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Sample records for component allee effects

  1. Demographic and Component Allee Effects in Southern Lake Superior Gray Wolves.

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    Jennifer L Stenglein

    Full Text Available Recovering populations of carnivores suffering Allee effects risk extinction because positive population growth requires a minimum number of cooperating individuals. Conservationists seldom consider these issues in planning for carnivore recovery because of data limitations, but ignoring Allee effects could lead to overly optimistic predictions for growth and underestimates of extinction risk. We used Bayesian splines to document a demographic Allee effect in the time series of gray wolf (Canis lupus population counts (1980-2011 in the southern Lake Superior region (SLS, Wisconsin and the upper peninsula of Michigan, USA in each of four measures of population growth. We estimated that the population crossed the Allee threshold at roughly 20 wolves in four to five packs. Maximum per-capita population growth occurred in the mid-1990s when there were approximately 135 wolves in the SLS population. To infer mechanisms behind the demographic Allee effect, we evaluated a potential component Allee effect using an individual-based spatially explicit model for gray wolves in the SLS region. Our simulations varied the perception neighborhoods for mate-finding and the mean dispersal distances of wolves. Simulation of wolves with long-distance dispersals and reduced perception neighborhoods were most likely to go extinct or experience Allee effects. These phenomena likely restricted population growth in early years of SLS wolf population recovery.

  2. The evidence for Allee effects

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    Andrew M. Kramer; Brian Dennis; Andrew M. Liebhold; John M. Drake

    2009-01-01

    Allee effects are an important dynamic phenomenon believed to be manifested in several population processes, notably extinction and invasion. Though widely cited in these contexts, the evidence for their strength and prevalence has not been critically evaluated. We review results from 91 studies on Allee effects in natural animal populations. We focus on empirical...

  3. Genetic Allee effects and their interaction with ecological Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Meike J; Stuis, Hanna; Metzler, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that genetic processes such as inbreeding depression and loss of genetic variation can increase the extinction risk of small populations. However, it is generally unclear whether extinction risk from genetic causes gradually increases with decreasing population size or whether there is a sharp transition around a specific threshold population size. In the ecological literature, such threshold phenomena are called 'strong Allee effects' and they can arise for example from mate limitation in small populations. In this study, we aim to (i) develop a meaningful notion of a 'strong genetic Allee effect', (ii) explore whether and under what conditions such an effect can arise from inbreeding depression due to recessive deleterious mutations, and (iii) quantify the interaction of potential genetic Allee effects with the well-known mate-finding Allee effect. We define a strong genetic Allee effect as a genetic process that causes a population's survival probability to be a sigmoid function of its initial size. The inflection point of this function defines the critical population size. To characterize survival-probability curves, we develop and analyse simple stochastic models for the ecology and genetics of small populations. Our results indicate that inbreeding depression can indeed cause a strong genetic Allee effect, but only if individuals carry sufficiently many deleterious mutations (lethal equivalents). Populations suffering from a genetic Allee effect often first grow, then decline as inbreeding depression sets in and then potentially recover as deleterious mutations are purged. Critical population sizes of ecological and genetic Allee effects appear to be often additive, but even superadditive interactions are possible. Many published estimates for the number of lethal equivalents in birds and mammals fall in the parameter range where strong genetic Allee effects are expected. Unfortunately, extinction risk due to genetic Allee effects

  4. Review: Allee effects in social species.

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    Angulo, Elena; Luque, Gloria M; Gregory, Stephen D; Wenzel, John W; Bessa-Gomes, Carmen; Berec, Ludek; Courchamp, Franck

    2018-01-01

    Allee effects have important implications for many aspects of basic and applied ecology. The benefits of aggregation of conspecific individuals are central to Allee effects, which have led to the widely held assumption that social species are more prone to Allee effects. Robust evidence for this assumption, however, remains rare. Furthermore, previous research on Allee effects has failed to adequately address the consequences of the different levels of organisation within social species' populations. Here, we review available evidence of Allee effects and model the role of demographic and behavioural factors that may combine to dampen or strengthen Allee effects in social species. We use examples across various species with contrasting social structure, including carnivores, bats, primates and eusocial insects. Building on this, we provide a conceptual framework that allows for the integration of different Allee effects in social species. Social species are characterised by nested levels of organisation. The benefits of cooperation, measured by mean individual fitness, can be observed at both the population and group levels, giving rise to "population level" and "group level" Allee effects respectively. We also speculate on the possibility of a third level, reporting per capita benefits for different individuals within a group (e.g. castes in social insects). We show that group size heterogeneity and intergroup interactions affect the strength of population-level demographic Allee effects. Populations with higher group size heterogeneity and in which individual social groups cooperate demonstrate the weakest Allee effects and may thus provide an explanation for why extinctions due to Allee effects are rare in social species. More adequately accounting for Allee effects in social species will improve our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary implications of cooperation in social species. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British

  5. Allee effects on population dynamics with delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celik, C.; Merdan, H.; Duman, O.; Akin, O.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the stability analysis of equilibrium points of population dynamics with delay when the Allee effect occurs at low population density. Mainly, our mathematical results and numerical simulations point to the stabilizing effect of the Allee effects on population dynamics with delay

  6. Allee effects on population dynamics in continuous (overlapping) case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merdan, H.; Duman, O.; Akin, O.; Celik, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the stability analysis of equilibrium points of a continuous population dynamics with delay under the Allee effect which occurs at low population density. The mathematical results and numerical simulations show the stabilizing role of the Allee effects on the stability of the equilibrium point of this population dynamics.

  7. Populational Growth Models Proportional to Beta Densities with Allee Effect

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    Aleixo, Sandra M.; Rocha, J. Leonel; Pestana, Dinis D.

    2009-05-01

    We consider populations growth models with Allee effect, proportional to beta densities with shape parameters p and 2, where the dynamical complexity is related with the Malthusian parameter r. For p>2, these models exhibit a population dynamics with natural Allee effect. However, in the case of 1effect. In order to inforce it, we present some alternative models and investigate their dynamics, presenting some important results.

  8. Fatal disease and demographic Allee effect: population persistence and extinction.

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    Friedman, Avner; Yakubu, Abdul-Aziz

    2012-01-01

    If a healthy stable host population at the disease-free equilibrium is subject to the Allee effect, can a small number of infected individuals with a fatal disease cause the host population to go extinct? That is, does the Allee effect matter at high densities? To answer this question, we use a susceptible-infected epidemic model to obtain model parameters that lead to host population persistence (with or without infected individuals) and to host extinction. We prove that the presence of an Allee effect in host demographics matters even at large population densities. We show that a small perturbation to the disease-free equilibrium can eventually lead to host population extinction. In addition, we prove that additional deaths due to a fatal infectious disease effectively increase the Allee threshold of the host population demographics.

  9. Experimental demonstration of an Allee effect in microbial populations.

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    Kaul, RajReni B; Kramer, Andrew M; Dobbs, Fred C; Drake, John M

    2016-04-01

    Microbial populations can be dispersal limited. However, microorganisms that successfully disperse into physiologically ideal environments are not guaranteed to establish. This observation contradicts the Baas-Becking tenet: 'Everything is everywhere, but the environment selects'. Allee effects, which manifest in the relationship between initial population density and probability of establishment, could explain this observation. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that small populations of Vibrio fischeri are subject to an intrinsic demographic Allee effect. Populations subjected to predation by the bacterivore Cafeteria roenbergensis display both intrinsic and extrinsic demographic Allee effects. The estimated critical threshold required to escape positive density-dependence is around 5, 20 or 90 cells ml(-1)under conditions of high carbon resources, low carbon resources or low carbon resources with predation, respectively. This work builds on the foundations of modern microbial ecology, demonstrating that mechanisms controlling macroorganisms apply to microorganisms, and provides a statistical method to detect Allee effects in data. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Interaction between Allee effects caused by organism-environment feedback and by other ecological mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Qin

    Full Text Available Understanding Allee effect has crucial importance for ecological conservation and management because it is strongly related to population extinction. Due to various ecological mechanisms accounting for Allee effect, it is necessary to study the influence of multiple Allee effects on the dynamics and persistence of population. We here focus on organism-environment feedback which can incur strong, weak, and fatal Allee effect (AE-by-OEF, and further examine their interaction with the Allee effects caused by other ecological mechanisms (AE-by-OM. The results show that multiple Allee effects largely increase the extinction risk of population either due to the enlargement of Allee threshold or the change of inherent characteristic of Allee effect, and such an increase will be enhanced dramatically with increasing the strength of individual Allee effects. Our simulations explicitly considering spatial structure also demonstrate that local interaction among habitat patches can greatly mitigate such superimposed Allee effects as well as individual Allee effect. This implies that spatially structurized habitat could play an important role in ecological conservation and management.

  11. Interaction between Allee effects caused by organism-environment feedback and by other ecological mechanisms.

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    Qin, Lijuan; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Wanxiong; Song, Weixin

    2017-01-01

    Understanding Allee effect has crucial importance for ecological conservation and management because it is strongly related to population extinction. Due to various ecological mechanisms accounting for Allee effect, it is necessary to study the influence of multiple Allee effects on the dynamics and persistence of population. We here focus on organism-environment feedback which can incur strong, weak, and fatal Allee effect (AE-by-OEF), and further examine their interaction with the Allee effects caused by other ecological mechanisms (AE-by-OM). The results show that multiple Allee effects largely increase the extinction risk of population either due to the enlargement of Allee threshold or the change of inherent characteristic of Allee effect, and such an increase will be enhanced dramatically with increasing the strength of individual Allee effects. Our simulations explicitly considering spatial structure also demonstrate that local interaction among habitat patches can greatly mitigate such superimposed Allee effects as well as individual Allee effect. This implies that spatially structurized habitat could play an important role in ecological conservation and management.

  12. Experimental demonstration of an Allee effect in microbial populations

    OpenAIRE

    Kaul, RajReni B.; Kramer, Andrew M.; Dobbs, Fred C.; Drake, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial populations can be dispersal limited. However, microorganisms that successfully disperse into physiologically ideal environments are not guaranteed to establish. This observation contradicts the Baas-Becking tenet: ?Everything is everywhere, but the environment selects?. Allee effects, which manifest in the relationship between initial population density and probability of establishment, could explain this observation. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that small populations of Vi...

  13. Sexually transmitted infections and mate-finding Allee effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berec, Luděk; Janoušková, E.; Theuer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 114, APR 01 (2017), s. 59-69 ISSN 0040-5809 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Allee effect * mating * sexually transmitted disease Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 1.613, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0040580916301186

  14. Number of conspecifics and reproduction in the invasive plant Eschscholzia californica (Papaveraceae): is there a pollinator-mediated Allee effect?

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    Anic, V; Henríquez, C A; Abades, S R; Bustamante, R O

    2015-05-01

    The component Allee effect has been defined as 'a positive relationship between any measure of individual fitness and the number or density of conspecifics'. Larger plant populations or large patches have shown a higher pollinator visitation rate, which may give rise to an Allee effect in reproduction of the plants. We experimentally tested the effect of number of conspecifics on reproduction and pollinator visitation in Eschscholzia californica Cham., an invasive plant in Chile. We then built patches with two, eight and 16 flowering individuals of E. californica (11 replicates per treatment) in an area characterised by dominance of the study species. We found that E. californica exhibits a component Allee effect, as the number of individuals of this species has a positive effect on individual seed set. However, individual fruit production was not affected by the number of plants examined. Pollinator visitation rate was also independent of the number of plants, so this factor would not explain the Allee effect. This rate was positively correlated with the total number of flowers in the patches. We also found that the number of plants did not affect the seed mass or proportion of germinated seeds in the patches. Higher pollen availability in patches with 16 plants and pollination by wind could explain the Allee effect. The component Allee effect identified could lead to a weak demographic Allee effect that might reduce the rate of spread of E. californica. Knowledge of this would be useful for management of this invasive plant in Chile. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Allee effect in a discrete-time predator-prey system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celik, Canan; Duman, Oktay

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of a discrete-time predator-prey system with and without Allee effect. By analyzing both systems, we first obtain local stability conditions of the equilibrium points without the Allee effect and then exhibit the impact of the Allee effect on stability when it is imposed on prey population. We also show the stabilizing effect of Allee effect by numerical simulations and verify that when the prey population is subject to an Allee effect, the trajectory of the solutions approximates to the corresponding equilibrium point much faster. Furthermore, for some fixed parameter values satisfying necessary conditions, we show that the corresponding equilibrium point moves from instability to stability under the Allee effect on prey population.

  16. A spatially explicit model for an Allee effect: why wolves recolonize so slowly in Greater Yellowstone.

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    Hurford, Amy; Hebblewhite, Mark; Lewis, Mark A

    2006-11-01

    A reduced probability of finding mates at low densities is a frequently hypothesized mechanism for a component Allee effect. At low densities dispersers are less likely to find mates and establish new breeding units. However, many mathematical models for an Allee effect do not make a distinction between breeding group establishment and subsequent population growth. Our objective is to derive a spatially explicit mathematical model, where dispersers have a reduced probability of finding mates at low densities, and parameterize the model for wolf recolonization in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). In this model, only the probability of establishing new breeding units is influenced by the reduced probability of finding mates at low densities. We analytically and numerically solve the model to determine the effect of a decreased probability in finding mates at low densities on population spread rate and density. Our results suggest that a reduced probability of finding mates at low densities may slow recolonization rate.

  17. Bioeconomic synergy between tactics for insect eradication in the presence of Allee effects

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    Julie C. ​Blackwood; Ludek Berec; Takehiko Yamanaka; Rebecca S. Epanchin-Niell; Alan Hastings; Andrew M. Liebhold

    2012-01-01

    Preventing the establishment of invading pest species can be beneficial with respect to averting future environmental and economic impacts and also in preventing the accumulation of control costs. Allee effects play an important role in the dynamics of newly established, low-density populations by driving small populations into self-extinction, making Allee effects...

  18. How Hives Collapse: Allee Effects, Ecological Resilience, and the Honey Bee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Dennis

    Full Text Available We construct a mathematical model to quantify the loss of resilience in collapsing honey bee colonies due to the presence of a strong Allee effect. In the model, recruitment and mortality of adult bees have substantial social components, with recruitment enhanced and mortality reduced by additional adult bee numbers. The result is an Allee effect, a net per-individual rate of hive increase that increases as a function of adult bee numbers. The Allee effect creates a critical minimum size in adult bee numbers, below which mortality is greater than recruitment, with ensuing loss of viability of the hive. Under ordinary and favorable environmental circumstances, the critical size is low, and hives remain large, sending off viably-sized swarms (naturally or through beekeeping management when hive numbers approach an upper stable equilibrium size (carrying capacity. However, both the lower critical size and the upper stable size depend on many parameters related to demographic rates and their enhancement by bee sociality. Any environmental factors that increase mortality, decrease recruitment, or interfere with the social moderation of these rates has the effect of exacerbating the Allee effect by increasing the lower critical size and substantially decreasing the upper stable size. As well, the basin of attraction to the upper stable size, defined by the model potential function, becomes narrower and shallower, indicating the loss of resilience as the hive becomes subjected to increased risk of falling below the critical size. Environmental effects of greater severity can cause the two equilibria to merge and the basin of attraction to the upper stable size to disappear, resulting in collapse of the hive from any initial size. The model suggests that multiple proximate causes, among them pesticides, mites, pathogens, and climate change, working singly or in combinations, could trigger hive collapse.

  19. Density-dependent selection on mate search and evolution of Allee effects.

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    Berec, Luděk; Kramer, Andrew M; Bernhauerová, Veronika; Drake, John M

    2018-01-01

    Sexually reproducing organisms require males and females to find each other. Increased difficulty of females finding mates as male density declines is the most frequently reported mechanism of Allee effects in animals. Evolving more effective mate search may alleviate Allee effects, but may depend on density regimes a population experiences. In particular, high-density populations may evolve mechanisms that induce Allee effects which become detrimental when populations are reduced and maintained at a low density. We develop an individual-based, eco-genetic model to study how mating systems and fitness trade-offs interact with changes in population density to drive evolution of the rate at which males or females search for mates. Finite mate search rate triggers Allee effects in our model and we explore how these Allee effects respond to such evolution. We allow a population to adapt to several population density regimes and examine whether high-density populations are likely to reverse adaptations attained at low densities. We find density-dependent selection in most of scenarios, leading to search rates that result in lower Allee thresholds in populations kept at lower densities. This mainly occurs when fecundity costs are imposed on mate search, and provides an explanation for why Allee effects are often observed in anthropogenically rare species. Optimizing selection, where the attained trait value minimizes the Allee threshold independent of population density, depended on the trade-off between search and survival, combined with monogamy when females were searching. Other scenarios led to runaway selection on the mate search rate, including evolutionary suicide. Trade-offs involved in mate search may thus be crucial to determining how density influences the evolution of Allee effects. Previous studies did not examine evolution of a trait related to the strength of Allee effects under density variation. We emphasize the crucial role that mating systems, fitness

  20. Combining Tactics to Exploit Allee Effects for Eradication of Alien Insect Populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suckling, David M. [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd., Christchurch (New Zealand); Tobin, Patrick C. [Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Northern Research Station, Morgantown, WV (United States); Mccullough, Deborah G. [Departments of Entomology and Forestry, Michigan State University, Natural Science Building, East Lansing, MI (United States); Herms, Daniel A. [Department of Entomology, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Full text: Invasive species increasingly threaten ecosystems, food production, and human welfare worldwide. Hundreds of eradication programs have targeted a wide range of nonnative insect species to mitigate the economic and ecological impacts of biological invasions. Many such programs used multiple tactics to achieve this goal, but interactions between tactics have received little formal consideration, specifically as they interact with Allee dynamics. If a population can be driven below an Allee threshold, extinction becomes more probable because of factors such as the failure to find mates, satiate natural enemies, or successfully exploit food resources, as well as demographic and environmental stochasticity. A key implication of an Allee threshold is that the population can be eradicated without the need and expense of killing the last individuals. Some combinations of control tactics could interact with Allee dynamics to increase the probability of successful eradication. Combinations of tactics can be considered to have synergistic (greater efficiency in achieving extinction from the combination), additive (no improvement over single tactics alone), or antagonistic (reduced efficiency from the combination) effects on Allee dynamics. We highlight examples of combinations of tactics likely to act synergistically, additively, or antagonistically on pest populations. By exploiting the interacting effects of multiple tactics on Allee dynamics, the success and costeffectiveness of eradication programs can be enhanced. (author)

  1. A cascade of destabilizations: Combining Wolbachia and Allee effects to eradicate insect pests.

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    Blackwood, Julie C; Vargas, Roger; Fauvergue, Xavier

    2018-01-01

    The management of insect pests has long been dominated by the use of chemical insecticides, with the aim of instantaneously killing enough individuals to limit their damage. To minimize unwanted consequences, environmentally friendly approaches have been proposed that utilize biological control and take advantage of intrinsic demographic processes to reduce pest populations. We address the feasibility of a novel pest management strategy based on the release of insects infected with Wolbachia, which causes cytoplasmic incompatibilities in its host population, into a population with a pre-existing Allee effect. We hypothesize that the transient decline in population size caused by a successful invasion of Wolbachia can bring the population below its Allee threshold and, consequently, trigger extinction. We develop a stochastic population model that accounts for Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibilities in addition to an Allee effect arising from mating failures at low population densities. Using our model, we identify conditions under which cytoplasmic incompatibilities and Allee effects successfully interact to drive insect pest populations towards extinction. Based on our results, we delineate control strategies based on introductions of Wolbachia-infected insects. We extend this analysis to evaluate control strategies that implement successive introductions of two incompatible Wolbachia strains. Additionally, we consider methods that combine Wolbachia invasion with mating disruption tactics to enhance the pre-existing Allee effect. We demonstrate that Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility and the Allee effect act independently from one another: the Allee effect does not modify the Wolbachia invasion threshold, and cytoplasmic incompatibilities only have a marginal effect on the Allee threshold. However, the interaction of these two processes can drive even large populations to extinction. The success of this method can be amplified by the

  2. On the stability analysis of a general discrete-time population model involving predation and Allee effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merdan, H.; Duman, O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the stability analysis of equilibrium points of a general discrete-time population dynamics involving predation with and without Allee effects which occur at low population density. The mathematical analysis and numerical simulations show that the Allee effect has a stabilizing role on the local stability of the positive equilibrium points of this model.

  3. A Gompertz population model with Allee effect and fuzzy initial values

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    Amarti, Zenia; Nurkholipah, Nenden Siti; Anggriani, Nursanti; Supriatna, Asep K.

    2018-03-01

    Growth and population dynamics models are important tools used in preparing a good management for society to predict the future of population or species. This has been done by various known methods, one among them is by developing a mathematical model that describes population growth. Models are usually formed into differential equations or systems of differential equations, depending on the complexity of the underlying properties of the population. One example of biological complexity is Allee effect. It is a phenomenon showing a high correlation between very small population size and the mean individual fitness of the population. In this paper the population growth model used is the Gompertz equation model by considering the Allee effect on the population. We explore the properties of the solution to the model numerically using the Runge-Kutta method. Further exploration is done via fuzzy theoretical approach to accommodate uncertainty of the initial values of the model. It is known that an initial value greater than the Allee threshold will cause the solution rises towards carrying capacity asymptotically. However, an initial value smaller than the Allee threshold will cause the solution decreases towards zero asymptotically, which means the population is eventually extinct. Numerical solutions show that modeling uncertain initial value of the critical point A (the Allee threshold) with a crisp initial value could cause the extinction of population of a certain possibilistic degree, depending on the predetermined membership function of the initial value.

  4. Allee effect in the selection for prime-numbered cycles in periodical cicadas.

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    Tanaka, Yumi; Yoshimura, Jin; Simon, Chris; Cooley, John R; Tainaka, Kei-ichi

    2009-06-02

    Periodical cicadas are well known for their prime-numbered life cycles (17 and 13 years) and their mass periodical emergences. The origination and persistence of prime-numbered cycles are explained by the hybridization hypothesis on the basis of their lower likelihood of hybridization with other cycles. Recently, we showed by using an integer-based numerical model that prime-numbered cycles are indeed selected for among 10- to 20-year cycles. Here, we develop a real-number-based model to investigate the factors affecting the selection of prime-numbered cycles. We include an Allee effect in our model, such that a critical population size is set as an extinction threshold. We compare the real-number models with and without the Allee effect. The results show that in the presence of an Allee effect, prime-numbered life cycles are most likely to persist and to be selected under a wide range of extinction thresholds.

  5. Double Allee effects and extinction in the island fox

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angulo, E.; Roemer, G. W.; Berec, Luděk; Gascoigne, J.; Courchamp, F.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 4 (2007), s. 1082-1091 ISSN 0888-8892 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600070602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Allee efect * Aquila chrysaetos * golden Eagle Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.934, year: 2007

  6. Single-species models of the allee effect: Extinction boundaries, sex ratios and mate encounters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boukal S., David; Berec, Luděk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 218, - (2002), s. 375-394 ISSN 0022-5193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB1007201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Allee effect Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.552, year: 2002

  7. Bioeconomic synergy between tactics for insect eradication in the presence of Allee effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blackwood, J. C.; Berec, Luděk; Yamanaka, T.; Epanchin-Niell, R. S.; Hastings, A.; Liebhold, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 279, č. 1739 (2012), s. 2807-2815 ISSN 0962-8452 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) EF-0553768 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Allee effect * eradication * management cost Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.683, year: 2012 http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/279/1739/2807.full

  8. Allee effect in polar bears: A potential consequence of polychlorinated biphenyl contamination.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlová, Viola; Nabe-Nielsen, J.; Dietz, R.; Sonne, C.; Grimm, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 1843 (2016), č. článku 20161883. ISSN 0962-8452 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : allee effect * polychlorinated biphenyls * polar bears * male reproduction Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.940, year: 2016

  9. Von Bertalanffy's dynamics under a polynomial correction: Allee effect and big bang bifurcation

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    Leonel Rocha, J.; Taha, A. K.; Fournier-Prunaret, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we consider new one-dimensional populational discrete dynamical systems in which the growth of the population is described by a family of von Bertalanffy's functions, as a dynamical approach to von Bertalanffy's growth equation. The purpose of introducing Allee effect in those models is satisfied under a correction factor of polynomial type. We study classes of von Bertalanffy's functions with different types of Allee effect: strong and weak Allee's functions. Dependent on the variation of four parameters, von Bertalanffy's functions also includes another class of important functions: functions with no Allee effect. The complex bifurcation structures of these von Bertalanffy's functions is investigated in detail. We verified that this family of functions has particular bifurcation structures: the big bang bifurcation of the so-called “box-within-a-box” type. The big bang bifurcation is associated to the asymptotic weight or carrying capacity. This work is a contribution to the study of the big bang bifurcation analysis for continuous maps and their relationship with explosion birth and extinction phenomena.

  10. High prices for rare species can drive large populations extinct: the anthropogenic Allee effect revisited.

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    Holden, Matthew H; McDonald-Madden, Eve

    2017-09-21

    Consumer demand for plant and animal products threatens many populations with extinction. The anthropogenic Allee effect (AAE) proposes that such extinctions can be caused by prices for wildlife products increasing with species rarity. This price-rarity relationship creates financial incentives to extract the last remaining individuals of a population, despite higher search and harvest costs. The AAE has become a standard approach for conceptualizing the threat of economic markets on endangered species. Despite its potential importance for conservation, AAE theory is based on a simple graphical model with limited analysis of possible population trajectories. By specifying a general class of functions for price-rarity relationships, we show that the classic theory can understate the risk of species extinction. AAE theory proposes that only populations below a critical Allee threshold will go extinct due to increasing price-rarity relationships. Our analysis shows that this threshold can be much higher than the original theory suggests, depending on initial harvest effort. More alarmingly, even species with population sizes above this Allee threshold, for which AAE predicts persistence, can be destined to extinction. Introducing even a minimum price for harvested individuals, close to zero, can cause large populations to cross the classic anthropogenic Allee threshold on a trajectory towards extinction. These results suggest that traditional AAE theory may give a false sense of security when managing large harvested populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Allee effect: the story behind the stabilization or extinction of microbial ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Madhurankhi; Bhattacharyya, Purnita; Tribedi, Prosun

    2017-03-01

    A population exhibiting Allee effect shows a positive correlation between population fitness and population size or density. Allee effect decides the extinction or conservation of a microbial population and thus appears to be an important criterion in population ecology. The underlying factor of Allee effect that decides the stabilization and extinction of a particular population density is the threshold or the critical density of their abundance. According to Allee, microbial populations exhibit a definite, critical or threshold density, beyond which the population fitness of a particular population increases with the rise in population density and below it, the population fitness goes down with the decrease in population density. In particular, microbial population displays advantageous traits such as biofilm formation, expression of virulence genes, spore formation and many more only at a high population density. It has also been observed that microorganisms exhibiting a lower population density undergo complete extinction from the residual microbial ecosystem. In reference to Allee effect, decrease in population density or size introduces deleterious mutations among the population density through genetic drift. Mutations are carried forward to successive generations resulting in its accumulation among the population density thus reducing its microbial fitness and thereby increasing the risk of extinction of a particular microbial population. However, when the microbial load is high, the chance of genetic drift is less, and through the process of biofilm formation, the cooperation existing among the microbial population increases that increases the microbial fitness. Thus, the high microbial population through the formation of microbial biofilm stabilizes the ecosystem by increasing fitness. Taken together, microbial fitness shows positive correlation with the ecosystem conservation and negative correlation with ecosystem extinction.

  12. Population collapse to extinction: the catastrophic combination of parasitism and Allee effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilker, Frank M

    2010-01-01

    Infectious diseases are responsible for the extinction of a number of species. In conventional epidemic models, the transition from endemic population persistence to extirpation takes place gradually. However, if host demographics exhibits a strong Allee effect (AE) (population decline at low densities), extinction can occur abruptly in a catastrophic population crash. This might explain why species suddenly disappear even when they used to persist at high endemic population levels. Mathematically, the tipping point towards population collapse is associated with a saddle-node bifurcation. The underlying mechanism is the simultaneous population size depression and the increase of the extinction threshold due to parasite pathogenicity and Allee effect. Since highly pathogenic parasites cause their own extinction but not that of their host, there can be another saddle-node bifurcation with the re-emergence of two endemic equilibria. The implications for control interventions are discussed, suggesting that effective management may be possible for ℛ(0)≫1.

  13. On the numerical simulation of population dynamics with density-dependent migrations and the Allee effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweilam, H N; Khader, M M; Al-Bar, F R

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the variational iteration method (VIM) and the Adomian decomposition method (ADM) are presented for the numerical simulation of the population dynamics model with density-dependent migrations and the Allee effects. The convergence of ADM is proved for the model problem. The results obtained by these methods are compared to the exact solution. It is found that these methods are always converges to the right solutions with high accuracy. Furthermore, VIM needs relative less computational work than ADM

  14. Dynamics of a Diffusive Predator-Prey Model with Allee Effect on Predator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction-diffusion Holling-Tanner prey-predator model considering the Allee effect on predator, under zero-flux boundary conditions, is discussed. Some properties of the solutions, such as dissipation and persistence, are obtained. Local and global stability of the positive equilibrium and Turing instability are studied. With the help of the numerical simulations, the rich Turing patterns, including holes, stripes, and spots patterns, are obtained.

  15. Generalized Models from Beta(p, 2) Densities with Strong Allee Effect: Dynamical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Aleixo, Sandra M.; Rocha, J. Leonel

    2012-01-01

    A dynamical approach to study the behaviour of generalized populational growth models from Beta(p, 2) densities, with strong Allee effect, is presented. The dynamical analysis of the respective unimodal maps is performed using symbolic dynamics techniques. The complexity of the correspondent discrete dynamical systems is measured in terms of topological entropy. Different populational dynamics regimes are obtained when the intrinsic growth rates are modified: extinction, bistability, chaotic ...

  16. Neglecting uncertainty behind Allee effect estimation may generate false predictions of population extinction risk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berec, Luděk; Mrkvička, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 6 (2013), s. 845-856 ISSN 0030-1299 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0843 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) KJB101420801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Allee effect Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.559, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-0706.2012.19987.x/pdf

  17. Life cycle replacement by gene introduction under an allee effect in periodical cicadas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariai, Yukiko; Hayashi, Saki; Morita, Satoru; Umemura, Yoshitaka; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R; Yoshimura, Jin

    2011-04-06

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are divided into three species groups (-decim, -cassini, -decula) of similar but distinct morphology and behavior. Each group contains at least one species with a 17-year life cycle and one with a 13-year cycle; each species is most closely related to one with the other cycle. One explanation for the apparent polyphyly of 13- and 17-year life cycles is that populations switch between the two cycles. Using a numerical model, we test the general feasibility of life cycle switching by the introduction of alleles for one cycle into populations of the other cycle. Our results suggest that fitness reductions at low population densities of mating individuals (the Allee effect) could play a role in life cycle switching. In our model, if the 13-year cycle is genetically dominant, a 17-year cycle population will switch to a 13-year cycle given the introduction of a few 13-year cycle alleles under a moderate Allee effect. We also show that under a weak Allee effect, different year-classes ("broods") with 17-year life cycles can be generated. Remarkably, the outcomes of our models depend only on the dominance relationships of the cycle alleles, irrespective of any fitness advantages.

  18. Life cycle replacement by gene introduction under an allee effect in periodical cicadas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Nariai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp. in the USA are divided into three species groups (-decim, -cassini, -decula of similar but distinct morphology and behavior. Each group contains at least one species with a 17-year life cycle and one with a 13-year cycle; each species is most closely related to one with the other cycle. One explanation for the apparent polyphyly of 13- and 17-year life cycles is that populations switch between the two cycles. Using a numerical model, we test the general feasibility of life cycle switching by the introduction of alleles for one cycle into populations of the other cycle. Our results suggest that fitness reductions at low population densities of mating individuals (the Allee effect could play a role in life cycle switching. In our model, if the 13-year cycle is genetically dominant, a 17-year cycle population will switch to a 13-year cycle given the introduction of a few 13-year cycle alleles under a moderate Allee effect. We also show that under a weak Allee effect, different year-classes ("broods" with 17-year life cycles can be generated. Remarkably, the outcomes of our models depend only on the dominance relationships of the cycle alleles, irrespective of any fitness advantages.

  19. Expansion or extinction: deterministic and stochastic two-patch models with Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun; Lanchier, Nicolas

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the impact of Allee effect and dispersal on the long-term evolution of a population in a patchy environment. Our main focus is on whether a population already established in one patch either successfully invades an adjacent empty patch or undergoes a global extinction. Our study is based on the combination of analytical and numerical results for both a deterministic two-patch model and a stochastic counterpart. The deterministic model has either two, three or four attractors. The existence of a regime with exactly three attractors only appears when patches have distinct Allee thresholds. In the presence of weak dispersal, the analysis of the deterministic model shows that a high-density and a low-density populations can coexist at equilibrium in nearby patches, whereas the analysis of the stochastic model indicates that this equilibrium is metastable, thus leading after a large random time to either a global expansion or a global extinction. Up to some critical dispersal, increasing the intensity of the interactions leads to an increase of both the basin of attraction of the global extinction and the basin of attraction of the global expansion. Above this threshold, for both the deterministic and the stochastic models, the patches tend to synchronize as the intensity of the dispersal increases. This results in either a global expansion or a global extinction. For the deterministic model, there are only two attractors, while the stochastic model no longer exhibits a metastable behavior. In the presence of strong dispersal, the limiting behavior is entirely determined by the value of the Allee thresholds as the global population size in the deterministic and the stochastic models evolves as dictated by their single-patch counterparts. For all values of the dispersal parameter, Allee effects promote global extinction in terms of an expansion of the basin of attraction of the extinction equilibrium for the deterministic model and an increase of the

  20. Estimating Allee dynamics before they can be observed: polar bears as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter K Molnár

    Full Text Available Allee effects are an important component in the population dynamics of numerous species. Accounting for these Allee effects in population viability analyses generally requires estimates of low-density population growth rates, but such data are unavailable for most species and particularly difficult to obtain for large mammals. Here, we present a mechanistic modeling framework that allows estimating the expected low-density growth rates under a mate-finding Allee effect before the Allee effect occurs or can be observed. The approach relies on representing the mechanisms causing the Allee effect in a process-based model, which can be parameterized and validated from data on the mechanisms rather than data on population growth. We illustrate the approach using polar bears (Ursus maritimus, and estimate their expected low-density growth by linking a mating dynamics model to a matrix projection model. The Allee threshold, defined as the population density below which growth becomes negative, is shown to depend on age-structure, sex ratio, and the life history parameters determining reproduction and survival. The Allee threshold is thus both density- and frequency-dependent. Sensitivity analyses of the Allee threshold show that different combinations of the parameters determining reproduction and survival can lead to differing Allee thresholds, even if these differing combinations imply the same stable-stage population growth rate. The approach further shows how mate-limitation can induce long transient dynamics, even in populations that eventually grow to carrying capacity. Applying the models to the overharvested low-density polar bear population of Viscount Melville Sound, Canada, shows that a mate-finding Allee effect is a plausible mechanism for slow recovery of this population. Our approach is generalizable to any mating system and life cycle, and could aid proactive management and conservation strategies, for example, by providing a priori

  1. Estimating Allee dynamics before they can be observed: polar bears as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Péter K; Lewis, Mark A; Derocher, Andrew E

    2014-01-01

    Allee effects are an important component in the population dynamics of numerous species. Accounting for these Allee effects in population viability analyses generally requires estimates of low-density population growth rates, but such data are unavailable for most species and particularly difficult to obtain for large mammals. Here, we present a mechanistic modeling framework that allows estimating the expected low-density growth rates under a mate-finding Allee effect before the Allee effect occurs or can be observed. The approach relies on representing the mechanisms causing the Allee effect in a process-based model, which can be parameterized and validated from data on the mechanisms rather than data on population growth. We illustrate the approach using polar bears (Ursus maritimus), and estimate their expected low-density growth by linking a mating dynamics model to a matrix projection model. The Allee threshold, defined as the population density below which growth becomes negative, is shown to depend on age-structure, sex ratio, and the life history parameters determining reproduction and survival. The Allee threshold is thus both density- and frequency-dependent. Sensitivity analyses of the Allee threshold show that different combinations of the parameters determining reproduction and survival can lead to differing Allee thresholds, even if these differing combinations imply the same stable-stage population growth rate. The approach further shows how mate-limitation can induce long transient dynamics, even in populations that eventually grow to carrying capacity. Applying the models to the overharvested low-density polar bear population of Viscount Melville Sound, Canada, shows that a mate-finding Allee effect is a plausible mechanism for slow recovery of this population. Our approach is generalizable to any mating system and life cycle, and could aid proactive management and conservation strategies, for example, by providing a priori estimates of minimum

  2. Hierarchical competition models with the Allee effect II: the case of immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assas, Laila; Dennis, Brian; Elaydi, Saber; Kwessi, Eddy; Livadiotis, George

    2015-01-01

    This is part II of an earlier paper that dealt with hierarchical models with the Allee effect but with no immigration. In this paper, we greatly simplify the proofs in part I and provide a proof of the global dynamics of the non-hyperbolic cases that were previously conjectured. Then, we show how immigration to one of the species or to both would, drastically, change the dynamics of the system. It is shown that if the level of immigration to one or to both species is above a specified level, then there will be no extinction region where both species go to extinction.

  3. Safety in numbers: extinction arising from predator-driven Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Stephen D; Courchamp, Franck

    2010-05-01

    Experimental evidence of extinction via an Allee effect (AE) is a priority as more species become threatened by human activity. Kramer & Drake (2010) begin the International Year of Biodiversity with the important--but double-edged--demonstration that predators can induce an AE in their prey. The good news is that their experiments help bridge the knowledge gap between theoretical and empirical AEs. The bad news is that this predator-driven AE precipitates the prey extinction via a demographic AE. Although their findings will be sensitive to departures from their experimental protocol, this link between predation and population extinction could have important consequences for many prey species.

  4. Allee effect in polar bears: a potential consequence of polychlorinated biphenyl contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Viola; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Grimm, Volker

    2016-11-30

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland and Svalbard exhibited very high concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the 1980s and 1990s. In Svalbard, slow population growth during that period was suspected to be linked to PCB contamination. In this case study, we explored how PCBs could have impacted polar bear population growth and/or male reproductive success in Svalbard during the mid-1990s by reducing the fertility of contaminated males. A dose-response relationship linking the effects of PCBs to male polar bear fertility was extrapolated from studies of the effects of PCBs on sperm quality in rodents. Based on this relationship, an individual-based model of bear interactions during the breeding season predicted fertilization success under alternative assumptions regarding male-male competition for females. Contamination reduced pregnancy rates by decreasing the availability of fertile males, thus triggering a mate-finding Allee effect, particularly when male-male competition for females was limited or when infertile males were able to compete with fertile males for females. Comparisons of our model predictions on age-dependent reproductive success of males with published empirical observations revealed that the low representation of 10-14-year-old males among breeding males documented in Svalbard in mid-1990s could have resulted from PCB contamination. We conclude that contamination-related male infertility may lead to a reduction in population growth via an Allee effect. The magnitude of the effect is largely dependent on the population-specific mating system. In eco-toxicological risk assessments, appropriate consideration should therefore be given to negative effects of contaminants on male fertility and male mating behaviour. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Extinction and the Allee Effect in an Age-structured Ricker Population Model with Inter-stage Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lazaryan, N.; Sedaghat, H.

    2017-01-01

    We study the evolution in discrete time of certain age-structured populations, such as adults and juveniles, with a Ricker fitness function. We determine conditions for the convergence of orbits to the origin (extinction) in the presence of the Allee effect and time-dependent vital rates. We show that when stages interact, they may survive in the absence of interior fixed points, a surprising situation that is impossible without inter-stage interactions. We also examine the shift in the inter...

  6. Host-parasitoid dynamics and the success of biological control when parasitoids are prone to allee effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Bompard

    Full Text Available In sexual organisms, low population density can result in mating failures and subsequently yields a low population growth rate and high chance of extinction. For species that are in tight interaction, as in host-parasitoid systems, population dynamics are primarily constrained by demographic interdependences, so that mating failures may have much more intricate consequences. Our main objective is to study the demographic consequences of parasitoid mating failures at low density and its consequences on the success of biological control. For this, we developed a deterministic host-parasitoid model with a mate-finding Allee effect, allowing to tackle interactions between the Allee effect and key determinants of host-parasitoid demography such as the distribution of parasitoid attacks and host competition. Our study shows that parasitoid mating failures at low density result in an extinction threshold and increase the domain of parasitoid deterministic extinction. When proned to mate finding difficulties, parasitoids with cyclic dynamics or low searching efficiency go extinct; parasitoids with high searching efficiency may either persist or go extinct, depending on host intraspecific competition. We show that parasitoids suitable as biocontrol agents for their ability to reduce host populations are particularly likely to suffer from mate-finding Allee effects. This study highlights novel perspectives for understanding of the dynamics observed in natural host-parasitoid systems and improving the success of parasitoid introductions.

  7. Sex difference and Allee effects shape the dynamics of sex-structured invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Allison K; Kokko, Hanna; Neubert, Michael G

    2018-01-01

    The rate at which a population grows and spreads can depend on individual behaviour and interactions with others. In many species with two sexes, males and females differ in key life-history traits (e.g. growth, survival and dispersal), which can scale up to affect population rates of growth and spread. In sexually reproducing species, the mechanics of locating mates and reproducing successfully introduce further complications for predicting the invasion speed (spread rate), as both can change nonlinearly with density. Most models of population spread are based on one sex, or include limited aspects of sex differences. Here we ask whether and how the dynamics of finding mates interact with sex-specific life-history traits to influence the rate of population spread. We present a hybrid approach for modelling invasions of populations with two sexes that links individual-level mating behaviour (in an individual-based model) to population-level dynamics (in an integrodifference equation model). We find that limiting the amount of time during which individuals can search for mates causes a demographic Allee effect which can slow, delay, or even prevent an invasion. Furthermore, any sex-based asymmetries in life history or behaviour (skewed sex ratio, sex-biased dispersal, and sex-specific mating behaviours) amplify these effects. In contrast, allowing individuals to mate more than once ameliorates these effects, enabling polygynandrous populations to invade under conditions where monogamously mating populations would fail to establish. We show that details of individuals' mating behaviour can impact the rate of population spread. Based on our results, we propose a stricter definition of a mate-finding Allee effect, which is not met by the commonly used minimum mating function. Our modelling approach, which links individual- and population-level dynamics in a single model, may be useful for exploring other aspects of individual behaviour that are thought to impact the

  8. Spatial waves of advance with bistable dynamics: cytoplasmic and genetic analogues of Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, N H; Turelli, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Unlike unconditionally advantageous "Fisherian" variants that tend to spread throughout a species range once introduced anywhere, "bistable" variants, such as chromosome translocations, have two alternative stable frequencies, absence and (near) fixation. Analogous to populations with Allee effects, bistable variants tend to increase locally only once they become sufficiently common, and their spread depends on their rate of increase averaged over all frequencies. Several proposed manipulations of insect populations, such as using Wolbachia or "engineered underdominance" to suppress vector-borne diseases, produce bistable rather than Fisherian dynamics. We synthesize and extend theoretical analyses concerning three features of their spatial behavior: rate of spread, conditions to initiate spread from a localized introduction, and wave stopping caused by variation in population densities or dispersal rates. Unlike Fisherian variants, bistable variants tend to spread spatially only for particular parameter combinations and initial conditions. Wave initiation requires introduction over an extended region, while subsequent spatial spread is slower than for Fisherian waves and can easily be halted by local spatial inhomogeneities. We present several new results, including robust sufficient conditions to initiate (and stop) spread, using a one-parameter cubic approximation applicable to several models. The results have both basic and applied implications.

  9. Application of the anthropogenic allee effect model to trophy hunting as a conservation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard B; Cooney, Rosie; Leader-Williams, Nigel

    2013-10-01

    Trophy hunting can provide economic incentives to conserve wild species, but it can also involve risk when rare species are hunted. The anthropogenic Allee effect (AAE) is a conceptual model that seeks to explain how rarity may spread the seeds of further endangerment. The AAE model has increasingly been invoked in the context of trophy hunting, increasing concerns that such hunting may undermine rather than enhance conservation efforts. We question the appropriateness of uncritically applying the AAE model to trophy hunting for 4 reasons. First, the AAE assumes an open-access resource, which is a poor characterization of most trophy-hunting programs and obscures the potential for state, communal, or private-property use rights to generate positive incentives for conservation. Second, study results that show the price of hunting increases as the rarity of the animal increases are insufficient to indicate the presence of AAE. Third, AAE ignores the existence of biological and behavioral factors operating in most trophy-hunting contexts that tend to regulate the effect of hunting. We argue that site-specific data, rather than aggregated hunting statistics, are required to demonstrate that patterns of unsustainable exploitation can be well explained by an AAE model. Instead, we suggest that conservation managers seeking to investigate and identify constraints that limit the potential conservation role of trophy hunting, should focus on the critical governance characteristics that shape the potential conservation role of trophy hunting, such as corruption, insecure property rights, and inadequate sharing of benefits with local people. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Numerical solution of a logistic growth model for a population with Allee effect considering fuzzy initial values and fuzzy parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarti, Z.; Nurkholipah, N. S.; Anggriani, N.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Predicting the future of population number is among the important factors that affect the consideration in preparing a good management for the population. This has been done by various known method, one among them is by developing a mathematical model describing the growth of the population. The model usually takes form in a differential equation or a system of differential equations, depending on the complexity of the underlying properties of the population. The most widely used growth models currently are those having a sigmoid solution of time series, including the Verhulst logistic equation and the Gompertz equation. In this paper we consider the Allee effect of the Verhulst’s logistic population model. The Allee effect is a phenomenon in biology showing a high correlation between population size or density and the mean individual fitness of the population. The method used to derive the solution is the Runge-Kutta numerical scheme, since it is in general regarded as one among the good numerical scheme which is relatively easy to implement. Further exploration is done via the fuzzy theoretical approach to accommodate the impreciseness of the initial values and parameters in the model.

  11. Noise-induced extinction for a ratio-dependent predator-prey model with strong Allee effect in prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Partha Sarathi

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we study a stochastically forced ratio-dependent predator-prey model with strong Allee effect in prey population. In the deterministic case, we show that the model exhibits the stable interior equilibrium point or limit cycle corresponding to the co-existence of both species. We investigate a probabilistic mechanism of the noise-induced extinction in a zone of stable interior equilibrium point. Computational methods based on the stochastic sensitivity function technique are applied for the analysis of the dispersion of random states near stable interior equilibrium point. This method allows to construct a confidence domain and estimate the threshold value of the noise intensity for a transition from the coexistence to the extinction.

  12. Colonization of a territory by a stochastic population under a strong Allee effect and a low immigration pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'er, Shay; Assaf, Michael; Meerson, Baruch

    2015-06-01

    We study the dynamics of colonization of a territory by a stochastic population at low immigration pressure. We assume a sufficiently strong Allee effect that introduces, in deterministic theory, a large critical population size for colonization. At low immigration rates, the average precolonization population size is small, thus invalidating the WKB approximation to the master equation. We circumvent this difficulty by deriving an exact zero-flux solution of the master equation and matching it with an approximate nonzero-flux solution of the pertinent Fokker-Planck equation in a small region around the critical population size. This procedure provides an accurate evaluation of the quasistationary probability distribution of population sizes in the precolonization state and of the mean time to colonization, for a wide range of immigration rates. At sufficiently high immigration rates our results agree with WKB results obtained previously. At low immigration rates the results can be very different.

  13. A probabilistic cellular automata model for the dynamics of a population driven by logistic growth and weak Allee effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J. R. G.

    2018-04-01

    We propose and investigate a one-parameter probabilistic mixture of one-dimensional elementary cellular automata under the guise of a model for the dynamics of a single-species unstructured population with nonoverlapping generations in which individuals have smaller probability of reproducing and surviving in a crowded neighbourhood but also suffer from isolation and dispersal. Remarkably, the first-order mean field approximation to the dynamics of the model yields a cubic map containing terms representing both logistic and weak Allee effects. The model has a single absorbing state devoid of individuals, but depending on the reproduction and survival probabilities can achieve a stable population. We determine the critical probability separating these two phases and find that the phase transition between them is in the directed percolation universality class of critical behaviour.

  14. Study of dynamical properties in a bi-dimensional model describing the prey–predator dynamics with strong Allee effect in prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Mandal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we analyze a bi-dimensional differential equation system obtained by considering Holling type II functional response in prey–predator model with strong Allee effect in prey. One of the important consequence of this modification is the existence of separatrix curve which divides the behaviour of the trajectories in the phase plane. The results show that the origin is an attractor for any set of parameter values. Axial equilibrium points are stable or unstable according to the different parametric restrictions. The unique positive equilibrium point, if it exists, can be either an attractor or a repeller surrounded by a limit cycle, whose stability and uniqueness are also established. Therefore long-term coexistence of both populations is possible or they can go to extinction. Conditions on the parameter values are derived to show that the positive equilibrium point can be emerged or annihilated through transcritical bifurcation at axial equilibrium points. The existence of two heteroclinic curves is also established. It is also demonstrated that the origin is a global attractor in the phase plane for some parameter values, which implies that there are satisfying conditions where both populations can go to extinction. Ecological interpretations of all analytical results are provided thoroughly.

  15. Allee effects in social species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angulo, E.; Luque, G. M.; Gregory, S. D.; Wenzel, J. W.; Bessa-Gomes, C.; Berec, Luděk; Courchamp, F.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2018), s. 47-58 ISSN 0021-8790 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) GA15-24456S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : demography * metapopulation * population dynamics Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.474, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2656.12759/abstract

  16. Approximate probabilistic cellular automata for the dynamics of single-species populations under discrete logisticlike growth with and without weak Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J Ricardo G; Gevorgyan, Yeva

    2017-05-01

    We investigate one-dimensional elementary probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) whose dynamics in first-order mean-field approximation yields discrete logisticlike growth models for a single-species unstructured population with nonoverlapping generations. Beginning with a general six-parameter model, we find constraints on the transition probabilities of the PCA that guarantee that the ensuing approximations make sense in terms of population dynamics and classify the valid combinations thereof. Several possible models display a negative cubic term that can be interpreted as a weak Allee factor. We also investigate the conditions under which a one-parameter PCA derived from the more general six-parameter model can generate valid population growth dynamics. Numerical simulations illustrate the behavior of some of the PCA found.

  17. Complex dynamics of an eco-epidemiological model with different competition coefficients and weak Allee in the predator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saifuddin, Md.; Biswas, Santanu; Samanta, Sudip; Sarkar, Susmita; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2016-01-01

    The paper explores an eco-epidemiological model with weak Allee in predator, and the disease in the prey population. We consider a predator-prey model with type II functional response. The curiosity of this paper is to consider different competition coefficients within the prey population, which leads to the emergent carrying capacity. We perform the local and global stability analysis of the equilibrium points and the Hopf bifurcation analysis around the endemic equilibrium point. Further we pay attention to the chaotic dynamics which is produced by disease. Our numerical simulations reveal that the three species eco-epidemiological system without weak-Allee induced chaos from stable focus for increasing the force of infection, whereas in the presence of the weak-Allee effect, it exhibits stable solution. We conclude that chaotic dynamics can be controlled by the Allee parameter as well as the competition coefficients. We apply basic tools of non-linear dynamics such as Poincare section and maximum Lyapunov exponent to identify chaotic behavior of the system.

  18. Kultuurilooline allee seljatas võhikud / Silvia Paluoja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paluoja, Silvia, 1956-

    2007-01-01

    Pärnu südalinnas sae alla minevateks arvatud pärnade ja Vanapargi allee saatuse kohta ärgitas arutama riigikogu liige Mark Soosaar, kes asjatundjate ja huvilistega pargis kohtus. Pargikohtumisel osales ka riigikogu liige Mart Jüssi. Kommenteerib maaülikooli õppejõud Eino Laas

  19. Radiation effects in optical components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebele, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report discusses components of high performance optical devices may be exposed to high energy radiation environments during their lifetime. The effect of these adverse environments depends upon a large number of parameters associated with the radiation (nature, energy, dose, dose rate, etc.) or the system (temperature, optical performance requirements, optical wavelength, optical power, path length, etc.), as well as the intrinsic susceptibility of the optical component itself to degradation

  20. Component effects in mixture experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, G.F.

    1980-01-01

    In a mixture experiment, the response to a mixture of q components is a function of the proportions x 1 , x 2 , ..., x/sub q/ of components in the mixture. Experimental regions for mixture experiments are often defined by constraints on the proportions of the components forming the mixture. The usual (orthogonal direction) definition of a factor effect does not apply because of the dependence imposed by the mixture restriction, /sup q/Σ/sub i=1/ x/sub i/ = 1. A direction within the experimental region in which to compute a mixture component effect is presented and compared to previously suggested directions. This new direction has none of the inadequacies or errors of previous suggestions while having a more meaningful interpretation. The distinction between partial and total effects is made. The uses of partial and total effects (computed using the new direction) in modification and interpretation of mixture response prediction equations are considered. The suggestions of the paper are illustrated in an example from a glass development study in a waste vitrification program. 5 figures, 3 tables

  1. Radiation effects on eye components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durchschlag, H.; Fochler, C.; Abraham, K.; Kulawik, B.

    1999-08-01

    The most important water-soluble components of the vertebrate eye (lens proteins, aqueous humor, vitreous, hyaluronic acid, ascorbic acid) have been investigated in aqueous solution, after preceding X- or UV-irradiation. Spectroscopic, chromatographic, electrophoretic, hydrodynamic and analytic techniques have been applied, to monitor several radiation damages such as destruction of aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids, aggregation, crosslinking, dissociation, fragmentation, and partial unfolding. Various substances were found which were able to protect eye components effectively against radiation, some of them being also of medical relevance.

  2. Radiation effects on eye components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durchschlag, H.; Fochler, C.; Abraham, K.; Kulawik, B.

    1998-01-01

    The radiation damage (X-ray, UV light) of the most important components of the vertebrate eye (crystallins and other proteins, hyaluronic acid, vitreous, aqueous humour, ascorbic acid) has been investigated by various methods of physical chemistry. UV absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as circular dichroism unveiled changes of the chromophores/fluorophores of the constituent biopolymers and low-molecular components, together with alterations of helix content and the occurrence of aggregation. Size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, densimetry, viscometry and light scattering experiments monitored changes of the global structure of proteins and polysaccharides involved. Electrophoreses allowed conclusions on fragmentation, unfolding and crosslinking. Analytical methods provided information regarding the integrity of groups of special concern (SH, SS) and revealed the existence of stable noxious species (H 2 O 2 ). By means of various measures and additives, manifold modifications of the impact of both ionizing and nonionizing radiation may be achieved. Caused by differences in the primary reactions, eye polymers are protected efficaciously by typical OH radical scavengers against X-irradiation, whereas compounds which exhibit absorption behavior in the UV range turn out to act as potent protectives ('chemical filters') against UV light. A few substances, such as ascorbate, are able to provide protection against both sorts of radiation and are even able to exhibit a slight chemical repair of already damaged particles. The results obtained are of importance for understanding pathological alterations of the eye (loss of transparency, cataractogenesis) and for developing new strategies for protection and repair of eye components. (author)

  3. A history of altruism focusing on Darwin, Allee and E.O. Wilson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domondon, Andrew T

    2013-06-01

    The problem of altruism refers to the apparent difficulty in reconciling the existence of altruists, individuals who reduce their own fitness to increase the fitness of others, with natural selection. A historical and philosophical overview of solutions to this apparent contradiction is presented through a close reading of the key texts of Charles Darwin, Warder C. Allee and Edward O. Wilson. Following an analysis of Darwin's explanation for altruism, I examine the ideas of group selection and kin selection advanced by Allee and Wilson, respectively, Attention is also given to the philosophical implications each associated with their respective solutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Two component systems: physiological effect of a third component.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldiri Salvado

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems mediate the response and adaptation of organisms to environmental changes. In prokaryotes, this signal transduction is often done through Two Component Systems (TCS. These TCS are phosphotransfer protein cascades, and in their prototypical form they are composed by a kinase that senses the environmental signals (SK and by a response regulator (RR that regulates the cellular response. This basic motif can be modified by the addition of a third protein that interacts either with the SK or the RR in a way that could change the dynamic response of the TCS module. In this work we aim at understanding the effect of such an additional protein (which we call "third component" on the functional properties of a prototypical TCS. To do so we build mathematical models of TCS with alternative designs for their interaction with that third component. These mathematical models are analyzed in order to identify the differences in dynamic behavior inherent to each design, with respect to functionally relevant properties such as sensitivity to changes in either the parameter values or the molecular concentrations, temporal responsiveness, possibility of multiple steady states, or stochastic fluctuations in the system. The differences are then correlated to the physiological requirements that impinge on the functioning of the TCS. This analysis sheds light on both, the dynamic behavior of synthetically designed TCS, and the conditions under which natural selection might favor each of the designs. We find that a third component that modulates SK activity increases the parameter space where a bistable response of the TCS module to signals is possible, if SK is monofunctional, but decreases it when the SK is bifunctional. The presence of a third component that modulates RR activity decreases the parameter space where a bistable response of the TCS module to signals is possible.

  5. Radiation dose effects, hardening of electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont-Nivet, E.

    1991-01-01

    This course reviews the mechanism of interaction between ionizing radiation and a silicon oxide type dielectric, in particular the effect of electron-hole pairs creation in the material. Then effects of cumulated dose on electronic components and especially in MOS technology are examined. Finally methods hardening of these components are exposed. 93 refs

  6. Allee effects and pulsed invasion by the gypsy moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derk M. Johnson; Andrew M. Liebhold; Patrick C. Tobin; Ottar N. Bjornstad

    2006-01-01

    Biological invasions pose considerable threats to the world's ecosystems and cause substantial economic losses. A prime example is the invasion of the gypsy moth in the United States, for which more than $194 million was spent on management and monitoring between 1985 and 2004 alone. The spread of the gypsy moth across eastern North America is, perhaps, the most...

  7. Size effects in manufacturing of metallic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, F; Biermann, D; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    In manufacturing of metallic components, the size of the part plays an important role for the process behaviour. This is due to so called size effects, which lead to changes in the process behaviour even if the relationship between the main geometrical features is kept constant. The aim...... of this paper is to give a systematic review on Such effects and their potential use or remedy. First, the typology of size effects will be explained, followed by a description of size effects on strength and tribology. The last three sections describe size effects on formability, forming processes and cutting...... processes. (C) 2009 CIRP....

  8. Irradiation effects on plasma diagnostic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Iida, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Yujiro

    1998-10-01

    One of the most important issues to develop the diagnostics for the experimental thermonuclear reactor such as ITER is the irradiation effects on the diagnostics components. Typical neutron flux and fluence on the first wall are 1 MW/m 2 and 1 MWa/m 2 , respectively for ITER. In such radiation condition, most of the present diagnostics could not survive so that those will be planed to be installed far from the vacuum vessel. However, some diagnostics sensors such as bolometers and magnetic probes still have to be install inside vessel. And many transmission components for lights, wave and electric signals are inevitable even inside vessel. As a part of this R and D program of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA), we carried out the irradiation tests on the basic materials of the transmission components and in-vessel diagnostics sensors in order to identify radiation hardened materials that can be used for diagnostic systems. (J.P.N.)

  9. Human reliability program: Components and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baley-Downes, S.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''Human Reliability Program'' (HRP) is defined as a series of selective controls which are implemented and integrated to identify the ''insider threat'' from current and prospective employees who are dishonest, disloyal and unreliable. The HRP, although not a prediction of human behaviour, is an excellent tool for decision making and should compliment security and improve employee quality. The HRP consists of several component applications such as management evaluation; appropriate background investigative requirements; occupational health examination and laboratory testing; drug/alcohol screening; psychological testing and interviews; polygraph examination; job related aberrant behaviour recognition; on-going education and training; document control; drug/alcohol rehabilitation; periodic HRP audit; and implementation of an onsite central clearing house. The components and effects of HRP are discussed in further detail in this paper

  10. Irradiation effects on plasma diagnostic components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitani, Takeo [ed.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Iida, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Yujiro [and others

    1998-10-01

    One of the most important issues to develop the diagnostics for the experimental thermonuclear reactor such as ITER is the irradiation effects on the diagnostics components. Typical neutron flux and fluence on the first wall are 1 MW/m{sup 2} and 1 MWa/m{sup 2}, respectively for ITER. In such radiation condition, most of the present diagnostics could not survive so that those will be planed to be installed far from the vacuum vessel. However, some diagnostics sensors such as bolometers and magnetic probes still have to be install inside vessel. And many transmission components for lights, wave and electric signals are inevitable even inside vessel. As a part of this R and D program of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA), we carried out the irradiation tests on the basic materials of the transmission components and in-vessel diagnostics sensors in order to identify radiation hardened materials that can be used for diagnostic systems. (J.P.N.)

  11. Radiation effects on superconducting fusion magnet components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fusion devices based on the magnetic confinement principle heavily rely on the existence and performance of superconducting magnets and have always significantly contributed to advancing superconductor and magnet technology to their limits. In view of the presently ongoing construction of the tokamak device ITER and the stellerator device Wendelstein 7X and their record breaking parameters concerning size, complexity of design, stored energy, amperage, mechanical and magnetic forces, critical current densities and stability requirements, it is deemed timely to review another critical parameter that is practically unique to these devices, namely the radiation response of all magnet components to the lifetime fluence of fast neutrons and gamma rays produced by the fusion reactions of deuterium and tritium. I will review these radiation effects in turn for the currently employed standard "technical" low temperature superconductors NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, the stabilizing material (Cu) as well as the magnet insulation materials and conclude by discussing the potential of high temperature superconducting materials for future generations of fusion devices, such as DEMO. (author)

  12. Aging effects in PWR power plants components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a contribution to the study of aging process of components in commercial plants of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The analysis is made through application of the Fault Trees Method, Monte Carlo Method and Fussell-Vesely Importance Measure. The approach of the study of aging in nuclear power plants, besides giving attention to the economic factors involved directly with the extent of their operational life, also provide significant data on security issues. The latest case involving process of life extension of a PWR could be seen in Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant through investing of $27 million for the installation of a new reactor lid. The corrective action has generated an estimated operating life extension of Angra I in twenty years, offering great economy compared with building cost of a new plant and anterior decommissioning, if it had reached the time operating limit of forty years. The Extension of the operating life of a nuclear power plant must be accompanied by a special attention to the components of the systems and their aging process. After the application of the methodology (aging analysis of the injection system of the containment spray) proposed in this work, it can be seen that 'the increase in the rate of component failure, due the aging process, generates the increase in the general unavailability of the system that containing these basic components'. The final results obtained were as expected and may contribute to the maintenance policy, preventing premature aging process in Nuclear Plant Systems. (author)

  13. A Study on the Maintenance Effectiveness Assessment for Active Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woo Sang; Oh, Seung Jong

    2006-01-01

    One of the key tasks in the periodic safety review (PSR) of nuclear power plant is to assess the aging management of structures, systems and components (SSC). The evaluation can be categorized by two parts, passive and active components. Unlike the passive components, active components are periodically maintained and replaced with new components, so the evaluation of aging mechanism of the passive components such as erosion, corrosion is not applicable to the evaluation of active components of nuclear power plant. For active components, they will maintain capability to fulfill its design function if preventive maintenance effectiveness is proper. In this paper, the assessment based on the reliability and availability of the active components of the domestic nuclear power plants is examined

  14. Irradiation effects on plasma diagnostic components (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Sugie, Tatsuo

    2002-03-01

    Irradiation tests on a number of diagnostic components under fission neutrons, gamma-rays and 14 MeV neutrons have been carried out as a part of the ITER technology R and D program. UV range transmission losses of a KU-1 quartz were measured during 14 MeV neutron and 60 Co gamma-ray irradiation. Significant transmission losses were observed in the wavelength of 200-300 nm. Five kinds of ITER round robin fibers were irradiated in JMTR and the 60 Co gamma-ray irradiation facility. KS-4V, KU-H2G and F-doped fibers have a rather good radiation hardness, which might be available just outside of the vacuum vessel in ITER. Mica substrate bolometer was irradiated in JMTR up to 0.1 dpa. During the cool down phase of the first cycle all connections went open circuit. The use of gold meanders in the bolometer might be problematic in ITER. The magnetic probes were irradiated in JMTR. Drift of 10 - 40 mVs for 1000s was observed with a digital longterm integrator, however, which might be induced not only by RIEMF but also drift inside the integrator itself. ITER-relevant magnetic coil could be made with MI-cables, whose electric drift for 1000-s integration is less than 0.5 mVs. (author)

  15. Stress concentration effects in high pressure components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aller, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the stress concentration effects of sideholes in thick walled, high pressure cylinders. It has been shown that the theoretical stress concentration factor at the intersection of a small crossbore in a closed end, thick walled cylinder varies between 3.0 and 4.0. Tests have shown that this effect can be greatly reduced in practice by carefully radiusing the bore intersection and autofrettaging the cylinder. It has also been shown that the minimum stress concentration factor occurs when the main bore and sidehole or crossbore have the same diameter, and the radius of the intersection is approximately equal to the sidehole radius. When the bore and sidehole intersection angle decreases from 90 degrees, the stress concentration factor increases significantly. Knowledge of these fundamental relationships can be used in maintaining, as well ad designing, high pressure equipment

  16. Two component memory of Rotstein effect in nuclear emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushchin, E.M.; Lebedev, A.N.; Somov, S.V.; Timofeev, M.K.; Tipografshchik, G.I.

    1991-01-01

    Two sharply differing memory components - fast and slow -are simultaneously detected during investigation into the controlled mode of fast charged particle detection in simple nuclear emulsions, with the emulsion trace sensitivity, corresponding to these components, being about 5 time different. The value of memory time is T m ≅40 μs for fast memory and T m ≅3.5 ms for the slow one. The detection of two Rotstein effect memory components confirms the correctness of the trap model

  17. Effect of Temperature and Hose Genotype on Components of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Temperature and Hose Genotype on Components of Resistance to Groundnut Rust. P Subrahmanyam, PV Subba Rao, PM Reddy, D McDonald. Abstract. The effects of temperature on incubation period, infection frequency, lesion diameter, leaf area damage, pustule rupture, and sporulation were quantified for six ...

  18. Heavy components coupling effect on building response spectra generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T.H.; Johnson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates the dynamic coupling effect on the floor response spectra between the heavy components and the Reactor Interior (R/I) building in a PWR. The following cases were studied: (I) simplified models of one and two lump mass models representing building and heavy components, and (II) actual plant building and heavy component models. Response spectra are developed at building nodes for all models, using time-history analysis methods. Comparisons of response spectra from various models are made to observe the coupling effects. In some cases, this study found that the coupling would reduce the response spectra values in certain frequency regions even if the coupling is not required according to the above criteria. (orig./HP)

  19. Effects of Methylphenidate on Working Memory Components: Influence of Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Anne-Claude; Jain, Umesh; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Tannock, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    Background: To investigate the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) on components of working memory (WM) in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and determine the responsiveness of WM measures to MPH. Methods: Participants were a clinical sample of 50 children and adolescents with ADHD, aged 6 to 16 years old, who participated in an acute…

  20. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  1. Effect of ambient levels of ozone on photosynthetic components and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of ambient levels of ozone on photosynthetic components and radical scavenging system in leaves of African cowpea varieties. ... The O3-induced significant reduction in catalase activity was observed in Blackeye at vegetative and reproductive growth stages; and in Asontem at reproductive growth stage. On the other ...

  2. Parts and Components Reliability Assessment: A Cost Effective Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    System reliability assessment is a methodology which incorporates reliability analyses performed at parts and components level such as Reliability Prediction, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) to assess risks, perform design tradeoffs, and therefore, to ensure effective productivity and/or mission success. The system reliability is used to optimize the product design to accommodate today?s mandated budget, manpower, and schedule constraints. Stand ard based reliability assessment is an effective approach consisting of reliability predictions together with other reliability analyses for electronic, electrical, and electro-mechanical (EEE) complex parts and components of large systems based on failure rate estimates published by the United States (U.S.) military or commercial standards and handbooks. Many of these standards are globally accepted and recognized. The reliability assessment is especially useful during the initial stages when the system design is still in the development and hard failure data is not yet available or manufacturers are not contractually obliged by their customers to publish the reliability estimates/predictions for their parts and components. This paper presents a methodology to assess system reliability using parts and components reliability estimates to ensure effective productivity and/or mission success in an efficient manner, low cost, and tight schedule.

  3. Effectiveness of Bioactive Food Components in Experimental Colon Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Hijová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the evaluation of possible protective effects of selected bioactive food components in experimental N,N-dimethylhydrazine (DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis. Wistar albino rats (n = 92 were fed a high fat diet or conventional laboratory diet. Two weeks after the beginning of the trial, DMH injections were given to six groups of rats at the dose of 20 mg/kg b.w. twice weekly. The activity of bacterial enzymes in faeces and serum bile acid concentrations were determined. High fat diet, DMH injections, and their combination significantly increased the activies of β-galactosidase, β-glucuronidase, and α-glucosidase (p p < 0.001, as well as the bile acid concentration compared to the group at the highest risk. The protective effects of selected bioactive food components in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis allow for their possible use in cancer prevention or treatment.

  4. Circadian Effects on Simple Components of Complex Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Benjamin A.; Wickens, Christopher D.; Vieane, Alex Z.; Gutzwiller, Robert S.; Sebok, Angelia L.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to advance understanding and prediction of the impact of circadian rhythm on aspects of complex task performance during unexpected automation failures, and subsequent fault management. Participants trained on two tasks: a process control simulation, featuring automated support; and a multi-tasking platform. Participants then completed one task in a very early morning (circadian night) session, and the other during a late afternoon (circadian day) session. Small effects of time of day were seen on simple components of task performance, but impacts on more demanding components, such as those that occur following an automation failure, were muted relative to previous studies where circadian rhythm was compounded with sleep deprivation and fatigue. Circadian low participants engaged in compensatory strategies, rather than passively monitoring the automation. The findings and implications are discussed in the context of a model that includes the effects of sleep and fatigue factors.

  5. Effect of cooling water on stability of NLC linac components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Le Pimpec et al.

    2003-02-11

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  6. Effect of Cooling Water on Stability of NLC Linac Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, Frederic

    2002-11-01

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  7. Effects of application boron on yields, yield component and oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to investigate the effects of five boron (B) doses; 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 kg B ha-1 in B-deficient calcareous soils on yield and some yield components of four sunflower genotypes. Genotypes have shown variations with respect to their responses to B applications. AS-615 and Coban had the ...

  8. Effect of plastic strain on fracture strength of cracked components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear power plant components are occasionally subjected to large load by earthquake and may suffer plastic strain. Although the plastic strain induced in materials increases the strength, it may reduce the fracture toughness due to a crack in the components. In this study, the effect of the plastic strain on strength of cracked components was investigated. Firstly, the change in the tensile properties and fracture toughness due to plastic strain were examined for Type 316 stainless steel and carbon steel (SM490). The degree of nominal plastic strain was 5%, 10%, 20% and 40% (only for stainless steel). Secondly, the J-integral values of surface crack on a pipe were evaluated by finite element analyses. Finally, the critical load for fracture of the cracked pipe was evaluated for various pipe and crack geometries using the J-integral values and the fracture toughness obtained. It was concluded that the plastic strain enhances the fracture strength of the cracked components when the induced plastic strain is less than 10%, although the extremely large plastic strain could reduce the strength. (author)

  9. Antiplatelet effects of Cyperus rotundus and its component (+)-nootkatone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun Ji; Lee, Dong-Ung; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Lee, Sun-Mee; Kim, Yeong Shik; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2011-04-26

    Cyperus rotundus, a well-known oriental traditional medicine, has been reported to exhibit wide spectrum activity in biological systems including the circulatory system, however, little information is available on its antiplatelet activity. This study was undertaken to investigate the antiplatelet effects of Cyperus rotundus EtOH extract (CRE) and its constituent compounds. The antiplatelet activities of CRE and its eight constituent compounds were evaluated by examining their effects on rat platelet aggregations in vitro and ex vivo, and on mice tail bleeding times. During the in vitro platelet aggregation study, CRE showed significant and concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on collagen-, thrombin-, and/or AA-induced platelet aggregation. Of its eight components, (+)-nootkatone was found to have the most potent inhibitory effect on collagen-, thrombin-, and AA-induced platelet aggregation. In addition, CRE- and (+)-nootkatone-treated mice exhibited significantly prolonged bleeding times. Furthermore, (+)-nootkatone had a significant inhibitory effect on rat platelet aggregation ex vivo. This study demonstrates the antiplatelet effects of CRE and its active component (+)-nootkatone, and suggests that these agents might be of therapeutic benefit for the prevention of platelet-associated cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effects Radiation on Cellular Components of the Immune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubaidah-Alatas

    2001-01-01

    The immune system describes the body's ability to defend itself against various foreign intruders named as antigens by calling on an immune mechanism. Antigens penetration into body activate the body's immune system that may be humoral response, cellular response, or both. The immune response is primarily mediated by two cell types, lymphocyte and macrophage. This paper will discuss the cellular component of immune system and the radiation effects on various cells involved in system. Moreover, the effects of radiation on humoral and cellular responses and the relation among immunity, cancer and radiotherapy are also described. (author)

  11. Effect of gamma radiation on biochemical components in rapeseed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khawas, K.H.A.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study possibility of using safe doses of gamma rays (up to 10 KGy), dry heat treatments (roasting), humid heat treatments (autoclaving) as well as various soaking treatments to inactivate or minimize the antiqualities factors of rape seed (glucosinolate compounds and myrosinase enzyme) and detect the effects of these treatments on chemical composition of oil and residual meal Attention was focused on the effect of these treatments on the chemical composition, fatty acids constituents and unsaponifiable matter components of rape seed oil. Besides, the changes occurred in the chemical composition, total glucosinolate compounds and myrosinase activity of residual meal of rape seed were also studied

  12. Effects of irradiation on the components of implantable pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Shinji; Ono, Seiji; Kuga, Noriyuki; Shiba, Tooru; Hirose, Tetsuo; Matoba, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of irradiation on implantable pacemaker components. The pacemaker was divided into three components: lead wire and electrode, battery, and electrical circuit, and each component was irradiated by X-ray and electron beams, respectively. The pacemaker parameters were measured by both telemetry data of the programmer and directly measured data from the output terminal. The following results were obtained. For the lead wire and electrode, there was no effect on the pacemaker function due to irradiation by X-ray and electron beams. In the case of battery irradiation, there was no change in battery voltage or current up to 236 Gy X-ray dose. In the electrical circuit, the pacemaker reverted to the regular beating rate (fixed-rate mode) immediately after the start of X-ray irradiation, and it continued in this mode during irradiation. In patients with their own heartbeat rhythm, changing to the fixed-rate mode may cause dangerous conditions such as ventricular fibrillation. When the accumulated irradiation dose is increased, another failure can be seen in the output voltage of the pacemaker. The pacing output voltage dropped rapidly by about 40% at 30-88 Gy. Decreasing the output voltage results in pacing disorders, and heart failure may occur. In the telemetry data of the programmer, no change in output voltage could be detected, highlighting the difference between telemetry data and actual pacing data. (author)

  13. Effects of irradiation on the components of implantable pacemakers

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamura, S; Kuga, N; Shiba, T; Hirose, T; Fujimoto, H; Toyoshima, T; Hyodo, K; Matoba, M

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of irradiation on implantable pacemaker components. The pacemaker was divided into three components: lead wire and electrode, battery, and electrical circuit, and each component was irradiated by X-ray and electron beams, respectively. The pacemaker parameters were measured by both telemetry data of the programmer and directly measured data from the output terminal. The following results were obtained. For the lead wire and electrode, there was no effect on the pacemaker function due to irradiation by X-ray and electron beams. In the case of battery irradiation, there was no change in battery voltage or current up to 236 Gy X-ray dose. In the electrical circuit, the pacemaker reverted to the regular beating rate (fixed-rate mode) immediately after the start of X-ray irradiation, and it continued in this mode during irradiation. In patients with their own heartbeat rhythm, changing to the fixed-rate mode may cause dangerous conditions such as ventricular fib...

  14. Effects of Dietary Fiber and Its Components on Metabolic Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Haub

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fiber and whole grains contain a unique blend of bioactive components including resistant starches, vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. As a result, research regarding their potential health benefits has received considerable attention in the last several decades. Epidemiological and clinical studies demonstrate that intake of dietary fiber and whole grain is inversely related to obesity, type two diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Defining dietary fiber is a divergent process and is dependent on both nutrition and analytical concepts. The most common and accepted definition is based on nutritional physiology. Generally speaking, dietary fiber is the edible parts of plants, or similar carbohydrates, that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the small intestine. Dietary fiber can be separated into many different fractions. Recent research has begun to isolate these components and determine if increasing their levels in a diet is beneficial to human health. These fractions include arabinoxylan, inulin, pectin, bran, cellulose, β-glucan and resistant starch. The study of these components may give us a better understanding of how and why dietary fiber may decrease the risk for certain diseases. The mechanisms behind the reported effects of dietary fiber on metabolic health are not well established. It is speculated to be a result of changes in intestinal viscosity, nutrient absorption, rate of passage, production of short chain fatty acids and production of gut hormones. Given the inconsistencies reported between studies this review will examine the most up to date data concerning dietary fiber and its effects on metabolic health.

  15. Decarburisation Effect on Hardened Strip Steel Fastening Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karli JAASON

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment is widely used for high reliability fastening components such as buckles and brackets. The current study focuses on mass production of safety components which are fineblanked from sheet metal, austempered and chromium electroplated. Electroplating together with stamping defects may lead to unexpected brittle failure of the component. It is widely known that during austenitisation, decarburisation could avoid brittle failure and, therefore, slight decarburisation is recommended. There is little information how much mass production is influenced by decarburisation and where the limits are. The current study has two goals. The first one focuses on the extent of decarburisation effect on the part properties, and the second aims to find the optimum furnace setting for the product type used in the study. Also, it is necessary to choose a reliable decarburisation control method for austempered components. The effect on material grades was analyzed by using three steel alloys with carbon content of 0.37 wt.%, 0.47 wt.% and 0.62 wt.%. The specimens were austempered to hardness 45 – 51 HRC under endothermic protective atmosphere. To gain different decarburisation levels, two gas set-ups were used. Infrared gas analyzer was used to measure CO and CO2 content in the furnace gas. Three characteristics of the specimens were evaluated: hardness, rupture strength and brittleness. The depth of the decarburisation was determined by three different approaches according to standard EN ISO 3887. Based on the results, the spectrographic method is the most reliable for determining the depth of decarburisation. This study reveals that higher surface decarburisation has a positive effect on the ductility and no effect on the rupture strength of the component. The material with carbon content of 0.62 wt.% is the most sensitive to decarburisation. During mass production, the inaccuracy of hardness measuring raises which results in the inaccuracy of

  16. Effect of plastic strain on fracture strength of cracked components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plant components are occasionally subjected to excessive load by earthquake and may suffer plastic strain. Although the plastic strain introduced in materials increases the strength, it may reduce the fracture toughness. In this study, the effect of the plastic strain on strength of cracked components was investigated. Firstly, the change in the tensile properties and fracture toughness due to plastic strain were examined for Type 316 stainless steel and carbon steel (SM 490). The degree of nominal plastic strain was 5%, 10%, 20% and 40% (only for stainless steel). Secondly, the J-integral values of surface crack on a pipe were evaluated by finite element analyses. Finally, the critical load for fracture of the cracked pipe was evaluated for various pipe and crack geometries using the J-integral values and the fracture toughness obtained. It was concluded that the plastic strain enhances the fracture strength of the cracked components when the induced plastic strain is less than 10%, although the extremely large plastic strain could reduce the strength. (author)

  17. The effects of attachment components on formal-operational thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukčević Branimir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work our aim is to examine how the components of attachment influence the thinking development of adolescents in familial context. We investigated the components of attachment: unresolved family traumatisation, the use of external security base, fear of loss of external security base, negative self concept, negative other concept, capacity for mentalisation, low control of anger. We used a revised Questionnaire for Assessment of Adult and Adolescent Attachment (in original: UPIPAV-R. Formal operations were tested by Bond's Logical Operations Test. We examined the cultural-pedagogical status of the family, the parental mediation characteristic for the development of formal operations, and family property as the aspects of familial context. The sample consisted of 200 pupils aged 14 to 19. According to the attachment theory, secure attachment provides the feel of security in environment exploration, which is the ground of personality development. We assumed that components of attachment contribute formal-operational thinking development and change the influence of familial cultural-supportive tools. The findings show us that the culturalpedagogical status of the family improves formal operations development and unresolved family traumatisation has negative influence. Capacity for mentalisation has a positive indirect effect on thinking development through the influence of the cultural-pedagogical status of the family. The low control of anger has a negative indirect effect on thinking development; it increases the influence of unresolved family traumatisation. Negative self concept has indirect effects on thinking development through increasing this negative influence of unresolved family traumatisation and decreasing the role of familial cultural-supportive tools.

  18. Is Stacking Intervention Components Cost-Effective? An Analysis of the Incredible Years Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E. Michael; Olchowski, Allison E.; Webster-Stratton, Carolyn H.

    2007-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of delivering stacked multiple intervention components for children is compared to implementing single intervention by analyzing the Incredible Years Series program. The result suggests multiple intervention components are more cost-effective than single intervention components.

  19. Effects of air blast on power plant structures and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kot, C.A.; Valentin, R.A.; McLennan, D.A.; Turula, P.

    1978-10-01

    The effects of air blast from high explosives detonation on selected power plant structures and components are investigated analytically. Relying on a synthesis of state of the art methods estimates of structural response are obtained. Similarly blast loadings are determined from compilations of experimental data reported in the literature. Plastic-yield line analysis is employed to determine the response of both concrete and steel flat walls (plates) under impulsive loading. Linear elastic theory is used to investigate the spalling of concrete walls and mode analysis methods predict the deflection of piping. The specific problems considered are: the gross deformation of reinforced concrete shield and containment structures due to blast impulse, the spalling of concrete walls, the interaction or impact of concrete debris with steel containments and liners, and the response of exposed piping to blast impulse. It is found that for sufficiently close-in detonations and/or large explosive charge weights severe damage or destruction will result. This is particularly true for structures or components directly exposed to blast impulse

  20. Effect of component aging on PWR control rod drive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1992-01-01

    An aging assessment of PWR control rod drive (CRD) systems has been completed as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W), Combustion Engineering (CE), and Westinghouse (W) systems were evaluated to determine the potential for degradation as each system ages. Operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. This, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and operating environment, demonstrate that each design is subject to degradation, which if left unchecked, could affect its safety function as the plant ages. An industry survey, conducted with the assistance of EPRI and NUMARC, identified current CRD system maintenance and inspection practices. The results of this survey indicate that some plants have performed system modifications, replaced components, or augmented existing preventive maintenance practices in response to system aging. The survey results also supported the operating experience data, which concluded that the timely replacement of degraded components, prior to failure, was not always possible using existing condition monitoring techniques. The recommendations presented in this study also include a discussion of more advanced monitoring techniques, which provide trendable results capable of detecting aging

  1. Hypolipidemic effect of hemicellulose component of coconut fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhurani, J A; Rajamohan, T

    1998-08-01

    The neutral detergent fiber (NDF) isolated from coconut kernel was digested with cellulase and hemicellulase and the residual fiber rich in hemicellulose (without cellulose) and cellulose (with out hemicellulose) were fed to rats and compared with a fiber free group. The results indicate that hemicellulose rich fiber showed decreased concentration of total cholesterol, LDL + VLDL cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol, while cellulose rich fiber showed no significant alteration. There was increased HMG CoA reductase activity and increased incorporation of labeled acetate into free cholesterol. Rats fed hemicellulose rich coconut fiber produced lower concentration of triglycerides and phospholipids and lower release of lipoproteins into circulation. There was increased concentration of hepatic bile acids and increased excretion of faecal sterols and bile acids. These results indicate that the hemicellulose component of coconut fiber was responsible for the observed hypolipidemic effect.

  2. Modelling mate-finding Allee effects and populations dynamics, with applications in pest control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boukal S., David; Berec, Luděk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2009), s. 445-458 ISSN 1438-3896 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600070602 Grant - others:EU Research Training Network FishACE(BE) MRTN-CT-2004-005578 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : culling * efficiency * natural enemies Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.539, year: 2009

  3. Combining tactics to exploit allee effects for eradication of alien insect populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Maxwell Suckling; Patrick C. Tobin; Deborah G. McCullough; Daniel A. Herms

    2012-01-01

    Invasive species increasingly threaten ecosystems, food production, and human welfare worldwide. Hundreds of eradication programs have targeted a wide range of nonnative insect species to mitigate the economic and ecological impacts of biological invasions. Many such programs used multiple tactics to achieve this goal, but interactions between tactics have received...

  4. Impacts of predation on dynamics of age-structured prey: Allee effects and multi-stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlová, V.; Berec, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2012), s. 533-544 ISSN 1874-1738 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : age-specific predation * functional response * generalist predator Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.052, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs12080-011-0144-y

  5. Density-dependent selection on mate search and evolution of Allee effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berec, Luděk; Kramer, A. M.; Bernhauerová, V.; Drake, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2018), s. 24-35 ISSN 0021-8790 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) GA15-24456S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : evolutionary suicide * mate competition * mating Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.474, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2656.12662/epdf

  6. Gamma dose effects valuation on micro computing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffre, F.

    1995-01-01

    Robotics in hostile environment raises the problem of micro computing components resistance with gamma radiation cumulated dose. The current aim is to reach a dose of 3000 grays with industrial components. A methodology and an instrumentation adapted to test this type of components have been developed. The aim of this work is to present the advantages and disadvantages bound to the use of industrial components in the presence of gamma radiation. After an analysis of the criteria allowing to justify the technological choices, the different steps which characterize the selection and the assessment methodology used are explained. The irradiation and measures means now operational are mentioned. Moreover, the supply aspects of the chosen components for the design of an industrialized system is taken into account. These selection and assessment components contribute to the development and design of computers for civil nuclear robotics. (O.M.)

  7. Component unavailability versus inservice test (IST) interval: Evaluations of component aging effects with applications to check valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, W.E.; Poole, A.B.

    1997-07-01

    Methods are presented for calculating component unavailabilities when inservice test (IST) intervals are changed and when component aging is explicitly included. The methods extend usual approaches for calculating unavailability and risk effects of changing IST intervals which utilize Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods that do not explicitly include component aging. Different IST characteristics are handled including ISTs which are followed by corrective maintenances which completely renew or partially renew the component. ISTs which are not followed by maintenance activities needed to renew the component are also handled. Any downtime associated with IST, including the test downtime and the following maintenance downtime, is included in the unavailability evaluations. A range of component aging behaviors is studied including both linear and nonlinear aging behaviors. Based upon evaluations completed to date, pooled failure data on check valves show relatively small aging (e.g., less than 7% per year). However, data from some plant systems could be evidence for larger aging rates occurring in time periods less than 5 years. The methods are utilized in this report to carry out a range of sensitivity evaluations to evaluate aging effects for different possible applications. Based on the sensitivity evaluations, summary tables are constructed showing how optimal IST interval ranges for check valves can vary relative to different aging behaviors which might exist. The evaluations are also used to identify IST intervals for check valves which are robust to component aging effects. General insights on aging effects are also extracted. These sensitivity studies and extracted results provide useful information which can be supplemented or be updated with plant specific information. The models and results can also be input to PRAs to determine associated risk implications

  8. Effect of component design in retrieved bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Matthew D; Baker, Erin A; Salisbury, Meagan R; Kaplan, Lige M; Greene, Ryan T; Greene, Perry W

    2013-09-01

    Primary articulation of bipolar hemiarthroplasty systems is at the femoral head-liner interface. The purpose of this study was to compare observed damage modes on 36 retrieved bipolar systems with implant, demographic, intraoperative, and radiographic data to elucidate the effects of component design, specifically locking mechanism, on clinical performance. Retrieved bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty systems of 3 different design types were obtained, disassembled, and evaluated macro- and microscopically for varying modes of wear, including abrasion, burnishing, embedding, scratching, and pitting. Clinical record review and radiographic analysis were performed by a senior orthopedic surgery resident. Average bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty system term of service was 46 months (range, 0.27-187 months). All devices contained wear debris captured within the articulating space between the femoral head and liner. In 31% of patients without infection, lucency was observed on immediate prerevision radiographs. The system with a leaf locking mechanism showed significantly increased radiographically observed osteolysis (P=.03) compared with a system with a stopper ring locking mechanism. In addition, implant design and observed damage modes, including pitting and third-body particle embedding, were significantly associated with radiographically observed osteolysis. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Effect of blow-holes on reliability of cast component

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    surface approximation of the original multivariate implicit limit state/performance function in ... failure mechanism, the combination of finite element method with the theory of statistics and .... the cast component obtained using PATRAN, 2005.

  10. Effect of a kinderkinetics programme on components of children's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... on components of children's perceptual-motor and cognitive development. ... The intervention group participated in a perceptual-motor programme while the ... to improve body awareness, gross and fine motor skills, coordination, balance, ...

  11. Effects of Rootstock on the Volatile flavour Components of Page ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hosein

    2012-05-10

    May 10, 2012 ... Fruit flavor compounds were extracted by using ultrasound. (US) water bath ... treatments, processing and storage conditions (Oliveira et al., 2010b). ..... Identification of essential oil components by gas chromatography / mass ...

  12. The effects of attachment components on formal-operational thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Vukčević Branimir

    2010-01-01

    In this work our aim is to examine how the components of attachment influence the thinking development of adolescents in familial context. We investigated the components of attachment: unresolved family traumatisation, the use of external security base, fear of loss of external security base, negative self concept, negative other concept, capacity for mentalisation, low control of anger. We used a revised Questionnaire for Assessment of Adult and Adolescent Attachment (in original: UPIPAV-R)....

  13. Component effects on crystallization of RE-containing aluminoborosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani, E-mail: syazwanimf@ukm.edu.my [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang (Korea, Republic of); School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, The National University of Malaysia, 43650 Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hrma, Pavel [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Lanthanide-aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass is one option for immobilizing rare earth (RE) oxide fission products generated during reprocessing of pyroprocessed fuel. This glass system can accommodate a high loading of RE oxides and has excellent chemical durability. The present study describes efforts to model equilibrium crystallinity as a function of glass composition and temperature as well as liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) as a function of glass composition. The experimental method for determining T{sub L} was ASTM C1720-11. Typically, three crystalline phases were formed in each glass: Ce-borosilicate (Ce{sub 3}BSi{sub 2}O{sub 10}), mullite (Al{sub 10}Si{sub 2}O{sub 19}), and corundum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Cerianite (CeO{sub 2}) was a common minor crystalline phase and Nd-silicate (Nd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}) occurred in some of the glasses. In the composition region studied, T{sub L} decreased as SiO{sub 2} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} fractions increased and strongly increased with increasing fractions of RE oxides; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} had a moderate effect on the T{sub L} but, as expected, it strongly affected the precipitation of Al-containing crystals. - Highlights: • We investigated equilibrium crystal fraction in glasses versus temperature. • We fitted empirical models to measured data obtaining component coefficients. • Liquidus temperature increased as SiO{sub 2} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} fractions decreased. • Liquidus temperature increased as CeO{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fractions increased.

  14. Numerical simulation of runaway electron effect on Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Akiba, Masato; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    1998-07-01

    The runaway electron effects on Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) are studied by the numerical analyses. The present study is the first investigation of time-dependent thermal response of PFCs caused by runaway electron impact. For this purpose, we developed a new integrated numerical code, which consists of the Monte Carlo code for the coupled electrons and photons transport analysis and the finite element code for the thermo-mechanical analysis. In this code, we apply the practical incident parameters and distribution of runaway electrons recently proposed by S. Putvinski, which can express the time-dependent behavior of runaway electrons impact. The incident parameters of electrons in this study are the energy density ranging from 10 to 75 MJ/m 2 , the average electrons' energy of 12.5 MeV, the incident angle of 0.01deg and the characteristic time constant for decay of runaway electrons event of 0.15sec. The numerical results showed that the divertor with CFC (Carbon-Fiber-Composite) armor did not suffer serious damage. On the other hand, maximum temperatures at the surface of the divertor with tungsten armor and the first wall with beryllium armor exceed the melting point in case of the incident energy density of 20 and 50 MJ/m 2 . Within the range of the incident condition of runaway electrons, the cooling pipe of each PFCs can be prevented from the melting or burn-out caused by runaway electrons impact, which is one of the possible consequences of runaway electrons event so far. (author)

  15. Blood transport and genomic effects of olive oil components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriana, Francisco J.G.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that consuming diets rich in (extra virgin olive oil is associated with a low incidence of chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Recent evidence has emerged which implicates raised concentrations of plasma triglycerides in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD. It has been demonstrated that olive oil contributes to modulate metabolic processes related to secretion and transport of triglycerides. Intestinal triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from olive oil are very efficiently cleared during postprandial metabolism compared to other oils. Then, there is a massive interaction of nascent and remnant triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, as well as lipid metabolites and fat-soluble components, with hepatic and non-hepatic tissues. A diet-related response involves a multitude of gene products, including proteins implicated in lipid synthesis, oxidation and cell differentiation. Particularly, it has been reported a health beneficial effect of several components from (extra virgin olive oil (fatty acids and minor compounds, which are functioning as regulators of gene transcription . This review reaffirm that a diet rich in extra virgin olive oil is of vital importance in the prevention of cardiovascular and other diseases.Estudios epidemiológicos asocian el consumo de una dieta rica en aceite de oliva (virgen extra con una baja incidencia de enfermedades crónicas, como las enfermedades cardiovasculares y el cáncer. Una concentración elevada de triglicéridos en plasma, tanto en ayunas como durante el metabolismo postprandial, está implicada en la patogénesis cardiovascular. Se ha demostrado que el aceite de oliva contribuye a modular los procesos metabólicos relativos a la secreción y al transporte de triglicéridos. Con respecto a otros aceites comestibles, el aceite de oliva genera lipoproteínas intestinales ricas en triglicéridos que se metabolizan con rapidez. En este contexto, se

  16. Analyses of component degradation to evaluate maintenance effectiveness and aging effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, P.K.; Hsu, F.; Subudhi, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes degradation modeling, an approach for analyzing degradation and failure of components to understand the aging process of components. As used in our study, degradation modeling is the analysis of information on degradation of components for developing models of the degradation process and its implications. This modeling focuses on the analysis of the times of degradations of components, to model how the rate of degradation changes with the age of the component. With this methodology we also determine the effectiveness of maintenance as applicable to aging evaluations. The specific applications which are performed show quantitative models of degradation rates of components and failure rates of components from plant-specific data. The statistical techniques allow aging trends to be identified in the degradation data and in the failure data. Initial estimates of the effectiveness of maintenance in limiting degradations from becoming failures are developed. These results are important first steps in degradation modeling, and show that degradation can be modeled to identify aging trends. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  17. Effect of Component Failures on Economics of Distributed Photovoltaic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubin, Barry T. [Univ. of Hartford, West Hartford, CT (United States)

    2012-02-02

    This report describes an applied research program to assess the realistic costs of grid connected photovoltaic (PV) installations. A Board of Advisors was assembled that included management from the regional electric power utilities, as well as other participants from companies that work in the electric power industry. Although the program started with the intention of addressing effective load carrying capacity (ELCC) for utility-owned photovoltaic installations, results from the literature study and recommendations from the Board of Advisors led investigators to the conclusion that obtaining effective data for this analysis would be difficult, if not impossible. The effort was then re-focused on assessing the realistic costs and economic valuations of grid-connected PV installations. The 17 kW PV installation on the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater was used as one source of actual data. The change in objective required a more technically oriented group. The re-organized working group (changes made due to the need for more technically oriented participants) made site visits to medium-sized PV installations in Connecticut with the objective of developing sources of operating histories. An extensive literature review helped to focus efforts in several technical and economic subjects. The objective of determining the consequences of component failures on both generation and economic returns required three analyses. The first was a Monte-Carlo-based simulation model for failure occurrences and the resulting downtime. Published failure data, though limited, was used to verify the results. A second model was developed to predict the reduction in or loss of electrical generation related to the downtime due to these failures. Finally, a comprehensive economic analysis, including these failures, was developed to determine realistic net present values of installed PV arrays. Two types of societal benefits were explored, with quantitative valuations developed

  18. Inter cropping and population density effects on yield component ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus the objective of this study was to determine the influence of intercropping and population density on protein and oil yield components, photosynthesis of sorghum and Soybean at the canopy closure. The study was conducted at the University of Nairobi farm during the long rains. There was a significant increase in the ...

  19. Mitigation of harmful effects of welds in zirconium alloy components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Doubt, G.L.; Fong, R.W.L.; Root, J.H.; Bowden, J.W.; Sagat, S.; Webster, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    Welding produces local residual tensile stresses and changes in texture in components made from zirconium alloys. In the heat-affected zone in tubes or plates, the basal plane normals are rotated into the plane of the component and perpendicular to the direction of the weld. Thin-walled Zircaloy-2 tubes containing an axial weld do not reach their full strength because they always fail prematurely in the weld when pressurized to failure in a fixed-end burst test. Reinforcing the weld by increasing its thickness by 25% moves the failure to the parent metal and improves the biaxial strength of the tube by 20 to 25% and increases the total elongation by 200 to 450%. In components made from Zr-2.5Nb, the texture in the heat-affected zone promotes delayed hydride cracking (DHC) driven by tensile residual stress. Although the texture is not much affected by heat-treatments below 630 o C and large grain interaction stresses remain as a result of mixed textures, macro-residual tensile stresses can be relieved by heat treatment to the point where the probability of cracking is very low. (author)

  20. Study of aging effects in PWR power plants components - 15043

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Borges, D. da; Lava, D.D.; Guimaraes, A.C.F.; Moreira, M. de L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a simulation about the aging process of the containment spray injection system (CSIS) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) using the fault tree method (FT). The FT has the capacity to present the logic of events that leads to system unavailability, to capture frequency estimation of events, to model and calculate hazardous events frequency (before they happen) and help developing protective layers. The Monte Carlo method and Fussell-Vesely importance measure are used in this paper to determine the system unavailability probability and the most sensitive events to the aging process. The injection system fault tree consists of a main tree and 10 sub-trees. The main tree is composed of 35 basic events, 5 gates and 1 top event. The paper details the methodology. It can be seen that the increase of the failure rate of components due to the aging process, generates the increase in the general unavailability of the system that contains these components. The extension of the operating life of nuclear power plant must be accompanied by a special attention to the aging process of its components

  1. Mitigation of harmful effects of welds in zirconium alloy components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Doubt, G.L.; Fong, R.W.L.; Root, J.H.; Bowden, J.W.; Sagat, S.; Webster, R.T.

    1993-10-01

    Welding produces local residual tensile stresses and changes in texture in components made from zirconium alloys. In the heat-affected zone in tubes or plates, the basal plane normals are rotated into the plane of the component and perpendicular to the direction of the weld. Thin-walled zircaloy-2 tubes containing an axial weld do not reach their full strength, because they always fail prematurely in the weld when pressurised to failure in a fixed-end burst test. Reinforcing the weld by increasing its thickness by 25% moves the failure to the parent metal, improves the biaxial strength of the tube by 20 to 25%, and increases the total elongation by 200 to 450%. In components made from Zr-2.5Nb, the texture in the heat-affected zone promotes delayed hydride cracking (DHC) driven by tensile residual stress. Although the texture is not much affected by heat-treatments below 630 degrees celsius and large grain interaction stresses remain as a result of mixed textures, macro-residual tensile stresses can be relieved by heat-treatment to the point where the probability of cracking is very low

  2. Mitigation of harmful effects of welds in zirconium alloy components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Doubt, G.L.; Fong, R.W.L.; Root, J.H.; Bowden, J.W.; Sagat, S.

    1994-01-01

    Welding produces local residual tensile stresses and changes in texture in components made from zirconium alloys. In the heat-affected zone in tubes or plates, the basal plane normals are rotated into the plane of the component and perpendicular to the direction of the weld. Thin-walled Zircaloy-2 tubes containing an axial weld do not reach their full strength because they always fail prematurely in the weld when pressurized to failure in a fixed-end burst test. Reinforcing the weld by increasing its thickness by 25% moves the failure to the parent metal and improves the biaxial strength of the tube by 20 to 25% and increases the total elongation by 200 to 450%. In components made from Zr-2.5Nb, the texture in the heat-affected zone promotes delayed hydride cracking (DHC) driven by tensile residual stress. Although the texture is not much affected by heat-treatments below 630 C and large grain interaction stresses remain as a result of mixed textures, macro-residual tensile stresses can be relieved by heat treatment to the point where the probability of cracking is very low

  3. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus

    2006-06-01

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the measurement of

  4. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the

  5. Effect of radiation on volatile component in spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnayake, A.K.

    1991-01-01

    This research project deals with the determination of chemical changes of some spices such as Cardamon, Nutmeg, Clove and Pepper, when subjected to gamma irradiation. The spices were irradiated in a CO 6 0 gamma source with 5 kGy, 7kGy and 10 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/hr. Radiation dose less than 10 kGy can be used for processing of spices, without producing any changes in volatile components. The disadvantages in using the traditional methods of fumigation, use of chemicals or heat treatment as a measure of reducing contamination are discussed. It is shown that irradiation is the best method of decontamination of spices without making changes in oil percentage or chemical composition. Finally the study discusses the economic aspects and authorization from the point of view of consumer acceptance and the use of irradiation of spices

  6. Effect of disruptions on plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilligan, J.G.; Bourham, M.A.; Tucker, E.C.

    1995-01-01

    Erosion of plasma-facing components during disruptions is a limiting factor in the design of large tokamaks like ITER. During a disruption, much of the stored thermal energy of the plasma will be dumped onto divertor plates, resulting in local heat fluxes, which may exceed 100 GW/m 2 over a period of about 0.1--1.0 msec. Melted and/or vaporized material is produced which is redistributed in the divertor region. Simulation of disruption damage is summarized from code results and from experimental exposure of materials to high heat-flux plasmas in plasma guns. In the US several codes have been used to predict both melt/vaporization and heat transfer on surfaces as well as energy and momentum transport in the vapor/plasma shield produced at the surface

  7. Effects of passive components on the input current interharmonics of adjustable-speed drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Hamid; Blaabjerg, Frede; Zare, Firuz

    2016-01-01

    Current and voltage source Adjustable Speed Drives (ASDs) exert distortion current into the grid, which may produce some interharmonic components other than the characteristic harmonic components. This paper studies the effects of passive components on the input current interharmonics of adjustable...

  8. Effect of nutrient components for phytase production by Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    KALIYEVA AIGUL; SULEIMENOVA ZHANARA; AKHMETSADYKOV NURLAN; SADUYEVA ZHAZIRA

    2015-01-01

    In present study the effect of carbon sources, glucose, sucrose, lactose, maltose, fructose, xylose and nitrogen sources such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium phosphate, ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, yeast extract, peptone on the phytase production has been studied. Maximal phytase activity of Aspergillus niger was detected in media with 1.0% sucrose as a carbon source. All other monosaccharides and disaccharides used had less effect on phytase production. Among the inorganic and organic ...

  9. Stop and Restart Effects on Modern Vehicle Starting System Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windover, Paul R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Owens, Russell J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Levinson, Terry M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Laughlin, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gaines, Linda [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Many drivers of personal and commercial vehicles believe that turning the vehicle off and on frequently instead of idling will cause premature wear of the starter system (starter motor and starter battery). As a result, they are concerned that the replacement cost of the starter motor and/or battery due to increased manual engine cycling would be more than the cumulative cost of the fuel saved by not idling unnecessarily. A number of variables play a role in addressing this complex concern, including the number of starting cycles per day, the time between starting cycles, the intended design life of the starting system, the amount of fuel used to restart an engine, and the cumulative cost of the saved fuel. Qualitative and quantitative information from a variety of sources was used to develop a life-cycle economic model to evaluate the cost and quantify the realistic factors that are related to the permissible frequency of starter motor cycles for the average vehicle to economically minimize engine idle time. Annual cost savings can be calculated depending on shutdown duration and the number of shutdown cycles per day. Analysis shows that cost savings are realized by eliminating idling exceeding one minute by shutting down the engine and restarting it. For a typical motorist, the damage to starting system components resulting from additional daily start cycles will be negligible. Overall, it was found that starter life is mostly dependent on the total number of start cycles, while battery life is more dependent on ensuring a full charge between start events.

  10. Conference on Radiation and its Effects on Components and Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The aim of RADECS conferences is to provide an annual European forum for the presentation and discussion of the latest advances in the field of radiation effects on electronic and photonic materials, devices, circuits, sensors, and systems. The scope of the conference encompasses technological processes and design techniques for producing radiation tolerant systems for space, aeronautical or terrestrial applications, as well as relevant methodologies for their characterization and qualification. The conference features a technical program, an Industrial Exhibit, and one day tutorial or ‘short course’ on radiation effects. The technical program includes oral and poster sessions and round tables.

  11. Effects of commercial enrichment products on fatty acid components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to test the effects of enrichment products. Red pepper paste (ZA), AlgaMac 3050 (ZB) and Spresso (ZC) on fatty acid compositions in rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) which were intensively cultured on a mixture of ω3 algae and ω3 yeast. Enriched rotifers were seen to have higher level of ...

  12. effect of ambient levels of ozone on photosynthetic components

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    To clarify the long-term effects of ambient levels of tropospheric ozone (O3) on ... (Rubisco), thus contributing to the reduction in net photosynthetic rate at the .... USA). During the measurements, atmospheric. CO2 concentrations, air ...... productivity and implications for climate change. Annual Review of Plant Biology 63:.

  13. Effect of the interplanetary magnetic field azimuthal component on dynamics of magnetospheric substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshichev, O.A.; Kotikov, A.L.; Bolotinskaya, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of azimuthal component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the dynamics of magnetospheric substorms is considered. The turning of the azimuthal component of IMF from the positive direction to the negative one and, vice versa, negative and positive impulses in B y -component at B z z -component to the North, positive impulses in B z -component, are investigated. The importance of corresponding variations in magnetic activity level is evaluated. It is shown that turning of B y -component from the positive direction to the negative one increases magnetic activity, whereas the reverse transition affects but slightly the level of magnetic activity in the Northern auroral zone. The turning of B z -component to the North also results in the increase of magnetic activity but with a less intensity than in the case of the negative turning in B y -component

  14. Effect of Differential Diffusion in Two-Component Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingel', L. Kh.

    2017-03-01

    Examples are presented of an exact solution of a nonstationary problem on the development of convection in a binary mixture (seawater) near an infinite vertical surface in which the buoyancy disturbances are determined both by the temperature and by the disturbances of the impurity (salt) concentration. Consideration is given to the development of convection in a homogeneous medium near an infinite vertical surface at whose boundary specification is made of constant (after ″switching on″ at the initial moment) heat fluxes and impurities or variations of these substances, i.e., problems with boundary conditions of 1st and 2nd kind are considered. The obtained analytical solutions demonstrate the possibility of a nontrivial effect associated with the difference in the values of the coefficients of transfer of two substances: the inflows of positive buoyancy may lead, contrary to intuitive notions, to the origination of descending motion of the medium rather than the ascending one. Clarification is provided for the physical meaning of such effects, which can be substantial, for example, in melting of sea ice.

  15. School Climate as an Important Component in School Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Rapti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Expectations, values, faith, relationships with staff, the school leader, teachers and students behavior create school climate. The leader can promote or hinder a positive climate through his leadership model. The purpose of this study is to explore what are the climate types that appear in the school as well as to contribute to the expectations of different stakeholders on the school climate. The starting point for improving the performance of students and teachers is to improve school climate. Thus, this study will help leaders who for one reason or another have not been effective in keeping their responsibilities, and, as a result, did not work efficiently in improving school climate. It is assumed that a positive school climate enhances effective teaching, and as a result a better performance of student learning. This study will serve to further studies related to the expansion of the leaders’ roles on school climate. In conclusion, the research will assist policy makers in Albania to assess the content of the modules needed for training future managers and teachers to ensure they are equipped with the skills required to create a positive, open and collaborative climate in school. The school leader should be released from some managerial tasks, for paying more time to teachers and students.

  16. Goal setting: an integral component of effective diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla K; Bauman, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Goal setting is a widely used behavior change tool in diabetes education and training. Prior research found specific relatively difficult but attainable goals set within a specific timeframe improved performance in sports and at the workplace. However, the impact of goal setting in diabetes self-care has not received extensive attention. This review examined the mechanisms underlying behavioral change according to goal setting theory and evaluated the impact of goal setting in diabetes intervention studies. Eight studies were identified, which incorporated goal setting as the primary strategy to promote behavioral change in individual, group-based, and primary care settings among patients with type 2 diabetes. Improvements in diabetes-related self-efficacy, dietary intake, physical activity, and A1c were observed in some but not all studies. More systematic research is needed to determine the conditions and behaviors for which goal setting is most effective. Initial recommendations for using goal setting in diabetes patient encounters are offered.

  17. Effects of asymmetric vertical disruptions on ITER components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albanese, R.; Carpentieri, B.; Cavinato, M.; Minucci, S.; Palmaccio, R.; Portone, A.; Rubinacci, G.; Testoni, P.; Ventre, S.; Villone, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Halo current analysis of AVDEs (asymmetric VDEs) is performed. • Both resistive and inductive effects are considered. • Suitable compression techniques and supercomputing resources are used. • The vertical force on the sectors is nearly uniform. • The radial loads on the various sectors are very different. - Abstract: This paper deals with the halo current distribution due to asymmetric vertical displacement events (VDEs) and the subsequent force distributions on the conducting structures in the ITER tokamak. Both the eddy and halo current analyses have been carried out using the 3D code CARIDDI, based on an integral formulation in the conducting region. The plasma plays the role of a source term. The axisymmetric time evolution of the plasma is taken by 2D axisymmetric simulations. The most critical case is a slow VDE downward combined with an n = 1 kink, which may yield large horizontal forces and peaking factors. A simplified n = 1, m = 1 kink model is taken, given by a rigid horizontal displacement accompanied by a tilt. The halo currents are treated as injected currents on the faces of the first wall hit by the plasma. To take into account the inductive effects, which are important especially in the transient phases, suitable compression techniques and supercomputing resources have been utilized. In the worst case the total vertical force on the structure due to the halo currents is about 90 MN downwards (about 30 of which on the divertor); the horizontal force is about 4 MN (about half of which on the divertor); the distribution of the vertical force on the sectors is nearly uniform, whereas the radial loads on the various sectors are very different from each other

  18. Effects of asymmetric vertical disruptions on ITER components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, R. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, DIETI, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Carpentieri, B. [Johann Bernoulli Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Cavinato, M. [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, c/ Josep Plá n.2, Barcelona (Spain); Minucci, S. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, DIETI, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Palmaccio, R. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Cassino, FR (Italy); Portone, A. [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, c/ Josep Plá n.2, Barcelona (Spain); Rubinacci, G. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, DIETI, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Testoni, P., E-mail: pietro.testoni@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, c/ Josep Plá n.2, Barcelona (Spain); Ventre, S.; Villone, F. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Cassino, FR (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Halo current analysis of AVDEs (asymmetric VDEs) is performed. • Both resistive and inductive effects are considered. • Suitable compression techniques and supercomputing resources are used. • The vertical force on the sectors is nearly uniform. • The radial loads on the various sectors are very different. - Abstract: This paper deals with the halo current distribution due to asymmetric vertical displacement events (VDEs) and the subsequent force distributions on the conducting structures in the ITER tokamak. Both the eddy and halo current analyses have been carried out using the 3D code CARIDDI, based on an integral formulation in the conducting region. The plasma plays the role of a source term. The axisymmetric time evolution of the plasma is taken by 2D axisymmetric simulations. The most critical case is a slow VDE downward combined with an n = 1 kink, which may yield large horizontal forces and peaking factors. A simplified n = 1, m = 1 kink model is taken, given by a rigid horizontal displacement accompanied by a tilt. The halo currents are treated as injected currents on the faces of the first wall hit by the plasma. To take into account the inductive effects, which are important especially in the transient phases, suitable compression techniques and supercomputing resources have been utilized. In the worst case the total vertical force on the structure due to the halo currents is about 90 MN downwards (about 30 of which on the divertor); the horizontal force is about 4 MN (about half of which on the divertor); the distribution of the vertical force on the sectors is nearly uniform, whereas the radial loads on the various sectors are very different from each other.

  19. Simulated Space Environmental Effects on Thin Film Solar Array Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria; Carr, John; SanSoucie, Michael; Boyd, Darren; Phillips, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) experiment consists of thin-film, low mass, low volume solar panels. Given the variety of thin solar cells and cover materials and the lack of environmental protection typically afforded by thick coverglasses, a series of tests were conducted in Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Environmental Effects Facility to evaluate the performance of these materials. Candidate thin polymeric films and nitinol wires used for deployment were also exposed. Simulated space environment exposures were selected based on SSP 30425 rev. B, "Space Station Program Natural Environment Definition for Design" or AIAA Standard S-111A-2014, "Qualification and Quality Requirements for Space Solar Cells." One set of candidate materials were exposed to 5 eV atomic oxygen and concurrent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation for low Earth orbit simulation. A second set of materials were exposed to 1 MeV electrons. A third set of samples were exposed to 50, 100, 500, and 700 keV energy protons, and a fourth set were exposed to >2,000 hours of near ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. A final set was rapidly thermal cycled between -55 and +125degC. This test series provides data on enhanced power generation, particularly for small satellites with reduced mass and volume resources. Performance versus mass and cost per Watt is discussed.

  20. Sb(V reactivity with human blood components: redox effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana López

    Full Text Available We assessed the reactivity of Sb(V in human blood. Sb(V reactivity was determined using an HPLC-HG-AFS hyphenated system. Sb(V was partially reduced to Sb(III in blood incubation experiments; however, Sb(III was a highly unstable species. The addition of 0.1 mol L(-1 EDTA prevented Sb(III oxidation, thus enabling the detection of the reduction of Sb(V to Sb(III. The transformation of Sb(V to Sb(III in human whole blood was assessed because the reduction of Sb(V in human blood may likely generate redox side effects. Our results indicate that glutathione was the reducing agent in this reaction and that Sb(V significantly decreased the GSH/GSSG ratio from 0.32 ± 0.09 to 0.07 ± 0.03. Moreover, the presence of 200 ng mL(-1 of Sb(V increased the activity of superoxide dismutase from 4.4 ± 0.1 to 7.0 ± 0.4 U mL(-1 and decreased the activity of glutathione peroxidase from 62 ± 1 to 34 ± 2 nmol min(-1 mL(-1.

  1. Effects of relativistic small radial component on atomic photoionization cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaobin; Xing Yongzhong; Sun Xiaowei

    2008-01-01

    The effects of relativistic small radial component on atomic photoionization cross sections have been studied within relativistic average self-consistent field theory. Relativistic effects are relatively unimportant for low photon energy, along with a review of high-energy photoionization the relativistic effects are quite important. The effects of relativistic small radial component on photoionization process should show breakdown when the nuclear finite-size effects is taken into account. The compression of wavefunction into the space near nucleus is so strong in highly charged ions that the electronic radius greatly decreases, and the effects of relativistic small radial component on photoionization cross sections turn to stronger than ordinary atoms. Since relativistic effects are extremely sensitive to the behavior of small radial component, the results are in good agreement with relativistic effects on photoionization cross section. (authors)

  2. Egg fertilisation in a freshwater mussel: effects of distance, flow and male density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler L. Mosley; Wendell R. Haag; James A. Stoeckel

    2014-01-01

    1. Small or sparse populations can experience Allee effects if egg fertilisation is reduced because of a shortage of sperm. 2. Freshwater mussels are spermcasters that often occur as sparse, patchy populations. Previous studies suggested that sperm shortage limits these populations unless facultative hermaphroditism and selffertilisation occur at low density...

  3. Effect of facade components on energy efficiency in office buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Takeshi; Gustavsen, Arild; Jelle, Bjørn Petter

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of facade properties for energy efficiency of Tokyo office buildings. • Higher reflectance for opaque parts may slightly reduce energy demand. • Lower window U-value and solar heat gain coefficient are potential solutions. • Decreased heating due to insulation did not always compensate increased cooling. • Fundamental data for adjustment of facade properties of buildings are provided. - Abstract: Properties of facade materials should be considered to determine which of them strongly affect building energy performance, regardless of the building shapes, scales, ideal locations, and building types, and thus may be able to promote energy efficiency in buildings. In this study, the effects of four fundamental facade properties related to the energy efficiency of office buildings in Tokyo, Japan, were investigated with the purpose of reducing the heating and cooling energy demands. Some fundamental design factors such as volume and shape were also considered. It was found that the reduction in both the solar heat gain coefficient and window U-value and increase in the solar reflectance of the opaque parts are promising measures for reducing the energy demand. Conversely, the reduction in the U-value of the opaque parts decreased the heating energy demand, and this was accompanied by an increase in the cooling energy demand in some cases because the total energy demands were predominantly for cooling. The above-mentioned promising measures for reducing building energy demands are thus recommended for use, and an appropriate U-value should be applied to the opaque parts based on careful considerations. This study provides some fundamental ideas to adjust the facade properties of buildings.

  4. The Thermal-hydraulic Analysis for the Aging Effect of the Component in CANDU-6 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jun Ho; Jung, Jong Yeob

    2014-01-01

    CANDU reactor consists of a lot of components, including pressure tube, reactor pump, steam generator, feeder pipe, and so on. These components become to have the aging characteristics as the reactor operates for a long time. The aging phenomena of these components lead to the change of operating parameters, and it finally results to the decrease of the operating safety margin. Actually, due to the aging characteristics of components, CANDU reactor power plant has the operating license for the duration of 30 years and the plant regularly check the plant operating state in the overhaul period. As the reactor experiences the aging, the reactor operators should reduce the reactor power level in order to keep the minimum safety margin, and it results to the deficit of economical profit. Therefore, in order to establish the safety margin for the aged reactor, the aging characteristics for components should be analyzed and the effect of aging of components on the operating parameter should be studied. In this study, the aging characteristics of components are analyzed and revealed how the aging of components affects to the operating parameter by using NUCIRC code. Finally, by scrutinizing the effect of operating parameter on the operating safety margin, the effect of aging of components on the safety margin has been revealed

  5. The Effects of Institutional Classification and Gender on Faculty Inclusion of Syllabus Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Peter E.; Lusk, Danielle L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the effects that gender and institutional classification have on the inclusion of syllabus components. Course syllabi (N = 350) written by men and women from seven types of institutions, based on Carnegie classification, were sampled and evaluated for the presence of 26 syllabus components. The gender…

  6. Collaborative Encoding and Memory Accuracy: Examining the Effects of Interactive Components of Co-Construction Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Mary Ann; Fried, Adina Rachel; Cowan, Emily; Bays, Rebecca Brooke

    2014-01-01

    In 2 experiments, the effect of collaborative encoding on memory was examined by testing 2 interactive components of co-construction processes. One component focused on the nature of the interactive exchange between collaborators: As the partners worked together to create descriptions about ways to interact with familiar objects, constraints were…

  7. The effects of exercise program on burnout and metabolic syndrome components in banking and insurance workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Han Hui; Yeh, Ching Ying; Su, Chien Tien; Chen, Chiou Jong; Peng, Shu Mei; Chen, Ruey Yu

    2013-01-01

    To explore the effectiveness of exercise program for banking and insurance workers and clarify the association between exercise, burnout, and metabolic syndrome components. In the process of the study, a practicable worksite exercise program was developed for bank and insurance enterprises. A three-month (12-wk) exercise course was conducted, and its benefits evaluated. Levels of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed after exercise intervention. After intervention, the indicators of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were significantly improved in both low and high intensity groups, and the improvement were expressed in reduction of waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, person burnout and work-related burnout. A dose-response of burnouts and metabolic syndrome components with exercise intensity are shown (psyndrome components were independently associated with burnout and exercise intensity in the crude model. After adjustment for potential confounders, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure differences showed significant associations with exercise intensity (pburnouts and metabolic syndrome components.

  8. Effect of Demand-Driven advisory services components of Fadama II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Demand-Driven advisory services components of Fadama II on fish farmers' level of ... Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences ... In conclusion, provision of subsidized advisory services to fish farmers will help to boost ...

  9. Effect of saline irrigation water on yield and yield components of rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vaio

    2013-05-29

    May 29, 2013 ... levels at different growth stages of rice on yield and its components. Treatments included ... Therefore, irrigation with saline water at the early growth stages has more negative effect on ...... diversification. Land Degrad. Dev.

  10. A technique of including the effect of aging of passive components in probabilistic risk assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.H.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    The probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) being developed at most nuclear power plants to calculate the risk of core damage generally focus on the possible failure of active components. The possible failure of passive components is given little consideration. We are developing methods for selecting risk-significant passive components and including them in PRAS. These methods provide effective ways to prioritize passive components for inspection, and where inspection reveals aging damage, mitigation or repair can be employed to reduce the likelihood of component failure. We demonstrated a method by selecting a weld in the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system, basing our selection on expert judgement of the likelihood of failure and on an estimate of the consequence of component failure to plant safety. We then modified and used the Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events (PRAISE) computer code to perform a probabilistic structural analysis to calculate the probability that crack growth due to aging would cause the weld to fail. The PRAISE code was modified to include the effects of changing design material properties with age and changing stress cycles. The calculation included the effects of mechanical loads and thermal transients typical of the service loads for this piping design and the effects of thermal cycling caused by a leaking check valve. However, this particular calculation showed little change in low component failure probability and plant risk for 48 years of service. However, sensitivity studies showed that if the probability of component failure is high, the effect on plant risk is significant. The success of this demonstration shows that this method could be applied to nuclear power plants. The demonstration showed the method is too involved (PRAISE takes a long time to perform the calculation and the input information is extensive) for handling a large number of passive components and therefore simpler methods are needed

  11. The effect of market orientation and its components on innovation consequences : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinstein, A.

    While there is a rich body of research on market orientation's effect on business performance, much little attention has been given to its effect on innovation consequences. This is the first meta-analytic effort to study the independent effects of market orientation components (customer

  12. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Perraton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Luke Perraton, Zuzana Machotka, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAim: Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials.Method: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Only trials that have reported significant FMS-related outcomes were included. Data relating to the components of hydrotherapy programs (exercise type, duration, frequency and intensity, environmental factors, and service delivery were analyzed.Results: Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Overall, the quality of trials was good. Aerobic exercise featured in all 11 trials and the majority of hydrotherapy programs included either a strengthening or flexibility component. Great variability was noted in both the environmental components of hydrotherapy programs and service delivery.Conclusions: Aerobic exercise, warm up and cool-down periods and relaxation exercises are common features of hydrotherapy programs that report significant FMS-related outcomes. Treatment duration of 60 minutes, frequency of three sessions per week and an intensity equivalent to 60%–80% maximum heart rate were the most commonly reported exercise components. Exercise appears to be the most important component of an effective hydrotherapy program for FMS, particularly when considering mental health-related outcomes.Keywords: hydrotherapy, fibromyalgia syndrome, exercise, effective, components

  13. Effects of Applied Nitrogen Amounts on the Functional Components of Mulberry (Morus alba L.) Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Mari; Takahashi, Makoto; Katsube, Takuya; Koyama, Akio; Itamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-21

    This study investigated the effects of applied nitrogen amounts on specific functional components in mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves. The relationships between mineral elements and the functional components in mulberry leaves were examined using mulberry trees cultivated in different soil conditions in four cultured fields. Then, the relationships between the nitrogen levels and the leaf functional components were studied by culturing mulberry in plastic pots and experimental fields. In the common cultured fields, total nitrogen was negatively correlated with the chlorogenic acid content (R(2) = -0.48) and positively correlated with the 1-deoxynojirimycin content (R(2) = 0.60). Additionally, differences in nitrogen fertilizer application levels affected each functional component in mulberry leaves. For instance, with increased nitrogen levels, the chlorogenic acid and flavonol contents significantly decreased, but the 1-deoxynojirimycin content significantly increased. Selection of the optimal nitrogen application level is necessary to obtain the desired functional components from mulberry leaves.

  14. Finite-size effect and the components of multifractality in financial volatility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weixing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The apparent multifractality can be decomposed quantitatively. ► There is a marked finite-size effect in the detection of multifractality. ► The effective multifractality can be further decomposed into two components. ► A time series exhibits effective multifractality only if it possesses nonlinearity. ► The daily DJIA volatility is analyzed as an example. - Abstract: Many financial variables are found to exhibit multifractal nature, which is usually attributed to the influence of temporal correlations and fat-tailedness in the probability distribution (PDF). Based on the partition function approach of multifractal analysis, we show that there is a marked finite-size effect in the detection of multifractality, and the effective multifractality is the apparent multifractality after removing the finite-size effect. We find that the effective multifractality can be further decomposed into two components, the PDF component and the nonlinearity component. Referring to the normal distribution, we can determine the PDF component by comparing the effective multifractality of the original time series and the surrogate data that have a normal distribution and keep the same linear and nonlinear correlations as the original data. We demonstrate our method by taking the daily volatility data of Dow Jones Industrial Average from 26 May 1896 to 27 April 2007 as an example. Extensive numerical experiments show that a time series exhibits effective multifractality only if it possesses nonlinearity and the PDF has an impact on the effective multifractality only when the time series possesses nonlinearity. Our method can also be applied to judge the presence of multifractality and determine its components of multifractal time series in other complex systems.

  15. The effect of metabolic syndrome components on exercise performance in patients with intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Andrew W; Montgomery, Polly S

    2008-06-01

    To determine the effect of metabolic syndrome components on intermittent claudication, physical function, health-related quality of life, and peripheral circulation in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and to identify the metabolic syndrome components most predictive of each outcome measure. Patients limited by intermittent claudication with three (n = 48), four (n = 45), or five (n = 40) components of metabolic syndrome were studied. Patients were assessed on PAD-specific measures consisting of ankle-brachial index (ABI), initial claudication distance, absolute claudication distance, physical function measures, health-related quality of life, and calf blood flow and transcutaneous oxygen tension responses after 3 minutes of vascular occlusion. Initial claudication distance (mean +/- SD) progressively declined (P = .019) in those with three (203 +/- 167 m), four (124 +/- 77 m), and five (78 +/- 57 m) metabolic syndrome components, and absolute claudication distance progressively declined (P = .036) in these groups as well (414 +/- 224 m vs 323 +/- 153 m vs 249 +/- 152 m, respectively). Furthermore, compared with patients with only three components of metabolic syndrome, those with all five components had impaired values (P obesity was the predictor (P fasting glucose was the predictor (P intermittent claudication, physical function, health-related quality of life, and peripheral circulation. Abdominal obesity and elevated fasting glucose are the metabolic syndrome components that are most predictive of these outcome measures. Aggressively treating these metabolic syndrome components may be particularly important in managing symptoms and long-term prognosis of PAD patients.

  16. Components of Effective Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Headache: A Mixed Methods Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Emily F; Beals-Erickson, Sarah E; Fisher, Emma; Lang, Emily A; Palermo, Tonya M

    2017-01-01

    Internet-delivered treatment has the potential to expand access to evidence-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric headache, and has demonstrated efficacy in small trials for some youth with headache. We used a mixed methods approach to identify effective components of CBT for this population. In Study 1, component profile analysis identified common interventions delivered in published RCTs of effective CBT protocols for pediatric headache delivered face-to-face or via the Internet. We identified a core set of three treatment components that were common across face-to-face and Internet protocols: 1) headache education, 2) relaxation training, and 3) cognitive interventions. Biofeedback was identified as an additional core treatment component delivered in face-to-face protocols only. In Study 2, we conducted qualitative interviews to describe the perspectives of youth with headache and their parents on successful components of an Internet CBT intervention. Eleven themes emerged from the qualitative data analysis, which broadly focused on patient experiences using the treatment components and suggestions for new treatment components. In the Discussion, these mixed methods findings are integrated to inform the adaptation of an Internet CBT protocol for youth with headache.

  17. Effect of the dietary inclusion of soybean components on the innate immune system in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Appelgren, Pamela; Opazo, Rafael; Barros, Luis; Feijoó, Carmen G; Urzúa, Victoria; Romero, Jaime

    2014-02-01

    Some components of plant-based meals, such as saponins and vegetal proteins, have been proposed as inducers of intestinal inflammation in some fish. However, the molecular and cellular bases for this phenomenon have not been reported. In this work, zebrafish were used as a model to evaluate the effects of individual soybean meal components, such as saponins and soy proteins. Zebrafish larvae fed a fish meal feed containing soy components were assessed according to low and high inclusion levels. The granulocytes associated with the digestive tract and the induction of genes related to the immune system were quantitated as markers of the effects of the dietary components. A significant increase in the number of granulocytes was observed after feeding fish diets containing high saponin or soy protein contents. These dietary components also induced the expression of genes related to the innate immune system, including myeloid-specific peroxidase, as well as the complement protein and cytokines. These results reveal the influence of dietary components on the stimulation of the immune system. These observations could be significant to understanding the contributions of saponin and soy protein to the onset of enteritis in aqua-cultured fish, and this knowledge may aid in defining the role of the innate immune system in other inflammatory diseases involving dietary components in mammals.

  18. Radiation-induced organogenesis: effects of irradiated medium and its components on tobacco tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degani, N.

    1975-01-01

    Gamma irradiated medium induces the formation of buds in non-irradiated dark growth tobacco callus (Nicotiana tabacum Var. Wisconsin No.38). Experiments were conducted to determine the component(s) of the medium that is effective in this radiation-induced organogenesis. Fraction of medium were irradiated singly and in combination, then combined with non-irradiated fractions to form the complete growth medium. The results showed that irradiated indoleacetic acid (IAA) was not the effective component in the induction of organogensis. Omission of IAA from the medium resulted in the formation of buds, as expected. Irradiated myo-inositol induced organogenesis more consistently than the other irradiated components. The age of the inoculum tissue and its passage number from the tobacco stem affected the potency of the tobacco callus to organise. (author)

  19. Effects of composition on properties in an 11-component nuclear waste glass system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Piepel, G.F.; Mellinger, G.B.; May, R.P.; Gray, W.J.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1981-09-01

    Ninety simplified nuclear waste glass compositions within an 11-component oxide composition matrix were tested for crystallinity, viscosity, volatility, and chemical durability. Empirical models of property response as a function of glass composition were developed using statistical experimental design and modeling techniques. A new statistical technique was developed to calculate the effects of oxide components on each property. Independent melts were used to check the prediction accuracy of the models

  20. Radiation Effects and Component Hardening testing program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Weil, B.S.; Chesser, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes Phase II of the Radiation Effects and Component Hardening (REACH) testing program, performed as part of the joint collaborative agreement between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan, Components and materials were submitted to 10 5 R/hr gamma radiation fields for 10,000 hr, producing accumulated doses of 10 9 R; most performed as expected

  1. Effect of Nitrogen and Phosphorus on Yield and Yield Components of Sesame (Sesamumindicum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Ibrahim; Manzoor Hussain; Ahmad Khan; Yousaf Jamal; Muhammad Ali; Muhammad Faisal Anwar Malik

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is a structural component of chlorophyll and protein therefore adequate supply of nitrogen is beneficial for both carbohydrates and protein metabolism as it promotes cell division and cell enlargement, resulting in more leaf area and thus ensuring good seed and dry matter yield. Theexperiment entitled effect of nitrogen and phosphorus on yield and yield components of sesame were conducted at New Developmental Farm of the University of Agriculture Peshawar during kharif 2013. Randomiz...

  2. Consideration of the environmental effects on fatigue behavior of austenitic components. Calculation methods and practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seichter, Johannes; Reese, Sven H.; Klucke, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    During the last years environmental effects on the fatigue behavior of nuclear power plant components has worldwide been discussed controversial with respect to the transferability of laboratory data on real components. A publication from Argonne National Laboratory on experimental results concerning environmental effects (air and LWR coolant) on fatigue of austenitic steels included a proposal on calculation methods concerning the lifetime reduction due to environmental effects. This calculation method, i.e. multiplication of the usage factor by a F(en), has been included into the ASME Code, Section III, Division I, as Code Case N-792 (fatigue evaluations including environmental effects). The presented contribution evaluates the practical application of this calculation procedure and demonstrates the determination of the usage factor of an austenitic component under environmental exposure.

  3. Age effects in emotional prospective memory: cue valence differentially affects the prospective and retrospective component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzspahn, Katharina M; Horn, Sebastian S; Bayen, Ute J; Kliegel, Matthias

    2012-06-01

    While first studies suggested that emotional task material may enhance prospective memory performance in young and older adults, the extent and mechanisms of this effect are under debate. The authors explored possible differential effects of cue valence on the prospective and retrospective component of prospective memory in young and older adults. Forty-five young and 41 older adults performed a prospective memory task in which emotional valence of the prospective memory cue was manipulated (positive, negative, neutral). The multinomial model of event-based prospective memory was used to analyze effects of valence and age on the two prospective memory components separately. Results revealed an interaction indicating that age differences were smaller in both emotional valence conditions. For older adults positive cues improved the prospective component, while negative cues improved the retrospective component. No main effect of valence was found for younger adults on an overt accuracy measure, but model-based analyses showed that the retrospective component was enhanced in the positive compared with the negative cue condition. The study extends the literature in demonstrating that processes underlying emotional effects on prospective memory may differ depending on valence and age. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved

  4. Identifying effective components of child maltreatment interventions: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Put, C.E.; Assink, M.; Gubbels, J.; Boekhout van Solinge, N.F.

    There is a lack of knowledge about specific components that make interventions effective in preventing or reducing child maltreatment. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to increase this knowledge by summarizing findings on effects of interventions for child maltreatment and by examining

  5. Other components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of electronic and mechanical components which do not merit a chapter to themselves. Other hardware requires mention because of particularly high tolerance or intolerance of exposure to radiation. A more systematic analysis of radiation responses of structures which are definable by material was given in section 3.8. The components discussed here are field effect transistors, transducers, temperature sensors, magnetic components, superconductors, mechanical sensors, and miscellaneous electronic components

  6. Identifying Effective Components of Child Maltreatment Interventions: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Put, Claudia E; Assink, Mark; Gubbels, Jeanne; Boekhout van Solinge, Noëlle F

    2018-06-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about specific components that make interventions effective in preventing or reducing child maltreatment. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to increase this knowledge by summarizing findings on effects of interventions for child maltreatment and by examining potential moderators of this effect, such as intervention components and study characteristics. Identifying effective components is essential for developing or improving child maltreatment interventions. A literature search yielded 121 independent studies (N = 39,044) examining the effects of interventions for preventing or reducing child maltreatment. From these studies, 352 effect sizes were extracted. The overall effect size was significant and small in magnitude for both preventive interventions (d = 0.26, p child maltreatment. For preventive interventions, larger effect sizes were found for short-term interventions (0-6 months), interventions focusing on increasing self-confidence of parents, and interventions delivered by professionals only. Further, effect sizes of preventive interventions increased as follow-up duration increased, which may indicate a sleeper effect of preventive interventions. For curative interventions, larger effect sizes were found for interventions focusing on improving parenting skills and interventions providing social and/or emotional support. Interventions can be effective in preventing or reducing child maltreatment. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  7. Effect of the addition of mixture of plant components on the mechanical properties of wheat bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Monika; Dziki, Dariusz; Biernacka, Beata; Różyło, Renata; Miś, Antoni; Hassoon, Waleed H.

    2017-10-01

    Instrumental methods of measuring the mechanical properties of bread can be used to determine changes in the properties of it during storage, as well as to determine the effect of various additives on the bread texture. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the mixture of plant components on the physical properties of wheat bread. In particular, the mechanical properties of the crumb and crust were studied. A sensory evaluation of the end product was also performed. The mixture of plant components included: carob fiber, milled grain red quinoa and black oat (1:2:2) - added at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 % - into wheat flour. The results showed that the increase of the addition of the proposed additive significantly increased the water absorption of flour mixtures. Moreover, the use of the mixture of plant components above 5% resulted in the increase of bread volume and decrease of crumb density. Furthermore, the addition of the mixture of plant components significantly affected the mechanical properties of bread crumb. The hardness of crumb also decreased as a result of the mixture of plant components addition. The highest cohesiveness was obtained for bread with 10% of additive and the lowest for bread with 25% of mixture of plant components. Most importantly, the enrichment of wheat flour with the mixture of plant components significantly reduced the crust failure force and crust failure work. The results of sensory evaluation showed that the addition of the mixture of plant components of up to 10% had little effect on bread quality.

  8. Quantitative assessment of cooperative components in an effective and efficient cooperation in construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohnstedt, Kristian Ditlev; Wandahl, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration takes place on many levels among several professions and the implementation varies dependent on the project and location. The author believes that components in effective collaboration can be identified, used in set situations, and have a particular outcome. Collaboration in the con......Collaboration takes place on many levels among several professions and the implementation varies dependent on the project and location. The author believes that components in effective collaboration can be identified, used in set situations, and have a particular outcome. Collaboration...... in the construction industry is thus dissected in the need to create a more effective and efficient collaboration. In a sequential study based on both interviews and a survey, eight components were molded though theoretical evaluation of the structural coherence of found collaborative elements in the study....... The contribution in this paper are eight components facilitating collaboration, parties' behavior in the collaboration, communication, mutual relationships, capabilities and the framework. These components will in future research help form the backbone of a model for effective and efficient situational...

  9. Irradiation effect on chemical components of oil palm empty fruit bunch and palm press fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainon Othman; Mat Rasol Awang; Hassan Hamdani Mutaat; Tamikazu Kume; Hitoshi Ito; Shinpei Matsuhashi; Ishigaki, I.

    1998-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties of empty fruit bunch (EFB) and palm press fibre (PPF), which are major by-products of the oil palm industries, were studied for upgrading their utilisation as animal feed by radiation-fermentation process. Comparative analyses of raw EFB and PPF from 3 different mills showed significant variations in some of their chemical components. Significant differences were also observed between the chemical components of EFB and PPF samples. The water holding capacities (WHC) of both EFB and PPF suggested their suitability for use as fermentation media. Gamma irradiation of up to 50 kGy have little effect on the components of both EFB and PPF. Irradiation dose of 25 kGy appeared to produce enhancement effect on cellulase hydrolysis of holocellulose and alpha-cellulose of EFB but a retarding effect on hydrolysis of PPF

  10. Effect of Alloying Type and Lean Sintering Atmosphere on the Performance of PM Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, M. Vattur; Shvab, R.; Millot, S.; Hryha, E.; Nyborg, L.

    2017-12-01

    In order to be cost effective and to meet increasing performance demands, powder metallurgy steel components require continuous improvement in terms of materials and process development. This study demonstrates the feasibility of manufacturing structural components using two different alloys systems, i.e. lean Cr-prealloyed and diffusion bonded water atomised powders with different processing conditions. The components were sintered at two different temperatures, i.e. 1120 and 1250 °C for 30 minutes in three different atmospheres: vacuum, N2- 10%H2 atmosphere as well as lean N2-5%H2-0.5%CO-(0.1-0.4)%CH4 sintering atmosphere. Components after sintering were further processed by either low pressure carburizing, sinterhardening or case hardening. All trials were performed in the industrial furnaces to simulate the actual production of the components. Microstructure, fractography, apparent and micro hardness analyses were performed close to the surface and in the middle of the sample to characterize the degree of sintering (temperature and atmosphere) and the effect of heat treatment. In all cases, components possess mostly martensitic microstructure with a few bainitic regions. The fracture surface shows well developed sinter necks. Inter- and trans-granular ductile and cleavage fracture modes are dominant and their fraction is determined by the alloy and processing route.

  11. Using failure mode and effect analysis in identification of components sensitive to ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoi, Mirela; Turcu, Ilie; Apostol, Minodora; Farcasiu, Mita; Popa, Adrian; Florescu, Gheorghe; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2008-01-01

    Ageing represents a phenomenon of concern since any degradation that may occur in time could lower a component performance and so reduce its reliability. If the phenomenon is left unchecked and unmitigated, the ageing could increase the risk associated with the facility operation. To understand the ageing degradation of a component, it is first necessary to identify and understand the ageing processes. Since these processes involve constituent materials, parts and the service conditions of components, it is necessary to know the design, materials, service conditions, performance requirements, operating experience (operation, surveillance and maintenance histories) and relevant research results for the component of interest. The purpose of the Ageing Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (AFMEA) is to study the results or effects of item failure caused by ageing, on system operation and to classify each potential failure according to its severity The paper will present the advantages of using AFMEA in identification of most sensitive to ageing components, as the results obtained for a particular case. For each component analyzed, the stressors will be established, the corresponding ageing mechanisms will be identified, as the failure modes induced by the ageing mechanisms. (authors)

  12. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, Luke; Machotka, Zuzana; Kumar, Saravana

    2009-11-30

    Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Only trials that have reported significant FMS-related outcomes were included. Data relating to the components of hydrotherapy programs (exercise type, duration, frequency and intensity, environmental factors, and service delivery) were analyzed. Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Overall, the quality of trials was good. Aerobic exercise featured in all 11 trials and the majority of hydrotherapy programs included either a strengthening or flexibility component. Great variability was noted in both the environmental components of hydrotherapy programs and service delivery. Aerobic exercise, warm up and cool-down periods and relaxation exercises are common features of hydrotherapy programs that report significant FMS-related outcomes. Treatment duration of 60 minutes, frequency of three sessions per week and an intensity equivalent to 60%-80% maximum heart rate were the most commonly reported exercise components. Exercise appears to be the most important component of an effective hydrotherapy program for FMS, particularly when considering mental health-related outcomes.

  13. [Effects of different trophic modes on growth characteristics, metabolism and cellular components of Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weibao; Wang, Yang; Yang, Hong; Xi, Yuqin; Han, Rui; Niu, Shiquan

    2015-03-04

    We studied the effects of trophic modes related to glucose and light (photoautotrophy, mixotrophy and heterotrophy) on growth, cellular components and carbon metabolic pathway of Chlorella vulgaris. The parameters about growth of algal cells were investigated by using spectroscopy and chromatography techniques. When trophic mode changed from photoautotrophy to mixotrophy and to heterotrophy successively, the concentrations of soluble sugar, lipid and saturated C16/C18 fatty acids in C. vulgaris increased, whereas the concentrations of unsaturated C16, C18 fatty acids, proteins, photosynthetic pigments and 18 relative amino acids decreased. Light and glucose affect the growth, metabolism and the biochemical components biosynthesis of C. vulgaris. Addition of glucose can promote algal biomass accumulation, stimulate the synthesis of carbonaceous components, but inhibit nitrogenous components. Under illumination cultivation, concentration and consumption level of glucose decided the main trophic modes of C. vulgaris. Mixotrophic and heterotrophic cultivation could promote the growth of algal cells.

  14. Effects of heat from high-level waste on performance of deep geological repository components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report discusses the effects of heat on the deep geological repository systems and its different components. The report is focussed specifically on effects due to thermal energy release solely from high-level waste or spent fuel. It reviews the experimental data and theoretical models of the effects of heat both on the behaviour of engineered and natural barriers. A summary of the current status of research and repository development including underground test facilities is presented

  15. Evidence of aging effects on certain safety-related components: summary and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    In response to interest shown by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Principal Working Group I (PWG- 1) of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) conducted a generic study on the effects of aging of active components in nuclear power plants. Representatives from France, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom participated in the study by submitting reports documenting aging studies performed in their countries. This report consists of summaries of those reports, along with a comparison of the various statistical analysis methods used in the studies. The studies indicate that with some exceptions, active components generally do not present a significant aging problem in nuclear power plants. Design criteria and effective preventative maintenance programs, including timely replacement of components, are effective in mitigating potential aging problems. However, aging studies (such as qualitative and statistical analyses of failure modes and maintenance data) are an important part of efforts to identify and solve potential aging problems. Solving these problems typically includes such strategies as replacing suspect components with improved components, and implementing improved maintenance programs

  16. The Umov effect in application to an optically thin two-component cloud of cosmic dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Videen, Gorden; Zubko, Nataliya; Shkuratov, Yuriy

    2018-04-01

    The Umov effect is an inverse correlation between linear polarization of the sunlight scattered by an object and its geometric albedo. The Umov effect has been observed in particulate surfaces, such as planetary regoliths, and recently it also was found in single-scattering small dust particles. Using numerical modeling, we study the Umov effect in a two-component mixture of small irregularly shaped particles. Such a complex chemical composition is suggested in cometary comae and other types of optically thin clouds of cosmic dust. We find that the two-component mixtures of small particles also reveal the Umov effect regardless of the chemical composition of their end-member components. The interrelation between log(Pmax) and log(A) in a two-component mixture of small irregularly shaped particles appears either in a straight linear form or in a slightly curved form. This curvature tends to decrease while the index n in a power-law size distribution r-n grows; at n > 2.5, the log(Pmax)-log(A) diagrams are almost straight linear in appearance. The curvature also noticeably decreases with the packing density of constituent material in irregularly shaped particles forming the mixture. That such a relation exists suggest the Umov effect may also be observed in more complex mixtures.

  17. Evaluating the effect of Locking on Multitenancy Isolation for Components of Cloud-hosted Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laud Charles Ochei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Multitenancy isolation is a way of ensuring that the performance, stored data volume and access privileges required by one tenant and/or component does not affect other tenants and/or components. One of the conditions that can influence the varying degrees of isolation is when locking is enabled for a process or component that is being shared. Although the concept of locking has been extensively studied in database management, there is little or no research on how locking affects multitenancy isolation and its implications for optimizing the deployment of components of a cloud-hosted service in response to workload changes. This paper applies COMITRE (Component-based approach to Multitenancy Isolation through Request Re-routing to evaluate the impact of enabling locking for a shared process or component of a cloud-hosted application. Results show that locking has a significant effect on the performance and resource consumption of tenants especially for operations that interact directly with the local file system of the platform used on the cloud infrastructure. We also present recommendations for achieving the required degree of multitenancy isolation when locking is enabled for three software processes: continuous integration, version control, and bug tracking.

  18. Effect of ash components on the ignition and burnout of high ash coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, B.; Yan, R.; Zheng, C.G. [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). National Laboratory of Coal Combustion

    1998-11-01

    The effect of the ash components on the ignition and burnout of four Chinese high ash coals were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. To investigate the influence of the ash components, comparative experiments were carried out with original, deashed and impregnated coals. Eleven types of ash components, such as SiO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, MgO, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeS{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O and FeSO{sub 4},(NH{sub 4}){center_dot}6H{sub 2}O were used in the present study. It was found that most of the ash components have negative effects. The strong influence of some ash components suggests that the combustion characteristics of high ash coal may be determined by the ash composition. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Secondary Mathematics Coaching: The Components of Effective Mathematics Coaching and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengo, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Mathematics coaching, which can be defined broadly as job-embedded learning for mathematics teachers with someone who can help, is being used in Canada to improve teaching practice and increase student achievement. Mathematics coaching research is quite new with little written on the components of effective coaching. The paper attempts to…

  20. The effects of nitrogen rates on phenology and yield components of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of nitrogen rates on phenology and yield components of early maturing maize cultivars. DT Gungula, AO Togun, JG Kling. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences Vol. 13 (3) 2007: pp.319-324. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  1. Effects of cutting frequency on alfalfa yield and yield components in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cutting frequency on alfalfa yield and yield components in Songnen Plain, Northeast China. J Chen, F Tang, R Zhu, C Gao, G Di, Y Zhang. Abstract. The productivity and quality of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is strongly influenced by cutting frequency (F). To clarify that the yield and quality of alfalfa if affected by F, ...

  2. Effect of water stress on yield and yield components of sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment during year 2009 was conducted in the research station of the University of Tehran, College of Abouraihan in Pakdasht region, Iran. The study was aimed to investigate the effect of water stress on seed yield, yield component and some quantitative traits of four sunflower hybrids namely Azargol, Alstar, ...

  3. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.; Frasca, A.J.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare-earth permanent magnets

  4. Volatile Components of the Essential Oil of Artemisia montana and Their Sedative Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihiro, Kento; Myoda, Takao; Tajima, Noriaki; Gotoh, Kotaro; Kaneshima, Tai; Someya, Takao; Toeda, Kazuki; Fujimori, Takane; Nishizawa, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    The sedative effects of volatile components in the essential oil of Artemisia montana ("Yomogi") were investigated and measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Major components identified included 1,8-cineol, camphor, borneol, α-piperitone, and caryophyllene oxide. Among them, 1,8-cineol exhibited the highest flavor dilution (FD) value in an aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA), followed by borneol, o-cymene, β-thujone, and bornyl acetate. The sedative effects of yomogi oil aroma were evaluated by sensory testing, analysis of salivary α-amylase activity, and measurement of relative fluctuation of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in the brain using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). All results indicated the stress-reducing effects of the essential oil following nasal exposure, and according to the NIRS analysis, 1,8-cineol is likely responsible for the sedative effects of yomogi oil.

  5. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwarze, G.E.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets

  6. Indirect Allee effect, bistability and chaotic oscillations in a predator-prey discrete model of logistic type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Ruiz, Ricardo; Fournier-Prunaret, Daniele

    2005-01-01

    A cubic discrete coupled logistic equation is proposed to model the predator-prey problem. The coupling depends on the population size of both species and on a positive constant λ, which could depend on the prey reproduction rate and on the predator hunting strategy. Different dynamical regimes are obtained when λ is modified. For small λ, the species become extinct. For a bigger λ, the preys survive but the predators extinguish. Only when the prey population reaches a critical value then predators can coexist with preys. For increasing λ, a bistable regime appears where the populations apart of being stabilized in fixed quantities can present periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic oscillations. Finally, bistability is lost and the system settles down in a steady state, or, for the biggest permitted λ, in an invariant curve. We also present the basins for the different regimes. The use of the critical curves lets us determine the influence of the zones with different number of first rank preimages in the bifurcation mechanisms of those basins

  7. Analysis of embryo, cytoplasm and maternal effects on fatty acid components in soybean (Glycine max Merill.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Hailong; LI Wenxia; LI Wenbin

    2007-01-01

    The quality of oil determined by the constituents and proportion of fatty acid components,and the understanding of heredity of fatty acid components are of importance to breeding good quality soybean varieties.Embryo,cytoplasmic and maternal effects and genotype×environment interaction effects for quality traits of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill.] seeds were analyzed using a general genetic model for quantitative traits of seeds with parents,F1 and F2,of 20 crosses from a diallel mating design of five parents planted in the field in 2003 and 2004 in Harbin,China.The interaction effects of palmitic,stearic,and linoleic acid contents were larger than the genetic main effects,while the genetic main effects were equal to interaction effects for linolenic and oleic acid content.Among all kinds of genetic main effects,the embryo effects were the largest for palmitic,stearic,and linoleic acids,while the cytoplasm effects were the largest for oleic and linolenic acids.Among all kinds of interaction effects,the embryo interaction effects were the largest for fatty acids.The sum of additive and additive× environment effects were larger than that of dominance and dominance×environment effects for the linolenic acid content,but not for other quality traits.The general heritabilities were the main parts of heritabilities for palmitic and oleic acid contents,but the interaction was more important for stearic,linoleic,and linolenic acid contents.For the general heritability,maternal and cytoplasm heritabilities were the main components for palmitic,oleic,and linolenic acid contents.It was shown for the interaction heritabilities that the embryo interaction heritabilities were more important for oleic and linolenic acid contents,while the maternal interaction heritabilities were more important for linoleic acid content.Among selection response components,the maternal and cytoplasm general responses and/or interaction responses were more important for palmitic

  8. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  9. On The Effectiveness Of And Preference For Punishment And Extinction Components Of Function-Based Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Gregory P; Piazza, Cathleen C; Fisher, Wayne W; Maglieri, Kristen A

    2005-01-01

    The current study describes an assessment sequence that may be used to identify individualized, effective, and preferred interventions for severe problem behavior in lieu of relying on a restricted set of treatment options that are assumed to be in the best interest of consumers. The relative effectiveness of functional communication training (FCT) with and without a punishment component was evaluated with 2 children for whom functional analyses demonstrated behavioral maintenance via social ...

  10. Higher order Stark effect and transition probabilities on hyperfine structure components of hydrogen like atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' chikov, V.G. [National Research Institute for Physical-Technical and Radiotechnical Measurements - VNIIFTRI (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vitpal@mail.ru

    2000-08-15

    A quantum-electrodynamical (QED) perturbation theory is developed for hydrogen and hydrogen-like atomic systems with interaction between bound electrons and radiative field being treated as the perturbation. The dependence of the perturbed energy of levels on hyperfine structure (hfs) effects and on the higher-order Stark effect is investigated. Numerical results have been obtained for the transition probability between the hfs components of hydrogen-like bismuth.

  11. Effects of radiations on electronic components - Course IN2P3, release 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    As many off-the-shelf electronic components are now present onboard satellites, launchers and planes, this course proposes an overview of effects radiations can have on these components, notably in space applications. A first part proposes an overview of radiative environments, and more particularly presents the space radiative environment (solar wind, solar flares, cosmic radiation, radiation belts). It also presents the atmospheric and Earth radiative environment due to cosmic radiation, the alpha radiation (origin of particles, particle flow), the radiative environment within an accelerator. The second part addresses the effects of these radiative environments on electronic components, and the associated standards and tests. It addresses cumulative effects and proposes a detailed analysis of the effects of an ionizing dose on a MOS transistor, an analysis of the effects of ionising dose rate on a bipolar NPN or PNP vertical or lateral transistor, an analysis of the effects of atomic displacements, and a discussion of structure modifications. The next part describes various single events: the Single Event Upset (SEU) and the Multiple Bit Upset (MBU) in the case of a SRAM, the SEL (Single Event Latch-up) phenomenon, the SEGR (Single Event Gate Rupture) phenomenon in the case of a Power MOSFET, and the SEB (Single Event Burnout) phenomenon in the case of a Power MOSFET

  12. Effect of Raw Crushed Garlic (Allium sativum L.) on Components of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Prema Ram; Jani, Rameshchandra D; Sharma, Megh Shyam

    2017-09-28

    Metabolic syndrome consists of a group of risk factors characterized by abdominal obesity, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and prothrombotic and proinflammatory conditions. Raw garlic homogenate has been reported to reduce serum lipid levels in animal model; however, no precise studies have been performed to evaluate the effect of raw crushed garlic (Allium sativum L.) on components of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of raw crushed garlic on components of metabolic syndrome. A total of 40 metabolic syndrome patients were randomly selected from the diabetic center of SP Medical College, Bikaner, Rajasthan, India. They underwent treatment with 100 mg/kg body weight raw crushed garlic 2 times a day with standard diet for 4 weeks; their anthropometric and serum biochemical variables were measured at both the beginning and the end of the study. Statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS version 20, and Student's paired "t" test was used to compare variables before and after treatment with garlic preparation. Raw crushed garlic significantly reduced components of metabolic syndrome including waist circumference (p .05) of patients with metabolic syndrome after consumption of raw crushed garlic for 4 weeks. Raw crushed garlic has beneficial effects on components of metabolic syndrome; therefore, it can be used as an accompanying remedy for prevention and treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome.

  13. Analysis of conditional genetic effects and variance components in developmental genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J

    1995-12-01

    A genetic model with additive-dominance effects and genotype x environment interactions is presented for quantitative traits with time-dependent measures. The genetic model for phenotypic means at time t conditional on phenotypic means measured at previous time (t-1) is defined. Statistical methods are proposed for analyzing conditional genetic effects and conditional genetic variance components. Conditional variances can be estimated by minimum norm quadratic unbiased estimation (MINQUE) method. An adjusted unbiased prediction (AUP) procedure is suggested for predicting conditional genetic effects. A worked example from cotton fruiting data is given for comparison of unconditional and conditional genetic variances and additive effects.

  14. Fusibility of medical glass in hospital waste incineration: Effect of glass components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, X.G.; An, C.G.; Li, C.Y.; Fei, Z.W.; Jin, Y.Q.; Yan, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Medical glass, which is the principal incombustible component in hospital wastes, has a bad influence on combustion. In a rotary kiln incinerator, medical glass melts and turns into slag, possibly adhering to the inner wall. Prediction of the melting characteristics of medical glass hence is important for preventing slagging. The effect of various glass components on fusibility has been investigated experimentally; that of Na 2 O is the most marked. The softening temperature and flow temperature decrease 19.8 o C and 34.0 o C, respectively, with a rise of Na 2 O content in the Basic Content (standard composition of medical glass) of 1%. Correlations between fusion temperatures and glass components have been investigated; predictive functions of four characteristic melting temperatures have been obtained by simplifying the multi-variant series and were verified by testing glass samples. Relative errors of fusion temperatures (computed vs. measured) are mostly less than 5%.

  15. In vitro biosynthesis of globular proteins by murine splenic lymphocytes: effect of serum components as supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, H.K.L.; Pandey, A.K.; Singh, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    Studies on replacement of foetal calf serum (FCS) with precipitable protein, non precipitable protein, dialysable and non dialysable components of the FCS in media for the growth and proliferation of murine splenic rat lymphocytes have revealed that the whole serum could be completely replaced by either of the components without any appreciable deleterious effect on the mitogenic response but none of these components could offer optimum immune response. These findings establish a covalent association of whole FCS for synthesis and secretion of immunologically important pulsed proteins in terms of turnover rate and quantification by FPLC and suggest an important and yet undefined role of FCS in the process of immunoglobulin synthesis. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  16. Effective thermoelastic properties of discrete-fiber reinforced materials with transversally-isotropic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Lidiya; Khoroshun, Leonid; Müller, Wolfgang H.; Wille, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    In the present paper, we will illustrate the application of the method of conditional moments by constructing the algorithm for determination of the effective elastic properties of composites from the given elastic constants of the components and geometrical parameters of inclusions. A special case of two-component matrix composite with randomly distributed unidirectional spheroidal inclusions is considered. To this end it is assumed that the components of the composite show transversally isotropic symmetry of thermoelastic properties and that the axes of symmetry of the thermoelastic properties of the matrix and inclusions coincide with the coordinate axis x 3. As a numerical example a composite based on carbon inclusions and epoxide matrix is investigated. The dependencies of Young’s moduli, Poisson’s ratios and shear modulus from the concentration of inclusions and for certain values which characterize the shape of inclusions are analyzed. The results are compared and discussed in context with other theoretical predictions and experimental data.

  17. Implications of the effective one-component analysis of pair correlations in colloidal fluids with polydispersity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Mark J.; Errington, Jeffrey R.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2011-09-01

    Partial pair-correlation functions of colloidal suspensions with continuous polydispersity can be challenging to characterize from optical microscopy or computer simulation data due to inadequate sampling. As a result, it is common to adopt an effective one-component description of the structure that ignores the differences between particle types. Unfortunately, whether this kind of simplified description preserves or averages out information important for understanding the behavior of the fluid depends on the degree of polydispersity and can be difficult to assess, especially when the corresponding multicomponent description of the pair correlations is unavailable for comparison. Here, we present a computer simulation study that examines the implications of adopting an effective one-component structural description of a polydisperse fluid. The square-well model that we investigate mimics key aspects of the experimental behavior of suspended colloids with short-range, polymer-mediated attractions. To characterize the partial pair-correlation functions and thermodynamic excess entropy of this system, we introduce a Monte Carlo sampling strategy appropriate for fluids with a large number of pseudo-components. The data from our simulations at high particle concentrations, as well as exact theoretical results for dilute systems, show how qualitatively different trends between structural order and particle attractions emerge from the multicomponent and effective one-component treatments, even with systems characterized by moderate polydispersity. We examine consequences of these differences for excess-entropy based scalings of shear viscosity, and we discuss how use of the multicomponent treatment reveals similarities between the corresponding dynamic scaling behaviors of attractive colloids and liquid water that the effective one-component analysis does not capture.

  18. The Effects of Aging on the Components of Auditory – Verbal Short-Term Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Verhaegen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at exploring the effects of aging on the multiple components of the auditory-verbal short-term memory (STM. Participants of 45–54, 55–64, 65–74 and 75–84 years of age were presented STM tasks assessing short-term retention of order and item information, and of phonological and lexical-semantic information separately. Because older participants often present reduced hearing levels, we sought to control for an effect of hearing status on performance on STM tasks. Participants’ hearing thresholds were measured with a pure-tone audiometer. The results showed age-related effects on all STM components. However, after hearing status was controlled for in analyses of covariance, the age-related differences became non-significant for all STM processes. The fact that age-related hearing loss may in large part explain decreases in performance on STM tasks with aging is discussed.

  19. Structure and effective interactions in three-component hard sphere liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, A; Ashcroft, N W

    2001-04-01

    Complete and simple analytical expressions for the partial structure factors of the ternary hard sphere mixture are obtained within the Percus-Yevick approximation and presented as functions of relative packing fractions and relative hard sphere diameters. These solutions follow from the Laplace transform method as applied to multicomponent systems by Lebowitz [Phys. Rev. 133, A895 (1964)]. As an important application, we examine effective interactions in hard sphere liquid mixtures using the microscopic information contained in their partial structure factors. Thus the ensuring pair potential for an effective one-component system is obtained from the correlation functions by using an approximate inversion, and examples of effective potentials for three-component hard sphere mixtures are given. These mixtures may be of particular interest for the study of the packing aspects of melts that form glasses or quasicrystals, since noncrystalline solids often emerge from melts with at least three atomic constituents.

  20. Biocidal effects of Piper hispidinervum (Piperaceae) essential oil and synergism among its main components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, M F; Rossa, G E; Cassel, E; Vargas, R M F; Santana, O; Díaz, C E; González-Coloma, A

    2017-11-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of a pressure gradient (1-2 atm) in the extraction and composition of the essential oil (EO) of Piper hispidinervum by steam distillation. We also evaluated the insect antifeedant effects (Spodoptera littoralis, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, Myzus persicae and Rhopalosiphum padi) and nematicidal activity (Meloidogyne javanica) of the oils, their major components and their synergistic interactions. Safrole was the major component (78-81%) followed by terpinolene (5-9%). The EOs tested were effective insect antifeedants. Safrole, explained most of the insect antifeedant action of P. hispidinervum EOs. When safrole and terpinolene were tested in binary combinations, low ratios of safrole improved the antifeedant effects of terpinolene. P. hispidinervum EOs caused higher mortality of M. javanica juveniles than their major components. In binary combinations, low ratios of terpinolene increased the nematicidal effects of safrole. The EO treatment strongly suppressed nematode egg hatching and juvenile infectivity. P. hispidinervum EOs affected the germination of S. lycopersicum and L. sativa mostly at 24 h of treatment, being L. sativa the most sensitive. Safrole moderately affected germination and root growth of L. sativa, S. lycopersicum and L. perenne. Terpinolene only affected S. lycopersicum root growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Gas Turbine Component Performance on Engine and Rotary Wing Vehicle Size and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Christopher A.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, Subsonic Rotary Wing Project, further gas turbine engine studies have been performed to quantify the effects of advanced gas turbine technologies on engine weight and fuel efficiency and the subsequent effects on a civilian rotary wing vehicle size and mission fuel. The Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) vehicle and mission and a previous gas turbine engine study will be discussed as a starting point for this effort. Methodology used to assess effects of different compressor and turbine component performance on engine size, weight and fuel efficiency will be presented. A process to relate engine performance to overall LCTR vehicle size and fuel use will also be given. Technology assumptions and levels of performance used in this analysis for the compressor and turbine components performances will be discussed. Optimum cycles (in terms of power specific fuel consumption) will be determined with subsequent engine weight analysis. The combination of engine weight and specific fuel consumption will be used to estimate their effect on the overall LCTR vehicle size and mission fuel usage. All results will be summarized to help suggest which component performance areas have the most effect on the overall mission.

  2. Antioxidant and Cytoprotective Effects of Tibetan Tea and Its Phenolic Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tibetan tea (Kangzhuan is an essential beverage of the Tibetan people. In this study, a lyophilized aqueous extract of Tibetan tea (LATT was prepared and analyzed by HPLC. The results suggested that there were at least five phenolic components, including gallic acid, and four catechins (i.e., (+-catechin, (−-catechin gallate (CG, (−-epicatechin gallate (ECG, and (−-epigallocatechin gallate. Gallic acid, the four catechins, and LATT were then comparatively investigated by four antioxidant assays: ferric reducing antioxidant power, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide radical (PTIO• scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazl radical scavenging, and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical scavenging assays. In these assays, LATT, along with the five phenolic components, increased their antioxidant effects in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the half maximal scavenging concentrations of ECG were always lower than those of CG. Gallic acid and the four catechins were also suggested to chelate Fe2+ based on UV-visible spectral analysis. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC−ESI−Q−TOF−MS/MS analysis suggested that, when mixed with PTIO•, the five phenolic components could yield two types of radical adduct formation (RAF products (i.e., tea phenolic dimers and tea phenolic-PTIO• adducts. In a flow cytometry assay, (+-catechin and LATT was observed to have a cytoprotective effect towards oxidative-stressed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Based on this evidence, we concluded that LATT possesses antioxidative or cytoprotective properties. These effects may mainly be attributed to the presence of phenolic components, including gallic acid and the four catechins. These phenolic components may undergo electron transfer, H+-transfer, and Fe2+-chelating pathways to exhibit

  3. Antioxidant and Cytoprotective Effects of Tibetan Tea and Its Phenolic Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Li, Xican; Ren, Zhenxing; Qiu, Weimin; Chen, Jianlan; Jiang, Qian; Chen, Ban; Chen, Dongfeng

    2018-01-24

    Tibetan tea (Kangzhuan) is an essential beverage of the Tibetan people. In this study, a lyophilized aqueous extract of Tibetan tea ( LATT ) was prepared and analyzed by HPLC. The results suggested that there were at least five phenolic components, including gallic acid, and four catechins (i.e., (+)-catechin, (-)-catechin gallate ( CG ), (-)-epicatechin gallate ( ECG ), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate). Gallic acid, the four catechins, and LATT were then comparatively investigated by four antioxidant assays: ferric reducing antioxidant power, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide radical (PTIO•) scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazl radical scavenging, and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging assays. In these assays, LATT, along with the five phenolic components, increased their antioxidant effects in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the half maximal scavenging concentrations of ECG were always lower than those of CG . Gallic acid and the four catechins were also suggested to chelate Fe 2+ based on UV-visible spectral analysis. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) analysis suggested that, when mixed with PTIO•, the five phenolic components could yield two types of radical adduct formation (RAF) products (i.e., tea phenolic dimers and tea phenolic-PTIO• adducts). In a flow cytometry assay, (+)-catechin and LATT was observed to have a cytoprotective effect towards oxidative-stressed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Based on this evidence, we concluded that LATT possesses antioxidative or cytoprotective properties. These effects may mainly be attributed to the presence of phenolic components, including gallic acid and the four catechins. These phenolic components may undergo electron transfer, H⁺-transfer, and Fe 2+ -chelating pathways to exhibit antioxidative or

  4. The role of the seven crude drug components in the sleep-promoting effect of Yokukansan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuko; Fujii, Yuuko; Sugiyama, Reina; Konishi, Tenji

    2016-01-11

    Yokukansan is a traditional Japanese "Kampo" medicine derived from Yi-Gan San in traditional Chinese medicine. Many studies have been published on its effects and mechanisms. In this study, we focused on the sleep-promoting effects of Yokukansan. Yokukansan composes of seven crude drugs: Uncaria Hook, Bupleurm Root, Cnidium Rhizome, Japanese Angelica Root, Poria Sclerotium, Atractylodes Lancea Rhizome, and Glycyrrhiza. Although each has distinctive effects in isolation, they combine to work as a sleep aid in the Yokukansan formula. We examined the roles of the seven crude drug components in the sleep-promoting effect of Yokukansan. In this study, we used an easy in vivo assay method which we developed previously to screen sleeping substances using thermography. This assay method focuses on the decrease in skin temperature of mice during sleep inducement. By administering the crude drug components of Yokukansan one at a time, it was possible to separate them into two groups: those that caused a decrease in body temperature (Uncaria Hook, Bupleurm Root, Cnidium rhizome, and Japanese Angelica root) and those that did not (Poria Sclerotium, Atractylodes Lancea Rhizome, and Glycyrrhiza). Accordingly, it was thought that the crude drugs causing a drop in body temperature were responsible for promoting sleep, while those in the other group would have no such effect in isolation. To investigate whether the crude drugs that did not cause a decrease in body temperature might be unnecessary for the sleep-promoting effect of Yokukansan, a number of decoctions were prepared using only six of the seven crude drug components, excluding a different crude drug in each case. Results showed that when any of the three components (Poria Sclerotium, Atractylodes Lancea Rhizome, or Glycyrrhiza) of Yokukansan that had no effect on body temperature in isolation were removed from Yokukansan, the resulting extract no longer had any of Yokukansan's sleep-promoting effects. This result

  5. The ORC method. Effective modelling of thermal performance of multilayer building components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akander, Jan

    2000-02-01

    The ORC Method (Optimised RC-networks) provides a means of modelling one- or multidimensional heat transfer in building components, in this context within building simulation environments. The methodology is shown, primarily applied to heat transfer in multilayer building components. For multilayer building components, the analytical thermal performance is known, given layer thickness and material properties. The aim of the ORC Method is to optimise the values of the thermal resistances and heat capacities of an RC-model such as to give model performance a good agreement with the analytical performance, for a wide range of frequencies. The optimisation procedure is made in the frequency domain, where the over-all deviation between model and analytical frequency response, in terms of admittance and dynamic transmittance, is minimised. It is shown that ORC's are effective in terms of accuracy and computational time in comparison to finite difference models when used in building simulations, in this case with IDA/ICE. An ORC configuration of five mass nodes has been found to model building components in Nordic countries well, within the application of thermal comfort and energy requirement simulations. Simple RC-networks, such as the surface heat capacity and the simple R-C-configuration are not appropriate for detailed building simulation. However, these can be used as basis for defining the effective heat capacity of a building component. An approximate method is suggested on how to determine the effective heat capacity without the use of complex numbers. This entity can be calculated on basis of layer thickness and material properties with the help of two time constants. The approximate method can give inaccuracies corresponding to 20%. In-situ measurements have been carried out in an experimental building with the purpose of establishing the effective heat capacity of external building components that are subjected to normal thermal conditions. The auxiliary

  6. Matrix effects in PIXE evaluation of the major components in thick homogeneous samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oystaeyen, B. van; Demortier, G.

    1983-01-01

    Matrix effects on the major component X-ray yields in PIXE measurements are studied in general terms with the Au-Cu-Ag matrix as practical example. Postulating firstly that all the major components may be simultaneously detected through one well-isolated peak for each of them, and secondly that a known reference material is available which contains all the elements of the unknown sample, we propose a direct method to extract the true concentrations of the latter taking into accout the matrix effects. The geometrical parameters describing the target location with respect to ion beam direction and detector position are also studied and a first attempt is made to include them in the data treatment. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of chromotoxic effect of gamma radiation and different tissue culture media components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, J.; Hossain, Z.; Mandal, A.K.A.; Datta, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    Chromotoxic effect of different in vitro culture medium compositions were studied on aseptically grown root tip cells of Allium cepa and compared with gamma ray treated Allium cepa bulbs. Different types of chromosomal abnormalities were recorded in all medium composition as normally observed in Allium test with other chemicals and mutagens treated experiment. Different chromosomal abnormalities developed due to different medium components and gamma ray treatment are comparable. (author)

  8. Phagocytosis and Inflammation: Exploring the effects of the components of E?cigarette vapor on macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ween, Miranda P.; Whittall, Jonathan J.; Hamon, Rhys; Reynolds, Paul N.; Hodge, Sandra J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract E?cigarettes are perceived as harmless; however, evidence of their safety is lacking. New data suggests E?cigarettes discharge a range of compounds capable of physiological damage to users. We previously established that cigarette smoke caused defective alveolar macrophage phagocytosis. The present study compared the effect E?cigarette of components; E?liquid flavors, nicotine, vegetable glycerine, and propylene glycol on phagocytosis, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and phagocyt...

  9. The Effect of Multidimensional Motivation Interventions on Cognitive and Behavioral Components of Motivation: Testing Martin's Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh PooraghaRoodbarde; Siavash Talepasand; Issac Rahimian Boogar

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at examining the effect of multidimensional motivation interventions based on Martin's model on cognitive and behavioral components of motivation.Methods: The research design was prospective with pretest, posttest, and follow-up, and 2 experimental groups. In this study, 90 students (45 participants in the experimental group and 45 in the control group) constituted the sample of the study, and they were selected by available sampling method. Motivation inter...

  10. Role of antisymmetric spin-orbit component in effective interactions in the sd-shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinada, K.

    1981-10-01

    The antisymmetric spin-orbit interaction (ALS) proposed for sd-shell nuclei is investigated. It is shown that the centroid energy of the d sub(5/2) - d sub(3/2) interactions plays a crucial role in reproducing the excited band spectra of A = 18 - 24 nuclei. An empirical effective interaction without ALS component is proposed to reproduce the observed spectra of light sd-shell nuclei. (author)

  11. Accounting sodium effect in calculation of strength of nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    Accounting methods of liquid sodium effect on long-term strength and creep of structural materials of nuclear reactors are considered. The decrease of pearlite steel strength at the decarburization expense and the decrease of plasticity of austenitic steels at the expense of carburization are noted. The necessity to account thermal transfer of mass is shown. Values of safety factors are presented, they are recommended for the design of reactor component parts with the thickness not less than 1 mm [ru

  12. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Perraton, Luke; Machotka, Zuzana; Kumar, Saravana

    2009-01-01

    Luke Perraton, Zuzana Machotka, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAim: Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials.Method: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Onl...

  13. The effect of vertical earthquake component on the uplift of the nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Toshio

    1986-01-01

    During a strong earthquake, the base mat of a nuclear reactor building may be lifted partially by the response overturning moment. And it causes geometrical nonlinear interaction between the base mat and rock foundation beneath it. In order to avoid this uplift phenomena, the base mat and/or plan of the building is enlarged in some cases. These special design need more cost and/or time in construction. In the evaluation of the uplift phenomena, a parameter ''η'' named ''contact ratio'' is used defined as the ratio of compression stress zone area of base mat for total area of base mat. Usually this contact ratio is calculated under the combination of the maximum overturning moment obtained by the linear earthquake response analysis and the normal force by the gravity considering the effect of the vertical earthquake component. In this report, the effect of vertical earthquake component for the uplift phenomena is studied and it concludes that the vertical earthquake component gives little influence on the contact ratio. In order to obtain more reasonable contact retio, the nonlinear rocking analysis subjected to horizontal and vertical earthquake motions simultaneously is proposed in this report. As the second best method, the combination of the maximum overturning moment obtained by linear analysis and the normal force by only the gravity without the vertical earthquake effect is proposed. (author)

  14. Assessing the effect of oil price on world food prices: Application of principal component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim; Shokoohi, Zainab

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the co-movement of food prices and the macroeconomic index, especially the oil price, by principal component analysis to further understand the influence of the macroeconomic index on food prices. We examined the food prices of seven major products: eggs, meat, milk, oilseeds, rice, sugar and wheat. The macroeconomic variables studied were crude oil prices, consumer price indexes, food production indexes and GDP around the world between 1961 and 2005. We use the Scree test and the proportion of variance method for determining the optimal number of common factors. The correlation coefficient between the extracted principal component and the macroeconomic index varies between 0.87 for the world GDP and 0.36 for the consumer price index. We find the food production index has the greatest influence on the macroeconomic index and that the oil price index has an influence on the food production index. Consequently, crude oil prices have an indirect effect on food prices. - Research Highlights: →We investigate the co-movement of food prices and the macroeconomic index. →The crude oil price has indirect effect on the world GDP via its impacts on food production index. →The food production index is the source of causation for CPI and GDP is affected by CPI. →The results confirm an indirect effect among oil price, food price principal component.

  15. Effects of broccoli extract on biodistribution and labeling blood components with 99mTc-GH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cekic, Betul; Muftuler, Fazilet Zumrut Biber; Kilcar, Ayfer Yurt; Ichedef, Cigdem; Unak, Perihan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: people consume vegetables without the knowledge of the side effects of the biological and chemical contents and interactions between radiopharmaceuticals and herbal extract. To this end, current study is focused on the effects of broccoli extract on biodistribution of radiolabeled glucoheptonate ( 99m Tc-GH) and radiolabeling of blood components. Methods: GH was labeled with 99m Tc. Quality control studies were done utilizing TLC method. Biodistribution studies were performed on male rats which were treated via gavage with either broccoli extract or SF as control group for 15 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from rats' heart. Radiolabeling of blood constituents performed incubating with GH, SnCl 2 and 99m Tc. Results: radiochemical yield of 99m Tc-GH is 98.46±1.48 % (n=8). Biodistribution studies have shown that according to the control, the treated group with broccoli has approximately 10 times less uptake in kidney. The percentage of the radioactivity ratios of the blood components is found to be same in both groups. Conclusions: although there is no considerable effect on the radiolabeling of blood components, there is an outstanding change on the biodistribution studies especially on kidneys. The knowledge of this change on kidney uptake may contribute to reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and/or repetition of the examinations in Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  16. The Effect of Multidimensional Motivation Interventions on Cognitive and Behavioral Components of Motivation: Testing Martin's Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh PooraghaRoodbarde

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed at examining the effect of multidimensional motivation interventions based on Martin's model on cognitive and behavioral components of motivation.Methods: The research design was prospective with pretest, posttest, and follow-up, and 2 experimental groups. In this study, 90 students (45 participants in the experimental group and 45 in the control group constituted the sample of the study, and they were selected by available sampling method. Motivation interventions were implemented for fifteen 60-minute sessions 3 times a week, which lasted for about 2 months. Data were analyzed using repeated measures multivariate variance analysis test.Results: The findings revealed that multidimensional motivation interventions resulted in a significant increase in the scores of cognitive components such as self-efficacy, mastery goal, test anxiety, and feeling of lack of control, and behavioral components such as task management. The results of one-month follow-up indicated the stability of the created changes in test anxiety and cognitive strategies; however, no significant difference was found between the 2 groups at the follow-up in self-efficacy, mastery goals, source of control, and motivation.Conclusions: The research evidence indicated that academic motivation is a multidimensional component and is affected by cognitive and behavioral factors; therefore, researchers, teachers, and other authorities should attend to these factors to increase academic motivation.

  17. Molecular Orientation in Two Component Vapor-Deposited Glasses: Effect of Substrate Temperature and Molecular Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Charles; Jiang, Jing; Walters, Diane; Ediger, Mark

    Vapor-deposited glasses are widely investigated for use in organic electronics including the emitting layers of OLED devices. These materials, while macroscopically homogenous, have anisotropic packing and molecular orientation. By controlling this orientation, outcoupling efficiency can be increased by aligning the transition dipole moment of the light-emitting molecules parallel to the substrate. Light-emitting molecules are typically dispersed in a host matrix, as such, it is imperative to understand molecular orientation in two-component systems. In this study we examine two-component vapor-deposited films and the orientations of the constituent molecules using spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV-vis and IR spectroscopy. The role of temperature, composition and molecular shape as it effects molecular orientation is examined for mixtures of DSA-Ph in Alq3 and in TPD. Deposition temperature relative to the glass transition temperature of the two-component mixture is the primary controlling factor for molecular orientation. In mixtures of DSA-Ph in Alq3, the linear DSA-Ph has a horizontal orientation at low temperatures and slight vertical orientation maximized at 0.96Tg,mixture, analogous to one-component films.

  18. Assortative Mating for Psychopathy Components and its Effects on the Relationship Quality in Intimate Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kardum

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In three studies, we examined assortative mating for psychopathy components as well as its effects on the relationship quality in intimate partners. Compared to the original structure we confirmed three factors of psychopathy: criminal tendencies (CT, erratic lifestyle (ELS and interpersonal manipulation (IM, while callous affect (CA was not replicated. Hypotheses regarding positive versus negative assortment, initial assortment versus convergence, and active assortment versus social homogamy were tested. All hypotheses were examined using both variable-centered approach (VCA and couple-centered approach (CCA. We found moderate positive assortment between intimate partners in psychopathy as a latent construct estimated by structural modelling. Furthermore, positive assortment for all three components of psychopathy was found either by using only VCA (CT, only CCA (IM or both approaches (ELS. Additionally, initial assortment rather than convergence hypothesis and active assortment rather than social homogamy hypothesis was confirmed for all three psychopathy components, with a slight tendency towards divergence and social homogamy. We explored the effects of similarity in psychopathy components on the women and men' relationship quality by using profile similarity and polynomial regression analyses. Profile similarity in IM was significantly positively related to women's relationship quality, while the results of the polynomial regression analyses were more complex, and showed that only (dissimilarity in CT did not exert any effect on women and men's relationship quality. Greater disagreement between women and men's ELS was related with more sharp decrease of women's relationship quality, while men's relationship quality decreased at the higher levels of women and men's ELS. Greater disagreement between women and men's IM results in a lower women's relationship quality, while women and men's relationship quality was higher when women's IM was

  19. Thermal loads and their effect on integrity of mechanical systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, G.; Schoeckle, F.

    2010-01-01

    The initial step to establish a required quality status of systems and components is performed during the state of design. Main goal of the design is to consider every possible damage mechanism of the future operation (by specification of loads, medium and environment and the selection of the materials). The knowledge during the state of design determines the reliability of the component. Regarding the thermal loads, especially, only global parameters are specified usually (transients of flow and temperature connected to specified operation). These global transients are analyzed according to the standards. In operation, the safety (integrity) resp. remaining life of a component is determined by the real operation history. As experience showed, failures, defects and not specified (new) loads were discovered during operation, e.g. stratification effects in feedwater pipes and in surge lines or thermal effects in the region of valves due to switching or internal leakage. Standard surveillance in operation is performed using plant transducers that can only monitor global loads. However, problems usually are of local nature. Thermal loads like - turbulent temperatures due to mixing of media with different temperatures - temperature differences across shells or in regions of nozzles/thermal sleeves - temperature differences in piping cross sections (local and global stratification effects) - temperature differences along sections of piping systems have to be monitored by use of local instrumentation. During analysis, both the local loads and construction details have to be considered, in detail, using appropriate calculation / analysis tools. The complexity of the loads requires a comprehensive procedure: - determine the types of loads resulting from measured temperature transients - perform sensitivity studies to identify the load type that results in relevant stresses - evaluate the stresses of the significant loads - assess these stresses according to component

  20. Effect of residual stresses on the reliability of components under fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruestenberg, I.

    1995-01-01

    The assurance of the reliability of mechanical components relative to a variety of failure mechanisms is of decisive technical, industrial, and economic importance. In this dissertation, the reliability, i.e. the probability that the lifetime does not fall below a given value, is examined with respect to the particularly important failure mechanisms of fracture and fatigue. The general problem of uniaxial fatigue is studied on the basis of both continuum damage mechanics and crack mechanics. In particular, the mechanisms of crack initiation, as characterized by the Coffin-Manson-Neuber local strain-life equations for notched components as well as the mechanism of crack growth, as governed by the Paris-Erdogang relation, are taken into account. The nonlinear fatigue damage accumulation process for components subjected to general, cyclic loading histories is modeled by a multilinear damage law which allows, in principle, to characterize the subsequent activation of different fatigue mechanisms. Explicit equations are developed for quintuple-, quadruple-, and triple-linear damage accumulation. Particularly promising appears the triple-linear damage approach which allows, in principle, the identification of a nucleation, an initiation, and a final growth stage up to rupture of fatigue cracks. The beneficial effect of intentionally induced compressive residual stresses on the lifetime of the component is investigated. To this end, an elasto-plastic contact problem, based on Prandtl-Reuss' constitutive equations, is numerically solved, and the residual stress field, as it is typically produced by the mechanical process of cold rolling, is established. Assessments of the effect of adaptation, i.e. the subsequent reduction of the residual stresses due to cyclic in-service loading as well as of the effect of unavoidable surface roughness, introduced by manufacturing processes like forging, are carried out. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  1. Investigating the association of cardiovascular effects with personal exposure to particle components and sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chang-fu, E-mail: changfu@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Institute of Environmental Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Li, Ya-Ru; Kuo, I-Chun [Institute of Environmental Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Chieh [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lin, Lian-Yu; Su, Ta-Chen [Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-01

    Background: Few studies included information on components and sources when exploring the cardiovascular health effects from personal exposure to particulate matters (PM). We previously reported that exposure to PM between 1.0 and 2.5 {mu}m (PM{sub 2.5-1}) was associated with increased cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI, an arterial stiffness index), while exposure to PM smaller than 0.25 {mu}m (PM{sub 0.25}) decreased the heart rate variability (HRV) indices. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between PM elements and cardiovascular health effects and identify responsible sources. Methods: In a panel study of seventeen mail carriers, the subjects were followed for 5-6 days while delivering mail outdoors. Personal filter samples of PM{sub 2.5-1} and PM{sub 0.25} were analyzed for their elemental concentrations. The source-specific exposures were further estimated by using absolute principal factor analysis. We analyzed the component- and source-specific health effects on HRV indices and CAVI using mixed models. Results: Several elements in PM{sub 2.5-1} (e.g., cadmium and strontium) were associated with the CAVI. Subsequent analyses showed that an interquartile range increase in exposure to PM from regional sources was significantly associated with a 3.28% increase in CAVI (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.47%-5.13%). This significant effect remained (3.35%, CI: 1.62%-5.11%) after controlling for the ozone exposures. For exposures to PM{sub 0.25}, manganese, calcium, nickel, and chromium were associated with the CAVI and/or the HRV indices. Conclusions: Our study suggests that PM{sub 2.5-1} and PM{sub 0.25} components may be associated with different cardiovascular effects. Health risks from exposure to PM from sources other than vehicle exhaust should not be underappreciated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased arterial stiffness was related to the components in particles between 1.0 and 2.5 {mu}m. Black

  2. Coulomb and nuclear components of the breakup, their interference and effect on the fusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, P R S; Lubian, J; Canto, L F; Otomar, D R; Hussein, M S

    2015-01-01

    We discuss reaction mechanisms involving weakly bound nuclei, at near barrier energies, and the couplings between different reaction channels. This paper may be thought as a brief description of state of the art of this field, particularly on breakup reactions and their influence on the fusion cross section. Recent experimental and theoretical results are presented, including the interference between Coulomb and nuclear components of the breakup and the systematics so far reached on the static effects due to the characteristic of weakly bound nuclei, especially halo-nuclei and the dynamic effects of the breakup coupling on the fusion cross section. (paper)

  3. The component structure of ERP subsequent memory effects in the Von Restorff paradigm and the word frequency effect in recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Siri-Maria; Brumback, Ty; Donchin, Emanuel

    2013-11-01

    We examined the degree to which ERP components elicited by items that are isolated from their context, either by their font size ("size isolates") or by their frequency of usage, are correlated with subsequent immediate recall. Study lists contained (a) 15 words including a size isolate, (b) 14 high frequency (HF) words with one low frequency word ("LF isolate"), or (c) 14 LF words with one HF word. We used spatiotemporal PCA to quantify ERP components. We replicated previously reported P300 subsequent memory effects for size isolates and found additional correlations with recall in the novelty P3, a right lateralized positivity, and a left lateralized slow wave that was distinct from the slow wave correlated with recall for nonisolates. LF isolates also showed evidence of a P300 subsequent memory effect and also elicited the left lateralized subsequent memory effect, supporting a role of distinctiveness in word frequency effects in recall. Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. Effect of medium components and culture conditions in Bacillus subtilis EA-CB0575 spore production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Uribe, Luisa F; Romero-Tabarez, Magally; Villegas-Escobar, Valeska

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores have important biotechnological applications; however, achieving both, high spore cell densities and sporulation efficiencies in fermentation, is poorly reported. In this study, medium components and culture conditions were optimized with different statistical methods to increase spore production of the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria B. subtilis EA-CB0575. Key medium components were determined with Plackett-Burman (PB) design, and the optimum concentration levels of two components (glucose, MgSO4·7H2O) were optimized with a full factorial and central composite design, achieving 1.37 × 10(9) CFU/mL of spore cell density and 93.5 % of sporulation efficiency in shake flask. The optimized medium was used to determine the effect of culture conditions on spore production at bioreactor level, finding that maintaining pH control did not affect significantly spore production, while the interaction of agitation and aeration rates had a significant effect on spore cell density. The overall optimization generated a 17.2-fold increase in spore cell density (8.78 × 10(9) CFU/mL) and 1.9-fold increase in sporulation efficiency (94.2 %) compared to that of PB design. These results indicate the potential of B. subtilis EA-CB0575 to produce both, high spore cell densities and sporulation efficiencies, with very low nutrient requirements and short incubation period which can represent savings of process production.

  5. Effects of seawater components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Tachibana, Masahiko; Ishida, Kazushige; Ota, Nobuyuki; Shigenaka, Naoto; Inagaki, Hiromitsu; Noda, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Effects of seawater components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature have been studied with a radiolysis model in order to evaluate influence on integrity of materials used in an ABWR. In 2011, seawater flowed into a wide part of the nuclear power plant system of the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Reactor No. 5 owned by Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. after condenser tubes broke during the plant shutdown operation. The reactor water temperature was 250°C and its maximum Cl − concentration was ca. 450 ppm when seawater was mixed with reactor water. In order to clarify effects of the sea water components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature, a radiolysis model calculation was conducted with Hitachi's radiolysis analysis code 'SIMFONY'. For the calculation, the temperature range was set from 50 to 250°C with 50°C increments and the gamma dose rate was set at 60 Gys −1 to see the effect of gamma irradiation from fuels under shutdown conditions. Concentrations of radiolytic species were calculated for 10 5 s. Dilution ratio of seawater was changed to see the effects of concentration of seawater components. Reaction rate constants of the Cl − , Br − , HCO 3 − , and SO 4 2− systems were considered. The main radiolytic species were predicted to be hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide of low concentration was produced in seawater-mixed water at elevated temperatures. Compared with these main products, concentrations of radiolytic products originating from chloride ion and other seawater components were found to be rather low. The dominant product among them was ClO 3 − and its concentration was found to be below 0.01ppm at 10 5 s. Then, during the plant shutdown operation, the harmful influence from radiolytic species originating from seawater components on integrity of fuel materials must be smaller than that of chloride ion which is the main ionic species in seawater. (author)

  6. Preventive effect of two-component chemical radioprotector and variability in its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambov, V.; Metodiev, S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the radioprotective efficiency of two-component radioprotective schema consisting of the chemically synthesized radioprotector WR-2721 (OK-79) and a new glycoside pigment obtained from melanoidine CL. The application of melanoidine 7-21 days before WR-2721 significantly increases the radioprotective efficiency of the chemically obtained product and enhances the 30-day survival of hybrid mice treated with 15 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. The effect of potentiated radioprotection is not observed when the interval between the application of the two agents is reduced to 24 h. It is suggested that the observed enhancement of the radioprotective efficiency in the two-component schema is due to the antioxidant and immuno modulating properties of the pigment product, observed and described in our previous investigations. (author)

  7. Effects of Foliar Selenite on the Nutrient Components of Turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We administered foliar applications of 50, 100, and 200 mg L−1 selenium (Se, selenite on turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa Linn. and detected the changes in the main nutrient components in fleshy roots. Results showed that the foliar application of Se (IV significantly increased the Se content in turnip, and Se (IV positively affected the uptake of several mineral elements, including magnesium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, manganese, and copper. Se (IV treatments also improved the synthesis of protein and multiple amino acids instead of crude fat and total carbohydrate in turnip, indicating that the foliar application of Se (IV could enhance Se biofortification in turnip and promote its nutritional value. We recommended 50–100 mg L−1 Se treatment for foliar application on turnip based on the daily intake of Se for adults (96–139 μg person−1 day−1 and its favorable effects on the nutrient components of turnip.

  8. Effects of foliar selenite on the nutrient components of turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa Linn.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiong; Li, Boqun; Yang, Yongping

    2018-03-01

    We administered foliar applications of 50, 100 and 200 mg L‑1 selenium (Se, selenite) on turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa Linn.) and detected the changes in the main nutrient components in fleshy roots. Results showed that the foliar application of Se (Ⅳ) significantly increased the Se content in turnip, and Se (Ⅳ) positively affected the uptake of several mineral elements, including magnesium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, manganese and copper. Se (Ⅳ) treatments also improved the synthesis of protein and multiple amino acids instead of crude fat and total carbohydrate in turnip, indicating that the foliar application of Se (Ⅳ) could enhance Se biofortification in turnip and promote its nutritional value. We recommended 50–100 mg L‑1 Se treatment for foliar application on turnip based on the daily intake of Se for adults (96–139 µg person‑1 day‑1) and its favourable effects on the nutrient components of turnip.

  9. Two component tungsten powder injection molding – An effective mass production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antusch, Steffen; Commin, Lorelei; Mueller, Marcus; Piotter, Volker; Weingaertner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten and tungsten-alloys are presently considered to be the most promising materials for plasma facing components for future fusion power plants. The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) divertor design concept for the future DEMO power plant is based on modular He-cooled finger units and the development of suitable mass production methods for such parts was needed. A time and cost effective near-net-shape forming process with the advantage of shape complexity, material utilization and high final density is Powder Injection Molding (PIM). This process allows also the joining of two different materials e.g. tungsten with a doped tungsten alloy, without brazing. The complete technological process of 2-Component powder injection molding for tungsten materials and its application on producing real DEMO divertor parts, characterization results of the finished parts e.g. microstructure, hardness, density and joining zone quality are discussed in this contribution

  10. Effect of microemulsion component purity on the chromatographic figures of merit in chiral microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojtari, Adeline B; Foley, Joe P

    2009-04-17

    Numerous combinations of one-, two-, and three-chiral-component microemulsions have been previously prepared in our group, using N-dodecoxycarbonylvaline (DDCV), 2-hexanol, and ethyl acetate, dibutyl tartrate, or diethyl tartrate. A few results of the various formulations investigated suggested the possible presence of minor impurities in one or more components of the microemulsion. In this study, the purity of the current lots of R- and S-surfactant were measured, as was the subsequent effect of minor impurities on the relevant chromatographic figures of merit (CFOMs) that describe a chiral separation, i.e., efficiency, enantioselectivity, retention, migration window (elution range), and resolution. Two related methods are proposed for correcting enantioselectivities measured in the presence of chiral impurities in the chiral microemulsion.

  11. Identifying effective components of alcohol abuse prevention programs: effects of fear appeals, message style, and source expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, R D; Rogers, R W

    1983-04-01

    Despite the importance of alcohol abuse prevention programs, the effectiveness of many components of these programs has not been demonstrated empirically. An experiment tested the efficacy of three components of many prevention programs: fear appeals, one- versus two-sided message style, and the expertise of the source. The persuasive impact of this information was examined on 113 ninth-grade students' intentions to abstain from drinking alcohol while they are teenagers. The results reveal that fear appeals are successful in strengthening students' intentions to refrain from drinking. Implications are discussed for implementing these principles and for designing future investigations of alcohol abuse prevention programs.

  12. Effects of leached components from a hybrid resin composite on the reproductive system of male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Akbari Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: There is concern that leached components from dental composites may cause adverse changes in the reproductive health. This study aimed to assess the effects of leached components from a hybrid resin composite on the reproductive system of male mice.Materials and Methods: In the present animal study, twenty adult Syrian male mice were divided into two groups of 10 mice each. In the test group, components which leached from samples made from Filtek Z250 resin composite into 75% ethanol were daily administered to the mice for 28 days. In the control group, the procedure was repeated in the same way as the test group but without placing composite samples in the solution. Then, the body weight, weights of paired testes, Gonado Somatic Index, sperm viability, sperm motility, epididymal sperm reserve and daily sperm production were recorded. Four male mice in each group were mated with untreated female mice for 10 days. After that, the number of pregnant females and number of infants were recorded. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, Chi-square test and t-test.Results: There was a significant reduction in the sperm viability and sperm motility of male mice in the test group compared to the control group (P=0.001. There was no any significant differences in other parameters between two groups (P>0.05.Conclusion: This study showed that the leached components from resin composites cannot cause infertility but they could potentially cause some adverse effects on the reproductive system of male mice.

  13. Accelerator system for producing two-component beams for studies of interactive surface effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.; Ekern, R.; Hess, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    For studies of interactive surface effects caused by the simultaneous bombardment of targets by both chemically active and inactive ion species (e.g., D + and He + , respectively) a two beam component accelerator facility was placed in operation. One component, consisting of light ions (e.g., H, D, He) is accelerated by a 2-MV Van de Graaff accelerator which provides a mass analyzed and focussed beam for the energy range from approximately 100-keV to 2-MeV (for singly charged ions). The other component is a beam of light ions in the energy range from approximately 10-keV to 100-keV. This is furnished by a 100-kV dc accelerator system which provides a mass analyzed focussed beam. This beam is guided into the beam line of the Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically, and with the aid of beam steerers it is made to be co-axial with the Van de Graaff generated beam. The angle of incidence becomes hereby a free parameter for the interaction of the mixed beams with a surface. For each beam component, current densities of 650 μA cm -2 on target can readily be obtained. In order to reduce carbon contamination of the irradiated targets significantly, stainless steel beam lines have been used together with a combination of turbomolecular pumps and ion-sublimation pumps.A total pressure of 2 to 3 x 10 -8 torr in the beam lines and of 2 x 10 -9 torr in the target chamber can be obtained readily. Experimental results on the surface damage of Ni bombarded simultaneously with He + and D + ions are presented. The importance of such studies of interactive surface effects for the controlled thermonuclear fusion program are discussed

  14. Particle and surfactant interactions effected polar and dispersive components of interfacial energy in nanocolloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, A. R.; Das, Sarit K.; Agnihotri, Prabhat K.; Dhar, Purbarun

    2017-08-01

    We segregate and report experimentally for the first time the polar and dispersive interfacial energy components of complex nanocolloidal dispersions. In the present study, we introduce a novel inverse protocol for the classical Owens Wendt method to determine the constitutive polar and dispersive elements of surface tension in such multicomponent fluidic systems. The effect of nanoparticles alone and aqueous surfactants alone are studied independently to understand the role of the concentration of the dispersed phase in modulating the constitutive elements of surface energy in fluids. Surfactants are capable of altering the polar component, and the combined particle and surfactant nanodispersions are shown to be effective in modulating the polar and dispersive components of surface tension depending on the relative particle and surfactant concentrations as well as the morphological and electrostatic nature of the dispersed phases. We observe that the combined surfactant and particle colloid exhibits a similar behavior to that of the particle only case; however, the amount of modulation of the polar and dispersive constituents is found to be different from the particle alone case which brings to the forefront the mechanisms through which surfactants modulate interfacial energies in complex fluids. Accordingly, we are able to show that the observations can be merged into a form of quasi-universal trend in the trends of polar and dispersive components in spite of the non-universal character in the wetting behavior of the fluids. We analyze the different factors affecting the polar and dispersive interactions in such complex colloids, and the physics behind such complex interactions has been explained by appealing to the classical dispersion theories by London, Debye, and Keesom as well as by Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. The findings shed light on the nature of wetting behavior of such complex fluids and help in predicting the wettability and the degree of

  15. Effects of Coffee Components on Muscle Glycogen Recovery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Laís Monteiro Rodrigues; Reis, Caio Eduardo Gonçalves; da Costa, Teresa Helena Macedo

    2018-01-18

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world and it can improve insulin sensitivity, stimulating glucose uptake in skeletal muscle when adequate carbohydrate intake is observed. The aim of this review is to analyze the effects of coffee and coffee components on muscle glycogen metabolism. A literature search was conducted according to PRISMA and seven studies were included. They explored the effects of coffee components on various substances and signaling proteins. In one of the studies with humans, caffeine was shown to increase glucose levels, Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) phosphorylation, glycogen resynthesis rates and glycogen accumulation after exercise. After intravenous injection of caffeine in rats, caffeine increased adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation, and glucose transport. In in vitro studies caffeine raised AMPK and ACC phosphorylation, increasing glucose transport activity and reducing energy status in rat muscle cells. Cafestol and caffeic acid increased insulin secretion in rat beta-cells, and glucose uptake into human muscle cells. Caffeic acid also increased AMPK and ACC phosphorylation, reducing the energy status and increasing glucose uptake in rat muscle cells. Chlorogenic acid did not show any positive or negative effect. The findings from the current review must be taken with caution due to the limited number of studies on the subject. In conclusion, various coffee components had a neutral or positive role in the metabolism of glucose and muscle glycogen, whilst no detrimental effect was described. Coffee beverages should be tested as an option for athlete's glycogen recovery.

  16. Radioprotective effect of both vitamins E and / or C on some blood components of male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, W.A.; El-Daway, H.A.E.; Tawfik, S.S.M.; Soliman, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The protective effects of vitamin C and/or vitamin E on some blood components and serum level of thiobarbituric reactive substances (as indicator to level of lipid peroxidation) of irradiated male mice at dose 3 Gy sacrificed after 15,24 and 46 days of irradiation have been assessed in comparison with control and non-irradiated-treated with vitamin C and/or vitamin E groups. Vit. C, vit. E or in combination decreased the effect of irradiation on blood components and the level of thiobarbituric reactive substances, but average haemoglobin level RBC count, total WBC count, neutrophil count and lymphocyte count did not reach to the original average level even after 36 days of irradiation. Vit. E had a more protective effect than vit. C in case of total white blood cells, while vit. C was more protective in case of lymphocyte count. The combination of vitamins C and E had more protective effect than either of both vitamins alone. The decrease in lipid peroxidation products due to administration of vit. E and vit. C as antioxidants supported the theory that lipid peroxidation increased due to free radicals induced by irradiation

  17. The Effect of Simulated Flash-Heat Pasteurization on Immune Components of Human Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodie Daniels

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A pasteurization temperature monitoring system has been designed using FoneAstra, a cellphone-based networked sensing system, to monitor simulated flash-heat (FH pasteurization. This study compared the effect of the FoneAstra FH (F-FH method with the Sterifeed Holder method currently used by human milk banks on human milk immune components (immunoglobulin A (IgA, lactoferrin activity, lysozyme activity, interleukin (IL-8 and IL-10. Donor milk samples (N = 50 were obtained from a human milk bank, and pasteurized. Concentrations of IgA, IL-8, IL-10, lysozyme activity and lactoferrin activity were compared to their controls using the Student’s t-test. Both methods demonstrated no destruction of interleukins. While the Holder method retained all lysozyme activity, the F-FH method only retained 78.4% activity (p < 0.0001, and both methods showed a decrease in lactoferrin activity (71.1% Holder vs. 38.6% F-FH; p < 0.0001 and a decrease in the retention of total IgA (78.9% Holder vs. 25.2% F-FH; p < 0.0001. Despite increased destruction of immune components compared to Holder pasteurization, the benefits of F-FH in terms of its low cost, feasibility, safety and retention of immune components make it a valuable resource in low-income countries for pasteurizing human milk, potentially saving infants’ lives.

  18. Magnetic field effects on runaway electron energy deposition in plasma facing materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemer, K.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports magnetic field effects on runaway electron energy deposition in plasma facing materials and components is investigated using the Integrated TIGER Series. The Integrated TIGER Series is a set of time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes which perform photon and electron transport, with or without macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. A three-dimensional computational model of 100 MeV electrons incident on a graphite block was used to simulate runawayelectrons striking a plasma facing component at the edge of a tokamak. Results show that more energy from runaway electrons will be deposited in a material that is in the presence of a magnetic field than in a material that is in the presence of no field. For low angle incident runaway electrons in a strong magnetic field, the majority of the increased energy deposition is near the material surface with a higher energy density. Electrons which would have been reflected with no field, orbit the magnetic field lines and are redeposited in the material surface, resulting in a substantial increase in surface energy deposition. Based on previous studies, the higher energy deposition and energy density will result in higher temperatures which are expected to cause more damage to a plasma facing component

  19. Effect of solar radiation on the functional components of mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Mari; Katsube, Takuya; Koyama, Akio; Itamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    The functional components of mulberry leaves have attracted the attention of the health food industry, and increasing their concentrations is an industry goal. This study investigated the effects of solar radiation, which may influence the production of flavonol and 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) functional components in mulberry leaves, by comparing a greenhouse (poor solar radiation) and outdoor (rich solar radiation) setting. The level of flavonol in leaves cultivated in the greenhouse was markedly decreased when compared with those cultivated outdoors. In contrast, the DNJ content in greenhouse-cultivated plants was increased only slightly when compared with those cultivated outdoors. Interestingly, the flavonol content was markedly increased in the upper leaves of mulberry trees that were transferred from a greenhouse to the outdoors compared with those cultivated only in the outdoors. Solar radiation conditions influence the synthesis of flavonol and DNJ, the functional components of mulberry leaves. Under high solar radiation, the flavonol level becomes very high but the DNJ level becomes slightly lower, suggesting that the impact of solar radiation is great on flavonol but small on DNJ synthesis. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Characterization of heat tolerance in wheat cultivars and effects on production components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adérico Júnior Badaró Pimentel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: There is a need for heat tolerant wheat cultivars adapted to the expansion of cultivation areas in warmer regions due to the high demand of this cereal for human consumption. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of high temperatures on grain yield and yield components of wheat and characterize heat tolerant wheat genotypes at different development stages. The genotypes were evaluated in the field with and without heat stress. High temperatures reduced the number of spikelets per spike (21%, number of grains per spike (39%, number of grains per spikelet (23%, 1000-grain weight (27% and grain yield (79%. Cultivars MGS 1 Aliança, Embrapa 42, IAC 24-Tucuruí and IAC 364-Tucuruí III are the most tolerant to heat stress between the stages double ridge and terminal spikelet; MGS 1 Aliança, BRS 264, IAC 24-Tucuruí, IAC 364-Tucuruí III and VI 98053, between meiosis and anthesis; and BRS 254, IAC-24-Tucuruí, IAC-364-Tucuruí III and VI 98053, between anthesis and physiological maturity. High temperatures reduce grain yield and yield components. The number of grains per spike is the most reduced component under heat stress. The genotypes differed in tolerance to heat stress in different developmental stages.

  1. Antidiabetic Effect of an Active Components Group from Ilex kudingcha and Its Chemical Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwu Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The leaves of Ilex kudingcha are used as an ethnomedicine in the treatment of symptoms related with diabetes mellitus and obesity throughout the centuries in China. The present study investigated the antidiabetic activities of an active components group (ACG obtained from Ilex kudingcha in alloxan-induced type 2 diabetic mice. ACG significantly reduced the elevated levels of serum glycaemic and lipids in type 2 diabetic mice. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and glucokinase were upregulated significantly, while fatty acid synthetase, glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic enzyme was downregulated in diabetic mice after treatment of ACG. These findings clearly provided evidences regarding the antidiabetic potentials of ACG from Ilex kudingcha. Using LC-DAD/HR-ESI-TOF-MS, six major components were identified in ACG. They are three dicaffeoylquinic acids that have been reported previously, and three new triterpenoid saponins, which were the first time to be identified in Ilex kudingcha. It is reasonable to assume that antidiabetic activity of Ilex kudingcha against hyperglycemia resulted from these six major components. Also, synergistic effects among their compounds may exist in the antidiabetic activity of Ilex kudingcha.

  2. Rapidly Simultaneous Determination of Six Effective Components in Cistanche tubulosa by Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhong Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative determination of multiple effective components in a given plant usually requires a very large amount of authentic natural products. In this study, we proposed a rapid and non-destructive method for the simultaneous determination of echinacoside, verbascoside, mannitol, sucrose, glucose and fructose in Cistanche tubulosa by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. Near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC were conducted on 116 batches of C. tubulosa samples. The DRS data were processed using standard normal variety (SNV and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC methods. Partial least squares regression (PLSR was utilized to build calibration models for components-of-interest in C. tubulosa. All models were then assessed by calculating the root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC, correlation coefficient of calibration (r. The r values of all six calibration models were determined to be greater than 0.94, suggesting each model is reliable. Therefore, the quantitative NIR models reported in this study can be qualified to accurately quantify the contents of six medicinal components in C. tubulosa.

  3. Effect of component compression on the initial performance of an IPV nickel-hydrogen cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, Randall F.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental method was developed for evaluating the effect of component compression on the charge and discharge voltage characteristics of a 3 1/2 in. diameter boiler plate cell. A standard boiler plate pressure vessel was modified by the addition of a mechanical feedthrough on the bottom of the vessel which permitted different compressions to be applied to the components without disturbing the integrity of the stack. Compression loadings from 0.94 to 27.4 psi were applied by suspending weights from the feedthrough rod. Cell voltages were measured for 0.96-C, 55-min charge and for 1.37-C, 35-min and 2-C, 24-min discharges. An initial change in voltage performance on both charge and discharge as the loading increased was attributed to seating of the components. Subsequent variation of the compression from 2.97 to 27.4 psi caused only minor changes in either the charge or the discharge voltages. Several one month open-circuit voltage stands and 1100 cycles under LEO conditions at the maximum loading have produced no change in performance.

  4. Effects of multiple inhibitory components on anaerobic treatment processes in municipal solid waste incineration leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuqing; Dang, Yan; Lan, Zhangheng; Sun, Dezhi

    2016-06-01

    This study served to investigate the comparative and combined effects of calcium, ammonia nitrogen, and aquatic humic substances (AHS) on specific methanogenic activity (SMA) in municipal solid waste leachate at mesophilic conditions. Using orthogonal experiments, anaerobic granular sludge was cultured with different concentrations combinations of the three added components for 13 days. The combination of 6000 mg/L calcium, 400 mg/L ammonia nitrogen, and 4000 mg/L AHS was the most inhibitory combination on the SMA of granular sludge, with a calculated 4.49 mL (standard temperature and atmospheric pressure) (STP) CH4/(gVSS·d) of SMA. The SMA with the addition of the inhibitory components was much lower than the control group's (1000 mg/L calcium, 200 mg/L ammonia nitrogen and 2000 mg/L AHS) with a calculated 12.97 mL (STP) CH4/(gVSS·d) of SMA. Calcium was the major inhibitor among the three components followed by AHS. High concentrations of calcium significantly inhibited the utilization of propionate and butyrate in the substrate and further affected the methanogenic process.

  5. Effect of cathode component on the energy density of lithium-sulfur battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Seok; Kim, Seok; Choi, Soo Seok; Han, Ji Sung; Kim, Jan Dee; Jeon, Sang Eun; Jung, Bok Hwan

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the carbon black types and the sulfur particle size on the discharge capacity or the utilization of sulfur was investigated for the cathode having high loading of sulfur. The DBP (dibutyl phthalate) absorption number of the used carbon black has a strong effect on the utilization while the specific surface area is not so critical to it. It was also found that the sulfur particle size is a factor having an effect on the utilization. We have improved the cathode component and achieved the utilization of about 50%. By using that cathode, the volumetric energy density of about 330 Wh/l was obtained for the full size Li-S battery (3.8 mm thickness, 35 mm width and 62 mm height)

  6. On the effectiveness of and preference for punishment and extinction components of function-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Gregory P; Piazza, Cathleen C; Fisher, Wayne W; Maglieri, Kristen A

    2005-01-01

    The current study describes an assessment sequence that may be used to identify individualized, effective, and preferred interventions for severe problem behavior in lieu of relying on a restricted set of treatment options that are assumed to be in the best interest of consumers. The relative effectiveness of functional communication training (FCT) with and without a punishment component was evaluated with 2 children for whom functional analyses demonstrated behavioral maintenance via social positive reinforcement. The results showed that FCT plus punishment was more effective than FCT in reducing problem behavior. Subsequently, participants' relative preference for each treatment was evaluated in a concurrent-chains arrangement, and both participants demonstrated a dear preference for FCT with punishment. These findings suggest that the treatment-selection process may be guided by person-centered and evidence-based values.

  7. Investigation of LWR environmental effect on fatigue lifetime of austenitic stainless steel component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Youm, H. K.; Jin, T. E.

    1999-01-01

    The fatigue lifetime of principal components in nuclear power plant is evaluated by using the design fatigue curves in ASME B and PV code during design process. However, it is inadequate to evaluate fatigue lifetime considering the LWR environmental effect by these design fatigue curves because these are presented only under atmosphere environment. Therefore, many studies are recently performed for the design fatigue curves considering LWR environmental effect and are presented that the design fatigue curves in ASME B and PV code can be non-conservative. In present paper, the limits and differences of the design fatigue curves considering environmental effect are presented. To investigate the change of fatigue lifetime according to each design fatigue curve, the CUFs for the pressurizer spray nozzle partly composed of austenitic stainless steel are calculated according to each one. Finally, if the evaluation result can not be satisfied with fatigue design requirement, the alternatives to reduce design cumulative usage factor are discussed. (author)

  8. Interaction effects between internal governance mechanisms on the components of initial returns during the IPO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mediha Mezhoud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our work provides an analysis of the interaction effects between internal governance mechanisms on the components of initial returns during the listing period. The application of multivariate regressions on a sample of 110 IPO French companies during 2005-2010, has allowed us to conclude that the different interactions between these mechanisms significantly influence the level of under / overpricing. Indeed, the positive relationship between internal governance mechanisms and overpricing reflects a substitutability relationship. In contrast, the complementarity effect comes from the negative relationship characterizing the combination of governance mechanisms and the underpricing. Thus, the interactions effects between institutional ownership, board structure and under / overpricing are not conforming to the existence of a complementarity or substitutability relationship between these variables given the absence of a significant combination between these variables

  9. Differential effects of emotional cues on components of prospective memory: an ERP study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cona, Giorgia; Kliegel, Matthias; Bisiacchi, Patrizia S.

    2015-01-01

    So far, little is known about the neurocognitive mechanisms associated with emotion effects on prospective memory (PM) performance. Thus, this study aimed at disentangling possible mechanisms for the effects of emotional valence of PM cues on the distinct phases composing PM by investigating event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants were engaged in an ongoing N-back task while being required to perform a PM task. The emotional valence of both the ongoing pictures and the PM cues was manipulated (pleasant, neutral, unpleasant). ERPs were recorded during the PM phases, such as encoding, maintenance, and retrieval of the intention. A recognition task including PM cues and ongoing stimuli was also performed at the end of the sessions. ERP results suggest that emotional PM cues not only trigger an automatic, bottom-up, capture of attention, but also boost a greater allocation of top-down processes. These processes seem to be recruited to hold attention toward the emotional stimuli and to retrieve the intention from memory, likely because of the motivational significance of the emotional stimuli. Moreover, pleasant PM cues seemed to modulate especially the prospective component, as revealed by changes in the amplitude of the ERP correlates of strategic monitoring as a function of the relevance of the valence for the PM task. Unpleasant pictures seemed to modulate especially the retrospective component, as revealed by the largest old/new effect being elicited by unpleasant PM pictures in the recognition task. PMID:25674061

  10. Differential effects of emotional cues on components of prospective memory: An ERP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia eCona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, little is known about the neurocognitive mechanisms associated with emotion effects on prospective memory (PM performance. Thus, this study aimed at disentangling possible mechanisms for the effects of emotional valence of PM cues on the distinct phases composing PM by investigating event-related potentials (ERPs.Participants were engaged in an ongoing N-back task while being required to perform a PM task. The emotional valence of both the ongoing pictures and the PM cues was manipulated (pleasant, neutral, unpleasant. ERPs were recorded during the PM phases, such as encoding, maintenance, and retrieval of the intention. A recognition task including PM cues and ongoing stimuli was also performed at the end of the sessions.ERP results suggest that emotional PM cues not only trigger an automatic, bottom-up, capture of attention, but also boost a greater allocation of top-down processes. These processes seem to be recruited to hold attention towards the emotional stimuli and to retrieve the intention from memory, likely because of the motivational significance of the emotional stimuli. Moreover, pleasant PM cues seemed to modulate especially the prospective component, as revealed by changes in the amplitude of the ERP correlates of strategic monitoring as a function of the relevance of the valence for the PM task. Unpleasant pictures seemed to modulate especially the retrospective component, as revealed by the largest old/new effect being elicited by unpleasant PM pictures in the recognition task.

  11. Effect of the weld joint configuration on stressed components, residual stresses and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Bekir; Oezer, Alpay; Oezcatalbas, Yusuf [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the weld joint configuration on components has been studied, which are under service loads, under repair or construction and the residual stresses as well as the mechanical properties of the joint have been determined. For this purpose, a horizontal positioned tensile testing device and a semi-automatic MIG welding machine have been used and then the weld joints of the plates were subjected to different elastic stresses. When the temperature of the joined elements decreased to room temperature, applied elastic stresses were released. By this means, the effects of the existing tensile stresses in the joined parts and the tensile stresses created by the welding processes were investigated. The tensile stresses occurring in the joined elements were determined by using the photo-elasticity analysis method and the hole-drilling method. Also, tensile-shear tests were applied in order to determine the effect of permanent tensile loads on the mechanical properties of the joint. Experimental results showed that the application of corner welded lap joints for components under tensile loading significantly decrease the shear strength and yielding capacities of the joint. (orig.)

  12. Effects of heterosis for yield and yield components obtained by crossing divergent alfalfa populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katić Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available When breeding alfalfa for yield performance, it is necessary to use high-yielding parents obtained by different breeding methods. The assumption at the onset of this research was that crossing highest-yielding domestic cultivars with divergent populations from geographically distant breeding centers could result in the expression of heterotic effects in their hybrids contributing to increased alfalfa yield. The objective of this study was to determine yield and yield components and heterotic effects in hybrid progenies obtained by crossing the domestic cultivars NS Banat ZMS II and NS Mediana ZMS V with the cultivars Pella, Dolichi and Hyliki from Greece, UMSS 2001 from Bolivia and Jogeva 118 from Estonia in two series. The field trial planted in 2006, included 13 F1 hybrids and 6 of 7 initial parents in both series. Heterotic effects for yields of forage and hay were observed in 4 combinations (C NS Banat ZMS II x E Hyliki; C NS Banat ZMS II x E UMSS 2001; C NS Mediana ZMS V x E Hyliki; C NS Mediana ZMS V x E Dolichi. The populations that exhibited heterosis in a set of crossings are recommended for use as parent components for development of high-yielding synthetic alfalfa cultivars. .

  13. Effects of Different Heave Motion Components on Pilot Pitch Control Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Zavala, Melinda A.

    2016-01-01

    The study described in this paper had two objectives. The first objective was to investigate if a different weighting of heave motion components decomposed at the center of gravity, allowing for a higher fidelity of individual components, would result in pilot manual pitch control behavior and performance closer to that observed with full aircraft motion. The second objective was to investigate if decomposing the heave components at the aircraft's instantaneous center of rotation rather than at the center of gravity could result in additional improvements in heave motion fidelity. Twenty-one general aviation pilots performed a pitch attitude control task in an experiment conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames under different hexapod motion conditions. The large motion capability of the Vertical Motion Simulator also allowed for a full aircraft motion condition, which served as a baseline. The controlled dynamics were of a transport category aircraft trimmed close to the stall point. When the ratio of center of gravity pitch heave to center of gravity heave increased in the hexapod motion conditions, pilot manual control behavior and performance became increasingly more similar to what is observed with full aircraft motion. Pilot visual and motion gains significantly increased, while the visual lead time constant decreased. The pilot visual and motion time delays remained approximately constant and decreased, respectively. The neuromuscular damping and frequency both decreased, with their values more similar to what is observed with real aircraft motion when there was an equal weighting of the heave of the center of gravity and heave due to rotations about the center of gravity. In terms of open- loop performance, the disturbance and target crossover frequency increased and decreased, respectively, and their corresponding phase margins remained constant and increased, respectively. The decomposition point of the heave components only had limited

  14. Investigating Effective Components of Higher Education Marketing and Providing a Marketing Model for Iranian Private Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmaee, Roya Babaee; Nadi, Mohammad Ali; Shahtalebi, Badri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study and identify the effective components of higher education marketing and providing a marketing model for Iranian higher education private sector institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This study is a qualitative research. For identifying the effective components of higher education marketing and…

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on the fitness component of the pulse beetle, callosobruchus chinensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrahman, A.M.; Aboulnasr, A.E.; Roushdy, H.M.; Ahmed, M.Y.; Haiba, I.M.

    1984-01-01

    The present work deals with the fines components of the F 1 generation of pulse beetle, callosobruchus chinensis, developed from adults irradiated (as newly emerged adults) with higher doses and fractionation of sterilizing doses. The results obtained show a gradual decrease in egg production and hatchability. The dosages caused complete sterility in females and males respectively, shortening the life span of developed adults. The dose 200,000 rad caused immediate death to the irradiated adults. Fractionation of the sterilizing dose had no effect on either longevity or the percent of egg hatchability

  16. Effects of UV radiation on the UV-VIS absorption spectra of the EAGLE's medium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollmann, G.; Redmann, K.

    1990-01-01

    The impact of ultraviolet light on uv/vis absorption spectra of selected individual components of the cell breeding medium according to Eagle (MEM) was investigated. The strongest alterations of light absorption were detected in L-phenylalanin, L-tyrosin and L-tryptophane. Thus, the absorption behaviour of the Eagle (MEM) medium changed post radiationem may be attributed to spectrophotometric alterations of absorption in aromatic amino acids. The results are discussed with regard to the effect on the surface charge of erythrocytes. (author)

  17. The effect of crack branching on the residual lifetime of machine components containing stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdowski, R.M.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Speidel, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations concerning the effect of crack branching on the reduction of stress intensity at the tip of single cracks. The results indicate that the division of a single crack into n branches reduces the stress intensity at the branch tips by a factor of about 1/√n. This permits branched cracks to grow to larger depths before becoming critical. The implication is that longer residual lifetimes and longer operating times between inspections can be calculated for machine components with growing branched stress corrosion cracks. (author)

  18. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    The 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 14-15, 1998. This workshop occurs every two years, and has previously been held in Livermore/California, Nagoya/Japan, and the JRC-Ispra Site in Italy. The purpose of the workshop is to gather researchers involved in the topic of tritium migration, retention, and recycling in materials used to line magnetic fusion reactor walls and provide a forum for presentation and discussions in this area. This document provides an overall summary of the workshop, the workshop agenda, a summary of the presentations, and a list of attendees

  19. Radiation effects on optical components of a laser radar sensor designed for remote metrology in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Grann, E.B.; Slotwinski, A.

    1997-09-01

    A frequency modulated laser radar is being developed for in-vessel metrology and viewing of plasma-facing surfaces. Some optical components of this sensor must withstand intense gamma radiation (3 x 10 6 rad/h) during operation. The authors have tested the effect of radiation on a silica core polarization maintaining optical fiber and on TeO 2 crystals at doses up to ∼ 10 9 rad. Additional tests are planned for evaluating the performance of a complete acousto-optic (AO) scanning device. The progress made in these tests is also described

  20. A network analysis of the Chinese medicine Lianhua-Qingwen formula to identify its main effective components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Hua; Zhong, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jin-Ping; Wang, Yue-Fei; Jia, Wei-Na; Wang, Guo-Cai; Li, Zheng; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2016-02-01

    Chinese medicine is known to treat complex diseases with multiple components and multiple targets. However, the main effective components and their related key targets and functions remain to be identified. Herein, a network analysis method was developed to identify the main effective components and key targets of a Chinese medicine, Lianhua-Qingwen Formula (LQF). The LQF is commonly used for the prevention and treatment of viral influenza in China. It is composed of 11 herbs, gypsum and menthol with 61 compounds being identified in our previous work. In this paper, these 61 candidate compounds were used to find their related targets and construct the predicted-target (PT) network. An influenza-related protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed and integrated with the PT network. Then the compound-effective target (CET) network and compound-ineffective target network (CIT) were extracted, respectively. A novel approach was developed to identify effective components by comparing CET and CIT networks. As a result, 15 main effective components were identified along with 61 corresponding targets. 7 of these main effective components were further experimentally validated to have antivirus efficacy in vitro. The main effective component-target (MECT) network was further constructed with main effective components and their key targets. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the MECT network predicted key functions such as NO production being modulated by the LQF. Interestingly, five effective components were experimentally tested and exhibited inhibitory effects on NO production in the LPS induced RAW 264.7 cell. In summary, we have developed a novel approach to identify the main effective components in a Chinese medicine LQF and experimentally validated some of the predictions.

  1. Mixture component effects on the in vitro dermal absorption of pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riviere, J.E.; Qiao, G.; Baynes, R.E.; Brooks, J.D. [Coll. of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Mumtaz, M. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Interactions between chemicals in a mixture and interactions of mixture components with the skin can significantly alter the rate and extent of percutaneous absorption, as well as the cutaneous disposition of a topically applied chemical. The predictive ability of dermal absorption models, and consequently the dermal risk assessment process, would be greatly improved by the elucidation and characterization of these interactions. Pentachlorophenol (PCP), a compound known to penetrate the skin readily, was used as a marker compound to examine mixture component effects using in vitro porcine skin models. PCP was administered in ethanol or in a 40% ethanol/60% water mixture or a 40% ethanol/60% water mixture containing either the rubefacient methyl nicotinate (MNA) or the surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), or both MNA and SLS. Experiments were also conducted with {sup 14}C-labelled 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB). Maximal PCP absorption was 14.12% of the applied dose from the mixture containing SLS, MNA, ethanol and water. However, when PCP was administered in ethanol only, absorption was only 1.12% of the applied dose. There were also qualitative differences among the absorption profiles for the different PCP mixtures. In contrast with the PCP results, absorption of TCB or PCB was negligible in perfused porcine skin, with only 0.14% of the applied TCB dose and 0.05% of the applied PCB dose being maximally absorbed. The low absorption levels for the PCB congeners precluded the identification of mixture component effects. These results suggest that dermal absorption estimates from a single chemical exposure may not reflect absorption seen after exposure as a chemical mixture and that absorption of both TCB and PCB are minimal in this model system. (orig.)

  2. Hepatoprotective effects of kombucha tea: identification of functional strains and quantification of functional components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Ji, Baoping; Wu, Wei; Wang, Ruojun; Yang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Di; Tian, Wenli

    2014-01-30

    Kombucha tea (KT), a traditional health beverage containing potential hepatoprotective agents, is fermented from sugared tea by a symbiotic culture of yeast and bacteria for 8 days. However, the functional strains that produce components for the hepatoprotective property of KT remain unclear. Multiple strains are involved in traditional KT production. Therefore, KT has not been standardized or produced commercially. This study aimed to identify the functional strains and quantify the functional components with hepatoprotective effects in kombucha tea. Gluconacetobacter sp. A4 was one of the microorganisms in KT in which the D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone (DSL) produced by G. sp. A4 was significantly higher than that produced by original tea fungus at 8 days of fermentation. Traditional KT (TKT, tea broth fermented by mixed tea fungus), modified KT (MKT, fermented by single G. sp. A4), and DSL significantly inhibited the acetaminophen-induced increase of alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, triglyceride and malondialdehyde, as well as facilitating the reduction of total antioxidant capacity in mice. Furthermore, MKT and TKT are both similar to DSL in terms of protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice. These results suggested a positive relationship between DSL content and the hepatoprotective effect of TKT, MKT and DSL groups. G. sp. A4 was concluded to be a potential functional strain and DSL might be the key functional component for the hepatoprotective property in KT. The stronger capability of G. sp. A4 in producing DSL makes it a better choice for the commercial production of KT. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Implication of irradiation effects on materials data for the design of near core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, W.; Breitling, H.

    1995-01-01

    For LWR's strict regulations exist for the consideration of irradiation in the design and surveillance of the reactor pressure vessel in the various codes (ASME, RCC-M, KTA) but less for near core components. For FBR's no firm rules exist either for the vessel nor the reactor internals. In this paper the German design practices for the loop type SNR-300 will be presented, and also some information from the surveillance programme of the KNK-reactor. Austenitic stainless steels have been mainly selected for the near core components. For some special applications Ni-alloys and a stabilized 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo-alloy were specified. Considerations of the irradiation effects on material properties will be made for the various temperature and fluence levels around the core. The surveillance programmes will be described. Both, the consideration of irradiation effects in the elastic and inelastic analysis and the surveillance programmes had been a part of the licensing process for SNR-300. (author). 8 figs, 4 tabs

  4. Rotation and toroidal magnetic field effects on the stability of two-component jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millas, Dimitrios; Keppens, Rony; Meliani, Zakaria

    2017-09-01

    Several observations of astrophysical jets show evidence of a structure in the direction perpendicular to the jet axis, leading to the development of 'spine and sheath' models of jets. Most studies focus on a two-component jet consisting of a highly relativistic inner jet and a slower - but still relativistic - outer jet surrounded by an unmagnetized environment. These jets are believed to be susceptible to a relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability, depending on the effective inertia ratio of the two components. We extend previous studies by taking into account the presence of a non-zero toroidal magnetic field. Different values of magnetization are examined to detect possible differences in the evolution and stability of the jet. We find that the toroidal field, above a certain level of magnetization σ, roughly equal to 0.01, can stabilize the jet against the previously mentioned instabilities and that there is a clear trend in the behaviour of the average Lorentz factor and the effective radius of the jet when we continuously increase the magnetization. The simulations are performed using the relativistic MHD module from the open source, parallel, grid adaptive, mpi-amrvac code.

  5. The effect of glucose administration on the recollection and familiarity components of recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sünram-Lea, Sandra I; Dewhurst, Stephen A; Foster, Jonathan K

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that glucose administration facilitates long-term memory performance. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effect of glucose administration on different components of long-term recognition memory. Fifty-six healthy young individuals received (a) a drink containing 25 g of glucose or (b) an inert placebo drink. Recollection and familiarity components of recognition memory were measured using the 'remember-know' paradigm. The results revealed that glucose administration led to significantly increased proportion of recognition responses based on recollection, but had no effect on the proportion of recognition responses made through participants' detection of stimulus familiarity. Consequently, the data suggest that glucose administration appears to facilitate recognition memory that is accompanied by recollection of contextual details and episodic richness. The findings also suggest that memory tasks that result in high levels of hippocampal activity may be more likely to be enhanced by glucose administration than tasks that are less reliant on medial temporal lobe structures.

  6. Effects of pectolytic enzyme treatment and microfiltration on antioxidant components of elderberry juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furulyás D.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, pectolytic enzymes (Pectinex BE XXL, Trenolin Rot, and Fructozym P were investigated for their influence on phenolic, anthocyanin content, and antioxidant activities of elderberry (Sambucus nigra L. pulps during juice processing. Prior to pressing the berries, three different enzymes were added to pulps in order to evaluate the effect of different pectolytic enzyme treatments on the valuable components of elderberry juice. Control sample was prepared without enzyme. After treatment, squeezing, and clarification steps, microfiltration was carried out with ceramic membrane. The effect of this technology on the antioxidant capacity, total polyphenol content, and total anthocyanin content of the clarified elderberry juices has been evaluated in permeate and retentate samples, and membrane retention was calculated. Significantly lower antioxidant capacity was detected in the case of control sample than that obtained using enzyme-treated juices. Retention of antioxidant content on the microfiltration membrane was greatly reduced by using the enzymes. Higher valuable component yield was obtained using Fructozym P enzyme compared with Pectinex BE XXL used in industry.

  7. Effectiveness of electron beam microbial decontamination and change of essential oil components in fennel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohtsu, Naomi; Chikuta, Yasuhiro; Mino, Yoshiki; Aoki, Kenji; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of electron beam (EB) disinfection and sterilization technology and the changes of essential oil components in fennel were investigated. The absorbed dose was maximal at a depth of 0.9-1.0 g/cm 2 , which was 130% of the surface dose of 15 kGy in packed fennel irradiated with 5 MeV EB in a downward direction, and decreased in the deepest layer. As a result, in a fennel bacterial count of 10 5 cfu/g, a microbial contamination level below 1.0x10 3 cfu/g was obtained at a packing depth of 2.3 g/cm 2 and at the absorbed dose of more than 3 kGy. The bacteria in fennel were highly sensitive to EB irradiation. Furthermore, EB irradiation had no effect on the essential oil content of fennel, and no change of the essential oil components was found at the irradiation level necessary for decontamination. (author)

  8. Robust and Effective Component-based Banknote Recognition by SURF Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, Faiz M; Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, YingLi

    2011-01-01

    Camera-based computer vision technology is able to assist visually impaired people to automatically recognize banknotes. A good banknote recognition algorithm for blind or visually impaired people should have the following features: 1) 100% accuracy, and 2) robustness to various conditions in different environments and occlusions. Most existing algorithms of banknote recognition are limited to work for restricted conditions. In this paper we propose a component-based framework for banknote recognition by using Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF). The component-based framework is effective in collecting more class-specific information and robust in dealing with partial occlusion and viewpoint changes. Furthermore, the evaluation of SURF demonstrates its effectiveness in handling background noise, image rotation, scale, and illumination changes. To authenticate the robustness and generalizability of the proposed approach, we have collected a large dataset of banknotes from a variety of conditions including occlusion, cluttered background, rotation, and changes of illumination, scaling, and viewpoints. The proposed algorithm achieves 100% recognition rate on our challenging dataset.

  9. Effect of Application of Pseudomonas fluorescent Strains on Yield and Yield Components of Rapeseed Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Najafi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria has been identified as an alternative to chemical fertilizer to enhance plant growth and yield directly and indirectly. Use of rhizosphere free living bacteria is one of the methods for crop production and leads to improvement of resources absorption. In order to study of yield, yield components and radiation use efficiency, under application of PGPR condition, an experiment was carried out in 2008 growing season at Agriculture and natural resources research station of Mashhad. The cultivars selected from three rapeseed species belong to Brassica napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica juncea (landrace, BP.18، Goldrush، Parkland، Hyola330، Hyola401. Experimental factorial design was randomized in complete block with three replications. Treatments included six varieties of Rapeseed and inoculations were four levels as non–inoculation, inoculation with P. fluorescens169, P. putida108 and use then together. Results showed that strains of fluorescent pseudomonas bacteria had greatest effects on yield and yield components cultivars. A significant difference in the number of pods per plant and 1000 seed weight observed. The cultivars were different in all treats except 1000 seed weight. Overall results indicated that application of growth stimulating bacteria in combination with different cultivars, had a positive effect growth, yield characteristics of plant varieties of rapeseed plants.

  10. Effects of physiotherapy treatment on knee osteoarthritis gait data using principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Mezghani, Neila; Turcot, Katia; Hagemeister, Nicola; Boivin, Karine; de Guise, Jacques A

    2011-03-01

    Interpreting gait data is challenging due to intersubject variability observed in the gait pattern of both normal and pathological populations. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of using principal component analysis for grouping knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients' gait data in more homogeneous groups when studying the effect of a physiotherapy treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) knee kinematic and kinetic data were recorded during the gait of 29 participants diagnosed with knee OA before and after they received 12 weeks of physiotherapy treatment. Principal component analysis was applied to extract groups of knee flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle and moment data. The treatment's effect on parameters of interest was assessed using paired t-tests performed before and after grouping the knee kinematic data. Increased quadriceps and hamstring strength was observed following treatment (Pphysiotherapy on gait mechanics of knee osteoarthritis patients may be masked or underestimated if kinematic data are not separated into more homogeneous groups when performing pre- and post-treatment comparisons. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Salinity and Silicon on Seed Yield and Yield Components of Purslane Portulaca oleracea L.(

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Rahimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to study the effects on salinity and silicon application on yield and yield components of purslane (Portulaca oleracea L., an experiment was conducted in a completely randomized desgin with three replications and two factors consisted of four different levels of salinity using NaCl (0, 7, 14, 21dS/m and two levels of silicon (application of one mMol sodium silicate and not application. Increasing salinity concentration significantly caused a negative effect on seed yield. But yield components such as number and weight of seed were more sensitive than number of capsul in main stem in final seed yield. Application of silicon increased seed yield in control but was not significant in salinity levels and leaves and stem biomass. Seed yield and total seed weight in branches was significantly decresed. Weight of 1000 seed in main stem and branches was not significantly different in salinity levels. As a result, purslane could be extremely tolerated to saline conditions, so it seems that it can be cultivated in saline soils and arid regions. Also applied silicon can be increase yield and plant tolerance to environmental stress. Keywords: 1000 seed, Branches, Capsul, Dry weight

  12. Functional effects of Japanese style fermented soy sauce (shoyu) and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Shigehiro

    2005-09-01

    The functional effects of Japanese style fermented soy sauce (shoyu) have been studied. Soy sauce promotes digestion, because the consumption of a cup of clear soup containing soy sauce enhances gastric juice secretion in humans. Soy sauce possesses antimicrobial activity against bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella flexneri, Vibrio cholera, Salmonella enteritidis, nonpathogenic Escherichia coli and pathogenic E. coli O157:H7. Soy sauce also contains an antihypertensive component. An angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor having antihypertensive effects was found in soy sauce. The active compound was identified as nicotianamine, which comes from soybeans. Soy sauce exhibits anticarcinogenic effects. Giving diets containing soy sauce to mice inhibit benzo[a]pyrene (BP)-induced forestomach neoplasia. The anticarcinogenic compounds in soy sauce were identified. The flavor components of Japanese style fermented soy sauce, such as 4-hydroxy-2(or 5)-ethyl-5(or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF), which is a characteristic flavor component of Japanese style fermented soy sauce and 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF) and 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HMF) exhibit antioxidant activities and anticarcinogenic effects on BP-induced mice forestomach neoplasia when fed following carcinogen exposure. The feeding of a diet containing 10% soy sauce to male C3H mice for 13 months also reduces the frequency and multiplicity of spontaneous liver tumors. HDMF and HEMF also exhibit anticataract effects in the spontaneous cataract rat (ICR/f rat). Fermented soy sauce contains three tartaric isoflavone derivatives called shoyuflavones. These shoyuflavones were shown to have inhibitory activities against histidine decarboxylase, which produces histamine, a mediator of inflammation, allergy and gastric acid secretion. Soy sauce also exhibits antiplatelet activity. beta-Carbolines were isolated from soy sauce as the active compounds. Soybeans and wheat, which are the

  13. Toxic effects of lead and nickel nitrate on rat liver chromatin components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Chadegani Iii, Azra; Fani, Nesa; Abdossamadi, Sayeh; Shahmir, Nosrat

    2011-01-01

    The biological activity of heavy metals is related to their physicochemical interaction with biological receptors. In the present study, the effect of low concentrations of nickel nitrate and lead nitrate (lead nitrate to chromatin compared to nickel nitrate. Also, the binding affinity of lead nitrate to histone proteins free in solution was higher than nickel. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that lead reacts with chromatin components even at very low concentrations and induce chromatin aggregation through histone-DNA cross-links. Whereas, nickel nitrate is less effective on chromatin at low concentrations, suggesting higher toxicity of lead nitrate on chromatin compared to nickel. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of resveratrol, an important component of red wine, on intestinal cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoying Zhang1, Jan Anderson1, Radhey S Kaushik2,3, Chandradhar Dwivedi11Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences; 2Department of Veterinary Sciences; 3Department of Biology/Microbiology, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USAAbstract: Resveratrol, a natural product derived from grapes and an important component of red wine, has been shown to inhibit cyclooxygenase and prevent various cancers. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of dietary grape extract, a source of resveratrol on intestinal cancer development in rats and to determine effects of resveratrol on cell growth in human colonic adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 cells, thus elucidating possible mechanisms of action of resveratrol. Results showed that dietary grape extract (5%, about 7 μg resveratrol consumed daily significantly decreased the incidence and multiplicity of tumors in small intestine in rats and resveratrol significantly inhibited cell viability and cell proliferation in Caco-2 cells.Keywords: resveratrol, grapes, colonic adenocarcinoma, Caco-2 cells

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on blood and blood components: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The present publication reviews, in a comprehensive manner, the relevant literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on whole blood, blood cells, and other blood components. It presents the interested reader with sufficient information and data to facilitate rational decisions in relation to the feasibility of irradiation of blood and blood products for the purposes stated above. The IAEA expects that this can promote a wider use of the technology for improving health care practice in Member States, particularly in view of the recent spread of conventional as well as ''modern'' diseases which exert immunosuppressive effects in afflicted patients, with pathological consequences. Innumerable patients could thus benefit from this application of ionizing energy. 209 refs, 1 tab

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation and cold storage at 4±1 on components of buffalo meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAHMOUD, A. A.; SHALABY, M. T.; DOMA, M. B.; HUSSEIN, M. A.; EMAM, O.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation with 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 KGy and cold storage at 4± 1 on some components of buffalo meat was studied. The results showed that no significant differences effect on the chemical composition of buffalo meat such as moisture content, crude protein, crude fat and ash content. While cold storage caused a slight decrease in the above mentioned parameters. irradiation treatment did not affect significantly on the total nitrogen and non-protein nitrogen. Gradual increase in the solubility of protein and slight decrease in the total nitrogen was observed during cold storage. Total volatile nitrogen and free amino nitrogen increased during cold storage. Total free amino acids increased gradually with different rates depending on the applied irradiation dose. Directly after irradiation isoleucine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and arginine exhibit a proportional relationship with the dose level used with the buffalo meat tissues.4 tab

  17. Full component Lagrangian in the linear multiplet formulation of string-inspired effective supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giedt, Joel

    2003-01-01

    We compute the component field four-dimensional N = 1 supergravity Lagrangian that is obtained from a superfield Lagrangian in the U(1) K formalism with a linear dilaton multiplet. All fermionic terms are presented. In a variety of important ways, our results generalize those that have been reported previously, and are flexible enough to accommodate many situations of phenomenological interest in string-inspired effective supergravity, especially models based on orbifold compactifications of the weakly coupled heterotic string. We provide for an effective theory of hidden gaugino and matter condensation. We include supersymmetric Green-Schwarz counterterms associated with the cancellation of U(1) and modular duality anomalies; the modular duality counterterm is of a rather general form. Our assumed form for the dilaton Kaehler potential is quite general and can accommodate Kaehler stabilization methods. We note possible applications of our results. We also discuss the usefulness of the linear dilaton formulation as a complement to the chiral dilaton approach

  18. Key components of effective collaborative goal setting in the chronic care encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative goal setting in patient-provider communication with chronic patients is the phase in which--after collecting the data regarding the patient's health--it is necessary to make a decision regarding the best therapy and behaviors the patient should adopt until the next encounter. Although it is considered a pivotal phase of shared decision making, there remain a few open questions regarding its components and its efficacy: What are the factors that improve or impede agreement on treatment goals and strategies?; What are the 'success conditions' of collaborative goal setting?; How can physicians effectively help patients make their preferences explicit and then co-construct with them informed preferences to help them reach their therapeutic goals? Using the theoretical framework of dialogue types, an approach developed in the field of Argumentation Theory, it will be possible to formulate hypotheses on the success conditions' and effects on patient commitment of collaborative goal setting.

  19. Three-dimensional effects on cracked components under anti-plane loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Berto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The existence of three-dimensional effects at cracks has been known for many years, but understanding has been limited, and for some situations still is. Understanding improved when the existence of corner point singularities and their implications became known. Increasingly powerful computers made it possible to investigate three-dimensional effects numerically in detail. Despite increased understanding, threedimensional effects are sometimes ignored in situations where they may be important. The purpose of the present investigation is to study by means of accurate 3D finite element (FE models a coupled fracture mode generated by anti-plane loading of a straight through-the-thickness crack in linear elastic plates. An extended version of the present work has recently been published in the literature. The results obtained from the highly accurate finite element analyses have improved understanding of the behaviour of through cracked components under anti-plane loading. The influence of plate bending is increasingly important as the thickness decreases. It appears that a new field parameter, probably a singularity, is needed to describe the stresses at the free surfaces. Discussion on whether KIII tends to zero or infinity as a corner point is approached is futile because KIII is meaningless at a corner point. The intensity of the local stress and strain state through the thickness of the cracked components has been evaluated by using the strain energy density (SED averaged over a control volume embracing the crack tip. The SED has been considered as a parameter able to control fracture in some previous contributions and can easily take into account also coupled three-dimensional effects. Calculation of the SED shows that the position of the maximum SED is independent of plate thickness. Both for thin plates and for thick ones the maximum SED is close to the lateral surface, where the maximum intensity of the coupled mode II takes place.

  20. Reproductive effects of lipid soluble components of Syzygium aromaticum flower bud in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Kumar Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum (clove have been used in indigenous medicines for the treatment of male sexual disorders in Indian subcontinent. Objective: To evaluate the effect of Syzygium aromaticum flower bud on male reproduction, using Parkes (P strain mice as animal model. Materials and Methods: Mice were orally administered lipid soluble components of Syzygium aromaticum flower bud in doses of 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg body weight for 35 days, and several male reproductive endpoints were evaluated. Results: Treatment with lower dose (15 mg of Syzygium increased the motility of sperm and stimulated the secretory activities of epididymis and seminal vesicle, while higher doses (30 and 60 mg had adverse effects on sperm dynamics of cauda epididymidis and on the secretory activities of epididymis and seminal vesicle. Libido was not affected in treated males; however, a significant decrease in litter in females sired by males treated with higher doses of Syzygium was recorded. Conclusion: Treatment with Syzygium aromaticum flower bud causes dose-dependent biphasic effect on male reproductive indices in P mice; lower dose of Syzygium appears stimulatory, while the higher doses have adverse effect on male reproduction. The results suggest that the lower dose of Syzygium may have androgenic effect, but further studies are needed to support this contention.

  1. The effect of particulate matter components on the acidity of rain in upper Silesia (Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlawiczka, Stanislaw [Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland); Department of Environmental Protection and Engineering, Technical University of Czestochowa, Czestochowa (Poland); Korszun, Katarzyna [Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland)

    2012-07-15

    Analysis of data characterizing the chemical composition of atmospheric precipitation was presented, with an emphasis on components responsible for neutralization of rain acidity. For this purpose, chemometric methods were applied. Based on a principal component analysis (PCA) a strong correlation between precipitation pH and potassium and ammonium ions in the heating period (October-March) and potassium and sodium ions in the non-heating period (April-September) was observed. Additionally, a classification of eight variables, i.e., Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} according to their similarities was made using a cluster analysis. Based on this study, two ions, potassium and ammonium, together with the pH value were classified into one group (cluster) in the heating period while in the non-heating period ions of potassium and sodium were clustered together with the pH. The results of the cluster analysis indicated that the selected ions contributed the most to the neutralization of the atmospheric precipitation acidity. This relationship was confirmed by a discriminant analysis in which potassium and ammonium ions were selected as components of the highest potential for precipitation classification according to its acidity degree. The relationship between the precipitation pH and the number of non-precipitation days preceding the precipitation was also analyzed. It was found that although the observed an increase of the pH value was not very high, nevertheless, the effect of the duration of the period preceding the precipitation on the pH value recorded on the day of the precipitation occurrence was quite evident. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. The effect of particulate matter components on the acidity of rain in upper Silesia (Poland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlawiczka, Stanislaw; Korszun, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of data characterizing the chemical composition of atmospheric precipitation was presented, with an emphasis on components responsible for neutralization of rain acidity. For this purpose, chemometric methods were applied. Based on a principal component analysis (PCA) a strong correlation between precipitation pH and potassium and ammonium ions in the heating period (October-March) and potassium and sodium ions in the non-heating period (April-September) was observed. Additionally, a classification of eight variables, i.e., Na + , K + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , Cl - , and NH 4 + according to their similarities was made using a cluster analysis. Based on this study, two ions, potassium and ammonium, together with the pH value were classified into one group (cluster) in the heating period while in the non-heating period ions of potassium and sodium were clustered together with the pH. The results of the cluster analysis indicated that the selected ions contributed the most to the neutralization of the atmospheric precipitation acidity. This relationship was confirmed by a discriminant analysis in which potassium and ammonium ions were selected as components of the highest potential for precipitation classification according to its acidity degree. The relationship between the precipitation pH and the number of non-precipitation days preceding the precipitation was also analyzed. It was found that although the observed an increase of the pH value was not very high, nevertheless, the effect of the duration of the period preceding the precipitation on the pH value recorded on the day of the precipitation occurrence was quite evident. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Pentiptycene-derived light-driven molecular brakes: substituent effects of the brake component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Ting; Huang, Yau-Ting; Huang, Guan-Jhih; Lu, Hsiu-Feng; Chao, Ito; Huang, Shou-Ling; Huang, Shing-Jong; Lin, Ying-Chih; Ho, Jinn-Hsuan; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2010-10-11

    Five pentiptycene-derived stilbene systems (1 R; R = H, OM, NO, Pr, and Bu) have been prepared and investigated as light-driven molecular brakes that have different-sized brake components (1 Hbrake component in the trans form ((E)-1 R), which corresponds to the brake-off state. When the brake is turned on by photoisomerization to the cis form ((Z)-1 R), the pentiptycene rotation can be arrested on the NMR spectroscopic timescale at temperatures that depend on the brake component. In the cases of (Z)-1 NO, (Z)-1 Pr, and (Z)-1 Bu, the rotation is nearly blocked (k(rot)=2-6 s(-1)) at 298 K. It is also demonstrated that the rotation is slower in [D(6)]DMSO than in CD(2)Cl(2). A linear relationship between the free energies of the rotational barrier and the steric parameter A values is present only for (Z)-1 H, (Z)-1 OM, and (Z)-1 NO, and it levels off on going from (Z)-1 NO to (Z)-1 Pr and (Z)-1 Bu. DFT calculations provide insights into the substituent effects in the rotational ground and transition states. The molar reversibility of the E-Z photoswitching is up to 46%, and both the E and Z isomers are stable under the irradiation conditions. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effect of Biofertilizers on the Yield and Yield Components of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khorramdel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Application of biological fertilizers is one of the most important methods for plant nutrition in ecological agriculture. In order to investigate the effect of biofertilizers on yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella sativa L., a field experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with three replications during 2007 growing season at the Agricultural Research Station of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Treatments included: (A Azotobacter paspali, (B Azospirillum brasilense, (C the fungus of Glomus intraradaices, C+A, C+B, A+B, A+B+C, and control without no biofertilizers. In all treatments except control, the amounts of 15 mg of each biofertilizer were applied to 110 g of seeds. Results indicated that application of biofertilizers enhanced yield and yield components and decreased percentage of hollow capsules. Plant performance was better with application of Azospirillum plus mycorrhiza and a mixture of Azotobacter, Azospirillum and mycorrhiza in terms of yield determining criteria. The maximum and minimum amounts of seed yield were recorded in the B+C treatment with 41.4 gm-2, and control with 24.1 gm-2, respectively. There was no significant correlation between number of capsules per plant and seed yield, but the positive and significant correlation between number of branches per plant, number of seeds per capsule, 1000-seed weight and seed yield was observed. This study showed that application of suitable biofertilizers could increase yield and yield components of black cumin. Keywords: Biofertilizer, Ecological agriculture, Medicinal plants, Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

  5. Effect of Light Spectral Quality on Essential Oil Components in Ocimum Basilicum and Salvia Officinalis Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. IVANITSKIKH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In plants grown with artificial lighting, variations in light spectral composition can be used for the directed biosynthesis of the target substances including essential oils, e.g. in plant factories. We studied the effect of light spectral quality on the essential oil composition in Ocimum basilicum and Salvia officinalis plants grown in controlled environment. The variable-spectrum light modules were designed using three types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs with emission peaked in red, blue and red light, white LEDs, and high-pressure sodium lamps as reference. Qualitative and quantitative essential oil determinations were conducted using gas chromatography with mass selective detection and internal standard method.Sweet basil plant leaves contain essential oils (са. 1 % including linalool, pinene, eugenol, camphor, cineole, and other components. And within the genetic diversity of the species, several cultivar groups can be identified according to the flavor (aroma perceived by humans: eugenol, clove, camphor, vanilla basil. Essential oil components produce particular flavor of the basil leaves. In our studies, we are using two sweet basil varieties differing in the essential oil qualitative composition – “Johnsons Dwarf” (camphor as a major component of essential oils and “Johnsons Lemon Flavor” (contains large amount of citral defining its lemon flavor.In sage, essential oil composition is also very variable. As for the plant responses to the light environment, the highest amount of the essential oils was observed at the regimes with white and red + blue LED light. And it was three times less with red light LEDs alone. In the first two environments, thujone accumulation was higher in comparison with camphor, while red LED light and sodium lamp light favored camphor biosynthesis (three times more than thujone. The highest amount of eucalyptol was determined in plants grown with red LEDs.

  6. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  7. Effect of humates in diet of dairy cows on the raw milk main components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Potůčková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of supplemental humic substances (HS on the main milk components was investigated. A total of 10 dairy cows (Czech pied cattle, crossbred Czech pied cattle ´ Ayrshire and crossbred Czech pied cattle ´ Red Holstein were tested. Animals were randomly divided into 2 groups, control (C and experimental (E. Animals fed the same feed mixture and group E was additionally supplemented with HS (200 mg.kg-1 of product Humafit prepared from the Sakhalin Leonardite. The experimental period took 3 months. Cows were milked twice a day. The milk composition (lactose, fat, crude protein, pure protein and casein of every cow was monitored on days 0, 14, 28, 42, 56, 70 and 84 of the experiment. Pure protein content was determined by Kjeldahl method, other components were analysed using an infrared analyserMilkoScan FT 120. It was found that the crude protein, pure protein and casein content in milk of group E significantly (p <0.05 increased from the 56th day of the experimental period. Differences of the protein fraction contents in group C and of the dry matter, non-fat dry matter, lactose and fat content in both groups were non-significant (p <0.05.Higher protein and especially casein content in milk could be very important for the cheesemaking as it could increase the cheese yield. Normal 0 21 false false false CS X-NONE X-NONE

  8. Effect of soot on oil properties and wear of engine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D A; Lewis, R

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the work outlined in this paper was to increase the understanding of the wear mechanisms that occur within a soot contaminated contact zone, to help in future development of a predictive wear model to assist in the automotive engine valve train design process. The paper builds on previous work by the author, through testing of different lubricants and increased levels of soot contamination. Wear testing has been carried out using specimens operating under realistic engine conditions, using a reciprocating test-rig specifically designed for this application, where a steel disc is held in a heated bath of oil and a steel ball is attached to a reciprocating arm (replicating a sliding elephant's foot valve train contact). Detailed analysis of the test specimens has been performed using scanning electron microscopy to identify wear features relating to the proposed wear mechanisms. Analysis of worn engine components from durability engine tests has also been carried out for a comparison between specimen tests and engine testing. To assist the understanding of the wear test results obtained, the physical properties of contaminated lubricants were investigated, through viscosity, traction and friction measurements. The results have revealed how varying lubrication conditions change the wear rate of engine components and determine the wear mechanism that dominates in specific situations. Testing has also shown the positive effects of advanced engine lubricants to reduce the amount of wear produced with soot present

  9. ATR-IR study of skin components: Lipids, proteins and water. Part I: Temperature effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsztyńska-Janus, S.; Pietruszka, A.; Kiełbowicz, Z.; Czarnecki, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this work we report the studies of the effect of temperature on skin components, such as lipids, proteins and water. Modifications of lipids structure induced by increasing temperature (from 20 to 90 °C) have been studied using ATR-IR (Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool for characterization of the molecular structure and properties of tissues, such as skin. Due to the small depth of penetration (0.6-5.6 μm), ATR-IR spectroscopy probes only the outermost layer of the skin, i.e. the stratum corneum (SC). The assignment of main spectral features of skin components allows for the determination of phase transitions from the temperature dependencies of band intensities [e.g. νas(CH2) and νs(CH2)]. The phase transitions were determined by using two methods: the first one was based on the first derivative of the Boltzmann function and the second one employed tangent lines of sigmoidal, aforementioned dependencies. The phase transitions in lipids were correlated with modifications of the structure of water and proteins.

  10. The application of prepared porous carbon materials: Effect of different components on the heavy metal adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min; Wei, Yuexing; Yu, Lei; Tang, Xinhong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, five typical municipal solid waste (MSW) components (tyres, cardboard, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylic textile, toilet paper) were used as raw materials to prepare four kinds of MSW-based carbon materials (paperboard-based carbon materials (AC1); the tyres and paperboard-based carbon materials (AC2); the tyres, paperboard and PVC-based carbon materials (AC3); the tyres, paperboard, toilet paper, PVC and acrylic textile-based carbon materials (AC4)) by the KOH activation method. The characteristic results illustrate that the prepared carbon adsorbents exhibited a large pore volume, high surface area and sufficient oxygen functional groups. Furthermore, the application of AC1, AC2, AC3, AC4 on different heavy metal (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+)) removals was explored to investigate their adsorption properties. The effects of reaction time, pH, temperature and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capability of heavy metals were investigated. Comparisons of heavy metal adsorption on carbon of different components were carried out. Among the four samples, AC1 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity for Cu(2+); the highest adsorption capacities of Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) are obtained for AC2; that of Cr(3+) are obtained for AC4. In addition, the carbon materials exhibit better adsorption capability of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) than the other two kind of metal ions (Zn(2+) and Cr(3+)). © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. The Effect of Simulated Flash-Heat Pasteurization on Immune Components of Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Brodie; Schmidt, Stefan; King, Tracy; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Amundson Mansen, Kimberly; Coutsoudis, Anna

    2017-02-22

    A pasteurization temperature monitoring system has been designed using FoneAstra, a cellphone-based networked sensing system, to monitor simulated flash-heat (FH) pasteurization. This study compared the effect of the FoneAstra FH (F-FH) method with the Sterifeed Holder method currently used by human milk banks on human milk immune components (immunoglobulin A (IgA), lactoferrin activity, lysozyme activity, interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10). Donor milk samples ( N = 50) were obtained from a human milk bank, and pasteurized. Concentrations of IgA, IL-8, IL-10, lysozyme activity and lactoferrin activity were compared to their controls using the Student's t -test. Both methods demonstrated no destruction of interleukins. While the Holder method retained all lysozyme activity, the F-FH method only retained 78.4% activity ( p pasteurization, the benefits of F-FH in terms of its low cost, feasibility, safety and retention of immune components make it a valuable resource in low-income countries for pasteurizing human milk, potentially saving infants' lives.

  12. Effects of lipophilic components on the compatibility of lipid-based formulations with hard gelatin capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Jing; Etzler, Frank M; Ubben, Johanna; Birch, Amy; Zhong, Li; Schwabe, Robert; Dudhedia, Mayur S

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of lipophilic components on the compatibility of propylene glycol (PG)-containing lipid-based drug delivery system (LBDDS) formulations with hard gelatin capsules. The presence of a lipophilic active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) (log P approximately 6.1) and an additional lipophilic excipient (Capmul MCM) significantly affected the activity of PG in the fills and the equilibrium of PG between capsule shells and fills. These changes in activity and equilibrium of PG were furthermore correlated to the mechanical and thermal properties of the liquid-filled capsules and subsequently linked to the shelf-life of the capsules on stability with respect to capsule deformation. The present study also investigated the mechanism by which lipophilic component(s) might affect the activity of PG in the fill formulations and the equilibrium of PG between capsule shells and fills. The activities of PG in two series of "binary" mixtures with Capmul MCM and with Cremophor EL were measured, respectively. The mixtures of PG containing Capmul MCM were found to be more nearly ideal than those containing Cremophor EL. The observed negative deviation from Rauolt's law indicates that the excess free energies of mixing are less then zero indicating favorable interaction between PG and the other component. It is speculated that enhanced hydrogen bonding opportunities with Cremophor EL are responsible for the decreased excess free energy of mixing. Replacement of Cremophor EL with lipophilic API also reduces the hydrogen bonding opportunities for PG in the mixtures. This hypothesis may further explain the increased activity of PG in the fills and the shifted equilibrium of PG toward the capsule shells. Activity determination utilizing headspace gas chromatography (GC) using short 30 min incubation time seems to be a time-efficient approach for assessing capsule-fill compatibility. Direct measurements of PG migration and other physical properties of

  13. Detection and mitigation of aging and service wear effects of nuclear power plant components in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachner, J.

    1987-07-01

    In Canada, the operational safety management of nuclear power plants employs methods which are intended to prevent, detect, correct and mitigate system and component failures from any cause, including the effects of aging and service wear degradation. The paper gives an overview of the application of these methods in the detection and mitigation of aging effects before they impact on plant safety and production reliability. Regulatory audits of these methods, to ensure that an acceptable level of plant safety is maintained by the nuclear power plant licensees, are also described. The methods are: a preventive maintenance program, Significant Event Reporting system, and a reliability based assessment of performance of safety related systems. The above methods are discussed and illustrated by examples. The soundness of the approach has been proven by the results achieved in 163 reactor-years of operation. Present and future developments include reviews of current monitoring, testing and inspection methods to ensure that appropriate time variant parameters (capable of revealing aging degradation before loss of functional capability) are monitored, and reviews of the effectiveness of existing maintenance programs and methods in mitigating aging and service wear effects

  14. Effects of long-term exposure to particulate matter and metal components on mortality in the Rome longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badaloni, Chiara; Cesaroni, Giulia; Cerza, Francesco; Davoli, Marina; Brunekreef, Bert; Forastiere, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of long-term exposure to metal components in particulate matter on mortality are still controversial. OBJECTIVES: To study the association between long-term exposure to PM10, PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance, particulate matter components (copper, iron, zinc, sulfur, silicon,

  15. Effective components of nurse-coordinated care to prevent recurrent coronary events: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaterse, Marjolein; Dobber, Jos; Jepma, Patricia; Peters, Ron J. G.; ter Riet, Gerben; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Buurman, Bianca M.; Scholte op Reimer, Wilma J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines on secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease recommend nurse-coordinated care (NCC) as an effective intervention. However, NCC programmes differ widely and the efficacy of NCC components has not been studied. To investigate the efficacy of NCC and its components in secondary

  16. Investigating the effect of adjusted DuPont ratio and its components on investor's decisions in short and long term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Khaleghi Kasbi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of adjusted DuPont ratio and its components on investors’ decisions in short and long term. The primary objective of this study is to find the effect of adjusted DuPont ratio and its components on herding behavior of investors in one and several year period. Hence, 85 corporations as the member of Tehran stock exchange over the period 2006-2011 are selected. In order to recognize the herding, by market index consideration, the herded β and in order to hypothesis validity SPSS software and multivariable linear regression have been used. As the results of this study indicate, the adjusted DuPont ratio and its components have more effect on investors’ decisions in short term but in long the period, the effect of this ratio on herding investors’ behavior are reduced. Furthermore, from the two components of adjusted DuPont ratio, profit margin has more effect on investor's decisions.

  17. Failure mode and effect analysis on safety critical components of space travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouroush Jenab

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sending men to space has never been an ordinary activity, it requires years of planning and preparation in order to have a chance of success. The payoffs of reliable and repeatable space flight are many, including both Commercial and Military opportunities. In order for reliable and repeatable space flight to become a reality, catastrophic failures need to be detected and mitigated before they occur. It can be shown that small pieces of a design which seem ordinary can create devastating impacts if not designed and tested properly. This paper will address the use of a Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA with modified Risk Priority Number (RPN and its application to safety critical design components of shuttle liftoff. An example will be presented here which specifically focuses on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs to illustrate the FMECA approach to reliable space travel.

  18. The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components Delayed Hydride Cracking

    CERN Document Server

    Puls, Manfred P

    2012-01-01

    By drawing together the current theoretical and experimental understanding of the phenomena of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys, The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components: Delayed Hydride Cracking provides a detailed explanation focusing on the properties of hydrogen and hydrides in these alloys. Whilst the focus lies on zirconium alloys, the combination of both the empirical and mechanistic approaches creates a solid understanding that can also be applied to other hydride forming metals.   This up-to-date reference focuses on documented research surrounding DHC, including current methodologies for design and assessment of the results of periodic in-service inspections of pressure tubes in nuclear reactors. Emphasis is placed on showing that our understanding of DHC is supported by progress across a broad range of fields. These include hysteresis associated with first-order phase transformations; phase relationships in coherent crystalline metallic...

  19. Survey of radiation damage effects in superconducting magnet components and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guess, J.F.; Boom, R.W.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Sekula, S.T.

    1975-12-01

    A study has been made of the published investigations of fast-particle irradiations at low temperatures on the properties of likely CTR magnet materials. The materials topics included in this survey are: (1) irradiation of Nb-Ti alloys with fast neutrons, protons, deuterons, and electrons; (2) irradiation of A-15 compounds (mainly Nb 3 Sn) with fast neutrons, deuterons, and oxygen ions; (3) irradiation of Cu and Al with fast and thermal neutrons; (4) irradiation of insulators with neutrons and gamma rays; and (5) irradiation of structural materials with neutrons. The study of the literature also included the available information on the effects of low-temperature irradiation on integrated components of the materials described above which might be envisaged in the construction of a CTR magnet system, since the ultimate problem is the operation of a magnet system in a radiation environment

  20. High dose effect of gamma and neutrons on the N-JFET electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, Jamal-Eddin

    2006-11-01

    Two types of N-JFET components have been irradiated by high doses of thermal neutrons and gamma rays up to 2000x10 12 n/cm 2 and 1000 kGy, respectively. The static tests show a decrease of the g m and I d s parameters. The behaviour of electronic noise on the output was the principal dynamic test after irradiation. The result of this test gives an increase of the noise with radiation dose increasing. The noise was described as the Equivalent Noise of Charge (ENC) at the output of the measurements set-up. The quantities and the qualities of the noise depend on the N-JEET type and the type of radiation (neutrons or gamma). Other tests were carried out like the relaxation or recovery phenomena after radiation, and the superposed effects of gamma and neutrons.(author)

  1. The effects of dorso-lumbar motion restriction on the ground reaction force components during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Joseph J; Traum, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The effects of restricting dorso-lumbar spine mobility on ground reaction forces in runners was measured and assessed. A semi-rigid cast was used to restrict spinal motion during running. Subjects ran across a force platform at 3.6 m/s, planting the right foot on the platform. Data was collected from ten running trials with the cast and ten without the cast and analysed. Casted running showed that the initial vertical heel strike maximum was increased (p running (p running results in measurable and repeatable alterations in ground reaction force components. Alterations in load transfer due to decreased spinal motion may be a factor contributing to selected injuries in runners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bank loan components and the time-varying effects of monetary policy shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Haan, W.J.; Sumner, S.W.; Yamashiro, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    The impulse response function (IRF) of an aggregate variable is time-varying if the IRFs of its components are different from each other and the relative magnitudes of the components are not constant—two conditions likely to be true in practice. We model the behaviour of loan components and document

  3. Effect of halloysite nanotubes on the structure and function of important multiple blood components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Keke; Feng, Ru; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren

    2017-01-01

    Many researchers have investigated the application of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in biomedicine, because of their special nanoscale hollow tubular structure. Although the cytocompatibility of HNTs has been studied, their blood compatibility has not been systematically investigated. In this work, the effect of HNTs on the structure and function of different blood components has been studied, including the morphology and hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs). Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, optical density test and flow cytometry analysis, we found that HNTs can affect the morphology and membrane integrity of RBCs in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in a content-dependent way. In particular, based on UV–vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, HNTs can alter the secondary structure and conformation of human fibrinogen and γ-globulins. In addition, the detection of biomarker molecules C3a and C5a in plasma suggests that HNTs can trigger complement activation. In the blood clotting assay, HNTs were found to significantly prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), shorten the prothrombin time (PT) of platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and change the thromboelastography (TEG) parameters of whole blood coagulation. Furthermore, confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to test intracellular uptake by macrophages, and the cellular uptake of HNTs in the RAW 264.7 was found to be content-dependent, but not time-dependent. These findings provide insight for the potential use of HNTs as biofriendly nanocontainers for biomaterials in vivo. - Highlights: • Comprehensive study of blood compatibility halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) is processed. • We examine and analyze the effect of HNTs on conformation changes of three plasma proteins. • We prove HNTs can affect blood components at high content but little at low content. • We prove HNTs could be used as biomaterials

  4. Effect of halloysite nanotubes on the structure and function of important multiple blood components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Keke; Feng, Ru; Jiao, Yanpeng, E-mail: tjiaoyp@jnu.edu.cn; Zhou, Changren

    2017-06-01

    Many researchers have investigated the application of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in biomedicine, because of their special nanoscale hollow tubular structure. Although the cytocompatibility of HNTs has been studied, their blood compatibility has not been systematically investigated. In this work, the effect of HNTs on the structure and function of different blood components has been studied, including the morphology and hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs). Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, optical density test and flow cytometry analysis, we found that HNTs can affect the morphology and membrane integrity of RBCs in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in a content-dependent way. In particular, based on UV–vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, HNTs can alter the secondary structure and conformation of human fibrinogen and γ-globulins. In addition, the detection of biomarker molecules C3a and C5a in plasma suggests that HNTs can trigger complement activation. In the blood clotting assay, HNTs were found to significantly prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), shorten the prothrombin time (PT) of platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and change the thromboelastography (TEG) parameters of whole blood coagulation. Furthermore, confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to test intracellular uptake by macrophages, and the cellular uptake of HNTs in the RAW 264.7 was found to be content-dependent, but not time-dependent. These findings provide insight for the potential use of HNTs as biofriendly nanocontainers for biomaterials in vivo. - Highlights: • Comprehensive study of blood compatibility halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) is processed. • We examine and analyze the effect of HNTs on conformation changes of three plasma proteins. • We prove HNTs can affect blood components at high content but little at low content. • We prove HNTs could be used as biomaterials

  5. Effectiveness of multi-component non-pharmacologic delirium interventions: A Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hshieh, Tammy T.; Yue, Jirong; Oh, Esther; Puelle, Margaret; Dowal, Sarah; Travison, Thomas; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    .26) respectively. Among the higher quality RMTs, length of stay trended −0.33 days shorter (95% CI −1.38–0.72) and odds of institutionalization trended 6% lower (95% CI 0.69–1.30). Conclusions and Relevance Multi-component non-pharmacologic delirium prevention interventions are effective in reducing delirium incidence and preventing falls, with trend towards decreasing length of stay and avoiding institutionalization. Given the current focus on prevention of hospital-based complications and improved cost-effectiveness of care, this meta-analysis supports the use of these interventions to advance acute care for older persons. PMID:25643002

  6. Effect of cell culture medium components on color of formulated monoclonal antibody drug substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Varma, Sharat; Yang, Yi; Mun, Melissa; Arevalo, Silvana; Gawlitzek, Martin; Swartz, Trevor; Lim, Amy; Li, Feng; Zhang, Boyan; Meier, Steve; Kiss, Robert

    2013-01-01

    As the industry moves toward subcutaneous delivery as a preferred route of drug administration, high drug substance concentrations are becoming the norm for monoclonal antibodies. At such high concentrations, the drug substance may display a more intense color than at the historically lower concentrations. The effect of process conditions and/or changes on color is more readily observed in the higher color, high concentration formulations. Since color is a product quality attribute that needs to be controlled, it is useful to study the impact of process conditions and/or modifications on color. This manuscript summarizes cell culture experiments and reports on findings regarding the effect of various media components that contribute to drug substance color for a specific monoclonal antibody. In this work, lower drug substance color was achieved via optimization of the cell culture medium. Specifically, lowering the concentrations of B-vitamins in the cell culture medium has the effect of reducing color intensity by as much as 25%. In addition, decreasing concentration of iron was also directly correlated color intensity decrease of as much as 37%. It was also shown that the color of the drug substance directly correlates with increased acidic variants, especially when increased iron levels cause increased color. Potential mechanisms that could lead to antibody coloration are briefly discussed. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. The response of parental components of ZP maize hybrids to effects of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Lidija

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of four inbred lines, parental components of ZP maize hybrids, to effects of six herbicides applied after emergence of both, maize and weeds, was observed in the present study. The following herbicides were applied in the 2-3-leaf stage of maize: isoxaflutole (Merlin 750-WG in the amount of 0.135 kg ha-1, nicosulfuron (Motivell in the amount of 1.25 l ha-1, foramsulfuron (Equip in the amount of 2.0 l ha-1, dicamba + rimsulfuron (Tarot plus in the amount of 0.3 kg ha-1, mezotrion (Callisto in the amount of 0.25 l ha-1 and thifensulfuron-methyl (Grid in the amount of 0.02 kg ha-1. The phytotoxic effect of herbicides on the maize grain yield was evaluated according to the 1-9 EWRC scale. Maize inbreds showed different susceptibility depending on the applied herbicide. The least favourable effects in both years for all genotypes were obtained in the treatments with Tarot plus and Grid, in which the lowest values of maize grain yield were recorded.

  8. Effects of inulin on the structure and emulsifying properties of protein components in dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Luo, Denglin; Li, Xuan; Xu, Baocheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Jianxue

    2016-11-01

    High-purity gliadin, glutenin and gluten fractions were extracted from wheat gluten flour. To investigate the effects of three types of inulin with different degrees of polymerization (DP) on the emulsifying properties, disulfide contents, secondary structures and microstructures of these fractions, Turbidimetry, spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used in this study. The results showed that the emulsifying activity of gliadin was higher than that of glutenin and gluten, but its emulsion stability was lower than that of glutenin. Adding inulin increased the emulsifying activity of the three protein fractions and emulsion stability of gliadin and gluten, but decreased the emulsion stability of glutenin and disulfide bond contents of glutenin and gluten. In the presence of inulin, the α-helical structure of the three proteins had no significant change, whereas the β-turn structure decreased and β-sheet structure increased. The SEM images showed that inulin had the most significant effect on the glutenin microstructure. In general, inulin with a higher DP had greater effects on the structure and emulsifying properties of protein components in dough. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dietary effects of lutein-fortified chlorella on milk components of Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Park, Keun-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Jang, Seung-Wan; Moon, Byung-Hern; An, Byoung-Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the dietary effect of conventional or lutein-fortified chlorella on milk production and lutein incorporation in milk. Fifteen Holstein cows in mid-lactation were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design each with a 21-day period. Cows were top-dressed daily with 30 g of conventional or lutein-fortified chlorella for 3 weeks. Cows without chlorella served as the control. The feed intake and milk yield were not affected by dietary treatments. The concentrations of milk protein and solids non-fat in groups fed diets containing both conventional and lutein-fortified chlorella were significantly higher than those of the control group (P milk fat among groups. The levels of plasma glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 were not influenced by the dietary treatments. Lutein content in milk was significantly increased in groups fed lutein-fortified chlorella as compared with those of conventional chlorella and control, respectively (P lutein-fortified chlorella has positive effects on milk components and the use of lutein-fortified chlorella in a dairy diet is effective in the production of milk enriched with lutein.

  10. Effect of individual components of soy formula and cows milk formula on zinc bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennerdal, B.; Cederblad, A.; Davidsson, L.; Sandstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    Zinc absorption from human milk, cows milk formulas, and soy formulas was studied in human adults by a radioisotope technique using 65 Zn and whole body counting. Individual dietary components were investigated for effects on zinc absorption. Phytate was found to have a strong inhibitory effect on zinc absorption; addition of phytate to cows milk formula (yielding a phytate concentration similar to that of soy formula) resulted in a decrease in zinc absorption from 31 to 16% similar to the absorption for soy formula (14%). Carbohydrate source, calcium, and zinc levels of the diet did not affect zinc absorption significantly. Iron supplementation of cows milk formula decreased zinc absorption from 24 to 18% although this decrease was not found to be significant (p less than 0.1). Absorption of zinc from a whey-adjusted cows milk formula was higher (31%) than from a nonmodified cows milk formula (22%). Increasing the zinc supplementation level in cows milk formula but not in soy formula increased zinc absorption to approximate that from breast milk. It is suggested that reduction of phytate content of soy formula may be a more effective avenue of modification than increased level of zinc supplementation

  11. The time-dependent effect of the biological component of 137Cs soil contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, H.; Pillath, J.; Lennartz, R.; Hill, P.; Hille, R.

    2004-01-01

    In investigations of the long-term development of the population dose in the highly contaminated regions of the Commonwealth of Independence States it was found that the external dose has not decreased as strongly as expected since 1992. Further investigations have shown that, contrary to expectations, no linear correlation can be observed between soil contamination and measured area dose rate. As a contribution towards clarifying these issues, the area dose rate and the soil contamination including the plant fraction were investigated in the Korma district, Belarus. It was found that it is necessary to cover and average over larger areas in order to determine from ground contamination the long-term development of the external dose commitment. This means that for this purpose the introduction of an ''effective'' surface contamination (sum of mineral and organic contamination components) is necessary. The phenomena observed are described in a model, which permits an analytical calculation of the contamination profile in soil taking migration and transfer effects into account. The differences observed between the measured soil contamination and the resulting external doses or the directly measured dose rate can be explained by the proposed model. Moreover, their long-term development can be calculated. The results show that a time decade after the accident the biological part of the ''effective'' soil contamination becomes dominant and cannot be neglected. (orig.)

  12. Effect of Microwave Heating on the Dielectric Properties and Components of Iron-Fortified Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-shu Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the iron-fortified milk as research object, this paper makes a research on the influence of iron on the dielectric properties and wave absorption properties and effect of nutritional components, such as casein and whey protein in milk, and thermostability in the process of microwave heating, and rapid heat transfer method in ferrous gluconate–milk and ferrous chloride–milk, respectively. The results show that the iron of ionic form has greater influence to convert microwave to heat energy and the effect of microwave absorption properties was greater for ferrous chloride than for ferrous gluconate at high concentration. The effect of different forms of iron on the composition of milk was different, and the composition of milk systems was more stable by microwave heating, but the rapid heat transfer method is superior in the aim of increasing the nutritional value of milk. The ferrous gluconate–milk system has a better thermal stability than ferrous chloride–milk system. From the aspect of dielectric induction, the paper discovers the response rules of iron and evaluates the microwave thermal safety of the traditional and the iron-fortified products by microwave heating.

  13. A review of Neuropharmacology Effects of Nigella sativa and Its Main Component, Thymoquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Soheila; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    Neuropharmacology is the scientific study of drug effect on nervous system. In the last few years, different natural plants and their active constituents have been used in neurological therapy. The availability, lower price, and less toxic effects of herbal medicines compared with synthetic agents make them as simple and excellent choice in the treatment of nervous diseases. Nigella sativa, which belongs to the botanical family of Ranunculaceae, is a widely used medicinal plant all over the world. In traditional and modern medicines several beneficial properties have been attributed to N. sativa and its main component, thymoquinone (TQ). In this review, various studies in scientific databases regarding the neuropharmacological aspects of N. sativa and TQ have been introduced. Results of these studies showed that N. sativa and TQ have several properties including anticonvulsant, antidepressant, anxiolytic, anti-ischemic, analgesic, antipsychotic, and memory enhancer. Furthermore, its protective effects against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and multiple sclerosis have been discussed. Although there are many studies indicating the beneficial actions of this plant in nervous system, the number of research projects relating to the human reports is rare. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Functional remediation components: A conceptual method of evaluating the effects of remediation on risks to ecological receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Bunn, Amoret; Downs, Janelle; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Salisbury, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Governmental agencies, regulators, health professionals, tribal leaders, and the public are faced with understanding and evaluating the effects of cleanup activities on species, populations, and ecosystems. While engineers and managers understand the processes involved in different remediation types such as capping, pump and treat, and natural attenuation, there is often a disconnect between (1) how ecologists view the influence of different types of remediation, (2) how the public perceives them, and (3) how engineers understand them. The overall goal of the present investigation was to define the components of remediation types (= functional remediation). Objectives were to (1) define and describe functional components of remediation, regardless of the remediation type, (2) provide examples of each functional remediation component, and (3) explore potential effects of functional remediation components in the post-cleanup phase that may involve continued monitoring and assessment. Functional remediation components include types, numbers, and intensity of people, trucks, heavy equipment, pipes, and drill holes, among others. Several components may be involved in each remediation type, and each results in ecological effects, ranging from trampling of plants, to spreading invasive species, to disturbing rare species, and to creating fragmented habitats. In some cases remediation may exert a greater effect on ecological receptors than leaving the limited contamination in place. A goal of this conceptualization is to break down functional components of remediation such that managers, regulators, and the public might assess the effects of timing, extent, and duration of different remediation options on ecological systems.

  15. Effects and interactions of medium components on laccase from a marine-derived fungus using response surface methodology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza-Ticlo, D.; Garg, S.; Raghukumar, C.

    The effects of various synthetic medium components and their interactions with each other ultimately impact laccase production in fungi. This was studied using a laccase-hyper-producing marine-derived basidiomycete, Cerrena unicolor MTCC 5159...

  16. Quantity component of the effectiveness of seed dispersal by birds in the temperate rainforest of Chiloé, Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Salvande, Miguel; Figueroa, Javier A; Armesto, Juan J

    2011-01-01

    The quantity component of the disperser effectiveness of resident birds during the autumn-winter period has not yet been detailed in temperate rainforests of South America. In this study, the potentially frugivorous bird species in the temperate rainforests of southern Chile during the Austral autumn-winter were identified, and the quantity component of the disperser effectiveness of the birds (number of visits and number of seeds dispersed per hour) were evaluated for the tree species Luma a...

  17. Different cellular effects of four anti-inflammatory eye drops on human corneal epithelial cells: independent in active components

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Mingli; Wang, Yao; Yang, Lingling; Zhou, Qingjun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the cellular effects of four commercially available anti-inflammatory eye drops and their active components on human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. Methods The cellular effects of four eye drops (Bromfenac Sodium Hydrate Eye Drops, Pranoprofen Eye Drops, Diclofenac Sodium Eye Drops, and Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops) and their corresponding active components were evaluated in an HCEC line with five in vitro assays. Cell proliferation and migration were...

  18. The effects of methanol on the trapping of volatile ice components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Daren J.; Brown, Wendy A.

    2015-04-01

    The evaporation of icy mantles, which have been formed on the surface of dust grains, is acknowledged to give rise to the rich chemistry that has been observed in the vicinity of hot cores and corinos. It has long been established that water ice is the dominant species within many astrophysical ices. However, other molecules found within astrophysical ices, particularly methanol, can influence the desorption of volatile species from the ice. Here we present a detailed investigation of the adsorption and desorption of methanol-containing ices, showing the effect that methanol has on the trapping and release of volatiles from model interstellar ices. OCS and CO2 have been used as probe molecules since they have been suggested to reside in water-rich and methanol-rich environments. Experiments show that methanol fundamentally changes the desorption characteristics of both OCS and CO2, leading to the observation of mainly codesorption of both species with bulk water ice for the tertiary ices and causing a lowering of the temperature of the volcano component of the desorption. In contrast, binary ices are dominated by standard volcano desorption. This observation clearly shows that codepositing astrophysically relevant impurities with water ice, such as methanol, can alter the desorption dynamics of volatiles that become trapped in the pores of the amorphous water ice during the sublimation process. Incorporating experimental data into a simple model to simulate these processes on astrophysical timescales shows that the additional methanol component releases larger amounts of OCS from the ice mantle at lower temperatures and earlier times. These results are of interest to astronomers as they can be used to model the star formation process, hence giving information about the evolution of our Universe.

  19. Effect of the IMF By component on the ionospheric flow overhead at EISCAT: observations and theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    Full Text Available We have analysed a database of ∼300 h of tristatic ionospheric velocity measurements obtained overhead at Tromsø (66.3° magnetic latitude by the EISCAT UHF radar system, for the presence of flow effects associated with the y-component of the IMF. Since it is already known that the flow depends upon IMF Bz, a least-squares multivariate analysis has been used to determine the flow dependence on both IMF By and Bz simultaneously. It is found that significant flow variations with IMF By occur, predominantly in the midnight sector (∼2100–0300 MLT, but also pre-dusk (∼1600–1700 MLT, which are directed eastward for IMF By positive and westward for IMF By negative. The flows are of magnitude 20–30 m s–1 nT–1 in the midnight sector, and smaller, 10–20 m s–1 nT–1, pre-dusk, and are thus associated with significant changes of flow of order a few hundred m s–1 over the usual range of IMF By of about ±5 nT. At other local times the IMF By-related perturbation flows are much smaller, less than ∼5 m s–1 nT–1, and consistent with zero within the uncertainty estimates. We have investigated whether these IMF By-dependent flows can be accounted for quantitatively by a theoretical model in which the equatorial flow in the inner magnetosphere is independent of IMF By, but where distortions of the magnetospheric magnetic field associated with a "penetrating" component of the IMF By field changes the mapping of the field to the ionosphere, and hence the ionospheric flow. We find that the principal flow perturbation produced by this effect is an east-west flow whose sense is determined by the north-south component of the unperturbed flow. Perturbations in the north-south flow are typically smaller by more than an order of magnitude, and generally negligible in terms of observations. Using equatorial flows which are determined from EISCAT data for zero IMF By, to which the corotation flow has been added, the theory predicts the presence

  20. Effect of the IMF By component on the ionospheric flow overhead at EISCAT: observations and theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khan

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We have analysed a database of ∼300 h of tristatic ionospheric velocity measurements obtained overhead at Tromsø (66.3° magnetic latitude by the EISCAT UHF radar system, for the presence of flow effects associated with the y-component of the IMF. Since it is already known that the flow depends upon IMF Bz, a least-squares multivariate analysis has been used to determine the flow dependence on both IMF By and Bz simultaneously. It is found that significant flow variations with IMF By occur, predominantly in the midnight sector (∼2100–0300 MLT, but also pre-dusk (∼1600–1700 MLT, which are directed eastward for IMF By positive and westward for IMF By negative. The flows are of magnitude 20–30 m s–1 nT–1 in the midnight sector, and smaller, 10–20 m s–1 nT–1, pre-dusk, and are thus associated with significant changes of flow of order a few hundred m s–1 over the usual range of IMF By of about ±5 nT. At other local times the IMF By-related perturbation flows are much smaller, less than ∼5 m s–1 nT–1, and consistent with zero within the uncertainty estimates. We have investigated whether these IMF By-dependent flows can be accounted for quantitatively by a theoretical model in which the equatorial flow in the inner magnetosphere is independent of IMF By, but where distortions of the magnetospheric magnetic field associated with a "penetrating" component of the IMF By field changes the mapping of the field to the ionosphere, and hence the ionospheric flow. We find that the principal flow perturbation produced by this effect is an east-west flow whose sense is determined by the north-south component of the unperturbed flow. Perturbations in the north-south flow are typically smaller by more than an order of magnitude, and generally negligible in terms of observations. Using equatorial flows which are determined from EISCAT data for zero IMF By, to which the corotation flow has been added, the theory predicts the presence

  1. The nicotine + alcohol interoceptive drug state: contribution of the components and effects of varenicline in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Patrick A; Cannady, Reginald; Besheer, Joyce

    2016-08-01

    Nicotine and alcohol co-use is highly prevalent, and as such, individuals experience the interoceptive effects of both substances together. Therefore, examining sensitivity to a compound nicotine and alcohol (N + A) interoceptive cue is critical to broaden our understanding of mechanisms that may contribute to nicotine and alcohol co-use. This work assessed the ability of a N + A interoceptive cue to gain control over goal-tracking behavior and determined the effects of the α4β2 nicotinic partial agonist and smoking cessation compound varenicline on sensitivity to N + A. Two groups of male Long Evans rats were trained to discriminate N + A (0.4 mg/kg nicotine + 1 g/kg alcohol, intragastric gavage (IG)) from water under two different training conditions using a Pavlovian drug discrimination task. The effects of varenicline (0, 1, 3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (IP)) administered alone and on sensitivity to N + A and the components were determined. Under both training conditions, N + A rapidly gained control over behavior, with a greater contribution of nicotine to the N + A compound cue. Varenicline fully substituted for the N + A training dose, and varenicline (1 mg/kg) enhanced sensitivity to the lowest N + A dose (0.1 N + 0.1 A). Given the high selectivity of varenicline for the α4β2 receptor, this finding suggests a functional role for α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in modulating sensitivity to N + A. The N + A compound cue is a unique cue that is modulated, in part, by activity at the α4β2 nAChR. These findings advance understanding of the interoceptive effects of nicotine and alcohol in combination and may have implications in relation to their co-use.

  2. Effect of NS-nitragin application on soybean yield and yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural soils of Serbia are low in soybean symbiotic bacteria and application of bacteriological preparations has been introduced as a regular cultivation practice when growing soybean. A trial was set up on experimental field of Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops from Novi Sad on chernozem soil using a randomized block design with four replicates. Mineral nitrogen fertilizers were used in rates of 0, 30, 60, and 90 kg ha-1 in the experiment. Each of the nitrogen treatments had two variations, with and without inoculation. The effects of inoculation and different nitrogen fertilizer rates on yield and yield components were determined based on the pod number, seed number, 1000 seed mass and protein and oil content in seeds. Significantly higher pod number was observed in inoculated plants with the application of 30 kg N ha-1. Inoculation with NS-Nitragin increased seed number per plant. In treatment with no mineral nitrogen applied and with application of 30 kg N ha-1 and 60 kg N ha-1, 1000 seed mass was statistically higher in inoculated plants than in uninoculated ones. Inoculation produced statistically significant difference in soybean yield only in the treatment with no mineral nitrogen applied. Inoculation and applied mineral nitrogen rates had no significant effect on protein content in soybean grain.

  3. Stevia rebaudiana Leaves: Effect of Drying Process Temperature on Bioactive Components, Antioxidant Capacity and Natural Sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto; Ah-Hen, Kong; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Honores, Carolina; Moraga, Nelson O

    2016-03-01

    Stevia leaves are usually used in dried state and undergo the inevitable effect of drying process that changes the quality characteristics of the final product. The aim of this study was to assess temperature effect on Stevia leaves through analysis of relevant bioactive components, antioxidant capacity and content of natural sweeteners and minerals. The drying process was performed in a convective dryer at constant temperatures ranging from 30 to 80 °C. Vitamin C was determined in the leaves and as expected showed a decrease during drying proportional to temperature. Phenolics and flavonoids were also determined and were found to increase during drying below 50 °C. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ORAC assays, and the latter showed the highest value at 40 °C, with a better correlation with the phenolics and flavonoids content. The content of eight natural sweeteners found in Stevia leaves was also determined and an increase in the content of seven of the sweeteners, excluding steviol bioside, was found at drying temperature up to 50 °C. At temperatures between 60 and 80 °C the increase in sweeteners content was not significant. Stevia leaves proved to be an excellent source of antioxidants and natural sweeteners.

  4. Effect of multi-component ions exchange on low salinity EOR: Coupled geochemical simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Pouryousefy

    2016-09-01

    Upon combining the simulation and experimental results, we concluded that the multi-component ion exchange is not the sole mechanism behind low salinity effect for two reasons. First, almost 10% additional oil recovery was observed from the experiments by injecting the 2000 ppm CaCl2 compared with 50,000 ppm CaCl2 solutions. Even though in both cases the surface is expected to be fully saturated with Ca2+ according to the geochemical modelling. Second, 6% incremental oil recovery was achieved from the experiments by injecting 2000 ppm NaCl solution compared with that of 50,000 ppm NaCl. Although 25% incremental adsorption of divalent cations (Ca2+ were presented during the flooding of the 2000 ppm NaCl solution. Therefore, it is worth noting that the electrical double layer expansion due to the ion exchange needs to be taken into account to pinpoint the mechanism(s of low-salinity water effect.

  5. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Organic Fertilizers Application on Yield Components of Two Wheat Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gholamalizadeh Ahangar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was conducted in order to evaluate the direct effects of organic and bio - fertilizers on yield components of two native wheat cultivars, Bolani and cross - Bolani. The experiment conducted as a factorial in a completely randomized design with three replications. Treatment includes fertilizer factor: vermicompost (F1, vermicompost + compost (F2, vermicompost + mycorrhiza (F3, compost + vermicompost + mycorrhiza (F4, compost (F5, mycorrhiza + compost (F6, mycorrhiza (F7 and control (no fertilizer application F8 and cultivar factor includes two cultivar Bolani (C1 and cross - Bolani (C2. The results showed that the interaction effect of combined treatments (F7C2 of high yield (1.13 g.pot-1 obtained. The treatment combination (F7C2 of (0.355 was highest harvest index. The high correlation between weight per plant with plant height, spike length, grain yield and harvest index were observed. Generally the combined application of vermicompost and mycorrhiza cultivar cross - Bolani is more suitable for grain production.

  6. Effects of nitrogen application method and weed control on corn yield and yield components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahvand, Pariya; Sajedi, Nurali; Mousavi, Seyed Karim; Ghiasvand, Mohsen

    2014-04-01

    The effects of nitrogen fertilizer application and different methods for weed control on yield and yield components of corn was evaluated in Khorramabad in 2011. The experiment was conducted as a split plot based on randomized complete block design in 3 replications. Nitrogen application was as main plot in 4 levels (no nitrogen, broadcasting nitrogen, banding nitrogen and sprayed nitrogen) and methods of weed control were in 4 levels (non-control weeds, application Equip herbicide, once hand control of weeds and application Equip herbicide+once time weeding) was as subplots. Result illustrated that effects of nitrogen fertilizer application were significant on grain and forage yield, 100 seeds weight, harvest index, grain number per row and cob weight per plant. Grain yield increased by 91.4 and 3.9% in application banding and broadcasting for nitrogen fertilizer, respectively, compared to the no fertilizer treatment. The results show improved efficiency of nitrogen utilization by banding application. Grain yield, harvest index, seed rows per cob, seeds per row and cob weight were increased by weed control. In the application of Equip herbicide+ hand weeding treatment corn grain yield was increased 126% in comparison to weedy control. It represents of the intense affects of weed competition with corn. The highest corn grain yield (6758 kg h(-1)) was related to the application banding of nitrogen fertilizer and Equip herbicide+once hand weeding.

  7. Effects of the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Stress Management on Executive Function Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Ruiz, Ana; Robles-Ortega, Humbelina; Pérez-García, Miguel; Peralta-Ramírez, María Isabel

    2017-02-13

    This study aims to determine whether it is possible to modify executive function in stressed individuals by means of cognitive-behavioral therapy for stress management. Thirty-one people with high levels of perceived stress were recruited into the study (treatment group = 18; wait-list group = 13). The treatment group received 14 weeks of stress management program. Psychological and executive function variables were evaluated in both groups pre and post-intervention. The treatment group showed improved psychological variables of perceived stress (t = 5.492; p = .001), vulnerability to stress (t = 4.061; p = .001) and superstitious thinking (t = 2.961; p = .009). Likewise, the results showed statistically significant differences in personality variables related to executive function, positive urgency (t = 3.585; p = .002) and sensitivity to reward (t = -2.201; p = .042), which improved after the therapy. These variables showed a moderate to high effect size (oscillates between 1.30 for perceived stress and .566 for sensitivity to reward). The cognitive-behavioral therapy for stress management may be an appropriate strategy for improving personality construct components related to executive function, however effects of the therapy are not showed on performance on the tests of executive function applied, as presented studies previous.

  8. Core components for effective infection prevention and control programmes: new WHO evidence-based recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Storr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health care-associated infections (HAI are a major public health problem with a significant impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life. They represent also an important economic burden to health systems worldwide. However, a large proportion of HAI are preventable through effective infection prevention and control (IPC measures. Improvements in IPC at the national and facility level are critical for the successful containment of antimicrobial resistance and the prevention of HAI, including outbreaks of highly transmissible diseases through high quality care within the context of universal health coverage. Given the limited availability of IPC evidence-based guidance and standards, the World Health Organization (WHO decided to prioritize the development of global recommendations on the core components of effective IPC programmes both at the national and acute health care facility level, based on systematic literature reviews and expert consensus. The aim of the guideline development process was to identify the evidence and evaluate its quality, consider patient values and preferences, resource implications, and the feasibility and acceptability of the recommendations. As a result, 11 recommendations and three good practice statements are presented here, including a summary of the supporting evidence, and form the substance of a new WHO IPC guideline.

  9. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on chromatin and its components from Yoshida ascites tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Patil, M.S.; Pradhan, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of U.V. irradiation on Yoshida ascites tumour chromatin and its non-DNA components. The extractability of total histones was increased from 6% to 17% with an increase in U.V. incident radiation dose from 500J/m 2 to 2000J/m 2 . The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis pattern of chromosomal proteins was examined after irradiation of the chromatin, and the effect of U.V. irradiation of chromatin on histones was also investigated. The results indicated that cross-linking of DNA with chromosomal proteins is an important category of U.V. radiation-induced lesions discerned in U.V. irradiated chromatin. Histones and several non-histone proteins seemed to undergo U.V. radiation-induced cross-linking with DNA, which was taken as indicative of their close association with DNA in the chromatin structure. It is suggested that the cross-link formation between DNA and non-histone proteins may be due to sequence-specific association of non-histone proteins with DNA. (U.K.)

  10. Dietary Aloe vera components' effects on cholesterol lowering and estrogenic responses in juvenile goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Francesco A; Cocci, Paolo; Angeletti, Mauro; Felici, Alberto; Polzonetti-Magni, Alberta Maria; Mosconi, Gilberto

    2013-08-01

    Aloes are now considered a very interesting source of bioactive compounds among which phytosterols should play a major role. The present study is an attempt to investigate the hypocholesterolemic activity of Aloe vera associated with its impact on the reproductive status of juvenile goldfish. Therefore, the short- and long-term effects of feeding supplementary diet containing aloe components (20 mg aloe/g diet; 2%) on plasma lipids, plasma vitellogenin, and hepatic estrogen receptor α/β1 mRNA levels in goldfish were examined. Results of GC-MS for phytosterols show high abundance of β-sitosterol in freeze-dried powder of Aloe vera whole leaves. Moreover, a 2% aloe powder dietary supplement was not found estrogenic in juvenile goldfish after either 7- or 30-day treatment, but was consistent in plasma hypocholesterolemic effects following long-term exposure. The present data further support that plasma cholesterol modulation induced by phytosterols may not be related to estrogen-like activity.

  11. Systematic review: Effective home support in dementia care, components and impacts - Stage 2, effectiveness of home support interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Paul; Hughes, Jane; Roe, Brenda; Giebel, Clarissa M; Jolley, David; Poland, Fiona; Abendstern, Michele; Chester, Helen; Challis, David

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explicate the outcomes of home support interventions for older people with dementia and/or their carers to inform clinical practice, policy and research. Most people with dementia receive support at home. However, components and effectiveness of home support interventions have been little explored. Systematic review with narrative summary. Electronic searches of published studies in English using PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsychINFO, CINAHL, Applied Social Science Index and CSA Social Services Abstracts. Databases and sources were searched from inception to April 2014 with no date restrictions to locate studies. The PRISMA statement was followed and established systematic review methods used. Using 14 components of care for people with dementia and their carers, identified previously, data across studies were synthesized. Interventions were grouped and described and effectiveness ratings applied. Qualitative studies were synthesized using key themes. Seventy studies (four qualitative) were included. Most were directed to carers and of high quality. Seven interventions for carers and two for people with dementia were identified, covering 81% of studies. Those relating to daily living, cognitive training and physical activity for people with dementia were absent. Measures of effectiveness were influenced mainly by the intensity (duration and frequency) of interventions. Those containing education, social support and behaviour management appeared most effective. These interventions reflect emergent patterns of home support. Research is required to identify effective interventions linked to the stage of dementia, which can be applied as part of routine clinical care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Identify the Effective Wells in Determination of Groundwater Depth in Urmia Plain Using Principle Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Babaei Hessar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Groundwater is the most important resource of providing sanitary water for potable and household consumption. So continuous monitoring of groundwater level will play an important role in water resource management. But because of the large amount of information, evaluation of water table is a costly and time consuming process. Therefore, in many studies, the data and information aren’t suitable and useful and so, must be neglected. The PCA technique is an optimized mathematical method that reserve data with the highest share in affirming variance with recognizing less important data and limits the original variables into to a few components. In this technique, variation factors called principle components are identified with considering data structures. Thus, variables those have the highest correlation coefficient with principal components are extracted as a result of identifying the components that create the greatest variance. Materials and Methods: The study region has an area of approximately 962 Km2 and area located between 37º 21´ N to 37º 49´ N and 44º 57´ E to 45º 16´ E in West Azerbaijan province of Iran. This area placed along the mountainous north-west of the country, which ends with the plane Urmia Lake and has vast groundwater resources. However, recently the water table has been reduced considerably because of the exceeded exploitation as a result of urbanization and increased agricultural and horticultural land uses. In the present study, the annual water table datasets in 51wells monitored by Ministry of Energy during statistical periods of 2002-2011 were used to data analysis. In order to identify the effective wells in determination of groundwater level, the PCA technique was used. In this research to compute the relative importance of each well, 10 wells were identified with the nearest neighbor for each one. The number of wells (p as a general rule must be less or equal to the maximum number of

  13. Effect of Different Tillage Methods and Cover Crop Types on Yield and Yield Components of Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Sharefee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Conservation agriculture is an appropriate strategy for maintaining and improving agricultural resources which increases crop production and stability and also provides environmental protection. This attitude contributes to the conservation of natural resources (soil, water, and air and is one of the most effective ways to overcome the drought crisis, water management and compensation of soil organic matter in arid and semi-arid regions. The practice of zero-tillage decreases the mineralization of organic matter and contributes to the sequestration of organic carbon in the soil. Higher amounts of organic matter in the soil improve soil structure and root growth, water infiltration and retention, and cation exchange capacity. In addition, zero-tillage reduces soil compaction and crop production costs. Cover crops are cultivated to protect the soil from erosion and elements loss by leaching or runoff and also improve the soil moisture and temperature. Given that South Khorasan farmers still use traditional methods of cultivation of wheat, and cover crops have no place in their farming systems, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cover crops types and tillage systems on yield and yield components of wheat in Birjand region. Materials and Methods A split plot field experiment was conducted based on randomized complete block design with three replications at the Research Farm of the University of Birjand over the growing season of 2014-2015. The main factor was the type of tillage (no-till, reduced tillage and conventional tillage and cover crop type (chickling pea (Lathyrus sativus, rocket salad (Eruca sativa, triticale (X Triticosecale witmack, barley (Hordeum vulgaris and control (no cover crop was considered as sub plots. Cover crops were planted on July 2014. Before planting wheat, cover crops were dried through spraying paraquat herbicide using a backpack sprayer at a rate of 3 L ha-1. Then the three tillage

  14. Effect of Plant Density and Weed Interference on Yield and Yied Components of Grain Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Weed control is an essential part of all crop production systems. Weeds reduce yields by competing with crops for water, nutrients, and sunlight. Weeds also directly reduce profits by hindering harvest operations, lowering crop quality, and producing chemicals which are harmful to crop plants. Plant density is an efficient management tool for maximizing grain yield by increasing the capture of solar radiation within the canopy, which can significantly affect development of crop-weed association. The response of yield and yield components to weed competition varies by crop and weeds species and weeds interference duration. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of weed interference periods and plant density on the yield and yield components of sorghum. Materials and Methods In order to study the effect of plant density and weeds interference on weeds traits, yield and yield components of sorghum (Var. Saravan, an experiment was conducted as in factorial based on a randomized complete block design with three replications at the research field of Islamic Azad University, Birjand Branch in South Khorasan province during year of 2013. Experimental treatments consisted of three plant density (10, 20 and 30 plants m-2 and four weeds interference (weed free until end of growth season, interference until 6-8 leaf stage, interference until stage of panicle emergence, interference until end of growth season. Measuring traits included the panicle length, number of panicle per plant, number of panicle per m2, number of seed per panicle, 1000-seed weight, seed yield, biological yield, number and weight of weeds per m2. Weed sampling in each plot have done manually from a square meter and different weed species counted and oven dried at 72 °C for 48 hours. MSTAT-C statistical software used for data analysis and means compared with Duncan multiple range test at 5% probability level. Results and Discussion Results showed that

  15. Effect of Component Population on the Growth and Yield of Maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiment to determine the optimum component populations of maize (Zea mays L.) and egusi melon Colocynthis citrullus L. Schrad) component crops in intercrop were conducted in 2004 and 2005 cropping seasons. There were three maize populations (17,780; 26,670 and 53,330 plants/ha), three egusi melon ...

  16. Fatigue evaluation including environmental effects for primary circuit components in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seichter, Johannes; Reese, Sven H.; Klucke, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The influence of LWR coolant environment to the lifetime of materials in Nuclear Power Plants is in discussion internationally. Environmental phenomena were investigated in laboratory tests and published in recent years. The discussion is mainly focused both on the transition from laboratory to real plant components and on numerical calculation procedures. Since publishing of the NUREG/CR-6909 report in 2007, formulae for calculating the Fen factors have been modified several times. Various calculation procedures like the so called 'Strain-integrated Method' and 'Simplified Approach' have been published while each approach yields to different results. The recent revision of the calculation procedure, proposed by ANL in 2012, is presented and discussed with regard to possible variations in the results depending on the assumptions made. In German KTA Rules the effect of environmentally assisted fatigue (EAF) is taken into account by means of so called attention thresholds. If the threshold value is exceeded, further measures like NDT, in-service inspections including fracture mechanical evaluations or detailed assessment procedures have to be performed. One way to handle those measures is to apply sophisticated procedures and to show that the calculated CUF is below the defined attention thresholds. On the basis of a practical example, methods and approaches will be discussed and recommendations in terms of avoiding over-conservatism and misinterpretation will be presented.

  17. Baldwin Effect and Additional BLR Component in AGN with Superluminal Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patiño-Álvarez, Víctor M.; Torrealba, Janet; Chavushyan, Vahram [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Puebla (Mexico); Cruz-González, Irene [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City (Mexico); Arshakian, Tigran [Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Köln (Germany); Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory, Byurakan (Armenia); Isaac Newton Institute of Chile in Estern Europe and Eurasia, Armenian Branch, Santiago (Chile); León-Tavares, Jonathan [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Puebla (Mexico); Popović, Luka, E-mail: chavushyanv@gmail.com [Astronomical Observatory, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-06-02

    We study the Baldwin Effect (BE) in 96 core-jet blazars with optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data from a radio-loud AGN sample obtained from the MOJAVE 2 cm survey. A statistical analysis is presented of the equivalent widths (W{sub λ}) of emission lines Hβ λ4861, Mg II λ2798, C IV λ1549, and continuum luminosities at 5100 Å, 3000 Å, and 1350 Å. The BE is found statistically significant (with confidence level c.l.≥ 95%) in Hβ and C IV emission lines, while for Mg II the trend is slightly less significant (c.l. = 94.5%). The slopes of the BE in the studied samples for Hβ and Mg II are found steeper and with statistically significant difference than those of a comparison radio-quiet sample. We present simulations of the expected BE slopes produced by the contribution to the total continuum of the non-thermal boosted emission from the relativistic jet, and by variability of the continuum components. We find that the slopes of the BE between radio-quiet and radio-loud AGN should not be different, under the assumption that the broad line is only being emitted by the canonical broad line region around the black hole. We discuss that the BE slope steepening in radio AGN is due to a jet associated broad-line region.

  18. Effects of irradiation and drying on volatile components of fresh shiitake (Lentinus edodes Sing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ming-Sheng; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Horng, Deng-Tsen; Yang, Jui-Sen

    1998-01-01

    Fresh shiitake (Lentinus edodes Sing) was irradiated with doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 kGy using 60 Co. Effects of γ-irradiation and drying on the volatile composition of shiitake were studied by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry. Irradiation above 1.0 kGy could inhibit the growth and mould decay of fresh shiitakes after harvesting. Irradiation with 2 kGy increased the eight-carbon volatile components of fresh shiitake. Treatment at 1 kGy irradiation of fresh shiitake produced some new volatile compounds in the dry product, such as methylethyl disulphide, sulphinylbis methane, methyl(methylthio)ethyl disulphide and N-(3-methylbutyl) acetamide. The eight-carbon compounds mostly disappeared after drying. The amount of sulphur-containing volatile compounds in dried shiitake became lower during irradiation. Irradiation with doses of 1 or 2 kGy of fresh shiitake did not increase the volatile content of shiitake after drying

  19. Fatigue evaluation including environmental effects for primary circuit components in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seichter, Johannes [Siempelkamp Pruef- und Gutachter-Gesellschaft mbH, Dresden (Germany); Reese, Sven H.; Klucke, Dietmar [Component Technology Global Unit Generation, E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The influence of LWR coolant environment to the lifetime of materials in Nuclear Power Plants is in discussion internationally. Environmental phenomena were investigated in laboratory tests and published in recent years. The discussion is mainly focused both on the transition from laboratory to real plant components and on numerical calculation procedures. Since publishing of the NUREG/CR-6909 report in 2007, formulae for calculating the Fen factors have been modified several times. Various calculation procedures like the so called 'Strain-integrated Method' and 'Simplified Approach' have been published while each approach yields to different results. The recent revision of the calculation procedure, proposed by ANL in 2012, is presented and discussed with regard to possible variations in the results depending on the assumptions made. In German KTA Rules the effect of environmentally assisted fatigue (EAF) is taken into account by means of so called attention thresholds. If the threshold value is exceeded, further measures like NDT, in-service inspections including fracture mechanical evaluations or detailed assessment procedures have to be performed. One way to handle those measures is to apply sophisticated procedures and to show that the calculated CUF is below the defined attention thresholds. On the basis of a practical example, methods and approaches will be discussed and recommendations in terms of avoiding over-conservatism and misinterpretation will be presented.

  20. Phagocytosis and Inflammation: Exploring the effects of the components of E-cigarette vapor on macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ween, Miranda P; Whittall, Jonathan J; Hamon, Rhys; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra J

    2017-08-01

    E-cigarettes are perceived as harmless; however, evidence of their safety is lacking. New data suggests E-cigarettes discharge a range of compounds capable of physiological damage to users. We previously established that cigarette smoke caused defective alveolar macrophage phagocytosis. The present study compared the effect E-cigarette of components; E-liquid flavors, nicotine, vegetable glycerine, and propylene glycol on phagocytosis, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and phagocytic recognition molecule expression using differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Similar to CSE, phagocytosis of NTHi bacteria was significantly decreased by E-liquid flavoring (11.65-15.75%) versus control (27.01%). Nicotine also decreased phagocytosis (15.26%). E-liquid, nicotine, and E-liquid+ nicotine reduced phagocytic recognition molecules; SR-A1 and TLR-2. IL-8 secretion increased with flavor and nicotine, while TNF α , IL-1 β , IL-6, MIP-1 α , MIP-1 β , and MCP-1 decreased after exposure to most flavors and nicotine. PG, VG, or PG:VG mix also induced a decrease in MIP-1 α and MIP-1 β We conclude that E-cigarettes can cause macrophage phagocytic dysfunction, expression of phagocytic recognition receptors and cytokine secretion pathways. As such, E-cigarettes should be treated with caution by users, especially those who are nonsmokers. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  1. The effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin component of Curcuma domestica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chosdu, R.; Erizal; Iriawan, T.; Hilmy, N.

    1995-02-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin component of Curcuma domestica rhizome were investigated. Pure curcumin, sliced and powdered rhizome with 10% of moisture content were irradiated at 0, 10, 30 and 50 kGy (dose rate of 6 kGy/h). Curcumin content was analysed using HPLC method and ESR spectra. Results show that free radicals are already present in unirradiated rhizome. Gamma irradiation at the doses of 10, 30 and 50 kGy induced the free radicals formation of pure curcumin and Curcuma domestica rhizome. The ESR spectra of irradiated rhizome gave a very similar spectra to the signal of irradiated pure curcumin. The percentage of free radicals intensity from pure curcumin was very stable at room temperature up to 670 hours of storage. However, the percentage intensity of free radicals in the irradiated rhizome were decay during storage. Irradiation treatment and storage time did not give a significant change on curcumin content, water activity, pH and moisture content of rhizome investigated.

  2. The effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin component of Curcuma domestica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chosdu, R.E.; Erizal; Iriawan, T.; Hilmy, N. [National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia). Center for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation

    1995-10-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin component of Curcuma domestica rhizome were investigated. Pure curcumin, sliced and powdered rhizome with 10% of moisture content were irradiated at 0, 10, 30 and 50 kGy (dose rate of 6 kGy/h). Curcumin content was analysed using HPLC method and ESR spectra. Results show that free radicals are already present in unirradiated rhizome. Gamma irradiation at the doses of 10, 30 and 50 kGy induced the free radicals formation of pure curcumin and curcuma domestica rhizome. The ESR spectra of irradiated rhizome gave a very similar spectra to the signal of irradiated pure curcumin. The percentage of free radicals intensity from pure curcumin was very stable at room temperature up to 670 hours of storage. However, the percentage intensity of free radicals in the irradiated rhizome were decay during storage. Irradiation treatment and storage time did not give a significant change on curcumin content, water activity, pH and moisture content of rhizome investigated. (Author).

  3. Effects of Plymetrics Training and Weight Training on selected Motor Ability Components among University Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Alauddin; Mallick, Nazrul Islam

    2012-11-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to find out the effects of plyometrics training and weight training among university male students.Procedure: 60 male students from the different colleges of the Burdwan University were randomly selected as subjects and their age were 19-25 years served as Weight training Group (WTG), second group served as Plyometric Training Group (PTG) and the third group served as Control Group (CT). Eight weeks weight training and six weeks plyometric training were given for experiment accordingly. The control group was not given any training except of their routine. The selected subjects were measured of their motor ability components, speed, endurance, explosive power and agility. ANCOVA was calculation for statistical treatment.Finding: Plyometric training and weight training groups significantly increase speed, endurance, explosive power and agility.Conclusion: The plyometric training has significantly improved speed, explosive power, muscular endurance and agility. The weight training programme has significantly improved agility, muscular endurance, and explosive power. The plometric training is superior to weight training in improving explosive power, agility and muscular endurance.

  4. The effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin component of Curcuma domestica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chosdu, R.E.; Erizal; Iriawan, T.; Hilmy, N.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin component of Curcuma domestica rhizome were investigated. Pure curcumin, sliced and powdered rhizome with 10% of moisture content were irradiated at 0, 10, 30 and 50 kGy (dose rate of 6 kGy/h). Curcumin content was analysed using HPLC method and ESR spectra. Results show that free radicals are already present in unirradiated rhizome. Gamma irradiation at the doses of 10, 30 and 50 kGy induced the free radicals formation of pure curcumin and curcuma domestica rhizome. The ESR spectra of irradiated rhizome gave a very similar spectra to the signal of irradiated pure curcumin. The percentage of free radicals intensity from pure curcumin was very stable at room temperature up to 670 hours of storage. However, the percentage intensity of free radicals in the irradiated rhizome were decay during storage. Irradiation treatment and storage time did not give a significant change on curcumin content, water activity, pH and moisture content of rhizome investigated. (Author)

  5. Effect of copper precipitates on the toughness of low alloy steels for pressure boundary components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.; Willer, D.; Katerbau, K.H.

    2004-01-01

    The ferritic bainitic steel 15NiCuMoNb5 (WB 36)is widely used for pressure boundary components. Due to the high copper content which leads to precipitation hardening high strength and toughness are characteristic for this type of steel. However, in the initial state, there is still a high amount of dissolved copper in an oversaturated state which makes the steel susceptible to thermal ageing. Ageing and annealing experiments were performed, and the change in microstructure was investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), measurements of the residual electric resistance and hardness measurements. A correlation between micro structural changes and changes in mechanical properties could be established. It could clearly be shown that significant effects on strength and toughness have to be considered when the size of the copper rich precipitates vary in the range from 1.2 to 2.2 nm in radius. The changes in microstructure affect both, the Carpy impact transition temperature and the fracture toughness qualitatively and quantitatively in a similar way. The investigations have contributed to a better understanding of precipitation hardening by copper not only for this type of steel but also for copper containing steels and weld subjected to neutron irradiation. (orig.)

  6. The biochemical effects of nano tamoxifen and some bioactive components in experimental breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Afaf; Abdelhamid, Abdou Osman; El Awady, Mostafa K; Abd El Azeem, Amal S; Mohammed, Dina Mostafa

    2017-11-01

    The effect of nano tamoxifen and some bioactive components such as yeast, isoflavone, and silymarin on the level of resistance and prevention of breast cancer progression in experimental animals is the target of this study. Thirty female Sprague-Dawley rats received a single medication dosage of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) intragastrically. After fourteen days of DMBA admission, the procedure protocol started out. Finally, all the experimental results evaluated, tabulated and statistically analyzed. The results demonstrated a highly significant elevation in the 8-OHdG level in group 1 (nano yeast) and 3 (nano silymarin) while the results demonstrated a highly significant reduction in group 2 (nano tamoxifen). The apoptosis results demonstrated a significant elevation in group 3 (nano silymarin) where appeared significant reduction in group 4 (nano isoflavone). ErbB-2 results demonstrated a significant elevation in group 2 (nano tamoxifen) and a significant reduction in each of group 3 (nano silymarin) and 4 (nano isoflavone). The lipid peroxide level demonstrated an extremely significant reduction in group 4 (nano isoflavone). And a significant reduction of total antioxidant was observed in group 3 (nano silymarin) in comparison to injected animals control. This may be considered a new vision and strategy to resist breast cancer disease or prevent progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Baldwin Effect and Additional BLR Component in AGN with Superluminal Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Manuel Patiño Álvarez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the Baldwin Effect (BE in 96 core-jet blazars with optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data from a radio-loud AGN sample obtained from the MOJAVE 2cm survey. A statistical analysis is presented of the equivalent widths W_lambda of emission lines H beta 4861, Mg II 2798, C IV 1549, and continuum luminosities at 5100, 3000, and 1350 angstroms. The BE is found statistically significant (with confidence level c.l. > 95% in H beta and C IV emission lines, while for Mg II the trend is slightly less significant (c.l. = 94.5%. The slopes of the BE in the studied samples for H beta and Mg II are found steeper and with statistically significant difference than those of a comparison radio-quiet sample. We present simulations of the expected BE slopes produced by the contribution to the total continuum of the non-thermal boosted emission from the relativistic jet, and by variability of the continuum components. We find that the slopes of the BE between radio-quiet and radio-loud AGN should not be different, under the assumption that the broad line is only being emitted by the canonical broad line region around the black hole. We discuss that the BE slope steepening in radio AGN is due to a jet associated broad-line region.

  8. [Study on liver targeted drug delivery system of the effective anticancer component from Bolbstemma paniculatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Yi; Ll, Tong-Hui; Tang, Chen-Kang; Zhu, Zi-Ping; Chi, Qun; Hou, Shi-Xiang

    2005-06-01

    To study the liver targeted drug delivery system of TBMS--the effective anticancer component from Bolbstemma paniculatum, and to discuss the system's function of decreasing toxicity. BCA was used as carrier material. The preparation through overall feedback dynamic techniques. The properties of preparation and toxicology were also technology of nanoparticles was optimized studied. Thenanoparticles' targeting in mice vivo was observed with transmission electron microscopy. The function of decreasing toxicity was researched by the XXTX-2000 automatic quantitative analysis management system. D50 was 0.68 microm. Drug-loading rate and entrapment rate were 37.3% and 88.6% respectively. The release in vitro accorded with Weibull equation. The reaching release balance time and the t 1/2 extended 26 times and 19 times respectively comparing with injection. Nanoparticles mainly distributed in liver tissue. Their toxicity to lung and liver was evidently lower than injection. Nanoparticles' LD50 exceeded injection's by 13.5% and their stimulus was much lower than injection. The TBMS can be targeted to liver by liver targeted drug delivery system. At the same time, the problem about the toxicity hindering clinical application could be solved, which lays the foundation for the further studies on TBMS.

  9. Platform for Lipid Based Nanocarriers' Formulation Components and their Potential Effects: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Ragwa Mohamed; Youssef, Nancy Abdel Hamid Abou; Kassem, Abeer Ahmed

    2017-11-27

    Lipid based nanocarriers have gained recently enormous interest for pharmaceutical application. They have the potential to provide controlled drug release and to target the drug to a specific area. In addition, lipid based nanocarriers can improve the bioavailability of drugs suffering from high hepatic first-pass metabolism, by enhancing their transport via the lymphatic system. The main components of lipid based nanocarriers are lipids and surfactants. Both have great influence on the prepared lipid based systems characteristics. The criteria for their selection are much related to physicochemical properties of the drug and the required administration route. This work gives an overview on the effect of both the type and amount of lipids and surfactants used in the manufacture of lipid based nanocarriers on their behavior and characteristics. Recent studies revealed that the properties of the final product including; particle size, homogeneity, drug loading capacity, zeta potential, drug release profile, stability, permeability, pharmacokinetic properties, crystallinity and cytotoxicity, may be significantly influenced not only by the type but also the amount of the lipids and/or surfactants included in the formulation of the lipid based nanocarriers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Robust and Effective Component-based Banknote Recognition for the Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, Faiz M; Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, Yingli

    2012-11-01

    We develop a novel camera-based computer vision technology to automatically recognize banknotes for assisting visually impaired people. Our banknote recognition system is robust and effective with the following features: 1) high accuracy: high true recognition rate and low false recognition rate, 2) robustness: handles a variety of currency designs and bills in various conditions, 3) high efficiency: recognizes banknotes quickly, and 4) ease of use: helps blind users to aim the target for image capture. To make the system robust to a variety of conditions including occlusion, rotation, scaling, cluttered background, illumination change, viewpoint variation, and worn or wrinkled bills, we propose a component-based framework by using Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF). Furthermore, we employ the spatial relationship of matched SURF features to detect if there is a bill in the camera view. This process largely alleviates false recognition and can guide the user to correctly aim at the bill to be recognized. The robustness and generalizability of the proposed system is evaluated on a dataset including both positive images (with U.S. banknotes) and negative images (no U.S. banknotes) collected under a variety of conditions. The proposed algorithm, achieves 100% true recognition rate and 0% false recognition rate. Our banknote recognition system is also tested by blind users.

  11. Effect of Media Components on the Mycelial Film Formation in Submerged Culture of Lentinus edodes (Shiitake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Tsivileva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between the chemical composition of nutrient medium, the activity of extracellular lectins of Lentinus edodes (Berk. Sing Lentinula edodes (Berk. Pegler (shiitake, and the formation of pigmented mycelial film in liquid culture has been found. A possibility to regulate the lectin activity of shiitake using the synthetic components has been shown. The formulation of medium, on which the brown mycelial film appears in several days of submerged cultivation, has been proposed. Among the natural amino acids studied as nitrogen sources, and nine divalent metal cations as inorganic additives, L-asparagine and Ca2+ (Mn2+ in the simultaneous presence exhibited the explicit positive effect in respect to the above without regard to the age of the culture. Quantum chemical methods and QSAR were applied to test our supposition that a differential character of interaction between the studied amino acids and Ca2+ (Mn2+ cations should be related not to the distinct electron structures of zwitter ions, but most likely to their differing hydrophobicities. The results obtained seem to make some contribution to the present notion of biochemicalprocesses that give rise to the occurrence of the aforesaid morphological structure of shiitake.

  12. Effect of pasteurization on selected immune components of donated human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewaschuk, J B; Unger, S; O'Connor, D L; Stone, D; Harvey, S; Clandinin, M T; Field, C J

    2011-09-01

    Pasteurized, donated milk is increasingly provided to preterm infants in the absence of mother's own milk. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pasteurization on the concentration of selected components in donated human breast milk. Donated milk from 34 mothers was pooled into 17 distinct batches (4 mothers per batch). Aliquots of each batch were then Holder pasteurized (62.5 °C for 30 min). Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70 and IL-13 were measured in a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), heparin-binding epidermal-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) were measured by ELISA. Lipids were assessed by gas chromatography and gangliosides by the resorcinol-HCl reaction. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10 and HGF were significantly reduced by pasteurization (PPasteurization significantly reduced the concentration of several immunoactive compounds present in breast milk, but did not have an impact on others.

  13. The Effect of Drought Stress on Morphological Characteristics and Yield Components of Medicinal Plant Fenugreek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bazzazi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L. is one of the oldest medicinal plants. In order to study water-stress effects on some morphological characteristics of fenugreek, an experiment was carried out in a strip plots based on randomized complete blocks design with three replicates, at Research Farm of Shahrekord University, Shahrekord, Iran, in 2010. The first factor was allocated to four water stress levels (irrigation after depletion of 20 (as control, 40, 60 and 80% of available soil moisture and the second factor was six fenugreek landraces (Shiraz, Ardestan, Tirancheh, Yazd, Jahrom and Hindi. The results of ANOVA and comparison of means indicated that the effect of water stress was significant for all traits and variation was observed among landraces for all the studied characteristics. Mean comparison showed that drought stress reduced days to flowering, days to maturity, plant height and yield components (number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod and 1000-kernel weight. It was also revealed that water stress caused reduction in biological yield (43% and grain yield (42.3% of all genotypes. Comparison between landraces indicated that maximum biological and grain yield belonged to Ardestan landrace. Assessment of cluster analysis showed that it was possible to classify Ardestan, Shiraz and Tirancheh as a single group having tolerance to water stress. In general, based on obtained results, the Ardestan landrace, with 22.37 g/plant, had the highest biological yield and Hindi landrace, with 73.83 days to maturity, was the most early-maturing one.

  14. Insights into tetrabromobisphenol A adsorption onto soils: Effects of soil components and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fei; Gu, Xueyuan; Gu, Cheng; Ji, Rong; Tan, Yinyue; Xie, Jinyu

    2015-12-01

    Concerns regarding tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely utilized brominated flame retardant in the world, are growing because of the wide application and endocrine-disrupting potential of this compound. To properly assess its environmental impacts, it is important to understand the mobility and fate of TBBPA in soil environments. In this study, the effects of soil components, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and heavy metal cations on TBBPA adsorption onto two Chinese soils (red soil and black soil) were investigated using batch sorption experiments. The desorption behavior of TBBPA when the two soils are irrigated with eutrophicated river water was also investigated. The results showed that pH greatly affects the adsorptive behavior of TBBPA in soils. Iron oxide minerals and phyllosilicate minerals are both active surfaces for TBBPA sorption, in addition to soil organic matter (SOM). DOC (50 mg OC L(-1)) exhibited a limited effect on TBBPA sorption only under neutral conditions. TBBPA sorption was only minimally affected by the heavy metals (Cu2+, Pb2+ and Cd2+) in the studied pH range. Eutrophicated river water significantly enhanced the desorption of TBBPA from red soil due to the change in soil solution pH. These findings indicate that mobility of TBBPA in soils is mainly associated with soil pH, organic matter and clay fractions: it will be retained by soils or sediments with high organic matter and clay fractions under acidic conditions but becomes mobile under alkaline conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of gamma-radiation on some components of food and agricultural products (pyridoxine, folic acid, methionine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlehtseanu, I.

    1974-01-01

    the effects of gamma radiation on individual components of food and agricultural products (Pyridoxine, folic acid, methionine) were investigated. Some of the studies have provided support for the hypothesis that the structural changes occurring in separately irradiated components of a foodstuff are greater than those taking place in the same components when present in the foodstuff. Results of irradiating pyridoxine and pyridoxal in an aqueous medium; of folic acid in aqueous solutions and in solid state; and of methionine in aqueous solutions and solid state, are given. (E.T.)

  16. Meta-analysis of graduated driver licensing laws: effectiveness of specific program components : traffic tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Graduated driver licensing (GDL) programs in the United States do not represent a single homogeneous intervention; rather, they contain different combinations and variations of program components. Programs vary by the duration of each stage of the GD...

  17. Evaluation of runaway-electron effects on plasma-facing components for NET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, H.; Calén, H.

    1991-03-01

    Runaway electrons which are generated during disruptions can cause serious damage to plasma facing components in a next generation device like NET. A study was performed to quantify the response of NET plasma facing components to runaway-electron impact. For the determination of the energy deposition in the component materials Monte Carlo computations were performed. Since the subsurface metal structures can be strongly heated under runaway-electron impact from the computed results damage threshold values for the thermal excursions were derived. These damage thresholds are strongly dependent on the materials selection and the component design. For a carbonmolybdenum divertor with 10 and 20 mm carbon armour thickness and 1 degree electron incidence the damage thresholds are 100 MJ/m 2 and 220 MJ/m 2. The thresholds for a carbon-copper divertor under the same conditions are about 50% lower. On the first wall damage is anticipated for energy depositions above 180 MJ/m 2.

  18. The effects of seed coating treatment on yield and yield components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... 2University of Adnan Menderes, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Mechanization, ... Key words: Fuzzy cotton seed, seed coating, yield components. .... gin turnout (%) characteristics are statistically important.

  19. Effect of uncertainty components such as recalibration on the performance of quality control charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, P; Zhang, Nevin

    2005-01-01

    Uncertainty components (recalibration, new reagent lots, etc.) may be the source of random changes in the level of quality control (QC) values, thus causing false alarms. We propose a method for reducing false alarms.......Uncertainty components (recalibration, new reagent lots, etc.) may be the source of random changes in the level of quality control (QC) values, thus causing false alarms. We propose a method for reducing false alarms....

  20. Effects of Plant Density on Sweet and Baby Corn (Hybrid KSC 403 Yield and Yield Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Bavi

    2016-07-01

    GlM procedure. Means of all treatments were comprised using least significant difference (LSD at 5 % probability level. Results and Discussion The effects of plant density on yield components of baby corn was significant. Increasing the plant densities increased the ear number and percentage of non-standard ears. The Highest yield of ear without husk, standard and non-standard were obtained (2649.5, 766.97, and 3043.9 kg.ha-1, respectively with 13 plants.m-2. In sweet corn, increasing plant density from 7 to 13 plants.m-2, decreased row per ear, grain per row and thousand grain weight. Highest grain yield (1232.5 kg ha-1 and green ear (12607.2 kg ha-1 of sweet corn were obtained with plant density of 9.m-2. Conclusions Analysis of correlation showed that in both baby and sweet corn, there were positive and significant correlations between yield and its components. There was the high number of non-standard ears in all experimental treatments. In sweet corn, the standard ear without husk yield has positive and significant correlation with all traits except the percentage of standard ear and sheathed ear weight. In addition, unsuitable climate conditions during silking stage reduced the yield of sweet corn through the high number of aborted florets. Yield of sweet corn yield showed negative and significant correlation with grain row per ear and grain per row. However, increasing the ear number.m-2 increased yield in higher plant densities up to 9 plant.m-2 density. Generally, the baby corn had high yield with good quality in this region, but, standard ear percent of the baby corn of the hybrid KSC 403 was very low. On the other hand, sweet corn grain yield was low due to high air temperatures during pollination and maturity stages.

  1. Effect of Abscisic Acid on Accumulation of Five Active Components in Root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Licorice is one of the most generally used herbal medicines in the world; however, wild licorice resources have decreased drastically. Cultivated Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer are the main source of licorice at present, but the content of main active components in cultivated G. uralensis are lower than in wild G. uralensis. Therefore, the production of high-quality cultivated G. uralensis is an urgent issue for the research and production fields. In this study, the content of five active components and seven endogenous phytohormones in cultivated G. uralensis (two-year-old were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, respectively. Furthermore, different concentrations (25–200 mg/L of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA were sprayed on the leaves of G. uralensis in the fast growing period. Results showed that ABA, zeatin riboside (ZR, and dihydrozeatin riboside (DHZR had strong correlation with active components. In addition, the content of five active components increased remarkably after ABA treatment. Our results indicate that ABA is significantly related to the accumulation of active components in G. uralensis, and the application of exogenous ABA at the proper concentration is able to promote the accumulation of main components in G. uralensis.

  2. The effect of introducing increased-reliability-risk electronic components into 3rd generation telecommunications systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmela, Olli

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the dependability of 3rd generation telecommunications network systems is studied. Special attention is paid to a case where increased-reliability-risk electronic components are introduced to the system. The paper consists of three parts: First, the reliability data of four electronic components is considered. This includes statistical analysis of the reliability test data, thermo-mechanical finite element analysis of the printed wiring board structures, and based on those, a field reliability estimate of the components is constructed. Second, the component level reliability data is introduced into the network element reliability analysis. This is accomplished by using a reliability block diagram technique and Monte Carlo simulation of the network element. The end result of the second part is a reliability estimate of the network element with and without the high-risk component. Third, the whole 3rd generation network having multiple network elements is analyzed. In this part, the criticality of introducing high-risk electronic components into a 3rd generation telecommunications network is considered

  3. The effect of introducing increased-reliability-risk electronic components into 3rd generation telecommunications systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmela, Olli [Nokia Networks, P.O. Box 301, 00045 Nokia Group (Finland)]. E-mail: olli.salmela@nokia.com

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, the dependability of 3rd generation telecommunications network systems is studied. Special attention is paid to a case where increased-reliability-risk electronic components are introduced to the system. The paper consists of three parts: First, the reliability data of four electronic components is considered. This includes statistical analysis of the reliability test data, thermo-mechanical finite element analysis of the printed wiring board structures, and based on those, a field reliability estimate of the components is constructed. Second, the component level reliability data is introduced into the network element reliability analysis. This is accomplished by using a reliability block diagram technique and Monte Carlo simulation of the network element. The end result of the second part is a reliability estimate of the network element with and without the high-risk component. Third, the whole 3rd generation network having multiple network elements is analyzed. In this part, the criticality of introducing high-risk electronic components into a 3rd generation telecommunications network is considered.

  4. Multiscale imaging and characterization of the effect of mixing temperature on asphalt concrete containing recycled components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, M C; Griffa, M; Bressi, S; Partl, M N; Tebaldi, G; Poulikakos, L D

    2016-10-01

    When producing asphalt concrete mixture with high amounts of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), the mixing temperature plays a significant role in the resulting spatial distribution of the components as well as on the quality of the resulting mixture, in terms of workability during mixing and compaction as well as in service mechanical properties. Asphalt concrete containing 50% RAP was investigated at mixing temperatures of 140, 160 and 180°C, using a multiscale approach. At the microscale, using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy the RAP binder film thickness was visualized and measured. It was shown that at higher mixing temperatures this film thickness was reduced. The reduction in film thickness can be attributed to the loss of volatiles as well as the mixing of RAP binder with virgin binder at higher temperatures. X-ray computer tomography was used to characterize statistically the distribution of the RAP and virgin aggregates geometric features: volume, width and shape anisotropy. In addition using X-ray computer tomography, the packing and spatial distribution of the RAP and virgin aggregates was characterized using the nearest neighbour metric. It was shown that mixing temperature may have a positive effect on the spatial distribution of the aggregates but did not affect the packing. The study shows a tendency for the RAP aggregates to be more likely distributed in clusters at lower mixing temperatures. At higher temperatures, they were more homogeneously distributed. This indicates a higher degree of blending both at microscale (binder film) and macroscale (spatial distribution) between RAP and virgin aggregates as a result of increasing mixing temperatures and the ability to quantify this using various imaging techniques. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Effect of component substitution on the atomic dynamics in glass-forming binary metallic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, B.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Yang, F.; Voigtmann, Th.; Evenson, Z.; Hansen, T. C.; Meyer, A.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the substitution of early transition metals (Zr, Hf, and Nb) in Ni-based binary glass-forming metallic melts and the impact on structural and dynamical properties by using a combination of neutron scattering, electrostatic levitation (ESL), and isotopic substitution. The self-diffusion coefficients measured by quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) identify a sluggish diffusion as well as an increased activation energy by almost a factor of 2 for Hf35Ni65 compared to Zr36Ni64 . This finding can be explained by the locally higher packing density of Hf atoms in Hf35Ni65 compared to Zr atoms in Zr36Ni64 , which has been derived from interatomic distances by analyzing the measured partial structure factors. Furthermore, QENS measurements of liquid Hf35Ni65 prepared with 60Ni , which has a vanishing incoherent scattering cross section, have demonstrated that self-diffusion of Hf is slowed down compared to the concentration weighted self-diffusion of Hf and Ni. This implies a dynamical decoupling between larger Hf and smaller Ni atoms, which can be related to a saturation effect of unequal atomic nearest-neighbor pairs, that was observed recently for Ni-rich compositions in Zr-Ni metallic melts. In order to establish a structure-dynamics relation, measured partial structure factors have been used as an input for mode-coupling theory (MCT) of the glass transition to calculate self-diffusion coefficients for the different atomic components. Remarkably, MCT can reproduce the increased activation energy for Hf35Ni65 as well as the dynamical decoupling between Hf and Ni atoms.

  6. Effect of halloysite nanotubes on the structure and function of important multiple blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keke; Feng, Ru; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren

    2017-06-01

    Many researchers have investigated the application of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in biomedicine, because of their special nanoscale hollow tubular structure. Although the cytocompatibility of HNTs has been studied, their blood compatibility has not been systematically investigated. In this work, the effect of HNTs on the structure and function of different blood components has been studied, including the morphology and hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs). Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, optical density test and flow cytometry analysis, we found that HNTs can affect the morphology and membrane integrity of RBCs in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in a content-dependent way. In particular, based on UV-vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, HNTs can alter the secondary structure and conformation of human fibrinogen and γ-globulins. In addition, the detection of biomarker molecules C3a and C5a in plasma suggests that HNTs can trigger complement activation. In the blood clotting assay, HNTs were found to significantly prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), shorten the prothrombin time (PT) of platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and change the thromboelastography (TEG) parameters of whole blood coagulation. Furthermore, confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to test intracellular uptake by macrophages, and the cellular uptake of HNTs in the RAW 264.7 was found to be content-dependent, but not time-dependent. These findings provide insight for the potential use of HNTs as biofriendly nanocontainers for biomaterials in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Basic characteristics of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF): blood cell components and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kazuhiko; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Taisuke; Isobe, Kazushige; Suzuki, Masashi; Masuki, Hideo; Okudera, Hajime; Uematsu, Kohya; Nakata, Koh; Kawase, Tomoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is widely used in regenerative medicine because of its high concentrations of various growth factors and platelets. However, the distribution of blood cell components has not been investigated in either PRP or other PRP derivatives. In this study, we focused on plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF), a PRP derivative, and analyzed the distributions of platelets and white blood cells (WBCs). Peripheral blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers ( N  = 14) and centrifuged to prepare PRGF and PRP. Blood cells were counted using an automated hematology analyzer. The effects of PRP and PRGF preparations on cell proliferation were determined using human periosteal cells. In the PRGF preparations, both red blood cells and WBCs were almost completely eliminated, and platelets were concentrated by 2.84-fold, whereas in the PRP preparations, both platelets and WBCs were similarly concentrated by 8.79- and 5.51-fold, respectively. Platelet counts in the PRGF preparations were positively correlated with platelet counts in the whole blood samples, while the platelet concentration rate was negatively correlated with red blood cell counts in the whole blood samples. In contrast, platelet counts and concentration rates in the PRP preparations were significantly influenced by WBC counts in whole blood samples. The PRP preparations, but not the PRGF preparations, significantly suppressed cell growth at higher doses in vitro. Therefore, these results suggest that PRGF preparations can clearly be distinguished from PRP preparations by both inclusion of WBCs and dose-dependent stimulation of periosteal cell proliferation in vitro.

  8. ROOTSTOCK-SCION INTERACTION: 1. EFFECT ON THE YIELD COMPONENTS OF CABERNET SAUVIGNON GRAPEVINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO MIELE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The interaction between rootstock, scion and environment can induce different responses to the grapevine physiology. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the rootstock effect on the yield components of Cabernet Sauvignon (CS grapevine grown in the Serra Gaúcha viticultural region. The experimental design was completely randomized blocks, with 15 treatments, three replicates and ten vines per plot. The results show that all variables evaluated were significantly affected by the year and the rootstock. The CS/Solferino was among other combinations influenced by the year and had higher significant yield/ vine. Indeed, it was higher than that CS/Rupestris du Lot, CS/101-14 Mgt., CS/3309 C, CS/5BB K, CS/161- 49 C, CS/1103 P. and CS/Isabel. The number of clusters/bud, per burst bud and per vine and the weight of clusters were affected by the rootstock as well. Pruning weight/vine, yield/pruning weight, leaf area/vine, leaf area index and leaf area/fresh fruit weight are variables related to the physiology of grapevine which were also affected by the rootstock. In general, rootstocks had adapted well to the environment where the experiment was carried out, giving vigor and high yield to Cabernet Sauvignon grapevine, which means that they may be used by grape growers in this region. However, the choice of the right rootstock depends on various aspects, such as those related to the soil characteristics, climate conditions, grape varieties, and even clones, and production purposes.

  9. Effects of sulfur dioxide on nitrogen fixation, carbon partitioning, and yield components in snapbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, S.M.; Campbell, W.F.

    1987-01-01

    The air pollutant SO 2 is known to affect plant biochemistry and physiology, although very little is known about its effects on N 2 -fixation in legumes. This study sought to determine if N 2 -fixation, C partitioning, and plant productivity of snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were affected under short-term, low-level SO 2 exposures. Plants were exposed, 29 d after planting (7 d before anthesis), to 0, 18, and 36 μmol SO 2 m -3 for 4 h d -1 for 5 d in a fumigation chamber. On the last day of SO 2 treatment, plants were also exposed to 14 CO 2 to determine changes in C partitioning patterns. At these concentrations, there was no visible damage to plant tissue and no significant changes in dry weight or yield components. Only the 36 μmol SO 2 m -3 treatment reduced C 2 H 2 reduction rates, but recovery to near control rates occurred within 24 h after SO 2 removal. Leaves of plants treated with 18 μmol SO 2 m -3 exported more of their total assimilated 14 C than control plants, while those treated with 36 μmol SO 2 m -3 retained greater amounts. Retention of 14 C at the 36 μmol SO 2 m -3 level may account for the inhibition of C 2 H 2 -reduction because of less photosynthate arriving at the root nodules. These data suggest that SO 2 levels that do not cause visible injury may interfere with C metabolism and transport in snapbean

  10. Effect of preservatives on the accuracy of mid-infrared milk component testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbano, D M; Wojciechowski, K L; Lynch, J M

    2010-12-01

    Our objective was to determine the effect of commonly used milk preservatives on the accuracy of fat, protein, and lactose content determination in milk by mid-infrared (mid-IR) milk analysis. Two producer raw milks (Holstein and Jersey) and 2 pasteurized modified milks, 1 similar to Holstein milk and 1 similar to Jersey milk were used as the 4 different milk sources. Seven different milk preservative approaches (K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and 6 different bronopol-based preservatives) and a portion of unpreserved milk for each of the 4 different milks sources were tested for fat B, lactose, protein, and fat A. The experiment was replicated 3 times (28 d each) for a total of 84 d. Two mid-infrared (mid-IR) transmittance milk analyzers (an optical and a virtual filter instrument) were used. A large batch of pilot milk was prepared from pasteurized, homogenized, unpreserved whole milk, split into vials, quick frozen by immersion in liquid nitrogen, and transferred into a -80 °C freezer. Pilots were thawed and analyzed on each testing day during the study. Significant increases were observed in all uncorrected readings on the pilot milks over the 84 d of the study, but the increases were gradual and small on each instrument for all components. Results from the study were corrected for these changes. A significant difference in mid-IR fat A readings was observed, whereas no differences were detected for fat B, lactose, or protein between unpreserved and preserved milks containing 0.02% K(2)Cr(2)O(7.) Therefore, K(2)Cr(2)O(7) has little or no effect on mid-IR test results. All bronopol-based preservative approaches in this study differed in mid-IR test results compared with K(2)Cr(2)O(7)-preserved and unpreserved milks, with the largest effect on protein results. Mid-IR uncorrected readings increased with time of refrigerated storage at 4°C for all preservative approaches, with the largest increase for protein. The rate of increase in uncorrected readings with time of storage was

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on the quality of ready meals and their meat components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on the quality of a chicken masala ready meal, minced red meat and salmon meat were studied in a series of experiments. Chicken masala meals treated with a dose of 1-3 kGy and stored for up to 14 d at refrigeration temperatures were analysed for vitamins E and B 1 , oxidative rancidity, microbiological quality and 2-alkylcyclobutanones. It was found that vitamin levels were significantly reduced by a combination of irradiation, storage and reheating, while thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values decreased upon irradiation, which was an unexpected result. The shelf life of the meals was extended by irradiation as levels of bacteria were significantly reduced in the prepared meals upon treatment. Both 2-dodecylcyclobutanone and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone were detected in the irradiated samples, thereby showing that these compounds can be used as markers of irradiation treatment for such food products. In order to study potential components for ready meals, freshly minced beef was used to prepare beef patties, which were vacuum packed and treated with doses from 2.5 to 10 kGy. Following irradiation, half the samples were retained in vacuum packs while the remainder were transferred to sterile containers and overwrapped with cling film. Samples were stored for up to 21 d at refrigeration temperature with TBA values and microbiological quality being analysed at regular intervals. The TBA values of vacuum packed samples were unaffected by irradiation although storage did result in an increase. On the other hand, the TBA values of overwrapped patties increased upon irradiation and storage. The microbiological quality of the irradiated patties upon storage was significantly better than those of untreated patties. A further series of experiments were undertaken to determine the effect of adding antioxidants to beef and salmon patties in order to improve lipid stability upon irradiation. In an initial experiment, minced beef patties were prepared

  12. Effects of self-esteem on state and trait components of interpersonal dependency and depression in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagishi, Yukihiro; Sakata, Masatsugu; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2011-09-01

    This longitudinal study was undertaken to clarify the relationships among self-esteem, interpersonal dependency, and depression, focusing on a trait and state component of interpersonal dependency and depression. In a sample of 466 working people, self-esteem, interpersonal dependency, job stressor, and depression were assessed at 2 points of time. A structural equation model (SEM) was created to differentiate the trait component of interpersonal dependency, depression and the state component of interpersonal dependency, depression. The model revealed that self-esteem influenced trait interpersonal dependency and trait depression but not state interpersonal dependency or depression. Setting a latent variable as a trait component to differentiate trait and state in interpersonal dependency and depression in SEM was found to be effective both statistically and clinically. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Chemical composition of Galla chinensis extract and the effect of its main component(s) on the prevention of enamel demineralization in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.L.; Liu, M.D.; Li, J.Y.; Zhou, X.D.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the chemical composition of Galla chinensis extract (GCE) by several analysis techniques and to compare the efficacy of GCE and its main component(s) in inhibition of enamel demineralization, for the development of future anticaries agents, main organic composition of GCE was

  14. Investigation of effective factors of transient thermal stress of the MONJU-System components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Masaaki; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kimitaka; Jinbo, M. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Transient thermal stress of each system Component in the fast breeder reactor is an uncertain factor on it's structural design. The temperature distribution in a system component changes over a wide range in time and in space. An unified evaluation technique of thermal, hydraulic, and structural analysis, in which includes thermal striping, temperature stratification, transient thermal stress and the integrity of the system components, is required for the optimum design of tho fast reactor plant. Thermal boundary conditions should be set up by both the transient thermal stress analysis and the structural integrity evaluation of each system component. The reasonable thermal boundary conditions for the design of the MONJU and a demonstration fast reactor, are investigated. The temperature distribution analysis models and the thermal boundary conditions on the Y-piece structural parts of each system component, such as reactor vessel, intermediate heat exchanger, primary main circulation pump, steam generator, superheater and upper structure of reactor core, are illustrated in the report. (M. Suetake)

  15. The effects of aging on electrical and I ampersand C components: Results of US Nuclear Plant Aging Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Gunther, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    The US NRC's hardware oriented engineering research program for plant aging and degradation monitoring has achieved results in the area of electrical, control, and instrumentation (ECI) components used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The principal goals of the program, known as the Nuclear Power Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, are to understand the effects of age-related degradation in NPPs and how to manage and mitigate them effectively. This paper describes how these goals have been achieved for key ECI components used in the safety systems of NPPs. The status of relevant on-going and planned research projects is also provided

  16. The effects of aging on electrical and I ampersand C components: Results of US nuclear plant aging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Gunther, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    The US NRC's hardware oriented engineering research program for plant aging and degradation monitoring has achieved results in the area of electrical, control, and instrumentation (ECI) components used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The principal goals of the program, known as the Nuclear Power Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, are to understand the effects of age-related degradation in NPPs and how to manage and mitigate them effectively. This paper describes how these goals have been achieved for key ECI components used in the safety systems of NPPs. The status of relevant on-going and planned research projects is also provided

  17. Building lifespan: effect on the environmental impact of building components in a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Rob

    2017-01-01

    of building lifespan are inadequately addressed. The aim of this research is therefore to explore how environmental impact from building components is affected by building lifespans of 50, 80, 100 and 120 years in a Danish context. LCAs are undertaken for 792 parametric variations of typical construction...... solutions, covering all primary building components and based on contemporary practice. A full statistical analysis is carried out, which shows a significant statistical correlation between changes in building lifespan and environmental impact for all primary building components, except windows......Construction professionals must now integrate environmental concerns with life cycle assessment (LCA) early in the procurement process. Building lifespan is important to LCA, since results must be normalized on an annualized basis for comparison. However, the scientific literature shows that issues...

  18. Asssessment of the effect of selected components of equine seminal plasma on semen freezability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Mráčková

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, selected components of seminal plasma in equine semen were evaluated. Levels of enzymes, electrolytes, microelements and some other components were observed. The aim of this study was to fi nd some important differences between the levels of these components and the total sperm motility after freezing and thawing (freezability of the semen. Total of 32 ejaculates from 7 stallions were collected, assessed and prepared in 0,5 ml straws for freezing. After thawing, the sperm motility was analyzed and ejaculates were divided into two groups: “good” freezable and “poor” freezable. The only statistically significant difference between groups of „good“ and „poor“ freezable ejaculates was in the concentration of vitamin E in the seminal plasma. In the group of „good“ freezable ejaculates, the level of vitamin E was significantly lower (p≤0,05 than in the group of “poor” freezable ejaculates.

  19. Effective Removal of Oil-mist and Odorous Component By Using Photocatalyst with Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Teruo; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Onishi, Hajime; Tada, Yukio; Takimoto, Akira

    The air cleaning is one of the social problems from the view of the living environment and the health recently. A commercial kitchen and food factory generate the exhaust gas including the odorous components and the oil-mist, but it is difficult to clean this gas without frequent maintenance for disposal of oil. Various ideas have been suggested and used for it, but the decisive solution has not been found yet. This paper is concerning of proposal of the photocatalyst method which used the condensation together to clean the gas including oil-mist and odorous component, and it was clarified experimentally about the influence of operation condition and surface shape of the condensation side for the removal of oil-mist and the odorous components of formaldehyde, amine and ammonia.

  20. Effect of certain active components from traditional Chinese medicinal herbs on Aβ secretion rate with L-[35S]-Methionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yaer; Zhang Naizheng; Li Aimin; Xia Zongqin

    2006-01-01

    To observe the effect of certain active components from traditional Chinese medicinal herbs on Aβ secretion rates with L-[ 35 S]-Methionine, β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in SK-N-SH cell lines stably transfected with APP695 was metabolically labeled with L-[ 35 S]-Methionine. the supernatant from culture medium was immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibody against Aβ 22-35 , Western blot was carried out, and the gray density of Aβ band in the autoradiograph was measured by an image analysis system. The active components from certain traditional Chinese medicinal herbs (ZMS from Zhimu and AST and HT from Huangqi) were added to the culture medium at a final concentration of 10 -5 mol/L. An Aβ band in the autoradiograph was clearly viewed in the culture medium after 24 h incorporation of [ -35 S]-Methionine which represent the secretion rate of Aβ by the cells. One of the 3 tested components (AST) could significantly reduce the Aβ secretion rate while the other two showed no effect. The preliminary result showed that certain active component from traditional Chinese medicines could decrease the Aβ secretion rate but other active components could not. Combined use of the AST and ZMS was more effective than single AST. (authors)

  1. Effect of crosstalk on component savings in multi-core fiber networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nooruzzaman, Md; Morioka, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    We estimate potential component savings in MCF-based networks by using shortest path traffic routing and compare them with the current SCF-based systems. We also investigate the potential impact of various inter-core crosstalk values on the number of needed transponders in MCF networks.......We estimate potential component savings in MCF-based networks by using shortest path traffic routing and compare them with the current SCF-based systems. We also investigate the potential impact of various inter-core crosstalk values on the number of needed transponders in MCF networks....

  2. Geometry Effects on Multipole Components and Beam Optics in High-Velocity Multi-Spoke Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [ODU, JLAB; Deitrick, Kirsten E. [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

    2013-12-01

    Velocity-of-light, multi-spoke cavities are being proposed to accelerate electrons in a compact light-source. There are strict requirements on the beam quality which require that the linac have only small non-uniformities in the accelerating field. Beam dynamics simulations have uncovered varying levels of focusing and defocusing in the proposed cavities, which is dependent on the geometry of the spoke in the vicinity of the beam path. Here we present results for the influence different spoke geometries have on the multipole components of the accelerating field and how these components, in turn, impact the simulated beam properties.

  3. Behaviour of bituminized waste under gamma irradiation. Effect of STE3 decontamination process components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernat, Ph.

    1994-10-01

    Liquid wastes of light and medium activity are treated by chemical co-precipitation and sludge are mixed with bitumen. Irradiation is responsible of gas production and potential swelling of the embedded. It prevails on limitation of filling of storage containers and activity to 140 Ci. The aim of this work is the study of influence of the components of the decontamination process on the behaviour of bituminous wastes, in order to control swelling and to state radiolysis mechanisms, both for production and storage of wastes. For pure bitumen, mechanism of production of H 2 and CH 4 are specified. Oxygen consumption, localised on the surface of samples, leads to conversion of aromatic oils and resins to asphaltenes, by a chain reaction mechanism. CO 2 et CO are reaction products of gaseous oxygen, respectively with bitumen and light hydrocarbons. The composition of bitumen is slightly modified to heavier and higher polarity products, with parallel hardening. NaNO 3 , Na 2 SO 4 , BaSO 4 , PPFNi, K 2 SO 4 , NiSO 4 , et diatoms DIT3R et DIC3 have strictly a dilution effect towards gas generation. CoS, above 1% embedded, strongly inhibits production of H 2 , CH 4 and light hydrocarbons. Degradation of bitumen being reduced, a radical mechanism with both radicals H· et R· might exist. Kinetic shows that a bi-radicals mechanism (or more) is probable. In the same way, Raney's nickel induces a important decrease of production of H 2 , CH 4 et C 2 , with a capacity of 7,7 ml/g. Swelling depends on dimension of sample gas production and dose rate. Solid content and particle size are not determining parameters. Low swelling is obtained for penetrability higher than 70 1/10 mm, This can be realised by addition of a solvent as TBP and by increasing temperature above 40 deg C. Rheological characterizations (oscillation and creeping mode) have not been successful to correlate swelling with a physical parameter. (author)

  4. Proinflammatory effect in whole blood by free soluble bacterial components released from planktonic and biofilm cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thay Bernard

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral bacterium associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis. Increasing evidence points to a link between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases, however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the pathogenic potential of free-soluble surface material, released from live planktonic and biofilm A. actinomycetemcomitans cells. Results By employing an ex vivo insert model (filter pore size 20 nm we demonstrated that the A. actinomycetemcomitans strain D7S and its derivatives, in both planktonic and in biofilm life-form, released free-soluble surface material independent of outer membrane vesicles. This material clearly enhanced the production of several proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1β in human whole blood, as evidenced by using a cytokine antibody array and dissociation-enhanced-lanthanide-fluorescent-immunoassay. In agreement with this, quantitative real-time PCR indicated a concomitant increase in transcription of each of these cytokine genes. Experiments in which the LPS activity was blocked with polymyxin B showed that the stimulatory effect was only partly LPS-dependent, suggesting the involvement of additional free-soluble factors. Consistent with this, MALDI-TOF-MS and immunoblotting revealed release of GroEL-like protein in free-soluble form. Conversely, the immunomodulatory toxins, cytolethal distending toxin and leukotoxin, and peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein, appeared to be less important, as evidenced by studying strain D7S cdt/ltx double, and pal single mutants. In addition to A. actinomycetemcomitans a non-oral species, Escherichia coli strain IHE3034, tested in the same ex vivo model also released free-soluble surface material with proinflammatory activity. Conclusion A. actinomycetemcomitans, grown in biofilm and planktonic form, releases free-soluble surface material independent of outer

  5. Proinflammatory effect in whole blood by free soluble bacterial components released from planktonic and biofilm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscarsson, Jan; Karched, Maribasappa; Thay, Bernard; Chen, Casey; Asikainen, Sirkka

    2008-11-27

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral bacterium associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis. Increasing evidence points to a link between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases, however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the pathogenic potential of free-soluble surface material, released from live planktonic and biofilm A. actinomycetemcomitans cells. By employing an ex vivo insert model (filter pore size 20 nm) we demonstrated that the A. actinomycetemcomitans strain D7S and its derivatives, in both planktonic and in biofilm life-form, released free-soluble surface material independent of outer membrane vesicles. This material clearly enhanced the production of several proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1 beta) in human whole blood, as evidenced by using a cytokine antibody array and dissociation-enhanced-lanthanide-fluorescent-immunoassay. In agreement with this, quantitative real-time PCR indicated a concomitant increase in transcription of each of these cytokine genes. Experiments in which the LPS activity was blocked with polymyxin B showed that the stimulatory effect was only partly LPS-dependent, suggesting the involvement of additional free-soluble factors. Consistent with this, MALDI-TOF-MS and immunoblotting revealed release of GroEL-like protein in free-soluble form. Conversely, the immunomodulatory toxins, cytolethal distending toxin and leukotoxin, and peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein, appeared to be less important, as evidenced by studying strain D7S cdt/ltx double, and pal single mutants. In addition to A. actinomycetemcomitans a non-oral species, Escherichia coli strain IHE3034, tested in the same ex vivo model also released free-soluble surface material with proinflammatory activity. A. actinomycetemcomitans, grown in biofilm and planktonic form, releases free-soluble surface material independent of outer membrane vesicles, which induces proinflammatory

  6. The measurement and effect of implementation fidelity in the multi component smoking intervention: The X:IT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bast, Lotus Sofie

    2016-01-01

    -based smoking prevention programs have been launched over the past three decades, and generally multi component initiatives are recommended. The effects have been inconclusive, though, which may partly be due to lack of implementation, but little evidence exists on the implementation of school-based smoking....... Methods: My three papers were based on the school-randomized X:IT study, which tested a multi component intervention to prevent smoking among adolescents in 94 Danish elementary schools (51 intervention and 43 control schools). Participants were grade 7 pupils (mean age: 12.5 years). We collected data......Title: The measurement and effect of implementation fidelity in the multi component smoking intervention: The X:IT study Background: Careful measurement of implementation fidelity is crucial in the examination of whether an intervention worked as intended or not. A large number of school...

  7. Social priming of dyslexia and reduction of the Stroop effect: what component of the Stroop effect is actually reduced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustinova, Maria; Ferrand, Ludovic

    2014-03-01

    Recently, Goldfarb, Aisenberg, and Henik (2011) showed that in a manual format of the Stroop task, dyslexia priming eliminates the normal magnitude of the interference-based Stroop-like findings otherwise exhibited by individuals participating in such research. Goldfarb et al. (2011) consequently concluded that the effect of word reading in a Stroop task (i.e., one automatic behavior) can be effectively controlled through an automatic instruction "do not read" (i.e., another automatic behavior). The present study further investigated these ideas by examining when and how dyslexia priming controls different processes involved in a Stroop task. To this end, the original finding was first replicated (Experiment 1) and subsequently extended to the vocal (instead of manual) response modality to examine whether previously reported eliminations of the Stroop effect persist with this response format (i.e., format producing larger Stroop effects). Since past work (e.g., Augustinova & Ferrand, 2012a; Brown, Joneleit et al., 2002; Ferrand & Augustinova, 2013) had suggested that various interventions were likely to reduce (rather than eliminate) the interference-based Stroop-like findings with vocal responses, a further aim of these experiments was to identify the component of these findings that dyslexia priming actually reduces. To this end, the effects of this intervention were examined in a more fine-grained variant of the Stroop task that distinguished between interference resulting from task-irrelevant processes involved in computing the lexical and semantic representations of the word (i.e., a written distractor to ignore) and task-relevant processes involved in the selection of a response (i.e., a color target to name) that are both involved in this task. In line with our past work (e.g., Augustinova & Ferrand, 2012a; Ferrand & Augustinova, 2013), the results of two experiments (Experiments 2 and 3) showed that in the vocal format, dyslexia priming reduces but does not

  8. Evaluation on Glare from Vehicle Lamps and Effectiveness of Road Components as Glare Barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangkuto, R.A.; Paripurna, A.; Soelami, F.X.N.

    2009-01-01

    Vehicle lamps are vital components which are required to ensure the driver’s safety, particularly at nighttime. However, vehicle lamps may cause glare which can reduce visibility and create discomfort. The objectives of this research are to evaluate glare from car headlamp and motorcycle lamps; and

  9. Effect of Defects Distribution on Fatigue Life of Wind Turbine Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafsanjani, Hesam Mirzaei; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    by a Poisson process / field where the defects form clusters that consist of a parent defect and related defects around the parent defect. The fatigue life is dependent on the number, type, location and size of the defects in the component and is therefore quite uncertain and needs to be described...

  10. Effect of sulfur and iron fertilizers on yield, yield components and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-13

    Jun 13, 2011 ... per plant. Interaction between water stress and combination of iron and sulfur fertilizers had significant .... Results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) of water stress (W), sulfur (B) and iron (C), and their interaction with gain yield, yield components and ... the soil structure and it increased the usefulness of other.

  11. Identifying key components for an effective case report poster: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Lisa L; Paranjape, Anuradha; Estrada, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Residents demonstrate scholarly activity by presenting posters at academic meetings. Although recommendations from national organizations are available, evidence identifying which components are most important is not. To develop and test an evaluation tool to measure the quality of case report posters and identify the specific components most in need of improvement. Faculty evaluators reviewed case report posters and provided on-site feedback to presenters at poster sessions of four annual academic general internal medicine meetings. A newly developed ten-item evaluation form measured poster quality for specific components of content, discussion, and format (5-point Likert scale, 1 = lowest, 5 = highest). Evaluation tool performance, including Cronbach alpha and inter-rater reliability, overall poster scores, differences across meetings and evaluators and specific components of the posters most in need of improvement. Forty-five evaluators from 20 medical institutions reviewed 347 posters. Cronbach's alpha of the evaluation form was 0.84 and inter-rater reliability, Spearman's rho 0.49 (p words. Our evaluation tool provides empirical data to guide trainees as they prepare posters for presentation which may improve poster quality and enhance their scholarly productivity.

  12. The Effects of an Abolishing Operation Intervention Component on Play Skills, Challenging Behavior, and Stereotypy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Russell; O'Reilly, Mark; Sigafoos, Jeff; Machalicek, Wendy; Rispoli, Mandy; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Aguilar, Jeannie; Fragale, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce stereotypy and challenging behavior during play skills instruction by adding an abolishing operation component (AOC) to the intervention strategy. An alternating treatments design compared one condition in which participants were allowed to engage in stereotypy freely before beginning the play skills…

  13. Effective Components of TORDIA Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Clarke, Greg N.; Weersing, V. Robin; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Shamseddeen, Wael; Porta, Giovanna; Berk, Michele; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Spirito, Anthony; Emslie, Graham J.; Keller, Martin B.; Wagner, Karen D.; Brent, David A.

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we conducted a secondary analysis of the Treatment of SSRI-Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) study to explore the impact of specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment components on outcome. In TORDIA, 334 youths (ages 12 to 18 years) with major depressive disorder who had failed to respond to an adequate…

  14. Effects of climate change and adaptation on the livestock component of mixed farming systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Descheemaeker, Katrien; Zijlstra, Mink; Masikati, Patricia; Crespo, Olivier; Homann-Kee Tui, Sabine

    2018-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the impacts of climate change and adaptation options on the livestock component of heterogeneous African farming systems hamper tailored decision making towards climate-smart agriculture. This study addressed this knowledge gap through the development and use of a

  15. Effect of (+)-pulegone and other oil components of Mentha x piperita on cucumber respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mucciarelli, M.; Camusso, W.; Bertea, C.M.; Bossi, S.; Maffei, M.

    2001-01-01

    Peppermint (Menthaxpiperita L.) essential oil and main components were assessed for their ability to interfere with plant respiratory functions. Tests were conducted on both root segments and mitochondria isolated by etiolated seedlings of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Total essential oil inhibited

  16. The effect of image position on the Independent Components of natural binocular images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David W; Hibbard, Paul B

    2018-01-11

    Human visual performance degrades substantially as the angular distance from the fovea increases. This decrease in performance is found for both binocular and monocular vision. Although analysis of the statistics of natural images has provided significant insights into human visual processing, little research has focused on the statistical content of binocular images at eccentric angles. We applied Independent Component Analysis to rectangular image patches cut from locations within binocular images corresponding to different degrees of eccentricity. The distribution of components learned from the varying locations was examined to determine how these distributions varied across eccentricity. We found a general trend towards a broader spread of horizontal and vertical position disparity tunings in eccentric regions compared to the fovea, with the horizontal spread more pronounced than the vertical spread. Eccentric locations above the centroid show a strong bias towards far-tuned components, eccentric locations below the centroid show a strong bias towards near-tuned components. These distributions exhibit substantial similarities with physiological measurements in V1, however in common with previous research we also observe important differences, in particular distributions of binocular phase disparity which do not match physiology.

  17. Valued ecosystem components for watershed cumulative effects: an analysis of environmental impact assessments in the South Saskatchewan River watershed, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Murray A; Noble, Bram F; Dubé, Monique G

    2013-07-01

    The accumulating effects of human development are threatening water quality and availability. In recognition of the constraints to cumulative effects assessment (CEA) under traditional environmental impact assessment (EIA), there is an emerging body of research dedicated to watershed-based cumulative effects assessment (WCEA). To advance the science of WCEA, however, a standard set of ecosystem components and indicators is required that can be used at the watershed scale, to inform effects-based understanding of cumulative change, and at the project scale, to inform regulatory-based project based impact assessment and mitigation. A major challenge, however, is that it is not clear how such ecosystem components and indicators for WCEA can or should be developed. This study examined the use of aquatic ecosystem components and indicators in EIA practice in the South Saskatchewan River watershed, Canada, to determine whether current practice at the project scale could be "scaled up" to support ecosystem component and indicator development for WCEA. The hierarchy of assessment components and indicators used in a sample of 35 environmental impact assessments was examined and the factors affecting aquatic ecosystem component selection and indicator use were identified. Results showed that public environmental impact statements are not necessarily publically accessible, thus limiting opportunities for data and information sharing from the project to the watershed scale. We also found no consistent terminology across the sample of impact statements, thus making comparison of assessment processes and results difficult. Regulatory compliance was found to be the dominant factor influencing the selection of ecosystem components and indicators for use in project assessment, rather than scientific reasoning, followed by the mandate of the responsible government agency for the assessment, public input to the assessment process, and preexisting water licensing arrangements external

  18. Effect of acaricidal components isolated from lettuce (Lactuca sativa) on carmine spider mite (Tetranychus cinnabarinus Boisd.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Zhang, Y; Ding, W; Luo, J; Li, S; Zhang, Q

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the acaricidal activity of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) extracts against carmine spider mites (Tetranychus cinnabarinus Boisd.) and isolate the acaricidal components. Acaricidal activities of lettuce extracts isolated from different parts (the leaf, root and seed) using various solvents (petroleum ether, acetone and methanol) were evaluated with slide-dip bioassay and relatively high median lethal concentration (LC50) values were detected. Acetone extracts of lettuce leaves harvested in July and September were fractionated and isolated with silica gel and thin-layer chromatography. Consequently, acetone extracts of lettuce leaves harvested in July exhibited higher acaricidal activity than those harvested in September, with an LC50 value of 0.268 mg ml-1 at 72 h post-treatment. A total of 27 fractions were obtained from the acetone extract of lettuce leaves harvested in July, and mite mortalities with the 11th and 12th fractions were higher than those with the other 25 fractions (LC50: 0.751 and 1.258 mg ml-1 at 48 h post-treatment, respectively). Subsequently, active acaricidal components of the 11th fraction were identified by infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Five components were isolated from the 11th fraction, with components 11-a and 11-b showing relatively high acaricidal activities (LC50: 0.288 and 0.114 mg ml-1 at 48 h post-treatment, respectively). Component 11-a was identified as β-sitosterol. In conclusion, acetone extracts of lettuce leaves harvested in July might be used as a novel phytogenic acaricide to control mites.

  19. Different cellular effects of four anti-inflammatory eye drops on human corneal epithelial cells: independent in active components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mingli; Wang, Yao; Yang, Lingling; Zhou, Qingjun

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the cellular effects of four commercially available anti-inflammatory eye drops and their active components on human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. The cellular effects of four eye drops (Bromfenac Sodium Hydrate Eye Drops, Pranoprofen Eye Drops, Diclofenac Sodium Eye Drops, and Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops) and their corresponding active components were evaluated in an HCEC line with five in vitro assays. Cell proliferation and migration were measured using 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1)-3 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay and transwell migration assay. Cell damage was determined with the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Cell viability and median lethal time (LT₅₀) were measured by 7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) staining and flow cytometry analysis. Cellular effects after exposure of HCECs to the four anti-inflammatory eye drops were concentration dependent. The differences of cellular toxicity on cell proliferation became significant at lower concentrations (Eye Drops showed significant increasing effects on cell damage and viability when compared with the other three solutions. Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops inhibited the migration of HCECs significantly. Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops showed the quickest effect on cell viability: the LT₅₀ was 3.28, 9.23, 10.38, and 23.80 min for Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops, Diclofenac Sodium Eye Drops, Pranoprofen Eye Drops, and Bromfenac Sodium Hydrate Eye Drops, respectively. However, the comparisons of cellular toxicity revealed significant differences between the eye drops and their active components under the same concentration. The corneal epithelial toxicity differences among the active components of the four eye drops became significant as higher concentration (>0.020%). The four anti-inflammatory eye drops showed different cellular effects on HCECs, and the toxicity was not related with their active components, which provides new reference for the clinical application and drug

  20. Protein and lipid accretion in body components of growing pigs : effects of body weight and nutrient intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, P.

    1994-01-01

    In pig production, optimization of the conversion of animal feeding-stuffs into body components, especially lean meat, requires knowledge of the response relationships between nutrient intake and animal performance. In this study, the separate effects of protein and energy intake on rate

  1. Effects of a multi-component camp-based intervention on inflammatory markers and adipokines in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, T.; Larsen, K. T.; Moller, N. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effects of a multi-component camp-based intervention on inflammatory markers and adipokines in children. Methods. One hundred and fifteen children were recruited in Odense, Denmark (2012-2014). The participants were randomly allocated to either the day camp intervention ...

  2. A guide to the effects of nuclear irradiation on materials, electronic and electrical components, oils and greases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.C.E.

    1983-03-01

    A review is given of the effects of radiation on a selection of materials. Potentially damaging radiation thresholds are listed. The information has been taken from 12 documents for which references are given. The results of a study comparing component fault rates for nuclear and non-nuclear chemical plant are presented. (U.K.)

  3. Comparative cost-effectiveness of the components of a behavior change communication campaign on HIV/AIDS in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Suruchi; Nambiar, Devaki

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies show that exposure to entertainment-education-based mass media campaigns is associated with reduction in risk behaviors. Concurrently, there is a growing interest in comparing the cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions taking into account infrastructural and programmatic costs. In such analyses, though few in number, mass media campaigns have fared well. Using data from a mass media communication campaign in the low HIV prevalence states of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Delhi in Northern India, in this article we examine the following: (1) factors that mediate behavior change in different components of the campaign, comprising a TV drama, reality show for youth audiences, and TV spots; (2) the relative impact of campaign components on the behavioral outcome: condom use; and (3) the cost-effectiveness calculations arising from this analysis. Results suggest that recall of the TV spots and the TV drama influences behavior change and is strongly associated with interpersonal communication and positive gender attitudes. The TV drama, in spite of being the costliest, emerges as the most cost-effective component when considering the behavioral outcome of interest. The analysis of the comparative cost-effectiveness of individual campaign components provides insights into the planning of resources for communication interventions globally.

  4. Long-term effects of a weight loss intervention with or without exercise component in postmenopausal women : A randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roon, Martijn; van Gemert, Willemijn A; Peeters, Petra H; Schuit, A.J.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term effects of a weight loss intervention with or without an exercise component on body weight and physical activity. Women were randomized to diet (n = 97) or exercise (N = 98) for 16 weeks. During the intervention, both groups had achieved the set

  5. Acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A.E.; Olthof, M.R.; Meeuse, J.C.; Seebus, E.; Heine, R.J.; van Dam, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Coffee consumption has been associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We conducted a randomized crossover

  6. Health Effects of Bioactive Components in Plant Foods; Results and Opinion of the EU-COST926 Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, R.; Piskula, M.; Bovy, Arnaud; Dekker, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the main results of EU-action: “COST 926: Impact of new technologies on the health benefits and safety of bioactive plant compounds”. The bioavailability and the effects on gene expression of various bioactive components in plant foods are described in relation with their

  7. Effect of amiodarone and dronedarone administration in rats on thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression in different cardiac components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoykov, I.; van Beeren, H. C.; Moorman, A. F. M.; Christoffels, V. M.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Bakker, O.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In view of their different actions on thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms we set out to investigate whether amiodarone (AM) and dronedarone (Dron) have different and/or component-specific effects on cardiac gene expression. DESIGN: Rats were treated with AM or Dron and the expression

  8. Non-Mendelian Dominant Maternal Effects Caused by CRISPR/Cas9 Transgenic Components in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chieh Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 system has revolutionized genomic editing. The Cas9 endonuclease targets DNA via an experimentally determined guide RNA (gRNA. This results in a double-strand break at the target site . We generated transgenic Drosophila melanogaster in which the CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to target a GAL4 transgene in vivo. To our surprise, progeny whose genomes did not contain CRISPR/Cas9 components were still capable of mutating GAL4 sequences. We demonstrate this effect was caused by maternal deposition of Cas9 and gRNAs into the embryo, leading to extensive GAL4 mutations in both somatic and germline tissues. This serves as a cautionary observation on the effects of maternal contributions when conducting experiments using genomically encoded CRISPR/Cas9 components. These results also highlight a mode of artificial inheritance in which maternal contributions of DNA editing components lead to transmissible mutant defects even in animals whose genomes lack the editing components. We suggest calling this a dominant maternal effect to reflect it is caused by the gain of maternally contributed products. Models of CRISPR-mediated gene drive will need to incorporate dominant maternal effects in order to accurately predict the efficiency and dynamics of gene drive in a population.

  9. Effects of Drought Stress on Canola (Brassica napus L. Genotypes Yield and Yield Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Canola (Brassica napus L. genotypes with wide adaptability to environmental conditions could play a major role in Iran’s oilseed crop production. Selection of high performing genotypes is very important for developing canola cultivation. Water stress can reduce crop yield by affecting both source and sink for assimilation. Canola yield depends on genotype and environmental conditions and response of genotypes to environmental factors. Canola genotypes response to stress depends on the developmental stage and the events occurring prior to and during flowering stage. Resistance to water stress is divided to avoidance and tolerance. Some species are tolerable against water stress. In a while, other species respond ending life cycle, falling leaves and other reactions into water stress. Therefore, investigation of canola genotypes response to water stress in phenological growth stages can be valuable in order to determine resistant or tolerant genotypes. Materials and Methods In order to study the effect of drought stress on canola genotypes yield and its components, an experiment was conducted in 2013-2014 as a split plot based on randomized complete block design with three replications at the research farm, Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center of East-Azarbaijan, Tabriz-Iran. Three levels of drought stress were considered as main plot (No-stress, stress at the flowering and pod setting growth stages and 18 canola genotypes including HW113, RS12, Karaj1, KR18, L73, L72, HW101, L146, L210, L183, SW101, L5, L201, HW118, KR4, Karaj2, Karaj3 and KS7 as subplots. Flood irrigation was scheduled at 50% field capacity, 30 and 30% field capacity for no-stress, stress at the flowering and pod setting growth stages, respectively; i.e. soil moisture capacity was maintained at 30% by irrigating to 100% field capacity when available moisture reached 30% in drought stress treatments. An ANOVA was conducted using the PROC-GLM procedure

  10. Effect of Organic Fertilizers on Yield and Yield Components of Safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M Azimzadeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Soil organic matters impose direct and indirect effect on crop production through providing of nutrients and also improvement of soil physical condition and stimulation of plant growth. It also seems that plant production based on application of organic fertilizers is more stable than application of chemical fertilizers. So, there has been lots of attention from agronomists, ecologists and consumers toward organic fertilizers. In organic farming, agricultural ecosystem is considered as a living thing and integrated totality, so in this system, soil, crop, microorganisms and micro-climate affect on each other and also are under the effect of each other. For better performance of this system, each component should be in its appropriate condition. Periodical reverse of organic matter to soil and crop rotation will improve biological and physical characteristics of soil. However, balance of nutrients in organic matter which is available for plant is important because causes less dependence to chemical fertilizers. Indeed, nutrients balance is more important than application of chemical fertilizers that can lead to water pollution and decreasing quality of food products. Application of chemical fertilizers caused considerable increasing of farmer's income in last decade. These fertilizers also imposed ecological and environmental problems. In Iran like most of the countries, overusing of chemical inputs like fertilizers has caused destruction of water and soil resources. In addition, leaching of soluble chemical fertilizers specially nitrogen fertilizers has caused pollution of drinking water and overfilling of the water of lakes and ponds in some regions. So researchers have done a lot of effort to replace organic and biological fertilizers with chemical one. The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of organic fertilizers on safflower production. Materials and Methods In order to evaluate the effect of organic fertilizers and

  11. Main Quality Attributes of Monoclonal Antibodies and Effect of Cell Culture Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Behrouz

    2017-05-01

    The culture media optimization is an inevitable part of upstream process development in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) production. The quality by design (QbD) approach defines the assured quality of the final product through the development stage. An important step in QbD is determination of the main quality attributes. During the media optimization, some of the main quality attributes such as glycosylation pattern, charge variants, aggregates, and low-molecular-weight species, could be significantly altered. Here, we provide an overview of how cell culture medium components affects the main quality attributes of the mAbs. Knowing the relationship between the culture media components and the main quality attributes could be successfully utilized for a rational optimization of mammalian cell culture media for industrial mAbs production.

  12. Effect of the combined stress on the life of components under thermal cycling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuchowski, R.; Zietkowski, L.

    1987-01-01

    The life of structural components subjected to temperature changes is affected, among other factors, by the nature of the stress field. If life prediction for axially stressed components can be accomplished with a number of well established techniques, the behaviour under a complex state of stress and varying temperature conditions still is the object of intensive research. The present study was aimed at assessing the influence of the stress field upon the life of specimens made of chromium-nickel H23N18 steel under thermal cycling conditions. The designation of steel is in accordance with Polish Standards. The experiments were made on thin-walled tubular specimens loaded with various combinations of a static axial force and a static torque. (orig./GL)

  13. Growing Effective Strength without Growing End Strength: Operational Utilization of the Reserve Component during Training Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs ( ASD (LA)) to identify legislation that impedes the use of RMI to meet operational requirements during active...Its Major Components. Washington DC: Department of Defense, December 21, 2010. ———. DoD Instruction 5100.20: National Security Agency/ Central ...course and speed; communicate that information coherently to the platform launching the weapon; and, launch the attack using anything from a kinetic

  14. Experimental investigation of steep-front short duration (SFSD) surge effects on power systems components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.B. (Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    Results are reported from experiments in which steep-front, short- duration (SFSD) voltage impulses were imposed on various electrical distribution components. These pulses were generated by switching a section of charged, high voltage coaxial cable across the component under study. Components included underground distribution cable, terminators, insulators and arresters. SFSD voltage needed to flashover 15 kV polyethylene cable with a single pulse is approximately 625 kV peak. Strength of polyethylene cable decreases with increasing number of SFSD pulses, indicating cumulative degradation of the polymer. For 15 kV and 25 kV cable terminators, the SFSD CFO was over twice the rated standard lightning BIL for the same units. Similarly, porcelain suspension insulators required more than a doubling of voltage to decrease time to flashover from 1 microsecond to .1 microsecond. Arresters were found to respond rapidly to steep-front current pulses, but the arrester material itself was found to result in a higher discharge voltage for SFSD pulses. Arresters also showed a delay in turn-on of current following the arrival of a steep-front voltage surge.

  15. Inhibitory effects of bee venom and its components against viruses in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Bashir; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Choul Goo; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2016-12-01

    Bee venom (BV) from honey bee (Apis Melifera L.) contains at least 18 pharmacologically active components including melittin (MLT), phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2 ), and apamin etc. BV is safe for human treatments dose dependently and proven to possess different healing properties including antibacterial and antiparasitidal properties. Nevertheless, antiviral properties of BV have not well investigated. Hence, we identified the potential antiviral properties of BV and its component against a broad panel of viruses. Co-incubation of non-cytotoxic amounts of BV and MLT, the main component of BV, significantly inhibited the replication of enveloped viruses such as Influenza A virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). Additionally, BV and MLT also inhibited the replication of non-enveloped viruses such as Enterovirus-71 (EV-71) and Coxsackie Virus (H3). Such antiviral properties were mainly explained by virucidal mechanism. Moreover, MLT protected mice which were challenged with lethal doses of pathogenic influenza A H1N1 viruses. Therefore, these results provides the evidence that BV and MLT could be a potential source as a promising antiviral agent, especially to develop as a broad spectrum antiviral agent.

  16. The effect of multi-component adsorption on selectivity in ion exchange displacement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugcu, N; Cramer, S M

    2005-01-21

    This paper examines chemically selective displacement chromatography using affinity ranking plots, batch displacer screening experiments, column displacements, multi-component adsorption isotherms and spectroscopy. The affinity ranking plot indicated that the displacers, sucrose octasulfate (SOS) and tatrazine, should possess sufficient affinity to displace the proteins amyloglucosidase and apoferritin over a wide range of operating conditions. In addition, the plots indicated that the separation of these proteins by displacement chromatography would be extremely difficult. Further, the two proteins were shown to have very similar retention times under shallow linear gradient conditions. When batch displacement experiments were carried out, both tartrazine and SOS exhibited significant selectivity differences with respect to their ability to displace these two proteins, in contrast to the affinity ranking plot results. Column displacement experiments carried out with sucrose octasulfate agreed with the predictions of the affinity ranking plots, with both proteins being displaced but poorly resolved under several column displacement conditions. On the other hand, column displacement with tartrazine as the displacer resulted in the selective displacement and partial purification of apoferritin. Single- and multi-component isotherms of the proteins with or without the presence of displacers were determined and were used to help explain the selectivity reversals observed in the column and batch displacement experiments. In addition, fluorescence and CD spectra suggested that the displacers did not induce any structural changes to either of the proteins. The results in this paper indicate that multi-component adsorption behavior can be exploited for creating chemically selective displacement separations.

  17. Effects of Human Development Index and Its Components on Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality: a Global Ecological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Salman; Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Somayeh; Mansori, Kamyar; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Ayubi, Erfan

    2016-01-01

    Geographic disparity for colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality according to the human development index (HDI) might be expected. This study aimed at quantifying the effect measure of association HDI and its components on the CRC incidence and mortality. In this ecological study, CRC incidence and mortality was obtained from GLOBOCAN, the global cancer project for 172 countries. Data were extracted about HDI 2013 for 169 countries from the World Bank report. Linear regression was constructed to measure effects of HDI and its components on CRC incidence and mortality. A positive trend between increasing HDI of countries and age-standardized rates per 100,000 of CRC incidence and mortality was observed. Among HDI components education was the strongest effect measure of association on CRC incidence and mortality, regression coefficients (95% confidence intervals) being 2.8 (2.4, 3.2) and 0.9 (0.8, 1), respectively. HDI and its components were positively related with CRC incidence and mortality and can be considered as targets for prevention and treatment intervention or tracking geographic disparities.

  18. Systematic review of reviews of intervention components associated with increased effectiveness in dietary and physical activity interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Philip H

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop more efficient programmes for promoting dietary and/or physical activity change (in order to prevent type 2 diabetes it is critical to ensure that the intervention components and characteristics most strongly associated with effectiveness are included. The aim of this systematic review of reviews was to identify intervention components that are associated with increased change in diet and/or physical activity in individuals at risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library were searched for systematic reviews of interventions targeting diet and/or physical activity in adults at risk of developing type 2 diabetes from 1998 to 2008. Two reviewers independently selected reviews and rated methodological quality. Individual analyses from reviews relating effectiveness to intervention components were extracted, graded for evidence quality and summarised. Results Of 3856 identified articles, 30 met the inclusion criteria and 129 analyses related intervention components to effectiveness. These included causal analyses (based on randomisation of participants to different intervention conditions and associative analyses (e.g. meta-regression. Overall, interventions produced clinically meaningful weight loss (3-5 kg at 12 months; 2-3 kg at 36 months and increased physical activity (30-60 mins/week of moderate activity at 12-18 months. Based on causal analyses, intervention effectiveness was increased by engaging social support, targeting both diet and physical activity, and using well-defined/established behaviour change techniques. Increased effectiveness was also associated with increased contact frequency and using a specific cluster of "self-regulatory" behaviour change techniques (e.g. goal-setting, self-monitoring. No clear relationships were found between effectiveness and intervention setting, delivery mode, study population or delivery provider. Evidence on long

  19. Row orientation effect on UV-B, UV-A and PAR solar irradiation components in vineyards at Tuscany, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoni, D.; Carreras, G.; Zipoli, G.; Sabatini, F.; Dalla Marta, A.; Orlandini, S.

    2008-11-01

    Besides playing an essential role in plant photosynthesis, solar radiation is also involved in many other important biological processes. In particular, it has been demonstrated that ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation plays a relevant role in grapevines ( Vitis vinifera) in the production of certain important chemical compounds directly responsible for yield and wine quality. Moreover, the exposure to UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) can affect plant-disease interaction by influencing the behaviour of both pathogen and host. The main objective of this research was to characterise the solar radiative regime of a vineyard, in terms of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and UV components. In this analysis, solar spectral UV irradiance components, broadband UV (280-400 nm), spectral UV-B and UV-A (320-400 nm), the biological effective UVBE, as well as the PAR (400-700 nm) component, were all considered. The diurnal patterns of these quantities and the UV-B/PAR and UV-B/UV-A ratios were analysed to investigate the effect of row orientation of the vineyard in combination with solar azimuth and elevation angles. The distribution of PAR and UV irradiance at various heights of the vertical sides of the rows was also studied. The results showed that the highest portion of plants received higher levels of daily radiation, especially the UV-B component. Row orientation of the vines had a pronounced effect on the global PAR received by the two sides of the rows and, to a lesser extent, UV-A and UV-B. When only the diffused component was considered, this geometrical effect was greatly attenuated. UV-B/PAR and UV-A/PAR ratios were also affected, with potential consequences on physiological processes. Because of the high diffusive capacity of the UV-B radiation, the UV-B/PAR ratio was significantly lower on the plant portions exposed to full sunlight than on those in the shade.

  20. Effect of microbiological testing on subsequent mid-infrared milk component analysis of the same milk sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Karen L; Melilli, Caterina; Barbano, David M

    2014-09-01

    Our objectives were to determine if mixing and sampling of a raw milk sample at 4°C for determination of total bacteria count (TBC) and if incubation at 14°C for 18h and sampling for a preliminary incubation (PI) count influenced the accuracy of subsequent fat, protein, or lactose measurement by mid-infrared (IR) analysis of milk from the same sample container due to either nonrepresentative sampling or the presence of microbial metabolites produced by microbial growth in the milk from the incubation. Milks of 4 fat levels (2.2, 3, 4, and 5%) reflected the range of fat levels encountered in producer milks. If the portion of milk removed from a cold sample was not representative, then the effect on a milk component test would likely be larger as fat content increases. Within the milks at each fat level, 3 treatments were used: (1) 20 vials of the same milk sampled for testing TBC using a BactoScan FC and then used for a milk component test; (2) 20 vials for testing TBC plus PI count followed by component test; and (3) 20 vials to run for IR component test without a prior micro sampling and testing. This was repeated in 3 different weeks using a different batch of milk each week. No large effect on the accuracy of component milk testing [IR fat B (carbon hydrogen stretch) and fat A (carbonyl stretch)] due to the cold milk sample handling and mixing procedures used for TBC was detected, confirming the fact that the physical removal of milk from the vial by the BactoScan FC (Foss Electric, Hillerød, Denmark) was a representative portion of the milk. However, the representativeness of any other sampling procedure (manual or automated) of a cold milk sample before running milk component testing on the same container of milk should be demonstrated and verified periodically as a matter of routine laboratory quality assurance. Running TBC with a BactoScan FC first and then IR milk analysis after had a minimal effect on milk component tests by IR when milk bacteria counts

  1. Effect of Opalescence(®) bleaching gels on the elution of bulk-fill composite components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Lena; Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Rothmund, Lena; He, Xiuli; Yang, Yang; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Kehe, Kai; Polydorou, Olga; Hickel, Reinhard; Högg, Christof

    2016-02-01

    Bleaching treatments can affect release of components from conventional composites. In this continuing study the influence of two different bleaching gels on the elution of bulk-fill composite components was investigated. The composites Tetric EvoCeram(®) Bulk Fill, QuiXFil™ and X-tra fil were treated with the bleaching gels Opalescence PF 15% (PF 15%) for 5 h and PF 35% (PF 35%) for 30 min and then stored in methanol and water for 24 h and 7 d. The eluates were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Unbleached specimens were used as control group. A total of 7 different elutable substances have been identified from the investigated composites after bleaching-treatment. Three of them were methacrylates: 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA). Compared to the unbleached controls an increase in elution after PF 15%-treatment of following compounds was found: HEMA (Tetric EvoCeram(®) Bulk Fill), TEGDMA (QuiXFil™, X-tra fil) and 4-N,N-dimethylaminobenzoic acid butyl ethoxy ester (DMABEE) (Tetric EvoCeram(®) Bulk Fill, QuiXFil™, X-tra fil). Following compounds showed a reduction in elution after PF 35%-treatment compared to controls: TEGDMA (QuiXFil™) and DMABEE (Tetric EvoCeram(®) Bulk Fill). The highest concentration of HEMA was 0.22 mmol/l (Tetric EvoCeram(®) Bulk Fill, methanol, 7 d, PF 15%), the highest concentration of TEGDMA was 0.3 mmol/l (X-tra fil, water, 7 d, PF 15%) and the highest concentration of DMABEE was 0.05 mmol/l (QuiXFil™, water, 7 d, PF 35%). PF 15% and PF 35% can lead to reduced and/or increased elution of some bulk-fill components, compared to unbleached bulk-fill composites. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fatigue evaluation including environmental effects for primary circuit components in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seichter, Johannes [Siempelkamp Pruef- und Gutachter-Gesellschaft mbH, Dresden (Germany); Reese, Sven H.; Klucke, Dietmar [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Hannover (Germany). Component Technology

    2013-06-01

    The influence of LWR coolant environment to the lifetime of materials in nuclear power plants is being discussed internationally. Environmental phenomena had been investigated in laboratory tests and published in recent years. The discussion is mainly focused both on the transition from laboratory to real plant components and on numerical calculation procedures. Since publishing of the NUREG/CR-6909 report in 2007, formulae for calculating the Fen factors have been modified several times. Various calculation procedures are discussed and recommendations are made how to avoid extremely conservative results. (orig.)

  3. Effect of components (polymer, plasticizer and solvent as a variable in fabrication of diclofenac transdermal patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetna Modi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery influence consumer acceptance and marked increase in bioavailability of some drugs which undergoes hepatic first-pass metabolism. Fabrication of transdermal patch requires lots of attention regarding the amount of components used for it. Because of varied nature of polymer and plasticizer, transdermal patches have different properties and different drug release. This study is on the basis to evaluate the amount to be needed for fabrication of diclofenac transdermal patch. Study shows that Hydroxy Propyl Methyl Cellulose has great influence on transdermal patch, if it is used alone in combination with glycerin or PEG-4000 plasticizer.

  4. Long-term effects as the cause of failure in electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renz, H.; Kreichgauer, H.

    1989-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the utilisation properties of electronic components, their failure rates are discussed with particular reference to the socalled bath-tub curve. The main emphasis is on the construction and manufacture of integrated circuits and the possible types and causes of failure arising from the individual manufacturing stages (layout faults, internal corrosion, masking and etching errors, leakage currents, inadequate heat removal, etc.). A technical insurance assessment is then provided of the long-term failures associated with technological matters. (orig.) [de

  5. Pursuing an ecological component for the Effect Factor in LCIA methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Bjørn, Anders; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.

    have also been altered by past impacts. Model frameworks are usually built on stability, linearity of causality and expectation of a safe return to stable states if the stressor is minimised. However, the command-and-control paradigm has resulted in the erosion of natural resources and species...... EC50-based) or 1 (assuming that continuous stress affects reproduction rate), but these are all based on biological/physiological responses and do not add a true ecological component to the impact. Such factor simply changes the HC50 by 1 or 0.3 log units. A stressor with equal intensity in two...

  6. Effects of monitoring for visual events on distinct components of attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H. Poth

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the environment for visual events while performing a concurrent task requires adjustment of visual processing priorities. By use of Bundesen's (1990 Theory of Visual Attention (TVA, we investigated how monitoring for an object-based brief event affected distinct components of visual attention in a concurrent task. The perceptual salience of the event was varied. Monitoring reduced the processing speed in the concurrent task, and the reduction was stronger when the event was less salient. The monitoring task neither affected the temporal threshold of conscious perception nor the storage capacity of visual short-term memory nor the efficiency of top-down controlled attentional selection.

  7. Identification of anti-biofilm components in Withania somnifera and their effect on virulence of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, S; Cai, J N; Song, K Y; Jeon, J G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify components of the Withania somnifera that could show anti-virulence activity against Streptococcus mutans biofilms. The anti-acidogenic activity of fractions separated from W. somnifera was compared, and then the most active anti-acidogenic fraction was chemically characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The effect of the identified components on the acidogenicity, aciduricity and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formation of S. mutans UA159 biofilms was evaluated. The change in accumulation and acidogenicity of S. mutans UA159 biofilms by periodic treatments (10 min per treatment) with the identified components was also investigated. Of the fractions, n-hexane fraction showed the strongest anti-acidogenic activity and was mainly composed of palmitic, linoleic and oleic acids. Of the identified components, linoleic and oleic acids strongly affected the acid production rate, F-ATPase activity and EPS formation of the biofilms. Periodic treatment with linoleic and oleic acids during biofilm formation also inhibited the biofilm accumulation and acid production rate of the biofilms without killing the biofilm bacteria. These results suggest that linoleic and oleic acids may be effective agents for restraining virulence of S. mutans biofilms. Linoleic and oleic acids may be promising agents for controlling virulence of cariogenic biofilms and subsequent dental caries formation. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Effects of different components of Mao Dongqing's total flavonoids and total saponins on transient ischemic attack (TIA) model of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ming-San; Peng, Meng-Fan; Ma, Rui-Juan; Bai, Ming; Liu, Bao-Song

    2018-03-01

    Objective: To study the effects of the different components of the total flavonoids and total saponins from Mao Dongqing's active site on the rats of TIA model, determine the optimal reactive components ratio of Mao Dongqing on the rats of TIA. Methods: TIA rat model was induced by tail vein injection of tert butyl alcohol, the blank group was injected with the same amount of physiological saline, then behavioral score wasevaluated. Determination the level of glutamic acid in serum, the activity of Na+-K+-ATP enzyme, CA ++ -ATP enzyme and Mg ++ -ATP enzyme in Brain tissue, observe the changes of hippocampus in brain tissue, the comprehensive weight method was used to evaluate the efficacy of each component finally. Results: The contents of total flavonoids and total saponins in the active part of Mao Dongqing can significantly improve the pathological changes of brain tissue in rats, improve the activity of Na + -K + -ATP enzyme, Ca ++ -ATP enzyme and Mg ++ -ATP enzyme in the brain of rats, and reduce the level of glutamic acid in serum. The most significant of the contents was the ratio of 10:6. The different proportions of total flavonoids and total saponins in the active part of Mao Dongqing all has a better effect on the rats with TIA, and the ratio of 10:6 is the best active component for preventing and controlling TIA.

  9. Investigation of the effects of a seismic event on accelerated aged components and benefits in equipment life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rygg, D.E.; Epstein, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Westinghouse has performed extensive testing to determine the effects of aging on a wide range of components. Additionally, Westinghouse has an extensive data base of nuclear plant equipment and components. This paper presents how the data base of information on plant parts can be analyzed, modified, and managed or tracked to reflect in-plant parts life extension based on actual tests on aging. Such an approach can benefit utility programs for parts inventory, plant operations and plant availability, and can also reduce the costs of parts reordering. Rather than weigh the merits of the positions in this debate, this paper presents the results of a component aging program which simulates from five to twenty years of operation followed by a seismic event and identifies the possible incorporation of this data into a plant data base which offers quick reference and provides other relevant information on the component and equipment. The use of this data as part of a well structured maintenance and surveillance program offers an avenue to resolve this debate in a cost effective manner

  10. Conceptual benefits of passive nuclear power plants and their effect on component design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVine, J.C. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Today, nearly ten years after the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) Program was conceived by US utility leaders, and a decade and a half since a new nuclear power plant was ordered in the US, the ALWR passive plant is coming into its own. This design concept, a midsized simplified light water reactor, features extremely reliable passive systems for accident prevention and mitigation and combines proven experience with state-of-the-art engineering and human factors. It is now emerging as the front runner to become the next generation reactor in the US and perhaps around the world. Although simple and straightforward in concept, the passive plant is in many respects a significant departure from previous trends in reactor engineering. Successful implementation of this concept presents numerous challenges to the designers of passive plant systems and components. This paper provides a brief history of the ALWR program, it outlines the ALWR passive plant design objectives and principles, and it summarizes with examples their implications on component design. (orig.)

  11. Effect of applied voltage on phase components of composite coatings prepared by micro-arc oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenjun [Department of Prosthodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Fang, Yu-Jing [Department of Colorectal Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Zheng, Huade [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Tan, Guoxin [Guangdong University of Technology, Guangdong Province 510006 (China); Cheng, Haimei [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ning, Chengyun, E-mail: imcyning@scut.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2013-10-01

    In this report, we present results from our experiments on composite coatings formed on biomedical titanium substrates by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in constant-voltage mode. The coatings were prepared on the substrates in an aqueous electrolyte containing calcium acetate and β-glycerol phosphate disodium salt pentahydrate (β-GP). We analyzed the element distribution and phase components of the coatings prepared at different voltages by X-ray diffraction, thin-coating X-ray diffraction, electron-probe microanalysis, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the composite coatings formed at 500 V consist of titania (TiO{sub 2}), hydroxylapatite (HA), and calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). Furthermore, the concentration of Ca, P, and Ti gradually changes with increasing applied voltage, and the phase components of the composite coatings gradually change from the bottom of the coating to the top: the bottom layer consists of TiO{sub 2}, the middle layer consists of TiO{sub 2} and HA, and the top layer consists of HA and a small amount of CaCO{sub 3}. The formation of HA directly on the coating surface by MAO technique can greatly enhance the surface bioactivity. - Highlights: • Coatings prepared on biomedical titanium substrate by micro-arc oxidation • Coatings composed of titania, hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate • Hydroxyapatite on the coating surface can enhance the surface bioactivity.

  12. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covington, J.A.; Wicks, G.G.; Molecke, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of 'pineapple slices', polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90 degrees C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants

  13. Genotypic Variability of the Components and their Effects on the Rice Yield: Correlation and Path Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharkhawat Hossain

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty modern Boro rice varieties were evaluated with a view to find variability and genetic association for grain yield and yield components characters. Genotypic and Phenotypic correlation among these characters were computed. Both genotypic and phenotypic correlation coefficients were significant between plant height and number of effective tillers per plant followed by panicle length. There was a positive significant correlation between yield and number of effective tillers per plant followed by percent filled grain per panicle. Path coefficient showed that number of effective tiller per plant and plant height are the characters that contribute largely to grain yield.

  14. Proof of fatigue strength of nuclear components part II: Numerical fatigue analysis for transient stratification loading considering environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krätschmer, D.; Roos, E.; Schuler, X.; Herter, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    For the construction, design and operation of nuclear components and systems the appropriate technical codes and standards provide detailed analysis procedures which guarantee a reliable behaviour of the structural components throughout the specified lifetime. Especially for cyclic stress evaluation the different codes and standards provide different fatigue analyses procedures to be performed considering the various mechanical and thermal loading histories and geometric complexities of the components. To consider effects of light water reactor coolant environments, new design curves included in report NUREG/CR-6909 for austenitic stainless steels and for low alloy steels have been presented. For the usage of these new design curves an environmental fatigue correction factor for incorporating environmental effects has to be calculated and used. The application of this environmental correction factor to a fatigue analysis of a nozzle with transient stratification loads, derived by in-service monitoring, has been performed. The results are used to compare with calculated usage factors, based on design curves without taking environmental effects particularly into account. - Highlights: ► We model an nozzle for fatigue analysis und mechanical and thermal loading conditions. ► A simplified as well as a general elastic–plastic fatigue analysis considering environmental effects is performed. ► The influence of different factors calculating the environmental factor F en are shown. ► The presented numerical evaluation methodology allows the consideration of all relevant parameters to assess lifetime.

  15. Differential effects of adding and removing components of a context on the generalization of conditional freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Felisa; Quinn, Jennifer J; Fanselow, Michael S

    2003-01-01

    Rats were conditioned across 2 consecutive days where a single unsignaled footshock was presented in the presence of specific contextual cues. Rats were tested with contexts that had additional stimulus components either added or subtracted. Using freezing as a measure of conditioning, removal but not addition of a cue from the training context produced significant generalization decrement. The results are discussed in relation to the R. A. Rescorla and A. R. Wagner (1972), J. M. Pearce (1994), and A. R. Wagner and S. E. Brandon (2001) accounts of generalization. Although the present data are most consistent with elemental models such as Rescorla and Wagner, a slight modification of the Wagner-Brandon replaced-elements model that can account for differences in the pattern of generalization obtained with contexts and discrete conditional stimuli is proposed.

  16. Effects of elevated temperature postharvest on color aspect, physiochemical characteristics, and aroma components of pineapple fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanhe; Liu, Yan

    2014-12-01

    In this work, 2 separate experiments were performed to describe the influence of elevated temperature treatments postharvest on the color, physiochemical characteristics and aroma components of pineapple fruits during low-temperature seasons. The L* (lightness) values of the skin and pulp of pineapple fruits were decreased. The a* (greenness-redness) and b* (blueness-yellowness) values of the skin and pulp were all markedly increased. The elevated temperature significantly increased the contents of total soluble solids (TSS) and slightly affected contents of vitamin C (nonsignificant). Titratable acidity (TA) of pineapple fruits were notably decreased, whereas the values of TSS/TA of pineapple fruits were significantly increased. The firmness of the pineapple fruits decreased and more esters and alkenes were identified. The total relative contents of esters were increased, and the total relative contents of alkenes were decreased. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Effects of the components in rice flour on thermal radical generation under microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lufen; Huang, Luelue; Fan, Daming; Hu, Bo; Gao, Yishu; Lian, Huizhang; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The relationships between radical generation under microwave irradiation and the components of various types of rice flour were investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the radicals found in rice flour samples. The EPR spectra revealed that several types of radical (carbon-centered, tyrosyl and semiquinone) were localized in the starch and protein fractions of the rice flour. The signal intensity of the free radicals was observed to increase exponentially with increasing microwave power and residence time. The rice bran samples exhibited the greatest free radical signal intensity, followed by the brown rice samples and the white rice samples. This finding was consistent for both the native and the microwaved samples. The ratio of rice starch to rice protein also played an important role in the generation of radicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of different drying techniques on bioactive components, fatty acid composition, and volatile profile of robusta coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjiang; Hu, Rongsuo; Chu, Zhong; Zhao, Jianping; Tan, Lehe

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of different drying techniques, namely, room-temperature drying (RTD), solar drying (SD), heat-pump drying (HPD), hot-air drying (HAD), and freeze drying (FD), on bioactive components, fatty acid composition, and the volatile compound profile of robusta coffee beans. The data showed that FD was an effective method to preserve fat, organic acids, and monounsaturated fatty acids. In contrast, HAD was ideal for retaining polyunsaturated fatty acids and amino acids. Sixty-two volatile compounds were identified in the differently dried coffee beans, representing 90% of the volatile compounds. HPD of the coffee beans produced the largest number of volatiles, whereas FD resulted in the highest volatile content. A principal component analysis demonstrated a close relationship between the HPD, SD, and RTD methods whereas the FD and HAD methods were significantly different. Overall, the results provide a basis for potential application to other similar thermal sensitive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of low doses of gamma rays on yield, yield components, and other characters of two maize varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, Z. B.; Jabbo, N. F.; Khalaf, M. Z.; Majid, A. H.; Ali, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The study was conducted during the fall of 1991 and 1992 at Al-Latyfia Experimental Station to determine the effect of low doses of gamma rays on yield, yield components, and other characters of two maize varieties. Five doses were used in addition to control. A factorial experiment with randomized complete block design in three replications was used in the study. Results revealed that there was significant difference between varieties in plant and ear height in 1992. However, differences between varieties were also significantly affected by most yield component characters. Low doses significantly affected plant height, weight of 500 kernels in 1991, and kernel row number in 1992. Grain yield was affected significantly in 1991 and 1992 by low doses. Results showed that 2.0 krad was the most useful low dose to increase grain yield, whereas there was no significant effect between varieties in grain yield. 7 refs., 6 tabs

  20. Disentangling the developmental and neurobehavioural effects of perinatal exposure to a chemical mixture found in blood of Arctic populations: differential toxicity of mixture components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, W.; Nakai, J.; Yagminas, A.; Chu, I.; Moir, D. [Health Canada (Canada)

    2004-09-15

    The current study was designed to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects of perinatal exposure to a chemical mixture that is based on relative concentrations of persistent organic pollutants found in the blood of Canadian Arctic populations and contains 14 PCB congeners, 12 organochlorine pesticides and methyl mercury. This study compared the effects of the complete mixture with the effects of three major components of the mixture (the PCB component, the organochlorine pesticide component, and the methyl mercury component). By examining a range of neurobehavioural functions over development we also determine if specific neurobehavioural disturbances produced by the mixture can be attributed to components of the mixture and if neurobehavioural effects produced by components of the mixture are altered by concurrent exposure to other components in the mixture. Ninety-two nulliparious female Sprague-Dawley rats served as subjects.

  1. Effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting of molten multi-component oxides ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wangjinustb@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Matsuda, Nozomu [Bar and Wire Product Unit, Nippon steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Fukuoka, 802-8686 (Japan); Shinozaki, Nobuya [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Miyoshi, Noriko [The Center for Instrumental Analysis, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 804-8550 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takanobu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 852-8588 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Multi-component oxides had a good wetting on stainless substrates with pretreatments. • Various substrates surface roughness caused the difference of final contact angles. • The wetting rate was slow on polished substrate due to the slow surface oxidation. - Abstract: A study on the effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting behavior of molten multi-component oxides ceramic was performed and aimed to contribute to the further understanding of the application of oxides ceramic in penetration treatment of stainless steel coatings and the deposition of stainless steel cermet coatings. The results show that at 1273 K, different surface pre-treatments (polishing and heating) had an important effect on the wetting behavior. The molten multi-component oxides showed good wettability on both stainless steel substrates, however, the wetting process on the polished substrate was significantly slower than that on the heated substrates. The mechanism of the interfacial reactions was discussed based on the microscopic and thermodynamic analysis, the substrates reacted with oxygen generated from the decomposition of the molten multi-component oxides and oxygen contained in the argon atmosphere, and the oxide film caused the molten multi-component oxides ceramic to spread on the substrates surfaces. For the polished substrate, more time was required for the surface oxidation to reach the surface composition of Heated-S, which resulted in relatively slow spreading and wetting rates. Moreover, the variance of the surface roughness drove the final contact angles to slightly different values following the sequence Polished-S > Heated-S.

  2. The Joint Force Air Component Commander and the Integration of Offensive Cyberspace Effects: Power Projection through Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    in theory . Offensive cyberspace operations have the potential to provide these types of power- projecting effects in the battlespace, but how can...approach to allow for the maturation of command relationships, authorities, and buildup of operational capacity. In the direct support model...send cyber- space liaisons to the air component to integrate joint cyberspace operations. A major step in the center’s maturation process is

  3. The effects of vermicompost and chemical fertilizers on yield and yield components of marshmallow (Altheae officinalis L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Sadeghi; K. Bakhsh Kelarestaghi; K. Hajmohammadnia Ghalibaf

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of vermicompost and chemical fertilizers on growth characteristics, yield and yield components of marshmallow (Altheaeofficinalis L.), a field experiment was conducted as factorial layout based on a randomized complete block design with three replications at Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during growing season of 2012. Experimental treatments were designed based on 3 levels of vermicompost (0, 5 and 10 t ha-1) and 5 levels of ...

  4. Antineoplastic and immunomodulatory effect of polyphenolic components of Achyranthes aspera (PCA) extract on urethane induced lung cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Chandradeo; Kumar, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds of Achyranthes aspera (PCA) extract is evaluated for anti-cancerous and cytokine based immunomodulatory effects. The PCA extract contains known components of phenolic acid and flavonoids such as mixture of quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, kaempferol, quercetin and chrysin along with many unknown components. PCA has been orally feed to urethane (ethyl carbamate) primed lung cancerous mice at a dosage of 100 mg/kg body weight for 30 consecutive days. 100 mg powder of A. aspera contains 2.4 mg phenolic acid and 1.1 mg flavonoid (2:1 ratio). Enhanced activities and expression of antioxidant enzymes GST, GR, CAT, SOD, while down regulated expression and activation of LDH enzymes in PCA feed urethane primed lung cancerous tissues as compared to PCA non-feed urethane primed lung cancerous tissues were observed. PCA feed urethane primed lung tissues showed down regulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α along with TFs, NF-κB and Stat3 while the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 were enhanced in PCA feed urethane primed lung tissues. FTIR and CD spectroscopy data revealed that PCA resisted the urethane mediated conformational changes of DNA which is evident by the shift in guanine and thymine bands in FTIR from 1,708 to 1,711 cm(-1) and 1,675 to 1,671 cm(-1), respectively in PCA feed urethane primed lung cancerous tissues DNA in comparison to urethane primed lung cancerous tissues DNA. The present study suggests that PCA components have synergistic anti-cancerous and cytokine based immunomodulatory role and DNA conformation restoring effects. However, more research is required to show the effects of each component separately and in combination for effective therapeutic use to cure and prevent lung cancer including other cancers.

  5. Financial literacy and financial literacy education : what might be the components of an effective financial literacy curriculum?

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nirmala

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There is concern about lack of financial literacy and need for financial literacy education, but little or no attempt to understand their nature. Three questions were asked: 'What is financial literacy?', 'What is financial literacy education?' and 'What might be the components of an effective financial literacy curriculum?'. Adopting an inductive grounded theory approach and a pragmatist philosophy, in association with real-world organisations such as the National ...

  6. Motor-cognitive dual-task performance: effects of a concurrent motor task on distinct components of visual processing capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Künstler, E. C. S.; Finke, K.; Günther, A.; Klingner, C.; Witte, O.; Bublak, P.

    2017-01-01

    Dual tasking, or the simultaneous execution of two continuous tasks, is frequently associated with a performance decline that can be explained within a capacity sharing framework. In this study, we assessed the effects of a concurrent motor task on the efficiency of visual information uptake based on the ‘theory of visual attention’ (TVA). TVA provides parameter estimates reflecting distinct components of visual processing capacity: perceptual threshold, visual processing speed, and visual sh...

  7. Effects of broccoli extract on biodistribution and labeling blood components with {sup 99m}Tc-GH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cekic, Betul; Muftuler, Fazilet Zumrut Biber; Kilcar, Ayfer Yurt; Ichedef, Cigdem; Unak, Perihan [Ege University, Izmir (Turkey). Inst. of Nuclear Sciences. Dept. of Nuclear Applications

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: people consume vegetables without the knowledge of the side effects of the biological and chemical contents and interactions between radiopharmaceuticals and herbal extract. To this end, current study is focused on the effects of broccoli extract on biodistribution of radiolabeled glucoheptonate ({sup 99m}Tc-GH) and radiolabeling of blood components. Methods: GH was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc. Quality control studies were done utilizing TLC method. Biodistribution studies were performed on male rats which were treated via gavage with either broccoli extract or SF as control group for 15 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from rats' heart. Radiolabeling of blood constituents performed incubating with GH, SnCl{sub 2} and {sup 99m} Tc. Results: radiochemical yield of {sup 99m}Tc-GH is 98.46{+-}1.48 % (n=8). Biodistribution studies have shown that according to the control, the treated group with broccoli has approximately 10 times less uptake in kidney. The percentage of the radioactivity ratios of the blood components is found to be same in both groups. Conclusions: although there is no considerable effect on the radiolabeling of blood components, there is an outstanding change on the biodistribution studies especially on kidneys. The knowledge of this change on kidney uptake may contribute to reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and/or repetition of the examinations in Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  8. Effects of Sowing Date and Limited Irrigation on Yield and Yield Components of Five Rainfed Wheat Varieties in Maragheh Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Tavakkoli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of sowing date (SD and single irrigation (SI amounts on yield and yield components of rainfed wheat varieties, a field experiment was conducted as split-split plots arranged in a randomized complete blocks design with three replications during 2002-2004 at main station of Dryland Agricultural Research Institute in Maragheh, Iran. Treatments included three sowing dates (early, normal and late, three levels of single irrigation (rainfed, 50 mm and 100 mm only at planting time and five wheat varieties (three numbered lines, Azar2 and double-cross Shahi. Results revealed that interactions of SD, SI and wheat varieties were significant for grain yield, number of kernels per spike and water productivity (P≤0.01. Single irrigation at normal planting time increased grain yield, straw, biomass, harvest index, and water productivity. Grain yield and water productivity were increased by 131% and 84.8%, respectively. Single irrigation at late planting time was not significant on agronomic traits and produced low water productivity. Regarding the reaction of wheat to planting date and single irrigation, results showed that normal single irrigation can improve yield, yield components and water productivity index. The effectiveness of single irrigation under dryland conditions can be observed in all wheat cultivars. Although this effectiveness on yield and yield components is observable, but it is necessary to select the time of irrigation properly.

  9. Detection and mitigation of aging effects of nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachner, J.

    1988-09-01

    This paper describes the general principles of the methods for timely detection and mitigation of aging effects. These methods include condition monitoring, failure trending, system reliability monitoring, predictive maintenance and scheduled maintenance. In addition, developments of existing detection and mitigation methods needed to improve the capability for effective managing of nuclear power plant aging are discussed

  10. Effectiveness of a worksite mindfulness-based multi-component intervention on lifestyle behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, J.; Boot, C.R.L.; Proper, K.I.; Bongers, P.M.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Overweight and obesity are associated with an increased risk of morbidity. Mindfulness training could be an effective strategy to optimize lifestyle behaviors related to body weight gain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a worksite mindfulness-based

  11. The Components of Community Awareness and Preparedness; its Effects on the Reduction of Tsunami Vulnerability and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufekci, Duygu; Lutfi Suzen, Mehmet; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet

    2017-04-01

    The resilience of coastal communities against tsunamis are dependent on preparedness of the communities. Preparedness covers social and structural components which increases with the awareness in the community against tsunamis. Therefore, proper evaluation of all components of preparedness will help communities to reduce the adverse effects of tsunamis and increase the overall resilience of communities. On the other hand, the complexity of the metropolitan life with its social and structural components necessitates explicit vulnerability assessments for proper determination of tsunami risk, and development of proper mitigation strategies and recovery plans. Assessing the vulnerability and resilience level of a region against tsunamis and efforts for reducing the tsunami risk are the key components of disaster management. Since increasing the awareness of coastal communities against tsunamis is one of the main objectives of disaster management, then it should be considered as one of the parameter in tsunami risk analysis. In the method named MetHuVA (METU - Metropolitan Human Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment) proposed by Cankaya et al., (2016) and Tufekci et al., (2016), the awareness and preparedness level of the community is revealed to be an indispensable parameter with a great effect on tsunami risk. According to the results obtained from those studies, it becomes important that the awareness and preparedness parameter (n) must be analyzed by considering their interaction and all related components. While increasing awareness can be achieved, vulnerability and risk will be reduced. In this study the components of awareness and preparedness parameter (n) is analyzed in different categories by considering administrative, social, educational, economic and structural preparedness of the coastal communities. Hence the proposed awareness and preparedness parameter can properly be analyzed and further improvements can be achieved in vulnerability and risk analysis

  12. Inhibitory effects of selected Turkish spices and oregano components on some foodborne fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgül, A; Kivanç, M

    1988-05-01

    The inhibitory effects of 10 selected Turkish spices, oregano essential oil, thymol and carvacrol towards growth of 9 foodborne fungi were investigated in culture media with pH 3.5 and 5.5. The antifungal effects of sodium chloride, sorbic acid and sodium benzoate and the combined use of oregano with sodium chloride were also tested under the same conditions for comparison. Of the spices tested, only sodium chloride were also tested under the same conditions for comparison. Of the spices tested, only oregano at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0% (w/v) levels showed effect on all fungi. 8% (w/v) sodium chloride was less effective than oregano. Oregano essential oil, thymol or carvacrol at concentrations of 0.025% and 0.05% completely inhibited the growth of all fungi, showing greater inhibition than sorbic acid at the same concentrations. The combined use of oregano and sodium chloride exhibited a synergistic antifungal effect.

  13. Component-Customizable Porous Rare-Earth-Based Colloidal Spheres towards Highly Effective Catalysts and Bioimaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng Chao; Rui, Xianhong; Wei, Weifeng; Chen, Libao; Yu, Yan

    2017-11-16

    Multicomponent porous colloidal spheres are of interest because they not only show a combination of the properties associated with all different components, but also usually present synergy effects. However, a combination of different components in a single porous sphere is still greatly challenged due to the different precipitation behaviors of each component. In this work, we have developed a general synthetic route to prepare several categories of porous monodisperse rare-earth (RE)-based colloidal spheres with customizable elemental compositions and a uniform element distribution. The two-step synthetic strategy is based on the integration of coordination chemistry precipitation of RE ions and a subsequent ion-exchange process, which steers clear of obstacles, such as differences in solubility product constant, that are to be found in traditional co-precipitation methods. Our approach provides a new mixing mechanism to realize homogeneous distribution of each element within the porous spheres. An array of binary, ternary, and even senary RE colloidal porous spheres with diameters of 500 nm to 700 nm has been successfully synthesized. Taking advantage of their good dispersibility, porosity, and customizable components, these porous RE oxide spheres show excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, and promising application in single-phase multifunctional bioprobes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effect of micella interesterification on fatty acids composition and volatile components of soybean and rapeseed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifi, Sherine M.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Micella interesterification of soybean and rapeseed oils was carried out using 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 percentages of nickel catalyst, each at different temperatures of 60, 90 and 120ºC for 2, 4, and 6 hours. The proposed interesterification reaction conditions to obtain an oil with low linoleic acid level were 0.2 % nickel catalyst at 120ºC for 4 hours, 0.4% nickel catalyst at 90ºC for 4 hours and 0.6% at 60ºC for 4 hours. Fatty acid composition and chemical analysis of the interesterified and non-esterified oils were estimated. Selected samples undergo heating at 180ºC for 4 hours determining the volatile components. The appearance of some components supported the interesterification process for modification of fatty acid constituents of the oils.Se ha llevado a cabo la interesterificación en fase miscelar de aceites de soja y de colza usando un 0.2%, 0.4% y 0.6% de níquel como catalizador, a diferentes temperaturas (60, 90 y 120ºC durante 2, 4 y 6 horas. Las condiciones de reacción de interesterificación propuestas para obtener un aceite con niveles de ácidos linolénicos bajos fueron 0.2 % de níquel a 120ºC durante 4 horas, 0.4 % de níquel a 90ºC durante 4 horas y 0.6 % a 60ºC durante 4 horas. Se han estimado la composición en ácidos grasos y el análisis químico de los aceites interesterificados y no-esterificados. Las muestras seleccionadas se sometieron a calentamiento a 180ºC durante 4 horas determinando los componentes volátiles. La aparición de algunos componentes apoyó el proceso de interesterificación por modificación de los ácidos grasos constituyentes de los aceites.

  15. Effects of component performance on overall performance of R410A air conditioner with oil flooding and regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • COP benefits more than cooling capacity with regenerator. • High oil temperature leads to degradation of the system. • The improvement brought by oil flooding was greatly reduced by solubility. • A modified system is proposed for reducing the negative effects of solubility. • Comprehensive effects of regenerator, oil temperature and solubility are obtained. - Abstract: Oil flooded compression with regenerator (OFCR) is one of the possible technologies to improve the performance of air conditioner. The addition of OFCR system to basic vapor compression system adds several components: oil separator, oil cooler and regenerator. These components can lead to a significant increase in performance. In this study, parametric studies of these components performance have been carried out under various operating conditions. Compared with basic vapor compression system, COP of OFCR system with 100% effective regenerator is improved by 0.7–11.8% while COP of OFCR system without regenerator is reduced by 0.6–1.8%. When oil temperature exiting the oil cooler reaches 40 °C and 50 °C, the performance of OFCR system is worse than that of basic system at evaporation temperature T_e = 15 °C and T_e ⩾ 5 °C respectively. COP and cooling capacity of OFCR with solubility are decreased by 6.9% and 14.3% respectively at T_e = 5 °C and 0.4 oil mass fraction. A modification of OFCR system is suggested for reducing the negative effects of solubility. The results of COP and cooling capacity show that the modified OFCR system has a 3–4% performance improvement. Comprehensive effects of regenerator efficiency, oil temperature and solubility are also studied. Taking the solubility into account, the effects of regenerator efficiency and oil temperature are slightly different from that without solubility.

  16. FORMATION OF BACTERIAL AND ZOOPLANKTON COMPONENT OF NATURAL FOOD BASE UNDER EFFECT OF TRADITIONAL ORGANIC FERTILIZERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krazhan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Characterization of bacteria and zooplankton in rearing ponds using traditional fertilizers: cattle manure and bird droppings in modern conditions for fish farming. Methodology. Material collection and processing were carried out according to conventional hydrochemical and hydrobiological methods. Findings. We consider forming of bacteria and zooplankton component of natural food base of Irkliiv herbivorous fish nursery rearing ponds under the influenced of traditional organic fertilizers such as bird droppings (0,12 t/ha and cattle manure (2,0 t/ha. Each pond was planted by ongrowing Nyvka carp larvae (40,0 thousand ind./ha with silver carp (1,0 thousand ind./ha and grass carp larvae (1,0 thousand ind./ha. Qualitative and quantitative development of bacteria and zooplankton in fish-breeding ponds was investigated. The results show that in the development of the studied invertebrate groups of zooplankton in production ponds had no significant differences, except for rotifers, which group prevailed by the biomass to 3,6 times in the pond with the introduction of humus. Originality. The parameters of bacteria and zooplankton by the application of traditional organic fertilizers at present fish farming are studied. Practical value. These quantitative indicators of bacteria and zooplankton of fish-rearing ponds with water supply from Kremenchug reservoir, the application of cattle manure and bird droppings could be offered as an optimum data at present fish production stage.

  17. Unique effects of different components of trait emotional intelligence in traditional bullying and cyberbullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroncelli, Andrea; Ciucci, Enrica

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated whether different components of trait emotional intelligence (or trait emotional self-efficacy) were uniquely related to traditional bullying and cyberbullying in a sample of 529 preadolescents (mean age of 12 years and 7 months), while controlling for the other forms of bullying/victimization. Binary logistic regressions showed that the dimension of emotional intelligence concerning the regulation and use of emotions was negatively related both to traditional bullying and cyberbullying; however, this association did not emerge when traditional bullying was controlled for cyberbullying, whilst it still emerged when cyberbullying was controlled for traditional bullying and both forms of victimization. Differently, the dimensions concerning appraisal of own and others' emotions were not deficient in children performing bullying and/or cyberbullying behaviors. Despite high co-occurrence between traditional and electronic bullying, our results suggested that these two forms are distinct phenomena, involving different personality traits. Implications for interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Salinity on Yield and Component Characters in Canola (Brassica napus L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad BYBORDI

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cultivars �Okapi�, �SLM046�, �Elite�, �Fornax� and �Licord� Brassica napus were tested for yield and component characters under different levels of salinity. The variations due to salinity levels, cultivars and cultivarxsalinity (interaction were significant for different characters. The variable degrees of increase and decrease of regression coefficient estimate mates (curve estimation showed the performance as influenced by different salinity levels. The performance of Brassica napus variety in plant height and days to first flowering was the best for �SLM046�, �Okapi� �SLM046� and �Okapi� cultivars. �SLM046� showed the best performance in days to maturity, followed by �Licord� and �Elite�. �Okapi� performed better than others regarding the increased number of seeds per plant and seed yield per plant, followed by �Fornax�. Considering all characters, the most tolerance ability was found in �SLM046� and �Okapi�, against different levels of salinity.

  19. Plasma cleaning of beamline optical components: Contamination and gas composition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Smith, J.A.; Wallace, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have initiated a program to study the impact of gas composition on the carbon removal rate during plasma cleaning of optical components, and of possible contamination due to the plasma processing. The measurements were performed in a test chamber designed to simulate the geometry of the grating/Codling mirror section of a Grasshopper monochromator. Removal rates were determined for a direct-current (dc) (Al electrode) discharge using a quartz crystal microbalance coated with polymethylmethacrylate, located at the position of the grating. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis of strateg- ically located, gold-coated stainless steel samples was employed to determine contamination. The relative removal rates of the gases studied were 3% C 2 F 6 /O 2 much-gt O 2 +H 2 O>O 2 ∼N 2 O>H 2 >N 2 . Although the C 2 F 6 /O 2 gas mixture showed a 20 times greater removal rate than its nearest competitor, it also caused significant contamination to occur. Contamination studies were performed for both dc and radio-frequency (rf) discharges. For the dc discharge we found that great care must be taken in order to avoid Al contamination; for the rf discharge, significant Fe contamination was observed

  20. Effects of Chemical Components on the Growth of Azotobacter vinelandii Mutant and PHB Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Izzah Mohd Razak; Safiyyah Zainuddin; Ying, P.L.W.; Chyan, J.B.; Elly Ellyna Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxy butyrate (PHB) is a non-toxic biodegradable polymer produced by some bacteria and can be applied in medical, pharmacology and food industry. Eight types of chemical components acting as supplements were added to culture medium as nutrient pulses. The growth of bacteria was monitored by recording the absorbance value at 600 nm for every 24 hours of cultivation. PHB was extracted using chloroform. Reading at 235 nm was recorded to determine the PHB concentration. By observing the dry cell weight, we observed the addition of sucrose increased the biomass of Azotobacter vinelandii mutant from 1.5 mg/ mL to 5.6 mg/ mL and 8.4 mg/ mL after 3, 4 and 7 days of cultivation, respectively. The highest PHB concentration of 859.27 μg/ mL was obtained after seven days of cultivation in the medium which was supplied with urea sequentially, With sucrose, the PHB concentration increased from 25.45 μg/ ml to 99.59 μg/ ml and 655.56 μg/ ml after 3, 4 and 7 days of cultivation, respectively. The PHB concentrations obtained with sucrose-pulses were the second highest after urea. As a conclusion, sucrose and urea are the two major factors in the growth and PHB production by A. vinelandii mutant. (author)

  1. Effects of simulated flue gas on components of Scenedesmus raciborskii WZKMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xie-kun; Xu, Jing-liang; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Wei-zheng; Yuan, Zhen-hong

    2015-08-01

    Scenedesmus raciborskii WZKMT cultured with simulated flue gas was investigated. Cellular components, including total sugar, starch, chlorophyll, protein and lipid, were compared between simulated flue gas and 7% (v/v) CO2. Dissolution of SO2 and NO in simulated flue gas led to pH decrease and toxicity to microalgae cells. Furthermore, the death or aging of microalgae cells reduced the buffer capacity and caused decrease of simulated flue gas absorption. With 7% CO2, the highest total sugar and starch content could attain to 66.76% and 53.16%, respectively, which indicated S. raciborskii WZKMT is a desired feedstock candidate for bioethanol production. Microalgae growth and starch accumulation was inhibited, while cells produced more chlorophyll, protein and lipid when simulated flue gas was the carbon source. Fatty acids composition analysis indicated that there was no significant distinction on fatty acids relative content (fatty acid/TFA) between cells aerated using simulated flue gas and 7% CO2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microstructural effects of phosphorus on pressure die cast Al-12Si components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suárez-Peña, B.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The refinement of cuboidal silicon in eutectic Al-Si alloys by phosphorus additions used to manufacture pressure die cast components was studied. The results show that the addition of phosphorus in the form of AlFeP mother alloy before process degassing, leads to the best refinement of the size of the Si-cuboids phase, among several phosphorus additions analysed in the present research.

    Se ha estudiado el afino del silicio cuboidal en aleaciones eutécticas Al-Si por acción del fósforo, en piezas obtenidas mediante la técnica de fundición a presión. Tras la adición de fósforo en pruebas industriales, en las que dicho elemento se incorpora al baño con diversas composiciones, los mejores resultados se obtienen con la adición de la aleación madre AlFeP, previa al desgasificado industrial.

  3. The effect of cell surface components on adhesion ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak-Berecka, Magdalena; Waśko, Adam; Paduch, Roman; Skrzypek, Tomasz; Sroka-Bartnicka, Anna

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cell envelope components and surface properties of two phenotypes of Lactobacillus rhamnosus isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract. The ability of the bacteria to adhere to human intestinal cells and to aggregate with other bacteria was determined. L. rhamnosus strains E/N and PEN differed with regard to the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and specific surface proteins. Transmission electron microscopy showed differences in the structure of the outer cell surface of the strains tested. Bacterial surface properties were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fatty acid methyl esters and hydrophobicity assays. Aggregation capacity and adhesion of the tested strains to the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 was determined. The results indicated a high adhesion and aggregation ability of L. rhamnosus PEN, which possessed specific surface proteins, had a unique fatty acid content, and did not synthesize EPS. Adherence of L. rhamnosus was dependent on specific interactions and was promoted by surface proteins (42-114 kDa) and specific fatty acids. Polysaccharides likely hindered bacterial adhesion and aggregation by masking protein receptors. This study provides information on the cell envelope constituents of lactobacilli that influence bacterial aggregation and adhesion to intestinal cells. This knowledge will help to understand better their specific contribution in commensal-host interactions and adaptation to this ecological niche.

  4. Dose effects on damage of thymidylic acid and its components irradiated by A N+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Yu Zengliang

    1996-08-01

    Research into damage of DNA components is an important field in mechanism study to the low energy ion beam irradiation. It was found that the UV difference spectra of irradiated thymine (T) had two positive peaks caused by the changes of π electron conjugation of the pyrimidine ring, and that the residual activity of T sample irradiated by a N + ion beam was not influenced by treatments of acid and alkali as well as heat. In addition, the residual activities of irradiated thymidine (dTR) and thymidine 5'-phosphate (5'-dTMP) with and without treating of strong acid and strong alkali were also measured. With UV absorption spectrophotometry, the yield of T released from the irradiated samples of dTR and 5'-dTMP and the residual concentration of these target molecules were deduced, and it was found that the yield of T increased when the solution of the irradiated dTR sample was treated by heat but decreased when this solution was treated by acid and alkali for these treatments splitting T-S or T-S-P. On the other hand, the yield of inorganic phosphate released from the irradiated 5'-dTMP was investigated and found that it was increased by the treatment of alkali and that the increase degree was depended on the time scale of the treatment. Moreover, G(Pi) of the irradiated 5'-dTMP non-linearly decreased with increasing dose. (10 figs.)

  5. Extinction after retrieval: effects on the associative and nonassociative components of remote contextual fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzi, Marco; Cannas, Sara; Saraulli, Daniele; Rossi-Arnaud, Clelia; Cestari, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Long-lasting memories of adverse experiences are essential for individuals' survival but are also involved, in the form of recurrent recollections of the traumatic experience, in the aetiology of anxiety diseases (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD]). Extinction-based erasure of fear memories has long been pursued as a behavioral way to treat anxiety disorders; yet, such a procedure turns out to be transient, context-dependent, and ineffective unless it is applied immediately after trauma. Recent evidence indicates that, in both rats and humans, extinction training can prevent the return of fear if administered within the reconsolidation window, when memories become temporarily labile and susceptible of being updated. Here, we show that the reconsolidation-extinction procedure fails to prevent the spontaneous recovery of a remote contextual fear memory in a mouse model of PTSD, as well as the long-lasting behavioral abnormalities induced by traumatic experience on anxiety and in both social and cognitive domains (i.e., social withdrawal and spatial learning deficits). Such a failure appears to be related to the ineffectiveness of the reconsolidation-extinction procedure in targeting the pathogenic process of fear sensitization, a nonassociative component of traumatic memory that causes animals to react aberrantly to harmless stimuli. This indicates fear sensitization as a major target for treatments aimed at mitigating anxiety and the behavioral outcomes of traumatic experiences.

  6. Energy deposition and thermal effects of runaway electrons in ITER-FEAT plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddaluno, G.; Maruccia, G.; Merola, M.; Rollet, S.

    2003-01-01

    The profile of energy deposited by runaway electrons (RAEs) of 10 or 50 MeV in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Fusion Energy Advanced Tokamak (ITER-FEAT) plasma facing components (PFCs) and the subsequent temperature pattern have been calculated by using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and the finite element heat conduction code ANSYS. The RAE energy deposition density was assumed to be 50 MJ/m 2 and both 10 and 100 ms deposition times were considered. Five different configurations of PFCs were investigated: primary first wall armoured with Be, with and without protecting CFC poloidal limiters, both port limiter first wall options (Be flat tile and CFC monoblock), divertor baffle first wall, armoured with W. The analysis has outlined that for all the configurations but one (port limiter with Be flat tile) the heat sink and the cooling tube beneath the armour are well protected for both RAE energies and for both energy deposition times. On the other hand large melting (W, Be) or sublimation (C) of the surface layer occurs, eventually affecting the PFCs lifetime

  7. Energy deposition and thermal effects of runaway electrons in ITER-FEAT plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddaluno, G.; Maruccia, G.; Merola, M.; Rollet, S.

    2003-03-01

    The profile of energy deposited by runaway electrons (RAEs) of 10 or 50 MeV in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Fusion Energy Advanced Tokamak (ITER-FEAT) plasma facing components (PFCs) and the subsequent temperature pattern have been calculated by using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and the finite element heat conduction code ANSYS. The RAE energy deposition density was assumed to be 50 MJ/m 2 and both 10 and 100 ms deposition times were considered. Five different configurations of PFCs were investigated: primary first wall armoured with Be, with and without protecting CFC poloidal limiters, both port limiter first wall options (Be flat tile and CFC monoblock), divertor baffle first wall, armoured with W. The analysis has outlined that for all the configurations but one (port limiter with Be flat tile) the heat sink and the cooling tube beneath the armour are well protected for both RAE energies and for both energy deposition times. On the other hand large melting (W, Be) or sublimation (C) of the surface layer occurs, eventually affecting the PFCs lifetime.

  8. The effects of drying on the chemical components of essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... The significance of the effect of drying on essential oil composition of this plant is discussed. ... addition, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of its oils have ..... methods on the flavour quality of marjoram (Origanum majorana L.),.

  9. The effectiveness of acupuncture research across components of the trauma spectrum response (tsr: a systematic review of reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Courtney

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-morbid symptoms (for example, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and fatigue are particularly common in military fighters returning from the current conflicts, who have experienced physical and/or psychological trauma. These overlapping conditions cut across the boundaries of mind, brain and body, resulting in a common symptomatic and functional spectrum of physical, cognitive, psychological and behavioral effects referred to as the ‘Trauma Spectrum Response’ (TSR. While acupuncture has been shown to treat some of these components effectively, the current literature is often difficult to interpret, inconsistent or of variable quality. Thus, to gauge comprehensively the effectiveness of acupuncture across TSR components, a systematic review of reviews was conducted using the Samueli Institute’s Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL© methodology. Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycInfo were searched from inception to September 2011 for systematic reviews/meta-analyses. Quality assessment was rigorously performed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN 50 checklist and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE methodology. Adherence to the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials in Acupuncture (STRICTA criteria was also assessed. Results Of the 1,480 citations identified by our searches, 52 systematic reviews/meta-analyses, all high quality except for one, met inclusion criteria for each TSR component except post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and sexual function. The majority of reviews addressed most STRICTA components, but did not describe safety. Conclusions Based on the results of our review, acupuncture appears to be effective for treating headaches and, although more research is needed, seems to be a promising treatment option for anxiety, sleep disturbances, depression

  10. Effects of Nitrogen and Phosphorous Biofertilizers on Yield and Yield Components of Corn AS71 in Dareh-shahr, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fathi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofertilizers are inputs that naturally supplement replace chemical fertilizers and they are recommended in sustainable agriculture. To study the effects of biological fertilizers on yield and yield components of corn, a factorial experiment in randomized complete block design with three replications were conducted at Dareh-shahr, Iran in 2010. Biological factors were 4 levels of nitrogen biofertilizers (nitroxin, nitrokara, supernitroplus and control and 4 levels of phosphorus biofertilizers (biophosphore, phosphate fertilized 2, MC1 and control. Results showed that biological nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers had significant effects on all traits under study. Interaction of nitrogen biological fertilizer × phosphate biological fertilizer was significant on 100 seed weight (P

  11. Emission of carbon. A most important component for greenhouse effect in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milaev, V.B.; Kopp, I.Z.; Yasenski, A.N. [Scientific Research Inst. of Atmospheric Air Protection, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Greenhouse effect is most often defined as the probabilities of atmospheric air quasiequilibrium temperature increase as a result of air pollution due to emission of anthropogenic gaseous substances which are usually called `greenhouse gases`. Among greenhouse gases are primarily considered several gaseous substances which contain carbon atoms: carbon oxide, carbon dioxide and methane (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), and chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons (freons) spectra of which are transparent to solar radiation, but absorb and reradiate longwave radiation causing disturbance of quasistationary thermal regieme of the atmosphere. Qualitative estimates of the income and relative roles of different substances in occurrence of greenhouse effect differ considerable. At the modern state of knowledge the problem of greenhouse effect and greenhouse gases is considered in several aspects. The most widespread and investigated is climatic or meteorological aspect, it is discussed in a number of international works. Rather pressing is thermal physics aspect of the problem of estimating greenhouse effect, which consists in correct construction of a calculation model and usage of the most representative experimental data, since analytical methods require many assumptions, introduction of which may lead to results which differ very much. Bearing these uncertainties in mind the UNEP/WMO/ICSU conference has included into the number of the most urgent tasks in the study of greenhouse effect, the problem of determining the priority of factors which cause greenhouse effect, which in its turn predetermines the necessity to substantiate the methods of selection and criterion of comparative evaluation of such factors. (author)

  12. Emission of carbon. A most important component for greenhouse effect in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milaev, V B; Kopp, I Z; Yasenski, A N [Scientific Research Inst. of Atmospheric Air Protection, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Greenhouse effect is most often defined as the probabilities of atmospheric air quasiequilibrium temperature increase as a result of air pollution due to emission of anthropogenic gaseous substances which are usually called `greenhouse gases`. Among greenhouse gases are primarily considered several gaseous substances which contain carbon atoms: carbon oxide, carbon dioxide and methane (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), and chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons (freons) spectra of which are transparent to solar radiation, but absorb and reradiate longwave radiation causing disturbance of quasistationary thermal regieme of the atmosphere. Qualitative estimates of the income and relative roles of different substances in occurrence of greenhouse effect differ considerable. At the modern state of knowledge the problem of greenhouse effect and greenhouse gases is considered in several aspects. The most widespread and investigated is climatic or meteorological aspect, it is discussed in a number of international works. Rather pressing is thermal physics aspect of the problem of estimating greenhouse effect, which consists in correct construction of a calculation model and usage of the most representative experimental data, since analytical methods require many assumptions, introduction of which may lead to results which differ very much. Bearing these uncertainties in mind the UNEP/WMO/ICSU conference has included into the number of the most urgent tasks in the study of greenhouse effect, the problem of determining the priority of factors which cause greenhouse effect, which in its turn predetermines the necessity to substantiate the methods of selection and criterion of comparative evaluation of such factors. (author)

  13. Curcumin, an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), and its effects on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaadam, Betül; Şanlier, Nevin

    2017-09-02

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a type of herb belonging to ginger family, which is widely grown in southern and south western tropical Asia region. Turmeric, which has an importance place in the cuisines of Iran, Malesia, India, China, Polynesia, and Thailand, is often used as spice and has an effect on the nature, color, and taste of foods. Turmeric is also known to have been used for centuries in India and China for the medical treatments of illnesses such as dermatologic diseases, infection, stress, and depression. Turmeric's effects on health are generally centered upon an orange-yellow colored, lipophilic polyphenol substance called "curcumin," which is acquired from the rhizomes of the herb. Curcumin is known recently to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer effects and, thanks to these effects, to have an important role in prevention and treatment of various illnesses ranging notably from cancer to autoimmune, neurological, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetic. Furthermore, it is aimed to increase the biological activity and physiological effects of the curcumin on the body by synthesizing curcumin analogues. This article reviews the history, chemical and physical features, analogues, metabolites, mechanisms of its physiological activities, and effects on health of curcumin.

  14. Effects of NOX Storage Component on Ammonia Formation in TWC for Passive SCR NOX Control in Lean Gasoline Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y. [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A. [ORNL; Toops, Todd J. [ORNL; Parks, II, James E. [ORNL

    2018-04-01

    A prototype three-way catalyst (TWC) with NOX storage component was evaluated for ammonia (NH3) generation on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine as a component in a passive ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The passive NH3 SCR system is a potential approach for controlling nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions from lean burn gasoline engines. In this system, NH3 is generated over a close-coupled TWC during periodic slightly-rich engine operation and subsequently stored on an underfloor SCR catalyst. Upon switching to lean, NOX passes through the TWC and is reduced by the stored NH3 on the SCR catalyst. Adding a NOX storage component to a TWC provides two benefits in the context of a passive SCR system: (1) enabling longer lean operation by storing NOX upstream and preserving NH3 inventory on the downstream SCR catalyst; and (2) increasing the quantity and rate of NH3 production during rich operation. Since the fuel penalty associated with passive SCR NOX control depends on the fraction of time that the engine is running rich rather than lean, both benefits (longer lean times and shorter rich times achieved via improved NH3 production) will decrease the passive SCR fuel penalty. However, these benefits are primarily realized at low to moderate temperatures (300-500 °C), where the NOX storage component is able to store NOX, with little to no benefit at higher temperatures (>500 °C), where NOX storage is no longer effective. This study discusses engine parameters and control strategies affecting the NH3 generation over a TWC with NOX storage component.

  15. Toxic and hormetic-like effects of three components of citrus essential oils on adult Mediterranean fruit flies (Ceratitis capitata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella A Papanastasiou

    Full Text Available Plant essential oils (EOs and a wide range of their individual components are involved in a variety of biological interactions with insect pests including stimulatory, deterrent, toxic and even hormetic effects. Both the beneficial and toxic properties of citrus EOs on the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly have been experimentally evidenced over the last years. However, no information is available regarding the toxic or beneficial effects of the major components of citrus EOs via contact with the adults of the Mediterranean fruit fly. In the present study, we explored the toxicity of limonene, linalool and α-pinene (3 of the main compounds of citrus EOs against adult medflies and identified the effects of sub-lethal doses of limonene on fitness traits in a relaxed [full diet (yeast and sugar] and in a stressful (sugar only feeding environment. Our results demonstrate that all three compounds inferred high toxicity to adult medflies regardless of the diet, with males being more sensitive than females. Sub-lethal doses of limonene (LD20 enhanced the lifespan of adult medflies when they were deprived of protein. Fecundity was positively affected when females were exposed to limonene sub-lethal doses. Therefore, limonene, a major constituent of citrus EOs, induces high mortality at increased doses and positive effects on life history traits of medfly adults through contact at low sub-lethal doses. A hormetic-like effect of limonene to adult medflies and its possible underlying mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Components and modifiers of the healthy worker effect: evidence from three occupational cohorts and implications for industrial compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.; Chiarelli, A.M.; Lindsay, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined the components and modifiers of the healthy worker effect using mortality data from three occupational cohorts: the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited followed between 1950 and 1981, a 10% sample of the Canadian labor force followed between 1965 and 1979, and workers at the Eldorado Resources Limited Beaverlodge uranium mine followed between 1950 and 1980. Two important components of the healthy worker effect have been identified in these cohorts, namely, initial selection of and continuing employment of healthy individuals. There is less evidence for a contribution from the existence of differential risk factors among employed individuals as compared with the general population. The healthy worker effect is, however, substantially modified by time since employment, sex, age, specific cause of death, and specific occupation. Because of this variation, it is inappropriate to account for the healthy worker effect by a single parameter, and all of the above factors must be taken into account in any appropriate analysis. When the only available comparison group for an occupational cohort is the general population, the healthy worker effect is unlikely to have any substantial influence on the process of assessing causality for any observed association or attributing cause in an individual case. This would be particularly true for cancer, and even more so for lung cancer, a disease often associated with industrial compensation cases

  17. Combined effects of alcohol and caffeine on the late components of the event-related potential and on reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Frances Heritage; Garfield, Joshua

    2006-01-01

    The effects of .7 ml/kg alcohol and 200 mg caffeine on the P200, N200, P300 and N500 difference wave components of the event-related potential and on reaction time (RT) were examined in 16 females who performed both simple and choice RT tasks. Alcohol slowed the decision time (DT) component of reaction time, lengthened the latency of the P200 and P300 components, reduced N200 amplitude, increased P300 amplitude at parietal sites, and modified the effect of sagittal site on N500 difference wave peak amplitude. Caffeine shortened DT in the choice RT task, shortened N200 latency at right hemisphere sites, and shortened N200 latency in the choice RT task in combination with alcohol compared to when alcohol was administered alone. Caffeine also increased P300 amplitude in the choice RT task and reduced the integral of the N500 difference wave at most sites when combined with alcohol. It was concluded that whereas alcohol slows attention allocation and impairs working memory, caffeine accelerated response-related decisions and enhanced cortical arousal.

  18. A 'cost-effective' probabilistic model to select the dominant factors affecting the variation of the component failure rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchsteiger, C.

    1992-11-01

    Within the framework of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), the component failure rate λ is a key parameter in the sense that the study of its behavior gives the essential information for estimating the current values as well as the trends in the failure probabilities of interest. Since there is an infinite variety of possible underlying factors which might cause changes in λ (e.g. operating time, maintenance practices, component environment, etc.), an 'importance ranking' process of these factors is considered most desirable to prioritize research efforts. To be 'cost-effective', the modeling effort must be small, i.e. essentially involving no estimation of additional parameters other than λ. In this paper, using a multivariate data analysis technique and various statistical measures, such a 'cost-effective' screening process has been developed. Dominant factors affecting the failure rate of any components of interest can easily be identified and the appropriateness of current research plans (e.g. on the necessity of performing aging studies) can be validated. (author)

  19. Segmented frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements: minimizing the effects of photobleaching within a multi-component system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwani, Hadi M; Lowry, Mark; Keating, Patrick; Warner, Isiah M; Cook, Robert L

    2007-11-01

    This study introduces a newly developed frequency segmentation and recombination method for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements to address the effects of changing fractional contributions over time and minimize the effects of photobleaching within multi-component systems. Frequency segmentation and recombination experiments were evaluated using a two component system consisting of fluorescein and rhodamine B. Comparison of experimental data collected in traditional and segmented fashion with simulated data, generated using different changing fractional contributions, demonstrated the validity of the technique. Frequency segmentation and recombination was also applied to a more complex system consisting of pyrene with Suwannee River fulvic acid reference and was shown to improve recovered lifetimes and fractional intensity contributions. It was observed that photobleaching in both systems led to errors in recovered lifetimes which can complicate the interpretation of lifetime results. Results showed clear evidence that the frequency segmentation and recombination method reduced errors resulting from a changing fractional contribution in a multi-component system, and allowed photobleaching issues to be addressed by commercially available instrumentation.

  20. Effects of dietary components on testosterone metabolism via UDP‐glucuronosyltransferase (UGT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl eJenkinson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential interference in testosterone metabolism through ingested substances has ramifications for: i a range of pathologies such as prostate cancer, ii medication contra-indications, iii disruption to the endocrine system, and iv potential confounding effects on doping tests. Conjugation of anabolic steroids during phase II metabolism, mainly driven by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT 2B7, 2B15 and 2B17, has been shown to be impaired in vitro by a range of compounds including xenobiotics and pharmaceuticals. Following early reports on the effects of a range of xenobiotics on UGT activity in vitro, the work was extended to reveal similar effects with common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Notably, recent studies have evidenced inhibitory effects of the common foodstuffs green tea and red wine, along with their constituent flavonoids and catechins. This review amalgamates the existing evidence for the inhibitory effects of various pharmaceutical and dietary substances on the rate of UGT glucuronidation of testosterone; and evaluates the potential consequences for health linked to steroid levels, interaction with treatment drugs metabolised by the UGT enzyme and steroid abuse in sport.

  1. Dissolution of multi-component LNAPL gasolines: The effects of weathering and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekmine, Greg; Bastow, Trevor P.; Johnston, Colin D.; Davis, Greg B.

    2014-05-01

    The composition of light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) gasoline and other petroleum products changes profoundly over their life once released into aquifers. However limited attention has been given to how such changes affect key parameters such as the activity coefficients which control partitioning of components of petroleum fuel into groundwater and are used to predict long-term risk from fuel releases. Laboratory experiments were conducted on a range of fresh, weathered and synthetic gasoline mixtures designed to mimic the expected changes in composition in an aquifer. Weathered gasoline created under controlled evaporation and water washing, and naturally weathered gasoline, were investigated. Equilibrium concentrations in water and molar fractions in the gasoline mixtures were compared with equilibrium concentrations predicted by Raoult's law assuming ideal behaviour of the solutions. The experiments carried out allowed the relative sensitivity of the activity coefficients of key risk drivers such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) compounds to be quantified with respect to the presence of other types of compounds and where the source LNAPL had undergone different types of weathering. Results differed for the mixtures examined but in some cases higher than predicted dissolved equilibrium concentrations showed non-ideal behaviour for toluene, benzene and xylenes. Comparison of the activity coefficients showed that the naturally weathered gasoline and a 50% evaporated unleaded gasoline present a similar range of values varying between 1.0 and 1.2, suggesting close to ideal partitioning between the LNAPL and water. The fresh and water-washed gasoline had higher values for the activity coefficient, from 1.2 to 1.4, indicating non-ideal partitioning. Results from synthetic mixtures demonstrated that these differences could be due to the different molar fractions of the nC5 and nC6 aliphatic hydrocarbons acting on the molecular interactions

  2. Improving the Effectiveness of the Bio-slurry Extension Component of National Biodigester Program in Cambodia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M. F.

    2009-10-15

    This report deals with the escalating challenge Cambodia faces in its agricultural sector for providing sufficient feeding to an increasing population, while also having improper soil management. Based on field visits, interviews, regular meetings, training workshops, and joint analysis it was revealed that farmers used both organic (bio-slurry) and inorganic fertilisers but were unaware of the balance needed and required doses of fertiliser. Further, it appeared that farmers have limited access to improve crop management practices, specifically to fertiliser management. In a response to the problem, the current weaknesses, and further scope of improvement of present organisational setup of slurry extension component of NBP and subsidy system have been analysed in depth. Extensive recommendations are offered on an organisational setup level (e.g. strengthen the linkage between Provincial Biogas Program Office-PBPO and Cambodian Centre for Study and Development in Agriculture-CEDAC by involving CEDAC in the planning process), subsidy (e.g. provide subsidy to attract farmers for construction of standard compost hut, boundaries and shade), planning (e.g. bottom up planning approach is suggested where a seasonal planning meeting should be organized at province by the project director involving CEDAC provincial coordinator), development of training materials (e.g. a national consultant should be hired for developing a training manual on bio-slurry systems), training (e.g. strengthen user training by increasing its number, frequency, topics), farmers participatory action research (e.g. the participatory approach should be replaced by a demonstration one), monitoring and reporting (e.g. monitoring system should be established as desk and field monitoring)

  3. Effect of substrate on periphyton communities and relationships among food web components in shallow hypertrophic lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Mieczan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the role of natural (common reed and artificial substrata (bamboo in structuring the abundance and taxonomic composition of periphyton assemblages. Investigations were conducted in a shallow, hypertrophic lake situated in the area of Polesie Lubelskie (Eastern Poland. Periphyton communities (algae, ciliates, small metazoa and chironomids on both types of substratum were sampled monthly, from May to November of 2007. Water samples for chemical analysis were collected together with biological samples. We selected the group of ten environmental variables which are the most important in determining the habitat conditions in highly eutrophic lakes: temperature, Secchi disc visibility, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, periphytic chlorophyll-a, N-NO3, N-NH4, TP, P-PO4 and total organic carbon (TOC. The abundances of periphytic algae, ciliates, metazoa and chironomids were significantly affected by season and substrate. On natural substrata, in all studied months, periphyton communities showed higher abundances. The results of PCA analysis confirmed the distinction between periphyton communities on natural and artificial substrata. The Monte Carlo permutation test showed that the periphyton communities on common reed were the most significantly affected by temperature, N-NO3, Secchi disc visibility and TOC. The communities on artificial substrata were significantly influenced by temperature, P-PO4 and TOC. On natural substrata biomass of periphytic algae was significantly negatively correlated with abundances of all groups of potential grazers (ciliates, metazoa, chironomids. On artificial substrata the relations between components of periphytic food web were stronger; correlation coefficients between algae, protists and chironomids were significant at P<0.01. The results of analysis indicate that periphytic algae can play an important role as food source for higher trophic levels. These interactions are less significant on natural (reed

  4. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  5. Effects of mulch practices on fresh ear yield and yield components of sweet corn

    OpenAIRE

    KARA, Burhan; ATAR, Bekir

    2013-01-01

    The experiment was carried out in the vegetation seasons of 2010 and 2011. The main purpose of the study was to determine the effects of mulch practices (a control-unmulched treatment, a plastic mulch treatment, and a straw mulch treatment) on fresh ear yield and some yield-related traits of sweet corn according to 3 sowing dates: 1 April, 15 April, and 1 May, respectively. The main effects of sowing dates were significant for the harvest period, the emerging rate from soil, the fresh ear yie...

  6. The effect of solvent component on the discharge performance of Lithium-sulfur cell containing various organic electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seok; Jung, Yongju; Lim, Hong S.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of solvent component on the discharge performance of lithium-sulfur (Li/S) cell and the optimal composition of ternary electrolyte for the improved discharge performance of the cell have been investigated. The capacity value and capacity stability with cycle are dependent on the nature of solvent as well as the composition of mixed solvent. The change trend of discharge performance as a function of content of each solvent component is studied. Capacity value increases as the 1,3-dioxolane (DOX) content decreases. Average discharge voltage shows larger value when the 1,2-dimethoxy ethane (DME) content is small. Finally, we have obtained the optimal solvent composition by using a statistical method

  7. Effects of non-uniform temperature gradients on surface tension driven two component magneto convection in a porous- fluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, N.; Sumithra, R.

    2018-04-01

    The problem of surface tension driven two component magnetoconvection is investigated in a Porous-Fluid system, consisting of anincompressible two component electrically conducting fluid saturatedporous layer above which lies a layer of the same fluid in the presence of a uniform vertical magnetic field. The lower boundary of the porous layeris rigid and the upper boundary of the fluid layer is free with surfacetension effects depending on both temperature and concentration, boththese boundaries are insulating to heat and mass. At the interface thevelocity, shear and normal stress, heat and heat flux, mass and mass fluxare assumed to be continuous suitable for Darcy-Brinkman model. Theeigenvalue problem is solved in linear, parabolic and inverted parabolictemperature profiles and the corresponding Thermal Marangoni Numberis obtained for different important physical parameters.

  8. Effects of Handedness and Saccadic Bilateral Eye Movements on Components of Autobiographical Recollection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew; Dagnall, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The effects of handedness and saccadic bilateral eye movements on autobiographical recollection were investigated. Recall of autobiographical memories was cued by the use of neutral and emotional words. Autobiographical recollection was assessed by the autobiographical memory questionnaire. Experiment 1 found that mixed-handed (vs. right handed)…

  9. Effectiveness of a one-year multi-component day-camp intervention for overweight children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Traberg; Huang, Tao; Møller, Niels Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood overweight has noticeable psychological and social consequences for the child and leads to an increased risk of mortality and morbidity later in life. With the high prevalence of overweight in children and adolescents, it is important to identify effective approaches...

  10. Effect of seed-irradiation on morphological characters yield components of brassica campestris var. sarson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, F.S.; Ahmad, S.

    1996-01-01

    Seed of Brassica campestris (var. Sarson) were used to study the effect of radiation of different morphological and yield parameters. Survival percentage showed drastic decrease at higher doses (75 Kr and 100 Kr). Similarly all characters showed a trend of decrease with increasing dose. LD50 for Brassica was about 50 Kr. (author)

  11. components analysis and age at harvest effect on quality of gari from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... Four elite cassava varieties in Ghana released under the local names Afisiafi, Tekbankye, Abasafitaa and Gblemoduade were planted in June and harvested the following year at 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 months after planting, and processed into gari. The effect that age at harvest had on selected.

  12. Variance components for direct and maternal effects on body weights of Katahdin lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for BW in Katahdin lambs. Six animal models were used to study direct and maternal effects on birth (BWT), weaning (WWT) and postweaning (PWWT) weights using 41,066 BWT, 33,980 WWT, and 22,793 PWWT records collected over 17 yr in 100 flocks. F...

  13. Effects of cellular structure and cell wall components on water holding capacity of mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, Ekaraj; Boom, Remko M.; Haaren, van Els; Siccama, Joanne; Sman, van der Ruud G.M.

    2016-01-01

    In a sequel of papers we have investigated effects of different physical contributions to the water holding capacity of foods by considering the common white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus). In the current paper of our sequel, we consider individual contributions of the cellular phase to

  14. Effectiveness of Drug Education Components: Knowledge, Attitudes, Decision Making, Motivations, and Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Scott W.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of school-based drug education in affecting knowledge, attitudes, decision making, motivation, and self-esteem. Pre- and postintervention surveys of fourth through eighth graders indicated that self-esteem did not improve significantly. Knowledge and attitude scores improved significantly, with a positive…

  15. The Effects of Varying Planning Demands on Drawing Components of Squares and Diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Pia; Laszlo, Judith I.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated effects of changing the level of motor planning demands in simple drawing tasks for which children aged 5-11 years completed or copied squares and diamonds. Results were consistent with previous studies. Low planning demands resulted in less difference between square and diamond performance than did tasks demanding higher planning.…

  16. Effect of sucralfate and its components on taurocholate-induced damage to rat gastric mucosal cells in tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, M.; Razandi, M.; Ivey, K.J. (Long Beach VA Medical Center, CA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of sucralfate and its components, sucrose octasulfate and aluminum hydroxide, on: (1) damage to rat cultured gastric mucosal cells induced by sodium taurocholate in a neutral environment and in conditions independent of systemic factors, (2) prostaglandin E2 and on 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha release by cultured cells, and (3) sulfhydryl content of cultured cells. Cell damage was quantitated by chromium-51 release assay. Prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha were measured by radioimmunoassay. Total sulfhydryl content of cultured cells was determined calorimetrically. Microscopically, sucralfate was found to adhere tightly to epithelial cell surfaces despite frequent washings. Sucralfate 2 mg/ml and 5 mg/ml significantly decreased taurocholate-induced damage, reducing taurocholate-induced specific 51Cr release by 11.8 points (equal to 29% decrease in cell damage, P less than 0.01) and 22.9 points (equal to 56% decrease in cell damage, P less than 0.001), respectively. Sucrose octasulfate and aluminum hydroxide did not exert significant protection against damage induced by sodium taurocholate. The protective effect of sucralfate was not prevented by indomethacin, nor was it counteracted by the sulfhydryl blocker, iodoacetamide. Sucralfate, but not its components, significantly and dose-dependently stimulated prostaglandin E2 (r = 0.94, P less than 0.05) and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (r = 0.89, P less than 0.05) production by cultured cells. Neither sucralfate nor its components affected sulfhydryl content of cultured cells. In conclusion, sucralfate, but not its components, (1) protects rat gastric mucosal cells against taurocholate-induced damage in conditions independent of systemic factors and in a neutral environment and (2) significantly stimulates prostaglandin production by cultured cells.

  17. Effect of sucralfate and its components on taurocholate-induced damage to rat gastric mucosal cells in tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, M.; Razandi, M.; Ivey, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of sucralfate and its components, sucrose octasulfate and aluminum hydroxide, on: (1) damage to rat cultured gastric mucosal cells induced by sodium taurocholate in a neutral environment and in conditions independent of systemic factors, (2) prostaglandin E2 and on 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha release by cultured cells, and (3) sulfhydryl content of cultured cells. Cell damage was quantitated by chromium-51 release assay. Prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha were measured by radioimmunoassay. Total sulfhydryl content of cultured cells was determined calorimetrically. Microscopically, sucralfate was found to adhere tightly to epithelial cell surfaces despite frequent washings. Sucralfate 2 mg/ml and 5 mg/ml significantly decreased taurocholate-induced damage, reducing taurocholate-induced specific 51Cr release by 11.8 points (equal to 29% decrease in cell damage, P less than 0.01) and 22.9 points (equal to 56% decrease in cell damage, P less than 0.001), respectively. Sucrose octasulfate and aluminum hydroxide did not exert significant protection against damage induced by sodium taurocholate. The protective effect of sucralfate was not prevented by indomethacin, nor was it counteracted by the sulfhydryl blocker, iodoacetamide. Sucralfate, but not its components, significantly and dose-dependently stimulated prostaglandin E2 (r = 0.94, P less than 0.05) and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (r = 0.89, P less than 0.05) production by cultured cells. Neither sucralfate nor its components affected sulfhydryl content of cultured cells. In conclusion, sucralfate, but not its components, (1) protects rat gastric mucosal cells against taurocholate-induced damage in conditions independent of systemic factors and in a neutral environment and (2) significantly stimulates prostaglandin production by cultured cells

  18. Effects of apples and specific apple components on the cecal environment of conventional rats: Role of apple pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Hansen, Max; Bergström, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Background: Our study was part of the large European project ISAFRUIT aiming to reveal the biological explanations for the epidemiologically well-established health effects of fruits. The objective was to identify effects of apple and apple product consumption on the composition of the cecal...... microbial community in rats, as well as on a number of cecal parameters, which may be influenced by a changed microbiota. Results: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of cecal microbiota profiles obtained by PCR-DGGE targeting bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed an effect of whole apples in a long-term feeding...... study (14 weeks), while no effects of apple juice, puree or pomace on microbial composition in cecum were observed. Administration of either 0.33 or 3.3% apple pectin in the diet resulted in considerable changes in the DGGE profiles. A 2-fold increase in the activity of beta-glucuronidase was observed...

  19. Effect of Opalescence® bleaching gels on the elution of dental composite components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Lena; Rothmund, Lena; He, Xiuli; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Schweikl, Helmut; Hellwig, Elmar; Carell, Thomas; Hickel, Reinhard; Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Högg, Christof

    2015-06-01

    Bleaching treatments can affect on the polymer network of dental composites. This study was performed to evaluate the influence of different bleaching treatments on the elution of composite components. The composites Tetric EvoCeram(®), CLEARFIL™ AP-X, Tetric EvoFlow(®), Filtek™ Supreme XT, Ceram X(®) mono+, Admira and Filtek™ Silorane were treated with the bleaching gels Opalescence PF 15% (PF 15%) for 5h and PF 35% (PF 35%) for 30 min and then stored in methanol and water for 24h and 7 d. The eluates were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Unbleached specimens were used as control group. A total of 16 different elutable substances have been identified from the investigated composites after bleaching-treatment. Six of them were methacrylates: 1,10-decandioldimethacrylate (DDDMA), 1,12-dodekandioldimethacrylate (DODDMA), ethylenglycoldimethacrylate (EGDMA), 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethylenglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and urethandimethacrylate (UDMA). Compared with the unbleached controls the composites Tetric EvoCeram(®), CLEARFIL™ AP-X and Tetric EvoFlow(®) showed a reduced elution of UDMA, TEGDMA and HEMA after bleaching-treatment. Compared with the unbleached controls an increase elution of UDMA, DMABEE, BPA and TEGDMA for the composites Filtek™ Supreme XT, Ceram X(®) mono+, Admira and Filtek™ Silorane after bleaching-treatment has been detected. The highest concentration of UDMA was 0.01 mmol/l (Tetric EvoCeram(®), water, 24h, controls), the highest concentration of TEGDMA was 0.28 mmol/l (CLEARFIL™ AP-X, water, 7 d, controls), the highest concentration of HEMA was 0.74 mmol/l (Tetric EvoFlow(®), methanol, 7 d, PF 35%), the highest concentration of DMABEE was 0.10 mmol/l (Ceram X(®) mono+, water, 7 d, PF 35%) and the highest concentration of BPA was 0.01 mmol/l (Admira, methanol, 7 d, controls). Bleaching treatments can lead to a reduced or an increased elution of substances from the dental composites

  20. Software component quality evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a software inspection process that can be used to evaluate the quality of software components. Quality criteria, process application, independent testing of the process and proposed associated tool support are covered. Early results indicate that this technique is well suited for assessing software component quality in a standardized fashion. With automated machine assistance to facilitate both the evaluation and selection of software components, such a technique should promote effective reuse of software components.