insertion/deletion moves can provide the ability to overcome finite system size limitations that often prohibit the use of modern molecular simulation techniques. In performing these simulations, we use the discrete fractional component Monte Carlo (DFCMC) method in the Gibbs ensemble framework, which allows us to separate the bulk and air-water interface into two separate boxes and efficiently swap tetraethylene glycol surfactants C 10 E 4 between boxes. Combining this move with preferential translations, volume biased insertions, and Wang-Landau biasing vastly enhances sampling and helps overcome the classical "insertion problem", often encountered in non-lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We demonstrate that this methodology is both consistent with the original molecular thermodynamic theory (MTT) of Blankschtein and co-workers, as well as their recently modified theory (MD/MTT), which incorporates the results of surfactant infinite dilution transfer free energies and surface tension calculations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. An Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System for Data from Multiple Wavelength Domains: Water and Energy Balance Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaife, T. L.; Davenport, I. J.; Lines, E.; Styles, J.; Lewis, P.; Gurney, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite observations offer a spatially and temporally synoptic data source for constraining models of land surface processes, but exploitation of these data for such purposes has been largely ad-hoc to date. In part this is because traditional land surface models, and hence most land surface data assimilation schemes, have tended to focus on a specific component of the land surface problem; typically either surface fluxes of water and energy or biogeochemical cycles such as carbon and nitrogen. Furthermore the assimilation of satellite data into such models tends to be restricted to a single wavelength domain, for example passive microwave, thermal or optical, depending on the problem at hand. The next generation of land surface schemes, such as the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) and the US Community Land Model (CLM) represent a broader range of processes but at the expense of increasing overall model complexity and in some cases reducing the level of detail in specific processes to accommodate this. Typically, the level of physical detail used to represent the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the surface is not sufficient to enable prediction of intrinsic satellite observations (reflectance, brightness temperature and so on) and consequently these are not assimilated directly into the models. A seemingly attractive alternative is to assimilate high-level products derived from satellite observations but these are often only superficially related to the corresponding variables in land surface models due to conflicting assumptions between the two. This poster describes the water and energy balance modeling components of a project funded by the European Space Agency to develop a data assimilation scheme for the land surface and observation operators to translate between models and the intrinsic observations acquired by satellite missions. The rationale behind the design of the underlying process model is to represent the physics of the

  14. Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, M.B.

    1997-04-01

    This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future

  15. Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, M.B.

    1997-04-01

    This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

  16. Chemical Characteristics and NaCl Component Behavior of Biochar Derived from the Salty Food Waste by Water Flushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Eun Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biochar is the product of the pyrolysis of organic materials in a reduced state. In recent years, biochar has received attention due to its applicability to organic waste management, thereby leading to active research on biochar. However, there have been few studies using food waste. In particular, the most significant difference between food waste and other organic waste is the high salinity of food waste. Therefore, in this paper, we compare the chemical characteristics of biochar produced using food waste containing low- and high-concentration salt and biochar flushed with water to remove the concentrated salt. In addition, we clarify the salt component behavior of biochar. Peak analysis of XRD confirms that it is difficult to find salt crystals in flushed char since salt remains in the form of crystals when salty food waste is pyrolyzed washed away after water flushing. In addition, the Cl content significantly decreased to 1–2% after flushing, similar to that of Cl content in the standard, non-salted food waste char. On the other hand, a significant amount of Na was found in pyrolyzed char even after flushing resulting from a phenomenon in which salt is dissolved in water while flushing and Na ions are adsorbed. FT-IR analysis showed that salt in waste affects the binding of aromatic carbons to compounds in the pyrolysis process. The NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the aromatic carbon content, which indicates the stability of biochar, is not influenced by the salt content and increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature.

  17. Evidence-based modelling of diverse plant water use strategies on stomatal and non-stomatal components under drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    zhou, S.; Prentice, C.; Medlyn, B. E.; Sabaté, S.

    2013-12-01

    Models disagree on how to represent effects of drought stress on plant gas exchange. Some models assume drought stress affects the marginal water use efficiency of plants (marginal WUE; i.e. the change in photosynthesis per unit of change in transpiration) whereas others assume drought stress acts directly on photosynthetic capacity. It is not clear whether either of these approaches is sufficient to capture the drought response, or whether the effect of drought varies among species and functional types. A collection of Eucalyptus and Quercus species derived from different hydro-climate habitats, in together with two European riparian species, were conducted with drought treatments respectively in Australia and Spain for three months. Measurements included net CO2 assimilation rate versus substomatal CO2 concentration (A-Ci) curves, fluorescence, and predawn leaf water potential at increasing levels of water stress. The correlations with quantitative plant traits of leaf, stomata, vessel, and wood density, leaf nitrogen content and 13C discrimination were also explored. We analysed the effect of drought effect on leaf gas exchange with a recently developed stomatal model that reconciles the empirical and optimal approaches on predicting optimal stomatal conductance. The model's single parameter g1 is a decreasing function of marginal WUE. The two genera showed consistence on the contrasting response patterns between species derived from mesic and arid habitats, which differed greatly in their estimated g1 values under moist conditions, and in the rate at which g1 declined with water stress. They also differed greatly in the predawn water potential at which apparent carboxylation capacity (apparent Vcmax) and mesophyll conductance (gm) declined most steeply, and in the steepness of this decline. Principal components analysis revealed a gradient in water relation strategies from sclerophyll species to malacophyll species. Malacophylls had higher g1, apparent Vcmax

  18. Comparative analysis of water resources carrying capacity based on principal component analysis in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region from the perspective of urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanfeng; Wang, Ruimei; Zhang, Xiling; Cheng, Changlin; Song, Huan; Hu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    According to related statistics, this paper selected 15 indicators to establish the evaluation index system of water resources carrying capacity and evaluated the level of water resources carrying capacity in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region during 2004 and 2014 using the principal component analysis while comparing the water resources carrying capacity in Hebei, Tianjin and Beijing. The results show that there are four factors affecting water resources carrying capacity, including industry-environment factor, agriculture-society-water supply factor, life-ecology factor and water resources exploitation factor. During the period from 2004 to 2014, Hebei Province gets the maximum score in evaluating the water resources carrying capacity, then Beijing gets the lower level, and Tianjin gets the lowest level. The water resources carrying capacity in Hebei Province decreased in the fluctuation and increased after 2012, which rose in the fluctuation in Beijing and showed a periodic variation in Tianjin.

  19. The atmospheric component of the Mediterranean Sea water budget in a WRF multi-physics ensemble and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Alejandro; Flaounas, Emmanouil; Drobinski, Philippe; Brossier, Cindy Lebeaupin

    2014-11-01

    The use of high resolution atmosphere-ocean coupled regional climate models to study possible future climate changes in the Mediterranean Sea requires an accurate simulation of the atmospheric component of the water budget (i.e., evaporation, precipitation and runoff). A specific configuration of the version 3.1 of the weather research and forecasting (WRF) regional climate model was shown to systematically overestimate the Mediterranean Sea water budget mainly due to an excess of evaporation (~1,450 mm yr-1) compared with observed estimations (~1,150 mm yr-1). In this article, a 70-member multi-physics ensemble is used to try to understand the relative importance of various sub-grid scale processes in the Mediterranean Sea water budget and to evaluate its representation by comparing simulated results with observed-based estimates. The physics ensemble was constructed by performing 70 1-year long simulations using version 3.3 of the WRF model by combining six cumulus, four surface/planetary boundary layer and three radiation schemes. Results show that evaporation variability across the multi-physics ensemble (˜10 % of the mean evaporation) is dominated by the choice of the surface layer scheme that explains more than ˜70 % of the total variance and that the overestimation of evaporation in WRF simulations is generally related with an overestimation of surface exchange coefficients due to too large values of the surface roughness parameter and/or the simulation of too unstable surface conditions. Although the influence of radiation schemes on evaporation variability is small (˜13 % of the total variance), radiation schemes strongly influence exchange coefficients and vertical humidity gradients near the surface due to modifications of temperature lapse rates. The precipitation variability across the physics ensemble (˜35 % of the mean precipitation) is dominated by the choice of both cumulus (˜55 % of the total variance) and planetary boundary layer (˜32 % of

  20. Filling the gap: using non-invasive geophysical methods to monitor the processes leading to enhanced carbon turnover induced by periodic water table fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellage, A.; Pronk, G.; Atekwana, E. A.; Furman, A.; Rezanezhad, F.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2017-12-01

    Subsurface transition environments such as the capillary fringe are characterized by steep gradients in redox conditions. Spatial and temporal variations in electron acceptor and donor availability - driven by hydrological changes - may enhance carbon turnover, in some cases resulting in pulses of CO2-respiration. Filling the mechanistic knowledge gap between the hydrological driver and its biogeochemical effects hinges on our ability to monitor microbial activity and key geochemical markers at a high spatial and temporal resolution. However, direct access to subsurface biogeochemical processes is logistically difficult, invasive and usually expensive. In-line, non-invasive geophysical techniques - Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) and Electrodic Potential (EP), specifically - offer a comparatively inexpensive alternative and can provide data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The challenge lies in linking electrical responses to specific changes in biogeochemical processes. We conducted SIP and EP measurements on a soil column experiment where an artificial soil mixture was subjected to monthly drainage and imbibition cycles. SIP responses showed a clear dependence on redox zonation and microbial abundance. Temporally variable responses exhibited no direct moisture dependence suggesting that the measured responses recorded changes in microbial activity and coincided with the depth interval over which enhanced carbon turnover was observed. EP measurements detected the onset of sulfate mineralization and mapped its depth zonation. SIP and EP signals thus detected enhanced microbial activity within the water table fluctuation zone as well as the timing of the development of specific reactive processes. These findings can be used to relate measured electrical signals to specific reaction pathways and help inform reactive transport models, increasing their predictive capabilities.

  1. Effect of maltose and trehalose on growth, yield and some biochemical components of wheat plant under water stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmat A. Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the greenhouse experiment, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Giza 168 were treated with 10 mM of maltose and trehalose as foliar spray using Tween 20 as wetting agent at 15, 30 and 45 days post sowing with two times of irrigation at 10 and 20 days intervals. Two samples were taken after 45 and 120 days from planting. At the first sample date, plant height, shoot fresh and dry weights and leaf area were recorded. At harvesting time (the second sample no. of spikes/plant, no. of spikelets/plant and weight of 1000 grains were taken. Chemical analyses were conducted in leaves at the first sample date for determination of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, amino acids, reducing sugars, total soluble sugars, protein, proline, PAL, POD, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, PPO and MDA. The obtained results indicated that maltose and trehalose had significant and positive effect on most growth parameters. Opposite trend was found in plant height, no. of spike/plant and weight of 1000 grains by drought treatment. Maltose and trehalose treatments enhanced in the most biochemical components whereas they decreased PAL and catalase activity. Variable trends in amino acids and ascorbate peroxidase were observed by drought. However, the drought has more stimulative effect in most cases than the first time period of irrigation. The results concluded that foliar applications with maltose or trehalose induced water stress tolerance in wheat plants. Maltose treatment gave the best results in most morphological parameters, grains yield and biochemical components than trehalose treatment.

  2. Occurrence and behaviors of fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC components in drinking water and wastewater treatment systems and their applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyang; Hur, Jin; Zhuang, Wane

    2015-05-01

    Fluorescence excitation emission matrices-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) is a powerful tool for characterizing dissolved organic matter (DOM), and it is applied in a rapidly growing number of studies on drinking water and wastewater treatments. This paper presents an overview of recent findings about the occurrence and behavior of PARAFAC components in drinking water and wastewater treatments, as well as their feasibility for assessing the treatment performance and water quality including disinfection by-product formation potentials (DBPs FPs). A variety of humic-like, protein-like, and unique (e.g., pyrene-like) fluorescent components have been identified, providing valuable insights into the chemical composition of DOM and the effects of various treatment processes in engineered systems. Coagulation/flocculation-clarification preferentially removes humic-like components, and additional treatments such as biological activated carbon filtration, anion exchange, and UV irradiation can further remove DOM from drinking water. In contrast, biological treatments are more effective for protein-like components in wastewater treatments. PARAFAC components have been proven to be valuable as surrogates for conventional water quality parameter, to track the changes of organic matter quantity and quality in drinking water and wastewater treatments. They are also feasible for assessing formations of trihalomethanes and other DBPs and evaluating treatment system performance. Further studies of EEM-PARAFAC for assessing the effects of the raw water quality and variable treatment conditions on the removal of DOM, and the formation potentials of various emerging DBPs, are essential for optimizing the treatment processes to ensure treated water quality.

  3. Considerations for the use of functional principal components analysis in sports biomechanics: examples from on-water rowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmenhoven, John; Cobley, Stephen; Draper, Conny; Harrison, Andrew; Bargary, Norma; Smith, Richard

    2017-11-15

    The proliferation of new biomechanical technology in laboratory and field settings facilitates the capture of data-sets consisting of complex time-series. An understanding of the appropriate statistical approaches for analysing and interpreting these data-sets is required and the functional data analysis (FDA) family of statistical techniques has emerged in the biomechanical literature. Given the use of FDA is currently in its infancy with biomechanical data, this paper will form the first of a two part series aiming to address practical issues surrounding the application of FDA techniques in biomechanics. This work focuses on functional principal components analysis (fPCA), which is explored using existing literature and sample data from an on-water rowing database. In particular methodological considerations for the implementation of fPCA such as temporal normalisation of data, removal of unwanted forms of variation in a data-set and documented methods for preserving the original temporal properties within a set of curves are explored in detail as a part of this review. Limitations and strengths of the technique are outlined and recommendations are provided to encourage the appropriate use of fPCA within the field of applied sports biomechanics.

  4. Water-soluble Organic Components in Aerosols Associated with Savanna Fires in Southern Africa: Identification, Evolution and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Hegg, Dean A.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Magi, Brian I.; Sadilek, Martin

    2003-01-01

    During the SAFARI 2000 field campaign, both smoke aerosols from savanna fires and haze aerosols in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere were collected from an aircraft in southern Africa. These aerosol samples were analyzed for their water-soluble chemical components, particularly the organic species. A novel technique, electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry, was used concurrently with an ion chromatography system to analyze for carbohydrate species. Seven carbohydrates, seven organic acids, five metallic elements, and three inorganic anions were identified and quantified. On the average, these 22 species comprised 36% and 27% of the total aerosol mass in haze and smoke aerosols, respectively. For the smoke aerosols, levoglucosan was the most abundant carbohydrate species, while gluconic acid was tentatively identified as the most abundant organic acid. The mass abundance and possible source of each class of identified species are discussed, along with their possible formation pathways. The combustion phase of a fire had an impact on the chemical composition of the emitted aerosols. Secondary formation of sulfate, nitrate, levoglucosan, and several organic acids occurred during the initial aging of smoke aerosols. It is likely that under certain conditions, some carbohydrate species in smoke aerosols, such as levoglucosan, were converted to organic acids during upward transport.

  5. Analysis of volatile components from Ziziphora taurica subsp. taurica by steam distillation, superheated-water extraction, and direct thermal desorption with GCxGC-TOFMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Mustafa Z; Göğüş, Fahrettin; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Lewis, Alastair C

    2005-05-01

    Volatile components from the leaves of Ziziphora taurica subsp. taurica have been isolated by steam distillation, superheated-water extraction, and direct thermal desorption techniques. The volatile components were characterized by comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. The extraction yields from Z. taurica leaves were found to be 1.56% and 1.32% for steam distillation and superheated-water extraction respectively. The major compounds found in the volatile fractions of the leaves of Z. taurica were pulegone, terpinen-4-ol, cis-carveol, trans-carveol, and verbenone. The number of volatile components identified were 28, 30, and 41 for steam distillation, superheated-water extraction, and direct thermal desorption, respectively.

  6. A Quick Reference on Anion Gap and Strong Ion Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente Artero, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic acid-base disorders are common in emergency and critically ill patients. Clinicians may have difficulty recognizing their presence when multiple acid-base derangements are present in a single patient simultaneously. The anion gap and the strong ion gap concepts are useful calculations to identify the components of complex metabolic acid-base associated to the presence of unmeasured anions. This article presents their definition, normal values, indications, limitations, and guidelines for interpretation of changes in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Consumo e eficiência do uso da água e componentes do rendimento do arroz irrigado Water use ifficiency, water consumiption and rice yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Gregório Ramos Hernandez

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito de dois níveis de manejo da água, preparo do solo e de herbicidas no rendimento de grãos, consumo de água, eficiência do uso da água e nos componentes do rendimento do arroz irrigado. O experimento foi conduzido no ano agrícola 1993/1994 em área da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS. A cultivar de arroz BR-IRGA-414 foi semeada em linhas, em 22 de dezembro de 1993. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso, trifatorial (2³, constituído de duas épocas do início da irrigação (15 e 30 dias após a emergência - DAE, dois sistemas de preparo do solo (preparo convencional e cultivo mínimo e controle de plantas invasoras (com e sem uso de herbicidas. Os resultados demonstraram que o consumo de água não diferiu significativamente entre os tratamentos. A associação entre o início da irrigação aos 30 DAE e o cultivo mínimo promoveu menor eficiência do uso da água. O inicio da irrigação aos 15 DAE proporcionou maior índice de colheita com maior número de panículas por metro quadrado e também menor esterilidade de espiguetas em relação à irrigação com início aos 30 DAE.The objective of this experiment was to study the effect oftwo water managments, tiliage systems and weed contral on rice yield, water use and water use efficiency and crop yield components. The experiment was conducted in 1993/94 crop growing season in the experimental field ofthe Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria - RS. Rice cultivar BR-IRGA-414 was sowed in rows in December 22, 1993. A factorial (23 experiment in a completely randomized block design was used wiih two irrigation dates (15 and 30 days after emergency - DAE, two soil tillage system (minimum and conventional and two weed control leveis (with and withoul herbicide appiication. The results indicate that the water consumption was similar among ali treatments. The interaction between irrigation at 30 DAE

  8. Study of water stress effects in different growth stages on yield and yield components of different rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Zinolabedin Tahmasebi; Pirdashti, Hemmatollah; Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad Modarres; Balouchi, Hamidreza

    2008-05-15

    A field experiment was conducted during 2001-2003 to evaluate the effect of water stress on the yield and yield components of four rice cultivars commonly grown in Mazandaran province, Iran. In northern Iran irrigated lowland rice usually experiences water deficit during the growing season include of land preparation time, planting, tillering stage, flowering and grain filing period. Recently drought affected 20 of 28 provinces in Iran; with the southeastern, central and eastern parts of the country being most severely affected. The local and improved cultivars used were Tarom, Khazar, Fajr and Nemat. The different water stress conditions were water stress during vegetative, flowering and grain filling stages and well watered was the control. Water stress at vegetative stage significantly reduced plant height of all cultivars. Water stress at flowering stage had a greater grain yield reduction than water stress at other times. The reduction of grain yield largely resulted from the reduction in fertile panicle and filled grain percentage. Water deficit during vegetative, flowering and grain filling stages reduced mean grain yield by 21, 50 and 21% on average in comparison to control respectively. The yield advantage of two semidwarf varieties, Fajr and Nemat, were not maintained under drought stress. Total biomass, harvest index, plant height, filled grain, unfilled grain and 1000 grain weight were reduced under water stress in all cultivars. Water stress at vegetative stage effectively reduced total biomass due to decrease of photosynthesis rate and dry matter accumulation.

  9. Effect of Foliar Application of Phosphorus and Water Deficit on Yield and Yield Components of Winter Wheat (Cultivar Alvand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vafapour

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of foliar application of phosphorus (P and water deficit on yield and yield components of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Alvand, a split-plot experiment, with completely randomized blocks design and three replications, was carried out at the Research Farm of Boyer Ahmad Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Station, 13 km west of Yasouj, in 2008-2009. The main plots were irrigation at three levels (1- full irrigation (control, 2- deficit irrigation from the stem elongation to booting stage, and 3- deficit irrigation from booting stage to the end of growth period and the subplots were five levels of foliar application of P fertilizer (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 kg/ha KH2PO4. The results showed that the effects of different irrigation regimes and foliar application of P were significant on all traits, and their interaction was significant on plant height, number of grain per spike, grain yield and biological yield. Full irrigation and foliar application of 6 kg/ha P produced the highest grain and biological yield (6000 and 14170 kg/ha, respectively and deficit irrigation from the stem elongation to booting stage without foliar application of P produced the lowest grain and biological yield (2920 and 8219 kg/ha, respectively. Foliar application of P affects significantly the evaluated traits only in drought-stress treatments and its effect was not significant in full irrigation treatment. In general, foliar application of 9 kg/ha P compensated the losses in wheat due to drought stress.

  10. Gap-filling of dry weather flow rate and water quality measurements in urban catchments by a time series modelling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, Santiago; Vezzaro, Luca; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    solids (TSS) online measurements (year 2007, 2 minutes time-step, combined system, Ecully, Lyon, France). Results show up the potential of the method to fill gaps longer than 0.5 days, especially between 0.5 days and 1 day (mean NSE > 0.6) in the flow rate time series. TSS results still perform very...... seeks to evaluate the potential of the Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA), a time-series modelling/gap-filling method, to complete dry weather time series. The SSA method is tested by reconstructing 1000 artificial discontinuous time series, randomly generated from real flow rate and total suspended...

  11. A Novel and Efficient Five-Component Synthesis of Pyrazole Based Pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-diones in Water: A Triply Green Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid M. Heravi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel one pot synthesis of pyrazolo[4′,3′:5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-diones, via a five-component reaction, involving, hydrazine hydrate, ethyl acetoacetate, and 1,3-dimethyl barbituric acid, an appropriate aryl aldehydes and ammonium acetate catalyzed via both of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis in water, is reported.

  12. A comprehensive analysis of the physiological and anatomical components involved in higher water loss rates after leaf development at high humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.; Heuvelink, E.; Pinto De Carvalho, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the poor regulation of water loss after leaf development at high relative air humidity (RH), the relative importance of the physiological and anatomical components was analyzed focusing on cultivars with a contrasting sensitivity to elevated RH. The stomatal responsiveness to

  13. Final environmental assessment for a refinement of the power delivery component of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) is designing and constructing a system of regional water supply facilities to meet current and projected water demands and increase system reliability. The existing Southern Nevada Water system is being upgraded with a number of improvements to increase the capacity of the system. However, even the expanded system is expected to be unable to meet projected peak daily water demands by the year 1999. As a result, new facilities are being designed and constructed to operate in conjunction with the upgraded Southern Nevada Water system. These new facilities, known as the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility (SNWA-TTF), include four primary components: a new raw water intake; new transmission facilities including below ground pipelines, tunnels, and above ground pumping stations; a water treatment facility; and new power supply facilities. Because existing power supplies would not be adequate for the new water treatment facilities, new power facilities, consisting of two new 230 kV-69 kV substations and new 69 and 230 kV power lines, are being constructed. This environmental assessment is specifically on the new power facilities

  14. Mixed-component sulfone-sulfoxide tagged zinc IRMOFs:In situ ligand oxidation, carbon dioxide, and water sorption studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Macguire R; Burrows, Andrew D; Kepert, Cameron J; Southon, Peter D; Qazvini, Omid T; Telfer, Shane G; Richardson, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Reported here are the syntheses and adsorption properties of a series of single- and mixed-component zinc IRMOFs derived from controlled ratios of sulfide and sulfone functionalized linear biphenyldicarboxylate (bpdc) ligands. During MOF synthesis the sulfide moieties undergo in situ oxidation, giving rise to sulfoxide functionalized ligands, which are incorporated to give mixed-component sulfoxide–sulfone functionalized MOFs. The single- and mixed-component systems all share the IRMOF-9 stru...

  15. Nutritional properties of green gram germinated in mineral fortified soak water: I. Effect of dehulling on total and bioaccessible nutrients and bioactive components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghbaei, Morteza; Prakash, Jamuna

    2017-03-01

    The study aimed at investigating the effect of germinating green gram ( Vigna radiata , GG) in mineral fortified soak water on total and bioaccessible nutrients and bioactive components in whole and dehulled GG. Whole GG was soaked in water fortified with iron (100 or 200 mg/100 ml) or zinc (50 or 100 mg/100 ml), germinated and a portion was dehulled. Whole and dehulled grains were analyzed for selected total and in vitro digestible/bioaccessible constituents. GG germinated in water served as controls. GG germinated in mineral fortified soak water had high iron and zinc content in whole and dehulled grains. Protein and calcium content did not differ significantly. In vitro digestible starch and protein was higher in dehulled grains. A remarkable increase in bioaccessible iron and zinc was seen in grains germinated in mineral fortified water, the increase was more at lower level of fortification of levels for both minerals. Both total and bioaccessible bioactive components, total phenols, tannins and flavonoids were significantly lesser in grains germinated in fortified water. Germinating pulses in fortified water can be used as a pre-processing technology for fortification of minerals.

  16. Evaluation Study of the Monitoring Result for River Water Environment Component Around U Mining Research Area at, Kalan West Kalimantan from 1997/1998 up to 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad-Sorot-Soediro

    2004-01-01

    The Uranium research which have been carrying out since 1980/1981 up to now and uranium processing activities which was carried out since 1981/1982 to 1996/1997 have probably decreased environment quality. Therefore the environment component would be monitored through Kalan river water every year. From 1997/1998 up to 2002 the environment quality decreased. So, the environment quality is necessarily to be evaluated doing those period. Aim of study is to recover development information of environmental quality at river water component up to 5 years. Evaluation has been done by comparing research the yearly data obtained and construct the correlation with U mining and processing activities on that year. BOD, COD, As, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ni, Zn, Cu, Pb, Mn, Mo and radioactivity of U, Th and Ra content with in Kalan water river tends to become lower in accordance with the decreasing of U mining and processing research activities. (author)

  17. Effect of Mycorrhiza Symbiosis on Yield, Yield Components and Water Use Efficiency of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Affected by Different Irrigation Regimes in Mashhad Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Plant association with mycorrhiza has been considered as one of the options to improve input efficiency particularly for water and nutrient - (Allen and Musik, 1993; Bolan, 1991. This has been due to kncreasing the absorbing area of the root and therefore better contact with water and nutrients. Inoculation with mycorrhiza enhances nutrient uptake with low immobility such as phosphorus and solphur-, improve association and could be an option to drought and other environmental abnormalities such as salinity (Rice et al., 2002. Moreover, higher water use efficiency (WUE for crops -has been reported in the literatures (Sekhara and Reddy, 1993.The sustainable use of scarce water resources in Iran is a priority for agricultural development. The pressure of using water in agriculture sector is increasing, so creating ways to improve water-use efficiency and taking a full advantage of available water are crucial. Water stress reduce crop yield by impairing the growth of crop canopy and biomass. Scheduling water application is very crucial for efficient use of drip irrigation system, as excessive irrigation reduces yield, while inadequate irrigation causes water stress and reduces production. The aim of present study was to evaluate the symbiotic effect of mycorrhiza on yield, yield components and water use efficiency of sesame under different irrigation regimes in Mashhad. Material and Methods In order to investigate the impact of inoculation with two species of Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi on yield, yield components and water use efficiency (WUE of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. under different irrigation regimes, an experiment was conducted as split plot based on a randomized complete block design with three replications during two growing seasons 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 at the Agricultural Research Station, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad.. The experimental factors were three irrigation regimes include 2000, 3000 and

  18. Activity Analysis of Water Rescue Services in Europe Compared with the Water Rescue Service of the Czech Red Cross as a Component of the Integrated Rescue System of the Czech Republic.

    OpenAIRE

    PROCHÁSKA, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to describe the role of the Water Rescue Service of the Czech Red Cross as a component of the Integrated Rescue System, and also to analyze and compare its activities with activities, skills and the material-technical equipment with other three randomly selected Water Rescue Services in Europe (Slovak Red Cross - Water Rescue Service, Irish Water Safety, The Royal Life Saving Society UK). One of the major benefits of the diploma thesis was a proposal how to improve th...

  19. Charting service quality gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Cândido, Carlos; Morris, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Some of the most influential models in the service management literature (Parasuraman et al., 1985; Grönroos, 1990) focus on the concept of service quality gap (SQG). Parasuraman et al. (1985) define a pioneering model with five SQGs, the concepts of which are amplified in Brogowicz et al.’s (1990) model. The latter has five types of encompassing gaps: information and feedback-related gaps; design-related gaps; implementation-related gaps; communication-related gaps; and customers’ perception...

  20. Influence of the Three Gorges Project on the Water Resource Components of Poyang Lake Watershed: Observations from TRMM and GRACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Three Gorges Project (TGP has received many criticisms about its potential effects on the changes in the downstream ecosystems. Poyang Lake is the largest body of water downstream of the TGP, and it is not immune to these changes. TRMM and GRACE data were introduced in this study to estimate river-lake water exchange, from which the hydrological responses of Poyang Lake could be identified. A significant decreasing trend of the runoff coefficient has been observed since 2003, resulting in 6.02 km3 more water discharge from the lake into the Yangtze River than under normal conditions. No significant interannual changes occurred in the water level or local precipitation, and GRACE observations revealed that groundwater discharge appeared to be the most likely compensation for the water loss. A novel approach, namely, the groundwater abnormality index (GAI, was developed to depict the water exchange using GRACE and surface water observations. Lower than normal GAIs were found between 2003 and 2005, reaching a minimum of −29.26 in October 2003, corresponding to ten times of the mean GAI during 2006–2012, clearly indicating a significant water exchange in Poyang Lake Basin from groundwater to surface water after the TGP impoundment.

  1. Effect of Mulch and Water Stress on Some Physiological Traits, Yield Components and Grain Yield of Red Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Amini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Water use in agricultural production as one of the most important environmental factors affecting plant growth and development, especially in arid and semi-arid climatic conditions of Iran is of special importance (21. One of the ways of alleviating water scarcity is by enhancing its use efficiency or productivity. Improving water use efficiency in arid and semi-arid areas depends on effective conservation of moisture and efficient use of limited water. Mulching is one of the management practices for increasing water use efficiency (WUE . Straw mulch is commonly used as mulch. Straw mulching has potential for increasing soil water storage (16. Mulches modify the microclimate and growing conditions of crops (16, conserve more water and increase water use efficiency (34. Red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is the most important food legume (25 and is an important source of proteins and minerals (28. The majority of red kidney bean production is under drought conditions, and thus yield reductions due to drought are very common (29. This research was carried out to evaluate the effect of wheat straw mulch and water stress on physiological traits, yield components and grain yield of red kidney bean cultivars. Materials and Methods A field experiment was conducted in 2012 at the Research Farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Tabriz, Iran (latitude 38°05_N, longitude 46°17_E, altitude 1360 m above sea level. In order to investigate the effect of mulch on grain yield and yield components of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivars at different water stress treatments, a factorial experiment was conducted based on RCB design with three replications. The factors were including water stress treatment (I1 and I2, irrigation after 60 and 120 mm evaporation from class A pan, respectively; mulch application at two levels (M1: (no mulch and M2: 2 ton ha-1 wheat straw mulch and red kidney bean cultivars including Akhtar and

  2. CHANGES OF WATER BALANCE COMPONENTS OF MIDFOREST POND IN A HYDROLOGICAL YEARS OF A DIFFERENT METEOROLOGICAL CONDITION COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Korytowski

    2014-10-01

    years. Evaporation from pond surface which was from 408 mm (2009/2010 to 835 mm (2002/2003 was the dominant factor of outgoing part of water balance. Outflow from the pond to neighboring areas had significant participation – about 44% of precipitation, in water balance in wet 2009/2010 hydrological year.

  3. Behind the Pay Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  4. Thermotropic nanostructured gels with complex hierarchical structure and two gelling components for water shut-off and enhance of oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunina, L. K.; Kuvshinov, I. V.; Kuvshinov, V. A.; Kozlov, V. V.; Stasyeva, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents the results of laboratory and field tests of thermotropic composition MEGA with two simultaneously acting gelling components, polymer and inorganic. The composition is intended for improving oil recovery and water shut-off at oilfields developed by thermal flooding, and cyclic-steam stimulated oil production wells. The composition forms an in-situ "gel-in-gel" system with improved structural-mechanical properties, using reservoir or carrier fluid heat for gelling. The gel blocks water breakthrough into producing wells and redistribute fluid flows, thus increasing the oil recovery factor.

  5. Effects of Foliar Applications of Sulfur, Nitrogen and Phosphorus on Castor Bean (Ricinus cmmunis L. Seed Yield and its Components under Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mosavi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of foliar applications of some macroelements on castor seed yield and its components under drought stress conditions, an experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Research Center of East Azerbaijan province. A factorial experiment, based on randomized complete block design with three replications, was carried out during 2013 growing season. Treatment factors consisted of irrigations with two levels (no water deficit and water deficit during grain filling stage and of foliar applications of macroelements with four levels [control, wettable sulfur (0.2 percent, nitrogen (urea: 0.6 percent and phosphor (super phosphate triple: 0.4 percent. Traits studied were: plant height, number of inflorescence, number of lateral branches, number of leaves, leaf temperature, relative water content, number of seeds per plant, 1000-kernal weight and seed yield. All traits, except number of inflorescence, were affected significantly by drought stress. Water deficit reduced plant height, number of leaves, number of seeds per plant, 1000-kernal weight, seed yield, relative water content, while it increased leaf temperature. Number of lateral branches was affected significantly by interaction between factors. Maximum latral branches (1.86 were obtained under non-stress treatment with nitrogen foliar application. Moderate drought stress had significant effect on leaf temperature and relative water content. It seems that, these traits can be used in determination of water deficit effects on castor bean.

  6. Environmental and resource burdens associated with world biofuel production out to 2050: footprint components from carbon emissions and land use to waste arisings and water consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Geoffrey P; Li, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Environmental or 'ecological' footprints have been widely used in recent years as indicators of resource consumption and waste absorption presented in terms of biologically productive land area [in global hectares (gha)] required per capita with prevailing technology. In contrast, 'carbon footprints' are the amount of carbon (or carbon dioxide equivalent) emissions for such activities in units of mass or weight (like kilograms per functional unit), but can be translated into a component of the environmental footprint (on a gha basis). The carbon and environmental footprints associated with the world production of liquid biofuels have been computed for the period 2010-2050. Estimates of future global biofuel production were adopted from the 2011 International Energy Agency (IEA) 'technology roadmap' for transport biofuels. This suggests that, although first generation biofuels will dominate the market up to 2020, advanced or second generation biofuels might constitute some 75% of biofuel production by 2050. The overall environmental footprint was estimated to be 0.29 billion (bn) gha in 2010 and is likely to grow to around 2.57 bn gha by 2050. It was then disaggregated into various components: bioproductive land, built land, carbon emissions, embodied energy, materials and waste, transport, and water consumption. This component-based approach has enabled the examination of the Manufactured and Natural Capital elements of the 'four capitals' model of sustainability quite broadly, along with specific issues (such as the linkages associated with the so-called energy-land-water nexus). Bioproductive land use was found to exhibit the largest footprint component (a 48% share in 2050), followed by the carbon footprint (23%), embodied energy (16%), and then the water footprint (9%). Footprint components related to built land, transport and waste arisings were all found to account for an insignificant proportion to the overall environmental footprint, together amounting to

  7. Groundwater contamination and the relationship between water chemistry and biotic components in a karst system (Bihor Mountains, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Epure

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical and chemical characteristics, microbial contaminat ion, and meiofauna of the Ocoale-Gheţar-Dobreşti karst system (Bihor Mountains, Romania were studied in order to assess the natural water quality by an interdisciplinary study. A total of 60 water samples were collected seasonally from 7 sites. Physico-chemical results showed a typical composition of karst waters, except for one site, where Ca2+ was absent, pH was very low, and the abundance and diversity of meiofauna were highest, demonstrating life support even for the most sensitive animals. No significant chemical pollution was found, but microbial contamination occurred in all samples, according to the national water quality standards of the analyzed springs. The Canonical Correlation Analysis and the Canonical Correspondence Analysis performed showed a strong connection between pH, nitrates and faecal pollution, indicating also a direct connection between microbial contaminants and dissolved oxygen.

  8. A kinetic model for impact/sliding wear of pressurized water reactor internal components. Application to rod cluster control assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.; Durbec, V.

    1996-12-01

    A new concept of industrial wear model adapted to components of nuclear plants is proposed. Its originality is to be supported, on one hand, by experimental results obtained via wear machines of relatively short operational times, and, on the other hand, by the information obtained from the operating feedback over real wear kinetics of the reactors components. The proposed model is illustrated by an example which corresponds to a specific real situation. The determination of the coefficients permitting to cover all assembly of configurations and the validation of the model in these configurations have been the object of the most recent work. (author)

  9. Impact test of components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsoi, L.; Buland, P.; Labbe, P.

    1987-01-01

    Stops with gaps are currently used to support components and piping: it is simple, low cost, efficient and permits free thermal expansion. In order to keep the nonlinear nature of stops, such design is often modeled by beam elements (for the component) and nonlinear springs (for the stops). This paper deals with the validity and the limits of these models through the comparison of computational and experimental results. The experimental results come from impact laboratory tests on a simplified mockup. (orig.)

  10. Calculation of the surface water pollution index in the evaluation of environmental component of product life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Аскольдович Проскурнин

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The assessment feasibility of the combined effect of the product life cycle on the environment is grounded. As an example, the pollution of surface waters at the production stage is considered in the article. A mechanism of ranking indicators of surface water pollution according to their importance is proposed. An algorithm for checking the consistency of the statistical expert judgment in determining weight coefficient for the indicators of pollution, based on the use of the concordance coefficient, is given

  11. Some Insights of Value-Added Tax Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuceu Ionuţ-Constantin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the Total Value-Added Tax Gap and its components for the Member States of the European Union: the Policy VAT Gap (which reflects VAT revenue losses due to the application of tax exemptions and reduced VAT rates and the Compliance VAT Gap (that refers to losses in VAT receipts arising from tax evasion, insolvency and bankruptcy.

  12. Evaluation and mitigation of the degradation by corrosion in the components of the service water system of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices A, E.; Salaices, M.; Ovando, R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the main problems that face the nuclear power stations is the degradation by corrosion in the service water systems. The corrosion causes lost substantial in energy generation and a high cost in maintenance and repairs. In this work, the results of a study of the degradation by the MIC mechanisms (microorganisms influenced corrosion), incrustations in heat exchangers and erosion for solid particles in the components of a typical service water system of a nuclear plant are presented. Diverse mitigation options are analyzed for these mechanisms. In the analysis, it was used the CHECWORKS-CWA code to carry out the evaluation of the degradation so much as well as the mitigation of the caused damage. The results are presented in susceptibility indexes and degradation rates component-by-component. A significant decrement could be observed in the susceptibility to MIC when changing the operation conditions of stagnated flow to continuous flow. With respect to the erosion by solid particles, it was found a significant reduction of the damage it when adding filters to the system. Finally, in the case of the heat exchangers, it is shown that one of the more viable options to diminish incrustations and existent calcium deposits it is the reduction of the pH of the service water. (Author)

  13. Long-Term Managed Aquifer Recharge in a Saline-Water Aquifer as a Critical Component of an Integrated Water Scheme in Southwestern Florida, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Missimer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR systems can be used within the context of integrated water management to create solutions to multiple objectives. Southwestern Florida is faced with severe environmental problems associated with the wet season discharge of excessive quantities of surface water containing high concentrations of nutrients into the Caloosahatchee River Estuary and a future water supply shortage. A 150,000 m3/day MAR system is proposed as an economic solution to solve part of the environmental and water supply issues. Groundwater modeling has demonstrated that the injection of about 150,000 m3/day into the Avon Park High Permeable Zone will result in the creation of a 1000 m wide plume of fresh and brackish-water (due to mixing extending across the water short area over a 10-year period. The operational cost of the MAR injection system would be less than $0.106/m3 and the environmental benefits would alone more than cover this cost in the long term. In addition, the future unit water supply cost to the consumer would be reduced from $1 to $1.25/m3 to $0.45 to $0.65/m3.

  14. The Impact of Para Rubber Expansion on Streamflow and Other Water Balance Components of the Nam Loei River Basin, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winai Wangpimool

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, Para rubber is an economical crop which provides a high priced product and is in demand by global markets. Consequently, the government of Thailand is promoting the expansion of Para rubber plantations throughout the country. Traditionally, Para rubber was planted and grown only in the southern areas of the country. However, due to the Government’s support and promotion as well as economic reasons, the expansion of Para rubber plantations in the northeast has increased rapidly. This support has occurred without accounting for suitable cultivation of Para rubber conditions, particularly in areas with steep slopes and other factors which have significant impacts on hydrology and water quality. This study presents the impacts of Para rubber expansion by applying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT hydrological model on the hydrology and water balance of the Nam Loei River Basin, Loei Province. The results showed that the displacement of original local field crops and disturbed forest land by Para rubber production resulted in an overall increase of evapotranspiration (ET of roughly 3%. The major factors are the rubber canopy and precipitation. Moreover, the water balance results showed an annual reduction of about 3% in the basin average water yield, especially during the dry season.

  15. Effect of Different Level of Water Stress and Nitrogen Fertilizer on Yield and Yield Components of Barley in Badjgah (Fars province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali asghar ghaemi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Barley is very important to feed humans, livestock, medical, industrial uses, especially in fermentation industries. In Iran, barley crop cultivation was nearly 1.4 million hectares withits production of 1.3 million tons in 2003 (2. Barelyis the oldest crops to environmental stresses such as drought and salinity resistance (3.The different barely growth stages with extreme water requirement can benoted in germination stage, stem elongation, heading the production stage, the stage of flowering and seed production. Typically, for spring and autumn barely respectively 3 and 4 to 5 times irrigation is done during the growing season. The barley water requirement over its life is between 4 and 7 thousand cubic meters and 518 liters of water is needed to produce one kilogram of dry matter. Due to limited water resources and low rainfall in Iran, efficient use of water is absolutely essential and the maximum water utilization must be achieved by applying a minimum amount of water in agriculture. One of the ways to increase productivity in agricultural water is deficit irrigation.Deficit irrigation is an optimization strategy for water use efficiency in irrigation.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the simultaneous effect of fertilizer treatments (150, 225 and 75 kg/ ha and water at three different levels (100%, 75% and 50% of crop water requirement at different growth stages on leaf area index, weight fresh and dried herb and plant nitrogen concentration and the effect of irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer on yield, yield components and productivity of water use. Materials and Method: This research was conducted in Shiraz University in fall 2012 to study the effect of interaction of deficit irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer on yield, yield component and water use efficiency and nitrogen concentration in different stages of barley (Bahman species growth. This experiment were evaluated using a randomized complete block design with s

  16. The content of 103Ru in components of fresh-water and adjoining to them ground ecosystems after accident on ChNPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubin, O.L.

    2007-01-01

    The content of 103 Ru in components of various fresh-water reservoirs and coastal ecosystems of Ukraine was studied since 1986 till 1987. It is established, that the maximal content of 103 Ru in water's ecosystems was typical for the higher water's plants. The maximum of the content of 103 Ru in fishes is registered in cooling-pond of ChNPP. It is caused by the vast radionuclide pollution of cooling-pond during the active moment of accident. Probably, the main quantity of 103 Ru penetrates into organism of fishes on the trophic way. With increase if distance from ChNPP the content of 103 Ru in fishes decreases. Thus, the level of biological availability of 103 Ru for fishes increase. It is obvious, that it is caused by the sizes of the particles which have fallen in researched reservoirs and/or the physical and chemical form of 103 Ru finding of in the fallout

  17. Evaluation of Military Field-Water Quality. Volume 7. Performance Evaluation of the 600-GPH Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit (ROWPU): reverse Osmosis (RO) Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    the contaminants in the feed water. " Very few experiments have been performed with the noncellulosic thin-film composite membranae of interest herein...The mixing portion of the model consisted of a completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) element on the brine-water side of the membrane, as shown in Fig...per pressure vessel). (CSTR - completely stirred tank reactor ; i - integer.) 132 Table B-1. Comparison of A and B parameters obtained with CALIBRATOR

  18. Parameterization of light absorption by components of seawater in optically complex coastal waters of the Crimea Peninsula (Black Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Egor V; Khomenko, Georges; Chami, Malik; Sokolov, Anton A; Churilova, Tatyana Y; Korotaev, Gennady K

    2009-03-01

    The absorption of sunlight by oceanic constituents significantly contributes to the spectral distribution of the water-leaving radiance. Here it is shown that current parameterizations of absorption coefficients do not apply to the optically complex waters of the Crimea Peninsula. Based on in situ measurements, parameterizations of phytoplankton, nonalgal, and total particulate absorption coefficients are proposed. Their performance is evaluated using a log-log regression combined with a low-pass filter and the nonlinear least-square method. Statistical significance of the estimated parameters is verified using the bootstrap method. The parameterizations are relevant for chlorophyll a concentrations ranging from 0.45 up to 2 mg/m(3).

  19. Effectiveness of Geoelectrical Resistivity Surveys for the Detection of a Debris Flow Causative Water Conducting Zone at KM 9, Gap-Fraser’s Hill Road (FT 148, Fraser’s Hill, Pahang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Anuri Ghazali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the findings of resistivity surveys which were conducted at the initiation area of debris flow at KM 9, Fraser’s Hill Gap road (FT148. The study involves three slope parallel survey lines and two lines perpendicular to the slope face. The parallel lines are FH01, FH02, and FH03, while the lines FH04 and FH05 are perpendicular. A granite body was detected at the central part of the east line and is nearest to the ground surface along FH02. The existence of low resistivity zones within the granite body is interpreted as highly fractured, water conducting zones. These zones are continuous as they have been detected in both the east-west as well as the north-south lines. The residual soil layer is relatively thin at zones where weathered granite dominates the slope face of the failure mass. The weak layer is relatively thick with an estimated thickness of 80 m and water flow occurs at the base of it. The high water flow recorded from the horizontal drains further supports the possible existence of these highly fractured, water conducting zones located within the granite. The shallow fractured granite is virtually “floating” above the water saturated zone and therefore is considered unstable.

  20. Hydrological Components of a Young Loblolly Pine Plantation on a Sandy Soil with Estimates of Water Use and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah A. Abrahamson; Phillip M. Dougherty; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    1998-01-01

    Fertilizer and irrigation treatments were applied in a 7- to l0-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation on a sandy soil near Laurinburg, North Carolina. Rainfall, throughfall, stemflow, and soil water content were measured throughout the study period. Monthly interception losses ranged from 4 to 15% of rainfall. Stemflow ranged from 0.2...

  1. The Solutions Data Base Component of the Water Pollution Abatement Subsystem (WPAS) of the Pollution Abatement Management System. (PAMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Data Base system will adapt these existing subroutines.14 14j. E. Hendry, D. F. Rudd, and J. D. Seader , "Synthesis in the Design of Chemical Processes...Legislation - The 1977 Amendments," Water Resources Bulletin, Vol. 14, No. 2 (April 1978), pp 491-493. Hendry, J. E., D. F. Rudd, and J. D. Seader

  2. A Review On The Development And Application Of Methods For Estimating Head Loss Components In Water Distribution Pipework

    OpenAIRE

    John I. Sodiki; Emmanuel M. Adigio

    2014-01-01

    The historical development of the common methods of estimating the frictional loss and the loss through pipe fittings in water distribution systems (respectively, the Hazen-Williams and D’Arcy-Weisbach equations) are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, the methods of applying these equations to index pipe runs are outlined.

  3. Response of Cotton to Irrigation Methods and Nitrogen Fertilization: Yield Components, Water-Use Efficiency, Nitrogen Uptake, and Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janat, M.

    2009-01-01

    Efficient crop use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer is critical from economic and environmental viewpoints, especially under irrigated conditions. Cotton yield parameters, fiber quality, water- and N-use efficiency responses to N, and irrigation methods in northern Syria were evaluated. Field trials were conducted for two growing seasons on a Chromoxerertic Rhodoxeralf soil. Treatments consisted of drip fertigation, furrow irrigation, and five different rates of N fertilizer (50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 kg N /ha). Cotton was irrigated when soil moisture in the specified active root depth was 80% of the field capacity as indicated by the neutron probe. Seed cotton yield was higher than the national average (3,928 kg/ha) by at least 12% as compared to all treatments. Lint properties were not negatively affected by the irrigation method or N rates. Water savings under drip fertigation ranged between 25 and 50% of irrigation water relative to furrow irrigation. Crop water-use efficiencies of the drip-fertigated treatments were in most cases 100% higher than those of the corresponding furrow-irrigated treatments. The highest water demand was during the fruit-setting growth stage. It was also concluded that under drip fertigation, 100 -150 N kg/ha was adequate and comparable with the highest N rates tested under furrow irrigation regarding lint yield, N uptake, and recovery. Based on cotton seed yield and weight of stems, the overall amount of N removed from the field for the drip-fertigated treatments ranged between 101-118 kg and 116-188 N/ha for 2001 and 2002, respectively. The N removal ranged between 94-113 and 111-144 kg N/ha for the furrow-irrigated treatments for 2001 and 2002, respectively. (author)

  4. Behaviour Of Saline Irrigation Water Components In Pakistani Barley And Calcareous Soil Under Scheduling Irrigation Using Neutron Scattering Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RIZK, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the behaviour of cation uptake by Pakistani barley (genotype PK-30163) as affected by saline irrigation water, as well as cation distribution within the soil profile. This experiment was carried out at Soil and Water Research Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Inshas, Egypt. The soil was transferred from Wadi Sudr (South Sinai, Egypt). It is salted affected soil (calcareous soil, EC = 4.3 dS/m) and was irrigated using ground water irrigation (12.5 dS/m). Nine used lysimeters were irrigated with three artificial saline water (0.3, 4 and 8 dS/m) using drip irrigation system. The irrigation schedule was carried out using neutron scattering technique according to the hydro physical properties of the soil. Pakistani barley (halophytic plant) was used to remove salts from the soil especially sodium cations. The cation uptake and cation distribution (Na, K, Ca, Mg) within the soil profile were studied.The data indicated that roots of barley collected within 0-15 cm layer showed high cation uptake that made the salt concentrations in this layer low. Sodium uptake ratio was 43, 37 and 47% from total cation uptake by using fresh water (0.3 dS/m), 4 and 8 dS/m, respectively. The maximum uptake for Na, K, Ca and Mg was 20.51, 19.13, 3.98 and 12.81 g/lys at 5.69, 3.05, 6.56 and 4.15 dS/m, respectively. It was found that Pakistani barley preferred Mg uptake rather than Ca uptake.

  5. World Health Assembly Resolution WHA68.15: "Strengthening Emergency and Essential Surgical Care and Anesthesia as a Component of Universal Health Coverage"—Addressing the Public Health Gaps Arising from Lack of Safe, Affordable and Accessible Surgical and Anesthetic Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Raymond; Makasa, Emmanuel; Hollands, Michael

    2015-09-01

    On May 22 2015, the 68th World Health Assembly (WHA) adopted resolution WHA68.15, "Strengthening emergency and essential surgical care and anesthesia as a component of universal health coverage (UHC)." For the first time, governments worldwide acknowledged and recognized surgery and anesthesia as key components of UHC and health systems strengthening. The resolution details and outlines the highest level of political commitments to address the public health gaps arising from lack of safe, affordable, and accessible surgical and anesthetic services in an integrated approach. This article reviews the background of resolution WHA68.15 and discusses how it can be of use to surgeons, anesthetists, advanced practice clinicians, nurses, and others caring for the surgical patients, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

  6. Monitoring of Structural Components and Water Balance as AN Aid to Wetland Management Using Geospatial Techniques - a Case Study for Nalsarovar Lake, Gujarat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, T. V. R.; Panigrahy, S.

    2011-09-01

    The hydrologic variability greatly influences the structural components of wetlands that have a great bearing on habitats for avifauna, aquatic fauna including fish etc. This paper highlights the results of a study carried out to derive changes in open-water and vegetation, and also water balance for Nalsarovar Lake, Gujarat. MODIS 8-day composite data for three consecutive years viz 2002/03, 2003/04 and 2004/05 were used to study the seasonal and inter annual dynamics of water regime in the lake. Digital elevation model derived using Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission data with interpolated bottom topography was used to generate elevation contours and compute water volume from water spread data. The reference data of 2002 (drought year) shows the maximum extent of wetland to be 8.06 km2 with emergent vegetation of recorded as 2.36 km2 and open-water as 5.70 km2. The rainfall has an impact on the preferred habitat availability for various species of avifauna and it is noted that emergent vegetation present in the lake completely dried up by summer 2002, a rainfall deficit year but revived again in the preceding year i.e. 2003 which was a good rainfall year with 46.68 km2 under emergent vegetation and 61.96 km2 under open-water. The 2002 being a drought year has shown very low reference storage (0.256 MCM), which has shown a gradual decrease in the storage to 0.00019 MCM in March 2003. The reference storage also registered a steep increase to 18.165 MCM in October 2003 and decreased 1.264 MCM in March 2004. From this study it is evident that water level of about 9 m elevation at the end of the rainy season is found to be optimal for maintaining various habitats that in turn support the avifauna for the rest of the lean period.

  7. Radiating gap filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: In May, corrosion on the outside wall of the over 50 year old Canadian Chalk River reactor vessel caused a heavy water leak and the reactor was shut down triggering worldwide a nuclear medicine shortage. The reactor is also a major supplier of the isotope molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), a precursor of the medically widely used technetium-99 m . To fill the gap in demand, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has now arranged with US company Lantheus Medical Imaging, Inc., a world leader in medical imaging, to supply Mo-99. Subject to pending Australian regulatory processes, the deal is expected to assist in alleviating the world's current nuclear medicine shortage. As ANSTO is currently also the only global commercial supplier that produces Mo-99 from low enriched uranium (LEU) targets, Lantheus will be the first company bringing LEU derived Tc-99 m to the US market. To date, over 95% of Mo-99 is derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets. However, there are concerns regarding proliferation risks associated with HEU targets and for commercial uses production from LEU targets would be desirable. ANSTO says that global Mo-99 supply chain is fragile and limited and it is working closely with nuclear safety and healthy regulators, both domestically and overseas, to expedite all necessary approvals to allow long-term production and export of medical isotopes.

  8. Bridging the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer Overgaard, Majken; Broeng, Jes; Jensen, Monika Luniewska

    Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures.......Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures....

  9. Similarities of Water-soluble Vitamin Components among Non-prescription Pharmaceutical Vitamin Products Generally Available on the Domestic Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiichiro; Kojina, Moeko; Aiba, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Similarities among non-prescription pharmaceutical vitamin products generally available in community pharmacies were examined based on their vitamin components, and a chart was constructed to differentiate products to assist in appropriate product choice. In the analysis of the similarities, two hundred and seventy-six data entries on vitamin products were extracted from the database on the package inserts of the pharmaceutical products provided by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, and they were reviewed for the amounts of vitamins they contained, in which the B vitamins, or vitamin B 1 , B 2 , B 6 , B 12 , and niacin, were considered as well as vitamins C and E. Pantothenic acid and L-Cysteine that are frequently used in combination with those vitamins are also taken into consideration. The data entries were then processed by classical multi-dimensional scaling to evaluate the inter-product similarities. As a result, it was shown that the products categorized as pharmaceutical nutrients and tonics containing vitamins (NTcV) are similar to one another, reflecting the fact that they are less characteristic regarding their vitamin components. As for the products in other categories, they were generally found to be featured for their unique content of vitamin components, and thereby, each category includes products with a wide range of variation. It was also indicated that some products categorized as vitamin B 1 , B 2 , and C products are less distinguishable from those categorized as NTcV. These findings will assist pharmacists to decide on an appropriate product for a customer following consultation.

  10. Long-term observation of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals in the total suspended particles collected at Okinawa, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Somada, Y.; Ijyu, M.; Azechi, S.; Oshiro, Y.; Nakaema, F.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2011-12-01

    The economic growth and population increase in recent Asia have been increasing air pollution. Emission rate of air pollutants from Asia, in particular oxides of nitrogen, surpassed those from North America and Europe and should continue to exceed them for decades. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location is ideal in observing East Asia's air quality because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background clean air and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. We collected total suspended particles (TSP) on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS), Okinawa, Japan during August 2005 and August 2010. Sampling duration was one week for each sample. We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and acid-digested metals in TSP samples using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, total organic carbon analyzer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals showed that the concentrations were the lowest in summer, higher in fall and winter, and the highest in spring. When air mass came from Asian continent, the concentrations of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals were much higher compared to the other directions, suggesting long-range transport of air pollutants from Asian continent. Also, when the air mass came from Asian continent (75-100% dominant), the mean concentrations of non-sea salt sulfate and nitrate increased ca. 1.8 times and ca. 3.7 times, respectively between 2005 and 2010, and the ratio of nitrate to

  11. Effect of Components in Water on the Extraction of Herbal Medicine—Advanced Approach Using Multivariate Analysis—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Yasushi

    Many kinds of water products have been offered commercially suggesting some strange efficacy beyond our scientific knowledge even now at which various advanced scientific and technological research have been highly promoted. However, it seems quite obvious that such a strange efficacy must be nonexistent. If such efficacy were really existing, it must be solved by some suitable scientific procedure. In this study, the extraction of paeoniflorin from paeoniae radix was examined by varying the kind of extracting water. Then, the result was analyzed using multivariate analysis where the effect on the extraction was assumed to be ascribed to the ionic species dissolved in each water examined. The dissolved species were analyzed by chemical and instrumental analyses. According to the multivariate analysis, the amount of extracted paeoniflorin (Y) was presented by the following regression equation. The result shows that pH, [Ca2+], and [HCO3 -] were significant parameters and the combination of Ca2+ and HCO3 - affected negatively on the extraction of paeoniflorin. Y=28.11-0.71 pH-0.0034[Ca2+]-0.93[HCO3 -] where [Ca2+] is the concentration of calcium ion and [HCO3 -] is that of bicarbonate ion.

  12. Oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of carbon/carbon composites and their components in water vapour at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Fei; Peng, Li-na; He, Guo-qiang; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 4D-C/C composite was fabricated using carbon fibre and coal tar pitch. • The rate of mass loss and oxidation kinetics parameters of fibres-H 2 O and matrix-H 2 O are obtained. • The rate of mass loss and oxidation kinetics parameters of C/C–H 2 O are obtained. • Oxidation rate of the fibre bundle is greater than the oxidation rate of the matrix. - Abstract: Thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the oxidation kinetics of four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components (fibres and matrices) in a H 2 O–Ar atmosphere at high temperatures. The oxidation processes were restricted to reaction-limited oxidation. The rate of mass loss was estimated for the four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components at high temperature. The pressure exponent for the reaction of the carbon/carbon composites with H 2 O was 0.59, and the pre-exponential factor and activation energy for the reactions of H 2 O with the carbon/carbon composites, carbon fibres and matrices were determined

  13. Evaluation of material degradation of light water reactor structure using a miniaturized specimen sampled from actual components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okido, Shinobu; Hirano, Akihiko; Hayashi, Makoto

    1996-01-01

    The authors have proposed a miniaturized specimen method to evaluate the degree of sensitization for IASCC (irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking), and fracture toughness using a small fragment sample from an actual component. This technique consists of two processes. The first process entails the sampling of a small fragment from the surface layer of the component by electric discharged machining (EDM). For this process a specially designed sampling electrode and technique have been developed. The results showed that the extraordinary layer was shallower than 300E m. This shallow extraordinary layer does not affect the evaluation of the material properties, because the surface layer of the sampled small fragment deeper than 300E m is removed when the test pieces are machined from the sampled fragment. The second process is a fracture toughness test using a miniaturized center cracked tension (CCT) specimen. The fracture toughness was evaluated by the stretch zone width (SZW) on the fracture surface. SZWs obtained in 1 mm thick CCT specimen well agreed with those in 1TCT specimen. However, SZW measured in 0.3 mm thick CCT specimen was about one fourth that of 1 TCT specimen, because SZW formation seems to be restricted by the deformation due to the plane stress condition on both sides of the CCT specimen. Accordingly, the macroscopic fracture toughness can be evaluated by measuring the SZW in a miniaturized CCT specimen with at least 1 mm thickness

  14. CHANGES OF WATER BALANCE COMPONENTS OF MIDFOREST POND IN A HYDROLOGICAL YEARS OF A DIFFERENT METEOROLOGICAL CONDITION COURSE

    OpenAIRE

    Mariusz Korytowski; Czesław Szafrański

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the researches carried out at the catchment of water pond number one, located at Wielosławice Forestry of Siemianice Experimental Farm. The researches were carried out in three hydrological years 2002/2003, 2003/2004 i 2009/2010 of a different precipitation sums. The area of investigated catchment of pond number one is about 7,5 ha and its forestation totals 100 % and it is situated in a part of Niesób catchment - left-side tributary of Prosna River. Fresh ha...

  15. Bridging a Cultural Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Talma

    2008-01-01

    There has been a broad wave of change in tertiary calculus courses in the past decade. However, the much-needed change in tertiary pre-calculus programmes--aimed at bridging the gap between high-school mathematics and tertiary mathematics--is happening at a far slower pace. Following a discussion on the nature of the gap and the objectives of a…

  16. Loop capabilities in Rez for water chemistry and corrosion control of cladding and in-core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, J.; Zmitko, M.; Srank, J.; Vsolak, R.

    1999-01-01

    Main characteristics of LVR-15 research reactor and its irradiation facilities are presented. For testing of cladding, internals and RPV materials specialised loop are used. There are now five high pressure loops modelling PWR, WWER or BWR water environment and chemistry. Loops can be connected with instrumented in-pile channels enable slow strain rate testing, 1CT or 2CT specimens loading and electrically heated rods exposition. Reactor dosimetry including neutronic parameters measurements and calculations and mock-up experiments are used. Water chemistry control involves gas (O 2 , H 2 ) dosing system, Orbisphere H 2 /O 2 measurement, electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements and specialised analytical chemistry laboratory. For cladding corrosion studies in-pile channels with four electrically heated rods with heat flux up to 100 W/cm 2 , void fraction 5 % at the outlet, inlet temperature 320 deg. C and flow velocity 3 m/s were development and tested. For corrosion layer investigation there is eddy current measurements and PIE techniques which use crud thickness measurement, chemical analyses of the crud, optical metallography, hydrogen analysis, SEM and TEM. (author)

  17. Effect of soil structures and nitrogen nutrition on yield and yield components of Barley: utilization of δC13 as an indicator of water deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibawa, Gede; Menard, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of combination between soil structures and nitrogen doses on the yield and its components. The treatments consisted of three soil structures: loose(O), block(B) and alternate between loose and compact(G) and five doses of nitrogen ranging from 0 to 200 kg/ha which were tested at TASS2, TASS3 and TASS4. Results showed that soil structures influenced nitrogen absorption and yield mainly through grain number/m2. The soil structure effect depends greatly on the climate. This study proved that carbon isotopic composition δC 1 3 related greatly to the carbon and water nutrition of the plant, therefore it can be used as an indicator of water deficit. (author), 17 refs, 2 tabs, 7 figs

  18. Kingian Co-Evolution of the Water and Mineral/Rock Components for Earth and Mars: Implications for Planetary Habitability (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, V. R.

    2013-12-01

    Planetary habitability may fluctuate episodically against a background provided by the co-evolution of a planet's mineral/rock (geosphere) components and its water (hydrosphere) in relation to its position in a circumstellar system. The water/rock (geosphere/hydrosphere) co-evolution can be inferred from the geological histories of the terrestrial planets of the solar system, particularly from the very extensive understanding of Earth and Mars. Habitability and water/rock co-evolution have components that are tychistic (i.e., driven by chance) and anancastic (i.e., dynamically driven largely by deterministic forces). They also have a final, end-directed (i.e., teleomatic) aspect that operates in accordance with natural laws. This is a larger perspective on the idea of planetary habitability than is generally associated with an astronomical approach, and it incorporates additional insights from a geological perspective on the issue. The geological histories of Mars and Earth are punctuated with critical, short-term epochs of extreme change, which for Earth are known to be associated with major disruptions of its biosphere. These catastrophic epochs can be described as a type of non-Darwinian evolution that was envisioned by the geologist Clarence King. In an 1877 paper King proposed that accelerated evolutionary change occurs during sudden environmental disruptions. Such Kingian disruptions in mineral/rock and water evolution mark the planetary histories of Mars and Earth, including the early formation and condensation of a steam atmosphere, an impacting cataclysm at about 3.9 to 4 Ga, episodes of concentrated volcanism and tectonism, and associated rapid changes in the linked atmosphere and hydrosphere. These disruptions are closely tied to migrations of water between different planetary reservoirs, the nature of planetary accretion, the origin of a physically coupled atmosphere and ocean, the prospects for initiating plate tectonics, and punctuated greenhouse

  19. Synthesis of Biologically Active Natural Component 4-Hydroxyderricin Through Water-Accelerated [3,3]-Sigmatropic Rearrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sijun; Lee, Jaejun; Yoon, Hyunho; Jun, Jonggab [Hallym Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We report herein the practical and effective total synthesis of biologically active 4-hydroxyderricin, a poly-phenolic chalcone compound containing m-prenyl group at ring A. The key steps of the synthesis are Claisen-Schmidt condensation of the the two phenolic units 17 and 18 to chalcone 19 and the water-accelerated [3,3]-sigma-tropic rearrangement of 1,1-dimethyl-2-propenyl aryl ether 20 to introduce the m-prenyl unit in 4-hydroxyderricin. Two types of polyphenolic chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin (1) and xanthoangelol (2), are especially rich in the plant, and the 4-hydroxyderricin exhibited the major responsibility for the various biological activities. Sugamoto reported the synthesis of 4-hydroxy-derricin via [1,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of chalcone ether using montmorillonite K10 which showed relatively low rearrangement yield (Scheme 1), and this is the only reported total synthesis of 1 as far as we know.

  20. Measurement of bubble velocity in an air/water flow through a narrow gap by using high-speed cinematography; Ermittlung der Blasengeschwindigkeit einer Luft/Wasser-Spaltstroemung mit Hilfe der Hochgeschwindigkeitskinematographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, S.; Friedel, L. [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    To predict the mass flow of a two phase mixture at a given pressure difference through narrow gaps, apart from the change in state of the gas phase during pressure reduction, the knowledge of the fluid dynamics on balance which occurs in the form of a relative velocity between the phases is important. These two influences were examined with the aid of high speed cinematography for a water/air bubble flow. Apart from the quick reduction in pressure due to the sudden reduction in crossection at the entry to the gap, there are no significant differences between the experimentally determined volume change in bubbles of different sizes and that calculated assuming an isothermal change in state. The mean velocity of the bubbles does not differ appreciably from that calculated assuming an homogeneous flow. [Deutsch] Zur Vorhersage des sich bei gegebener Druckdifferenz einstellenden Massenstroms eines Zweiphasengemischs durch enge Spalte ist neben der Zustandsaenderung der Gasphase waehrend der Druckabsenkung u.a. auch die Kenntnis des sich dabei einstellenden fluiddynamischen Ungleichgewichts in Form einer Relativgeschwindigkeit zwischen den Phasen von Bedeutung. Diese beiden Einfluesse wurden mit Hilfe der Hochgeschwindigkeitskinematographie fuer eine Wasser/Luft-Blasenstroemung untersucht. Abgesehen von der raschen Druckabsenkung aufgrund der ploetzlichen Querschnittsverengung im Spalteintritt treten keine nennenswerten Unterschiede zwischen den experimentell ermittelten und den unter der Annahme einer isothermen Zustandsaenderungen berechneten Volumenaenderung verschiedengrosser Blasen auf. Die mittlere Geschwindigkeit der Blasen unterscheidet sich dabei nicht wesentlich von der unter der Annahme einer homogenen Stroemung berechneten. (orig.)

  1. Alterations in water and electrolyte absorption in the rat colon following neutron irradiation: influence of neutron component and irradiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dublineau, I; Ksas, B; Joubert, C; Aigueperse, J; Gourmelon, P; Griffiths, N M

    2002-12-01

    To study the absorptive function of rat colon following whole-body exposure to neutron irradiation, either to the same total dose with varying proportion of neutrons or to the same neutron proportion with an increasing irradiation dose. Different proportions of neutron irradiation were produced from the reactor SILENE using a fissile solution of uranium nitrate (8, 47 and 87% neutron). Water and electrolyte fluxes were measured in the rat in vivo under anaesthesia by insertion into the descending colon of an agarose gel cylinder simulating the faeces. Functional studies were completed by histological analyses. In the first set of experiments, rats received 3.8 Gy with various neutron percentages and were studied from 1 to 14 days after exposure. In the second set of experiments, rats were exposed to increasing doses of irradiation (1-4Gy) with a high neutron percentage (87%n) and were studied at 4 days after exposure. The absorptive capacity of rat colon was diminished by irradiation at 3-5 days, with a nadir at 4 days. The results demonstrate that an increase in the neutron proportion is associated with an amplification of the effects. Furthermore, a delay in the re-establishment of normal absorption was observed with the high neutron proportion (87%n). A dose-dependent reduction of water absorption by rat colon was also observed following neutron irradiation (87%n), with a 50% reduction at 3 Gy. Comparison of this dose-effect curve with the curve obtained following gamma (60)Co-irradiation indicates an RBE of 2.2 for absorptive colonic function in rat calculated at 4 days after exposure.

  2. Phase transport of HCl, HFeCl4, water, and crude oil components in acid-crude oil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, Marcel; van Haasterecht, Menno

    2003-12-15

    A model describing the transport of HCl and HFeCl(4) from a water phase to a crude oil phase and subsequent sludge formation is proposed. Crude oil phase transfer compounds (PTCs) that are basic in nature facilitate transport of acid to the crude oil phase. These crude oil PTCs are able to migrate to the acid-oil interface and form acid-base complexes that can return to the oil phase. Once in the crude phase, these protonated compounds have a propensity to form aggregates. Growth of small aggregates into larger aggregates eventually generates a precipitate known as acid-sludge. Under certain conditions the model predicts the amount of acid-sludge formed to be proportional to the acid activity, or acidity function H(0), in the water phase. This relation was confirmed experimentally. Furthermore, the total amount of phase-transported acid is proportional to the base content of the crude oil. In strong HCl formulations containing Fe(3+), the acid HFeCl(4) is formed in small amounts that can be transported to the crude oil phase. In principle, the behavior of HFeCl(4) is similar to that of HCl. It was shown that HCl and HFeCl(4) compete for basic, or receptor, sites and that exchange between these two acids is reversible. The antisludging agent dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid, DBSA, intervenes through the same mechanism; that is, it competes for receptor sites with HCl and HFeCl(4). Exchange between HCl/HFeCl(4) and DBSA was also shown to be reversible.

  3. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part II: WWER conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Devrient, B.; Roth, A. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T. [Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, MPA, Stuttgart (Germany); Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWRs) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of crack growth behavior of LAS in high-temperature water due to EAC under constant load (steady-state power operation), to study the effect of transient conditions (during operation or start-up/shut-down of a plant) using their impact on time-based and cycle-based crack growth rates and to a more detailed understanding of the acting mechanisms. Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurized water reactor (WWER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (WWER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarizes the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated WWER conditions. The influence of oxygen content and the effect of specimen size (C(T)25 versus C(T)50 specimens) on the crack growth rates are shown. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  4. Gap Junctions and Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesse, Daniel; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli; Fortes, Fabio S.; Jasmin; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; de Narareth Meirelles, Maria; Huang, Huan; Soares, Milena B.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Spray, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction channels provide intercellular communication between cells. In the heart, these channels coordinate impulse propagation along the conduction system and through the contractile musculature, thereby providing synchronous and optimal cardiac output. As in other arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases, chagasic cardiomyopathy is associated with decreased expression of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) and its gene. Our studies of cardiac myocytes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi have revealed that synchronous contraction is greatly impaired and gap junction immunoreactivity is lost in infected cells. Such changes are not seen for molecules forming tight junctions, another component of the intercalated disc in cardiac myocytes. Transcriptomic studies of hearts from mouse models of Chagas disease and from acutely infected cardiac myocytes in vitro indicate profound remodelling of gene expression patterns involving heart rhythm determinant genes, suggesting underlying mechanisms of the functional pathology. One curious feature of the altered expression of Cx43 and its gene expression is that it is limited in both extent and location, suggesting that the more global deterioration in cardiac function may result in part from spread of damage signals from more seriously compromised cells to healthier ones. PMID:21884887

  5. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  6. Source apportionment of size-segregated atmospheric particles based on the major water-soluble components in Lecce (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contini, D.; Cesari, D.; Genga, A.; Siciliano, M.; Ielpo, P.; Guascito, M.R.; Conte, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have potential effects on human health, on the radiation balance, on climate, and on visibility. The understanding of these effects requires detailed knowledge of aerosol composition and size distributions and of how the different sources contribute to particles of different sizes. In this work, aerosol samples were collected using a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Measurements were taken between February and October 2011 in an urban background site near Lecce (Apulia region, southeast of Italy). Samples were analysed to evaluate the concentrations of water-soluble ions (SO 4 2− , NO 3 − , NH 4 + , Cl − , Na + , K + , Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ) and of water-soluble organic and inorganic carbon. The aerosols were characterised by two modes, an accumulation mode having a mass median diameter (MMD) of 0.35 ± 0.02 μm, representing 51 ± 4% of the aerosols and a coarse mode (MMD = 4.5 ± 0.4 μm), representing 49 ± 4% of the aerosols. The data were used to estimate the losses in the impactor by comparison with a low-volume sampler. The average loss in the MOUDI-collected aerosol was 19 ± 2%, and the largest loss was observed for NO 3 − (35 ± 10%). Significant losses were observed for Ca 2+ (16 ± 5%), SO 4 2− (19 ± 5%) and K + (10 ± 4%), whereas the losses for Na + and Mg 2+ were negligible. Size-segregated source apportionment was performed using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), which was applied separately to the coarse (size interval 1–18 μm) and accumulation (size interval 0.056–1 μm) modes. The PMF model was able to reasonably reconstruct the concentration in each size-range. The uncertainties in the source apportionment due to impactor losses were evaluated. In the accumulation mode, it was not possible to distinguish the traffic contribution from other combustion sources. In the coarse mode, it was not possible to efficiently separate nitrate from the contribution of crustal/resuspension origin

  7. Source apportionment of size-segregated atmospheric particles based on the major water-soluble components in Lecce (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contini, D., E-mail: d.contini@isac.cnr.it [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Cesari, D. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Genga, A.; Siciliano, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche e Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Ielpo, P. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Istituto di Ricerca Sulle Acque, IRSA-CNR, Bari (Italy); Guascito, M.R. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche e Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Conte, M. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have potential effects on human health, on the radiation balance, on climate, and on visibility. The understanding of these effects requires detailed knowledge of aerosol composition and size distributions and of how the different sources contribute to particles of different sizes. In this work, aerosol samples were collected using a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Measurements were taken between February and October 2011 in an urban background site near Lecce (Apulia region, southeast of Italy). Samples were analysed to evaluate the concentrations of water-soluble ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup −}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) and of water-soluble organic and inorganic carbon. The aerosols were characterised by two modes, an accumulation mode having a mass median diameter (MMD) of 0.35 ± 0.02 μm, representing 51 ± 4% of the aerosols and a coarse mode (MMD = 4.5 ± 0.4 μm), representing 49 ± 4% of the aerosols. The data were used to estimate the losses in the impactor by comparison with a low-volume sampler. The average loss in the MOUDI-collected aerosol was 19 ± 2%, and the largest loss was observed for NO{sub 3}{sup −} (35 ± 10%). Significant losses were observed for Ca{sup 2+} (16 ± 5%), SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} (19 ± 5%) and K{sup +} (10 ± 4%), whereas the losses for Na{sup +} and Mg{sup 2+} were negligible. Size-segregated source apportionment was performed using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), which was applied separately to the coarse (size interval 1–18 μm) and accumulation (size interval 0.056–1 μm) modes. The PMF model was able to reasonably reconstruct the concentration in each size-range. The uncertainties in the source apportionment due to impactor losses were evaluated. In the accumulation mode, it was not possible to distinguish the traffic contribution from other combustion sources. In the coarse mode, it was not possible to

  8. Using GRACE Amplitude Data in Conjunction with the Spatial Distribution of Groundwater Recharge to Estimate the Components of the Terrestrial Water Storage Anomaly across the Contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, W. E.; Reitz, M.; Zell, W.

    2017-12-01

    The GRACE satellite project by NASA has been mapping the terrestrial water storage anomaly (TWSA) across the globe since 2002. To date most of the studies using this data have focused on estimating long-term storage declines in groundwater aquifers or the cryosphere. In this study we are focusing on using the amplitude of the seasonal storage signal to estimate the sources and values of the different water components that are contributing to the TWSA signal across the contiguous United States (CONUS). Across the CONUS the TWSA seasonal amplitude observed by GRACE varies by a factor of ten or more (from 1 to 10+ cm of liquid water equivalent). For a seasonal sinusoidal recharge rate, the change in storage in either the soil (unsaturated zone beneath the root zone) or groundwater (by water-table fluctuation) is limited to the amplitude of the recharge rate divided by π or 2π, respectively. We compiled the GRACE signal for the 18 major HUC watersheds across the CONUS and compared them to estimates of seasonal recharge-rate amplitudes based on a recent map of recharge rates generated by the USGS. The ratios of the recharge to GRACE amplitudes suggest that all but two of the HUCs must have other substantial sources of storage change in addition to soil or groundwater. The most likely additional sources are (1) winter snowpack, (2) seasonal irrigation withdrawals, and/or (3) surface water (rivers or reservoirs). Estimates of the seasonal amplitudes of these three signals across the CONUS suggest they can explain the remaining GRACE seasonal signal that cannot be explained by soil or groundwater fluctuations. Each of these signals has its own unique spatial distribution, with snowpack limited to the northern states, surface water limited to large rivers or reservoirs, and irrigation as a dominant signal limited to arid to semi-arid agricultural regions. Use of the GRACE seasonal signal shows promise in constraining the hydraulic diffusivities of surficial aquifer

  9. Water-soluble carbohydrates of root components and activity rhythms at vegetative growth stage of Artemisia scoparia in northeastern grassland of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyu; Yang, Yunfei; Zhi, Heng

    2017-01-01

    The root system of perennials is composed of the roots of different growth years. The nutrient storage capacities and activities of roots are an important basis for judging root components and plant senescence. In this research, changes in the contents of water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) were used as indicators of the nutrient storage and activity of roots of different life years. From the early resprouting stage to the rapid growth stage, Artemisia scoparia L. plants of 1-3 age classes were sampled and measured once every 18 days. The nutrient storage capacities and activity rhythms of plant root components of the three age classes were analysed quantitatively. Among the A. scoparia population in northeast China, the nutrient storage capacities of 1a/2a plant root collars and 2-year old roots were generally large, whereas those of 3a plant root collars and 3-year old roots were significantly reduced. As for changes in the WSC content in the root system at the 18 day resprouting stage, the decline rates in the root collars of the 1a and 2a plants were 102 and 109 times those of the 3a plants, respectively. The decline rate in the 2-year old roots of the 1a plants was 1.8 times that of the 2a plants and 29.6 times that of the 3a plants. When nutrients were most active, all root components of the 1a plants entered into the resprouting stage, but the 2/3-year old roots of the 2a plants lagged behind. All the root components of the 3a plants generally lagged. At the vegetative growth stage, the WSC contents in all root components of the 1a plants declined logarithmically. For the 3a plants, the content in the root collars decreased linearly with that in the 3-year old roots. The older root components (3-year old roots) of the 2a plants and all root components of the 3a plants exhibited signs of aging.

  10. Induction of foetal haemoglobin synthesis in erythroid progenitor stem cells: mediated by water-soluble components of Terminalia catappa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimola, I A; Inuwa, H M; Nok, A J; Mamman, A I

    2014-06-01

    Current novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) focus on increasing foetal haemoglobin (HbF) levels in SCA patients. Unfortunately, the only approved HbF-inducing agent, hydroxyurea, has long-term unpredictable side effects. Studies have shown the potential of plant compounds to modulate HbF synthesis in primary erythroid progenitor stem cells. We isolated a novel HbF-inducing Terminalia catappa distilled water active fraction (TCDWF) from Terminalia catappa leaves that induced the commitment of erythroid progenitor stem cells to the erythroid lineage and relatively higher HbF synthesis of 9.2- and 6.8-fold increases in both erythropoietin (EPO)-independent and EPO-dependent progenitor stem cells respectively. TCDWF was differentially cytotoxic to EPO-dependent and EPO-independent erythroid progenitor stem cell cultures as revealed by lactate dehydrogenase release from the cells. TCDWF demonstrated a protective effect on EPO-dependent and not EPO-independent progenitor cells. TCDWF induced a modest increase in caspase 3 activity in EPO-independent erythroid progenitor stem cell cultures compared with a significantly higher (P˂0.05) caspase 3 activity in EPO-dependent ones. The results demonstrate that TCDWF may hold promising HbF-inducing compounds, which work synergistically, and suggest a dual modulatory effect on erythropoiesis inherent in this active fraction. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. On the Ranking Uncertainty of Labor Market Wage Gaps

    OpenAIRE

    William C. Horrace

    2002-01-01

    This paper uses multiple comparison methods to perform inference on labor market wage gap estimates from a regression model of wage determination. The regression decomposes a sample of workers' wages into a human capital component and a gender specific component; the gender component is called the gender differential or wage gap and is sometimes interpreted as a measure of sexual discrimination. Using data on fourteen industry classifications (e.g. retail sales, agriculture), a new relative e...

  12. Spatial-temporal evolution of self-organized loop-patterns on a water surface and a diffuse discharge in the gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Geng, Jinling; Jia, Pengying; Zhang, Panpan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Yaru

    2017-11-01

    Excited by an alternating current voltage, a patterned discharge and a diffuse discharge are generated in a needle to liquid configuration. Using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), temporal evolution of the discharge between the two electrodes is investigated for the diffuse mode and the patterned mode, respectively. For the diffuse mode, the positive discharge is in a glow regime, and the negative discharge is in a Townsend discharge regime. For the patterned mode, the discharge always belongs to the Townsend discharge regime. Moreover, in the patterned mode, various patterns including the single loop, single loop with the surrounding corona, triple loops, and concentric loops with a central spot are observed on the water surface with the increasing positive peak-value of the applied voltage (Upp). Temporally resolved images of the loop-patterns are captured on the water surface. From the electrical measurements and the ICCD imaging, it is found that the loop pattern emerges after the discharge bridges the two electrodes. Then, it begins to evolve and finally degenerates with the decrease in the discharge current. The pattern does not disappear until the discharge quenches. Formation of the loop-patterns is attributed to the role of negative ions.

  13. Interfacial dynamic and dilational rheology of polyelectrolyte/surfactant two-component nanoparticle systems at air–water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, L.J.; Bao, M.T.; Li, Y.M.; Gong, H.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DTAB/PSS mixture can self-assemble nanoparticles in bulk solution. • The nanoparticles can adsorb at the interface forming a nanoparticle monolayer. • The nanoparticles spread at the interface undergo a disassembly process with time. • The nanoparticle monolayer presents peculiar dilational viscoelastic behavior. - Abstract: The interfacial characteristics of nanoparticles and consequent inter-particle interactions at the interface are poorly understood. In this work, the interfacial dynamic and corresponding dilational surface rheology of self-assembled polyelectrolyte/surfactant nanoparticles at the air–water interface are characterized. The nanoparticles are prepared from dodecyltrimethylammonium (DTAB) and poly (sodium 4-styrene-sulfonate) (PSS) by mixing them in aqueous solution. The interfacial dynamic characteristics have been carried out by comparing the surface pressure with the dilational rheological response of these nanoparticles at interface. The results indicate that this type of nanoparticles can adsorb at the interface forming a nanoparticle monolayer, which leads to the surface tension decreased markedly. The dependence of surface pressure on time shows the instability and disassembly process of nanoparticles at the interface. On the basis of these observations, it is proposed that the nanoparticles undergo a dynamic process that interface induced nanoparticles disassembly into DTAB/PSS complexes. The presence of PSS in the subphase can promote the process of nanoparticles disassembly. A transition point in dilational elasticity and viscosity response of the nanoparticles versus oscillation frequency further validate the micro dynamic process of nanoparticles and the formation of polyelectrolyte/surfactant complex monolayer at the interface

  14. Assessment of wall friction model in multi-dimensional component of MARS with air–water cross flow experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jin-Hwa [Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Seoul National University, Gwanak 599, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chi-Jin [Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Seoul National University, Gwanak 599, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr [Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Seoul National University, Gwanak 599, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Euh, Dong-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Seoul National University, Gwanak 599, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Recently, high precision and high accuracy analysis on multi-dimensional thermal hydraulic phenomena in a nuclear power plant has been considered as state-of-the-art issues. System analysis code, MARS, also adopted a multi-dimensional module to simulate them more accurately. Even though it was applied to represent the multi-dimensional phenomena, but implemented models and correlations in that are one-dimensional empirical ones based on one-dimensional pipe experimental results. Prior to the application of the multi-dimensional simulation tools, however, the constitutive models for a two-phase flow need to be carefully validated, such as the wall friction model. Especially, in a Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) system, the injected emergency core coolant (ECC) on the upper part of the downcomer interacts with the lateral steam flow during the reflood phase in the Large-Break Loss-Of-Coolant-Accident (LBLOCA). The interaction between the falling film and lateral steam flow induces a multi-dimensional two-phase flow. The prediction of ECC flow behavior plays a key role in determining the amount of coolant that can be used as core cooling. Therefore, the wall friction model which is implemented to simulate the multi-dimensional phenomena should be assessed by multidimensional experimental results. In this paper, the air–water cross film flow experiments simulating the multi-dimensional phenomenon in upper part of downcomer as a conceptual problem will be introduced. The two-dimensional local liquid film velocity and thickness data were used as benchmark data for code assessment. And then the previous wall friction model of the MARS-MultiD in the annular flow regime was modified. As a result, the modified MARS-MultiD produced improved calculation result than previous one.

  15. Components of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Ministry of the Environment of the Slovak Republic deals with the components of the environment. The results of monitoring of air (emission situation), ambient air quality, atmospheric precipitation, tropospheric ozone, water (surface water, groundwater resources, waste water and drinking water), geological factors (geothermal energy, fuel deposits, ore deposits, non-metallic ore deposits), soil (area statistics, soil contamination. soil reaction and active extractable aluminium, soil erosion), flora and fauna (national strategy of biodiversity protection) are presented

  16. Wide-Gap Chalcopyrites

    CERN Document Server

    Siebentritt, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    Chalcopyrites, in particular those with a wide band gap, are fascinating materials in terms of their technological potential in the next generation of thin-film solar cells and in terms of their basic material properties. They exhibit uniquely low defect formation energies, leading to unusual doping and phase behavior and to extremely benign grain boundaries. This book collects articles on a number of those basic material properties of wide-gap chalcopyrites, comparing them to their low-gap cousins. They explore the doping of the materials, the electronic structure and the transport through interfaces and grain boundaries, the formation of the electric field in a solar cell, the mechanisms and suppression of recombination, the role of inhomogeneities, and the technological role of wide-gap chalcopyrites.

  17. An ecohydrological sketch of climate change impacts on water and natural ecosystems for the Netherlands: bridging the gap between science and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, J. P. M.; Runhaar, J.; van Ek, R.; van der Hoek, D. C. J.; Bartholomeus, R. P.; Batelaan, O.; van Bodegom, P. M.; Wassen, M. J.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.

    2012-11-01

    For policy making and spatial planning, information is needed about the impacts of climate change on natural ecosystems. To provide this information, commonly hydrological and ecological models are used. We give arguments for our assessment that modelling only is insufficient for determining the impacts of climate changes on natural ecosystems at regional scales. Instead, we proposed a combination of hydrological simulations, a literature review and process-knowledge on climate-hydrology-vegetation interactions, to compile a sketch map that indicates climate change effects on a number of ecosystems in the Netherlands. Soon after a first version of our sketch map was published by a Dutch professional journal, copies appeared in policy documents, and also in a commercial and popular atlas of the Netherlands. Moreover, the map led to a question in the Dutch parliament about the sustainability of bog reserves under the future climate. Apparently, there was an urgent need for the information provided by the map. The map shows that climate change will presumably have the largest influence on ecosystems in the Netherlands that depend on precipitation as the major water source, like heathlands, dry grasslands, rain-fed moorland pools and raised bogs. Also highly susceptible are fens in reserves surrounded by deeply drained polders, because such fens depend on the inlet of surface water, of which quality is likely to deteriorate upon climate change. While the map is indicative for directions of change, in view of the uncertainties of our study, no conclusions should be drawn that may have far-reaching consequences, such as giving up certain nature targets that might no longer be feasible in the future climate. Instead, we advise to anticipate the potential threats from climate change by taking a number of adaptation measures that enhance the robustness of nature reserves. To improve climate change projections on hydrology and ecosystems, future research should especially

  18. Chlorophyll-a Concentration Retrieval in the Optically Complex Waters of the St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf Using Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Laliberté

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Empirical methods based on band ratios to infer chlorophyll-a concentration by satellite do not perform well over the optically complex waters of the St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf. Using a dataset of 93 match-ups, we explore an alternative method relying on empirical orthogonal functions (EOF to develop an algorithm that relates the satellite-derived remote sensing reflectances to in situ chlorophyll-a concentration for the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS. Results show that an accuracy of 41% at retrieving chlorophyll-a concentration can be reached using the EOF method compared to 140% for the widely-used Ocean Chlorophyll 4 (OC4v4 empirical algorithm, 53% for the Garver-Siegel-Maritorena (GSM01 and 54% for the Generalized Inherent Optical Property (GIOP semi-analytical algorithms. This result is possible because the EOF approach is able to extract region-specific radiometric features from the satellite remote sensing reflectances that are related to absorption properties of optical components (water, coloured dissolved organic matter and chlorophyll-a using the visible SeaWiFS channels. The method could easily be used with other ocean-colour satellite sensors (e.g., MODIS, MERIS, VIIRS, OLCI to extend the time series for the St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf waters.

  19. Point Locations of 849 Continuous Record Streamflow Gages Used to Estmate Annual and Average Values of Water-Budget Components Based on Hydrograph Separation and PRISM Precipitation in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, estimates of annual water-budget components were...

  20. Modeling the monthly mean soil-water balance with a statistical-dynamical ecohydrology model as coupled to a two-component canopy model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Kochendorfer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The statistical-dynamical annual water balance model of Eagleson (1978 is a pioneering work in the analysis of climate, soil and vegetation interactions. This paper describes several enhancements and modifications to the model that improve its physical realism at the expense of its mathematical elegance and analytical tractability. In particular, the analytical solutions for the root zone fluxes are re-derived using separate potential rates of transpiration and bare-soil evaporation. Those potential rates, along with the rate of evaporation from canopy interception, are calculated using the two-component Shuttleworth-Wallace (1985 canopy model. In addition, the soil column is divided into two layers, with the upper layer representing the dynamic root zone. The resulting ability to account for changes in root-zone water storage allows for implementation at the monthly timescale. This new version of the Eagleson model is coined the Statistical-Dynamical Ecohydrology Model (SDEM. The ability of the SDEM to capture the seasonal dynamics of the local-scale soil-water balance is demonstrated for two grassland sites in the US Great Plains. Sensitivity of the results to variations in peak green leaf area index (LAI suggests that the mean peak green LAI is determined by some minimum in root zone soil moisture during the growing season. That minimum appears to be close to the soil matric potential at which the dominant grass species begins to experience water stress and well above the wilting point, thereby suggesting an ecological optimality hypothesis in which the need to avoid water-stress-induced leaf abscission is balanced by the maximization of carbon assimilation (and associated transpiration. Finally, analysis of the sensitivity of model-determined peak green LAI to soil texture shows that the coupled model is able to reproduce the so-called "inverse texture effect", which consists of the observation that natural vegetation in dry climates tends

  1. Gap length distributions by PEPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warszawer, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions guaranteeing exponential gap length distributions are formulated and discussed. Exponential gap length distributions of bubble chamber tracks first obtained on a CRT device are presented. Distributions of resulting average gap lengths and their velocity dependence are discussed. (orig.)

  2. A Semi-parametric Multivariate Gap-filling Model for Eddy Covariance Latent Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Chen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative descriptions of latent heat fluxes are important to study the water and energy exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The eddy covariance approaches have been recognized as the most reliable technique for measuring surface fluxes over time scales ranging from hours to years. However, unfavorable micrometeorological conditions, instrument failures, and applicable measurement limitations may cause inevitable flux gaps in time series data. Development and application of suitable gap-filling techniques are crucial to estimate long term fluxes. In this study, a semi-parametric multivariate gap-filling model was developed to fill latent heat flux gaps for eddy covariance measurements. Our approach combines the advantages of a multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis, PCA) and a nonlinear interpolation technique (K-nearest-neighbors, KNN). The PCA method was first used to resolve the multicollinearity relationships among various hydrometeorological factors, such as radiation, soil moisture deficit, LAI, and wind speed. The KNN method was then applied as a nonlinear interpolation tool to estimate the flux gaps as the weighted sum latent heat fluxes with the K-nearest distances in the PCs’ domain. Two years, 2008 and 2009, of eddy covariance and hydrometeorological data from a subtropical mixed evergreen forest (the Lien-Hua-Chih Site) were collected to calibrate and validate the proposed approach with artificial gaps after standard QC/QA procedures. The optimal K values and weighting factors were determined by the maximum likelihood test. The results of gap-filled latent heat fluxes conclude that developed model successful preserving energy balances of daily, monthly, and yearly time scales. Annual amounts of evapotranspiration from this study forest were 747 mm and 708 mm for 2008 and 2009, respectively. Nocturnal evapotranspiration was estimated with filled gaps and results are comparable with other studies

  3. Impact of water management on root morphology, growth and yield component of lowland rice varieties under the organic system of rice intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A F Aziez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Water management is one of the keys to success in increasing rice production in paddy fields. Paddy rice production will decrease if the rice plants suffer from water stress, and conversely conventional cultivation is very wasteful of water. Local aromatic varieties have deeper rooting character than improved varieties making it more efficient in using water. The purpose of this study was to obtain more efficient and more productive aromatic local varieties in the use of irrigation water in the SRI organic cultivation system. This research was conducted in organic rice fields in Kebonagung village, Imogiri, Bantul with split plot design of 2 factors with 4 replications. Factor I: The mode of irrigation consists of (a intermittent irrigation, and (b continuous irrigation and Factor II: varieties consisting of (a Mentikwangi, (b Gabusan, (c Sintanur and (d IR64. The observation parameters included (1 root characters i.e. surface area of root, total length of root, and dry weight of root, (2 plant growth analysis i.e. specific leaf weight, net assimilation rate, plant growth rate, (3 and yield components i.e. weight 1000 grains, grain weight per hill, and grain weight per plot. The results showed that intermittent irrigation increased the surface area of root and the dry weight of root of Mentikwangi variety, and increased the specific leaf weight and weight of 1000 grains of IR64 variety, and increased the specific leaf weight and the net assimilation rate of Sintanur variety. Grain weight per hill and per plot showed no difference between intermittent irrigation and continuous irrigation. Grain weight per hill and per plot in intermittent irrigation achieved by Gabusan variety were 35.69 g and 14.28 kg respectively, while in continuous irrigation the grain weight achieved by Gabusan variety were 37.69 g and 15.08 kg respectively. In conclusion, there was no difference in yield between intermittent irrigation and continuous irrigation, so that the

  4. Multilayer Oil-in-Water Emulsions: Formation, Characteristics and Application as the Carriers for Lipophilic Bioactive Food Components – a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortnowska Grażyna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review article demonstrates fundamentals regarding the manufacturing of multilayer oil-in-water (M-O/W emulsions and factors affecting stability of these systems. Moreover, characteristics of major bioactive lipophilic components and ingredients mostly applied to form multilayered membranes as well analytical methods used to examine properties of M-O/W emulsions are specified. It has been shown that production of M-O/W systems is based on the layer-by-layer (LbL electrostatic deposition technique which makes use of the electrostatic attraction of oppositely charged surfactants and biopolymers to form multicomposite protective layers around emulsion droplets. Finally, limitations regarding studies of M-O/W systems which should be developed are specified.

  5. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs

  7. Effect of Salicylic Acid on Yield, Component Yield and Essential Oil of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L. under Water Deficit Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rezaei Chiyaneh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the production of medicinal plants can be influenced by environmental factors such as water limitation. In other hand salicylic acid as a plant regulator can enhance drought resistance in plants. In order to investigate the effect of different irrigation intervals on yield, yield components and essential oil of black cumin (Nigella sativa L., a field experiment was conducted a farm located in West Azerbaijan province- city Nagadeh, West- Azerbaijan, during growing season of 2011- 2012. The experiment was arranged as split plot based on a randomized complete block design with three replications. Irrigation intervals (6, 12 and 18 days and three levels of salicylic acid concentration (0, 0.5 and 1 mM considered as in main plots and sub-plots, respectively. Results showed that irrigation had significant effects on all characteristics such as Plant height, number of follicule per plant, number of seed per follicule, biological yield, grain yield, essential oil content and essential oil yield with the exception of 1000- seed weight. With increasing irrigation intervals from 6 to 18 days, plant height, number of follicule per plant, number of seed per follicule, biological yield, grain yield, essential oil percentage and essential oil yield were decreased up to 49, 52, 40, 35, 43, 20 and 55 %, respectively. In contrast, yield components and yield were enhanced up to treatments 0.5 mM of salicylic acid. Grain yield and essential oil yield with application of 0.5 mM salicylic acid increased up to 13 and 11 % compared to control, respectively. It seems that due to the limited sources of water in the region irrigation after 12 days and 0.5 mM salicylic acid concentration are suitable for black cumin grain production.

  8. Impact of Pre-Anthesis Water Deficit on Yield and Yield Components in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Plants Grown under Controlled Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria I. Al-Ajlouni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought at pre-anthesis stages can influence barley growth and results in yield losses. Therefore, it is important to understand how drought at pre-anthesis can affect different traits associated with yield reduction in barley. The objective of this study was to understand the relevance of the genetic background of major flowering time genes in barley plants subjected to pre-anthesis drought and its impact on yield and yield components. A glasshouse experiment using a Randomized Complete Block Design was conducted to investigate the effect of drought and its timing on yield and yield components on eleven barley genotypes, which were selected to represent genetic diversity of major flowering time genes (PPDH1, PPDH2, HvVrn1, HvVrn2 and HvVrn3. Barley plants were exposed to three water regimes, non-stressed and stressed, which was applied at two pre-anthesis growth stages, tillering (SS and stem elongation (SE. Results identified differences among genotypes in all measured traits. Grain yield, grain number and "thousand kernel weight" were reduced in all genotypes due to drought, irrespective of the growth stage. Early flowering genotypes had better performance as reflected in higher yield compared with late flowering genotypes. Results verified the fundamental importance of early flowering to improve productivity in response to pre-anthesis drought. The results of this study can help in selecting barley lines for future breeding purposes with improved resilience to drought conditions in Mediterranean environments.

  9. Other components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of electronic and mechanical components which do not merit a chapter to themselves. Other hardware requires mention because of particularly high tolerance or intolerance of exposure to radiation. A more systematic analysis of radiation responses of structures which are definable by material was given in section 3.8. The components discussed here are field effect transistors, transducers, temperature sensors, magnetic components, superconductors, mechanical sensors, and miscellaneous electronic components

  10. Semantic Gaps Are Dangerous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejstrup, Michael; le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    Semantic gaps are dangerous Language adapts to the environment where it serves as a tool to communication. Language is a social agreement, and we all have to stick to both grammaticalized and non-grammaticalized rules in order to pass information about the world around us. As such language develops...... unpolite language and tend to create dangerous relations where specialy language creates problems and trouble that could be avoided if we had better language tools at hand. But we have not these tools of communication, and we are in a situation today where media and specially digital and social media......, supported by new possibilities of migration, create dangerous situations. How can we avoid these accidental gaps in language and specially the gaps in semantic and metaphoric tools. Do we have to keep silent and stop discusing certain isues, or do we have other ways to get acces to sufficient language tools...

  11. Where are the Gaps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneham, Marshall

    Reading a Handbook like this gives a vivid picture of the enormous vigour and power of materials modelling. One is tempted to believe that we can answer all the questions materials technology might pose. Even if that were partly true, we should be identifying just what we do not know how to do. Some gaps will be depend on new hardware and software, especially when modelling quantum systems. Some gaps will be recognised only after some social or technological change has brought them into focus. Among the developments likely to stimulate innovation could be novel nanoelectronics, or the fields where physics meets biology. Still further gaps exist because we have been slaves to fashion, and have been drawn away from unpopular (roughly translating as "too difficult") fields; examples might include excited state spectroscopy, or electrical breakdown.

  12. The longevity gender gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aviv, Abraham; Shay, Jerry; Christensen, Kaare

    2005-01-01

    In this Perspective, we focus on the greater longevity of women as compared with men. We propose that, like aging itself, the longevity gender gap is exceedingly complex and argue that it may arise from sex-related hormonal differences and from somatic cell selection that favors cells more...... resistant to the ravages of time. We discuss the interplay of these factors with telomere biology and oxidative stress and suggest that an explanation for the longevity gender gap may arise from a better understanding of the differences in telomere dynamics between men and women....

  13. Bridge the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on photo projects organised for teenage refugees by the Society for Humanistic Photography (Berlin, Germany). These projects, named Bridge the Gap I (2015), and Bridge the Gap II (2016), were carried out in Berlin and brought together teenagers with refugee and German-majorit...... was produced – and sometimes not produced - within the projects. The importance of memory work in the context of refugee resettlement is often overlooked, but is particularly relevant when cultural encounters are organised in museums and exhibition galleries....

  14. Missing the gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene; Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    by the premise that difference and gaps are places where creative learning is intensified (Glaveanu & Gillespie, 2015). The public discourse around education is often concerned with minding or avoiding the gap by making education more relevant for or similar to the labour market, but what if facilitating...... creative learning at the borders need not minimize differences, but handle and learn from them? If not, schools and educational institutions risk becoming bad copies of the labour marked instead of enabling students to enter the market with something new, something radically dissimilar from what...

  15. The use of dissolvable layered double hydroxide components in an in situ solid-phase extraction for chromatographic determination of tetracyclines in water and milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiroonsoontorn, Nattaphorn; Sansuk, Sira; Santaladchaiyakit, Yanawath; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2017-10-13

    This research presents a simple and green in situ solid phase extraction (is-SPE) combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the simultaneous analysis of tetracyclines (TCs) including tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline. In is-SPE, TCs were efficiently extracted through the precipitation formation of dissolvable layered double hydroxides (LDHs) by mixing the LDH components such as magnesium and aluminum ions (both in metal chloride salts) thoroughly in an alkaline sample solution. After the centrifugation, the precipitate was completely dissolved with trifluoroacetic acid to release the enriched TCs, and then analyzed by HPLC. Under optimized conditions, this method gave good enrichment factors (EFs) of 41-93 with low limits of detection (LODs) of 0.7-6μg/L and limits of quantitation (LOQs) of 3-15μg/L. Also, the proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of TCs in water and milk samples with the recoveries ranging from 81.7-108.1% for water and 55.7-88.7% for milk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Radiation Streaming Calculation for Air Gap of the Shielding Door

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Y. S.; Jeon, G. P.; Mun, K. J.; Nam, J. M.; Cho, J. S.; Cho, J. H.; Kim, Jun Yeon

    2011-01-01

    There are many penetrations and the thin air filled clearance gaps in accelerator facility, such as a cable, a cooling water pipe or an air conditioning duct as well as an air gap of between the wall and the shielding door. The estimation of the radiation streaming through these penetrations or the air filled gaps is one of the most difficult parts in shielding design. The Shin's semiempirical formula describing energy-space distributions of neutrons and gamma-rays streaming in ducts or labyrinths is very useful for application to accelerator facility. A streaming calculation code DUCT-III is based on the Shin's formula with the albedo data up to 3GeV. In this paper, the source term was calculated by MCNPX and the radiation streaming through the air gap of between the wall and the shielding door by DUCT-III. The DUCT-III code is based on the Shin's semi-empirical formula. The formula, which describes the direct and albedo components, is derived in generic straight duct geometry. It is expressed by the product of spatial distributions which are represented by twice and eight-time reflected components, and power of an albedo matrix. This formula was then extended to bent ducts. The inflow of radiations to downstream at a corner of multi-bent ducts is formulated with the flux in the upstream leg. Using the obtained inflow current as the source term to downstream, the formula predicts the radiation flux in the downstream leg

  17. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  18. 'Mind the Gap!'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Karl Gunnar

    This paper challenges the widely held view that sharply falling real transport costs closed the transatlantic gap in grain prices in the second half of the 19th century. Several new results emerge from an analysis of a new data set of weekly wheat prices and freight costs from New York to UK mark...

  19. Spark gap produced plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.Y.

    1990-01-01

    A Spark Gap (Applied voltage : 2-8KV, Capacitor : 4 Micro F. Dia of the tube : 1 inch, Electrode distance : .3 ∼.5 inch) was made to generate a small size dynamic plasma. To measure the plasma density and temperature as a function of time and position, we installed and have been installing four detection systems - Mach-Zehnder type Interferometer for the plasma refractivity, Expansion speed detector using two He-Ne laser beams, Image Processing using Lens and A Optical-Fiber Array for Pointwise Radiation Sensing, Faraday Rotation of a Optical Fiber to measure the azimuthal component of B-field generated by the plasma drift. These systems was used for the wire explosion diagnostics, and can be used for the Laser driven plasma also

  20. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  1. Component testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchings, M.T.; Schofield, Peter; Seymour, W.A.J.

    1986-01-01

    A method for non-destructive testing of an industrial component to ascertain if it is a single crystal, and to find the crystal orientations of those parts of the component which are single crystals, involves irradiating the component with a monochromatic collimated neutron beam. Diffracted neutron beams are observed live by means of LiF/ZnS composite screen, an image intensifier and a television camera and screen. (author)

  2. Assessing plant water relations based on hidden in formation in the hyper-spectral signatures: Parameterization of olive leaf P-V curve and estimation of water potential components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Plant Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) is characterized by complex structures and biophysical processes acting over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Additionally, in olive grove systems, the plant adaptive strategies to respond to soil water-limited conditions make the system even more complex. One of the greatest challenges in hydrological research is to quantify changing plant water relations. A promising new technology is provided by the advent of new field spectroscopy detectors, characterized by very high resolution over the spectral range between 300 and 2500 nm, allowing the detection of narrow reflectance or absorptance peaks, to separate close lying peaks and to discover new information, hidden at lower resolutions. The general objective of the present research was to investigate a range of plant state function parameters in a non-destructive and repeatable manner and to improve methodologies aimed to parameterize hydrological models describing the entire SPAC, or each single compartment (soil or plant). We have investigated the use of hyperspectral sensing for the parameterization of the hydraulic pressure-volume curve (P-V) for olive leaf and for the indirect estimation of the two principal leaf water potential components, i.e. turgor and osmotic potentials. Experiments were carried out on an olive grove in Sicily, during the mature phase of the first vegetative flush. Leaf spectral signatures and associated P-V measurements were acquired on olive leaves collected from well-irrigated plants and from plants maintained under moderate or severe water stress. Leaf spectral reflectance was monitored with a FieldSpec 4 spectro-radiometer (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc.), in a range of wavelengths from VIS to SWIR (350-2500 nm), with sampling intervals of 1.4 nm and 2.0 nm, respectively in the regions from 350 to 1000 nm and from 1000 to 2500 nm. Measurements required the use of contact probe and leaf clip (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc

  3. Synthesis of Submicron Hexagonal Plate-Type SnS2 and Band Gap-Tuned Sn1−xTixS2 Materials and Their Hydrogen Production Abilities on Methanol/Water Photosplitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Min Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available SnS2 and Sn1−xTixS2 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 mol materials were designed using solvothermal method with the aim to enhance hydrogen production from water/methanol water photosplitting. Scanning electron microscopy revealed hexagonal plates with one side, 3.0 μm in length, in the SnS2 materials. Pure SnS2 showed absorption band edges of above 660 nm, and the absorption was shifted to low wavelengths with the insertion of Ti ions. The evolution of H2 from MeOH/H2O (1 : 1 photosplitting over SnS2 hexagonal plates in the photocatalytic liquid system was 0.016 mL h−1 g−1, and the evolutions were enhanced in Sn1−xTixS2. In particular, 0.049 mL h−1 g−1 of H2 gas was produced in Sn0.7Ti0.3S2 without electrolytes and it increased significantly to more than 90.6% (0.47 mL h−1 g−1 evolutions at higher pH using 0.1 M of KOH. Based on the UV-visible absorption spectra, the high photocatalytic activity of Sn1−xTixS2 was attributed to the existence of an appropriate band-gap state that retarded recombination between the electrons and holes.

  4. 76 FR 74074 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Windy Gap Firming Project, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... deliver Windy Gap water to Colorado's Front Range community participants in all years. The purpose of the... to 2005, Windy Gap diverted an average annual 11,080 AF of water per year. However, demands among the... Windy Gap Firming Project, Colorado AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  5. The Effect of Chemical, Biological and Organic Nutritional Treatments on Sunflowers Yield and Yield Components under the Influence of Water Deficit Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh soleymani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction To achieve the higher economic yield of crop plants, supplying enough nutrients to plants is very important. Moreover, nutrient uptakes by plants is influenced by the soil water contents. However, nowadays chemical fertilizer application is important agronomic factor that has significant effects on growth and quantity and quality of final yield, but traditional nutrient management and excessive use of chemical fertilizers may cause the environmental problems such as contamination of soil and water resources, low quality of agricultural products and reduction of soil fertility. These factors have drawn attention to health and ecological sustainable farming systems (Sharma, 2002. In this context, usage of organic and biological products for plant nutrition is considered as one of the solutions to achieve the goals of sustainable agriculture. Materials and methods To evaluate the effect of various feeding systems on yield and yield components of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. under the influence of water deficit stress, a split-plot experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replications, was carried out in the Agricultural Faculty of Bu-Ali Sina University during the growing season of 2013-2014. Main plots consisted of two irrigation levels: optimum irrigation and deficit irrigation stress (irrigation after 60 and 120 mm evaporation from evaporation pan, class A, respectively and sub-plots included of nine nutrition systems: 1- no bio or chemical fertilizer application, 2- 100% of the recommended chemical fertilizer , 3- vermicompost, 4- phospho nitro kara, 5- vermicompost+ phospho nitro kara, 6- vermicompost+ ½ chemical fertilizer, 7- phospho nitro kara+ ½ chemical fertilizer, 8- vermicompost+ phospho nitro kara+ ½ chemical fertilizer, 9- ½ proposed chemical fertilizer. Phospho-nitro-kara which contains phosphate solubilizing and nitrogen fixing bacteria (Bacillus coagulans, azotobactr chroocuccum and

  6. Large gaps between primes

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, James

    2014-01-01

    We show that there exists pairs of consecutive primes less than $x$ whose difference is larger than $t(1+o(1))(\\log{x})(\\log\\log{x})(\\log\\log\\log\\log{x})(\\log\\log\\log{x})^{-2}$ for any fixed $t$. Our proof works by incorporating recent progress in sieve methods related to small gaps between primes into the Erdos-Rankin construction. This answers a well-known question of Erdos.

  7. Mind the Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Terry; Savage, Erica; Adams, Katie; Wittie, Michael; Boone, Edna; Hayden, Andrew; Barnes, Janey; Hettinger, Zach; Gettinger, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Decisions made during electronic health record (EHR) implementations profoundly affect usability and safety. This study aims to identify gaps between the current literature and key stakeholders’ perceptions of usability and safety practices and the challenges encountered during the implementation of EHRs. Materials and Methods Two approaches were used: a literature review and interviews with key stakeholders. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify usability and safety challenges and best practices during implementation. A total of 55 articles were reviewed through searches of PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus. We used a qualitative approach to identify key stakeholders’ perceptions; semi-structured interviews were conducted with a diverse set of health IT stakeholders to understand their current practices and challenges related to usability during implementation. We used a grounded theory approach: data were coded, sorted, and emerging themes were identified. Conclusions from both sources of data were compared to identify areas of misalignment. Results We identified six emerging themes from the literature and stakeholder interviews: cost and resources, risk assessment, governance and consensus building, customization, clinical work-flow and usability testing, and training. Across these themes, there were misalignments between the literature and stakeholder perspectives, indicating major gaps. Discussion Major gaps identified from each of six emerging themes are discussed as critical areas for future research, opportunities for new stakeholder initiatives, and opportunities to better disseminate resources to improve the implementation of EHRs. Conclusion Our analysis identified practices and challenges across six different emerging themes, illustrated important gaps, and results suggest critical areas for future research and dissemination to improve EHR implementation. PMID:27847961

  8. MV controlled spark gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimovich, V.M.; Evlampiev, S.B.; Korshunov, G.S.; Nikolaev, V.A.; Sviridov, Yu.F.; Khmyrov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    A megavolt gas-filled trigatron gap with a sectional gas-discharge chamber having a more than three-fold range of operating voltages is described. The discharge chamber consists of ten sections, each 70 mm thick, made of organic glass. The sections are separated one from another by aluminium gradient rings to which ohmic voltage divider is connected. Insulational sections and gradient rings are braced between themselves by means of metal flanges through gaskets made of oil-resistant rubber with the help of fiberglass-laminate pins. The gap has two electrodes 110 mm in diameter. The trigatron ignition assembly uses a dielectric bushing projecting over the main electrode plane. Use has been made of a gas mixture containing 10% of SF 6 and 90% of air making possible to ensure stable gap operation without readjusting in the voltage range from 0.4 to 1.35 MV. The operation time lag in this range is equal to 10 μs at a spread of [ru

  9. Carbon isotope fractionation during diamond growth in depleted peridotite: Counterintuitive insights from modelling water-maximum CHO fluids as multi-component systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, T.; Chacko, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2017-09-01

    Because of the inability of depleted cratonic peridotites to effectively buffer oxygen fugacities when infiltrated by CHO or carbonatitic fluids, it has been proposed recently (Luth and Stachel, 2014) that diamond formation in peridotites typically does not occur by rock-buffered redox reactions as previously thought but by an oxygen-conserving reaction in which minor coexisting CH4 and CO2 components in a water-rich fluid react to form diamond (CO2 + CH4 = 2C + 2H2O). In such fluid-buffered systems, carbon isotope fractionation during diamond precipitation occurs in the presence of two dominant fluid carbon species. Carbon isotope modelling of diamond precipitation from mixed CH4- and CO2-bearing fluids reveals unexpected fundamental differences relative to diamond crystallization from a single carbon fluid species: (1) irrespective of which carbon fluid species (CH4 or CO2) is dominant in the initial fluid, diamond formation is invariably associated with progressive minor (units), the carbon isotope composition of the first-precipitated diamond decreases by 3.7‰. The tight mode in δ13C of - 5 ± 1 ‰ for diamonds worldwide places strict constraints on the dominant range of XCO2 in water-rich fluids responsible for diamond formation. Specifically, precipitation of diamonds with δ13C values in the range -4 to -6‰ from mantle-derived fluids with an average δ13C value of -5‰ (derived from evidence not related to diamonds) requires that diamond-forming fluids were relatively reduced and had methane as the dominant carbon species (XCO2 = 0.1-0.5). Application of our model to a recently published set of in-situ carbon isotope analyses for peridotitic diamonds from Marange, Zimbabwe (Smit et al., 2016), which contain CH4 fluid inclusions, allows us to perfectly match the observed co-variations in δ13 C, δ15 N and N content and at the same time explain the previously counter-intuitive observation of progressive 13C enrichment in diamonds that appear to have

  10. Annual and average estimates of water-budget components based on hydrograph separation and PRISM precipitation for gaged basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, David L.; Messinger, Terence; McCoy, Kurt J.

    2015-07-14

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, annual and average estimates of water-budget components based on hydrograph separation and precipitation data from parameter-elevation regressions on independent slopes model (PRISM) were determined at 849 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations from Mississippi to New York and covered the period of 1900 to 2011. Only complete calendar years (January to December) of streamflow record at each gage were used to determine estimates of base flow, which is that part of streamflow attributed to groundwater discharge; such estimates can serve as a proxy for annual recharge. For each year, estimates of annual base flow, runoff, and base-flow index were determined using computer programs—PART, HYSEP, and BFI—that have automated the separation procedures. These streamflow-hydrograph analysis methods are provided with version 1.0 of the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Toolbox, which is a new program that provides graphing, mapping, and analysis capabilities in a Windows environment. Annual values of precipitation were estimated by calculating the average of cell values intercepted by basin boundaries where previously defined in the GAGES–II dataset. Estimates of annual evapotranspiration were then calculated from the difference between precipitation and streamflow.

  11. SUBORDINATE GAPS IN MANDARIN CHINESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Chi Wei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The existence of subordinate gaps in Mandarin Chinese casts doubt on analyses built on canonical coordinate gapping. We observe that the minimality of contrastive focus and the type of subordinate clause determine the acceptability of a missing gap in subordinate structure. Along this vein, we propose that a semantic-based deletion account can be used to interpret gapping in Mandarin. Such account relies on two violable constraints, AvoidF and Focus condition on gapping (Schwarzchild 1999, Merchant 2001 to compute the acceptability of a gap.

  12. Prediction of long-term influence of ONKALO and Korvensuo reservoir on groundwater level and water balance components on Olkiluoto island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karvonen, T.

    2010-08-01

    The Olkiluoto surface hydrological model was used to compute the influence of various ONKALO leakage scenarios on changes in groundwater level in overburden soils and hydraulic heads in the bedrock. Moreover, the model effect of ONKALO leakages on water balance components of the Olkiluoto Island (runoff, evapotranspiration, discharge to the sea area through the bedrock and discharge from the Korvensuo reservoir) and on the thickness and area of unsaturated bedrock layer were computed. Leakages into ONKALO lower the groundwater level in overburden soils especially during those years when precipitation is smaller than the long-term average value 550 mm a -1 . According to model results groundwater level can be below sea level if leakage rate into ONKALO is 180 l/min or more. If leakage rate is smaller than 180 l/min groundwater level is above sea level all the time also during dry years. The modelling results show that there are local water divides inside the island both on the southern and northern side of ONKALO at all time points and for all leakage rates. The local water divides ensure that sea water cannot intrude to ONKALO via surface waters. A more detailed version of the Olkiluoto surface hydrological model was developed for the area around the infiltration experiment. Site scale data were available for the location of the most transmissive hydrogeological zones. The analysis of hydraulic responses has shown that there are local connections between different areas around the pumping drillhole OL-KR14. The importance of the local responses was verified by an additional small hydrogeological zone HZInf connecting HZ19A, HZ19C, OL-KR14, OL-PP66, OL-PP68 and OL-PP69 that was added to the model. In future studies it is necessary to describe the local zones explicitly in the model to allow more realistic flow simulations. Discharge has been measured manually in four measuring weirs since March 2003. The old V-shaped measuring weirs were replaced by new automatic

  13. Utilization of satellite remote sensing data on land surface characteristics in water and heat balance component modeling for vegetation covered territories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Uspensky, Alexander; Startseva, Zoya; Volkova, Elena; Kukharsky, Alexander; Uspensky, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    The model of vertical water and heat transfer in the "soil-vegetation-atmosphere" system (SVAT) for vegetation covered territory has been developed, allowing assimilating satellite remote sensing data on land surface condition as well as accounting for heterogeneities of vegetation and meteorological characteristics. The model provides the calculation of water and heat balance components (such as evapotranspiration Ev, soil water content W, sensible and latent heat fluxes and others ) as well as vertical soil moisture and temperature distributions, temperatures of soil surface and foliage, land surface brightness temperature for any time interval within vegetation season. To describe the landscape diversity soil constants and leaf area index LAI, vegetation cover fraction B, and other vegetation characteristics are used. All these values are considered to be the model parameters. Territory of Kursk region with square about 15 thousands km2 situated in the Black Earth zone of Central Russia was chosen for investigation. Satellite-derived estimates of land surface characteristics have been constructed under cloud-free condition basing AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra and EOS Aqua, SEVIRI/Meteosat-8, -9 data. The developed technologies of AVHRR data thematic processing have been refined providing the retrieval of surface skin brightness temperature Tsg, air foliage temperature Ta, efficient surface temperature Ts.eff and emissivity E, as well as derivation of vegetation index NDVI, B, and LAI. The linear regression estimators for Tsg, Ta and LAI have been built using representative training samples for 2003-2009 vegetation seasons. The updated software package has been applied for AVHRR data thematic processing to generate named remote sensing products for various dates of the above vegetation seasons. The error statistics of Ta, Ts.eff and Тsg derivation has been investigated for various samples using comparison with in-situ measurements that has given RMS errors in the

  14. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Miranda, Fábio; Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer.

  15. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo H C G de Sá

    Full Text Available The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer.

  16. Non-metallic gage for gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroki, Hideo.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns a non-metallic gage for detecting a gap which can not be seen from the out side such as a gap between a water pipe and fuel rods without damaging an objective material as to whether the gap is formed within a standard value or not. The gage is made of a synthetic resin, for example, polyacetal having such a hardness as not damaging the objective material and endurable to repeating flexure upon use. The gage comprises a short gage portion having a predetermined standard thickness and an flexible extended connection portion reduced in the thickness. Provision of the extended connection portion enables wide range flexure thereof such as ±60deg relative to insertion direction during insertion operation upon testing to solve a drawback in the prior art such as worry of breakage of the gage, thereby enabling to conduct inspection rapidly at high reliability. (N.H.)

  17. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... environment and your health: Green living Sun Water Health effects of water pollution How to protect yourself from water pollution Air ... can hurt your health. Learn more about the health effects of polluted water. You can also learn more ... Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Here are ...

  18. Gap solitons in Rabi lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaopin; Malomed, Boris A

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a two-component one-dimensional system, which is based on two nonlinear Schrödinger or Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with spatially periodic modulation of linear coupling ("Rabi lattice") and self-repulsive nonlinearity. The system may be realized in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate, whose components are resonantly coupled by a standing optical wave, as well as in terms of the bimodal light propagation in periodically twisted waveguides. The system supports various types of gap solitons (GSs), which are constructed, and their stability is investigated, in the first two finite bandgaps of the underlying spectrum. These include on- and off-site-centered solitons (the GSs of the off-site type are additionally categorized as spatially even and odd ones), which may be symmetric or antisymmetric, with respect to the coupled components. The GSs are chiefly stable in the first finite bandgap and unstable in the second one. In addition to that, there are narrow regions near the right edge of the first bandgap, and in the second one, which feature intricate alternation of stability and instability. Unstable solitons evolve into robust breathers or spatially confined turbulent modes. On-site-centered GSs are also considered in a version of the system that is made asymmetric by the Zeeman effect, or by birefringence of the optical waveguide. A region of alternate stability is found in the latter case too. In the limit of strong asymmetry, GSs are obtained in a semianalytical approximation, which reduces two coupled GPEs to a single one with an effective lattice potential.

  19. Gap solitons in Rabi lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaopin; Malomed, Boris A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a two-component one-dimensional system, which is based on two nonlinear Schrödinger or Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with spatially periodic modulation of linear coupling ("Rabi lattice") and self-repulsive nonlinearity. The system may be realized in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate, whose components are resonantly coupled by a standing optical wave, as well as in terms of the bimodal light propagation in periodically twisted waveguides. The system supports various types of gap solitons (GSs), which are constructed, and their stability is investigated, in the first two finite bandgaps of the underlying spectrum. These include on- and off-site-centered solitons (the GSs of the off-site type are additionally categorized as spatially even and odd ones), which may be symmetric or antisymmetric, with respect to the coupled components. The GSs are chiefly stable in the first finite bandgap and unstable in the second one. In addition to that, there are narrow regions near the right edge of the first bandgap, and in the second one, which feature intricate alternation of stability and instability. Unstable solitons evolve into robust breathers or spatially confined turbulent modes. On-site-centered GSs are also considered in a version of the system that is made asymmetric by the Zeeman effect, or by birefringence of the optical waveguide. A region of alternate stability is found in the latter case too. In the limit of strong asymmetry, GSs are obtained in a semianalytical approximation, which reduces two coupled GPEs to a single one with an effective lattice potential.

  20. Narrow gap electronegative capacitive discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Narrow gap electronegative (EN) capacitive discharges are widely used in industry and have unique features not found in conventional discharges. In this paper, plasma parameters are determined over a range of decreasing gap length L from values for which an electropositive (EP) edge exists (2-region case) to smaller L-values for which the EN region connects directly to the sheath (1-region case). Parametric studies are performed at applied voltage V{sub rf}=500 V for pressures of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mTorr, and additionally at 50 mTorr for 1000 and 2000 V. Numerical results are given for a parallel plate oxygen discharge using a planar 1D3v (1 spatial dimension, 3 velocity components) particle-in-cell (PIC) code. New interesting phenomena are found for the case in which an EP edge does not exist. This 1-region case has not previously been investigated in detail, either numerically or analytically. In particular, attachment in the sheaths is important, and the central electron density n{sub e0} is depressed below the density n{sub esh} at the sheath edge. The sheath oscillations also extend into the EN core, creating an edge region lying within the sheath and not characterized by the standard diffusion in an EN plasma. An analytical model is developed using minimal inputs from the PIC results, and compared to the PIC results for a base case at V{sub rf}=500 V and 50 mTorr, showing good agreement. Selected comparisons are made at the other voltages and pressures. A self-consistent model is also developed and compared to the PIC results, giving reasonable agreement.

  1. Closing the stop gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czakon, Michal; Mitov, Alexander; Papucci, Michele; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Ruderman, Joshua T.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; New York Univ., NY; Weiler, Andreas; CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva

    2014-07-01

    Light stops are a hallmark of the most natural realizations of weak-scale supersymmetry. While stops have been extensively searched for, there remain open gaps around and below the top mass, due to similarities of stop and top signals with current statistics. We propose a new fast-track avenue to improve light stop searches for R-parity conserving supersymmetry, by comparing top cross section measurements to the theoretical prediction. Stop masses below ∝180 GeV can now be ruled out for a light neutralino. The possibility of a stop signal contaminating the top mass measurement is also briefly addressed.

  2. Photonic band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  3. gap: Genetic Analysis Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hua Zhao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary attempt at collecting tools and utilities for genetic data as an R package called gap is described. Genomewide association is then described as a specific example, linking the work of Risch and Merikangas (1996, Long and Langley (1997 for family-based and population-based studies, and the counterpart for case-cohort design established by Cai and Zeng (2004. Analysis of staged design as outlined by Skol et al. (2006 and associate methods are discussed. The package is flexible, customizable, and should prove useful to researchers especially in its application to genomewide association studies.

  4. Estimation of flow components by recursive filters: case study of Paracatu River Basin (SF-7), Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Moreira Hadad; Paulo Pereira Martins Junior; Vitor Vieira Vasconcelos

    2013-01-01

    The quantification of flow components is important for water resource management. The base, interflow, and runoff flows of nested basins of the Paracatu River (SF-7) were estimated with recursive signal filters in this study. At first, stationary analysis and multivariate gap filling were applied to the flow data. A methodology is presented, proposing filter calibration with the runoff influence and inflection of the recession curve for dry season. Filters are improved with a logic constraint...

  5. Gaps in nonsymmetric numerical semigroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fel, Leonid G.; Aicardi, Francesca

    2006-12-01

    There exist two different types of gaps in the nonsymmetric numerical semigroups S(d 1 , . . . , d m ) finitely generated by a minimal set of positive integers {d 1 , . . . , d m }. We give the generating functions for the corresponding sets of gaps. Detailed description of both gap types is given for the 1st nontrivial case m = 3. (author)

  6. A New Artificial Neural Network Enhanced by the Shuffled Complex Evolution Optimization with Principal Component Analysis (SP-UCI) for Water Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatbini, N.; Faridzad, M.; Yang, T.; Akbari Asanjan, A.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are useful in many fields, including water resources engineering and management. However, due to the non-linear and chaotic characteristics associated with natural processes and human decision making, the use of ANNs in real-world applications is still limited, and its performance needs to be further improved for a broader practical use. The commonly used Back-Propagation (BP) scheme and gradient-based optimization in training the ANNs have already found to be problematic in some cases. The BP scheme and gradient-based optimization methods are associated with the risk of premature convergence, stuck in local optimums, and the searching is highly dependent on initial conditions. Therefore, as an alternative to BP and gradient-based searching scheme, we propose an effective and efficient global searching method, termed the Shuffled Complex Evolutionary Global optimization algorithm with Principal Component Analysis (SP-UCI), to train the ANN connectivity weights. Large number of real-world datasets are tested with the SP-UCI-based ANN, as well as various popular Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs)-enhanced ANNs, i.e., Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO)-, Genetic Algorithm (GA)-, Simulated Annealing (SA)-, and Differential Evolution (DE)-enhanced ANNs. Results show that SP-UCI-enhanced ANN is generally superior over other EA-enhanced ANNs with regard to the convergence and computational performance. In addition, we carried out a case study for hydropower scheduling in the Trinity Lake in the western U.S. In this case study, multiple climate indices are used as predictors for the SP-UCI-enhanced ANN. The reservoir inflows and hydropower releases are predicted up to sub-seasonal to seasonal scale. Results show that SP-UCI-enhanced ANN is able to achieve better statistics than other EAs-based ANN, which implies the usefulness and powerfulness of proposed SP-UCI-enhanced ANN for reservoir operation, water resources engineering and management

  7. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  8. Current components, water pressure, physical, and other data from moored current meters, pressure gauges, and CTD casts from CHARTER/FISHING BOATS and other platforms from the Bering Sea - Coastal Waters of Western Alaska and other locations from 1989-05-14 to 1989-10-06 (NODC Accession 9000278)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current components, water pressure, physical, and other data were collected from moored current meters, pressure gauges, and CTD casts from CHARTER/FISHING BOATS and...

  9. Water-Soluble Polymer Nanoparticles Constructed by Three-Component Self-Assembly: An Efficient Theranostic Agent for Phosphorescent Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Shi, Min; Zhao, Heng; Lin, Jiaomin; An, Lu; Cui, Lili; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Zhiguo; Tian, Qiwei; Yang, Shiping

    2017-03-13

    Water-soluble polymer nanoparticles NP-1 and NP-2 were prepared by using a three-component self-assembly of an iridium complex, poly(4-vinyl pyridine-b-ethylene oxide) (P4VP-b-PEO), and methane sulfonic acid (MSA). Due to the unique metal-ligand charge-transfer transition property and the heavy-atom effect of the iridium atom, NP-1 and NP-2 showed bright phosphorescence and generated the singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) species effectively under visible-light irradiation (λ>400 nm) with a power density of 300 mW cm -2 . NP-2, an example of the polymer nanoparticles, showed minimal cytotoxic activity in the dark. Laser confocal fluorescence and flow-cytometry microscopy experiments demonstrated that NP-2 could be taken up by a model cancer-cell line of 4T1 cells, which could be used as a phosphorescent probe for cell imaging by preferentially staining the cytoplasm. After 6 hours of incubation with NP-2 (100 μg mL -1 ), the cell viability of 4T1 cells decreased to approximately 10 % upon visible-light irradiation (λ>400 nm, 300 mW cm -2 ) only for 10 minutes as a result of the generation of the 1 O 2 species, thus indicating a proof of concept for effective photodynamic therapy for cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. GAP-REACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Raggio, Greer A.; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Duan, Naihua; Marcus, Sue; Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Humensky, Jennifer; Becker, Anne E.; Alarcón, Renato D.; Oquendo, María A.; Hansen, Helena; Like, Robert C.; Weiss, Mitchell; Desai, Prakash N.; Jacobsen, Frederick M.; Foulks, Edward F.; Primm, Annelle; Lu, Francis; Kopelowicz, Alex; Hinton, Ladson; Hinton, Devon E.

    2015-01-01

    Growing awareness of health and health care disparities highlights the importance of including information about race, ethnicity, and culture (REC) in health research. Reporting of REC factors in research publications, however, is notoriously imprecise and unsystematic. This article describes the development of a checklist to assess the comprehensiveness and the applicability of REC factor reporting in psychiatric research publications. The 16-itemGAP-REACH© checklist was developed through a rigorous process of expert consensus, empirical content analysis in a sample of publications (N = 1205), and interrater reliability (IRR) assessment (N = 30). The items assess each section in the conventional structure of a health research article. Data from the assessment may be considered on an item-by-item basis or as a total score ranging from 0% to 100%. The final checklist has excellent IRR (κ = 0.91). The GAP-REACH may be used by multiple research stakeholders to assess the scope of REC reporting in a research article. PMID:24080673

  11. Gap Task Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  12. Closing the value gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    It's a predicament. For the most part, investor-owned electric utilities trade at a deep discount to the actual (that is, replacement-cost) value to their assets. That's because most utilities fail to earn real returns large enough to justify raising and investing capital. The result is a value gap, where overall market value is significantly lower than the replacement costs of the assets. This gap is wider for utilities than for virtually any other industry in our economy. In addition to providing education and awareness, senior management must determine which businesses and activities create value and which diminish it. Then, management must allocate capital and human resources appropriately, holding down investments in value-diminishing areas until they can improve their profitability, and aggressively investing in value-enhancing businesses while preserving their profitability. But value management must not stop with resource-allocation decisions. To create a lasting transition to a value management philosophy, the utility's compensation system must also change: executives will have motivation to create value when compensation stems from this goal, not from such misleading accounting measures as earnings-per-share growth or ROE. That requires clear value-creation goals, and the organization must continuously evaluate top management's performance in light of the progress made toward those goals

  13. Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chovanec, A.; Grath, J.; Kralik, M.; Vogel, W.

    2002-01-01

    An up-date overview of the situation of the Austrian waters is given by analyzing the status of the water quality (groundwater, surface waters) and water protection measures. Maps containing information of nitrate and atrazine in groundwaters (analyses at monitoring stations), nitrate contents and biological water quality of running waters are included. Finally, pollutants (nitrate, orthophosphate, ammonium, nitrite, atrazine etc.) trends in annual mean values and median values for the whole country for the years 1992-1999 are presented in tables. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  14. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available to explore desalination for future capacity. Water is essential to life: the human body is about 75 percent water, with up to 85 percent of brain cells liquid. Around 71 percent of the planet is covered in water, but 97,5 percent of it is salt water... risen to 90 percent, leaving only 10 percent for animals and plants. Yet 40 percent of the water used globally is for sanitation and other uses in buildings. The operation of buildings places a strain on raw water reserves, while wastewater and sewage...

  15. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marion County, Indiana Salt Lake County, Utah Seattle-King County, Washington Tools and Training CLPPP CAP Healthy ... wish to use tap water for drinking or cooking, especially when the water has been off and ...

  16. Soil moisture in sessile oak forest gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagyvainé Kiss, Katalin Anita; Vastag, Viktor; Gribovszki, Zoltán; Kalicz, Péter

    2015-04-01

    By social demands are being promoted the aspects of the natural forest management. In forestry the concept of continuous forest has been an accepted principle also in Hungary since the last decades. The first step from even-aged stand to continuous forest can be the forest regeneration based on gap cutting, so small openings are formed in a forest due to forestry interventions. This new stand structure modifies the hydrological conditions for the regrowth. Without canopy and due to the decreasing amounts of forest litter the interception is less significant so higher amount of precipitation reaching the soil. This research focuses on soil moisture patterns caused by gaps. The spatio-temporal variability of soil water content is measured in gaps and in surrounding sessile oak (Quercus petraea) forest stand. Soil moisture was determined with manual soil moisture meter which use Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) technology. The three different sizes gaps (G1: 10m, G2: 20m, G3: 30m) was opened next to Sopron on the Dalos Hill in Hungary. First, it was determined that there is difference in soil moisture between forest stand and gaps. Second, it was defined that how the gap size influences the soil moisture content. To explore the short term variability of soil moisture, two 24-hour (in growing season) and a 48-hour (in dormant season) field campaign were also performed in case of the medium-sized G2 gap along two/four transects. Subdaily changes of soil moisture were performed. The measured soil moisture pattern was compared with the radiation pattern. It was found that the non-illuminated areas were wetter and in the dormant season the subdaily changes cease. According to our measurements, in the gap there is more available water than under the forest stand due to the less evaporation and interception loss. Acknowledgements: The research was supported by TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0004 and AGRARKLIMA.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034.

  17. The Adaptation Finance Gap Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    UNEP’s Adaptation Gap Report series focuses on Finance, Technology and Knowledge gaps in climate change adaptation. It compliments the Emissions Gap Report series, and explores the implications of failing to close the emissions gap. The report builds on a 2014 assessment by the United Nations...... Environment Programme (UNEP), which laid out the concept of ‘adaptation gaps’ and outlined three such gaps: technology, finance and knowledge. The 2016 Adaptation Gap Report assesses the difference between the financial costs of adapting to climate change in developing countries and the amount of money...... and highlights challenges associated with measuring progress towards fulfilling the adaptation finance gap, while informing national and international efforts to advance adaptation. It analyses the ‘adaptation finance gap’ against the background of the provisions laid out in the Paris Agreement, and benefits...

  18. Minding the gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Carlberg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The plan for the Round table session was to focus on organizational and social/cultural differences between librarians and faculty with the aim to increase our awareness of the differences when we try to find ways to cooperate within the academy or school. This may help us to sort things out, experience acceptance and take adequate actions, saving energy and perhaps be less frustrated.  The questions that the workshop addressed were: What is in the gap between librarians and faculty when dealing with information literacy? How can we fill the gap? Participants discussed this in detail with the aim of together finding ways to understand it better and make it possible to find ways to fill this gap. By defining it and thereby making it easier to work out a strategy for future action to improve the teaching of information literacy, including listing possible, impossible or nearly impossible ways. The springboard to the discussion was extracted from some projects that the workshop leader has been engaged in since 2009. The first example is a research circle where Uppsala University Library used action research to observe and understand the process when we had the opportunity to implement information literacy classes with progression in an undergraduate program. What worked well? What did not? Why? This work was described together with other examples from Uppsala University to an international panel working with quality issues. What did they think of our work? May this change the ways we are working? How? Another example is an ongoing joint project where librarians and faculty members are trying to define ways to increase the cooperation between the library and faculty and make this cooperation sustainable. Recent experience from this was brought to the discussion.   There are an overwhelming number of papers written in this field. A few papers have inspired these ideas. One article in particular: Christiansen, L., Stombler, M. & Thaxton, L. (2004. A

  19. Prevention measures for avoiding unexpected drifting of marine component in recovery equipment of significant metals from sea water. Positioning and monitoring system for marine component and improvement of its positioning accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamada, Masao; Kasai, Noboru; Seko, Noriaki; Hasegawa, Shin; Takeda, Hayato; Katakai, Akio; Sugo, Takanobu; Onuma, Kenji

    2001-11-01

    Positioning and monitoring system for marine component in recovery equipment of significant metals from seawater with adsorbent was designed and assembled to avoid unexpected drifting accident. This system which was set on float part of the marine component obtains the positioning data from GPS satellites and sends them to Takasaki and Mutsu establishments through satellite communication. In both establishments, the position data were shown in computer displays. As characteristic test for 20 days in the real sea, 262 data were obtained every 2 hours. The twice of the distance root mean square (2DRMS) was 223.7 m. To improve this performance, three new functions were added to the present firmware. There are to raise positioning resolutions in longitude and latitude from 0.001 to 0.00001 degree, to remove the reflection of GPS signal from sea surface, and to average remaining three positioning data after maximum and minimum data were omitted from continuous five positioning data. The improved system shows the 2DRMS positioning of 15.5 m. This performance is enough to prevent marine component from its drifting accident. (author)

  20. Bridging the Evaluation Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Wouters

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Paul Wouters’ essay is concerned with bridging the gap between what we value in our academic work and how we are assessed in formal evaluation exercises. He reflects on the recent evaluation of his own center, and reminds us that it is productive to see evaluations not as the (obviously impossible attempt to produce a true representation of past work, but rather as the exploration and performance of “who one wants to be.” Reflecting on why STS should do more than just play along to survive in the indicator game, he suggests that our field should contribute to changing its very rules. In this endeavor, the attitude and sensibilities developed in our field may be more important than any specific theoretical concepts or methodologies.

  1. Finding the gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneham, A. M.

    Much of the pioneering work on radiation damage was based on very simple potentials. Potentials are now much more sophisticated and accurate. Self-consistent molecular dynamics is routine for adiabatic energy surfaces, at least for modest numbers of atoms and modest timescales. This means that non-equilibrium nuclear processes can be followed dynamically. It might also give the illusion that any damage process can be modelled with success. Sadly, this is not yet so. This paper discusses where the gaps lie, and specifically three groups of challenges. The first challenge concerns electronic excited states. The second challenge concerns timescales, from femtoseconds to tens of years. The third challenge concerns length scales, and the link between microscopic (atomistic) and mesoscopic (microstructural) scales. The context of these challenges is materials modification by excitation: the removal of material, the modification of bulk or surface material, the altering of rates of processes or changing of branching ratios, and damage, good or bad.

  2. Understanding the Gender Gap in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Noah; Kost, Lauren; Pollock, Steven

    2008-04-01

    While it has been suggested interactive engagement (IE) techniques can eliminate the gender gap (the difference in performance between men and women on measures of conceptual learning), we find that, at our institution, the gender gap persisted from pre to posttest in IE classes (Pollock, Physical Review: ST PER. 3, 010107, 2007). This talk reports on a three-part follow-up study that investigates what factors contribute to the gender gap. First, we analyze student grades in different components of the course and find that men and women's course grades are not significantly different (p>0.1), but men outscore women on exams and women outscore men on homework and participation. Second, we compare average posttest scores of men and women who score similarly on the pretest and find that there are no significant differences between men and women's average posttest scores. Finally, we analyze other factors in addition to the pretest score that could influence the posttest score and find that gender does not account for a majorportion of the variation in posttest scores when a measure of mathematics performance is included. These findings indicate that the gender gap exists in interactive physics classes, but may be due in large part to differences in preparation, background, and math skills as assessed by traditional survey instruments.

  3. Component Rhinoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Mohmand, Muhammad Humayun; Ahmad, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND According to statistics of American Society of Plastic Surgeons, cosmetic rhinoplasty was the second most frequently performed cosmetic surgery. This study shares the experiences with component rhinoplasty. METHODS From 2004 to 2010, all patients underwent aesthetic nasal surgery were enrolled. The patients requiring only correction of septal deviation and those presenting with cleft lip nasal deformity were excluded. All procedures were performed under general anaesthesia with ope...

  4. Hyperfrequency components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The document has a collection of 19 papers (11 on technologies, 8 on applications) by 26 authors and coauthors. Technological topics include: evolution from conventional HEMT's double heterojunction and planar types of pseudomorphic HEMT's; MMIC R&D and production aspects for very-low-noise, low-power, and very-low-noise, high-power applications; hyperfrequency CAD tools; parametric measurements of hyperfrequency components on plug-in cards for design and in-process testing uses; design of Class B power amplifiers and millimetric-wave, bigrid-transistor mixers, exemplifying combined use of three major types of physical simulation in electrical modeling of microwave components; FET's for power amplification at up to 110 GHz; production, characterization, and nonlinear applications of resonant tunnel diodes. Applications topics include: development of active modules for major European programs; tubes versus solid-state components in hyperfrequency applications; status and potentialities of national and international cooperative R&D on MMIC's and CAD of hyperfrequency circuitry; attainable performance levels in multifunction MMIC applications; state of the art relative of MESFET power amplifiers (Bands S, C, X, Ku); creating a hyperfrequency functions library, of parametrizable reference cells or macrocells; and design of a single-stage, low-noise, band-W amplifier toward development of a three-stage amplifier.

  5. Variance Components

    CERN Document Server

    Searle, Shayle R; McCulloch, Charles E

    1992-01-01

    WILEY-INTERSCIENCE PAPERBACK SERIES. The Wiley-Interscience Paperback Series consists of selected books that have been made more accessible to consumers in an effort to increase global appeal and general circulation. With these new unabridged softcover volumes, Wiley hopes to extend the lives of these works by making them available to future generations of statisticians, mathematicians, and scientists. ". . .Variance Components is an excellent book. It is organized and well written, and provides many references to a variety of topics. I recommend it to anyone with interest in linear models.".

  6. Measuring the Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinshu She MD, MPH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available China is a large country where rapid development is accompanied by growing inequalities. How economic inequalities translate to health inequalities is unknown. Baseline health assessment is lacking among rural Chinese children. We aimed at assessing baseline student health of rural Chinese children and comparing them with those of urban children of similar ages. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2003 Global School-Based Student Health Survey among 100 students Grade 4 to 6 from rural Guizhou, China. Results were summarized and compared with public data from urban Beijing using multivariate logistic regression models. Rural children are more likely to not wash their hands before a meal (odds ratio [OR] = 5.71, P .05. Rural parents are more likely to not know their children’s whereabouts (OR = 1.81, P < .05. Rural children are more than 4 times likely to have serious injuries (OR = 4.64, P < .01 and to be bullied (OR = 4.01, P < .01. In conclusion, school-age rural Chinese children exhibit more health risk behaviors and fewer protective factors at baseline compared to their urban counterparts. Any intervention aimed at improving child health should take this distributive gap into consideration.

  7. Water

    OpenAIRE

    Hertie School of Governance

    2010-01-01

    All human life depends on water and air. The sustainable management of both is a major challenge for today's public policy makers. This issue of Schlossplatz³ taps the streams and flows of the current debate on the right water governance.

  8. Peatlands as Filters for Polluted Mine Water?—A Case Study from an Uranium-Contaminated Karst System in South Africa—Part IV: Quantifying the Chemical Filter Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Winde

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the final part of a paper series on the ability of peat to filter uranium (U from mining-polluted water. The focus is on the characterization and site-specific quantification of the chemical component of the filter model introduced in Part II. Based on U levels in different sediment-water systems of the study area that were analyzed in this paper, peat generally displays the highest geochemical U enrichment even though absolute U levels are relatively low. Results of batch experiments suggest that peat removes U from local mine waters exceptionally well, reaching a removal efficiency of close to 100%. However, almost all of the initially sorbed U is released again on subsequent contact with clean dolomitic water. A synoptic summary of the findings presented in Parts I to IV concludes the paper series.

  9. Modeling water and heat balance components of large territory for vegetation season using information from polar-orbital and geostationary meteorological satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Startseva, Zoya; Uspensky, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Kukharsky, Alexander; Uspensky, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    To date, physical-mathematical modeling processes of land surface-atmosphere interaction is considered to be the most appropriate tool for obtaining reliable estimates of water and heat balance components of large territories. The model of these processes (Land Surface Model, LSM) developed for vegetation period is destined for simulating soil water content W, evapotranspiration Ev, vertical latent LE and heat fluxes from land surface as well as vertically distributed soil temperature and moisture, soil surface Tg and foliage Tf temperatures, and land surface skin temperature (LST) Ts. The model is suitable for utilizing remote sensing data on land surface and meteorological conditions. In the study these data have been obtained from measurements by scanning radiometers AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra and Aqua, SEVIRI/geostationary satellites Meteosat-9, -10 (MSG-2, -3). The heterogeneity of the land surface and meteorological conditions has been taken into account in the model by using soil and vegetation characteristics as parameters and meteorological characteristics as input variables. Values of these characteristics have been determined from ground observations and remote sensing information. So, AVHRR data have been used to build the estimates of effective land surface temperature (LST) Ts.eff and emissivity E, vegetation-air temperature (temperature at the vegetation level) Ta, normalized vegetation index NDVI, vegetation cover fraction B, the leaf area index LAI, and precipitation. From MODIS data the values of LST Tls, Å, NDVI, LAI have been derived. From SEVIRI data there have been retrieved Tls, E, Ta, NDVI, LAI and precipitation. All named retrievals covered the vast territory of the part of the agricultural Central Black Earth Region located in the steppe-forest zone of European Russia. This territory with coordinates 49°30'-54°N, 31°-43°E and a total area of 227,300 km2 has been chosen for investigation. It has been carried out for years 2009

  10. Influence of ethanol as bore fluid component on the morphological structure and performance of PES hollow fiber membrane for oil in water separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otitoju, Tunmise Ayode; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng

    2017-01-01

    The relationships among varying bore fluid compositions containing ethanol/water were studied. The ethanol composition was varied in the ratio of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The membrane dope solutions were prepared from 17.25 wt% polyethersulfone (PES), 0.75 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG), 3 wt% silicon dioxide sol and 78.25 wt% of 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) via dry-jet spinning process. The membranes’ morphology as a result of varying ethanol ratio in the bore fluid composition was characterized and their effects on crude oil/water emulsion separation were evaluated. Results show that the membrane pore size and porosity decreased with increasing ethanol content in the bore fluid mixture, whereas the inner wall thickness of fibers increased. Furthermore, an increase in ethanol concentration also resulted in a slight increase in water contact angle. The use of 100/0 of ethanol/water resulted in UF membranes with the lowest performance. On the other hand, bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water produced membrane with the best performance for crude oil/water separation. Overall, the use of bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water mixture was found to be a powerful way to tune the morphological properties and performance of HF membrane.

  11. Influence of ethanol as bore fluid component on the morphological structure and performance of PES hollow fiber membrane for oil in water separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otitoju, Tunmise Ayode; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2017-10-15

    The relationships among varying bore fluid compositions containing ethanol/water were studied. The ethanol composition was varied in the ratio of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The membrane dope solutions were prepared from 17.25 wt% polyethersulfone (PES), 0.75 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG), 3 wt% silicon dioxide sol and 78.25 wt% of 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) via dry-jet spinning process. The membranes’ morphology as a result of varying ethanol ratio in the bore fluid composition was characterized and their effects on crude oil/water emulsion separation were evaluated. Results show that the membrane pore size and porosity decreased with increasing ethanol content in the bore fluid mixture, whereas the inner wall thickness of fibers increased. Furthermore, an increase in ethanol concentration also resulted in a slight increase in water contact angle. The use of 100/0 of ethanol/water resulted in UF membranes with the lowest performance. On the other hand, bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water produced membrane with the best performance for crude oil/water separation. Overall, the use of bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water mixture was found to be a powerful way to tune the morphological properties and performance of HF membrane.

  12. PhoneGap for enterprise

    CERN Document Server

    Shotts, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    This book is intended for developers who wish to use PhoneGap to develop useful, rich, secure mobile applications for their enterprise environment. The book assumes you have working knowledge of PhoneGap, HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript, and a reasonable understanding of networking and n-tier architectures.

  13. LiGAPS-Beef 2018

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der A.; Ven, van de G.W.J.; Oosting, S.J.; Ittersum, van M.K.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    LiGAPS-Beef is a mechanistic model to assess potential and feed-limited beef production in different beef production systems across the world. The model is one of the first using concepts of production ecology to simulate livestock production. LiGAPS-Beef consists of a thermoregulation sub-model, a

  14. LiGAPS-Beef 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der A.; Ven, van de G.W.J.; Oosting, S.J.; Ittersum, van M.K.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    LiGAPS-Beef is a mechanistic model to assess potential and feed-limited beef production in different beef production systems across the world. The model is one of the first using concepts of production ecology to simulate livestock production. LiGAPS-Beef consists of a thermoregulation sub-model, a

  15. False air-bone gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmin, F

    1983-01-01

    A single case is reported of a severely hearing-impaired child with a finding of a large air-bone gap on pure-tone audiometry on multiple tests. Exploratory surgery found normal middle ear function. Subsequent audiometry indicated the presence of a false air-bone gap resulting from vibrotactile responses. Test procedures for identifying vibrotactile responses are discussed.

  16. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are ...

  17. The Emissions Gap Report 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Timothy Clifford

    This fifth Emissions Gap report has a different focus from previous years. While it updates the 2020 emissions gap analysis, it gives particular attention to the implications of the global carbon dioxide emissions budget for staying within the 2 °C limit beyond 2020. It does so because countries ...

  18. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  19. Gap junctions-guards of excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances...... of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane....

  20. Online stress corrosion crack and fatigue usages factor monitoring and prognostics in light water reactor components: Probabilistic modeling, system identification and data fusion based big data analytics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jagielo, Bryan J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States); Iverson, William I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL (United States); Bhan, Chi Bum [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Soppet, William S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Nuclear reactors in the United States account for roughly 20% of the nation's total electric energy generation, and maintaining their safety in regards to key component structural integrity is critical not only for long term use of such plants but also for the safety of personnel and the public living around the plant. Early detection of damage signature such as of stress corrosion cracking, thermal-mechanical loading related material degradation in safety-critical components is a necessary requirement for long-term and safe operation of nuclear power plant systems.

  1. Methane emissions from six crop species exposed to three components of global climate change: temperature, ultraviolet-B radiation and water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaderi, Mirwais M; Reid, David M

    2009-10-01

    We examined the effects of temperature, ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation and watering regime on aerobic methane (CH(4)) emission from six crops-faba bean, sunflower, pea, canola, barley and wheat. Plants were grown in controlled-environment growth chambers under two temperature regimes (24/20 and 30/26 degrees C), three levels of UVB radiation [0 (zero), 5 (ambient) and 10 (enhanced) kJ m(-2) d(-1)] and two watering regimes (well watered and water stressed). A gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector was used to measure CH(4) emission rates [ng g(-1) dry weight (DW) h(-1)] from detached fresh leaves of each species and attached leaves of pea plants. Plant growth [stem height, leaf area (LA) and aboveground dry matter (AG biomass)] and gas exchange [net CO(2) assimilation (A(N)), transpiration (E) and water use efficiency (WUE)] were also determined. We found that higher temperature, water stress and UVB radiation at the zero and enhanced levels significantly enhanced CH(4) emissions. Crop species varied in CH(4) emission, which was highest for pea and lowest for barley. Higher temperature and water stress reduced all growth parameters, whereas ambient and enhanced UVB decreased stem height but increased LA and AG biomass. Higher temperature decreased A(N) and WUE but increased E, whereas water stress decreased A(N) but increased E and WUE. Zero and enhanced UVB reduced A(N) and E. Growth and gas exchange varied with species. Overall, CH(4) emission was negatively correlated with stem height and AG biomass. We conclude that CH(4) emissions may increase under climatic stress conditions and this extra source might contribute to the 'greenhouse effect'.

  2. Bridging the terahertz gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Giles; Linfield, Edmund

    2004-01-01

    Over the last century or so, physicists and engineers have progressively explored and conquered the electromagnetic spectrum. Starting with visible light, we have encroached outwards, developing techniques for generating and detecting radiation at both higher and lower frequencies. And as each successive region of the spectrum has been colonized, we have developed technology to exploit the radiation found there. X-rays, for example, are routinely used to image hidden objects. Near-infrared radiation is used in fibre-optic communications and in compact-disc players, while microwaves are used to transmit signals from your mobile phone. But there is one part of the electromagnetic spectrum that has steadfastly resisted our advances. This is the terahertz region, which ranges from frequencies of about 300 GHz to 10 THz (10 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 Hz). This corresponds to wavelengths of between about 1 and 0.03 mm, and lies between the microwave and infrared regions of the spectrum. However, the difficulties involved in making suitably compact terahertz sources and detectors has meant that this region of the spectrum has only begun to be explored thoroughly over the last decade. A particularly intriguing feature of terahertz radiation is that the semiconductor devices that generate radiation at frequencies above and below this range operate in completely different ways. At lower frequencies, microwaves and millimetre- waves can be generated by 'electronic' devices such as those found in mobile phones. At higher frequencies, near-infrared and visible light are generated by 'optical' devices such as semiconductor laser diodes, in which electrons emit light when they jump across the semiconductor band gap. Unfortunately, neither electronic nor optical devices can conveniently be made to work in the terahertz region because the terahertz frequency range sits between the electronic and optical regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Developing a terahertz source is therefore a

  3. The fluctuating gap model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-01

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T c in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the quasi

  4. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  5. Gap Winds and Wakes: SAR Observations and Numerical Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feifei; Smith, Ronald B.

    1999-04-01

    The nature of terrain-induced gap winds and wakes in the atmosphere is examined using surface wind data from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and the shallow water equations. The shallow water model is used to predict the types of wake-jet wind patterns that might occur behind an idealized pair of bell-shaped hills with a gap between them. A regime diagram is constructed based on the width of the gap and the upstream Froude number. Specific predictions of the model are found to compare moderately well with SAR data from four examples of airflow near Unimak Island in the Aleutian Chain. The model predicts the observed wakes and jets, including jets that exceed the upstream speed. Theoretical analysis considers the relative importance of rising terrain and narrowing valley walls in the acceleration of gap winds. Wind speeds in the wake region are controlled by the Bernoulli function and regional pressure. Gap winds therefore are streams of air that have avoided Bernoulli loss over the terrain by passing through gaps. The speed of gap winds can exceed the upstream speed only in ridgelike situations when the regional leeside pressure is lower than the upstream pressure.

  6. A study on critical heat flux in gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae Joon; Jeong, Ji Whan; Cho, Young Ro; Chang, Young Cho; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jong Whan; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Hee Dong

    1999-04-01

    The scope and content of this study is to perform the test on critical heat flux in hemispherical narrow gaps using distilled water and Freon R-113 as experimental parameters, such as system pressure from 1 to 10 atm and gap thickness of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mm. The CHFG test results have shown that the measured values of critical power are much lower than the predictions made by empirical CHF correlations applicable to flat plate gaps and annuli. The pressure effect on the critical power was found to be much milder than predictions by those CHF correlations. The values and the pressure trend of the critical powers measured in the present experiments are close to the values converted from the CCFL data. This confirms the claim that a CCFL brings about local dryout and finally, global dryout in hemispherical narrow gaps. Increases in the gap thickness lead to increase in critical power. The measured critical power using R-113 in hemispherical narrow gaps are 60 % lower than that using water due to the lower boiling point, which is different from the pool boiling condition. The CCFL (counter counter flow limit) test facility was constructed and the test is being performed to estimate the CCFL phenomena and to evaluate the CHFG test results on critical power in hemispherical narrow gaps. (Author). 35 refs., 2 tabs., 19 figs

  7. Identification of stock components using morphological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, B J; Grabowski, T B; Marteinsdóttir, G

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the development of a quantitative method for distinguishing stock components of Icelandic cod Gadus morhua based on visual examination of morphology. The stock is known to be structured into genetically distinct geographic components (north and south of Iceland) and behavioural types that spawn sympatrically. Differences in morphology were tested between locations, genotypes (a proxy for behaviour) and sexes. Results show morphological markers on the head, fins and body of G. morhua that are correlated with the sex, genotype of the fish at the pantophysin (pan-I) locus and the location at which the fish were caught. Females were found to have relatively deep bodies, and the pan-I(BB) genotype (associated with deep-water feeding behaviour) have greater gaps between their fins. Overall, morphology is more useful for distinguishing sympatric genotypes but less powerful at identifying genetically distinct geographic sub-populations, perhaps because counter-gradient evolution reduces phenotypic differences even with an underlying genetic cause. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  8. Peatlands as Filters for Polluted Mine Water?—A Case Study from an Uranium-Contaminated Karst System in South Africa—Part III: Quantifying the Hydraulic Filter Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Winde

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As Part III of a four-part series on the filter function of peat for uranium (U, this paper focuses on the hydraulic component of a conceptual filter model introduced in Part II. This includes the quantification of water flow through the wetland as a whole, which was largely unknown and found to be significantly higher that anticipated. Apart from subaquatic artesian springs associated with the underlying karst aquifer the higher flow volumes were also caused by plumes of polluted groundwater moving laterally into the wetland. Real-time, quasi-continuous in situ measurements of porewater in peat and non-peat sediments indicate that rising stream levels (e.g., during flood conditions lead to the infiltration of stream water into adjacent peat deposits and thus allow for a certain proportion of flood water to be filtered. However, changes in porewater quality triggered by spring rains may promote the remobilization of possibly sorbed U.

  9. Current levels determination of 137 Cesium in sea water from Guayaquil to Greenwich Island and in some components of the aquatic ecosystems at Fort William cape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Piedad

    1998-01-01

    During VII ecuadorian expedition was carried out a study of the current activity of the 137 Cs in superficial water of sea. This project was made with the purpose of evaluating the impact of the radioactive atmospheric contamination on the masses of water of the Antarctic Continent , possibly originated in the processes of nuclear fission of the industry and also for the last nuclear explosions, effected of September of 1995 to January 1996 in the French Polynesia. The samples were taken between Guayaquil and Greenwich Island. They were analyzed using techniques of gamma spectroscopy, the results determined presence of 137 Cs with the concentration of within the permissible limits

  10. Pressurized water and steam tests. EdF's R and D studies on valves and fittings and on components of industrial circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This document gives a presentation of the means developed by the R and D direction of Electricite de France (EdF) for the tests performed on valves and fittings devoted to industrial installations: an internal calibration and metrology laboratory devoted to pressure, temperature and mechanical vibration tests, performing data acquisition and processing means, an internal water chemistry laboratory, and a series of test facilities for pressurized water and steam tests (Cumulus, Cypres, Cythere, GB, Coccinelle, Babette 1 and 2 loops). A description of the principal functions, functioning principle, performances, and performable tests is given for each loop. (J.S.)

  11. A comparison of three methods to estimate evapotranspiration in two contrasting loblolly pine plantations: age-related changes in water use and drought sensitivity of evapotranspiration components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Christophe Domec; Ge Sun; Asko Noormets; Michael J. Gavazzi; Emrys A. Treasure; Erika Cohen; Jennifer J. Swenson; Steve G. McNulty; John S. King

    2012-01-01

    Increasing variability of rainfall patterns requires detailed understanding of the pathways of water loss from ecosystems to optimize carbon uptake and management choices. In the current study we characterized the usability of three alternative methods of different rigor for quantifying stand-level evapotranspiration (ET), partitioned ET into tree transpiration (T),...

  12. Assessment of the anthropogenic component in the formation of extreme low-water periods based on remote sensing (case study for Russian south region)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailukova, Polina; Kireeva, Maria; Ilich, Vlad; Sazonov, Alexey; Kharlamov, Maxim

    2017-04-01

    Extreme low flow periods on the rivers are one of the most hydrological hazards. The aim of the study is determine causes of these periods based on the analysis of in land use changes. The territory of research is Don river basin. There is an assumption that the changes of Don watershed determines the increased duration of low-water periods, degradation of the river system of the region and the hard deficit of water resources. Authors analyzed archive of Landsat imagery for Don river basin for key time periods. The first key period is the middle 1970s - it was period of intensive land use on watershed. The second - is the middle 1990s characterized by decreasing rate of agriculture and increasing the area of abandoned lands. The third period is the middle 2000s when the rate of land use had started to increase. And the last period - 2014-2015 years, when low-water periods in Don river basin had become a disaster. We create mosaic of satellite images for each period and then classified it for several classes - urban area, different type of agricultural fields, forest, ponds and reservoirs. The analysis of classification results is demonstrate land use dynamic during last 45 years. The watershed changes was one the many reason of losses of the snowmelt runoff, which together with climate changes greatly increased the low-water period in the Don river basin. This research was supported by Russian President Grant 2017 (contract No. MK-2331.2017.5)

  13. 20 years of long-term water balance measurements of a landfill cover system with components constructed from pre-treated dredged material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, K.; Groengroeft, A.; Gebert, J.; Harms, C.; Eschenbach, A.

    2017-01-01

    The cover system of the mono-landfill Hamburg-Francop for disposal of dredged
    material comprises a mineral liner of pre-treated fine-grained dredged material (‘METHAmaterial’) and an overlying drainage layer of pre-treated sandy dredged material (‘METHAsand’). Water balance and effectiveness of

  14. HYDROPHOBIC ZEOLITE-SILICONE RUBBER MIXED MATRIX MEMBRANES FOR ETHANOL-WATER SEPARATION: EFFECT OF ZEOLITE AND SILICONE COMPONENT SELECTION ON PERVAPORATION PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-silica ZSM 5 zeolites were incorporated into poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) polymers to form mixed matrix membranes for ethanol removal from water via pervaporation. Membrane formulation and preparation parameters were varied to determine the effect on pervaporation perform...

  15. Annual and Intra-Annual Water Balance Components of a Short Rotation Poplar Coppice Based on Sap Flow and Micrometeorological and Hydrological Approaches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischer, Milan; Orság, Matěj; Trnka, Miroslav; Pohanková, Eva; Hlavinka, Petr; Tripathi, Abishek; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 991, JUN 04-07 (2013), s. 401-408 ISSN 0567-7572 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : short rotation poplar coppice * water balance * sap flow * Bowen ratio and energy balance method * modeling Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. Gap Surface Plasmon Waveguide Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Grøndahl; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic waveguides supporting gap surface plasmons (GSPs) localized in a dielectric spacer between metal films are investigated numerically and the waveguiding properties at telecommunication wavelengths are presented. Especially, we emphasize that the mode confinement can advantageously be con...

  17. Closing the Cybersecurity Skills Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Vogel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current consensus is that there is a worldwide gap in skills needed for a competent cybersecurity workforce. This skills gap has implications for the national security sector, both public and private. Although the view is that this will take a concerted effort to rectify, it presents an opportunity for IT professionals, university students, and aspirants to take-up jobs in national security national intelligence as well military and law enforcement intelligence. This paper examines context of the issue, the nature of the cybersecurity skills gap, and some key responses by governments to address the problem. The paper also examines the emerging employment trends, some of the employment challenges, and what these might mean for practice. The paper argues that the imperative is to close the cyber skills gap by taking advantage of the window of opportunity, allowing individuals interested in moving into the cybersecurity field to do so via education and training.

  18. Customizing Laboratory Information Systems: Closing the Functionality Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershkovich, Peter; Sinard, John H

    2015-09-01

    Highly customizable laboratory information systems help to address great variations in laboratory workflows, typical in Pathology. Often, however, built-in customization tools are not sufficient to add all of the desired functionality and improve systems interoperability. Emerging technologies and advances in medicine often create a void in functionality that we call a functionality gap. These gaps have distinct characteristics—a persuasive need to change the way a pathology group operates, the general availability of technology to address the missing functionality, the absence of this technology from your laboratory information system, and inability of built-in customization tools to address it. We emphasize the pervasive nature of these gaps, the role of pathology informatics in closing them, and suggest methods on how to achieve that. We found that a large number of the papers in the Journal of Pathology Informatics are concerned with these functionality gaps, and an even larger proportion of electronic posters and abstracts presented at the Pathology Informatics Summit conference each year deal directly with these unmet needs in pathology practice. A rapid, continuous, and sustainable approach to closing these gaps is critical for Pathology to provide the highest quality of care, adopt new technologies, and meet regulatory and financial challenges. The key element of successfully addressing functionality gaps is gap ownership—the ability to control the entire pathology information infrastructure with access to complementary systems and components. In addition, software developers with detailed domain expertise, equipped with right tools and methodology can effectively address these needs as they emerge.

  19. Evapotranspiration as a component of water footprint: use of conventional and satellite data for better estimation of spatial and temporal pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Piotr; Kepinska-Kasprzak, Malgorzata

    2014-08-01

    One of the main scientific goals of the COST Action ES1106 ("Assessment of European Agriculture Water use and Trade under Climate Change" EURO-AGRIWAT) is the analysis of the global water footprint (WF) in agriculture and virtual water trade (VWT). The starting point for further activities is analyses and inventory of data and tools which could be helpful for WF and WFT assessments. Evaporation values (ET) are crucial for agriculture where estimates of water reserves available for crops are the basis for scheduling the time and intensity of irrigation, yield prognoses, etc. Detail evapotranspiration data are, therefore, of essential value. However, stations performing direct measurements of evapotranspiration are very scarcely distributed in Poland for which reason the interpolation of the data is necessarily biased. Hence, evapotranspiration values are calculated using indirect methods (usually empirical formulas). Data from geostationary meteorological satellites are used operationally for determination of evapotranspiration with good spatial and temporal resolution (e.g. Land-SAF product). Study of relation between evapotranspiration values determined with use of satellite data and calculated using Penman-Monteith formula was performed for the study area in Poland. Daily values and cumulated (i.e. decadal, monthly and yearly) values were analyzed to determine quality and possible added value of the satellite product. Relation between reference ET and actual ET in two consecutive years was discussed, both for whole test area and individual stations, taking into account land use and possible water deficit in the root region, represented by H-SAF soil wetness index product. The differences were presented and discussed.

  20. Experimental study of gap and thickness influence on the vibration response and damping of flexible fluid-coupled coaxial cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.; Brown, S.; Lieb, B.; Lestingi, J.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical capabilities for fluid-solid situations are in the process of being developed. However, since the overall phenomenon of fluid-solid interaction is not thoroughly understood, it was the objective of this study to develop and carry out an experimental program which would provide additional insight into the mechanics of fluid-solid interaction. Since one of the primary components in a nuclear power system is the reactor vessel and the thermal liner, the experimental study described in this work was limited to the response of a set of coaxial cylinders with water in the annulus. The effects of cylinder thickness and the fluid filled annulus gap size on the resonant frequencies and mode shapes of the cylinders are presented; also included is an evaluation of damping for selected gaps and cylinder thicknesses. Details of the experimental setup and procedures are also outlined

  1. Rank Regressions, Wage Distributions, and the Gender Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Nicole M.; Lemieux, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Current Population Survey data from 1979 and 1991 were used to decompose changes in the gender wage gap into three components: skill distribution, wage structure, and improvements in women's position. Relative wage gains by women may have been a source of increasing wage inequality among men. (SK)

  2. Challenge the Gap: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Mel; Ainscow, Mel; Wigelsworth, Michael; Troncoso, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    Challenge the Gap (CtG) is a school collaboration programme designed by Challenge Partners that aims to break the link between disadvantage and attainment. The main components of CtG are: (1) after-school workshops drawing on published research and evidenced practice; (2) focused in-school interventions with a selected cohort of disadvantaged…

  3. Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can We Listen for Open Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    open water? Jeffrey A Nystuen Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington 1013 NE 40th Street Seattle, Washington 98105 phone: 206... Laboratory ,1013 NE 40th St,Seattle,WA,98105 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR...Listening to Glaciers: Passive Hydroacoustics Near Marine-Terminating Glaciers”, Oceanography, vol. 25. Stabeno, P.J, Falry, E.V., Kachel, N.B

  4. Verb gapping: an action-gap compatibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Berry

    2015-03-01

    This study addresses the processing of verb-gapping sentences, e.g., John closes a juice bottle and Jim [ ] a lemonade bottle. The goal was to explore if there would be an interaction between language comprehension and motor action not only for overt action verbs but also for gapped verbs. Participants read gapping sentences that either described clockwise or counter-clockwise manual rotations (e.g., closes vs. opens a juice bottle). Adopting a paradigm developed by Zwaan and Taylor (2006), sentence presentation was frame-by-frame. Participants proceeded from frame to frame by turning a knob either clockwise or counter clockwise. Analyses of the frame reading-times yielded a significant effect of compatibility between the linguistically conveyed action and the knob turning for the overt-verb (e.g., closes/opens a juice bottle) as well as for the gapped-verb frame (e.g., a lemonade bottle) - with longer reading times in the match condition than in the mismatch condition - but not for any of the other frames (e.g., and Jim). The results are promising in providing novel evidence for the real-time reactivation of gapped verbs and in suggesting that action simulation is not bound to the processing of overt verbs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of water- versus land-based exercise training as a component of a multidisciplinary intervention program for overweight and obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopera, Carlos Andrés; da Silva, Danilo Fernandes; Bianchini, Josiane Aparecida Alves; Locateli, João Carlos; Moreira, Amanda Caroline Teles; Dada, Rafaela Pilegi; Thivel, David; Nardo, Nelson

    2016-10-15

    To compare water- versus land-based exercise programs, as part of a multidisciplinary intervention, on physical fitness and health-related quality of life in overweight and obese adolescents. A total of 151 overweight and obese adolescents (age: 13.2±1.8years) were divided into: 1) a water-based intervention (WB; n=28); 2) a land-based intervention (LB; n=57); and 3) a control group (CG; n=66). Anthropometric measures, body composition, flexibility, abdominal strength/endurance, cardiorespiratory fitness and health-related quality of life were assessed prior and by the end of a 16-week intervention. Both the water- and land-based interventions were part of a multidisciplinary program focusing on behavioral changes. Fat Mass (%) was significantly reduced in both intervention groups and a higher progression was observed in the WB group (-9.8±7.2% versus -6.1±6.2%; pchanges within-groups). However, LB increased more abdominal strength than WB (69.6±165.8% versus 53.4±83.4%; pchange body weight (WB: -1.7±5.3%; LB: 0.1±3.4%; p>0.05 for both groups) and increased (padolescents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Is There a Gap in the Gap? Regional Differences in the Gender Pay Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Boris; König, Marion; Möller, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate regional differences in the gender pay gap both theoretically and empirically. Within a spatial oligopsony model, we show that more densely populated labour markets are more competitive and constrain employers' ability to discriminate against women. Utilising a large administrative data set for western Germany and a flexible semi-parametric propensity score matching approach, we find that the unexplained gender pay gap for young workers is substantially lower in ...

  7. Single and multi-component adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine from water onto transition metal modified and partially calcined inorganic-organic pillared clay fixed beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2015-01-23

    Fixed-beds of transition metal (Co(2+), Ni(2+) or Cu(2+)) inorganic-organic pillared clays (IOCs) were prepared to study single- and multi-component non-equilibrium adsorption of a set of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs: salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine) from water. Adsorption capacities for single components revealed that the copper(II) IOCs have better affinity toward salicylic and clofibric acid. However, multi-component adsorption tests showed a considerable decrease in adsorption capacity for the acids and an unusual selectivity toward carbamazepine depending on the transition metal. This was attributed to a combination of competition between PPCPs for adsorption sites, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and plausible pore blocking caused by carbamazepine. The cobalt(II) IOC bed that was partially calcined to fractionate the surfactant moiety showcased the best selectivity toward caffeine, even during multi-component adsorption. This was due to a combination of a mildly hydrophobic surface and interaction between the PPCP and cobalt(II). In general, the tests suggest that these IOCs may be a potential solution for the removal of PPCPs if employed in a layered-bed configuration, to take care of families of adsorbates in a sequence that would produce sharpened concentration wavefronts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Results of gap conductance tests in the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, R.W.; Sparks, D.T.

    1977-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) fuel rod behavior studies are being conducted by the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc. These studies are being performed under contract to the Energy Research and Development Adminstration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Water Reactor Safety Research Fuel Behavior Program. Experimental data for verification of analytical models developed to predict light water nuclear fuel rod behavior under normal and postulated accident conditions are being obtained from a variety of in-reactor and out-of-reactor experiments. This paper summarizes the results of tests performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to obtain data from which the thermal response, gap conductance, and stored energy of LWR fuel rods can be determined. Primary objectives of the PBF gap conductance test program are (a) to obtain data on a variety of pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rod designs, under a wide range of operating conditions, from which gap conductance values can be determined and (b) to evaluate experimentally the power oscillation method for measuring the gap conductance and thermal response of a fresh or burned LWR fuel rod. Tests have been performed with both irradiated and unirradiated PWR-type fuel and with fresh BWR-type fuel rods. Some PWR rod test results are described, and the thermal response data from BWR rod tests are discussed in greater detail. Comparisons are made of gap conductance values determined by the tests with analytically calculated values using the Fuel Rod Analysis Program-Transient (FRAP-T) computer code. These comparisons provide insight into both the experimental measurements methods and the validity of the gap conductance models

  9. Principal component analysis-adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFISs) for the simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of three metals in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mohammad; Olivieri, Alejandro C; Freitas, Matheus P

    2009-08-15

    A spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous determination of Al(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) using Alizarin Red S as a chelating agent was developed. The parameters controlling the behavior of the system were investigated and optimum conditions were selected. The presence of non-linearities was checked using Mallows augmented partial residual plots. To take into account these non-linearities, a principal component analysis-adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (PC-ANFISs) method was used for the analysis of ternary mixtures of Al(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) over the range of 0.05-0.90, 0.05-4.05 and 0.05-0.95 microg mL(-1), respectively. Absorbance data were collected between 370 and 700 nm. The method was applied to accurately and simultaneously determines the content of metal ions in several synthetic mixtures.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in PWR primary water: an update of metallurgical investigations performed on French withdrawn components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boursier, J.M. [R and D Division - Materials Branch Studies - Les Renardieres - 78 - Moret sur Loing (France); Gallet, S.; Rouillon, Y. [Nuclear Power Division - Corporate Laboratories - 37 - Avoine (France); Bordes, P. [Electricite de France, Nuclear Power Division - 93 - Saint Denis (France)

    2002-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304, 304L, 316 and 316L) are largely used in Nuclear Power Plants because of their good resistance to corrosion and their satisfactory mechanical properties. Nevertheless, on various French PWR Nuclear Power Plants, several cases of corrosion have been encountered in auxiliary circuit portions where deleterious species and oxygen can be present. This paper focuses on the metallurgical investigations performed on pulled out components such as Canopy welds or 'dead legs' (auxiliary circuit portions connected to the main primary loops) in terms of cracking locations and degradation parameters. In addition, some comparisons between Nuclear Power Plant feedback and fundamental research and development studies are discussed, particularly in the scope of temperature, microstructure, stresses (applied and residual) and medium responsible for the degradation. (authors)

  11. Characteristics of Conducting the Multi-Component Seismic Prospecting in the Transition Zone in Conditions of Very Shallow Water of Arctic Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Matveev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition zones of transition from land to sea are the areas where it is extremely difficult to conduct geophysical works with conventional methods. In the Arctic seas of Russia, there are additional difficulties associated with the short field season, unfavorable hydrometeorological conditions, and severe restrictions imposed on the methodology and acquisition techniques by requirements of the environmental nature protection legislation. To obtain high-quality seismic data it is extremely important to select the most suitable equipment for data acquisition, optimal shooting geometry and data acquisition methodology, and the most advanced data processing and quality control software. The purpose of this article is to show developed at JSC MAGE 4-component 2D seismic technology based on use of the autonomous bottom stations. It allows conducting the seismic regional 2D survey in the transit area with registration of converted (PS waves at higher efficiency level.

  12. SOFA 2 Component Framework and Its Ecosystem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malohlava, M.; Hnětynka, P.; Bureš, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 295, 9 May (2013), s. 101-106 ISSN 1571-0661. [FESCA 2012. International Workshop on Formal Engineering approaches to Software Components and Architectures /9./. Tallinn, 31.03.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD201/09/H057 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) GAP202/11/0312; UK(CZ) SVV-2012-265312 Keywords : CBSE * component system * component model * component * sofa * ecosystem * development tool Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software

  13. Facile one-pot four component synthesis of pyrido[2,3-d:6,5-d‧]dipyrimidines catalyzed by CuFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Hossein; Didar, Asieh

    2017-06-01

    A simple, efficient and green method for the synthesis of pyrido[2,3-d:6,5-d‧]dipyrimidine derivatives via one-pot four-component reaction of aromatic aldehyde, 2-thiobarbituric acid, ammonium acetate in the presence of catalytic amount of a magnetically heterogeneous catalyst has been developed. This protocol includes some important advantages such as; high to excellent product yields, high atom economy, usage of water as a green reaction medium, reusability of catalyst, and simple work-up procedure.

  14. ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DREES, A.; AHRENS, L.; III FLILLER, R.; GASSNER, D.; MCINTYRE, G.T.; MICHNOFF, R.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2002-01-01

    During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abort gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance

  15. Minimum period and the gap in periods of Cataclysmic binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paczynski, B.; Sienkiewicz, R.

    1983-01-01

    The 81 minute cutoff to the orbital periods of hydrogen-rich cataclysmic binaries is consistent with evolution of those systems being dominated by angular momentum losses due to gravitational radiation. Unfortunately, many uncertainties, mainly poorly known atmospheric opacities below 2000 K, make is physically impossible to verify the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation by using the observed cutoff at 81 minutes. The upper boundary of the gap in orbital periods observed at about 3 hours is almost certainly due to enhanced angular momentum losses from cataclysmic binaries which have longer periods. The physical mechanism of those losses is not identified, but a possible importance of stellar winds is pointed out. The lower boundary of the gap may be explained with the oldest cataclysmic binaries, whose periods evolved past the minimum at 81 minutes and reached the value of 2 hours within about 12 x 10 9 years after the binary had formed. Those binaries should have secondary components of only 0.02 solar masses, and their periods could be used to estimate ages of the oldest cataclysmic stars, and presumably the age of Galaxy. An alternative explanation for the gap requires that binaries should be detached while crossing the gap. A possible mechanism for this phenomenon is discussed. It requires the secondary components to be about 0.2 solar masses in the binaries just below the gap

  16. Energy gap subharmonic in characteristics of Y Ba2 Cu3 O7-x microbridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnyakov, A.V.; Levinsen, M.T.; Sheng, Yu.K.; Frel'toft, T.

    1996-01-01

    The microbridges formed in thin epitaxial Y Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-x films were investigated. The characteristics of the microbridges exhibited subharmonic gap structures corresponding to large (2Δ = 49 meV) and small (2Δ 2 = 10.3 meV) components of the energy gap at T = 4.2 K. The appearance of the subharmonic gap structures is attributed to the phenomenon of Andreev reflection

  17. Subharmonic gap structure in the characteristics of YBa2Cu3O7-x microbridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnyakov, A.V.; Levinsen, M.T.; Sheng, Y.Q.; Freltoft, T.

    1996-01-01

    The subharmonic gap structures corresponding to large, 2Δ 1 =48 meV, and small, 2Δ 2 =10.3 meV, components of the energy gap were observed in the first derivatives of the current-voltage characteristics of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x epitaxial thin film microbridges. The appearance of the subharmonic gap structures is attributed to Andreev reflection. (orig.)

  18. Determination of Cu, Co and Pb in gasoline by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using aqueous standard addition in gasoline-ethanol-water three-component system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Mustafa [Istanbul Technical University, Science and Letters Faculty, Chemistry Department, 34469 Maslak Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: ozcanm@itu.edu.tr; Akman, Suleyman [Istanbul Technical University, Science and Letters Faculty, Chemistry Department, 34469 Maslak Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-03-31

    Single phase gasoline-ethanol-water mixture was prepared for performing standardization with aqueous standards and for the elimination of difficulties with pipetting of gasoline. Standard addition calibration method was applied to the determination of Cu, Pb and Co in gasoline by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Good agreements were found for the analysis results of the present 'direct' method compared with those obtained by digesting gasoline in microwave furnace with nitric acid. The limit of detection values were 1.5 {mu}g kg{sup -1} Co, 2.5 {mu}g kg{sup -1} Cu and 4.0 {mu}g kg{sup -1} Pb in original gasoline samples.

  19. Transfer of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from contaminated irrigation water to parsley is dependent on curli and cellulose, the biofilm matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidot, Anat; Yaron, Sima

    2009-03-01

    Enteric pathogens can contaminate fresh produce, and this contaminated produce can be a significant potential source of human illness. The objective of this study was to determine a possible mode of transfer of Salmonella Typhimurium from contaminated irrigation water to mature parsley plants and to investigate the role of bacterial cellulose and curli. Parsley plants were drip irrigated with water containing green fluorescent protein-labeled Salmonella Typhimurium. Stems and leaves were harvested 1 day after the third irrigation and examined for the presence of Salmonella Typhimurium. Three weeks after harvesting, the presence of Salmonella was again confirmed in the regrown plants. During this period, bacterial numbers on leaves declined from 4.1 (+/- 0.3) to 2.3 (+/- 0.1) log CFU g(-1) (P edible parts of the plants. Confocal laser scanning microscopic images revealed that Salmonella Typhimurium formed aggregates at a depth of 8 to 32 microm beneath the leaf surface. Penetration might be achieved through the roots or the phyllosphere. The importance of the bacterial cellulose and curli was determined by comparing the wild-type strain with its mutants, which lack the ability to synthesize cellulose and curli. Counts of the double mutant were 2-log higher in the soil but 1-log lower in the leaves (P < 0.05). Deletion of the agfBA gene (for curli) was more effective than deletion of bcsA (for cellulose). Thus, curli and cellulose play a role in the transfer or survival of Salmonella Typhimurium in the plant, as they do for plant pathogens.

  20. A radiographic analysis of implant component misfit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharkey, Seamus

    2011-07-01

    Radiographs are commonly used to assess the fit of implant components, but there is no clear agreement on the amount of misfit that can be detected by this method. This study investigated the effect of gap size and the relative angle at which a radiograph was taken on the detection of component misfit. Different types of implant connections (internal or external) and radiographic modalities (film or digital) were assessed.

  1. Discovery and investigation of anticancer ruthenium-arene Schiff-base complexes via water-promoted combinatorial three-component assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Mun Juinn; Licona, Cynthia; Yuan Qiang Wong, Daniel; Pastorin, Giorgia; Gaiddon, Christian; Ang, Wee Han

    2014-07-24

    The structural diversity of metal scaffolds makes them a viable alternative to traditional organic scaffolds for drug design. Combinatorial chemistry and multicomponent reactions, coupled with high-throughput screening, are useful techniques in drug discovery, but they are rarely used in metal-based drug design. We report the optimization and validation of a new combinatorial, metal-based, three-component assembly reaction for the synthesis of a library of 442 Ru-arene Schiff-base (RAS) complexes. These RAS complexes were synthesized in a one-pot, on-a-plate format using commercially available starting materials under aqueous conditions. The library was screened for their anticancer activity, and several cytotoxic lead compounds were identified. In particular, [(η6-1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene)RuCl(4-methoxy-N-(2-quinolinylmethylene)aniline)]Cl (4) displayed low micromolar IC50 values in ovarian cancers (A2780, A2780cisR), breast cancer (MCF7), and colorectal cancer (HCT116, SW480). The absence of p53 activation or changes in IC50 value between p53+/+ and p53-/- cells suggests that 4 and possibly the other lead compounds may act independently of the p53 tumor suppressor gene frequently mutated in cancer.

  2. Library thermohydraulic components for training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelao Caruana, M. J.; Di Benedetto, A.; Pierini, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermohydraulic components Library was modeled in MatLab/Simulink®. This library owns Pipe type components (pump, control valve and / or heaters), storage tanks (Open, Closed and Equilibrium Water Vapor-Air) and Heat Exchangers (Co-Current, Counter-Current and U-tubes). Each component can be attached to other components through the component library Header, in order to create a more complex thermal-hydraulic system which in turn can interact with other thermal-hydraulic systems. (author)

  3. Gap filling strategies for long term energy flux data sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falge, E.; Baldocchi, D.; Olson, R.; Anthoni, P.; Aubinet, M.; Bernhofer, C.; Burba, G.; Ceulemans, R.; Clement, R.; Dolman, H.; Granier, A.; Gross, P.; Grünwald, T.; Hollinger, D.; Jensen, N.O.; Katul, G.; Keronen, P.; Kowalski, A.; Lai, C.T.; Law, B.E.; Meyers, T.; Moncrieff, J.; Moors, E.J.; Munger, J.W.; Pilegaard, K.; Rebmann, C.; Suyker, A.; Tenhunen, J.; Tu, K.

    2001-01-01

    At present a network of over 100 field sites are measuring carbon dioxide, water vapor and sensible heat fluxes between the biosphere and atmosphere, on a nearly continuous basis. Gaps in the long term measurements of evaporation and sensible heat flux must be filled before these data can be used

  4. Ageing of zirconium alloy components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Shah, Priti Kotak; Dubey, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    India has two types (pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs)) of commercial nuclear reactors in operation, in addition to research reactors. Many of the life limiting critical components in these reactors are fabricated from zirconium alloys. The progressive degradation of these components caused by the cumulative exposure of high energy neutron irradiation with increasing period of reactor operation was monitored to assess the degree of ageing. The components/specimens examined included fuel element claddings removed from BWRs, pressure tubes and garter springs removed from PHWRs and calandria tube specimens used in PHWRs. The tests included tension test (for cladding, garter spring), fracture toughness test (for pressure tube), crush test (for garter spring), and measurement of irradiation induced growth (for calandria tube). Results of various tests conducted are presented and applications of the test results are elaborated for residual life estimation/life extension of the components.

  5. CHEMISTRY OF FOG WATERS IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY - PART 3: CONCENTRATIONS AND SPECIATION OF ORGANIC AND INORGANIC NITROGEN. (R825433)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although organic nitrogen (ON) has been found to be a ubiquitous and significant component in wet and dry deposition, almost nothing is known about its concentration or composition in fog waters. To address this gap, we have investigated the concentration and composition of ON...

  6. The Adaptation Gap Report - a Preliminary Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alverson, Keith; Olhoff, Anne; Noble, Ian

    This first Adaptation Gap report provides an equally sobering assessment of the gap between adaptation needs and reality, based on preliminary thinking on how baselines, future goals or targets, and gaps between them might be defined for climate change adaptation. The report focuses on gaps in de...

  7. Gap junctions and motor behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, Ole; Tresch, Matthew C.

    2002-01-01

    The production of any motor behavior requires coordinated activity in motor neurons and premotor networks. In vertebrates, this coordination is often assumed to take place through chemical synapses. Here we review recent data suggesting that electrical gap-junction coupling plays an important role...... to the production of motor behavior in adult mammals....

  8. Globalization and the Gender Gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    There are several theoretical reasons why globalization will have a narrowing as well as a widening effect on the gender wage gap, but little is known about the actual impact, except for some country studies. This study contributes to the literature in three respects. First, it is a large

  9. Project LOCAL - Bridging The Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Robert N.

    1975-01-01

    Project LOCAL, a not-for-profit regional consortium, offers a broad spectrum of in-service training courses tailored to meet the needs of educators in various disciplines and levels of experience. The purpose of these offerings is to bridge the communication gap between innovative centers in computer-oriented education and staff members in Boston…

  10. The Politics of Achievement Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valant, J.; Newark, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    For decades, researchers have documented large differences in average test scores between minority and White students and between poor and wealthy students. These gaps are a focal point of reformers’ and policymakers’ efforts to address educational inequities. However, the U.S. public’s views...

  11. Talent Management: Bridging the Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    culling continues at each grade. By this process, the model proposes to raise the talent distribution and level. Professional sports use this method... TALENT MANAGEMENT: BRIDGING THE GAP A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in...

  12. Acute toxicity of sodium bicarbonate, a major component of coal bed natural gas produced waters, to 13 aquatic species as defined in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David D.; Farag, Aïda M.; Skaar, Don

    2014-01-01

    Water produced during coal bed natural gas (CBNG) extraction in the Powder River Structural Basin of Wyoming and Montana (USA) may contain concentrations of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) of more than 3000 mg/L. The authors evaluated the acute toxicity of NaHCO3, also expressed as bicarbonate (HCO3−), to 13 aquatic organisms. Of the 13 species tested, 7 had a median lethal concentration (LC50) less than 2000 mg/L NaHCO3, or 1300 mg/L HCO3−. The most sensitive species were Ceriodaphnia dubia, freshwater mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea), pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus), and shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus). The respective LC50s were 989 mg/L, 1120 mg/L, 1249 mg/L, and 1430 mg/L NaHCO3, or 699 mg/L, 844 mg/L, 831 mg/L, and 1038 mg/L HCO3−. Age affected the sensitivity of fathead minnows, even within life stage. Two days posthatch, fathead minnows were more sensitive to NaHCO3 and HCO3− compared with 4-d-old fish, even though fish up to 14 d old are commonly used for toxicity evaluations. The authors recommend that ion toxicity exposures be conducted with organisms less than 24 h posthatch to ensure that experiments document the most sensitive stage of development. The results of the present study, along with historical and current research regarding the toxicity of bicarbonate, may be useful to establish regulatory standards for HCO3−.

  13. CPRF/ZTH shell poloidal gap design and fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavornik, E.J.; Moses, R.W.; Dransfield, G.D.; Custer, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Design is in progress on a new generation Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) machine, designated as ZTH, to be assembled at Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 86-92. The front end of the machine will consist of an external electrically conducting shell that supports an internal vacuum liner containing the plasma. The external shell will contain insulated toroidal and poloidal gaps to permit penetration of magnetic fields and voltage to the plasma. Many perturbations of the magnetic field induce toroidal shell currents with poloidal Fourier components having mode numbers m ≥ 1. A typical butt-joint poloidal gap will convert these image currents into potentially damaging magnetic field errors with a large spectrum of toroidal-mode numbers. The ZTH shell poloidal gap will use concentric overlapping tapered shells in its construction, which will serve to minimize these errors

  14. Method of nickel-plating large components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbuer, K.

    1997-01-01

    The invention concerns a method of nickel-plating components, according to which even large components can be provided with an adequate layer of nickel which is pore- and stress-free and such that water is not lost. According to the invention, the component is heated and, after heating, is pickled, rinsed, scoured, plated in an electrolysis process, and rinsed again. (author)

  15. Gaps in EU Foreign Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik

    of Capability-Expectations Gap in the study of European foreign policy. Through examples from relevant literature, Larsen not only demonstrates how this concept sets up standards for the EU as a foreign policy actor (that are not met by most other international actors) but also shows how this curtails analysis......This book argues that theories of European foreign policy are performative: they create the objects they analyse. In this text, Larsen outlines the performativity approach to the role of theories based on the work of Derrida and goes on to examine the performative role of Christopher Hill's concept...... of EU foreign policy. The author goes on to discuss how the widespread use of the concept of ‘gap' affects the way in which EU foreign policy has been studied; and that it always produces the same result: the EU is an unfulfilled actor outside the realm of “normal” actors in IR. This volume offers new...

  16. Homolumo Gap and Matrix Model

    CERN Document Server

    Andric, I; Jurman, D; Nielsen, H B

    2007-01-01

    We discuss a dynamical matrix model by which probability distribution is associated with Gaussian ensembles from random matrix theory. We interpret the matrix M as a Hamiltonian representing interaction of a bosonic system with a single fermion. We show that a system of second-quantized fermions influences the ground state of the whole system by producing a gap between the highest occupied eigenvalue and the lowest unoccupied eigenvalue.

  17. Filling in biodiversity threat gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joppa, L. N.; O'Connor, Brian; Visconti, Piero

    2016-01-01

    increase to 10,000 times the background rate should species threatened with extinction succumb to pressures they face (4). Reversing these trends is a focus of the Convention on Biological Diversity's 2020 Strategic Plan for Biodiversity and its 20 Aichi Targets and is explicitly incorporated...... into the United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We identify major gaps in data available for assessing global biodiversity threats and suggest mechanisms for closing them....

  18. Prometheus and the Keeler gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeddine, Radwan; Nicholson, Phillip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.; French, Richard G.; Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Burns, Joseph A.

    2014-11-01

    Linblad resonances with Saturn’s satellites are located at many radii in the rings. While some cause density or bending waves, others hold gap edges from spreading, like the 2:1 resonance with Mimas located at the B-ring edge, the 7:6 resonance with Janus at the A-ring edge, and the 32:31 resonance with Prometheus at the inner edge of the Keeler gap. The latter is the case of study here.Theoretically, the inner edge of the Keeler gap should have 32 regular sinusoidal lobes, where either the maximum or the minimum radius is expected to be aligned with Prometheus and rotating with its mean motion. We show that such is not the case. Fit of occultation data shows the presence of the 32:31 resonance, however, the fit residuals is as high as the amplitude of the resonance amplitude (about 2 km). Analysis of the ISS data, shows irregularities overlapping the lobes (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS), that follow Keplerian motion. These irregularities may be due to clumps of particles with different eccentricities than the rest of the edge particles. This phenomenon may be caused by the resonance, as it has not been observed at other circular edges were no resonance is present at their location. The ISS data also shows that the lobe’s minimum/maximum is not perfectly aligned with the longitude of Prometheus, which may be due to libration about the centre of the resonance.

  19. Hyper-active gap filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omaki, Akira; Lau, Ellen F; Davidson White, Imogen; Dakan, Myles L; Apple, Aaron; Phillips, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Much work has demonstrated that speakers of verb-final languages are able to construct rich syntactic representations in advance of verb information. This may reflect general architectural properties of the language processor, or it may only reflect a language-specific adaptation to the demands of verb-finality. The present study addresses this issue by examining whether speakers of a verb-medial language (English) wait to consult verb transitivity information before constructing filler-gap dependencies, where internal arguments are fronted and hence precede the verb. This configuration makes it possible to investigate whether the parser actively makes representational commitments on the gap position before verb transitivity information becomes available. A key prediction of the view that rich pre-verbal structure building is a gene