WorldWideScience

Sample records for complications

  1. Postpartum complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronthal, A.J.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the CT findings of major postpartum complications and determine what role CT plays in their evaluation. The CT scans of nine patients with major postpartum complications were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had been referred to CT for evaluation of postpartum fever, abdominal pain, and elevated results of liver function tests. Complications identified at CT included hepatic infarctions (n = 2), endometritis (n = 2), postoperative wound abscess (n = 1), massive abdominal hemorrhage (n = 1), septic thrombophlebitis (n = 1), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). CT findings of hepatic infarction included wedge-shaped areas of decreased enhancement conforming to a vascular distribution

  2. Skin Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  3. Diphtheria Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  4. Flu Symptoms & Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu Symptoms & Complications Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... not everyone with flu will have a fever. Flu Complications Most people who get influenza will recover ...

  5. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Shoulder dystocia Shoulder dystocia Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... women more likely than others to have shoulder dystocia? A pregnant woman may be at risk for ...

  6. Complications and Deaths - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  7. Complications and Deaths - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the CMS Patient Safety Indicators, and 30-day...

  8. Skin Complications of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  9. Pregnancy Complications: Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preeclampsia Preeclampsia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... even if you’re feeling fine. What is preeclampsia? Preeclampsia is a serious blood pressure condition that ...

  10. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  11. Complications and Deaths - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hip/knee complication measure, CMS Patient Safety Indicators of serious...

  12. Complications and Deaths - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the CMS Patient Safety Indicators, and...

  13. Complicated Horseshoe Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. S.; Kim, S. R.; Cha, K. S.; Park, S. S. [Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Horseshoe kidney is an important urological anomaly when it is complicated or accompanied by other diseases. Recently we have experienced four cases of horseshoe kidney which were complicated with hydronephrosis, renal stone and adrenal pheochromocytoma. With review of literatures, we emphasize the importance of detection of these complications.

  14. Complicated Horseshoe Kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. S.; Kim, S. R.; Cha, K. S.; Park, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is an important urological anomaly when it is complicated or accompanied by other diseases. Recently we have experienced four cases of horseshoe kidney which were complicated with hydronephrosis, renal stone and adrenal pheochromocytoma. With review of literatures, we emphasize the importance of detection of these complications.

  15. Metabolic complications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sycova-Mila, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, a lot of space and time is devoted to the therapy of oncologic diseases itself. To reach the good therapy results, complex care of the oncologic patient is needed. Management of complications linked with the disease itself and management of complications emerged after administration of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or targeted therapy, plays a significant role. In addition to infectious, hematological, neurological, cardiac or other complications, metabolic complications are relatively extensive and serious. One of the most frequent metabolic complications in oncology is tumor lysis syndrome, hyperuricemia, hypercalcaemia and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. (author)

  16. Complications of wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Zahab S; Yao, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the incidence of complications associated with wrist arthroscopy. Given the paucity of information published on this topic, an all-inclusive review of published wrist arthroscopy complications was sought. Two independent reviewers performed a literature search using PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, and Academic Megasearch using the terms "wrist arthroscopy complications," "complications of wrist arthroscopy," "wrist arthroscopy injury," and "wrist arthroscopy." Inclusion criteria were (1) Levels I to V evidence, (2) "complication" defined as an adverse outcome directly related to the operative procedure, and (3) explicit description of operative complications in the study. Eleven multiple-patient studies addressing complications of wrist arthroscopy from 1994 to 2010 were identified, with 42 complications reported from 895 wrist arthroscopy procedures, a 4.7% complication rate. Four case reports were also found, identifying injury to the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve, injury to the posterior interosseous nerve, and extensor tendon sheath fistula formation. This systematic review suggests that the previously documented rate of wrist arthroscopy complications may be underestimating the true incidence. The report of various complications provides insight to surgeons for improving future surgical techniques. Level IV, systematic review of Levels I-V studies. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction and electrophysi......Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction....... The clinical significance of cardiovascular complications and cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is an important topic for future research, and the initiation of new randomised studies of potential treatments for these complications is needed....

  18. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  19. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess, ...

  20. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia.

  1. [Surgical complications of colostomies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Hazem; Affes, Nejmeddine; Rejab, Haitham; Abid, Bassem; Boujelbene, Salah; Mzali, Rafik; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-07-01

    The colostomy may be terminal or lateral, temporary or permanent. It may have psychological, medical or surgical complications. reporting the incidence of surgical complications of colostomies, their therapeutic management and trying to identify risk factors for their occurrence. A retrospective study for a period of 5 years in general surgery department, Habib Bourguiba hospital, Sfax, including all patients operated with confection of a colostomy. Were then studied patients reoperated for stoma complication. Among the 268 patients who have had a colostomy, 19 patients (7%) developed surgical stoma complications. They had a mean age of 59 years, a sex ratio of 5.3 and a 1-ASA score in 42% of cases. It was a prolapse in 9 cases (reconfection of the colostomy: 6 cases, restoration of digestive continuity: 3 cases), a necrosis in 5 cases (reconfection of the colostomy), a plicature in 2 cases (reconfection of the colostomy) a peristomal abscess in 2 cases (reconfection of the colostomy: 1 case, restoration of digestive continuity: 1 case) and a strangulated parastomal hernia in 1 case (herniorrhaphy). The elective incision and the perineal disease were risk factors for the occurrence of prolapse stomial. Surgical complications of colostomies remain a rare event. Prolapse is the most common complication, and it is mainly related to elective approach. Reoperation is often required especially in cases of early complications, with usually uneventful postoperative course.

  2. Imaging of osteochondroma complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Fernando Santos Emerich; Lewin, Fabio; Mariotti, Guilherme Cayres; Capasso Filho, Mauro; Yamaguchi, Claudia Kazue; Cruz, Rafael O.; Baptista, Pedro Pericles Ribeiro; Yonamine, Eduardo Sadao; Prospero, Jose Donato

    2007-01-01

    Osteochondroma is the most common entity beyond all the known osseous tumors. It is a lesion with a high enlargement capacity and a continuous growing in some cases, and it may determine complications, mainly due to mass effect. It may be present in a solitary or multiple forms, and the last one is related with a higher tendency to sarcomatous transformation, which is the most frightening complication. The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate, through an iconographic assay, the most common complications caused by the osteochondromas, making the correlation of its clinical and radiological aspects. (author)

  3. Postoperative rectal anastomotic complications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polanecký, O.; Adámek, S.; Šedý, Jiří; Skořepa, J.; Hladík, P.; Šmejkal, M.; Pafko, P.; Lischke, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 12 (2014), s. 781-785 ISSN 0006-9248 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : human * complication * anastomosis * rectum Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2014

  4. Complications of Circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Krill

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, circumcision is a commonly performed procedure. It is a relatively safe procedure with a low overall complication rate. Most complications are minor and can be managed easily. Though uncommon, complications of circumcision do represent a significant percentage of cases seen by pediatric urologists. Often they require surgical correction that results in a significant cost to the health care system. Severe complications are quite rare, but death has been reported as a result in some cases. A thorough and complete preoperative evaluation, focusing on bleeding history and birth history, is imperative. Proper selection of patients based on age and anatomic considerations as well as proper sterile surgical technique are critical to prevent future circumcision-related adverse events.

  5. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Search Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Pertussis Home About Pertussis Causes & Transmission Signs & Symptoms Complications ...

  7. Neurologic complications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pace

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic side effects related to cancer therapy are a common problem in oncology practice. These complications can negatively affect the management of the patient, because they can inhibit treatment and diminish quality of life. Therefore specific skills are required to recognise symptoms and clinical manifestations. This review focuses on the most common neurologic complications to improve physician’s familiarity in determining the aetiology of these symptoms.

  8. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  10. On complicity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value.

  11. Thrombophilia in complicated pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Şahin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the incidence and etiology of pregnancy complications associated with thrombophilic factors. Methods: Fifty-four patients with complicated pregnancy and 40 healthy pregnant subjects were included the study. Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation, protein S, protein C, anti-thrombin deficiency levels were investigated. Results: Of the 54 patients with complicated pregnancy, 29 had preeclampsia, 18 had intra uterine growth retardation, and 7 had intrauterine fetal loss. The most common defect was FVL mutation. FVL mutations in patient group and the control group were 27.2% and 10%, respectively, which were statistically significant. The protein S, protein C, and anti-thrombin deficiencies were found higher in the patient group compared to control (p>0.05 for each. Conclusion: FVL mutation was found higher in patient group compared to the control group, Protein C deficiency and anti-thrombin deficiency were related to preeclampsia but not other pregnancy complications. Clinicians should take into account the thrombophilia in complicated pregnancy, especially preeclampsia. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 497-502

  12. Complications of shoulder arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Todd C; Rudolph, Glen H; Caswell, Kyle; Espinoza, Christopher; Burkhead, Wayne Z; Krishnan, Sumant G

    2014-07-01

    Over the past 20 to 30 years, arthroscopic shoulder techniques have become increasingly popular. Although these techniques have several advantages over open surgery, surgical complications are no less prevalent or devastating than those associated with open techniques. Some of the complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder surgery include recurrent instability, soft-tissue injury, and neurapraxia. These complications can be minimized with thoughtful consideration of the surgical indications, careful patient selection and positioning, and a thorough knowledge of the shoulder anatomy. Deep infection following arthroscopic shoulder surgery is rare; however, the shoulder is particularly susceptible to Propionibacterium acnes infection, which is mildly virulent and has a benign presentation. The surgeon must maintain a high index of suspicion for this infection. Thromboemoblic complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder techniques are also rare, and studies have shown that pharmacologic prophylaxis has minimal efficacy in preventing these complications. Because high-quality studies on the subject are lacking, minimal evidence is available to suggest strategies for prevention. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  13. Post dengue neurological complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hizlinda Tohid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain–Barre syndrome (GBS is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case.

  14. Neuromuscular complications of thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Annie W C

    2007-11-01

    Thyroid hormones exert multiple effects on the neuromuscular system and the brain, with the most important being their role in stimulating the development and differentiation of the neuromuscular system and brain in foetal and neonatal life. In the presence of hyperthyroidism, muscular and neurological symptoms may be the presenting clinical features of the disease. The frequency and severity of neuromuscular complications vary considerably and are probably related to the degree of hyperthyroidism, although in some patients the neuromuscular dysfunction is caused by associated disorders rather than by hyperthyroidism per se. This update focuses on the most common neurological and muscular disorders that occur in patients with thyrotoxicosis. It is beyond the scope of this paper to discuss thyroid eye disease and cardiac complications, in themselves separate complications of specific myocytes.

  15. Imaging of postpartum complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooholamini, S.A.; Au, A.H.; Hansen, G.C.; Kioumehr, F.; Yaghmai, I.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficacy of various imaging modalities in the detection of postpartum complications. Nineteen cases of postpartum complications, studied radiologically, form the basis of this exhibit. Plain abdominal radiography, US, CT, and MR imaging were performed alone or in combination. The abnormalities detected included uterine rupture, intramural uterine hematoma, hematomas of the broad ligaments and the abdominal rectus muscles, ovarian vein thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, pyometrium, retained placenta and blood clots, periappendiceal abscess, superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, and cerebral edema. Representative cases will be illustrated; and the effective value of each technique will be stressed

  16. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Complication with intraosseous access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%), and bended/broken needle (4.0%). When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%), slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag) (8.8%), displacement after insertion (8...

  18. Anticoagulation in pregnancy complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Women with acquired and inherited thrombophilia are thought to be at increased risk for pregnancy complications, including recurrent pregnancy loss and, depending on the type of thrombophilia, severe preeclampsia. This review discusses the associations between the types of thrombophilia and types of

  19. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  20. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ureters, bladder, and urethra for the passage, storage, and voiding of urine. Serious kidney complications associated with IBD are rare, ... Proteinuria, an elevated level of protein in the urine, is one sign of amyloidosis. A biopsy (tissue sample) of the kidney can confirm the diagnosis. Various ...

  1. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... has two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  2. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  3. Complications in ankle arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zengerink, Maartje; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    To determine the complication rate for ankle arthroscopy. A review of a consecutive series of patients undergoing ankle arthroscopy in our hospital between 1987 and 2006 was undertaken. Anterior ankle arthroscopy was performed by means of a 2-portal dorsiflexion method with intermittent soft tissue

  4. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Gongora

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia, gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up.

  5. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Pregnancy Complications: Placental Abruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at risk? Zika virus and pregnancy Folic acid Medicine safety and pregnancy Birth defects prevention Learn how to help reduce ... high blood pressure, not smoking or using street drugs, and always wearing a seatbelt when riding in a car. ... complications Preterm labor & premature birth The newborn intensive ...

  7. Treatment of complicated grief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Rosner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide.

  8. Renal posttransplant's vascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašić Dragoslav

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Despite high graft and recipient survival figures worldwide today, a variety of technical complications can threaten the transplant in the postoperative period. Vascular complications are commonly related to technical problems in establishing vascular continuity or to damage that occurs during donor nephrectomy or preservation [13]. AIM The aim of the presenting study is to evaluate counts and rates of vascular complications after renal transplantation and to compare the outcome by donor type. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 463 kidneys (319 from living related donor LD and 144 from cadaveric donor - CD were transplanted during the period between June 1975 and December 1998 at the Urology & Nephrology Institute of Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade. Average recipients' age was 33.7 years (15-54 in LD group and 39.8 (19-62 in CD group. Retrospectively, we analyzed medical records of all recipients. Statistical analysis is estimated using Hi-squared test and Fischer's test of exact probability. RESULTS Major vascular complications including vascular anastomosis thrombosis, internal iliac artery stenosis, internal iliac artery rupture obliterant vasculitis and external iliac vein rupture were analyzed. In 25 recipients (5.4% some of major vascular complications were detected. Among these cases, 22 of them were from CD group vs. three from LD group. Relative rate of these complications was higher in CD group vs. LD group (p<0.0001. Among these complications dominant one was vascular anastomosis thrombosis which occurred in 18 recipients (17 from CD vs. one from LD. Of these recipients 16 from CD lost the graft, while the rest of two (one from each group had lethal outcome. DISCUSSION Thrombosis of renal allograft vascular anastomosis site is the most severe complication following renal transplantation. In the literature, renal allograft thrombosis is reported with different incidence rates, from 0.5-4% [14, 15, 16]. Data from the

  9. Neurological complications of alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Nikiforov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nervous system lesions associated with chronic alcohol intoxication are common in clinical practice. They lead to aggravated alcoholic disease, its more frequent recurrences, and intensified pathological craving for alcohol. Neurological pathology in turn occurs with frequent exacerbations. The interaction of diseases, age, and medical  pathomorphism modifies the clinical presentation and course of the  major pathology, as well as comorbidity, the nature and severity of  complications, worsens quality of life in a patient, and makes the  diagnostic and treatment process difficult. The paper discusses the  classification, clinical variants, biochemical and molecular biological  aspects of various complications of alcoholic disease. It considers its  most common form, in particular alcoholic polyneuropathy, as well as its rarer variants, such as hemorrhagic encephalopathy with a subacute course (Gayet–Wernicke encephalopathy.

  10. Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Malhi, Harmeet; Acosta, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Obesity usually is associated with morbidity related to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are many gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases for which obesity is the direct cause (eg, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) or is a significant risk factor, such as reflux esophagitis and gallstones. When obesity is a risk factor, it may interact with other mechanisms and result in earlier presentation or complicated diseases. There are increased odds ratios or relative risks of several gastrointestinal complications of obesity: gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, erosive gastritis, gastric cancer, diarrhea, colonic diverticular disease, polyps, cancer, liver disease including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallstones, acute pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Gastroenterologists are uniquely poised to participate in the multidisciplinary management of obesity as physicians caring for people with obesity-related diseases, in addition to their expertise in nutrition and endoscopic interventions. PMID:28192107

  11. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise E. Simcox

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction. Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  12. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lemierre's Syndrome Complicating Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre's syndrome is an anaerobic suppurative thrombophlebitis involving the internal jugular vein secondary to oropharyngeal infection. There is only one previous case report in pregnancy which was complicated by premature delivery of an infant that suffered significant neurological damage. We present an atypical case diagnosed in the second trimester with a live birth at term. By reporting this case, we hope to increase the awareness of obstetricians to the possibility of Lemierre's syndrome when patients present with signs of unabating oropharyngeal infection and pulmonary symptoms.

  14. [Complications of hemorrhoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    The most common and serious complications of haemorrhoids include perianal thrombosis and incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids with subsequent thrombosis. They are characterised by severe pain in the perianal region possibly with bleeding. In a short history of the perianal thrombosis, acute surgical incision or excision is indicated, which can result in rapid relief of the painful symptoms. In incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids, emergency haemorrhoidectomy may also be indicated. Segmental haemorrhoidectomy in the most affected quadrants followed by further elective surgery for haemorrhoids in the next stage is preferred.

  15. Complications of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.S.; Parker, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review systematically the toxicity of contemporary chemotherapy and irradiation on normal tissues of growing children. Whenever possible, the separate toxicity of chemotherapy, irradiation, and combination therapy is addressed. However, it is not always possible to quantitate specifically such reactions in the face of multiple drug therapy, which may enhance radiation injury or reactivate prior radiation injury. Prior detailed reviews have provided important sources of information concerning radiation injury for this more general discussion. The information provided will assist both the clinician and the radiologist in the recognition of early and late complications of therapy in pediatric oncology

  16. Complications of Macular Peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  17. Complications associated with orthognathic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    While most patients undergo orthognathic surgery for aesthetic purposes, aesthetic improvements are most often followed by postoperative functional complications. Therefore, patients must carefully decide whether their purpose of undergoing orthognathic surgery lies on the aesthetic side or the functional side. There is a wide variety of complications associated with orthognathic surgery. There should be a clear distinction between malpractice and complications. Complications can be resolved without any serious problems if the cause is detected early and adequate treatment provided. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must have a full understanding of the types, causes, and treatment of complications, and should deliver this information to patients who develop these complications. PMID:28280704

  18. Long term complications of diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long-term complications of diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, ... other tests. All these may help you keep complications of diabetes away. You will need to check your blood ...

  19. Complication of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imajo, Yoshinari; Suematsu, Toru; Narabayashi, Isamu; Gose, Kyuhei; Takimoto, Saeko

    1984-01-01

    The radiation pneumonitis is a major complication for patients recieving thoracic irradiation. This report describe the radiographic recognition, pathological change and imapired pulmonary functions of radiation pneumonitis. The 57 patients with lung cancer treated with radiation are analyzed on the pneumonitis by chest X-P. Among these, 50 patients (88%) develop radiation pneumonitis. Repeated CT scans give more detailed information than conventional radiograms as to exdative changes. The pathological analysis are made on the 35 patients of which affected lungs are resected after pre-operative irradiation. Three phases are recognized in the evolution of pneumonitis, the ongestive, the degenerative, and the fibrotic. Adding to the morphorogical damage, pulmonary functions also detrieorate both in ventilation and perfusion scans. (author)

  20. Tattoo complaints and complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen; Carlsen, Katrina Hutton; Sepehri, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Tattoos cause a broad range of clinical problems. Mild complaints, especially sensitivity to sun, are very common and seen in 1/5 of cases. Medical complications are dominated by allergy to tattoo pigment haptens or haptens generated in the skin, especially in red tattoos but also in blue and green...... tattoos. Symptoms are major and can be compared to cumbersome pruritic skin diseases. Tattoo allergies and local reactions show distinct clinical manifestations, with plaque-like, excessive hyperkeratotic, ulcero-necrotic, lymphopathic, neuro-sensory, and scar patterns. Reactions in black tattoos......) transferred by tattooing remain a significant risk needing active prevention. It is noteworthy that cancer arising in tattoos, in regional lymph nodes, and in other organs due to tattoo pigments and ingredients has not been detected or noted as a significant clinical problem hitherto, despite millions...

  1. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J. [Saint Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author).

  2. Neurologic Complications of Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Rajat

    2018-02-01

    Neurologic disturbances including encephalopathy, seizures, and focal deficits complicate the course 10-30% of patients undergoing organ or stem cell transplantation. While much or this morbidity is multifactorial and often associated with extra-cerebral dysfunction (e.g., graft dysfunction, metabolic derangements), immunosuppressive drugs also contribute significantly. This can either be through direct toxicity (e.g., posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome from calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus in the acute postoperative period) or by facilitating opportunistic infections in the months after transplantation. Other neurologic syndromes such as akinetic mutism and osmotic demyelination may also occur. While much of this neurologic dysfunction may be reversible if related to metabolic factors or drug toxicity (and the etiology is recognized and reversed), cases of multifocal cerebral infarction, hemorrhage, or infection may have poor outcomes. As transplant patients survive longer, delayed infections (such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy) and post-transplant malignancies are increasingly reported.

  3. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author)

  4. Complications of acucise endopyelotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, F J; Herrell, S D; Jahoda, A E; Albala, D M

    1998-10-01

    Endoscopic management of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction has a success rate of 80% to 86%. We have been performing a ureteral cutting balloon procedure under fluoroscopic control (Acucise endopyelotomy) for UPJ obstruction at Loyola University Medical Center since 1991. The overall success rate in 77 patients was 78%. All patients had a preoperative intravenous urogram or a retrograde pyelogram, but none had vascular imaging studies. Acucise endopyelotomy consisted of a posterolateral incision of the UPJ and placement of an endopyelotomy or double-J stent. Foley catheter placement at the end of the procedure demonstrated significant gross hematuria in three patients (4%). All three remained hemodynamically stable but with significant drops in postprocedure hemoglobin levels, which necessitated blood transfusion. Aggressive management included angiographic studies and embolization of lower-pole branching arteries in two patients (3%). One patient stopped bleeding after being given two units of blood. None of the patients required an open exploratory procedure. Although the risk of vascular injury is low with Acucise endopyelotomy, prolonged postoperative gross hematuria does mandate investigation and observation. Angiographic embolization appears to be the therapeutic modality of choice for patients with hemorrhagic complications after an Acucise endopyelotomy.

  5. Renal complications of anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, J; Tyson, E; Forni, L G

    2018-01-01

    Peri-operative acute kidney injury is common, accounting for 30-40% of all in-hospital cases of acute kidney injury. It is associated with clinically significant morbidity and mortality even with what was hitherto regarded as relatively trivial increases in serum creatinine, and carries over a 12-fold relative risk of death following major abdominal surgery. Comorbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, liver disease and particularly pre-existing chronic kidney disease, as well as the type and urgency of surgery, are major risk factors for the development of postoperative acute kidney injury. As yet, there are no specific treatment options for the injured kidney, although there are several modifiable risk factors of which the anaesthetist should be aware. As well as the avoidance of potential nephrotoxins and appropriate volume balance, optimal anaesthetic management should aim to reduce the risk of postoperative renal complications. This may include careful ventilatory management and blood pressure control, as well as appropriate analgesic strategies. The choice of anaesthetic agent may also influence renal outcomes. Rather than concentrate on the classical management of acute kidney injury, this review focuses on the potential development of acute kidney injury peri-operatively, and the means by which this may be ameliorated. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Chest complication after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, B. H.; Choi, J. Y.; Hahm, C. K.; Kang, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of many advances in medicine, anesthetic technique and surgical managements, pulmonary problems are the most frequent postoperative complications, particularly after abdominal surgery. As postoperative pulmonary complications, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, chronic bronchitis and lung abscess can be occurred. This study include evaluation of chest films of 2006 patients (927 male, 1079 female), who had been operated abdominal surgery from Jan. 1979 to June, 1980 in the Hanyang university hospital. The results were as follows: 1. 70 cases out of total 2006 cases (3.5%) developed postoperative chest complications, 51 cases (5.5%) in male, 19 cases (1.8%) in female. 2. The complication rate was increased according to the increase of age. The incidence of the postoperative complications over 40 years of age was higher than the overall average complications rate. 3. The most common postoperative pulmonary complication was pleural effusion, next pneumonia, atelectasis and pulmonary edema respectively. 4. The complication rate of the group of upper abdominal surgery is much higher than the group of lower abdominal surgery. 5. Complication rate was increased according to increase of the duration of operation. 6. There were significant correlations between the operation site and side of the complicated hemithorax

  7. Complications in ankle fracture surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ovaska, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    Mikko Ovaska. Complications in Ankle Fracture Surgery. Helsinki Bone and Joint Research Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. Helsinki 2014. Ankle fractures are among the most frequently encountered surgically treated fractures. The operative treatment of this fracture may be associated with several complications. The most frequently encountered complications are related wound healing, and deep infection may have d...

  8. Coloseminal fistula complicating sigmoid diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Cuenod, Charles-André; Jian, Raymond; Cellier, Christophe; Berger, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We report on a 32-year-old man with a history of chronic lower abdominal pain and urogenital symptoms, leading to the diagnosis of coloseminal fistula complicating diverticular disease. We reviewed the literature on this rare clinical entity and would like to stress the role of pelvic imaging with rectal contrast to investigate complicated forms of diverticular disease. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Pulmonary complications in neurosurgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randeep Guleria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neurosurgical patients. The common pulmonary complications in neurosurgical patients include pneumonia, postoperative atelectasis, respiratory failure, pulmonary embolism, and neurogenic pulmonary edema. Postoperative lung expansion strategies have been shown to be useful in prevention of the postoperative complications in surgical patients. Low tidal volume ventilation should be used in patients who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. An antibiotic use policy should be put in practice depending on the local patterns of antimicrobial resistance in the hospital. Thromboprophylactic strategies should be used in nonambulatory patients. Meticulous attention should be paid to infection control with a special emphasis on hand-washing practices. Prevention and timely management of these complications can help to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with pulmonary complications.

  10. Complications of pneumoconiosis: Radiologic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jae Sup; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hyo Rim; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Ko, Jeong Min; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2013-01-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure

  11. Complications of pneumoconiosis: Radiologic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Sup [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jung Im, E-mail: jijung@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Rim [Department of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, St. Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Arakawa, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine (Japan); Koo, Jung-Wan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure.

  12. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding.

  13. Pulmonary complications of cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, M.Y.; Flight, W.; Smith, E.

    2014-01-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has steadily increased over recent decades with a corresponding increase in the frequency of complications of the disease. Radiologists are increasingly involved with managing and identifying the pulmonary complications of CF. This article reviews the common manifestations of CF lung disease as well as updating radiologists with a number of less well-known complications of the condition. Early and accurate detection of the pulmonary effects of CF are increasingly important to prevent irreversible lung damage and give patients the greatest possibility of benefiting from the new therapies becoming available, which correct the underlying defect causing CF

  14. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nihat Sayin; Necip Kara; Gokhan Pekel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problemthat induces ernestful complications and it causessignificant morbidity owing to specific microvascularcomplications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy andneuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as,ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy.It can affect children, young people and adults and isbecoming more common. Ocular complications associatedwith DM are progressive and rapidly becoming theworld's most significant cause of morbidity and arepreventable with early detection and timely treatment.This review provides an overview of five main ocularcomplications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathyand papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surfacediseases.

  15. A COMPLICATED GRIEF INTERVENTION MODEL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-29

    Jul 29, 2010 ... of complicated grief as a contributing factor to impaired social functioning. This can ... includes a diagnosis of bereavement-related major depression if symptoms ..... networking, Social Sciences Citation Index, Social Sciences.

  16. Medical complications of bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Philip S; O'Melia, Anne; Brown, Carrie; Gibson, Dennis; Hollis, Jeff; Westmoreland, Patricia

    2017-12-02

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with many different medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa, and emphasizes the importance of a timely approach to diagnosis and management.

  17. A very complicated pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Gilbert*

    2013-12-01

    Discussion: Re-expansion pulmonary oedema is a recognised complication of large pleural effusion drainage. The mechanism remains unclear, although reduced left ventricular function, in this case from a possible pericardial effusion, may be a precipitant. To prevent this phenomenon the British Thoracic Society recommends draining a maximum of 1.5 litres of fluid. This case was further complicated by a pneumothorax; again a recognised complication, especially if there is underlying poor compliance of the lung parenchyma. Re-expansion pulmonary oedema has an incidence of <1% and pneumothorax <5%. Their occurrence has not previously been reported simultaneously. Large pleural effusions are commonly encountered in clinical practice in South Africa. The existence of multiple co-morbidities including tuberculosis, HIV and impaired cardiac function may complicate their management. This case highlights the need for close monitoring and controlled drainage of pleural effusions in emergency practice.

  18. A COMPLICATED GRIEF INTERVENTION MODEL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-29

    Jul 29, 2010 ... work approach to therapy) in an attempt to develop a model for complicated grief intervention ..... way feels right for them, thus making them equal partners with .... This question points out the benefits of success and affords the.

  19. Liver Transplant: Complications/Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transplant: Complications/Medications Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For Veterans and the Public Veterans and the Public Home Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis C Home Getting ...

  20. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalin Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia.

  1. Complications of lower limb phlebography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitler, E; Milbert, L; Richter, E I; Ringelmann, W; Strohm, C

    1983-06-01

    Some rare, but serious, complications during leg and pelvic phlebography are described. One fatal pulmonary embolus and six cases of necrosis of the dorsum of the foot due to phlebography were encountered. The causes, pathogenetic factors and other possible complications are discussed. Extravasation of contrast due to puncture on the lateral side of the foot, or near the ankle joint, leads to the formation of a contrast bleb which may proceed to tissue necrosis.

  2. Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor ... Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home ...

  3. Pulmonary complications in renal transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Bin; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Seung Rho; Hahm, Chang Kok; Joo, Kyung Bin [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema arising from renal transplantation. Among 393 patients who had undergone renal transplantation at our hospital during a previous ten-year period, 23 with pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema were included in this study. The complications involved were infection caused by CMV (n=6), bacteria (n=4), fungus (n=4), tuberculosis (n=2), varicella (n=1) or chlamydia (n=1), and malignancy involving lung cancer (n=4) or Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1). Two chest radiologists reviewed all images. The complications manifesting mainly as pulmonary nodules were lung cancer (4/4), tuberculosis (1/2), and Kaposi's sarcoma (1/1). Pulmonary consolidation was a main feature in bacterial infection (4/4), fungal infection (3/4), tuberculosis (1/2), chlamydial infection (1/1), and varicellar pneumonia (1/1). Ground-glass attenuation was a main CT feature in CMV pneumonia (4/6), and increased interstitial making was a predominant radiographic feature in CMV pneumonia (2/6). The main radiologic features described above can be helpful for differential diagnosis of the pulmonary complications of renal transplantation.

  4. Metabolomics window into diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Qiao, Shuxuan; Shi, Chenze; Wang, Shuya; Ji, Guang

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes has become a major global health problem. The elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during the diabetic progression is critical for better understanding its pathogenesis, and identifying potential biomarkers and drug targets. Metabolomics is a promising tool to reveal the metabolic changes and the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The present review provides an update on the application of metabolomics in diabetic complications, including diabetic coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy, and this review provides notes on the prevention and prediction of diabetic complications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Avoiding Complications with MPFL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marvin K; Werner, Brian C; Diduch, David R

    2018-05-12

    To discuss the potentially significant complications associated with medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Additionally, to review the most current and relevant literature with an emphasis on avoiding these potential complications. Multiple cadaveric studies have characterized the anatomy of the MPFL and the related morphologic abnormalities that contribute to recurrent lateral patellar instability. Such abnormalities include patella alta, excessive tibial tubercle to trochlear grove (TT-TG) distance, trochlear dysplasia, and malalignment. Recent studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes associated with the treatment of concomitant pathology in combination with MPFL reconstruction, which is critical in avoiding recurrent instability and complications. Although there remains a lack of consensus regarding various critical aspects of MPFL reconstruction, certain concepts remain imperative. Our preferred methods and rationales for surgical techniques are described. These include appropriate work up, a combination of procedures to address abnormal morphology, anatomical femoral insertion, safe and secure patellar fixation, appropriate graft length fixation, and thoughtful knee flexion during fixation.

  6. [Gastroplasty: complications and their prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlienger, J L; Meyer, L; Rohr, S; Pradignac, A; Perrin, A E; Meyer, C; Simon, C

    2003-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is now frequently proposed for the treatment of morbid or complicated obesity since the introduction of minimally invasive laparoscopic anti-obesity operations such as the adjustable silicone gastric binding gastroplasty. However this reversible procedure in not always as safe as presumed and the results in weight loss may be sometimes disappointing. Side effects are common and early or late complications occured in more than 20% out of the patients. They are favoured by post operative eating disorders. Nutritional consequences are probably underestimated and are not limited to uncomfortable digestive symptoms. Some deficiencies in micronutriments have been described. The worsening of previous eating disorders or psychosocial abnormalities are not seldom. Gastroplasty is not an harmless procedure. A good selection in patients, a regular follow up, nutritional advices and psychosocial management by a multidisciplinar team are required to reduce complications after gastroplasty.

  7. Neurological complications following bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was to report on Brazilian cases of neurological complications from bariatric surgery. The literature on the subject is scarce. METHOD: Cases attended by neurologists in eight different Brazilian cities were collected and described in the present study. RESULTS: Twenty-six cases were collected in this study. Axonal polyneuropathy was the most frequent neurological complication, but cases of central demyelination, Wernicke syndrome, optical neuritis, radiculits, meralgia paresthetica and compressive neuropathies were also identified. Twenty-one patients (80% had partial or no recovery from the neurological signs and symptoms. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery, a procedure that is continuously increasing in popularity, is not free of potential neurological complications that should be clearly presented to the individual undergoing this type of surgery. Although a clear cause-effect relation cannot be established for the present cases, the cumulative literature on the subject makes it important to warn the patient of the potential risks of this procedure.

  8. Neurological complications of infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sonia A.A.; Yaqub, Basim A.; Al-Deeb, Saleh M.

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed the files of 80 successive patients with native and prosthetic valve endocarditis admitted to Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital. Neurolological complications (NC) occurred in 28 (35%) patients. The valves involved were mitral in 12 (43%), aortic in eight (29%), combined mitral and aortic lesions in six (21%) and others in two (7%). The common causative organisms were Streptococci in 12 (43%), Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermides, both occurring in four (14%). Compared to the 52 infective endocarditis patients with no neurological complications (NNC), the NC occurred more frequently in male patients, those with aortic valve lesion, those with atrial fibrillation, those with delayed therapy and those with causative organisms being Streptococci or Staphylococci. Eleven patients died (39%), 12 (43%) recovered with motor sequelae, six (21%) had seizure disorder and five (18%) had full recovery. The frequency of neurological complications and mortality is comparable to those reported in the literature: however, the frequency was higher in our patients. (author)

  9. Venous thromboembolism and arterial complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandoni, Paolo; Piovella, Chiara; Pesavento, Raffaele

    2012-04-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests the likelihood of a link between venous and arterial thrombosis. The two vascular complications share several risk factors, such as age, obesity, smoking, diabetes mellitus, blood hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and metabolic syndrome. Moreover, there are many examples of conditions accounting for both venous and arterial thrombosis, such as the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, hyperhomocysteinemia, malignancies, infections, and the use of hormonal treatment. Finally, several recent studies have consistently shown that patients with venous thromboembolism are at a higher risk of arterial thrombotic complications than matched control individuals. We, therefore, speculate the two vascular complications are simultaneously triggered by biological stimuli responsible for activating coagulation and inflammatory pathways in both the arterial and the venous system. Future studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association, to assess its extent, and to evaluate its implications for clinical practice. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Complications After Cosmetic Surgery Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Holger J; Simic, Dario; Fuchs, Nina; Schweizer, Riccardo; Mehra, Tarun; Giovanoli, Pietro; Plock, Jan A

    2017-04-01

    Cosmetic surgery tourism characterizes a phenomenon of people traveling abroad for aesthetic surgery treatment. Problems arise when patients return with complications or need of follow-up care. To investigate the complications of cosmetic surgery tourism treated at our hospital as well as to analyze arising costs for the health system. Between 2010 and 2014, we retrospectively included all patients presenting with complications arising from cosmetic surgery abroad. We reviewed medical records for patients' characteristics including performed operations, complications, and treatment. Associated cost expenditure and Diagnose Related Groups (DRG)-related reimbursement were analyzed. In total 109 patients were identified. All patients were female with a mean age of 38.5 ± 11.3 years. Most procedures were performed in South America (43%) and Southeast (29.4%) or central Europe (24.8%), respectively. Favored procedures were breast augmentation (39.4%), abdominoplasty (11%), and breast reduction (7.3%). Median time between the initial procedure abroad and presentation was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9) for early, 81.5 days (IQR, 69.5) for midterm, and 4.9 years (IQR, 9.4) for late complications. Main complications were infections (25.7%), wound breakdown (19.3%), and pain/discomfort (14.7%). The majority of patients (63.3%) were treated conservatively; 34.8% became inpatients with a mean hospital stay of 5.2 ± 3.8 days. Overall DRG-related reimbursement premiums approximately covered the total costs. Despite warnings regarding associated risks, cosmetic surgery tourism has become increasingly popular. Efficient patients' referral to secondary/tertiary care centers with standardized evaluation and treatment can limit arising costs without imposing a too large burden on the social healthcare system. 4. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Intracraneal complications after raquis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, J J; Malillos, M

    Intracraneal bleeding is a rare complication after raquis surgery. It is believed to occur as a drop in the intracraneal pressure after a loss of CSF secondary to an iatrogenic dural tear. We report a patient who after surgery for lumbar stenosis presented a subarachnoid haemorrhage, an intraparenchymal haematoma, and a subdural haematoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature with such complications after this type of surgery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. LVAD pannus complicating destination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Ignaszewski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in technology, ventricular assist devices still experience a number of complications limiting their long-term use. We present a 73-year-old woman implanted with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD five years prior due to end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy, who died several weeks after admission to the hospital. Post-mortem examination revealed a large obstructing pannus in the LVAD inflow. As a result of increased LVAD use, complications such as infection, device thrombosis and pannus must be promptly recognized and managed appropriately to ensure the greatest chance of patient survival.

  13. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Postpartum Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey E. Ward

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sigmoid volvulus is a rare complication of pregnancy and the puerperium. Case. A 19-year-old patient, gravida 1 para 0 at 41 0/7 weeks of gestation, admitted for late-term induction of labor underwent an uncomplicated primary low transverse cesarean delivery for arrest of descent. Her postoperative period was complicated by sudden onset of abdominal pain and the ultimate diagnosis of sigmoid volvulus. Conclusion. Prompt surgical evaluation of an acute abdomen in the postpartum period is essential; delayed diagnosis and treatment can lead to significant maternal morbidity and mortality.

  14. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  15. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); M.R. de Vries (Mark); M. van der Elst (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of

  16. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Tim; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; de Vries, Mark R.; van der Elst, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of the syndesmotic screw

  17. Radiotherapy of complicated diabetic osteoarthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlyashchuk, E.L.; Ustinova, V.F.; Machkovskaya, G.K.; Moskvicheva, G.P.; Shekhtman, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    The method of antiinflammatory X-ray therapy as a complex treatment of 50 patients with complicated diabetic osteoarthropathy is presented. High efficacy of antiinflammatory X-ray therapy was noted; it broadened the possibilities of treatment of the given pathology. There was no patient in whom a negative effect of irradiation on the course of diabetes mellitus had been observed

  18. Medical Treatment of Tattoo Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Tattooing is a skin trauma and involves a special vulnus punctatum (with inserted tattoo ink, a vulnus venenatum), which should heal with no infection and no local complication. Local treatment in the healing phase ideally builds on the 'moist wound' principle using plastic film, hydrocolloids...

  19. How to avoid sedation complications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To ensure patient safety, it is crucial that the airway is safeguarded. The single most important responsibility is to protect it. An unobstructed airway, with intact protective reflexes and respiratory drive, is essential to avoid complications. In some procedures, e.g. dental, the airway may need to be shared with the surgeon.

  20. Surgical Treatment of Tattoo Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepehri, Mitra; Jørgensen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    With a continuing increase in the number of tattoos performed worldwide, the need to treat tattoo complications is growing. Earlier treatments of chronic inflammatory tattoo reactions were dominated by a medical approach, or with no active intervention. In this chapter, we will address modern...

  1. Multipl Pregnancies and Their Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Turan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the complications observed in multipl pregnancies which are increasing in day by day. Material and method: We reviewed 173 multiple pregnancies that were followed up in the Department of Obstetric and Gynecology in Ege University during one year period and determined the preterm delivery ratio, discordance between fetuses and investigated the complications which occurred during pregnancy. Results: 148 twin, 24 triplet and 1 quadriplet pregnancies had been followed in a year. While 56 of twin pregnancies and 4 of the triplet pregnancies occurred spontaneously, others conceived with medical treatment or with assisted reproductive technology. Cerclage was performed in 11 pregnancies. Preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus and cholestasis were observed in 12,26 and 8 patients respectively. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome was present in 4 patients and one patient had acardiac-acephalic twin pregnancy. Four patients had emergency cesarean section due to ablatio placenta. While 54 patients were hospitalized for one week to twelve weeks because of preterm labour 36 women had preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Only 38 patients had any problem during pregnancy. Discussion: Developments in assisted reproductive technology have been increasing the number of multiple gestations and their complications. The complications due to preterm labor, increased requirement of Neonatal Intensive Care Units and hospital payments are all burden on the families as well as on the social insurance companies.

  2. Complications of occipital bone pneumatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, Mary; Roche, Jim; Biggs, Michael; Forer, Martin; Fagan, Paul; Davis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Four cases of occipital bone pneumatization and subsequent complications are described, which include a pathological fracture of C 1 and the occipital bone, spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema and pneumatocele formation. Reviews of the published literature and possible aetiological factors have been discussed Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  3. Is this ?complicated? opioid withdrawal?

    OpenAIRE

    Parkar, S.R.; Seethalakshmi, R; Adarkar, S; Kharawala, S

    2006-01-01

    Seven patients with opioid dependence admitted in the de-addiction centre for detoxification developed convulsions and delirium during the withdrawal phase. After ruling out all other possible causes of these complications, opioid withdrawal seemed to emerge as the most likely explanation. The unpredictability of the course of opioid dependence and withdrawal needs to be considered when treating patients with opioid dependence.

  4. CNS complications of rotavirus gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volosinova, D.

    2010-01-01

    Rotavirus infection may be accompanied by serious complications, e.g. disabilities central nervous system (CNS). Theory rotavirus penetration across the blood-brain barrier and subsequent rota-associated convulsions by the 2-year case-history of the patient. Rotavirosis minor gastrointestinal symptoms may lead to erroneous diagnosis. (author)

  5. Complications of Prematurity - An Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Praveen; Rawat, Munmun; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2017-01-01

    Infographics or information graphics are easy-to-understand visual representation of knowledge. An infographic outlining the course of an extremely preterm infant and various potential complications encountered during a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stay was developed. This infographic can be used to discuss outcomes of prematurity during prenatal counseling and while the infant is in the NICU. PMID:29138522

  6. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions

  7. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS. As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  8. Complicity in International Criminal Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksenova, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Complicity is a criminal law doctrine that attributes responsibility to those who do not physically perpetrate the crime. It is an essential mode of liability for core international crimes because it reaches out to senior political and military leadership. These persons do not usually engage...... in direct offending, yet in the context of mass atrocities they are often more culpable than foot soldiers. The Statutes of the ad hoc tribunals, hybrid courts and the International Criminal Court expressly provide for different forms of complicity, and domestic legal systems recognize it in one form...... or another. This is in contrast with alternative modes of liability implied from the Statutes to address the situations with multiple accused removed from the scene of the crime / (in)direct co-perpetration, extended perpetration and the joint criminal enterprise....

  9. Oral complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockhart, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    Comprehensive management of patients receiving radiotherapy to the head and neck dictates that they have a thorough dental evaluation as part of their overall treatment planning. Early and appropriate patient education and dental treatment, along with careful management during and after radiotherapy, will significantly decrease the incidence and severity of complications, improve quality of life, and increase tolerance to therapy. 49 refs.; 16 figs.; 1 table

  10. Oral complications in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications

  11. Dengue-associated neuromuscular complications

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra Kumar Garg; Hardeep Singh Malhotra; Amita Jain; Kiran Preet Malhotra

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is associated with many neurological dysfunctions. Up to 4% of dengue patients may develop neuromuscular complications. Muscle involvement can manifest with myalgias, myositis, rhabdomyolysis and hypokalemic paralysis. Diffuse myalgia is the most characteristic neurological symptom of dengue fever. Dengue-associated myositis can be of varying severity ranging from self-limiting muscle involvement to severe dengue myositis. Dengue-associated hypokalemic paralysis often has a rapidly evo...

  12. Smoking, Labor, & Delivery: It's Complicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    You probably have mixed feelings about going into labor. On one hand, bringing a new life into the world is really exciting. On the other, it can be really scary to have a baby, especially if this is your first child. Unfortunately, it can be even scarier if you smoke. Research shows that smoking during pregnancy can lead to serious complications for you and your baby during labor and delivery.

  13. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Haruko; Koizumi, Nobuhiko; Nihei, Kenji; Taguchi, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Haruki.

    1982-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma came to complete remission after combined chemotherapy, intrathecal methotrexate, and whole brain irradiation of 2,400 rad. Two years after diagnosis, he developed it hemiparesis. CT scan showed cerebral infarction and hydrocephalus, and angiography revealed obstruction of the left middle cerebral artery. He survived with marked neurological deficits and no relapse of lymphoma. The literature was reviewed concerning complications after radiation to the brain. (Kondo, M.)

  14. Preoperative Smoking Status and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Grønkjær; Eliasen, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type.......To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type....

  15. Postoperative Complications of Beger Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana Samejima Peternelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic pancreatitis (CP is considered an inflammatory disease that may cause varying degrees of pancreatic dysfunction. Conservative and surgical treatment options are available depending on dysfunction severity. Presentation of Case. A 36-year-old male with history of heavy alcohol consumption and diagnosed CP underwent a duodenal-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR or Beger procedure after conservative treatment failure. Refractory pain was reported on follow-up three months after surgery and postoperative imaging uncovered stones within the main pancreatic duct and intestinal dilation. The patient was subsequently subjected to another surgical procedure and intraoperative findings included protein plugs within the main pancreatic duct and pancreaticojejunal anastomosis stricture. A V-shaped enlargement and main pancreatic duct dilation in addition to the reconstruction of the previous pancreaticojejunal anastomosis were performed. The patient recovered with no further postoperative complications in the follow-up at an outpatient clinic. Discussion. Main duct and pancreaticojejunal strictures are an unusual complication of the Beger procedure but were identified intraoperatively as the cause of patient’s refractory pain and explained intraductal protein plugs accumulation. Conclusion. Patients that undergo Beger procedures should receive close outpatient clinical follow-up in order to guarantee postoperative conservative treatment success and therefore guarantee an early detection of postoperative complications.

  16. [Complications after refractive surgery abroad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, E; Kern, T; Kohnen, T

    2008-05-01

    In this article a retrospective analysis of patients presenting at a German university following refractive surgery abroad is presented. A total of 20 cases of patients who had undergone treatment between 1998 and 2006 in China (1 case), Greece (1 case), Iran (1 case), Russia (2 cases), Switzerland (1 case), Slovakia (1 case), Spain (2 cases), South Africa (3 cases), Turkey (6 cases) and the USA (2 cases) were analyzed retrospectively. The following complications were observed: epithelial ingrowth into the interface with or without melting of the flap (6 cases), corneal ectasia (2 cases), dislocation of a phakic posterior chamber intraocular lens and prolapse into the anterior chamber with endothelial cell loss (1 case), secondary increase of intraocular pressure following implantation of a phakic intraocular lens (1 case), flap-related complications following laser-in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (2 cases), keratitis (1 case), dislocation of the complete flap (1 case), diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) grade IV (1 case), hyperopia as a consequence of radial keratotomy (1 case), and under correction/over correction and poor optical quality following laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) and LASIK for high myopia (5 cases) with possible early corneal ectasia. There are four important problems arising from refractive surgery abroad, often referred to as "LASIK tourism": wrong indications, insufficient management of complications, lack of postoperative care and the health economic aspect.

  17. Thromboembolic complications of thyroid storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, T; Benjamin, S; Cozma, L

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of hyperthyroidism. Early recognition and prompt treatment are essential. Atrial fibrillation can occur in up to 40% of patients with thyroid storm. Studies have shown that hyperthyroidism increases the risk of thromboembolic events. There is no consensus with regard to the initiation of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in severe thyrotoxicosis. Anticoagulation is not routinely initiated if the risk is low on a CHADS2 score; however, this should be considered in patients with thyroid storm or severe thyrotoxicosis with impending storm irrespective of the CHADS2 risk, as it appears to increase the risk of thromboembolic episodes. Herein, we describe a case of thyroid storm complicated by massive pulmonary embolism. Diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical findings. Early recognition and prompt treatment could lead to a favourable outcome.Hypercoagulable state is a recognised complication of thyrotoxicosis.Atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm.Anticoagulation should be considered for patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation irrespective of the CHADS2 score.Patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and clinical evidence of thrombosis should be immediately anticoagulated until hyperthyroidism is under control.

  18. Thoracic complications of rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, H.; Darby, M.; Edey, A.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a relatively common multisystem disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Thoracic disease, both pleural and pulmonary, is a frequent extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis and responsible for approximately 20% of rheumatoid-associated mortality. Rheumatoid disease and its associated therapies can affect all compartments of the lung inciting a range of stereotyped pathological responses and it is not infrequent for multiple disease entities to co-exist. In some instances, development of pulmonary complications may precede typical rheumatological presentation of the disease and be the first indication of an underlying connective tissue disease. The spectrum of thoracic disease related to rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed

  19. [Complications of termination of pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, P

    2016-12-01

    The legalization of abortion in France allowed to disappear almost maternal deaths caused by induced abortions. Nevertheless, the practice of abortion in a medical framework is encumbered with a number of immediate complications. Similarly, the late consequences of the practice of surgical abortion have generated an abundant literature, which it is important to analyse, both to meet the legitimate concerns of patients as to prevent any spread of false ideas under the influence of movements opposed to abortion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Ophthalmologic complications of systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klig, Jean E

    2008-02-01

    The human eye, as an organ, can offer critical clues to the presence of systemic disease. This article discusses the various ophthalmologic manifestations of systemic disease that can be evident on examination by an emergency department provider, as well as some findings that can be discerned with specialty consultation. The following topics are reviewed with respect to potential ocular signs and complications: syphilis, herpes zoster, Lyme disease, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, Reiter's syndrome, Kawasaki's disease, temporal arteritis, endocarditis, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Indications for emergent ophthalmologic consultation are also emphasized.

  1. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient's history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients' data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan.

  2. Orthopaedic complications of osteogenesis imperfecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azrak, S.; Ksyar, R.; Ben Rais, N.

    2009-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disease characterized by bone frailty. It is generally caused by an abnormal production of collagen, which is the main fibrous protein of the bone. Collagen is also present in the skin, tendons, the sclera of the eye and dentin. The most frequent manifestation of osteogenesis imperfecta is the occurrence of multiple fractures without major trauma. Severity and timing of the attack varies widely: some patients sustain a significant number of fractures during early childhood which may have a serious impact on growth, while others will have some fractures separated by a few years. In all cases, the bone strength improves in adulthood. The bone fractures cause pain and bone deformities sometimes result in a smaller size. Scoliosis is frequent and associated with painful vertebral collapses. We present a case of osteogenesis imperfecta in a 40-year-old adult and we describe the various orthopaedic complications of the disease, stressing the role of bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis and monitoring of these complications. (authors)

  3. [The iatrogenic complications of tracheostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirasirova, E A; Kuzina, E A; Lafutkina, N V; Piminidi, O K; Mamedov, R F; Rezakov, R A

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the complications of tracheostomy associated with bleeding from the brachiocephalic trunk. A total of 13 protocols of the autopsy study of the patients who had died in the intensive care unit were available for the analysis. These patients had experienced heavy external bleeding from the tracheostomy defect shortly before death. The study has demonstrated that all the victims had the tracheostomy hole localized below the level of the standard dissection of the tracheal rings. Nine patients presented with a damage to the brachiocephalic trunk while four others had a pressure injury to the blood vessels. The study included the elucidation of the possible relationship between the anthropometric characteristics of the patients and the variability of the passage of the brachiocephalic trunk in front of the trachea. The length of the neck was found to usually correlate with the length of the body and the brachiocephalic trunk to run in front of the trachea at the level of its 8th-11th rings. The results of the present study may be instrumental in reducing the risk of complications after tracheostomy.

  4. Late complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Norie

    1998-01-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  5. Oral complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockhart, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    Approximately 24,000 patients are diagnosed each year with malignant tumors of the head and neck. Many of these patients will be treated with radiotherapy, surgery, or chemotherapy, either singly or in combination. Certain predictable sequelae of radiotherapy exist that may be considered consequences of treatment rather than complications; these may be unavoidable consequences of curative radiotherapy to the head and neck. There are, however, additional problems that occur as a result of radiotherapy that are preventable in both incidence and severity, and are therefore avoidable complications. Cell kinetic factors, radiosensitivity of normal tissues, radiotherapeutic doses necessary for tumor control, and the complex anatomy of the maxillofacial region often predispose patients serious treatment morbidity. The potential for pain, infection, and long-term functional disability with decreased quality of life dictate conscientious management before, during, and after radiotherapy. This chapter discusses common problems that can arise, as well as current methods utilized both to improve patient tolerance to treatment and to decrease the risk of preventable and potentially dose-limiting morbidity

  6. Late complications of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaki, Norie [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  7. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Postoperative Complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complications were determined during the thirty day post operative period. ... An ideal model to predict postoperative complications ... their SAS for purposes of risk stratification; high risk. (0-4), medium .... surgical audit (9,14). Serial monitoring ...

  8. Neuropsychiatric complications of 500 cases of hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moetamedi M

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is often accompanied by diverse types of neuropychiatric complications. To demonstrate these complications we studied 500 hyperthyroid patients, who developed neuropsychiatric complications of hyperthyroidism for which other causes of these neuropsychiatric findings were carefully excluded. The patients were 15 to 65 years old (female to male ratio was 5:1, most of the cases were in third and fourth decades of life. Nervousness, tense dysphoria, insomnia and anxiousness were among the most common psychiatric complications, and tremor, hyperreflexia, thyrotoxic myopathy, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis were the most common neurologic complications. Therefore any physician, wether he or she is a general practitioner or a specialist must be aware of these diverse complications, because these neuropsychiatric complications can lead to the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and treatment of these potentially serious complications.

  9. Neurological complication in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritarwan, K.

    2018-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is neurotropic and immunotropic, making themassive destruction of both systems. Although their amount has been reduced, there is still neurological presentations and complications of HIV remain common in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Neurological opportunistic infections (OI) occur in advanced HIV diseases such as primary cerebral lymphoma, cryptococcal meningitis, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and progressive multifocal encephalopathy. Neurological problem directly related to HIV appear at any stage in the progress of HIV disease, from AIDS-associated dementia to the aseptic meningitis of primary HIV infection observed in subjects with an immune deficiency. The replication of peripheral HIV viral is able to be controlled in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy. Non-HIV-related neurological disease such as stroke increased important as the HIV population ages.

  10. Surgical Treatment of Tattoo Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Mitra; Jørgensen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    With a continuing increase in the number of tattoos performed worldwide, the need to treat tattoo complications is growing. Earlier treatments of chronic inflammatory tattoo reactions were dominated by a medical approach, or with no active intervention. In this chapter, we will address modern surgical approaches applied to situations when medical treatment is inefficient and lasers are not applicable. Dermatome shaving is positioned as first-line treatment of allergic tattoo reactions and also indicated in a number of other tattoo reactions, supplemented with excision in selected cases. The methods allow fundamental treatment with removal of the culprit pigment from the dermis. The different instruments, surgical methods, and treatment schedules are reviewed, and a guide to surgeons is presented. Postoperative treatments and the long-term outcomes are described in detail. An algorithm on specialist treatment and follow-up of tattoo reactions, which can be practiced in other countries, is presented. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Complicated grief in Aboriginal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiwak, Rae; Sareen, Jitender; Elias, Brenda; Martens, Patricia; Munro, Garry; Bolton, James

    2012-06-01

    To date there have been no studies examining complicated grief (CG) in Aboriginal populations. Although this research gap exists, it can be hypothesized that Aboriginal populations may be at increased risk for CG, given a variety of factors, including increased rates of all-cause mortality and death by suicide. Aboriginal people also have a past history of multiple stressors resulting from the effects of colonization and forced assimilation, a significant example being residential school placement. This loss of culture and high rates of traumatic events may place Aboriginal individuals at increased risk for suicide, as well as CG resulting from traumatic loss and suicide bereavement. Studies are needed to examine CG in Aboriginal populations. These studies must include cooperation with Aboriginal communities to help identify risk factors for CG, understand the role of culture among these communities, and identify interventions to reduce poor health outcomes such as suicidal behavior.

  12. Complications of cosmetic eye whitening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ann Q; Hoppener, Catherine; Venkateswaran, Nandini; Choi, Daniel S; Lee, Wendy W

    2017-09-01

    Introduced in 2008 and subsequently popularized in South Korea, cosmetic eye whitening has been offered as a treatment of chronic conjunctival hyperemia. Patients undergo conjunctivectomy with topical mitomycin C (MMC) 0.02% application to achieve a whitened appearance from bleaching of avascular sclera. Much speculation has arisen from this procedure given the limited available evidence on its efficacy and safety. A literature search was performed to review common complications of cosmetic eye whitening, including chronic conjunctival epithelial defects, scleral thinning, avascular zones in the sclera, dry eye syndrome, and diplopia requiring strabismus surgery. Informing the general public of the risks of this procedure is of great importance for dermatologists and other cosmetic surgeons.

  13. Intravitreal Bevacizumab: Indications and Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, S.; Nazim, M.; Karim, S.; Hussain, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bevacizmab is still an unlicensed drug for intraocular use in spite of the fact that it has shown comparable efficacy to other anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF) medications in some large sample randomized control trails. Although repackaged bevacizumab has got safety concerns but its use is growing because of easy availability and low cost. Our study focuses on the diverse and growing indications of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) and its ocular complications in our geographical setting. Method: This interventional case series was carried out at my private practice in Said Anwar Medical Complex, Dabgari, Peshawar, from January 2008 to July 2015. Total of 6107 injections were given to 4352 eyes. Intravitreal bevacizumab was injected in proper operating room setting. Bevacizumab injections were prepared from same vial by multiple withdrawals taking care of aseptic precautions. Follow up was done at 1 week and 20 days and adverse effects were noted. Results: Diabetic macular oedema (36 percent), central retinal vein occlusion (17.6 percent) and branched retinal vein occlusion (11 percent) were the top three indications of IVB. Other common indications were proliferative diabetic retinopathy (9.6 percent), neo-vascular glaucoma (5.9 percent), proliferative diabetic retinopathy with vitreous bleed (4.4 percent), proliferative diabetic retinopathy with tractional retinal detachment (3.7 percent), neo-vascular age related macular degeneration (2.9 percent), central serous retinopathy (1.48 percent) and Eale disease (1.48 percent). Endohthalmitis occurred in 3 eyes (0.069 percent) while retinal detachment was found in only 2 eyes (0.046 percent).Conclusion: Common indications of bevacizumab are diabetic macular oedema, central retinal vein occlusion and branched retinal vein occlusion. Complications like endophthalmitis and retinal detachment are rare. (author)

  14. [Complications and failures in dentoalveolar surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoelinga, P.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Complications and failures are unavoidable in dentoalveolar surgery, but can be reduced if treatment is carried out in the proper manner. Yet, one has to accept a certain percentage of complications and failures and the patient should be informed about that prior to surgery. Complications become

  15. Complications of Whipple surgery: imaging analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Priya; Fleming, Jason; Balachandran, Aparna; Charnsangavej, Chuslip; Tamm, Eric P

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate anatomic findings after the Whipple procedure, and the appearance of its complications, on imaging. Knowledge of the cross-sectional anatomy following the Whipple procedure, and clinical findings for associated complications, are essential to rapidly and accurately diagnose such complications on postoperative studies in order to optimize treatment.

  16. [Postoperative intraperitoneal complications in colon cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhina, E A; Topuzov, É G; Topuzov, É É

    2014-01-01

    The authors studied the clinical characteristics and terms of the development of postoperative intraperitoneal complications in patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. It was stated, that the diversity of clinical data depended on complication characteristics. Results of investigation allowed defining of the most dangerous terms of intraperitoneal complications and risk factors.

  17. Computed tomography of complications of lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyer, P.; Devine, N.; Frachon, I.; Vinatier, I.; Stern, M.; Le Normand, S.; Scherrer, A.

    1997-01-01

    In spite of improvements in single or double lung transplantation (LT) technique, complications after LT are not uncommon; the most frequent ale anastomotic complications, infections and rejection (acute or chronic). Early detection of complications of LT allows the optimal therapeutic option to be taken, yielding decreased morbidity and mortality. In some cases, CT plays a key role in early detection of several complications of LT that may not be depicted with other diagnostic modalities, so that knowledge of their CT features is important. In this pictorial review, the authors describe the spectrum of CT features of the complications of LT (including reimplantation response, mechanical problems, acute and chronic rejection, infection, lymphoproliferative disorders, recurrence of the initial disease and complications involving the pleura and the anastomotic sites). In addition, the authors analyze the value of CT compared to that of the other available modalities for the detection of complications of LT. (orig.). With 19 figs

  18. Recurring complications in second pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Paidas, Michael J; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To clarify the obstetric consequences in a second pregnancy after a first singleton pregnancy complicated by spontaneous preterm delivery or preeclampsia and stratified by the variation in fetal growth. METHODS: In a registry-based cohort study, we identified women having a first...... pregnancies. RESULTS: Compared with a spontaneous first delivery at term, a delivery between 32 and 36 weeks of gestation increased the risk of preterm delivery in the second pregnancy from 2.7% to 14.7% (odds ratio [OR] 6.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.84-6.42) and the risk of preeclampsia from 1.1% to 1.......8% (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.41-1.81); a delivery before 28 weeks increased the risk of a second preterm delivery to 26.0% (OR 13.1, 95% CI 10.8-15.9) and a second pregnancy with preeclampsia to 3.2% (OR 2.96, 95% CI 1.80-4.88). A first delivery in preeclamptic women between 32 and 36 weeks, compared...

  19. ORO dental complications of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaumuri, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Radiation and radioactivity were discovered more than 100 years ago. Since then, radiation has become important in cancer treatment. Approximately one million people will develop invasive cancer each year. Of these, 40% will receive curative benefit from surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination modality. Normal body tissues vary in their response to radiation. As with tumors, normal tissues in which cells are quickly dividing may be affected. This causes some of the side effects of radiation treatment. Since radiation is a local treatment, side effects depend on the area of the body being treated. The early effects of radiation may be seen a few days or weeks after treatments have started and may go on for several weeks after treatments have ended. Other effects may not show up until months, or even years, later. As radiotherapy is a viable treatment modality for head and neck cancer, however a wide range of potentially debilitating dental complications may accompany this treatment. The orofacial tissues of dental significance that may be affected by head and neck radiotherapy are the salivary glands, mucous membranes, taste buds, bone and teeth. (author)

  20. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  1. Complicated infective endocarditis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Seop; Kang, Min-Kyung; Cho, A Jin; Seo, Yu Bin; Kim, Kun Il

    2017-05-08

    Infective endocarditis is associated with not only cardiac complications but also neurologic, renal, musculoskeletal, and systemic complications related to the infection, such as embolization, metastatic infection, and mycotic aneurysm. We report three cases (the first patient is Chinese and the other two are Koreans) of complicated infective endocarditis; two of the cases were associated with a mycotic aneurysm, and one case was associated with a splenic abscess. One case of a patient with prosthetic valve endocarditis was complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage caused by mycotic aneurysm rupture. A second case of a patient with right-sided valve endocarditis associated with a central catheter was complicated by an abdominal aortic mycotic aneurysm. The third patient had a splenic infarction and abscess associated with infected cardiac thrombi. Complicated infective endocarditis is rare and is associated with cardiac, neurologic, renal, musculoskeletal, and systemic complications related to infection, such as embolization, metastatic infection, and mycotic aneurysm. Infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is more frequently associated with complications. Because the mortality rate increases when complications develop, aggressive antibiotic therapy and surgery, combined with specific treatments for the complications, are necessary.

  2. Complications of presumed ocular tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamade, Issam H; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2010-12-01

    To determine the effect of steroid treatment on visual outcome and ocular complications in patients with presumed ocular tuberculosis. Retrospective review of patients with presumptive ocular tuberculosis. The clinical diagnosis was made based on ocular findings, positive purified protein derivative (PPD) testing of more than 15 mm induration, exclusion of other causes of uveitis and positive ocular response to anti-tuberculous therapy (ATT) within 4 weeks. Group 1 included patients who had received oral prednisone or subtenon injection of triamcinolone acetonide prior to ATT. Group 2 included patients who did not receive corticosteroid therapy prior to administration of ATT.   Among 500 consecutive new cases of uveitis encountered in 1997-2007 there were 49 (10%) patients with presumed ocular tuberculosis. These comprised 28 (57%) male and 21 (43%) female patients with a mean age of 45 years (range 12-76 years). Four (20%) patients in group 1 had initial visual acuity of 20/40 or better, in comparison to eight (28%) patients in group 2. At 1-year follow-up, six (30%) patients in group 1 had a visual acuity of 20/40 or better compared with 20 (69%) patients in group 2 (p = 0.007). Of 20 eyes (26%) in group 1 that had visual acuity of < 20/50 at 1-year follow up, 14 (70%) eyes developed severe chorioretinal lesion (p = 0.019). Early administration of corticosteroids without anti-tuberculous therapy in presumed ocular tuberculosis may lead to poor visual outcome compared with patients who did not receive corticosteroids prior to presentation. Furthermore, the severity of chorioretinitis lesion in the group of patients given corticosteroid prior to ATT may account for the poor visual outcome. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Acta Ophthalmol.

  3. Medical Treatment of Tattoo Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Tattooing is a skin trauma and involves a special vulnus punctatum (with inserted tattoo ink, a vulnus venenatum), which should heal with no infection and no local complication. Local treatment in the healing phase ideally builds on the 'moist wound' principle using plastic film, hydrocolloids, silver dressing, and compression. Bacterial infections during healing are treated with oral antibiotics, and a list of first-line antibiotics is proposed. Notice is given to severe infections with affected general condition, and it is emphasized that intravenous antibiotic treatment must be instituted as early as possible to prevent septic shock and death. Hydrophilic antibiotics shall be given in high load and maintenance dose due to increased renal clearance of such antibiotics. Chronic allergic reactions of red tattoos respond little to local corticoids and are best treated with dermatome shaving. Laser removal is contraindicated due to the risk of photochemical activation of the allergy with anaphylaxis or worsening. Chronic reactions in black tattoos can be treated with local corticoids, dermatome shaving, and lasers as well. Systemic corticoid is used in allergic reactions in red tattoos and in cross-allergic reactions of other red tattoos as well as in black tattoo reactions associated with sarcoidosis and with cutaneous 'rush phenomenon' affecting any black tattoo. Systemic corticoid is also indicated in generalized eczema due to nickel allergy or another allergy challenged through tattooing or introduced by tattooing as a primary sensitization. The use of intralesional corticoid, antihistamines, and immunosuppressive medicines is discussed. A warning against the use of lactic acid and other caustic chemicals for tattoo removal is given, since such chemicals and commercial products cannot be dosed properly and very often result in disfiguring scarring. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Colorectal cancer complicating Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, H J

    2001-04-01

    Some earlier studies have indicated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis, have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Moreover, others in tertiary care centres have suggested that patients with Crohn's disease also have a higher risk of colorectal cancer. Canadian data on colorectal cancer in Crohn's disease appear to be limited. For this investigation, a single clinician database of 877 patients with Crohn's disease was used. Altogether, there were six patients with colorectal cancer (ie, overall rate of 0.7%). All of these patients were men with an initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease established at a mean age of approximately 28 years, with either ileocolonic disease or colonic disease alone, but not with ileal disease alone. Although there was a predominance of women in the overall study population (ie, 56.1%), no women developed colorectal cancer. The clinical behaviour of Crohn's disease was classified as nonstricturing in all six patients with colorectal cancer, but in two patients, Crohn's disease was complicated by a perirectal abscess or a fistula. All cancers were located in the rectum and were diagnosed 30 years, 22 years, seven years, 18 years, 20 years and 40 years after Crohn's disease was initially diagnosed. In three patients, the cancer was detected in a residual rectal stump after a partial colon resection at least 10 years earlier. In five patients, localized extension of disease through the serosa, nodal or distant metastases (ie, liver, lung) was found at the time of cancer diagnosis; two patients have since died. The present study confirms that Crohn's disease involving the colon may be a possible risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, at least in younger men, but, in this study, not in women. However, part of this increased risk in men may have been related to the presence of a rectal stump, rather than to Crohn's disease per se.

  5. Colorectal Cancer Complicating Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Some earlier studies have indicated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis, have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Moreover, others in tertiary care centres have suggested that patients with Crohn's disease also have a higher risk of colorectal cancer. Canadian data on colorectal cancer in Crohn's disease appear to be limited. For this investigation, a single clinician database of 877 patients with Crohn's disease was used. Altogether, there were six patients with colorectal cancer (ie, overall rate of 0.7%. All of these patients were men with an initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease established at a mean age of approximately 28 years, with either ileocolonic disease or colonic disease alone, but not with ileal disease alone. Although there was a predominance of women in the overall study population (ie, 56.1%, no women developed colorectal cancer. The clinical behaviour of Crohn's disease was classified as nonstricturing in all six patients with colorectal cancer, but in two patients, Crohn's disease was complicated by a perirectal abscess or a fistula. All cancers were located in the rectum and were diagnosed 30 years, 22 years, seven years, 18 years, 20 years and 40 years after Crohn's disease was initially diagnosed. In three patients, the cancer was detected in a residual rectal stump after a partial colon resection at least 10 years earlier. In five patients, localized extension of disease through the serosa, nodal or distant metastases (ie, liver, lung was found at the time of cancer diagnosis; two patients have since died. The present study confirms that Crohn's disease involving the colon may be a possible risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, at least in younger men, but, in this study, not in women. However, part of this increased risk in men may have been related to the presence of a rectal stump, rather than to Crohn's disease per se.

  6. Extravascular complications following abdominal organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, G.; Jaremko, J.L.; Lomas, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of transplants have been performed in the abdomen including liver, kidney, pancreas and islet, bowel, and multivisceral transplants. Imaging plays an important role in graft surveillance particularly to exclude post-transplant complications. When complications occur, therapeutic image-guided interventions are invaluable as these may be graft-saving and even life-saving. Vascular complications following transplantation have been extensively reported in recent reviews. The focus of this review is to discuss post-transplant complications that are primarily extravascular in location. This includes biliary, urological, intestinal, malignancy, infections, and miscellaneous complications. Familiarity with the imaging appearances of these complications is helpful for radiologists as accurate diagnosis and expedient treatment has an impact on graft and patient survival

  7. Abdominal CT findings of delayed postoperative complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Osadchy, A. [Sapir Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Kfar Saba (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Gayer, G. [Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Zrifin (Israel)

    2007-10-15

    Despite progress in surgical techniques and modern medical treatment, postoperative complications occur not infrequently and vary according to type of surgery, clinical setting, and time elapsed since surgery. In general, they can be divided into early and delayed complications. Delayed postoperative complications can be classified as specific and nonspecific. The common nonspecific delayed complications are incisional hernia and postoperative bowel obstruction. Bowel obstruction can be further categorized as obstruction related to benign or neoplastic etiology, the latter occurring in oncology patients in whom the primary surgery was related to an underlying abdominal neoplasm. Gossypiboma is another, fortunately rare, postoperative complication. Specific complications appear after specific operations and include the following: Splenosis - following splenectomy. Retained gallstones and spilled gallstones - following cholecystectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Dropped appendicolith and stump appendicitis - following appendectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Obturation obstruction by a bezoar - following gastric surgery. Afferent loop syndrome (ALS) - following Bilroth II gastrectomy. (author)

  8. Anorectal complications in patients with haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Rafaela V; Borges, Verónica P; Tomé, Ana L; Bernardes, Carlos F; Silva, Mário J; Bettencourt, Maria J

    2018-04-13

    Anorectal complications are common in patients with haematological malignancies. The objectives are to characterize anorectal complications in these patients, identify risk factors and shed light on treatment, morbidity and mortality rates. A retrospective, observational study that included 83 inpatients with haematological malignancies and proctological symptoms from January 2010 to September 2015 was conducted. Clinical outcomes were obtained through a detailed review of medical records. The median age was 56 years, and 52 (62.7%) patients were men. Fifty-six (67.5%) patients had nonseptic anorectal complications and 27 (32.5%) patients had septic anorectal complications. Patients with septic anorectal complications were more commonly male, older, and had lower absolute neutrophil counts, but the differences were not statistically significant (P=0.79, 0.67 and 0.89, respectively). In positive blood cultures [23/70 (32.9%)], Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Escherichia coli were the most common isolated agents. In nonseptic anorectal complications, conservative treatments/minor proctological procedures were adopted, and patients with septic anorectal complications were treated with antibiotics±major proctological procedures and/or surgical drainage/debridement. Forty-eight (85.7%) patients in the nonseptic complications group improved compared with 23 (85.2%) patients in the septic complications group. The overall mortality rate was 2.4% (n=2), with one (1.2%) death related to perianal sepsis. Enterococcus spp. were more commonly identified in this study and can be increasing in this specific population. In contrast to other reports, we did not identify an association between septic anorectal complications and possible risk factors such as male sex, younger age or a low absolute neutrophil count. Most patients had nonseptic anorectal complications. A major proctological procedure/surgical debridement should always be applied in septic complications

  9. Spontaneous ileal perforation complicating low anorectal malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TiJesuni Olatunji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorectal malformation is a common anomaly in neonates. Although colorectal perforations have been reported as a complication, ileal perforation is rarely encountered. This is a report of a 2-day-old boy presenting with a low anorectal malformation, complicated with ileal perforation, necessitating laparotomy and ileal repair. Anoplasty was done for the low anomaly. Early presentation and prompt treatment of anorectal malformations is important to prevent such potential life threatening complication.

  10. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS AFTER RADICAL CYSTECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Mager

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Radical cystectomy (RCE is associated with a considerable number of early postoperative complications as before. Based on 10 years’ experience, this paper demonstrates the frequency (33.9 % and types of early complications following RCE, as well as postoperative mortality (5.5 % and its resulting causes. Although postoperative mortality is relatively low today, the frequency of early postoperative complications remains high as before.

  11. Echocardiography diagnosis of myocardial infarction complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Oryshchyn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and management of myocardial infarction complications are discussed in this article. These complications are associated with high level of mortality and surgery is a main treatment method. High level of suspicion and early diagnosis are essential for appropriate treatment and improvement of prognosis. Echocardiography is a main diagnostic method. Analysis of literature about contemporary management of mechanical complications of myocardial infarction has been performed, case reports are presented.

  12. Post thyroidectomy complications: the Hyderabad experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanzada, T.W.; Samad, A.; Memonb, W.; Kumar, B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Thyroidectomy is a very common surgical procedure worldwide and is performed by surgeons with varied training. The outcome and complication rates are largely dependent on surgeon's skill and experience, the extent of surgery, indication of surgery and number of thyroid surgeries performed at that particular centre. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of postoperative complications after thyroid surgery in Hyderabad, Pakistan. Study Design: It was a descriptive study and was carried out at 2 private hospitals including a teaching University Hospital over a period of 3 years from April 2005 to March 2008. Patients and Methods: All patients with goitre, who underwent any sort of thyroid surgery, were included in this study. Patients' bio-data including name, age sex, clinical status of thyroid, thyroid function tests, ultrasound, fine needle aspiration cytology and operative procedure, findings, post operative complications and histopathology reports were recorded. Data were analysed using SPSS 16.0. Results: The overall postoperative complication rate was 10.7%. Postoperative hypocalcaemia was the most frequent complication observed in 3.5% of all patients followed by recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury noted in 2.8% patients. The less common complications were bleeding, seroma formation and wound infection. Majority of these complications were associated with total thyroidectomy, male gender, and in patients with age more than 30 years. Conclusion: The commonest post thyroidectomy complication was hypocalcaemia. Male gender, old age, and extensive thyroid surgery were associated with increased complication rate. (author)

  13. [Oral complications of chemotherapy of malignant neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obralić, N; Tahmiscija, H; Kobaslija, S; Beslija, S

    1999-01-01

    Function and integrity disorders of the oral cavity fall into the most frequent complication of the chemotherapy of leucemias, malignant lymphomas and solid tumors. Complications associated with cancer chemotherapy can be direct ones, resulting from the toxic action of antineoplastic agents on the proliferative lining of the mouth, or indirect, as a result of myelosuppression and immunosuppression. The most frequent oral complications associated with cancer chemotherapy are mucositis, infection and bleeding. The principles of prevention and management of oral complications during cancer chemotherapy are considered in this paper.

  14. Neurological complications following adult lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateen, F. J.; Dierkhising, R. A.; Rabinstein, A. A.; van de Beek, D.; Wijdicks, E. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The full spectrum of neurologic complications and their impact on survival in lung recipients has not been reported. A retrospective cohort review of the Mayo Clinic Lung Transplant Registry (1988-2008) was performed to determine the range of neurologic complications in a cohort of adult lung

  15. Childhood colostomy and its complications in Lagos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... loop colostomy was the most commonly performed procedure as recorded in 55 (83.3%) of these children, followed by the sigmoid loop type done for 5 (7.6%) patients. Transverse double-barrel. TABLE 1. Complication of colostomy [n=801. Complications. Frequency. Yo. Skin excoriation. 22. 33.3. Colostomy Diarrhea. 20.

  16. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates

  17. Submucous dissection of the nasopharynx complicating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present the case of a 60-year old woman, who had an unusual complication of nasotracheal intubation, which was carried out to relieve post-thyroidectomy respiratory distress at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH). She presented with a huge malignant goitre complicated by severe respiratory distress due ...

  18. An unusual complication of snake bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grace

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior pituitary hypofunction is a well-known complication following snake bite. However, central diabetes insipidus as a complication of snake bite is only rarely reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of central diabetes insipidus, which developed as sequelae to viper bite.

  19. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka B. Kesieme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended.

  20. Computed tomography and complicated peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pun, E.; Firkin, A.

    2004-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) can present with many complications including inflammation, ulceration and perforation. Improvements in CT have enabled better imaging of the gastroduodenal area. Three cases of complicated PUD detected on CT are presented with a brief review of the current literature. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  1. Multiple cranial nerve palsies complicating tympanomastoiditis: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media either acute or chronic, is not uncommon in childhood. Multiple cranial nerve palsies occuring as a complication of either form of otitis media is unusual. A case of a nine year old boy with chronic suppurative otitis media with associated mastoiditis complicated with ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve palsies is ...

  2. Oral piercings: immediate and late complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elma P; Ribeiro, Andre Luis Ribeiro; Pinheiro, João de Jesus V; Alves, Sérgio de M

    2011-12-01

    Oral piercings have a long history as part of religious, cultural, or sexual symbolism in many traditional tribes; currently, these ornaments have wide acceptance among young people. Several oral and systemic complications may be associated with this practice; however, limited data related to these complications can be obtained in the literature. This study includes 42 cases of oral piercings in 39 young adults, who were using or had used oral piercings, and the complications associated with their use. Immediate complications occurred in 29 cases, including excessive bleeding (69%) and pain (52.3%) as the most representative. Two cases of syncope were found. Late complications related to the piercing insertion site were observed in 97.6% of cases, with pain and swelling being present in 92.9% and 61.9% of cases, respectively. Dental pain and lacerations on the tongue represented the most prevalent complications associated with the surrounding tissues, accounting for 33.3% and 31% of cases. The use of oral piercings is related to a series of mainly local complications, and individuals who decide to use piercings should be aware of such complications. Individuals wishing to get a part of their body pierced should do so with qualified professionals and should regularly visit the dentist so that a regular control is achieved, thus ensuring the early detection of the adverse effects associated with this practice. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Postoperative Complications Prediction in Mulago Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... management in surgery. Knowing which patient to operate and those at high risk of developing complications contributes significantly to the quality of surgical care and cost reduction. The postoperative complications of patients who underwent Laparotomy in Mulago Hospital were studied using POSSUM scoring system.

  4. Subsequent Reproductive Performance in Survivors of Complicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To study the subsequent reproductive performance of women who had undergone complicated abortions. Materials and Methods Attempts were made to trace 299 survivors of complicated abortions from an earlier study. Their contact telephone numbers and addresses had been recorded at the time of initial ...

  5. [Complicated gastroduodenal ulcers in rheumatology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, V G; Shemerovskaia, T G; Sergeev, P V; Bokovanov, V E

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of observations of 250 patients with different rheumatological diseases has shown that 18% of the patients had ulcer disease with complications. The greatest risk of bleedings and perforations took place during the first year of treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. The main risk factors of complications were determined. They are: male sex, high parameters of gastric secretion.

  6. Genitourinary complications as initial presentation of inherited ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare disorder that presents with urological complications. We present a 6-year-old boy admitted with urological symptoms that revealed an inherited EB misdiagnosed. We also review the literature on this disorder and management of the common urological complications.

  7. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-11-16

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient's age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management.

  8. Update: Complications and management of infrarenal EVAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, J.V.P.; Clark, M.; Gibbs, R.; Jenkins, M.; Cheshire, N.; Hamady, M.

    2009-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is now an established technique for treating many patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. Familiarity with the complications associated with this technique and understanding treatment options are crucial for the lifelong performance of stent graft. This pictorial review article describes the currant role of different imaging modalities in surveillance and discusses the complications and its management strategies.

  9. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesieme, Emeka B.; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  10. Complications in diagnostic imaging. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansell, G.; Wilkins, R.A.; Medical Research Council, Harrow

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-seven chapters review various complications which may arise for patients and staff in medical diagnostic imaging. Five of these chapters are indexed separately covering topics on the complications of using radiopharmaceuticals, safety considerations in magnetic resonance imaging, radiation hazards of diagnostic radiology and medico-legal problems involving diagnostic radiology in both the UK and the USA. (UK)

  11. Microdebrider complications in laryngologic and airway surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Rebecca J; Solowski, Nancy L; Belafsky, Peter C; Courey, Mark C; Merati, Albert L; Rosen, Clark A; Weinberger, Paul M; Postma, Gregory N

    2014-11-01

    There is a paucity of experience in the published literature documenting complications of powered surgical instruments in laryngologic surgery. Our objective was to ascertain the nature of these complications from expert opinion and review of the literature, and to recommend strategies to decrease major complications. Review of the literature and an e-mail survey. A literature review of microdebrider complications in laryngologic surgery was conducted using PubMed and Ovid (1985 to 2013), along with an analysis of a confidential e-mail survey of various surgeons in selected high-volume laryngologic centers. Powered instrumentation is frequently used in the operating room for larynx and airway surgery. The microdebrider can improve efficiency, lower costs, and shorten operative times. However, use of the microdebrider has the potential for serious complications in the larynx and airway. Great care must be taken when utilizing the microdebrider in laryngologic surgery. Significant complications including major vocal fold scar, airway compromise, severe hemorrhage, and unintentional tissue loss have occurred. The microdebrider is a popular and valuable tool for the otolaryngologist. A thorough knowledge of the instrument and its potential complications will improve surgical outcomes and may prevent complications. Awareness of the risks and surgeon experience with use of the microdebrider will allow the surgeon to successfully utilize this device in a safe and effective manner. 5. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrù, Emanuele, E-mail: surgeon.ema@gmail.com [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Roccatagliata, Luca, E-mail: lroccatagliata@neurologia.unige.it [Neuroradiology Department, IRCCS San Martino University Hospital and IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132 (Italy); Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa (Italy); Cester, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.cester@sanita.padova.it [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Causin, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.causin@sanita.padova.it [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Castellan, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.castellan@hsanmartino.it [Neuroradiology Department, IRCCS San Martino University Hospital and IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132 (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    The number of neuroendovascular treatments of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has increased substantially in the last two decades. Complications of endovascular treatments of cerebral aneurysms are rare but can potentially lead to acute worsening of the neurological status, to new neurological deficits or death. Some of the possible complications, such as vascular access site complications or systemic side effects associated with contrast medium (e.g. contrast medium allergy, contrast induced nephropathy) can also be encountered in diagnostic angiography. The most common complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms are related to acute thromboembolic events and perforation of the aneurysm. Overall, the reported rate of thromboembolic complications ranges between 4.7% and 12.5% while the rate of intraprocedural rupture of cerebral aneurysms is about 0.7% in patients with unruptured aneurysms and about 4.1% in patients with previously ruptured aneurysms. Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications may occur during different phases of endovascular procedures and are related to different technical, clinical and anatomic reasons. A thorough knowledge of the different aspects of these complications can reduce the risk of their occurrence and minimize their clinical sequelae. A deep understanding of complications and of their management is thus part of the best standard of care.

  13. Complications associated with malnutrition in elective surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify the level of malnutrition and complications observed in Malaysia. Methods: A prospective, observational study was conducted with the objectives of identifying the degree of malnutrition, complications and the need for nutritional support in elective surgical patients. Collection of data was performed in ...

  14. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-01-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design

  15. Complications of stomas: their aetiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Angus J M; Nicol, Laura; Donaldson, Susan; Fraser, Cathie; Silversides, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The formation of a stoma is an essential part of many colorectal operations. Despite the frequency with which these surgeries are performed and the number of specialists involved in stoma care, complications are still common. This article investigates the most common complications, explains the reasons for their occurrence and suggests potential management options. Common stoma complications were identified by the colorectal/ stoma clinical nurse specialist (CSCNS) and a literature search was performed using a variety of online databases, including Medline and CINAHL using the keywords stoma, complications, prolapse, ischaemia, retraction, hernia and stenosis. Articles used were selected on the basis of relevance to the topic. The commonest complications of stomas included skin irritation, prolapse, retraction, ischaemia, hernia and stenosis.

  16. Perioperative complications in endovascular neurosurgery: Anesthesiologist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Megha U.; Ganjoo, Pragati; Singh, Daljit; Tandon, Monica S.; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Sharma, Durga P.; Jagetia, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endovascular neurosurgery is known to be associated with potentially serious perioperative complications that can impact the course and outcome of anesthesia. We present here our institutional experience in the anesthetic management of various endovascular neurosurgical procedures and their related complications over a 10-year period. Methods: Data was obtained in 240 patients pertaining to their preoperative status, details of anesthesia and surgery, perioperative course and surgery-related complications. Information regarding hemodynamic alterations, temperature variability, fluid-electrolyte imbalance, coagulation abnormalities and alterations in the anesthesia course was specifically noted. Results: Among the important complications observed were aneurysm rupture (2.5%), vasospasm (6.67%), thromboembolism (4.16%), contrast reactions, hemodynamic alterations, electrolyte abnormalities, hypothermia, delayed emergence from anesthesia, groin hematomas and early postoperative mortality (5.14%). Conclusion: Awareness of the unique challenges of endovascular neurosurgery and prompt and appropriate management of the associated complications by an experienced neuroanesthesiologist is vital to the outcome of these procedures. PMID:28413524

  17. Imaging evaluation of complications after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Mingyue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is an effective treatment for end-stage chronic liver diseases and acute liver failure. With the rapid development of surgical techniques, organ preservation technology, and pharmacotherapy, patients' survival rates are improved constantly. However, postoperative complications are still major influencing factors for postoperative incidence and mortality rates. Since clinical and laboratory examinations lack specificity and it is difficult to diagnose various postoperative complications, the application of imaging techniques effectively solves such problems. This article summarizes the imaging findings of common complications after liver transplantation, such as vascular complications, biliary complications, liver parenchyma lesions, and postoperative infection, and points out that imaging examinations have significant advantages and can be used for comprehensive evaluation of disease progression.

  18. [Awake craniotomy: analysis of complicated cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, A S; Kobyakov, G L; Gavrilov, A G; Lubnin, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is recognized as method that can decrease the frequency of neurological complications after surgery for gliomas located near eloquent brain regions. Unfortunately good neurological outcome can't be ensured even by using of this technique. This paper discusses reasons and possible ways of prevention of such complications. 162 awake craniotomies were performed in our clinic. 152 of patients were discharged from the clinic with good outcome. In 10 (6%) cases sustained severe neurological deficit was noted. These complications were associated with anatomic or ischemic injury of subcortical pathways and internal capsule. Awake craniotomy is effective instrument of brain language mapping and prevention of neurological deterioration. Severe neurological complications of awake craniotomy are associated with underestimate neurosurgical risks, especially in terms of blood vessel injury and depth of resection. The main way of prevention of such complications is meticulous planning of operation and adequate using of mapping facilities.

  19. Puberty as an accelerator for diabetes complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Hi; Craig, Maria E; Donaghue, Kim C

    2014-02-01

    Much is written about how difficult it is to deal with diabetes during adolescence, and rightly so. Less is understood as to how puberty may be an accelerator of vascular complications. With the increase in childhood diabetes, complication risks need to be revisited in relation to puberty and the secular increase in adiposity. Recent data suggest greater risk for severe vascular complications in those with diabetes during puberty, compared with young people who develop diabetes after puberty. It is also widely recognized that higher hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) results are often seen during the pubertal period. This article will review complication outcomes in relation to puberty and examine mechanisms by which puberty may modify risk above glycemic exposure, and possible gender disparities in the risk of complications in the adolescent period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Early hospital discharge and early puerperal complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Villalobos, Dolores; Hernández-Garduño, Adolfo; Salinas, Aarón; González, Dolores; Walker, Dilys; Rojo-Herrera, Guadalupe; Hernández-Prado, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the association between time of postpartum discharge and symptoms indicative of complications during the first postpartum week. Women with vaginal delivery at a Mexico City public hospital, without complications before the hospital discharge, were interviewed seven days after delivery. Time of postpartum discharge was classified as early (25 hours). The dependent variable was defined as the occurrence and severity of puerperal complication symptoms. Out of 303 women, 208 (68%) were discharged early. However, women with early discharge and satisfactory prenatal care had lower odds of presenting symptoms in early puerperium than women without early discharge and inadequate prenatal care (OR 0.36; 95% confidence intervals = 0.17-0.76). There was no association between early discharge and symptoms of complications during the first postpartum week; the odds of complications were lower for mothers with early discharge and satisfactory prenatal care.

  1. Complications of ERCP: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Merete; Matzen, Peter; Schulze, Svend

    2004-01-01

    included in this prospective study. Complications were assessed at the time of ERCP and by postal/telephone contact at 30-days after the procedure. RESULTS: A total of 1177 ERCPs were included in the analysis, of which 56.2% were therapeutic. The 30-day complication rate was 15.9%; the procedure...... occurred in relation to 5% of the ERCP procedures (3 deaths). Cardiorespiratory complications occurred in 2.3% (2 deaths). Dilated bile duct ( p = 0.0001), placement of stent ( p = 0.001), and use of more than 40 mg of hyoscine-N-butyl bromide ( p ... analysis. Risk of pancreatitis was increased with age under 40 years ( p = 0.0078), placement of stent ( p = 0.031), and a dilated bile duct ( p = 0.036). CONCLUSIONS: This prospective study confirms that the complication rate of ERCP including therapeutic procedures is high. Cardiopulmonary complications...

  2. Complications after lumbar myelography with amipaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Beum; Kim, Seung Hyun; Oh, Seung Chul; Lee, Yong Chul; Lee, Kwan Seh

    1982-01-01

    Amipaque is a water soluble, non-ionic myelographic contrast media, and owing to its high diagnostic accuracy and safety, its use is gradually increasing. The authors studied the complication after amipaque lumber myelography in 61 patients with low back pain during the period from January 1981 to November 1981 in Chung Ang University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. Total complication rate was 52% (32 of 61)and there was no sexual difference in its occurrence. 2. In total, no difference in complication rate was found between head-up positioned group with a degree of 30 .deg. (group I) after procedure and head-up positioned group with a degree of 70 .deg. (group II) but female patients had more complication rate in group I than in group II (75% vs 50%). Headache was more common in group I and nausea was more common in group II. 3. Headache was most common complication (44%) and there was no sexual difference in its occurrence. 4. No significance difference in complication rate was found between patients proved to have HNP and patients to have not. 5. Complications were less common in patients with punctured level of L 4-5 than in patients with L 2-3 or L 3-4 level punture

  3. Diabetic Foot Complications Despite Successful Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyo; Lee, Ho Seong; Park, Jungu; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Han, Duck Jong; Seo, Sang Gyo

    2017-06-01

    It is known that successful pancreas transplantation enables patients with diabetes to maintain a normal glucose level without insulin and reduces diabetes-related complications. However, we have little information about the foot-specific morbidity in patients who have undergone successful pancreas transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and predisposing factors for foot complications after successful pancreas transplantation. This retrospective study included 218 patients (91 males, 127 females) who had undergone pancreas transplantation for diabetes. The mean age was 40.7 (range, 15-76) years. Diabetes type, transplantation type, body mass index, and diabetes duration before transplantation were confirmed. After pancreas transplantation, the occurrence and duration of foot and ankle complications were assessed. Twenty-two patients (10.1%) had diabetic foot complications. Fifteen patients (6.9%) had diabetic foot ulcer and 7 patients (3.2%) had Charcot arthropathy. Three patients had both diabetic foot ulcer and Charcot arthropathy. Three insufficiency fractures (1.4%) were included. Mean time of complications after transplantation was 18.5 (range, 2-77) months. Creatinine level 1 year after surgery was higher in the complication group rather than the noncomplication group ( P = .02). Complications of the foot and ankle still occurred following pancreas transplantation in patients with diabetes. Level III, comparative study.

  4. Laryngeal complications after type 1 thyroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, C S; Avidano, M A; Crary, M A; Cassisi, N J; Gorham, M M

    1995-12-01

    Type I thyroplasty has become a primary surgical choice for voice restoration in patients with glottal incompetence. This study examines factors associated with laryngeal complications after type I thyroplasty. Ten laryngoscopic variables were analyzed from preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative videolaryngoscopies of 51 patients undergoing 58 medialization procedures. Ten patient and operative variables were examined by medical record review. Major complications were defined as wound hemorrhage, airway obstruction, or prosthesis extrusion. Minor complications were defined as vocal fold hematoma without airway obstruction or prosthesis movement. The major complication rate was 8.6%, and the minor complication rate was 29%. No delayed hemorrhage or airway obstruction occurred. Prosthesis extrusion occurred in five (8.6%) patients 1 week to 5 months after surgery. Extrusion was associated with suboptimal prosthesis placement in 80% of cases. Two patients retained excellent glottal closure despite extrusion. Vocal fold hematoma was identified in 14 (24%) cases and resolved within 1 week. Prosthesis movement occurred in three (5%) patients 1 week to 6 months after surgery and resulted in poor glottal closure. All patients with prosthesis extrusion or movement were female. Type I thyroplasty remains a safe outpatient procedure with few major complications. Prosthesis extrusion was associated with suboptimal prosthesis placement and may or may not result in poor glottal closure. Minor vocal fold hematomas were relatively frequent, resolved rapidly, and were not associated with airway obstruction. Female patients may be more prone to complications because of their small laryngeal size.

  5. Epidemiology of Intratemporal Complications of Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maranhão, André

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Despite the advent of antibiotics and immunizations in the last century, complications of otitis media remain quite frequent, have high morbidity and mortality rates, and pose a challenge to the otorhinolaryngologist. Objective To establish the annual incidence of intratemporal complications of otitis media and prospectively evaluate patients via an analysis of epidemiologic and clinical aspects. Methods Prospective, observational study. Between February 2010 and January 2011, patients admitted to a tertiary care, university-based otology practice with diagnosis of otitis media and an associated intratemporal complication (ITC were included in the study. The following data were evaluated: age, sex, type of ITC, treatment, imaging tests findings, type and degree of hearing loss, and clinical outcome. The overall incidence of all complications and of each complication individually was determined. Results A total of 1,816 patients were diagnosed with otitis media. For 592 (33% individuals, the diagnosis was chronic otitis media; for 1,224 (67%, the diagnosis was acute otitis media. ITCs of otitis media were diagnosed in 15 patients; thus, the annual incidence of intratemporal complications was 0.8%. We identified 19 ITC diagnoses in 15 patients (3 patients had more than one diagnosis. Labyrinthine fistulae were diagnosed in 7 (36.8% individuals, mastoiditis in 5 (26.3%, facial palsy in 4 (21.1%, and labyrinthitis in 3 (15.8%. Conclusion The incidence of intratemporal complications in Brazil remains significant when compared with developed countries. Chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma is the most frequent etiology of intratemporal complications. Labyrinthine fistula is the most common intratemporal complication.

  6. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Complicated Scrub Typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Sun Kim

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a mite-borne infectious disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi . Although early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy improve the prognosis for the majority of patients, life-threatening complications are not uncommon. Here, we present a case of successful veno-veno-type extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for scrub typhus-induced complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, myocarditis and multi-organ dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of successful extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in complicated scrub typhus in Korea.

  8. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  9. Laparoscopic surgery in children: abdominal wall complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaccaro S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Minimal invasive surgery has become the standard of care for operations involving the thoracic and abdominal cavities for all ages. Laparoscopic complications can occur as well as more invasive surgical procedures and we can classify them into non-specific and specific. Our goal is to analyze the most influential available scientific literature and to expose important and recognized advices in order to reduce these complications. We examined the mechanism, risk factors, treatment and tried to outline how to prevent two major abdominal wall complications related to laparoscopy: bleeding and port site herniation .

  10. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memis, Ahmet E-mail: ahmemis@yahoo.com; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices.

  11. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memis, Ahmet; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices

  12. Neurological complications of renal dialysis and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Kushan; Taube, David; Khalil, Nofal; Perry, Richard; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2018-04-01

    Neurological complications from renal replacement therapy contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in patients with renal failure. Such complications can affect either the central or peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological disturbances associated with the uraemic state do not respond fully to renal replacement therapy. There are also complications specifically associated with dialysis and transplantation. A multidisciplinary approach, involving both nephrologists and neurologists, is critical for the diagnosis and effective management of these disorders. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Complications of laryngeal framework surgery (phonosurgery).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, H M; Wanamaker, J; Trott, M; Hicks, D

    1993-05-01

    The rising popularity of surgery involving the laryngeal framework (surgical medialization of immobile vocal folds, vocal fold tightening, pitch variation, etc.) has resulted in increasing case experience. Little has appeared in the literature regarding complications or long-term results of this type of surgery. Several years' experience in a major referral center with various types of laryngeal framework surgery has led to a small number of complications. These have included late extrusion of the prosthesis and delayed hemorrhage. A review of these complications and recommendations for modification of technique to minimize them in the future are discussed.

  14. Microangiopathic complications related to different alleles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Journal Home ... Microangiopathic complications related to different alleles of manganese superoxide dismutase gene in diabetes mellitus type 1. TM EL Masry ... 23(2) 2005: 155-167 ...

  15. Zika Virus and Complications: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do if they have been exposed to unprotected sex but do not wish to become pregnant because ... A's Zika virus and complications » Zika digital timeline Video Zika virus - Questions and answers (Q&A) Related ...

  16. MRSA bacteraemia complicating amphotericin B treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    23 × 106 cells/l. CM was diagnosed following lumbar puncture (positive .... in the SA setting, especially in this vulnerable group of patients, with advanced HIV ... aware of this additional complication of amphotericin B treatment. Cannula sites ...

  17. Dispelling Rumours Around Zika and Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... South Sudan crisis Zika virus Dispelling rumours around Zika and complications Updated 12 September 2016 Spotlight! There ... control the male mosquito population are not spreading Zika further Wolbachia is a bacterium that can stop ...

  18. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melloni, Pietro; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious

  19. Subclinical hypothyroidism after vascular complicated pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, M. van der; Hop-de Groot, R.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Ross, H.A.; Heijer, M. den; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Women with a history of vascular complicated pregnancy are at risk for developing remote cardiovascular disease. It is associated with underlying cardiovascular risk factors both jeopardizing trophoblast and vascular function. Subclinical hypothyroidism may relate to both conditions.

  20. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  1. Very Complicated, indeed! / Jürgen Rooste

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rooste, Jürgen, 1979-

    2005-01-01

    Marco Laimre ja Killu Sukmiti näitus "Very Complicated Rock'n'Roll" Kunstihoone galeriis kuni 22. V. Heli: Indrek Pinsel, Andres Lõo, Riho Sibul, Erkki-Sven Tüür, Rainer Jancis (heliinstallatsiooni seadmine)

  2. Pulmonary complications in 110 consecutive renal transplant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pulmonary embolism in 5, and lung abscess in 1. Sixty- nine patients ... The incidence of pulmonary complications after renal ... the factors that influence the development of these .... mobilisation have reduced the risk of pulmonary embolism.

  3. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Post- Laparatomy Complications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    calculated Surgical Apgar Scores for 152 patients during a 6-month study ... major postoperative complications and/or death within. 30 days of ... respond to and control hemodynamic changes during a ... abdominal injury (18.42%). Intestinal ...

  4. [Neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, E; de Courtivron, B; Saliba, E

    2015-12-01

    To describe neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia. This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library and experts' recommendations. The risks of brachial plexus birth injury, clavicle and humeral fracture, perinatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and perinatal mortality are increased after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to provide neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room in case of perinatal asphyxia following shoulder dystocia, according to national and international guidelines. The initial clinical examination should search for complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture. The risk of perinatal complications is increased in newborn after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to manage these complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the ..... cohort with nominal significance, and a recent meta-analysis ..... Whereas it is generally thought that lysine acetylation is.

  6. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melloni, Pietro [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)], E-mail: pmelloni@cspt.es; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious.

  7. Neurological Complications Of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: Any ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , of the neurological deficits complicating chronic myeloid leukaemia. Method: Using patients\\' case folders and haematological malignancy register all cases of chronic myeloid leukaemia seen in Jos University Teaching Hospital between July ...

  8. Complications of gynecologic and obstetric management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, M.; Newton, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the incidence, diagnosis and management of complications associated with interventions used in gynecology and obstetrics. These are encountered in all phases of gynecologic and therapeutic procedures, radiation therapy, drug therapy and pre- and post-treatment care

  9. Complications associated with regional anaesthesia for Caesarean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    REVIEW. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia - February 2004. 15. Complications ..... The diagnosis may be difficult, since a chronic subdural haematoma may be mistaken for psychiatric disease61, and seizures may be ...

  10. Complications in obstructive jaundice: role of endotoxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greve, J. W.; Gouma, D. J.; Buurman, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Surgical treatment of patients with obstructive jaundice is associated with a high postoperative morbidity and mortality. A correlation was suggested between endotoxins and the observed complications. The mechanism by which endotoxins affect the negative outcome in operated jaundiced patients was,

  11. Management of complications of mesh surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dominic; Zimmern, Philippe E

    2015-07-01

    Transvaginal placements of synthetic mid-urethral slings and vaginal meshes have largely superseded traditional tissue repairs in the current era because of presumed efficacy and ease of implant with device 'kits'. The use of synthetic material has generated novel complications including mesh extrusion, pelvic and vaginal pain and mesh contraction. In this review, our aim is to discuss the management, surgical techniques and outcomes associated with mesh removal. Recent publications have seen an increase in presentation of these mesh-related complications, and reports from multiple tertiary centers have suggested that not all patients benefit from surgical intervention. Although the true incidence of mesh complications is unknown, recent publications can serve to guide physicians and inform patients of the surgical outcomes from mesh-related complications. In addition, the literature highlights the growing need for a registry to account for a more accurate reporting of these events and to counsel patients on the risk and benefits before proceeding with mesh surgeries.

  12. Digestive system complications among hospitalized children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    least common complication, occurring in one (3.3%) of the cases studied. Conclusion: Acute ... Keywords: Acute abdominal crisis, children, haemoglobin, hospitalization, multi-systemic ... improvement of the management of such children.

  13. Indications and Complications of Tube Thoracostomy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... surgeon and patients were followed up with serial chest X‑rays until certified cured. ... Others were trauma, 44 (26.3%), Parapneumonic effusion, 20 (12%), ... more frequent complications been empyema (5.6%) and pneumothorax (3.6%).

  14. Preoperative Alcohol Consumption and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Grønkjær, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To systematically review and summarize the evidence of the association between preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type. BACKGROUND:: Conclusions in studies on preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications have...... been inconsistent. METHODS:: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO citations. Included were original studies of the association between preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications occurring within 30 days of the operation.......30-2.49), prolonged stay at the hospital (RR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.18-1.31), and admission to intensive care unit (RR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). Clearly defined high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk of postoperative mortality (RR = 2.68; 95% CI: 1.50-4.78). Low to moderate preoperative alcohol...

  15. Complications of HIV Disease and Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F.; Havlir, Diane V.; Currier, Judith S.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing interest in the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of long-term complications of HIV disease and its therapies. Specifically, studies focused on cardiovascular, renal, bone, and fat abnormalities were prominent at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Although enthusiasm about the effectiveness of current antiretroviral therapy remains strong, collectively, the ongoing work in the area of HIV disease and treatment complications appears to refl...

  16. Complications of hip fractures: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleedin...

  17. Complications in posterior lumbar interbody fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuzer, Rolf-Peter

    2010-01-01

    From 1993 to 2000, 220 consecutive patients with unstable degenerative spondylolisthesis were studied after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using different types of grafts and pedicle screw systems. In a retrospective review the author detail the associated complications and their correlation with perioperative factors. The causes, strategies for their avoidance, and the clinical course of these complications are also disscused. The study group was composed of 136 women and 84 men...

  18. [Possible complications of orthokeratology in myopia correction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodina, N V; Musaeva, G M; Kobzova, M V

    2011-01-01

    Clinical cases representing complications (refractive, infectious and trophic) of orthokeratologic lenses (OKL) use are described. These clinical cases show that complications of OKL use can be both similar to those of routine contact correction and caused by features of mechanism of corneal refraction change as a result of OKL wear. In our opinion efficacy and safety of this option is directly depends on the correct lens fitting, patient's compliance and regular monitoring of corneal changes.

  19. Complications du traitement traditionnel des fractures : aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tous les patients reçus avec des complications du traitement traditionnel des fractures ont été inclus dans ce travail. Le diagnostic des lésions était clinique et radiologique. Nous avions reçu 51 patients porteurs de complications suite à des traitements de médecine traditionnelle, soit 13,7% du total des patients hospitalisés ...

  20. Acute complicated diverticulitis managed by laparoscopic lavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    with antibiotics and laparoscopic lavage. Conversion to laparotomy was made in six (3%) patients and the mean hospital stay was nine days. Ten percent of the patients had complications. During the mean follow-up of 38 months, 38% of the patients underwent elective sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis....... CONCLUSION: Primary laparoscopic lavage for complicated diverticulitis may be a promising alternative to more radical surgery in selected patients. Larger studies have to be made before clinical recommendations can be given....

  1. Postanesthetic ulceration of palate: A rare complication

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ramesh; Garg, Meenu; Pawah, Salil; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    The routine dental practice involves various dental procedures which needs the application of local anesthetics. Generally, there are very few complications associated with these procedures. Complications such as tissue necrosis can occur following the rapid injection of local anesthetic solutions. Palate is a favorable site for soft tissue lesions, various factors such as direct effects of the drug, blanching of the tissues during injection, a relatively poor blood supply, and reactivation o...

  2. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    such as endothelin Table 1. Long-Term Complications of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)  Retinopathy Results in retinal edema, hemorrhage and loss of...fact, people with type 1 diabetes who retain a low but detectable level of C-peptide are less prone to develop microvascular complications of the eyes...induced apoptosis of pericytes in early diabetic retinopathy . J Ophthalmol 2010:746978 33. Zhao X, Carnevale KA, Cathcart MK (2003) Human monocytes use

  3. The twisted diversion: a paralyzing complication

    OpenAIRE

    Hiew, Kenneth; Glendinning, Richard; Parr, Nigel; Kumar, Manal

    2013-01-01

    Ileal conduit remains a widely used urinary diversion performed after radical cystectomy. However, complications of ileal conduits remain an important concern in urological surgery. We report a rare case of an ileal conduit stricture, which can have grim complications if unobserved during the operation. Following an initial operation of radical cystectomy and ileal conduit formation in France in 2011, an 80-year-old male travelled back to the UK after 4 months of general weakness and limb par...

  4. Endodontic management of patients with systemic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaiselvam Rajeswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful endodontic practice requires complete knowledge about the various medical conditions and appropriateness in planning treatment as per the need with effective safety measures. This review focuses on a number of systemic complications encountered in endodontic practice and directions to be followed for avoiding potential complications. A detailed PubMed search was carried out using specific keywords, and 25 articles were referred for finalizing the content.

  5. [COMPLICATED URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN THE ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćosić, I; Ćosić, V

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections involving lower (cystitis, prostatitis) or upper (pyelonephritis, renal abscess, perinephric abscess) urinary tract. Differentiation of complicated and uncomplicated UTI is usually based on the presence of structural or functional urinary tract abnormalities, which can increase the risk of treatment failure and development of serious complications. Factors that increase the risk are foreign bodies, stones, obstruction, neurogenic bladder, kidney transplantation, immunosuppression, and pregnancy. Complicated UTI includes a spectrum of conditions that increase the risk of treatment failure, as well as of serious complications such as bacteremia and sepsis, perinephric abscess, renal impairment and emphysematous pyelonephritis. To avoid the potentially devastating outcomes, appropriate diagnostic procedures, antibiotic and surgical treatment, and appropriate follow-up are required. The incidence of complicated UTI will grow in the future due to general aging of the population, increasing incidence of diabetes, and ever growing number of immunocompromised and immunosuppressed patients. It is of key importance to recognize complicated UTI on time, and treat it wisely and aggressively to reduce duration of the disease and the risk of antibiotic resistance.

  6. PALLIATIVE TREATMENT OF DYSPHAGIA: FAILURES AND COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drobyazgin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dysphagia is the main clinical symptom in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma and proximal part of the stomach. Esophageal stenting is a highly effective and safe method to restore esophageal lumen patency. Published data indicate a high rate of stent-related complications. Material and methods. A retrospective, two-centered study included 166 patients (102 males and 64 females, who underwent endoscopically-guided esophageal stenting from 2004 to 2015. The age of the patients ranged from 36 to 92 years. Expandable metal stents were used for all patients. In most cases (81.3%, drug-eluting stents (22 mm diameter, 120 mm length were preferable. Treatment outcomes and complications were analyzed. Results. Complications during stent placement (incorrect stent disclosure were observed in 7 patients. All these complications were eliminated by relocating the stent to the desired position. Postoperative complications were noted in 29 patients (stent migration in 9 patients, stent fracture and migration in 2 patients, stent obstruction in 1 patient, destruction of stent coating and fragmentation in 5 patients, and dysphagia recurrence due to continuing tumor growth in 11 patients. All stent-related complications were corrected by re-endoscopy. Conclusions. The data obtained indicate the need for lifelong surveillance of patients after stenting.

  7. Rare Neurological Complications After Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Malek; Carandina, Sergio; Bossi, Manuela; Polliand, Claude; Genser, Laurent; Barrat, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered to be the most effective treatment of morbid obesity and improvement of obesity-related comorbidities, such as type II diabetes. However, both peripheral and central neurological complications can occur after bariatric surgery. Such complications tend to occur more frequently after bypass surgery than after sleeve gastrectomy (SG). The objective of this study was to identify the patients that presented post-operative neurological complications after undergoing SG and describe the incidence, presentation, and management of these complications. This was a retrospective study of 592 cases of SG performed between 2009 and 2014 with a special focus on patients who presented neurological complications. Of the 592 SG cases, only seven (1.18 %) patients presented neurological complications. All patients had uneventful post-operative course, but all reported feeding difficulties, accompanied by severe dysphagia, and rapid weight loss, with a mean weight loss of 35 kg (30-40 kg) 3 months after SG. All patients were readmitted owing to neurological symptoms that included paresthesia, abolition of deep tendon reflexes of the lower limbs, muscle pain, and motor and sensitive deficits in some cases. There were two cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy. All patients were treated for neuropathy secondary to vitamin B1 deficiency and had a significant improvement and/or resolution of their symptoms. Neurological complications after SG are rare and are often preceded by gastrointestinal symptoms, rapid weight loss, and lack of post-operative vitamin supplementation. Re-hospitalization and multidisciplinary team management are crucial to establish the diagnosis and initiate treatment.

  8. Unusual imaging characteristics of complicated hydatid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: ahmettuncayturgut@yahoo.com; Altin, Levent [Department of Radiology, Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Topcu, Salih [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey); Kilicoglu, Buelent [Department of 4th General Surgery, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Altinok, Tamer [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Kaptanoglu, Erkan [Department of Neurosurgery, Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Karademir, Alp [Department of Radiology, Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Kosar, Ugur [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-07-15

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although the liver and the lungs are the most frequently involved organs in the body, hydatid cysts of other organs are unusual. Radiologically, they usually demonstrate typical imaging findings, but unusual imaging characteristics of complicated cyst of hydatid disease, associated with high morbidity and mortality, are rarely described in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review the general features of hydatidosis and to discuss atypical imaging characteristics of the complicated hydatid disease in the human, with an emphasis on structure and rupture of the cystic lesion as well as ultrasonography (USG), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of the disease. In our study, the available literature and images of the cases with complicated hydatidosis involving liver, lung, brain, spine and orbit were reviewed retrospectively. In hydatid disease, there are many potential local and systemic complications due to secondary involvement in almost any anatomic location in humans. Radiologically, in addition to the presence of atypical findings such as perifocal edema, non-homogenous contrast enhancement, multiplicity or septations and calcification, various unusual manifestations due to rupture or infection of the cyst have been observed in our cases with complicated hydatid disease. To prevent subsequent acute catastrophic results and the development of recurrences in various organs, it should be kept in mind that complicated hydatid cysts can cause unusual USG, CT, and MRI findings, in addition to typical ones, in endemic areas. Therefore, familiarity with atypical radiological appearances of complicated hydatid disease may be valuable in making a correct diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Unusual imaging characteristics of complicated hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Altin, Levent; Topcu, Salih; Kilicoglu, Buelent; Altinok, Tamer; Kaptanoglu, Erkan; Karademir, Alp; Kosar, Ugur

    2007-01-01

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although the liver and the lungs are the most frequently involved organs in the body, hydatid cysts of other organs are unusual. Radiologically, they usually demonstrate typical imaging findings, but unusual imaging characteristics of complicated cyst of hydatid disease, associated with high morbidity and mortality, are rarely described in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review the general features of hydatidosis and to discuss atypical imaging characteristics of the complicated hydatid disease in the human, with an emphasis on structure and rupture of the cystic lesion as well as ultrasonography (USG), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of the disease. In our study, the available literature and images of the cases with complicated hydatidosis involving liver, lung, brain, spine and orbit were reviewed retrospectively. In hydatid disease, there are many potential local and systemic complications due to secondary involvement in almost any anatomic location in humans. Radiologically, in addition to the presence of atypical findings such as perifocal edema, non-homogenous contrast enhancement, multiplicity or septations and calcification, various unusual manifestations due to rupture or infection of the cyst have been observed in our cases with complicated hydatid disease. To prevent subsequent acute catastrophic results and the development of recurrences in various organs, it should be kept in mind that complicated hydatid cysts can cause unusual USG, CT, and MRI findings, in addition to typical ones, in endemic areas. Therefore, familiarity with atypical radiological appearances of complicated hydatid disease may be valuable in making a correct diagnosis and treatment

  11. Quantification of late complications after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Horst; Beck-Bornholdt, Hans-Peter; Svoboda, Vladimir; Alberti, Winfried; Herrmann, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of patients survive cancer after having received radiation therapy. Therefore, the occurrence of late normal tissue complications among long-term survivors is of particular concern. Methods: Sixty-three patients treated by radical surgery and irradiation for rectal carcinoma were subjected to an unconventional sandwich therapy. Preoperative irradiation was given in four fractions of 5 Gy each applied within 2 or 3 days; postoperative irradiation consisted mostly of 15x2 Gy (range, 20-40 Gy). A considerable proportion of these patients developed severe late complications (Radiother Oncol 53 (1999) 177). The data allowed a detailed analysis of complication kinetics, leading to a new model which was tested using data from the literature. Results: Data on late complications were obtained for eight different organs with a follow-up of up to 10 years. For the various organs, the percentage of patients being free from late complications, plotted as a function of time after start of radiation therapy, was adequately described by exponential regression. From the fit, the parameter p a was obtained, which is the percentage of patients at risk in a given year of developing a complication in a given organ during that year. The rate p a remained about constant with time. Following sandwich therapy, the annual incidence of complications in the bladder, ileum, lymphatic and soft tissue, and ureters was about the same (p a =10-14%/year), whereas complications in bone or dermis occurred at lower rates (4.7 or 7.5%/year, respectively). Discussion: Numerous data sets collected from published reports were analyzed in the same way. Many of the data sets studied were from patients in a series where there was a high incidence of late effects. Three types of kinetics for the occurrence of late effects after radiotherapy were identified: Type 1, purely exponential kinetics; Type 2, exponential kinetics, the slope of which decreased exponentially with time

  12. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Betka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225 removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI was observed in 124 cases (45% immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33% on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%, headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery.

  13. Complication of nose and paranasal sinus disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazmi, H.S.; Ali, S.; Ali, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Diseases of nose and paranasal sinuses can complicate to involve the orbit and other surrounding structures because of their close proximity. These diseases are usually infective or can be neoplastic in origin. Method: All the patients presenting in ENT or Eye Departments of Ayub Teaching Hospital during the one year study period who had complicated nose or paranasal sinus disease were included in the study. A detailed history and examination followed by CT scanning and laboratory investigations to assess the type and extent of the disease, was carried out. Results: Infections were the most common cause of complicated sinus disease 11 (75%). The rest of the 4 (25%) cases were tumours. 12 (80%) of the cases presented with proptosis. In 1 of these 12 cases, there was complete blindness. In 2 (13%) of the cases there was only orbital cellulitis. Two of these patients had facial swelling and 2 had nasal obstruction and presented as snoring. Two patients presented with history of weight loss and these patients had malignant tumour of the paranasal sinuses. One patient presented with early signs of meningitis. In 1 case sub periosteal scalp abscess (Pott's puffy tumour) was the only complication noted. Conclusion: Nose and paranasal sinus diseases can complicate to involve mostly the orbit, but sometimes brain, meninges and skull bones can also get involved. (author)

  14. Pediatric Liver Transplant: Techniques and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Natally; Marcelino, Antonio Sergio Zafred; Horvat, Joao Vicente; Yamanari, Tássia Regina; Batista Araújo-Filho, Jose de Arimateia; Panizza, Pedro; Seda-Neto, Joao; Antunes da Fonseca, Eduardo; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Mendes de Oliveira Cerri, Luciana; Chapchap, Paulo; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2017-10-01

    Liver transplant is considered to be the last-resort treatment approach for pediatric patients with end-stage liver disease. Despite the remarkable advance in survival rates, liver transplant remains an intricate surgery with significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis of complications is crucial for patient survival but is challenging given the lack of specificity in clinical presentation. Knowledge of the liver and vascular anatomy of the donor and the recipient or recipients before surgery is also important to avoid complications. In this framework, radiologists play a pivotal role on the multidisciplinary team in both pre- and postoperative scenarios by providing a road map to guide the surgery and by assisting in diagnosis of complications. The most common complications after liver transplant are (a) vascular, including the hepatic artery, portal vein, hepatic veins, and inferior vena cava; (b) biliary; (c) parenchymal; (d) perihepatic; and (e) neoplastic. The authors review surgical techniques, the role of each imaging modality, normal posttransplant imaging features, types of complications after liver transplant, and information required in the radiology report that is critical to patient care. They present an algorithm for an imaging approach for pediatric patients after liver transplant and describe key points that should be included in radiologic reports in the pre- and postoperative settings. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2017.

  15. [Incidence of complications of otitis media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernotti, M E; Casarotto, C; Tosello, M L; Zernotti, M

    2005-02-01

    Determine the incidence of otological and endocranial complications of acute otitis media, taking into account previous treatments and the development of complications. Retrospective follow-up study between March 1996-2003 including 16 patients: 9 men, 7 women. Nine patients (56.25%) had intracranial complications and seven otological ones. In the first group, 6 developed meningitis by Streptococcus pneumoniae, one sigmoid sinus thromboflebitis, one multiple abscesses, and one subdural empiema and encephalitis. Otological complications were six acute mastoiditis and the other one a facial paralysis. The child with thromboflebitis underwent mastoidectomy and closed meningeal comunication; 5 of the acute mastoiditis were operated on and the other received traditional treatment. The meningitis received medication. Two died, one because of a subdural empiema and the other due to meningitis. Despite the advances made by antibiotherapy and diagnosis, the complications of otitis media are still frequent. The pediatrician and otorhinolaryngologist should be on the alert for these as well as for Pneumococcus and its high resistance.

  16. Complications of hip fractures: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  17. Severe rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Sutlief, Stephen; Bergsagel, Carl; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Some investigators have reported severe rectal complications after brachytherapy. Due to the low number of such events, their relationship to dosimetric parameters has not been well characterized. Methods and materials: A total of 3126 patients were treated with low dose rate brachytherapy from 1998 through 2010. 2464 had implant alone, and 313 had implant preceded by 44–46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Post-implant dosimetry was based on a CT scan obtained on the day of implant, generally within 30 min of the procedure. Every patient’s record was reviewed for occurrence of rectal complications. Results: Eight of 2464 patients (0.32%) treated with brachytherapy alone developed a radiation-related rectal fistula. Average prostatic and rectal dose parameters were moderately higher for fistula patients than for patients without a severe rectal complication. For instance, the average R100 was 1.2 ± 0.75 cc for fistula patients, versus 0.37 ± 0.88 cc for non-fistula patients. However, the fistula patients’ values were well within the range of values for patients without a rectal complication. Four patients had some attempt at repair or reconstruction, but long-term functional outcomes were not favorable. Conclusions: Rectal fistulas are a very uncommon potential complication of prostate brachytherapy, which can occur even in the setting of acceptable day 0 rectal doses. Their occurrence is not easily explained by standard dosimetric or clinical factors

  18. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS. We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise.

  19. Factors associated with neonatal ostomy complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhat, Aliyah; Kernaleguen, Guen; Dicken, Bryan J; van Manen, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal ostomies, either temporary or permanent, are created for numerous reasons. Limited attention has been given to understanding what factors might place infants at risk for surgical wound complications. The purpose of the study is to identify factors associated with risk of significant abdominal wound complications (wound dehiscence and wound infection) following neonatal ostomy creation. This is a retrospective chart review of infants undergoing ostomy between January 2009 and December 2013 at the University of Alberta Hospital. 66 infants were identified of which 18.2% (12/66) had wound complications. Variables associated with wound dehiscence included: findings of bowel necrosis during laparotomy (7/9 wound dehiscence, 18/57 none, p=0.008), perioperative sepsis (3/9 wound dehiscence, 3/57 none, p=0.006), and perioperative blood transfusion (9/9 wound dehiscence, 30/57 none, p=0.007). Wound infection was not predicted by any variables collected. Neonates undergoing creation of an ostomy appear to be at substantial risk for wound complications. As wound complications are significant issues for infants undergoing surgery, emerging strategies should be explored to either avoid ostomy creation or promote wound healing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Postoperative abdominal complications after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Guohua

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic experiences on the patients who suffered abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass(CPB. Methods A total of 2349 consecutive patients submitted to cardiovascular surgery with CPB in our hospital from Jan 2004 to Dec 2010 were involved. The clinical data of any abdominal complication, including its incidence, characters, relative risks, diagnostic measures, medical or surgical management and mortality, was retrospectively analyzed. Results Of all the patients, 33(1.4% developed abdominal complications postoperatively, including 11(33.3% cases of paralytic ileus, 9(27.3% of gastrointestinal haemorrhage, 2(6.1% of gastroduodenal ulcer perforation, 2(6.1% of acute calculus cholecystitis, 3(9.1% of acute acalculus cholecystitis, 4(12.1% of hepatic dysfunction and 2(6.1% of ischemia bowel diseases. Of the 33 patients, 26 (78.8% accepted medical treatment and 7 (21.2% underwent subsequent surgical intervention. There were 5(15.2% deaths in this series, which was significantly higher than the overall mortality (2.7%. Positive history of peptic ulcer, advanced ages, bad heart function, preoperative IABP support, prolonged CPB time, low cardiac output and prolonged mechanical ventilation are the risk factors of abdominal complications. Conclusions Abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with CPB have a low incidence but a higher mortality. Early detection and prompt appropriate intervention are essential for the outcome of the patients.

  1. Neurological complications of Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2018-04-26

    Zika virus (ZIKV) disease is a vector-borne infectious disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Recently, ZIKV has caused outbreaks in most American countries. Areas covered: Publications about neurological complications of ZIKV infection retrieved from pubmed searchers were reviewed, and reference lists and relevant articles from review articles were also examined. Vertical/intrauterine transmission leads to congenital infection and causes microcephaly and congenital ZIKV syndrome. ZIKV preferentially infects human neural progenitor cells and triggers cell apoptosis. ZIKV RNA has been identified in foetal brain tissue and brains of microcephalic infants who died; amniotic fluid and placentas of pregnant mothers; and umbilical cord, cerebro-spinal fluid and meninges of newborns. The increase in the number of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) cases during the ZIKV outbreak in the Americas provides epidemiological evidence for the link between ZIKV infection and GBS. Less frequently reported ZIKV neurological complications include encephalitis/meningoencephalitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, myelitis, cerebrovascular complications (ischemic infarction; vasculopathy), seizures and encephalopathy, sensory polyneuropathy and sensory neuronopathy. Analysis of GBS incidence could serve as an epidemiological 'marker' or sentinel for ZIKV disease and other neurological complications associated to ZIKV. Expert commentary: An expanding spectrum of neurological complications associated with ZIKV infection is being recognised.

  2. [Orthognathic surgery: surgical failures and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery procedures mark the endpoint of lengthy orthodontic-surgical preparations and herald the completion of treatment for patients and their families. The main types of procedure are full maxillary Le Fort I osteotomies, mandibular osteotomies and chin surgery. To ensure a successful outcome, all require a favorable environment and extreme technical skill. But, like all surgical operations, they are also subject to peri- and post-operative complications resulting from treatment hazards or errors. Whatever the cause, surgical complications can entail failures in the management of the malformation. By seeking to understand and analyzing these complications, we can already help to prevent and reduce the contingent risks of failure. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  3. Complications of obesity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, S R

    2009-04-01

    The increasing prevalence and severity of obesity in children and adolescents has provided greater emphasis on the wide variety of comorbid conditions and complications that can be experienced as a consequence of obesity. These complications can occur both in the short term and in the long term. Some complications, earlier thought to be long-term issues, which would only occur in adulthood, have now been shown to occur in children and adolescents. These findings have raised concerns about the overall health experience of those who develop obesity early in life and have even raised questions about whether the obesity epidemic might shorten the life span of the current generation of children. In this paper, I will examine current knowledge regarding the different organ systems that may be impacted by childhood obesity.

  4. URETHROPLASTY FOR COMPLICATED ANTERIOR URETHRAL STRICTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Katsuya; Hori, Shunta; Morizawa, Yosuke; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Yoneda, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Yoshida, Katsunori; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    (Objectives) To compare efficacy and outcome of urethroplasty for complicated anterior urethral strictures. (Methods) Twelve patients, included 3 boys, with anterior urethral stricture underwent urethroplasty after the failure of either urethral dilatation or internal urethrotomy. We evaluated pre- and post-operative Q max and surgical outcome. (Results) Four patients were treated with end-to-end anastomosis, included a case of bulbar urethral elongation simultaneously, one patient was treated with augmented anastomotic urethroplasty, three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with prepucial flap, one patient was treated with tubed urethroplasty with prepucial flap (Ducket procedure) and three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft. Postoperative Qmax improved in all patients without major complications and recurrence during follow-up periods ranging from 17 to 102 months (mean 55 months). (Conclusions) Urethroplasty is an effective therapeutic procedure for complicated anterior urethral stricture.

  5. Complications of laparoscopic hysterectomy: the Monash experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, J; Lawrence, A; Michael, M; Pearce, S

    2002-08-01

    A retrospective review of medical records was performed to assess the incidence and type of significant complications encountered during laparoscopic hysterectomy Two hundred and sixty-five consecutive patients were reviewed between the years 1994 and August 2001. Two hundred and thirty-two laparoscopic vaginal hysterectomies and 33 total laparoscopic hysterectomies were performed. The operations were performed at Monash Medical Centre, a Melbourne tertiary public hospital, and two Melbourne private hospitals, by three surgeons. Ten significant complications occurred. There were two cases of ureteric fistula, two bladder injuries, two bowel obstructions, two postoperative haematomas, one case of a bladder fistula and one superficial epigastric artery injury. In-patient stay ranged from two to six days. Our complication and in-patient stay rates are consistent with previously reported rates.

  6. Normal tissue complication probability for salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of radiotherapy is to make a profitable balance between the morbidity (due to side effects of radiation) and cure of malignancy. To achieve this, one needs to know the relation between NTCP (normal tissue complication probability) and various treatment variables of a schedule viz. daily dose, duration of treatment, total dose and fractionation along with tissue conditions. Prospective studies require that a large number of patients be treated with varied schedule parameters and a statistically acceptable number of patients develop complications so that a true relation between NTCP and a particular variable is established. In this study Salivary Glands Complications have been considered. The cases treated in 60 Co teletherapy machine during the period 1994 to 2002 were analyzed and the clinicians judgement in ascertaining the end points was the only means of observations. The only end points were early and late xerestomia which were considered for NTCP evaluations for a period of 5 years

  7. Complications of transcatheteral occlusion of abdominal arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Belz, J.; Buecheler, E.

    1981-01-01

    The number of transcatheteral occulsion of abdominal arteries reported so far enables us to differentiate between complications, which are specific for the methods used, or which are organ-specific and material-specific. Among the complications specific for the methods concerned are: complications occuring in angiography; tumour embolism in the lung; transport of embolic material into the lung; transport of embolic material into the arteries of the lower half of the body; renal insufficiency; necrosis; and, finally, abscess formation. Among the organ-specific complications are: necrosis (especially of the spleen and in the operated upper gastro-intestinal tract); abscess formation (spleen, kidneys, liver); retroperitoneal phlegmones (kidney); relapsing haemorrhages (gastro-intestinal tract, kidneys); renal insufficiency (in case of pre-existing renal damage); hypertension (described so far as transient blood pressure increase only); hypertensive crisis (after renal artery occulsion for malignant hypertension); hepatic insufficiency and gallbladder infarction (in embolisation of the liver); transport of embolic material into adjacent arteris (in case of embolisation, into the vessels of the truncus coeliacus); and, finally, hypoglycaemia (in embolisation of the liver). Among the material-specific complications are: adhesion of the catheter tip to the vascular wall (Bucrylate); dislocation of Gianturco's spiral; allergic (anaphylactic) reaction to the embolic material (not described so far); recanalisation (in case of absorbable substances such as Fibrospum and Gelfoam); substitutive blood supply via the formation or extension of collaterals; necrosis in peripherally (capillary) occluding substances such as Bucrylate and Ethibloc; and, finally, abscess formation (in case of non-sterile embolic material). Some of these complications can be classified under more than one category. (orig./APR) [de

  8. Soft-contact-lenses-induced complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvajac Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Soft contact lenses occupy significant place in ophthalmology, both in the correction of refraction anomalies and in the treatment of many eye diseases. The number of patients that wear soft contact lenses for the purpose of correcting ametropia is constantly increasing. Due to the increasing number of wearers, the percentage of complications that can lead to serious eye damage and serious vision loss is also increasing. The aim of this study was to point out the most common complications related to soft contact lens use. Methods. In the period from 1995−2004 this prospective study included 510 patients wearing soft contact lenses for correcting ametropia. None of the patients wore contact lenses before and none suffered from any system or local diseases that could affected the development of eventual complications. The study took seven years with the patients who wore conventional lenses and three years with those who wore replacement contact lenses. All the necessary ophthalmologic examinations were done (visual acuity, refractokeratometry, the quantity of tear film, biomicroscopic examination of anterior eye segment. All the complications were filmed by video camera. Results. Of all the patients, 19 had blepharitis, 73 suffered from “dry eye”, 57 had conjunctival hyperemia, 12 had conjunctivitis, 34 had gigantopapillary conjunctivitis (GPC, 93 had punctiform epitheliopathy, 20 had corneal infiltration, one patient had keratitis, 91 had corneal vascularisation, and 95 patients had corneal deposits. Conclusion. Both the type and frequency of complications related to soft contact lens use in our group of patients, proved to be significant. Some of this complications (keratitis can significantly damage vision and lead to loss of vision and sometimes can require operative treatment.

  9. Complicated childhood inguinal hernias in UITH, Ilorin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode T Bamigbola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complicated inguinal hernias pose a threat to the life of the child as well as increase the morbidity associated with management of an otherwise straightforward condition. The aim of this study was to determine the presentation, treatment and management outcome of complicated inguinal hernias in children. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of all children 15 years and less managed for complicated inguinal hernia between 2002 and 2010. Data obtained included demographic characteristics, presentation, operative findings and outcome. Results: Complicated hernia rate was 13.9%.There were 41 children, 38 boys (92.7% and 3 girls. Ages ranged between 4 days and 15 years (Median = 90days. Most were infants (48.8%, n = 20 and neonates accounted for 19.5% (n = 8. Median duration of symptoms prior to presentation was 18 h (range = 2-96 h. Seven patients had been scheduled for elective surgery. Hernia was right sided in 68.3% (n = 28. Symptoms included vomiting (68.3%, abdominal distension (34.1% and constipation (4.9%; one patient presented with seizures. In 19 (46.3% patients hernia was reducible while 22(53.7% had emergency surgery. Associated anomalies included undescended testis (12.2%, umbilical hernia (14.6%. Intestinal resection rate was 7.3% and testicular gangrene occurred in 14.6%. Mean duration of surgery was 60.3 ± 26.7 min. Wound infection occurred in six patients (14.6%. Overall complication rate was 24.4%, 30% in infants. The mortality rate was 2.4% (n = 1. Conclusions: Morbidity associated with complicated inguinal hernia is high in neonates and infants. Delayed presentation is common in our setting. Educating the parents as well as primary care physicians on the need for early presentation is necessary.

  10. Assessment of complications due to intratympanic injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chuan Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study is to report and to analyze the complications following intratympanic injections (ITI of steroids. The occurrence rate of complications at different ITI sites, four quadrants of eardrum, was also compared. Methods: A retrospective clinical review in a medical center. Each patient received ITI twice in a week for 2–3 consecutive weeks as a salvage therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Post-injection complications, especially transient dizziness and vertigo, were recorded. Patients with acute or chronic vertigo episodes in 1 month were excluded. Results: A total of 59 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss and a total of 278 times of ITI were performed in 1 year. The post-injection complications included pain, tongue numbness, transient dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus, and a small persistent perforation. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of these complications between the injections sites on the 4 quadrants of the tympanic membrane. However, there was statistical significance in the post-injection vertiginous episode after IT injections to posterior-inferior quadrant (Q3 and posterior-superior quadrant (Q4 compared to anterior-superior quadrant (Q1 and anterior-inferior quadrant (Q2 (P = 0.0113. Conclusion: IT injection is recommended to be applied to the Q2 since the Q1 and Q4 injections are more likely to induce the adverse effect of tongue numbness, while the Q3 and Q4 areas are more likely to induce post-injection vertigo. Keywords: Intratympanic injection, Sudden deafness, Complications, Vertigo

  11. Complications of transcatheteral occlusion of abdominal arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H; Belz, Buecheler, E.

    1981-09-01

    The number of transcatheteral occulsion of abdominal arteries reported so far enables us to differentiate between complications, which are specific for the methods used, or which are organ-specific and material-specific. Among the complications specific for the methods concerned are: complications occuring in angiography; tumour embolism in the lung; transport of embolic material into the lung; transport of embolic material into the arteries of the lower half of the body; renal insufficiency; necrosis; and, finally, abscess formation. Among the organ-specific complications are: necrosis (especially of the spleen and in the operated upper gastro-intestinal tract); abscess formation (spleen, kidneys, liver); retroperitoneal phlegmones (kidney); relapsing haemorrhages (gastro-intestinal tract, kidneys); renal insufficiency (in case of pre-existing renal damage); hypertension (described so far as transient blood pressure increase only); hypertensive crisis (after renal artery occulsion for malignant hypertension); hepatic insufficiency and gallbladder infarction (in embolisation of the liver); transport of embolic material into adjacent arteris (in case of embolisation, into the vessels of the truncus coeliacus); and, finally, hypoglycaemia (in embolisation of the liver). Among the material-specific complications are: adhesion of the catheter tip to the vascular wall (Bucrylate); dislocation of Gianturco's spiral; allergic (anaphylactic) reaction to the embolic material (not described so far); recanalisation (in case of absorbable substances such as Fibrospum and Gelfoam); substitutive blood supply via the formation or extension of collaterals; necrosis in peripherally (capillary) occluding substances such as Bucrylate and Ethibloc; and, finally, abscess formation (in case of non-sterile embolic material). Some of these complications can be classified under more than one category.

  12. Influence of lithotripsy modalities on complication rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Localization of ureteric stones and difference in disintegration success are the most important factors in determining the first treatment approach for ureteric stones. Objective. The aim of our study was to evaluate the difference in complication rate between different ureteric stone lithotripsy modalities. Methods. Two hundred sixty patients with ureteric stones were analyzed in a prospective bicentric study that lasted 1 year. The patients were divided into two groups: I - 120 patients who underwent ESWL (extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy treatment and II - 140 patients who were treated endoscopically with ballistic lithotripsy. Results. Ureteroscopic lithotripsy of all pelvic and iliac stones was significantly more successful comparing to ESWL, while lumbar ureteric stone treatment with ureteroscopic lithotripsy was not significantly more successful than ESWL, except for lumbar stones larger than 100mm2 that were significantly better treated endoscopically. In the I group complications after lithotripsy were recorded in 64 (59.3% and in the II group in 58 (42.0% patients, meaning that complications were statistically significantly more frequent in the I than in the II group. In the II group complications were significantly more often recorded after treatment of proximal comparing to ureteric stones of other localizations, while in the I group complications were significantly more often detected after treatment of impacted stones than in the II group. Conclusion. Being significantly successful comparing to ESWL, ureteric stone treatment with ureteroscopic lithotripsy should be considered as the first therapeutic option for all, especially impacted stones located in the iliac and pelvic ureteric portion. In spite of absent statistical difference in the success rate, ESWL should be chosen as the first treatment option in all cases of lumbar ureteric stones due to lower complication rate except for stones larger than 100mm2 that

  13. Complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Karim; Patel, Nihar; Jain, Maneesh; El-Amm, Joelle; Amro, Farah; Tabbara, Imad A

    2014-08-01

    Infection, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and to a lesser extent sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) represent the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). During the last decade, progress in prevention and treatment of these complications led to improvement in the outcome of these patients. Despite the fact that nonmyeloablative regimens have been increasingly used in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities, the nonrelapse related mortality remains a challenge and long-term follow-up is required. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an updated concise review of the complications of AHSCT and of the available treatment interventions.

  14. Prevalence of complications in neuromuscular scoliosis surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Shallu; Wu, Chunsen; Andersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    .71 %) followed by implant complications (PR = 12.51 %), infections (PR = 10.91 %), neurological complications (PR = 3.01 %) and pseudoarthrosis (PR = 1.88 %). Revision, removal and extension of implant had highest PR (7.87 %) followed by malplacement of the pedicle screws (4.81 %). Rates of individual studies...... have moderate to high variability. The studies were heterogeneous in methodology and outcome types, which are plausible explanations for the variability; sensitivity analysis with respect to age at surgery, sample size, publication year and diagnosis could also partly explain this variability...

  15. Gastrointestinal complications of leukemia and its treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, T.B.; Bjelland, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemia represents 4% of all cancer deaths and is the leading cause of death from malignancy for all patients under 30 years of age. Various rare, usually preterminal gastrointestinal complications of leukemia have been reported. These complications are becoming more common and no longer should be considered unusual. Their increasing incidence is the result of new, more aggressive treatment methods and increased patient lifespan. The authors describe the relative incidence and common radiographic presentations of leukemia-related gastrointestinal disease and emphasize that its prognosis is favorable with prompt diagnosis and treatment

  16. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complications of neck liposuction and submentoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, James

    2009-02-01

    Patients desiring improved neck and jawline contours often are looking for minimally invasive procedures and are not interested in undergoing extensive face-lifting procedures. Realizing the limitations, surgeons may offer their patient such procedures as liposuction and submentoplasty. Even though these procedures are less involved than a facelift, many pitfalls can occur, leading to an unfavorable result and a disappointed patient. Proper patient selection and choosing the correct operation are crucial to avoiding these situations. This article focuses on the common complications of neck liposuction and submentoplasty and reviews the management and avoidance of these complications.

  18. The neurologic complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph R; Singhal, Divya

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has been increasingly employed to manage morbid obesity. Approximately 150000 bariatric procedures are performed in the US annually. Neurologic complications arise in as many as 5% of individuals having this surgery. Although the etiology of some of these complications remains obscure, the majority are the consequence of vitamin (most commonly thiamine and vitamin B12) or mineral (most commonly copper) deficiency and familiarity with these disorders is essential. Their rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment is essential to avoid long-term, irreversible consequences including, in some instances, death. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Postanesthetic ulceration of palate: A rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ramesh; Garg, Meenu; Pawah, Salil; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    The routine dental practice involves various dental procedures which needs the application of local anesthetics. Generally, there are very few complications associated with these procedures. Complications such as tissue necrosis can occur following the rapid injection of local anesthetic solutions. Palate is a favorable site for soft tissue lesions, various factors such as direct effects of the drug, blanching of the tissues during injection, a relatively poor blood supply, and reactivation of the latent forms of herpes can all promote to tissue ischemia and a lesion in the palate.

  20. Complications after osteosynthesis and their causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, S.

    1982-01-01

    From 1976 to 1981, 1,426 osteosyntheses were carried through according to the methods of the study group on questions of osteosynthesis. Complications occurred in 73 patients and consisted in the fracture or bending of the implant, or non-union. This led to an epicritical scrutiny of the case histories and X-ray images of these 73 patients in order to ascertain the causes underlying these complications, and to find out to what extent these problems can be recognized at an early date after the operation. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Diverticulosis of the colon and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, D; Farthmann, E H

    1983-12-01

    Colonic diverticula in reality are herniations of the mucosa through a thickened musculature of the bowel wall where it is penetrated by the vasa recta. Their prevalence increases with western food and with age. Low-residue diet and increased intraluminal pressure are considered to be etiologic factors. Diverticular disease is characterised by inflammatory and bleeding complications. Diverticulitis may lead to peridiverticulitis and pericolitis with frank peritonitis. Uncomplicated diverticulosis warrants observation only under dietary guidance. Repeated complications indicate elective operation by one-stage-resection. Perforation, abscess and massive bleeding necessitate immediate operative treatment aimed at elimination of the involved segment.

  2. Diverticulosis of the colon and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldmann, D.; Farthmann, E.H.

    1983-01-01

    Colonic diverticula in reality are herniations of the mucosa through a thickened musculature of the bowel wall where it is penetrated by the vasa recta. Their prevalence increases with western food and with age. Low-residue diet and increased intraluminal pressure are considered to be etiologic factors. Diverticular disease is characterised by inflammatory and bleeding complications. Diverticulitis may lead to peridiverticulitis and pericolitis with frank peritonitis. Uncomplicated diverticulosis warrants observation only under dietary guidance. Repeated complications indicate elective operation by one-stage-resection. Perforation, abscess and massive bleeding necessitate immediate operative treatment aimed at elimination of the involved segment. (orig.)

  3. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Carlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser.

  4. People at High Risk of Developing Flu-Related Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other People at High Risk of Developing Flu–Related Complications ... related complications if they get sick with influenza. People at High Risk for Developing Flu-Related Complications ...

  5. Prediction of complications following caustic ingestion in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, H B

    1995-01-01

    The records of 86 adults admitted to hospital following caustic ingestion were reviewed. Eighteen patients (21%) developed complications; of these, six were fatal. Patients without symptoms or signs did not develop complications. Complications occurred only following lye ingestion, or intentional...

  6. Complicating Audience: A Critical Communication Pedagogy Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joshua E.; Potter, David J.

    2018-01-01

    Courses: This activity is designed specifically for public-speaking courses, but it could be used in the general introductory communication course. It also holds potential for use in persuasion, argumentation, or strategic communication courses. Objectives: This activity helps students understand audience as a more complicated concept--one that…

  7. Complications after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Masataka

    1981-01-01

    From 1966 to 1973, 215 patients with cervical cancer were treated at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University. The patients were divided into two groups. In the first group, 123 patients were treated by external radiation with Tele- 60 Co plus radium insertions (1966-1970). In the second group, 83 patients were treated with linear accelerator plus cesium insertions (1970-1973). The results on both of 5-year survival rate and appearance of radiation injuries were compared with two groups. There was no significant difference in the cure rate between those of groups. The incidence of pigmentation, edema and diarrhea (early complications) was higher and the diarrhea continued significantly longer in the second group. The incidence of rectal ulcer and rectostenosis (later complications) was significantly higher than former group. A study was made to lean the reason for the significant higher occurrence of rectal ulcer and rectostenosis. As a result, it was determined that later complication was more emphasized especially by ret dose given intracavitary radiation. In addition, it is thought that the dose rate, the dose volume and natural history such as the patients' age are also related to the severity of the complication. (J.P.N.)

  8. Complications after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, M. (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-04-01

    From 1966 to 1973, 215 patients with cervical cancer were treated at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University. The patients were divided into two groups. In the first group, 123 patients were treated by external radiation with Tele-/sup 60/Co plus radium insertions (1966-1970). In the second group, 83 patients were treated with linear accelerator plus cesium insertions (1970-1973). The results on both of 5-year survival rate and appearance of radiation injuries were compared with in the two groups. There was no significant difference in the cure rate between those groups. The incidence of pigmentation, edema and diarrhea (early complications) was higher and the diarrhea continued significantly longer in the second group. The incidence of rectal ulcer and rectostenosis (later complications) was significantly higher than former group. A study was made to learn the reason for the significantly higher occurrence of rectal ulcer and rectostenosis. As a result, it was determined that later complication was more emphasized especially by dose rate of intracavitary irradiation. In addition, it is thought that the dose rate, the dose volume and natural history such as the patients' age are also related to the severity of the complications.

  9. Extrahepatic complications to cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens H; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    In addition to complications relating to the liver, patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension develop extrahepatic functional disturbances of multiple organ systems. This can be considered a multiple organ failure that involves the heart, lungs, kidneys, the immune systems, and other organ...

  10. LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OCCURRING DURING DENTAL IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihomir Georgiev

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the emergence of new concepts in dental treatment involving placement of dental implants and the significance of therapeutic treatment of the intrusion in their complications. The purpose of the article is to make a review of the problems and to point out options for their treatment.

  11. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa A. Kamel

    2015-11-01

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms.

  12. Management of liver complications in haemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Brissot

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver complications in haemoglobinopathies (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease are due to several factors, dominated (beside chronic viral infections, not considered here by chronic iron overload, biliary obstruction and venous thrombosis. Whereas the latter two factors can cause acute hepatic syndromes, all three mechanisms - when becoming chronic- can produce fibrosis and cirrhosis and even, in thalassaemia, hepatocellular carcinoma. These chronic hepatic complications are an indirect consequence of the significant improvement in life expectancy due to the overall amelioration of disease management. The diagnostic approach has benefited from non invasive (biochemical and imaging approaches which have considerably reduced the indication of liver biopsy. The therapeutic management involves relatively efficient curative medical, endoscopic or surgical methods, but should rest primarily on preventive measures focused on the haematological causative factors but also on hepatic co-morbidities. This chapter will focus on hepatic complications in thalassaemia and sickle cell disease (SCD, without considering the complications related to virus B or C infections which will be described in another chapter.

  13. [Obstetric hysterectomy. Incidence, indications and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Juan A Reveles; Rivera, Geannyne Villegas; Higareda, Salvador Hernández; Páez, Fernando Grover; Vega, Carmen C Hernández; Segura, Agustin Patiño

    2008-03-01

    Obstetric hysterectomy is indicated when patient's life is at risk, and it is a procedure that requires a highly experienced and skilled medical team to solve any complication. To identify incidence, indications, and complications of obstetric hysterectomy within a high-risk population. Transversal, retrospective study from July 1st 2004 to June 30 2006 at Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad, Hospital de Ginecoobstetricia, Centro Medico Nacional de Occidente, IMSS. There were reviewed 103 patient' files with obstetric hysterectomy. Incidence was calculated, and clinical and socio-demographic characteristics, indications, and complications of obstetric hysterectomy identified and expressed in frequency, percentages, and central tendency measurements. Incidence of obstetric hysterectomy was 8 cases within every 1,000 obstetric consultation. Age average was 31.1 +/- 5.1 years. 72.8% had cesarean surgery history. Main indication was placenta previa associated with placenta accreta (33%), followed by uterine hypotony (22.3%). Complications were hypovolemic shock (56.3%), and vesical injuries (5.8%). There were no maternal deaths. Cesarean history induces higher obstetric hysterectomy incidence in women with high-risk pregnancy, due to its relation to placentation disorders, as placenta previa that increases hemorrhage possibility, and thus, maternal morbidity and mortality.

  14. Complications, disease profile and histological yield from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The objective of the study was to evaluate (i) the technique used at Universitas Hospital in comparison with other international centres also performing renal biopsies, (ii) the disease profile in patients undergoing renal biopsies, (iii) the complications experienced during and/or after the procedure, and (iv) the ...

  15. Bilateral gluteal abscesses and myofibrosis complicating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: There is paucity of reports on the musculoskeletal complications of pentazocine abuse in Nigeria.The aim was to report a case of bilateral gluteal abscesses and myofibrosis as a consequence of parenteral pentazocine abuse. CASE SUMMARY: We report a case of a 39 year old housewife who presented ...

  16. Severe neurological complication following adjustable gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, G; Musa, N; Aquilino, F; Capuano, P

    2018-01-01

    In the last years with the increase of bariatric surgery, first of all as a result of new indications, a rise in the incidence of nutrient-related complications has been observed. Currently little is known about the impact of post-bariatric malnutrition and neurological complications. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome which occurs as a result of thiamine deficiency. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome must be considered a serious neurological complication of bariatric surgery with significant morbidity and mortality, with rapidly progressing neurological symptoms, and must be treated immediately. We report the case of a 35 years-old male patient, affected by morbid obesity, anxious-depressive syndrome and alcohol use disorder, who after adjustable gastric banding implanted in another hospital developed a severe malnutrition and neurological syndrome. The patient showed poor adherence to the follow-up and to the dietary indications and after all, we needed to place a PEG for enteral nutrition in order to resolve the malnutrition condition and the neurological syndrome. Our experience emphasizes that preoperative selection and assessment of a patient's nutritional status according to guidelines, is required to identify potential problems, and that bariatric surgeons or physicians caring for patient who have undergone bariatric surgery should be familiar with the constellation of nutritional and neurological disorder that may occur after surgery. We want to remark the importance of preoperative selection of the patients, the follow-up and the cooperation between patient and physician in order to obtain the best result and avoid severe complications.

  17. Panel 7 : Otitis Media: Treatment and Complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilder, Anne G M; Marom, Tal; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Coates, Harvey; Gisselsson-Solén, Marie; Hall, Amanda J; Marchisio, Paola; Ruohola, Aino; Venekamp, Roderick P; Mandel, Ellen M

    Objective We aimed to summarize key articles published between 2011 and 2015 on the treatment of (recurrent) acute otitis media, otitis media with effusion, tympanostomy tube otorrhea, chronic suppurative otitis media and complications of otitis media, and their implications for clinical practice.

  18. [Complicated acute apendicitis. Open versus laparoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Piedra, Francisco; Morales García, Dieter; Bernal Marco, José Manuel; Llorca Díaz, Javier; Marton Bedia, Paula; Naranjo Gómez, Angel

    2008-06-01

    Although laparoscopy has become the standard approach in other procedures, this technique is not generally accepted for acute appendicitis, especially if it is complicated due reports on the increase in intra-abdominal abscesses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morbidity in a group of patients diagnosed with complicated apendicitis (gangrenous or perforated) who had undergone open or laparoscopic appendectomy. We prospectively studied 107 patients who had undergone appendectomy for complicated appendicitis over a two year period. Mean operation time, mean hospital stay and morbidity, such as wound infection and intra-abdominal abscess were evaluated. In the group with gangrenous appendicitis morbidity was significantly lower in laparoscopic appendectomy group (p = 0.014). Wound infection was significantly higher in the open appendectomy group (p = 0.041), and there were no significant differences in intra-abdominal abscesses (p = 0.471). In the perforated appendicitis group overall morbidity (p = 0.046) and wound infection (p = 0.004) was significantly higher in the open appendectomy group. There were no significant differences in intra-abdominal abscesses (p = 0.612). These results suggest that laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis is a safe procedure that may prove to have significant clinical advantages over conventional surgery.

  19. Cerebral hemodynamics in normal and complicated pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Teelkien

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy, approximately 6-25% of women are diagnosed with some form of hypertension. These disorders are among the leading causes of maternal mortality and severe morbidity. While multiple maternal organs can be affected, cerebral involvement is one of the most feared complications as it can

  20. Complications of ERCP: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Merete; Matzen, Peter; Schulze, Svend

    2004-01-01

    occurred in relation to 5% of the ERCP procedures (3 deaths). Cardiorespiratory complications occurred in 2.3% (2 deaths). Dilated bile duct ( p = 0.0001), placement of stent ( p = 0.001), and use of more than 40 mg of hyoscine-N-butyl bromide ( p

  1. [Anemic syndrome frequency in complicated obstetrical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Maria Guadalupe Veloz; Erasto, Luis Cruz; Maxines, Claudia García; Rodríguez, María Antonia Basavilvazo; Valencia, Marcelino Hernández

    2008-09-01

    The prevalence of anemia varies from country to country and there is not a trustworthy record. To determine the frequency of anemia in obstetric patients and the association among healthy pregnancy and aggregate complications. Was carried out as transversal, observational and comparative study. Obstetrical patients entered and responded in the period of a year, were formed a group with normal pregnancy and another with complicated pregnancy, with a total sample of 194 patients. In the statistical analysis was employed Student t test for independent groups, with value if p anemia was found in 22.4%. Hematological stage from group with normal pregnancy was mild anemia in 16.9% and anemia moderated in 4.1% of the cases. The anemia degrees in the group with associated illness and pregnancy were mild anemia in 19.2% and moderated anemia in 4.2%. Not any case was found with severe anemia. The statistical analysis showed difference significant among both groups p preeclampsia severe (22.6%), type 2 diabetes (13.9%), gestational diabetes (12.2%) and the remainder with other complications that include to the hypertiroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, asthma and vein deep thrombosis. Frequency of anemia in this study was greater upon informing in the international literature. The obstetrical complication more frequently relates to diverse anemia degrees were the hypertensive stage during pregnancy. The anemia is presented with greater frequency in pregnancy patients with others associated illness.

  2. Computed Tomography Study Of Complicated Bacterial Meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To monitor the structural intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis using computed tomography (CT) scan. Retrospective study of medical and radiological records of patients who underwent CT scan over a 4 year period. AUniversityTeachingHospital in a developing country. Thirty three patients with clinically and ...

  3. On drawing complicated 3D surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, I.N.; Talanov, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of constructing images of complicated 3D surfaces - world sheet of strings is considered. The world sheet representation in the form of a frame of points determined with a specified supporting curve is described. The images of the world sheets of free string are constructed using various graphical technologies. 15 refs., 6 figs

  4. Indications and Complications of Tube Thoracostomy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    an accumulation of fluid within the pleural considered significant enough to warrant drainage. This is to prevent possible complications like infection of the fluid or to prevent respiratory compromise when excessive. Where the ideal drainage receptacle is unavailable, the underwater seal device has been improvised in.

  5. REVIEW ARTICLE Complications, disease profile and histological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kidneys. • although severe hypertension is universally listed as a contraindication to renal biopsy owingdue to risk of haemorrhage, no clinical studies are available to support this view.3. The difference in the diagnostic yield and complications of coaxial versus non-coaxial biopsy methods is a further consideration, but so.

  6. Biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimian, Negin; Westerkamp, Andrie C.; Porte, Robert J.

    Purpose of reviewThe incidence, pathogenesis and management of the most common biliary complications are summarized, with an emphasis on nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) and potential strategies to prevent NAS after liver transplantation.Recent findingsNAS have variable presentations in time

  7. Metabolic complications in the small intestine syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Rafael; Orozco, Reynaldo

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic complications in the syndrome of small intestine is presented in a patient of masculine sex, 27 years old, who consulted for a square of inflammation gingival, migraine, fever, anorexia and adinamia for three days, followed by maculopapular-eritematose eruption for 8 days, coincident with the ampicillin ingestion, and later on severe abdominal pain and diarrhea

  8. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of ...

  9. Safety and Complications of Medical Thoracoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimaa Nour Moursi Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To highlight the possible complications of medical thoracoscopy (MT and how to avoid them. Methods. A retrospective and prospective analysis of 127 patients undergoing MT in Nagoya Medical Center (NMC and Toyota Kosei Hospital. The data about complications was obtained from the patients, notes on the computer system, and radiographs. Results. The median age was 71.0 (range, 33.0–92.0 years and 101 (79.5% were males. The median time with chest drain after procedure was 7.0 (range, 0.0–47.0 days and cases with talc poudrage were 30 (23.6%. Malignant histology was reported in 69 (54.3%, including primary lung cancer in 35 (27.5, mesothelioma in 18 (14.2, and metastasis in 16 (12.6. 58 (45.7% revealed benign pleural diseases and TB was diagnosed in 15 (11.8%. 21 (16.5% patients suffered from complications including lung laceration in 3 (2.4%, fever in 5 (3.9% (due to hospital acquired infection (HAI in 2, talc poudrage in 2, and malignancy in 1, HAI in 2 (1.6%, prolonged air-leak in 14 (11.0%, and subcutaneous emphysema in 1 (0.8%. Conclusions. MT is generally a safe procedure. Lung laceration is the most serious complication and should be managed well. HAI is of low risk and can be controlled by medical treatment.

  10. Cushing's syndrome complicated by multiple opportunistic infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R. C.; Gallas, P. R.; Romijn, J. A.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    The case history of a 56-year-old man is described who suffered from severe adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome. The clinical course was complicated by simultaneous infections with Pneumocystis carinii, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus and

  11. Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness of Pregnant Women Attending the Three Levels of Health Facilities in Ife Central Local Government, Nigeria. ... Only 24 (6.0%) had adequate knowledge of obstetric danger signs without prompting. Three hundred and forty (84.8%) and 312 (78.3%) women respectively had ...

  12. Errors and complications in laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Drăghici

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. In laparoscopic surgery errors are unavoidable and require proper acknowledgment to reduce the risk of intraoperative and accurately assess the appropriate therapeutic approach. Fortunately, their frequency is low and cannot overshadow the benefits of laparoscopic surgery. Materials and Methods. We made an epidemiological investigation in General Surgery Department of Emergency Clinical Hospital "St. John" Bucharest, analyzing 20 years of experience in laparoscopic surgery, during 1994-2014. We wanted to identify evolution trends in complications of laparoscopic surgery, analyzing the dynamic of errors occurred in all patients with laparoscopic procedures. Results. We recorded 26847 laparoscopic interventions with a total of 427 intra-or postoperative complications that required 160 conversions and 267 reinterventions to resolve inconsistencies. The average frequency of occurrence of complications was 15.9‰ (15.9 of 1,000 cases. In the period under review it was a good momentum of laparoscopic procedures in our department. Number of minimally invasive interventions increased almost 10 times, from 266 cases operated laparoscopically in 1995 to 2638 cases in 2008. Annual growth of the number of laparoscopic procedures has surpassed the number of complications. Conclusions. Laborious work of laparoscopic surgery and a specialized centre with well-trained team of surgeons provide premises for a good performance even in the assimilation of new and difficult procedures.

  13. Aseptic necrosis of femoral head complicating thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzincolo, C.; Castaldi, G.; Scutellary, P.N.; Bariani, L.; Pinca, A.

    1986-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is described in 4 patients, selected from 280 patients with homozygous β-thalassemia (Cooley anemia). The incidence of the complication appears to be very high (14.5per mille) in thalassemia, compared to the general population. The possible mechanism are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Acute Right Ventricular Dysfunction Complicating Prolonged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of transient right ventricular dysfunction associated with prolonged cardiac tamponade, an unusual complication of uncertain etiology. We believe that in this case dynamic coronary flow restriction resulted in ischemic injury and stunning of the right ventricle. Other possible causes are briefly reviewed. Right ...

  15. Cardiopulmonary complications in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens H

    2006-01-01

    and portopulmonary hypertension in some patients. Recent research has focused on the assertion that the hemodynamic and neurohumoral dysregulation are of major importance for the development of the cardiovascular and pulmonary complications in cirrhosis. This aspect is important to take into account...

  16. Cardiopulmonary complications to chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2006-01-01

    and portopulmonary hypertension in some patients. Recent research has focused on the assertion that the hemodynamic and neurohumoral dysregulation are of major importance for the development of the cardiovascular and pulmonary complications in cirrhosis. This aspect is important to take into account...

  17. Complications Following Autologous Latissimus Flap Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufid Burgić

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Use of an autologous latissimus flap in breast reconstruction accounts for a supple and natural look of reconstructed breast. Most common postoperative complication, seroma, became more of a rule then an exception when it comes to postoperative evaluation of the patients who underwent this reconstructive procedure. A retrospective study analysing and evaluating different complication rates in 20 patients who underwent breast reconstruction by autologous latissimus flap, was conducted. All patients included in the study were operated at the Department of plastic surgery of Hôpital Civil in Strasbourg, France, between 1996 and 2008. The complication rates were noted as follows: seroma in 19 of our 20 patients (95%, late hypertrophic scarring in 3 patients (15%, postoperative surgical site hematoma in 3 patients (15%, and 2 patients (10% presented postoperative chronic back pain. Different options used in seroma treatment and prevention (subcutaneous-fascia anchor sutures of donor site, application of corticosteroids by injection into donor site postoperatively, passive drainage can reduce seroma formation and thus overall complication rates, leading to much faster patient’s recovery time and return to normal daily activities.

  18. esophageal carcinoma complicating achalasia, 25 years post

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mine

    Some degree of stasis usually persists despite adequate treatment and relief of symptoms. Complications or recurrent symptoms include dysphagia, esophageal reflux, stricture and carcinoma. 5. This case report suggests that long term surveillance of the patient with achalasia is essential even after successful treatment.

  19. Spectrum of neurosurgical complications following medical tourism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives: The cost of medical care and availability of resources (human and facilities) which differs from nation to nation are amongst others, factors driving medical tourism (MT) despite its potential drawbacks. The aim of the study was to analyse all patients that presented with neurosurgical complications ...

  20. Chronic subdural haematoma complicating spinal anaesthesia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subdural haematoma is a rare but serious complication of dural puncture. We report a case of chronic subdural haematoma, which occurred following spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean section. A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with a post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) following spinal anaesthesia.

  1. Pregnancy complicating irradiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakri, Younes N.; Martan, Ahmed; Amri, Aladin (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology); Amri, M. (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Cardiovascular Diseases)

    1992-01-01

    A case is reported of a 24 year-old primigravida who had severe effusive constrictive pericarditis secondary to mediastinal irradiation following chemotherapy for Hodgkins disease. Pregnancy was threatened by serious maternal cardiovascular complications and a non-viable fetus was born spontaneously and prematurely. Patient was completely asymptomatic before pregnancy. (au).

  2. Major Abdominal Surgical Complications : Innovative Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S.A. ter Hoeve-Boersema (Simone)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIn this thesis the focus was on three major complications after abdominal surgery: incisional hernia (IH), prolonged postoperative ileus (PPOI), and colorectal anastomotic leakage (CAL). The results were summarized in three parts: _Part 1_ focused on prediction and detection of

  3. Complications of balloon packing in epistaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Derks, Wynia; Fokkens, Wytske; Menger, Dirk Jan

    2015-01-01

    Although balloon packing appears to be efficient to control epistaxis, severe local complications can occur. We describe four patients with local lesions after balloon packing. Prolonged balloon packing can cause damage to nasal mucosa, septum and alar skin (nasal mucosa, the cartilaginous skeleton

  4. Fournier's gangrene complicating vasectomy | Lema | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 80, No 9 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Fournier's gangrene complicating vasectomy. VM Lema. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  5. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  6. Obstructive Respiratory Disease Complicating Pneumonia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In Nigeria, annual death of children from pneumonia is up to 204,000 yearly. This burden may be worsened by chronic complications of acute infectious pneumonia, with many of them requiring prolonged treatment and follow-up after discharge. Although, a particular aetiologic agent could not be identified, but ...

  7. The Elephant Trunk Technique: A New Complication

    OpenAIRE

    Neri, Eugenio; Toscano, Thomas; Frati, Giacomo; Sassi, Carlo

    2001-01-01

    We describe a complication that occurred during the 2nd stage of an “elephant trunk” aortic replacement. The patient was a 58-year-old woman who had undergone graft replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic arch with the elephant trunk technique for an acute, Stanford type-A aortic dissection.

  8. Airway Complications of Total Artificial Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Vikas; Donovan, Colin; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2017-02-01

    The total artificial heart is the mechanical device which is used as a bridge to the heart transplant in patients with biventricular failure. Due to the mechanical nature of the device, patients receiving total artificial heart (TAH) require to be on anticoagulation therapy. Hemorrhage and coagulopathy are few of the known complications of TAH.

  9. Thrombophilia and pregnancy complications: cause or association?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, S.

    2007-01-01

    Both acquired and inherited thrombophilia is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy failure (i.e. sporadic and recurrent miscarriage, late fetal loss), as well as hypertensive pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome. The question of whether this relationship can be

  10. Symptomatic hemorrhagic complications associated with dural substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Chen

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The increased risk of hemorrhagic complications associated with craniotomy is modified by choice of dural replacement. Our results could assist clinicians in their decision-making with respect to the optimal timing for synthetic dural substitutes in patients with tumor infiltration of the patient's dura, severe brain swelling in traumatic brain injury, or a result of shrinkage from exposure and electrocautery.

  11. Complications of cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Glišović

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranioplasty is a surgical repair of a defect or deformity of a skull with the use of autologous bone or synthetic materials.[4] It usually follows decompressive craniectomy, which is a commonly practiced neurosurgical intervention in patients with raised intracranial pressure unresponsive to other forms of treatment.[1] There are many conditions that may lead to intracranial hypertension, and the goal is to avoid brain necrosis caused by compartment pressure syndrome.[2] Consequently, the extensive use of decompressive craniectomy directly results in more cranioplasties, which sometimes present with unwanted complications.[5] Generally, the occurence of cranioplasty complications is between 16% and 34%.[3] Because of the many indications for craniectomy based on clinical data that speak in its favour, if will probably remain a relatively common neurosurgical intervention also in the future. The frequency of decompressive craniectomy and consequently of cranioplasty requires awareness of the many potential postoperative complications and understanding of its evolution. This article is a review of pathophysiological mechanisms after decompressive craniectomy and cranioplasty, of its complications and factors that potentially contribute to their occurence.

  12. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the cardiovascular system constitute a major public health problem. There is evidence demonstrating that genetic factors contribute to the risk of DVC genetic variants, structural variants, and epigenetic changes play ...

  13. Tube shunt complications and their prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, Steven R

    2009-03-01

    Glaucoma drainage devices (GDDs) have been generally accepted as a treatment of refractory glaucoma. GDDs have their own unique set of complications that are important to evaluate to prevent them. Tube shunts are typically used in eyes with refractory glaucoma. There is increased interest in studying the efficacy of GDDs. Most of the attention has been focused on comparing trabeculectomy with the Baerveldt implant (Advanced Medical Optics, Inc., Santa Anna, California, USA). The other leading implant is the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve. There are several retrospective studies comparing these two devices and a prospective study is ongoing. There is great interest in the complication rate of tube shunts and these have been published both retrospectively and prospectively. Complications such as hypotony, diplopia, strabismus, proptosis, tube erosion, failure, corneal decompensation, endophthalmitis, and visual loss are all important and some have recently been reviewed in the literature. Moreover, the use of glaucoma drainage implants in the pediatric population has been evaluated. Glaucoma drainage implants have been a powerful tool in our surgical fight to prevent blindness; however, they are not without complications or controversy.

  14. Submucous dissection of the nasopharynx complicating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2003-09-12

    Sep 12, 2003 ... way (dental, otorhinolaryngological) or may be preferred for long- term intubation. Complications arising from the use of this tech- nique have been .... Chondromalacia occurs as a result of erosion of the tracheal cartilages by a large goitre, but is rare unless the actual tracheal car- tilage is removed in ...

  15. Late complications after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Inst. of Biophysics and Radiobiology; University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Lab. of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology; Beck-Bornholdt, H.P. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Inst. of Biophysics and Radiobiology; Svoboda, V. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Inst. of Biophysics and Radiobiology; Portsmouth Oncology Centre, Saint Mary' s Hospital (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Alberti, W. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Herrmann, T. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology

    2012-11-15

    Background: The aim of the present study was to analyze in detail the time course of the incidence of radiation-induced late effects. For this purpose, unpublished data of patients treated by radiation therapy in Hamburg in the late 1980s were analyzed. Relatively large volumes were exposed to comparatively high doses, thus leading to a high rate of treatment-related side effects. Patients and methods: A total of 180 consecutive patients received radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The median age was 66 years (range 41-88 years). The median of the maximum dose was 77.5 Gy (range 56.3-95 Gy) and overall treatment time was 51 days (range 28-128 days). Endpoints analyzed were late complications of grade 3 or higher, overall and disease-free survival, local tumor control, and distant metastases. Data analysis was actuarial and the log-rank test was used to compare the various subgroups. Results After 2 years, 80.5 {+-} 3.2% of the patients were without any complications of grade 3 or higher, and after 5 years a constant level of 70.3 {+-} 4.0% was approached. When multiple lesions occurred per patient, the later events were disregarded. A total of 66 complications occurred in 42 patients. The percentage of patients being free from late complications, plotted as a function of time after start of radiation therapy, was adequately described by an exponential function and a constant fraction. Complications approached a constant level of 70.3% at a rate of 5.3% per month. This means that patients who will develop a complication do so at exponential kinetics and at a relatively high rate, whereas about 70% of the patients will never experience a late effect even over long observation periods. After subdividing the maximum dose into three equal dose groups of 55 patients each (< 73.3 Gy, 73.3-80 Gy, > 80 Gy), the constant fraction decreased from 85.7 to 72.8% and 52.2%, whereas the incidence rate was 4.3%, 7.7%, and 5.6% per month and, thus, almost independent of radiation dose

  16. Complications and Reoperations in Mandibular Angle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Collin L; Zenga, Joseph; Patel, Ruchin; Branham, Gregory

    2018-05-01

    Mandible angle fractures can be repaired in a variety of ways, with no consensus on the outcomes of complications and reoperation rates. To analyze patient, injury, and surgical factors, including approach to the angle and plating technique, associated with postoperative complications, as well as the rate of reoperation with regard to mandible angle fractures. Retrospective cohort study analyzing the surgical outcomes of patients with mandible angle fractures between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2015, who underwent open reduction and internal fixation. Patients were eligible if they were aged 18 years or older, had 3 or less mandible fractures with 1 involving the mandibular angle, and had adequate follow-up data. Patients with comminuted angle fractures, bilateral angle fractures, and multiple surgical approaches were excluded. A total of 135 patients were included in the study. All procedures were conducted at a single, large academic hospital located in an urban setting. Major complications and reoperation rates. Major complications included in this study were nonunion, malunion, severe malocclusion, severe infection, and exposed hardware. Of 135 patients 113 (83.7%) were men; median age was 29 years (range, 18-82 years). Eighty-seven patients (64.4%) underwent the transcervical approach and 48 patients (35.6%) received the transoral approach. Fifteen (17.2%) patients in the transcervical group and 9 (18.8%) patients in the transoral group experienced major complications (difference, 1%; 95% CI, -8% to 10%). Thirteen (14.9%) patients in the transcervical group and 8 (16.7%) patients in the transoral group underwent reoperations (difference, 2%; 95% CI, -13% to 17%). Active smoking had a significant effect on the rate of major complications (odds ratio, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.07 to 15.34; P = .04). During repair of noncomminuted mandibular angle fractures, both of the commonly used approaches-transcervical and transoral-can be used during treatment with equal

  17. Respiratory Disorders in Complicated Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Pervukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluating the results of respiratory therapy in patients with complicated traumatic injury of the cervical spine.Materials and methods. A retrospective comparative analysis of the clinical course was carried out in 52 patients with complicated traumatic injury of the cervical spine: group A: complete spinal cord injury (ASIA A, 37 patients and group B: incomplete injury (ASIA B, 15 patients. The severity of patients' status on integral scales, parameters of the respiratory pattern and thoracopulmonary compliance, gas composition, and acidbase status of the blood were assessed. Data on patients who required prolonged mechanical ventilation, duration of mechanical ventilation, incidence of nosocomial pneumonia, duration of stay in the ICU, time of hospital treatment, and mortality were included in the analysis. Results. The average APACHE II and SOFA scores were higher in group A patients. The development of the acute respiratory failure required longterm mechanical ventilation (more than 48 hours in 91.4% of group A patients and in 53.3% of group B patients. Ventilatorassociated pneumonia complicated the disease in 81.3% of group A patients and 62.5% of group B patients and was accompanied by sepsis in 25% and 12.5% of cases, respectively. Statistically significant deterioration of biomechanical properties and gas exchange function of the lungs was observed in patients complicated with septic pneumonia.Conclusion. Patients with complicated ASIA A and ASIA B cervical spine injuries demonstrate the presence of respiratory failure of neurogenic origin. In addition, the infectious bronchopulmonary complications aggravated respiratory failure in patients with ASIA A injury in 70.3% versus 33.3% in patients with ASIA B. Developmentof pulmonogenic sepsis led to deterioration of the biomechanical and gas exchange functions of the lungs and increased the likelihood of unfavorable outcome of the disease in 77.8% of cases. The high

  18. Orbital lymphoma: radiotherapy outcome and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, Scott L.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Garrity, James A.; Kurtin, Paul J.; Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Martenson, James A.; Habermann, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) have traditionally been treated with radiation. Forty-eight patients presenting with orbital NHL were treated with radiation and were evaluated for local control, overall survival, cause-specific survival, and complications. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients had low-grade and 3 patients had intermediate-grade histologic findings. Orbit-only disease occurred in 22 patients, the conjunctiva in 16, both in five, and lacrimal gland only in five. Patient age ranged from 35 to 94 years (median, 68). Ann Arbor stages were cIEA (34), cIIEA (six), cIIIEA (two), and cIVEA (six). Radiation doses ranged between 15 and 53.8 Gy (median, 27.5 Gy). Results: Follow-up ranged from 0.14 to 18.23 years (median, 5.35). Median overall survival and cause-specific survival were 6.5 and 15.5 years, respectively. Patients with clinical stage I or II disease had significantly better overall and cause-specific survival than patients with stage III or IV disease. Ten-year relapse-free survival in 41 patients with stage I or II disease was 66%. However, there was continued downward pressure on relapse-free survival out to 18 years. One local failure occurred. Twenty-five patients sustained acute complications. There were 17 minor and four major late complications. All major late complications occurred with doses more than 35 Gy. Conclusions: Excellent local control with radiation doses ranging from 15 to 30 Gy is achieved. Patients with stage I or II disease have better overall and cause-specific survival than patients with stage III or IV disease. Late relapse occurs in sites other than the treated orbit, even in patients with early-stage disease. Doses 35 Gy or higher result in significant late complications and are therefore not indicated for patients with low-grade tumors

  19. Urgent surgery for complicated colonic diverticula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funariu, Gheorghe; Binţinţan, Vasile; Seicean, Radu

    2006-03-01

    The AIM of this retrospective study was to evaluate the emergency surgical treatment of life-threatening complications of colonic diverticula. In the last 11 years, 22 of 101 patients with colonic diverticula (22.1%) underwent urgent surgery for acute complications: perforated gangrenous diverticulitis with generalized peritonitis (n=8) or pericolic abscess (n=8), acute bowel obstruction (n=4) and severe diverticular bleeding (n=2). In all patients with diffuse peritonitis or acute obstruction the indication for surgery was decided on clinical basis and the complicated diverticula were recognized only intra-operatively. Emergency surgical strategy differed according to the type of complication and the biologic condition of the patient: segmental colectomy and primary anastomosis for diverticular perforation (n=4), colonic stenosis (n=3) or diverticular bleeding (n=2); Hartmann resection with late reconnecting anastomosis in patients with diverticular perforation (n=5) or colonic obstruction (n=1); diverticulectomy with peritoneal drainage (n=2) and colostomy and drainage followed by secondary colectomy (n=5) for diverticular perforations in patients with poor general condition. Only one patient (4.5%) died post-operatively of multiple organ failure from generalized peritonitis. There was no anastomotic leakage in patients with primary anastomosis. Six patients (27.2%) developed wound infection. Hospital stay ranged between 11 and 60 days, significantly longer in cases with two-stage operations. Primary colectomy with immediate or delayed anastomosis is the best surgical procedure for acute divericular complications in patients with good biologic status. Two-stage operations such as colostomy and drainage coupled with late colectomy remain the viable alternative in patients with advanced disease and critical biologic condition.

  20. Complication with Intraosseous Access: Scandinavian Users’ Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Intraosseous access (IO) is indicated if vascular access cannot be quickly established during resuscitation. Complication rates are estimated to be low, based on small patient series, model or cadaver studies, and case reports. However, user experience with IO use in real-life emergency situations might differ from the results in the controlled environment of model studies and small patient series. We performed a survey of IO use in real-life emergency situations to assess users’ experiences of complications. Methods: An online questionnaire was sent to Scandinavian emergency physicians, anesthesiologists and pediatricians. Results: 1,802 clinical cases of IO use was reported by n=386 responders. Commonly reported complications with establishing IO access were patient discomfort/pain (7.1%), difficulties with penetration of periosteum with IO needle (10.3%), difficulties with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%), and bended/broken needle (4.0%). When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%), slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag) (8.8%), displacement after insertion (8.5%), and extravasation (3.7%). Compartment syndrome and osteomyelitis occurred in 0.6% and 0.4% of cases respectively. Conclusion: In users’ recollection of real-life IO use, perceived complications were more frequent than usually reported from model studies. The perceived difficulties with using IO could affect the willingness of medical staff to use IO. Therefore, user experience should be addressed both in education of how to use, and research and development of IOs. PMID:24106537

  1. Complication with Intraosseous Access: Scandinavian Users' Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hallas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraosseous access (IO is indicated if vascular access cannot be quickly established during resuscitation. Complication rates are estimated to be low, based on small patient series, model or cadaver studies, and case reports. However, user experience with IO use in real-life emergency situations might differ from the results in the controlled environment of model studies and small patient series. We performed a survey of IO use in real-life emergency situations to assess users’ experiences of complications.Methods: An online questionnaire was sent to Scandinavian emergency physicians, anesthesiologists and pediatricians.Results: 1,802 clinical cases of IO use was reported by n=386 responders. Commonly reported complications with establishing IO access were patient discomfort/pain (7.1%, difficulties with penetration of periosteum with IO needle (10.3%, difficulties with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%, and bended/broken needle (4.0%. When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%, slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag (8.8%, displacement after insertion (8.5%, and extravasation (3.7%. Compartment syndrome and osteomyelitis occurred in 0.6% and 0.4% of cases respectively.Conclusion: In users’ recollection of real-life IO use, perceived complications were more frequent than usually reported from model studies. The perceived difficulties with using IO could affect the willingness of medical staff to use IO. Therefore, user experience should be addressed both in education of how to use, and research and development of IOs. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:440–443.

  2. Anesthesia related Complications in Pediatric GI Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sabzevari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elective upper and lower GI endoscopy is usually performed in children on an outpatient basis with the child under sedation or general anesthesia (GA. The objective of this study was to describe Anesthesia related complications in   children undergoing elective GI endoscopy.   Materials and Methods: The study design was descriptive on 1388 patients undergoing elective GI endoscopy in Sheikh Hospital from 2009 to 2013. All patient received propofol or standard inhalational anesthesia. We examined patients’ demographic data  ,  location of GI endoscopy ,  perioperative vital singe ,  recovery time , respiratory and cardiac complications , post operative nausea and vomiting , agitation , diagnosis and outcome   Results: Pediatric patients aged 2 to 17 years. 29 % of elective GI endoscopy was upper GI endoscopy and 70.3 % was lower GI endoscopy and 0.7 was both of them. 47.7 % of Pediatric patients were female and 52.3 % was male. We haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related respiratory and cardiac complications (no apnea, no cardiac arrest. 8 patients (0.5% have transient bradicardia in post operative care Unit. 83 patients (5.9% have post operative nausea and vomiting controlled by medication.  6 patients (0.4% have post operative agitation controlled by medication.   Conclusions: General anesthesia and deep sedation in children undergoing elective GI endoscopy haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related complications. We suggest Anesthesia for infants, young children, children with neurologic impairment, and some anxious older children undergoing elective GI endoscopy. Keyword: Anesthesia, Complication, Endoscopy, Pediatric.

  3. Anesthesia related complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of intraoperative anesthesia-related complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Results: One hundred patients with male to female ratio of 1:8.09 in the age range of 20-80 years (mean 39 years) underwent general anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The duration of operation in 94 laparoscopic cholecystectomy was from 20 to 80 minutes (mean 60.63 minutes). The incidence of intraoperative hypotension was 9%. Four percent of the patients developed arrhythmias. Increase in end-tidal-carbon dioxide (ETCO/sub 2/) was observed in 3% of cases. Conversion rate to open cholecystectomy was 6%. Damage to intraabdominal vessels with trocar insertion occurred in 1% of cases. Conclusion: Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has major surgical and anesthetic advantages, there are anesthesia related complications requiring specific anesthetic interventions to improve patients outcome without compromising their safety. (author)

  4. Arterial Complications of Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Hermine, Claude; Ernst, Olivier; Delemazure, Olivier; Sergent, Geraldine

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the frequency and treatment of arterial complications due to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD).Materials: Lesions of the intrahepatic artery were encountered in 10 of 525 patients treated by PTBD (2%). Hemobilia followed in 9 patients and subcapsular hematoma in 1. Seven patients had a benign biliary stenosis and 3 had a malignant stenosis.Results: The bleeding resolved spontaneously in 3 patients. In 7 it required arterial embolization, which was successfully achieved either through the percutaneous catheter (n= 3) or by arteriography (n= 4).Conclusion: Arterial bleeding is a relatively rare complication of PTBD that can easily be treated by selective arterial embolization when it does not resolve spontaneously. In this series its frequency was much higher (16%) when the stenosis was benign than when it was malignant (0.6%)

  5. Neuromuscular complications of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Noah A; Trevino, Christopher R; Waheed, Waqar; Sobhani, Fatemeh; Landry, Kara K; Thomas, Alissa A; Hehir, Mike

    2018-01-17

    Immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICPI) therapy unleashes the body's natural immune system to fight cancer. ICPIs improve overall cancer survival, however, the unbridling of the immune system may induce a variety of immune-related adverse events. Neuromuscular immune complications are rare but they can be severe. Myasthenia gravis and inflammatory neuropathy are the most common neuromuscular adverse events but a variety of others including inflammatory myopathy are reported. The pathophysiologic mechanism of these autoimmune disorders may differ from that of non-ICPI-related immune diseases. Accordingly, while the optimal treatment for ICPI-related neuromuscular disorders generally follows a traditional paradigm, there are important novel considerations in selecting appropriate immunosuppressive therapy. This review presents 2 new cases, a summary of neuromuscular ICPI complications, and an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis

  7. Ulnar nerve entrapment complicating radial head excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Parfait Bienvenu Bouhelo-Pam

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several mechanisms are involved in ischemia or mechanical compression of ulnar nerve at the elbow. Presentation of case: We hereby present the case of a road accident victim, who received a radial head excision for an isolated fracture of the radial head and complicated by onset of cubital tunnel syndrome. This outcome could be the consequence of an iatrogenic valgus of the elbow due to excision of the radial head. Hitherto the surgical treatment of choice it is gradually been abandoned due to development of radial head implant arthroplasty. However, this management option is still being performed in some rural centers with low resources. Discussion: The radial head plays an important role in the stability of the elbow and his iatrogenic deformity can be complicated by cubital tunnel syndrome. Conclusion: An ulnar nerve release was performed with favorable outcome. Keywords: Cubital tunnel syndrome, Peripheral nerve palsy, Radial head excision, Elbow valgus

  8. Complications associated with cutaneous aesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Daniela; Ruzicka, Thomas; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, a plethora of novel therapeutic approaches to fight signs of aging and to influence external body appearance have become available in aesthetic dermatology. Extensive research in this field has led to advanced understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the aging face. To successfully address the complex age-related alterations anti-aging treatment nowadays calls for a multi-faceted approach. Most frequently utilized aesthetic procedures include the use of botulinum toxin, a variety of filling substances, microneedling (collagen induction therapy), chemical peeling, lasers, radiofrequency, thread facelift and injectional lipolysis with phosphatidylcholine/deoxycholate among others. Unfortunately, many clinicians still lack in-depth understanding of potential complications, risk factors and side effects associated with minimal-invasive procedures. The following review aims to give a broad overview of nowadays most frequently used approaches in the dermato-aesthetic field and their related complications. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Endometrial ablation: normal appearance and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drylewicz, Monica R; Robinson, Kathryn; Siegel, Cary Lynn

    2018-03-14

    Global endometrial ablation is a commonly performed, minimally invasive technique aimed at improving/resolving abnormal uterine bleeding and menorrhagia in women. As non-resectoscopic techniques have come into existence, endometrial ablation performance continues to increase due to accessibility and decreased requirements for operating room time and advanced technical training. The increased utilization of this method translates into increased imaging of patients who have undergone the procedure. An understanding of the expected imaging appearances of endometrial ablation using different modalities is important for the abdominal radiologist. In addition, the frequent usage of the technique naturally comes with complications requiring appropriate imaging work-up. We review the expected appearance of the post-endometrial ablated uterus on multiple imaging modalities and demonstrate the more common and rare complications seen in the immediate post-procedural time period and remotely.

  10. Mitral Prosthetic Valve Obstruction and Its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Rajan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic Valve Obstruction (PVO is a serious complication which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This could result from thrombus formation, development of pannus, or a combination of both. Patients with this complication often present with symptoms and signs of heart failure, systemic embolism, acute cardiovascular collapse, and sudden death. Transesophageal echocardiography and cine fluoroscopy play a vital role in diagnosis of this potentially lethal condition. Herein, we reported a 56-year-old male patient who presented with severe heart failure and was found to have obstructed ATS27 bileaflet mitral prosthetic valve. Thrombolysis and redo surgery are two important options for treating this condition although guidelines for choosing between the two are not very definite.

  11. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  12. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Raghavendra B; Bhogale, Govind S; Patil, Nanasaheb M; Pandurangi, Aditya A

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient's father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  13. Obstetric complications in women with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Birgit; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Olesen, Annette Wind

    2001-01-01

    It is not known whether schizophrenic women have increased incidence of complications during pregnancy and delivery. Data from the Danish Medical Birth Register were used to compare 2212 births to 1537 schizophrenic women in Denmark with a random sample of all deliveries in Denmark during 1973......–1993 (122 931 births to 72 742 women). The schizophrenic women had fewer antenatal care visits. They were at lower risk of pre-eclampsia, but tended to have lower Apgar scores. There were no other differences in the incidence of specific complications such as placenta previa, placental abruption......, and abnormal fetal presentation. Schizophrenic women were at increased risk of interventions such as Cesarean section, vaginal assisted delivery, amniotomy, and pharmacological stimulation of labor. There were no important differences between the deliveries to schizophrenic women who gave birth before...

  14. Complications of acromegaly: thyroid and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Amit; Shimon, Ilan

    2017-02-01

    In acromegaly the long-term exposure to high growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels may result in specific complications in different human organs, including the thyroid gland and the colon. We will review here the evidence available regarding the characteristic thyroid and colon complications in acromegaly. This review summarizes the published data observing noncancerous structural abnormalities (thyroid nodules, colonic polyps) and thyroid and colon cancer in patients diagnosed with acromegaly. Thyroid micro-carcinomas are probably over-diagnosed among acromegalic patients. In regard to colon cancer, there is no sufficient data to suggest that colon cancer risk is higher in acromegaly compared to the general population.

  15. A Rare Fatal Complication of Llizarov Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikary, Asit Kumar; Kumar, Mahesh; Dhaka, Shivani; Subramanian, Arulselvi

    2018-03-01

    Ilizarov process is used for the management of multiple fractures, polytrauma conditions, cosmetic limb lengthening, and fracture malunion. Complications associated with the process are nerve palsy, joint contracture, premature or delayed osseous consolidation, a nonunion and permanent stiffness of the joint, pin tract infection, edema, and transient paresthesia, etc. In our case, there was a fatal complication. A 25-year-old African lady underwent the Ilizarov procedure for femur lengthening in a hospital in New Delhi, India. During her first distraction process, she suddenly collapsed at the hospital and could not be revived. At postmortem, a small hematoma was seen around the surgically fractured area. On histopathology of internal organs, fat globules were present in the vasculature of brain and lungs. Cause of death was opined as due to fat embolism. This is the first case reported of a fatal fat embolism following Ilizarov procedure for limb lengthening in a healthy adult. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed

  17. [Rehabilitation methods for children with complicated cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, G; Cuşnir, V; Septichina, Natalia; Cuşnir, Vitalie

    2010-01-01

    The work deals with the results of surgical treatment of 155 patients, who had uveal cataract, by method of facoemulsification with artificial crystalline lens transplanting. The age of the sick varied from 3 to 15 as a result of a complex treatment, involving determination of ethnic factor in the development of uveal cataract, before- and after-operation conservative medical treatment, surgical treatment of abscuration ambliopia 78.1% children and the keenness of sight 0.4 and 68.7% got binocularious sight. The study lot of posttraumatic cataract affected children included 189 patients, from them 68 with stationary cataract, 87 with intumescent cataract and 34 with postoperatorial aphakia. Age from 2 to 15 years. 76.3% cases of evolution without postoperatorial complications, in 13.7% intraoperatorial were observed different complications. The work presents the results of surgical treatment 196 of children, who had innate cataract, by the method of facoasoriation with soft intra-eyepiece lens transplanting from 133 patients who had two-sided cataract, 63 had monolateral cataract. All children underwent laser simulation and videocomputer auto-training in post-operation period. As a result of the treatment, 66.8% patients got the amelioration of sight with 0.4, and 58% got binocular sight. The children's age varied between 6 months and 15 years. This article presents a review of the treatment results of 213 children with posttraumatic, congenital and complicated cataracts. The rehabilitation of the patients with the lens pathology includes a complex of measures of early diagnosis, surgery, optimal correction, medical treatment before and after surgery, the prophilaxis and treatment of complications. This approach permits to increase the visual acuity in 83.8% and to restore the binocular vision in 71.4% patients.

  18. Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery: Pseudomeningocoele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailon, Tamir; Smith, Justin S; Nassr, Ahmad; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Hilibrand, Alan S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Chou, Dean; Sasso, Rick C; Traynelis, Vincent C; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Buser, Zorica; Lord, Elizabeth L; Massicotte, Eric M; Sebastian, Arjun S; Than, Khoi D; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Riew, K Daniel; Shaffrey, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Rare complications of cervical spine surgery are inherently difficult to investigate. Pseudomeningocoele (PMC), an abnormal collection of cerebrospinal fluid that communicates with the subarachnoid space, is one such complication. In order to evaluate and better understand the incidence, presentation, treatment, and outcome of PMC following cervical spine surgery, we conducted a multicenter study to pool our collective experience. This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of patients who underwent cervical spine surgery at any level(s) from C2 to C7, inclusive; were over 18 years of age; and experienced a postoperative PMC. Thirteen patients (0.08%) developed a postoperative PMC, 6 (46.2%) of whom were female. They had an average age of 48.2 years and stayed in hospital a mean of 11.2 days. Three patients were current smokers, 3 previous smokers, 5 had never smoked, and 2 had unknown smoking status. The majority, 10 (76.9%), were associated with posterior surgery, whereas 3 (23.1%) occurred after an anterior procedure. Myelopathy was the most common indication for operations that were complicated by PMC (46%). Seven patients (53%) required a surgical procedure to address the PMC, whereas the remaining 6 were treated conservatively. All PMCs ultimately resolved or were successfully treated with no residual effects. PMC is a rare complication of cervical surgery with an incidence of less than 0.1%. They prolong hospital stay. PMCs occurred more frequently in association with posterior approaches. Approximately half of PMCs required surgery and all ultimately resolved without residual neurologic or other long-term effects.

  19. [The complications of intestinal stoma in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaev, S V; Bykov, N I; Isaeva, A V; Kachanov, A V; Tovkan, E A; Filip'yeva, N V; Gerasimenko, I N

    To investigate the complications of intestinal stoma in children and to develop measures for decrease of their incidence. The study included 152 children with congenital and acquired gastrointestinal pathology requiring surgical treatment with the imposition of intestinal stoma. Atresia of intestinal tube was observed in 28 (18.4%) children, meconium ileus - in 10 (6.6%) cases, Hirschsprung's disease - in 11 (7.2%)cases, anorectal malformations - in 39 (25.7%) cases, multiple malformations - in 11 (7.2%) patients, necrotic enterocolitis - in 56 (36.8%) patients, other reasons - in 7 (4.6%) cases. The average age of patients was 12,3±7,2 days. There were 93 (61.2%) boys and 59 (38.8%) girls. Ileostomy, ileocolostomy and colostomy were made in 37 (24.3%), 46 (30.3%) and 69 (45.4%) cases respectively. Time of intestinal stoma function was 18-217 days. Early complications were dehiscence in the area of stoma in 4 (2.6%) children, evagination in 7 (4.6%) patients, marginal necrosis of stoma in 2 (1.3%) cases, retraction of stomy into abdominal cavity in 1 (0.6%) child and abdominal skin maceration in 8 (5.2%) patients. Remote complications included dermatitis around stomy in 35 (23.1%) children, stenosis of stoma in 9 (5.9%) cases, evagination of stoma in 12 (7.9%) patients. Also, 5 patients were unable to use the colostomy bag due to vicious overlaying of intestinal stoma. Using the colostomy bags «Coloplast» and skin care products around the stoma significantly reduced (pstoma depends on not only technical aspects but also obligatory care performance with timely correction of complications.

  20. Medical Complications In Anorexia And Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravina, Giovanni; Milano, Walter; Nebbiai, Grazia; Piccione, Carla; Capasso, Anna

    2018-05-30

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and their variants are characterized by persistent alteration of eating behaviour, such as restricted intake or bingeing and purging, as well as excessive concerns about body shape and body weight. Purging behaviour may include self induced vomiting and/or abuse of laxatives, diuretics and physical hyperactivity. Unlike other psychiatric disorders, patients suffering from AN and BN have a high prevalence of many different medical complications, through the sequelae of undernutrition and purging, often with a serious impairment of health status and quality of life. This article describes the main diagnostic and clinical aspects of medical complications in AN and BN. The medical complications of ED are extremely variable and can occur with only modest biological and physical damage up to extremely serious and life-threatening conditions; the mortality rate of young subjects with AN is 4 - 11% with a risk of death about 12 times higher than that of subjects of the same age of the general population. The management of the medical-internship aspects of AN and BN is rightly placed within complex and articulated programs of interdisciplinary treatment with different levels of intensity of care (outpatient, semi-residential/residential, hospital in cases of emergency/medical and/or psychiatric emergency). the results of the investigations carried out, describe the functions of the various organs and apparatuses and the alterations detected, the possible complications and physiological adaptations to malnutrition. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra B Nayak; Govind S Bhogale; Nanasaheb M Patil; Aditya A Pandurangi

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints ...

  2. [Complications of cosmetic skin bleaching in Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, J J; Ly, F; Lightburn, E; Mahé, A

    2007-12-01

    Use of cosmetic products to bleach or lighten the skin is common among dark-skinned women in some sub-Saharan African countries. Long-term use of some pharmacologic compounds (e.g. hydroquinone, glucocorticoids and mercury) can cause adverse effects including dermatologic disorders such as dyschromia, exogenous ochronosis, acne and hypertrichosis, prominent striae, tinea corporis, pyoderma, erysipelas, scabies, and contact dermatitis and systemic complications such as hypertension, hypercorticism or surrenal deficiency, and mercurial nephropathy.

  3. Cerebral angiography in patients with complicated migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiler, K.; Wessely, P.; Holzner, F.

    1985-08-01

    38 patients (mean age: 29 years) were investigated by means of complete 4-vessel angiography: all of them were suffering from complicated migraine without detectable vascular malformation. Stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels were found in 11 patients (28.9%), but there was not a single case of vascular occlusion. A correlation between the localization of the stenosis, the localization of the headache and the presumed region of the transient cerebral function disturbance was found only in a few patients. Concerning the morphological changes of the small intracranial arterial branches, there was hardly an difference between clinically affected and non-affected territories of the middle cerebral artery. The angiograms of the 38 cases of complicated migraine were compared with the angiograms of 40 patients suffering from strokes in the young and those of 49 patients with transient ischaemic attacks. There were remarkably fewer stenoses or occlusions in the great craniocervical arteries of patients suffering from complicated migraine (28.9%) than in the vessels of cases of stroke in the young (52.5%). However, the incidence was comparable with the results in patients with transient ischaemic attacks (34.7%). The degree of morphological changes in the small intracranial arterial branches is likely to depend primarily on the patient's age and less on the diagnosis. The results suggest that in almost 30% of patients with complicated migraine - even at juvenile age-stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels might be found. However, considering the fact that most of the stenoses are without haemodynamic significance and their localization is not in agreement with the clinical data, the pathogenetic value of these vessel wall changes is highly questionable. (Author).

  4. Deep enteroscopy - indications, diagnostic yield and complications

    OpenAIRE

    Moeschler, Oliver; Mueller, Michael Karl

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in 2001 capsule endoscopy opened up the small bowel for diagnostic approaches followed by double balloon enteroscopy which enabled the endoscopic community to perform therapeutic interventions in the whole small intestine. In this review the scientific developments related to indications, diagnostic yield and complications of the last years between the competing devices double ballon enteroscopy, single balloon enteroscopy and spiral enteroscopy are illustrated.

  5. Nocardia brasiliensis Infection Complicating Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alison M; Sluzevich, Jason C; Mira-Avendano, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a severe and uncommon opportunistic infection caused by Nocardia species. We present a patient with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia who was receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy, whose treatment course was complicated by cutaneous and pulmonary nocardiosis. Tissue cultures confirmed Nocardia brasiliensis . Nocardiosis should be a diagnostic consideration for patients treated with long-term immunosuppression who have worsening pulmonary symptoms and relapsing pustular skin lesions.

  6. Nocardia brasiliensis Infection Complicating Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Alison M.; Sluzevich, Jason C.; Mira-Avendano, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a severe and uncommon opportunistic infection caused by Nocardia species. We present a patient with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia who was receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy, whose treatment course was complicated by cutaneous and pulmonary nocardiosis. Tissue cultures confirmed Nocardia brasiliensis. Nocardiosis should be a diagnostic consideration for patients treated with long-term immunosuppression who have worsening pulmonary symptoms and relapsing p...

  7. Nocardia brasiliensis Infection Complicating Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M. Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary nocardiosis is a severe and uncommon opportunistic infection caused by Nocardia species. We present a patient with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia who was receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy, whose treatment course was complicated by cutaneous and pulmonary nocardiosis. Tissue cultures confirmed Nocardia brasiliensis. Nocardiosis should be a diagnostic consideration for patients treated with long-term immunosuppression who have worsening pulmonary symptoms and relapsing pustular skin lesions.

  8. Medical Complications of Tattoos: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Parvez S; Chang, Christopher; Selmi, Carlo; Generali, Elena; Huntley, Arthur; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-04-01

    Tattoos are defined as the introduction of exogenous pigments into the dermis in order to produce a permanent design. This process may occur unintentional or may be deliberately administered for cosmetic or medical reasons. Tattoos have been around for over 5000 years and over time have evolved to represent a common cosmetic practice worldwide. Currently, adverse reactions are relatively rare and generally unpredictable and predominantly include immune-mediated reactions and skin infections. Along with better healthcare standards and more stringent public health mandates such as the provision of disposable needles, major infectious complications related to hepatitis and human retroviral infections have decreased significantly. When they do occur, skin infections are most frequently associated with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study is to review the types and rates of medical complications of permanent tattoos. PubMed search and search dates were open ended. Acute local inflammation is the most common complication, but infections, allergic contact dermatitis, and other inflammatory or immune responses that are not well-characterized may occur. As many patients with immune reactions to tattoos do not react on skin or patch testing, it is postulated that the antigens contained in dyes or pigments are such small molecules that they need to be haptenized in order to become immunogenic. Red ink is associated more frequently with long-term reactions, including granulomatous and pseudolymphomatous phenomena or morphea-like lesions and vasculitis. Exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and pyoderma gangrenosum may occur after tattooing. There is no well-defined association between cancer and tattoos. The treatment of tattoo-related complications may include local destructive measures (cryotherapy, electro-surgery, dermabrasion, chemical destruction, ablative laser destruction), surgical excision, and thermolysis of the

  9. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk fa...

  10. Candidate Genes for Late Diabetic Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Lindholm, Eero

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The new WHO criteria for classification of diabetes takes into account also clinical stages dividing the diabetic patients into noninsulin requiring (NIR), insulin requiring for control (IRC) and insulin requiring for survival (IRS) subgroups. Diabetic complications are the result of chronically elevated blood glucose. Genetic factors are beli...

  11. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-1055 TITLE: Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D...PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT : Approved for public release...official Department of the Army position , policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved

  12. Infectious complications in chronic renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kielberger, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE Infections represent a serious problem in chronic kidney disease (cohort and they are) associated with signifficant morbidity and mortality. The thesis originated in the nephrology division of the Department of Internal Medicine I., Charles University Teaching Hospital and Medical Faculty in Pilsen, an institution with a long standing research activity in the field. In the theoretical part of this work, a general summary of infectious complica...

  13. Pulmonary gangrene as a complication of mucormycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagoria, R.J.; Choplin, R.H.; Karstaedt, N.

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary gangrene, a rare complication of pneumonia occurs when vascular thrombosis leads to necrosis of a large portion of lung. The devitalized lung is then sloughed into a cavity, resulting in a characteristic radiographic appearance. The previously reported cases of pulmonary gangrene have been associated with either bacterial or tuberculous pneumonia; the authors describe a case resulting from mucormycosis. In addition to the plain-film findings, the computed tomographic (CT) appearance is described

  14. Complications of Cataract Surgery at the University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual outcome was not significantly affected by the early postoperative complication, but was significantly affected by late postoperative complication. Proper management of operative complications will help in reducing their adverse effects on the eye. Key words: cataract surgery, operative, complications, visual outcome ...

  15. Risk and complication rate of uterine fibroid embolization (UFE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeleff, B.; Rimbach, S.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Richter, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate risks and complication rate of uterine fibroid embolization (UFE). The most frequent complications reported in the literature are associated with angiography procedure, serious complications are extremely infrequent. The embolization of fibroids is a safe angiographic intervention. Nevertheless, the interventional radiologist must be aware of the common risks and complication and the strategies to avoid them. (orig.) [de

  16. A rare stoma-related complication: parastomal evisceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydin, Ibrahim; Sahin, Dursun Ali

    2014-04-01

    Defunctioning stoma is a commonly used colorectal surgical procedures. The stomal complications recorded are usually classified as early and late complications. Parastomal hernia is a common complication of stomal surgery. We present a very rare stoma-related complication developed after parastomal hernia and described parastomal evisceration.

  17. Postoperative complications following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy are common in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvard Hansen, Erik Sören; Qvist, N.; Rasmussen, L.

    2017-01-01

    (range: 0-14.9), and the follow-up period was 36 months. Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: A total of 167 postoperative complications occurred in 118 of the 229 patients (51.5%). Of these, 89 were grade 1 complications, 49 were grade 2 complications, and 29...

  18. Neurological complications are avoidable during CABG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Zulfiqar; Jalal, Anjum; Alamgir, Asif Rashid; Rasheed, Irfan

    2018-01-01

    To review the incidence of stroke in patients undergoing CABG and the impact of a preventive strategy adopted at tertiary care unit of cardiac surgery. The data of all patients who underwent isolated CABG (N= 722) from July 2016 to August 2017 at Faisalabad Institute of Cardiology was retrieved for this retrospective study. All operations were done on cardiopulmonary bypass and cold blood cardioplegia. Numeric data was summarized as Mean ± Standard Deviation while categoric variables were summarized into frequency and percentage. Mean age of patients was 53.83±8.8 years. Mean Parsonnet and Logistic EuroScore were 4.3±3.2 and 3.3±0.9 respectively. Forty nine patients (6.78%) had significant carotid artery disease. Mean number of grafts was 2.8±0.82. Diabetes was present in 27.8% patients. Neurological complications were noticed in 14 patients (1.94%) who included 12 permanent paralyses. Further subgroup analysis revealed that 67 patients who were operated by single clamp technique remained free of neurological complications. This is clinically remarkable finding but due to small population size it is statistically non- significant. The incidence of neurological complications can be reduced significantly by adopting the appropriate preventing measures. Use of Single Clamp technique may be the reasons of such a low incidence of stroke in this study.

  19. Complications of bladder distension during retrograde urethrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, J A; Crowell, W; Losonsky, J; Talkington, F D

    1981-05-01

    A severe, ulcerative cystitis that resulted in macroscopic hematuria occurred in 8 of 20 healthy dogs undergoing a series of diagnostic tests. Four of the remaining 12 dogs had mild bladder lesions consisting of submucosal edema and hemorrhage. Nine of the 20 dogs developed urinary tract infection after the procedures. These complications seemed associated with the radiographic technique of retrograde urethrography performed when the urinary bladder was distended. To test this hypothesis, retrograde urethrography was performed on 5 additional dogs. With the bladder undistended, no complications occurred. However, distention of these same dogs' bladders for 1 minute or less with sterile lactated Ringer's solution administered through a Foley catheter in the penile urethra resulted in a macroscopic hematuria in all 5 dogs which persisted for 24 hours. A microscopic hematuria continued for 5 days. One dog developed a bacterial urinary tract infection. A severe fibrinopurulent cystitis was present at necropsy of 2 dogs 2 days after distention. The morphologic changes in the bladder gradually diminished over 7 days, but mild submucosal edema and hemorrhage were still present when 2 dogs were necropsied, 7 days after distention. These studies indicated that retrograde urethrography in dogs may be complicated by hemorrhagic cystitis and urinary tract infection if performed with urinary bladder distention.

  20. Complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasa, S; Sharma, P

    2013-06-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is on the rise with more than 20% of the western population reporting symptoms and is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States. This increase in GORD is not exactly clear but has been attributed to the increasing prevalence of obesity, changing diet, and perhaps the decreasing prevalence of H. pylori infection. Complications of GORD could be either benign or malignant. Benign complications include erosive oesophagitis, bleeding and peptic strictures. Premalignant and malignant lesions include Barrett's metaplasia, and oesophageal cancer. Management of both the benign and malignant complications can be challenging. With the use of proton-pump inhibitors, peptic strictures (i.e., strictures related to reflux) have significantly declined. Several aspects of Barrett's management remain controversial including the stage in the disease process which needs to be intervened, type of the intervention and surveillance of these lesions to prevent development of high grade dysplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Machine Learning Methods to Predict Diabetes Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagliati, Arianna; Marini, Simone; Sacchi, Lucia; Cogni, Giulia; Teliti, Marsida; Tibollo, Valentina; De Cata, Pasquale; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2018-03-01

    One of the areas where Artificial Intelligence is having more impact is machine learning, which develops algorithms able to learn patterns and decision rules from data. Machine learning algorithms have been embedded into data mining pipelines, which can combine them with classical statistical strategies, to extract knowledge from data. Within the EU-funded MOSAIC project, a data mining pipeline has been used to derive a set of predictive models of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) complications based on electronic health record data of nearly one thousand patients. Such pipeline comprises clinical center profiling, predictive model targeting, predictive model construction and model validation. After having dealt with missing data by means of random forest (RF) and having applied suitable strategies to handle class imbalance, we have used Logistic Regression with stepwise feature selection to predict the onset of retinopathy, neuropathy, or nephropathy, at different time scenarios, at 3, 5, and 7 years from the first visit at the Hospital Center for Diabetes (not from the diagnosis). Considered variables are gender, age, time from diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hypertension, and smoking habit. Final models, tailored in accordance with the complications, provided an accuracy up to 0.838. Different variables were selected for each complication and time scenario, leading to specialized models easy to translate to the clinical practice.

  2. Obstetric complications and asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B; Pekkanen, J; Järvelin, M R

    2000-01-01

    Studies have shown that perinatal factors are associated with childhood asthma. The current analyses examined the association between obstetric complications and risk of asthma at the age of 7 years using a prospectively population-based birth cohort in northern Finland. Results indicated that obstetric complications were associated with a higher risk of asthma among children. Those children who were administered special procedures at birth, i.e., cesarean section, vacuum extraction, and other procedures, including use of forceps, manual auxiliary, and extraction breech, had an adjusted odds ratio (OR) for asthma of 1.38 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.92), 1.32 (95% CI 0.80-2.19), and 2.14 (95% CI 1.06-4.33), respectively, as compared to children who were delivered normally. Children who had a lower Apgar score at the first and the fifth minute after birth also had a higher risk as compared to those who had an Apgar score of 9-10. The results encourage further evaluation of the association between obstetric complications and risk of asthma among children in other populations, and further exploration of possible mechanisms underlying the association.

  3. [Late respiratory function complications following burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernesto, S; Marduel, Y; Freymond, N; Pacheco, Y; Devouassoux, G

    2008-03-01

    Twenty five per cent of thermal injuries are associated with secondary respiratory events linked to several mechanisms. In the acute phase of the accident oedema of the airways, the fume inhalation syndrome and ARDS are the most common causes responsible for death in 60% of cases. Late respiratory complications are little known and neglected. They comprise obstructive ventilatory defects due to the inhalation syndrome and restrictive defects secondary to ARDS or to dermal injury. We report the case of a female patient, extensively burnt 2 years previously, admitted to hospital with severe acute respiratory failure complicating COPD. The presence of both restrictive and obstructive defects led to the suggestion of alternative underlying mechanisms such as the pulmonary consequences of ARDS and extensive dermal scars. The latter were responsible for an armour like thickening of the skin of the thorax compatible with the restrictive defect. These functional abnormalities and the potential severity of acute respiratory failure are indications for regular pulmonary follow-up of patients with severe circumferential scarring of the thorax who are at high risk for respiratory complications.

  4. RISK FACTORS FOR CONTACT LENS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Štabuc Šilih

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Contact lenses are freely available without professional examination and fitting, as well as without adequate introduction and instructions on handling, disinfection and storage. Contact lenses may have physiological, metabolic and anatomic effect on the eyes, which is manifested both on the eyelids, lacrimal film, conjunctiva and in all layers of the cornea - the epithelium, stroma and the endothelium. We can see these complications too often at our everyday work. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the potential complications due to inappropriate use of contact lenses.Contact lenses are otherwise a safe and effective method of correcting visual acuity; they are also useful for therapeutic purposes. Complications related to contact lenses wear could be largely avoided with an appropriate professional approach and the compliance of contact lens wearers. It is important to discuss with patients their medical history, their desires and expectations, their working and living environment; followed by professional examination of patients and appropriate fitting of contact lenses. Patients should receive detailed oral and written instructions and be subscribed to regular checks. But unfortunately, all this is not enough, if patients do not comply every day with given instructions.

  5. Panel 7: Otitis Media: Treatment and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, Anne G M; Marom, Tal; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Coates, Harvey; Gisselsson-Solén, Marie; Hall, Amanda J; Marchisio, Paola; Ruohola, Aino; Venekamp, Roderick P; Mandel, Ellen M

    2017-04-01

    Objective We aimed to summarize key articles published between 2011 and 2015 on the treatment of (recurrent) acute otitis media, otitis media with effusion, tympanostomy tube otorrhea, chronic suppurative otitis media and complications of otitis media, and their implications for clinical practice. Data Sources PubMed, Ovid Medline, the Cochrane Library, and Clinical Evidence (BMJ Publishing). Review Methods All types of articles related to otitis media treatment and complications between June 2011 and March 2015 were identified. A total of 1122 potential related articles were reviewed by the panel members; 118 relevant articles were ultimately included in this summary. Conclusions Recent literature and guidelines emphasize accurate diagnosis of acute otitis media and optimal management of ear pain. Watchful waiting is optional in mild to moderate acute otitis media; antibiotics do shorten symptoms and duration of middle ear effusion. The additive benefit of adenoidectomy to tympanostomy tubes in recurrent acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion is controversial and age dependent. Topical antibiotic is the treatment of choice in acute tube otorrhea. Symptomatic hearing loss due to persistent otitis media with effusion is best treated with tympanostomy tubes. Novel molecular and biomaterial treatments as adjuvants to surgical closure of eardrum perforations seem promising. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of complementary and alternative treatments. Implications for Practice Emphasis on accurate diagnosis of otitis media, in its various forms, is important to reduce overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and antibiotic resistance. Children at risk for otitis media and its complications deserve special attention.

  6. Huge hydrocephalus: definition, management, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghih Jouibari, Morteza; Baradaran, Nazanin; Shams Amiri, Rouzbeh; Nejat, Farideh; El Khashab, Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Lack of comprehensive knowledge and numerous socioeconomic problems may make the parents leave hydrocephalic children untreated, leading to progressive hydrocephalus and eventual unordinary big head. Management of huge hydrocephalus (HH) differs from common hydrocephalus. We present our experience in the management of these children. HH is defined as head circumference larger than the height of the infant. Nine infants with HH have been shunted in Children's Hospital Medical Center and followed up for 0.5 to 7 years. The most common cause of hydrocephalus was aqueductal stenosis. The mean age of patients during shunting was 3 months. The head circumference ranged from 56 to 94 cm with the average of 67 cm. Cognitive statuses were appropriate based on their age in five patients. Motor development was normal only in one patient. Complications were found in most cases which included subdural effusion (six patients), shunt infection (four patients), skin injury (three patients), proximal catheter coming out of ventricle to the subdural space (two patients), and shunt exposure (one patient). Three patients died due to shunt infection and sepsis. Numerous complications may occur in patients with HH after shunt operation such as subdural effusion, ventricular collapse, electrolyte disturbance, skull deformity, scalp injury, and shunt infection. Mental and motor disabilities are very common in patients with HH. Many of these complications can be related to overdrainage; therefore, drainage control using programmable shunts is advisable.

  7. Pancreatic transplantation: Radiologic evaluation of vascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Kuni, C.C.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas is an increasingly common therapeutic option for preventing or delaying complications of type I diabetes mellitus. The authors studied the relative roles of various radiologic examinations in diagnosing vascular complications in these grafts including arterial and venous thrombosis, stenosis, and anastomotic leak (the most common vascular factors that necessitate pancreatectomy of the transplant), as defined with pathologic or arteriographic data. The results of 78 scintigraphic flow studies, 40 abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scans, 27 sonograms, and eight color Doppler studies were evaluated in 52 patients who received a total of 27 cadaveric and 26 living-donor grafts over a 12-year period. These results were correlated with the data from 45 gross and microscopic pathologic studies and 37 arteriograms to determine their relative value in enabling detection of graft thrombosis and other vascular complications. Scintigraphy, CT, sonography, and color Doppler were all sensitive in detection of generalized graft abnormalities but lacked specificity in defining the underlying etiologic factors

  8. Pancreatic transplantation: Radiologic evaluation of vascular complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Kuni, C.C.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G. (Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas is an increasingly common therapeutic option for preventing or delaying complications of type I diabetes mellitus. The authors studied the relative roles of various radiologic examinations in diagnosing vascular complications in these grafts including arterial and venous thrombosis, stenosis, and anastomotic leak (the most common vascular factors that necessitate pancreatectomy of the transplant), as defined with pathologic or arteriographic data. The results of 78 scintigraphic flow studies, 40 abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scans, 27 sonograms, and eight color Doppler studies were evaluated in 52 patients who received a total of 27 cadaveric and 26 living-donor grafts over a 12-year period. These results were correlated with the data from 45 gross and microscopic pathologic studies and 37 arteriograms to determine their relative value in enabling detection of graft thrombosis and other vascular complications. Scintigraphy, CT, sonography, and color Doppler were all sensitive in detection of generalized graft abnormalities but lacked specificity in defining the underlying etiologic factors.

  9. Comparison of post circumcision complications and wound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.; Ahmad, S.A.; Habib, A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the frequency of post circumcision complications like bleeding and infection along with wound healing in infants by conventional open method and the bone-cutter method. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital and Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from March 2009 to March 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 400 patients were included in the study that underwent circumcision. Patients were randomly allotted to either group A in whom the circumcision was done with conventional open technique (n = 200) or to group B, in whom circumcision was done with bone-cutter (n = 200). Patients were followed up in the surgical OPD after 5 days for assessment and earlier in case of any complication. Outcomes were measured by absence or presence of infection, post operative bleeding and cosmetic acceptance by the parents. Results: Comparison between the two groups showed that the bleeding rate was 8% in group A and 7% in group B (p = 0.704). Infection rate was 6% in group A and 5% in group B (p = 0.661). Delayed wound healing was seen in 4% of circumcisions in group A as opposed to 2% in group B ( p = 0.241). Conclusion: Complication is a part of any surgical procedure. So is the case with circumcision however no significant difference was found between the two procedures in terms of bleeding, infection, trauma to the glans and the cosmetic outcome. (author)

  10. Frequency of neonatal complications after premature delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Grgić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm delivery is the delivery before 37 weeks of gestation are completed. The incidence of preterm birth ranges from 5 to 15%. Aims of the study were to determine the average body weight, Apgar score after one and five minutes, and the frequency of the most common complications in preterminfants.Methods: The study involved a total of 631 newborns, of whom 331 were born prematurely Aims of this study were to (24th-37th gestational weeks-experimental group, while 300 infants were born in time (37-42 weeks of gestation-control group.Results: Average body weight of prematurely born infants was 2382 grams, while the average Apgar score in this group after the fi rst minute was 7.32 and 7.79 after the fifth minute. The incidence of respiratory distress syndrome was 50%, intracranial hemorrhage, 28.1% and 4.8% of sepsis. Respiratory distresssyndrome was more common in infants born before 32 weeks of gestation. Mortality of premature infants is present in 9.1% and is higher than that of infants born at term.Conclusions: Birth body weight and Apgar scores was lower in preterm infants. Respiratory distress syndrome is the most common fetal complication of prematurity. Intracranial hemorrhage is the second most common complication of prematurity. Mortality of premature infants is higher than the mortality of infants born at term birth.

  11. Does Post Septoplasty Nasal Packing Reduce Complications?

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    Bijan Naghibzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main issues in nasal surgery are to stabilize the nose in the good position after surgery and preserve the cartilages and bones in the favorable situation and reduce the risk of deviation recurrence. Also it is necessary to avoid the synechia formation, nasal valve narrowing, hematoma and bleeding. Due to the above mentioned problems and in order to solve and minimize them nasal packing, nasal splint and nasal mold have been advised. Patients for whom the nasal packing used may faced to some problems like naso-pulmonary reflex, intractable pain, sleep disorder, post operation infection and very dangerous complication like toxic shock syndrome. We have two groups of patients and three surgeons (one of the surgeons used post operative nasal packing in his patients and the two others surgeons did not.Complications and morbidities were compared in these two groups. Comparing the two groups showed that the rate of complication and morbidities between these two groups were same and the differences were not valuable, except the pain and discomfort post operatively and at the time of its removal. Nasal packing has several risks for the patients while its effects are not studied. Septoplasty can be safely performed without postoperative nasal packing. Nasal packing had no main findings that compensated its usage. Septal suture is one of the procedures that can be used as alternative method to nasal packing. Therefore the nasal packing after septoplasty should be reserved for the patients with increased risk of bleeding.

  12. Update on complications in pediatric anesthesia

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    Giovanni de Francisci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Complications in pediatric anesthesia can happen, even in our modern hospitals with the most advanced equipment and skilled anesthesiologists. It is important, albeit in a tranquil and reassuring way, to inform parents of the possibility of complications and, in general, of the anesthetic risks. This is especially imperative when speaking to the parents of children who will be operated on for minor procedures: in our experience, they tend to think that the anesthesia will be a light anesthesia without risks. Often the surgeons tell them that the operation is very simple without stressing the fact that it will be done under general anesthesia which is identical to the one we give for major operations. Different is the scenario for the parents of children who are affected by malignant neoplasms: in these cases they already know that the illness is serious. They have this tremendous burden and we choose not to add another one by discussing anesthetic risks, so we usually go along with the examination of the child without bringing up the possibility of complications, unless there is some specific problem such as a mediastinal mass.

  13. Chylothorax in dermatomyositis complicated with interstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Kentaro; Kiboshi, Takao; Shoda, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Chylothorax is a disease in which chyle leaks and accumulates in the thoracic cavity. Interstitial pneumonia and pneumomediastinum are common thoracic manifestations of dermatomyositis, but chylothorax complicated with dermatomyositis is not reported. We report a case of dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia complicated by chylothorax. A 77-year-old woman was diagnosed as dermatomyositis with Gottron's papules, skin ulcers, anti-MDA5 antibody and rapid progressive interstitial pneumonia. Treatment with betamethasone, tacrolimus and intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide was initiated, and her skin symptoms and interstitial pneumonia improved once. However, right-sided chylothorax began to accumulate and gradually increase, and at the same time, her interstitial pneumonia began to exacerbate, and skin ulcers began to reappear on her fingers and auricles. Although her chylothorax improved by fasting and parenteral nutrition, she died due to further exacerbations of dermatomyositis and interstitial pneumonia in spite of steroid pulse therapy, increase in the betamethasone dosage, additional intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide and plasma pheresis. An autopsy showed no lesions such as malignant tumors in the thoracic cavity. This is the first report of chylothorax complicated by dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia.

  14. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreizen, S.

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references

  15. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer

  16. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  17. Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2010-06-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients need maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated in our surgery unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented with a bilateral CLP, two with a unilateral CLP, and one with a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years. All underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. An external distractor was used for the first two patients and an internal distractor for the six following patients. After a seven-day latency, activation was implemented at a rate of 1mm twice a day. The average period of consolidation was four months. Maxillary advancement ranged between 7 and 19mm, with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. Complications were noted in seven patients: one intra-operative hemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth anchored at the pterygoid process during osteotomy, three cases of device dysfunction, two cases of significant pain during activation, one loosening of the orthodontic arch in an external system, two cases of labial ulceration, and one maxillary sinusitis due to migration of a wisdom tooth. Complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients were very frequent. Most were related to the device and did not interfere with the final result. This must be taken into account when indicating distraction and choosing the device. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the device. The complications related to the osteotomy are linked to the cicatricial ground of previous

  18. [Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2008-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients require a maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of the maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated at our Surgery Unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented a bilateral CLP, two a unilateral CLP and one a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years old. All had a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. The first two patients had external distractors and the six following internal ones. After a seven-day latency, activation was led to the rate of 1mm per day twice. The period of consolidation was four months on average. The maxillary advancement varied between 7 and 19 mm with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. We encountered difficulties and/or complications in seven patients: one intraoperatively haemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth fixed at the pterygoid process during the osteotomy, three device failures, two cases of significant pains during activation, one dissociation of the dental anchorage of an external system, two labial ulcerations and one maxillary sinusitis by migration of the 18. Difficulties of maxillary distraction in CLP patients are very frequent. The majority is related to the distractors and did not interfere with the final result. But this frequency must be taken into account in the indication and in the choice of the material. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the material. The complications related to the osteotomy are in connection with the cicatricial ground of the CLP. They are

  19. Colonic complications following human bone marrow transplantation

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    Paulino Martínez Hernández-Magro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human bone marrow transplantation (BMT becomes an accepted treatment of leukemia, aplastic anemia, immunodeficiency syndromes, and hematologic malignancies. Colorectal surgeons must know how to determine and manage the main colonic complications. Objective: To review the clinical features, clinical and pathological staging of graft vs host disease (GVHD, and treatment of patients suffering with colonic complications of human bone marrow transplantation. Patients and methods: We have reviewed the records of all patients that received an allogeneic bone marrow transplant and were evaluated at our Colon and Rectal Surgery department due to gastrointestinal symptoms, between January 2007 and January 2012. The study was carried out in patients who developed colonic complications, all of them with clinical, histopathological or laboratory diagnosis. Results: The study group was constituted by 77 patients, 43 male and 34 female patients. We identified colonic complications in 30 patients (38.9%; five patients developed intestinal toxicity due to pretransplant chemotherapy (6.4%; graft vs. host disease was present in 16 patients (20%; 13 patients (16.8% developed acute colonic GVHD, and 3 (3.8% chronic GVHD. Infection was identified in 9 patients (11.6%. Conclusions: The three principal colonic complications are the chemotherapy toxicity, GVHD, and superinfection; the onset of symptoms could help to suspect the type of complication (0–20 day chemotherapy toxicity, 20 and more GVHD, and infection could appear in any time of transplantation. Resumo: Experiência: O transplante de medula óssea humana (MOH passou a ser um tratamento adotado para leucemia, anemia aplástica, síndromes de imunodeficiência e neoplasias hematológicas. Cirurgiões colorretais devem saber como determinar e tratar as principais complicações do cólon. Objetivo: Revisar as características clínicas, estadiamentos clínico e patológico da doença do enxerto

  20. Complicated pleural tuberculosis in children: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, W.K.; Kim, W.S.; Kim, I.O.; Im, J.G.; Kim, J.H.; Yeon, K.M.; Han, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the CT features of complicated pleural tuberculosis in children and to define the use of CT in children with pleural tuberculosis. Materials and methods. The CT findings in 11 children with complicated pleural tuberculosis were retrospectively analysed. CT was performed to evaluate persistent pleural thickening (n = 6) or a mass-like lesion (n = 5) detected on plain radiographs. Chest radiographs and medical records were reviewed to determine whether additional information provided by CT had altered clinical management. Results. On CT, more than one location was involved in five patients (45 %) and in two patients (18 %) the entire pleural spaces were involved. Pleural thickening was seen in all 11 patients and enhancement after administration of contrast medium occurred in ten patients (91 %). Low-density fluid collections were seen in nine patients (82 %) and in two, CT revealed fluid collections within calcified pleural lesions. In five patients with mass-like lesions on plain radiographs, CT showed a low-density pleural mass with peripheral enhancement in four and a calcified pleural mass with fluid collection in one. CT demonstrated parenchymal abnormalities on the same side as pleural lesions in all 11 patients and hilar or mediastinal adenopathy in four. Four patients (36 %) underwent surgery because of fluid within a calcified fibrothorax (n = 3) and chest wall tuberculosis (n = 1) that were seen only on CT. Conclusions. The CT features of complicated pleural tuberculosis in children were pleural thickening, enhancement and fluid collection with associated parenchymal abnormalities and lymphadenopathy. In the evaluation of children with pleural tuberculosis, CT can be useful for demonstrating fluid within a calcified fibrothorax or chest wall involvement, which usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.)

  1. Atlas of Illustrative Cases of Tattoo Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Tattoos, and tattoo complications as well, are colorful and visually flashy. A clinical outlook provides important clues to diagnosis by pattern recognition. This atlas,which is a report of 79 case illustrations, is made as a practical tool and vade mecum for the clinician. The atlas can be used in the office and as a bedside tool. It includes characteristic photos, and each case is accompanied with a brief medical history, a comment with learning points, the final diagnosis, and a review of therapeutic options. This spectrum of cases illustrates the different diagnostic entities according to the newly proposed Bispebjerg University Hospital ('Tattoo Clinic') diagnostic system of tattoo complications, a system reported to the 11th revision of the WHO disease classification system. Cases include allergies predominantly seen in red tattoos manifesting the characteristic patterns of plaque elevation, excessive hyperkeratosis, ulcerating reactions, urticaria, and generalized skin rash. Each type of reaction has typical clues to diagnosis and a typical disease course. 'Cross-sensitivity' allergic reactions in old tattoos of the same color as the trigger tattoo are also illustrated. Reactions in black tattoos are dominated by a pattern with papulonodular reactions, which are nonallergic anddue to pigment agglomeration in the skin. Reactions may be granulomatous and a marker of systemic sarcoidosis, sometimes associated with a general outbreak in the skin in black tattoos, e.g. 'rush phenomenon'. Bacterial infections are also illustrated. The technical hazards of tattooing and sequels as well as unwanted effects of tattoo removal by lasers are shown along with severe scarring following tattoo removal by caustics. This atlas is a tutorial in modern medical and surgical treatments of tattoo complications. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Nasolacrimal Polyurethane Stent: Complications with CT Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Isabel T.; Paul, Laura; Grande, Carlos

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate initial results in patients with epiphora secondary to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct treated by placement of a polyurethane stent, and to discuss the technical problems and complications arising during the procedure, with visualization of the anatomy of the drainage apparatus using computed tomography (CT). Methods: We inserted 20 polyurethane Song stents under fluoroscopic guidance after dacryocystography in 19 patients with grade 3-4 epiphora caused by idiopathic obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. CT scans were obtained following stent placement in all patients. Results: We focus on the technical problems and complications that arose during these procedures. During negotiation of the guidewire past the obstruction at the level of the junction of the duct with the lacrimal sac, the guidewire created a false passage in a posterior suborbital direction in two cases and towards the posterior midline in another. In all cases the guidewire was withdrawn and reinserted through the proper anatomic route without further difficulty or complications. In two cases the stent was improperly positioned wholly or partially outside the nasolacrimal system (one medially, one posteriorly). In one case the stent was removed and reinserted; in the other it remains in place and functional. CT was performed in all these cases to ensure proper anatomic alignment and determine what had gone wrong. The epiphora was completely resolved in 13 cases and partially relieved in four; there were three cases of stent obstruction. Epistaxis of short duration (1 hr) occurred in seven patients and headache in one. Conclusions: Treatment of epiphora with polyurethane stents is a technique that is well tolerated by patients and achieves a high success rate, yet problems in placement may be encountered. Though no major consequences for patients are involved, cognizance of such difficulties is important to avoid incorrect positioning of stents

  3. Peristomal skin complications: causes, effects, and treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doctor K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly Doctor, Dorin T Colibaseanu Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA Abstract: Enterostomal formation remains a necessary part of multiple types of surgeries. Stomal difficulties can be a source of frustration for patients; however, a properly functioning stoma in a patient educated in its care can result in a highly functional individual, with a high quality of life, comparable to a person without a stoma. Correct surgical technique is vital to creating a stoma that is sufficiently everted, and in a good anatomical location. Loop ileostomies have a higher chance of complications, thus care in their formation is especially important. Systemic disease (inflammatory conditions, and autoimmune diseases especially as well as local conditions (pyoderma gangrenosum, infections, and fistulas, among others can be the causes for difficult-to-treat peristomal complications. Accurate diagnosis is essential in order to be able to address the underlying disease. Choosing the appropriate products to care for the stoma is often a process of trial and error, and is best done under the guidance of an enterostomal therapist. This is especially true for stomas in overweight individuals or stomas that have become flush with the skin with time and changing body habitus. Inattention to care can result in problems that range from simple mucocutaneous separations (separation of the bowel edge from the surrounding skin to large and difficult-to-heal ulcers. This article provides a systematic review of the most common challenges that patients with stoma are faced with, and offers solutions based on up-to-date review of the literature. Keywords: stoma care, stoma complications, stoma wound

  4. Colostomy closure: how to avoid complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Andrea; Levitt, Marc A; Lawal, Taiwo A; Peña, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Colostomy is an operation frequently performed in pediatric surgery. Despite its benefits, it can produce significant morbidity. In a previous publication we presented our experience with the errors and complications that occurred during cases of colostomy creation. We now have focused in the morbidity related to the colostomy closure. The technical details that might have contributed to the minimal morbidity we experienced are described. The medical records of 649 patients who underwent colostomy closure over a 28-year period were retrospectively reviewed looking for complications following these procedures. Our perioperative protocol for colostomy closure consisted in: clear fluids by mouth and repeated proximal stoma irrigations 24 h prior to the operation. Administration of IV antibiotics during anesthesia induction and continued for 48 h. Meticulous surgical technique that included: packing of the proximal stoma, plastic drape to immobilize the surgical field, careful hemostasis, emphasis in avoiding contamination, cleaning the edge of the stomas to allow a good 2-layer, end-to-end anastomosis with separated long-term absorbable sutures, generous irrigation of the peritoneal cavity and subsequent layers with saline solution, closure by layers to avoid dead space, and avoidance of hematomas. No drains and no nasogastric tubes were used. Oral fluids were started the day after surgery and patients were discharged 48-72 h after the operation. The original diagnoses of the patients were: anorectal malformation (583), Hirschsprung's disease (53), and others (13). 10 patients (1.5%) had complications: 6 had intestinal obstruction (5 due to small bowel adhesions, 1 had temporary delay of the function of the anastomosis due to a severe size discrepancy between proximal and distal stoma with a distal microcolon) and 4 incisional hernias. There were no anastomotic dehiscences or wound infection. There was no bleeding, no anastomotic stricture and no mortality. Based on

  5. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetesmellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin M Nentwich; Michael W Ulbig

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the mostfrequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitusand the most common cause of blindness in the workingagepopulation. In the next 15 years, the number ofpatients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected toincrease significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 millionpeople in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to besuffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people withdiabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts foran increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e. , exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema.

  6. Appendicitis in Pregnancy: Presentation, Management and Complications

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    Abdoulhossein Davoodabadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnancy is difficult. Delay operation, increase complications. Objectives This study focused on early operation on base of careful history, precise physical examination, and rational close observation and evaluates its results with conventional investigation in pregnant women suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and Methods A cross sectional study in100 pregnant women and 100 aged matched non pregnant women underwent appendectomy during Sep 2011 - Dec 2014. The data were analyzed by chi-square test through SPSS 16.0. Results Age 16 - 37 years, mean age in pregnant women and no pregnant women were24.75 ± 4.4 and 27.56 ± 6.53 years (P > 0.05, respectively. 20 - 25 years age group, were more frequent = 44%. 70% patients were gravid 1, mean hospital stay in pregnant women, and non-pregnant women were 48 ± 6 and 85.2 ± 43.19 hours (P value < 0.001. respectively. acute appendicitis was confirmed histological in non-pregnant was 72%, but In pregnant women 62%, most cases were in the third Trimester 66% (n = 41. Peri umbilical pain, with migration to the right lower quadrant, was in 75% of patients. Right-lower-quadrant pain was the most common presenting symptom. Diagnosis (62% was made on base care full history and precise physical examination and close observation of 12 ± 8 hours. there were no maternal and fetal complications related to all of the appendectomies during the all trimester up to delivery period. Conclusions There are no diagnostic laboratory findings in acute appendicitis during pregnancy. Careful history and physical examination and close observation of 12 ± 8 hours are sufficient for surgery decision making. In spite of high negative appendectomy since it has no Surgical and obstetric complication, early Appendectomy without aggressive investigation recommend.

  7. Cardiovascular Complications of Acute Amphetamine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazmi, Elham; Mousavi, Farinaz; Giahchin, Leila; Mokhtari, Tahmineh; Behnoush, Behnam

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate cardiovascular complications among patients who abuse amphetamines. Methods This cross-sectional study took place between April 2014 and April 2015 among 3,870 patients referred to the Toxicology Emergency Department of Baharlou Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Those with clinical signs of drug abuse and positive urine screening tests were included in the study, while cases of chronic abuse were excluded. Cardiac complications were evaluated via electrocardiography (ECG) and transthoracic echocardiography. Results A total of 230 patients (5.9%) had a history of acute amphetamine abuse and positive urine tests. Of these, 32 patients (13.9%) were <20 years old and 196 (85.2%) were male. In total, 119 (51.7%) used amphetamine and methamphetamine compounds while 111 (48.3%) used amphetamines with morphine or benzodiazepines. The most common ECG finding was sinus tachycardia (43.0%), followed by sinus tachycardia plus a prolonged QT interval (34.3%). Mean creatine kinase-MB and troponin I levels were 35.9 ± 4.3 U/mL and 0.6 ± 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. A total of 60 patients (26.1%) were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. The majority (83.3%) of these patients had normal echocardiography results. The mean aortic root diameter (ARD) was 27.2 ± 2.8 mm. Abnormalities related to the ARD were found in 10 patients (16.7%), three of whom subsequently died. Conclusion According to these findings, cardiac complications were common among Iranian patients who abuse amphetamines, although the majority of patients had normal echocardiography and ECG findings. PMID:28417026

  8. Management of Postoperative Complications Following Splenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yikun; Ren, Shiyan; Li, Chunmin; Qian, Songyi; Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Complications of post-splenectomy, especially intra-abdominal hemorrhage can be fatal, with delayed or inadequate treatment having a high mortality rate. The objective of this study was to investigate the cause, prompt diagnosis, and outcome of the fatal complications after splenectomy with a focus on early diagnosis and management of hemorrhage after splenectomy. The medical files of patients who underwent splenectomy between January 1990 and March 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. The cause, characteristics, management, and outcome in patients with post-splenectomy hemorrhage were analyzed. Fourteen of 604 patients (1.19%) undergoing splenectomy had intraperitoneal hemorrhage: reoperation was performed in 13 patients, and 3 patients died after reoperation, giving the hospital a mortality rate of 21.43%; whereas, 590 of 604 patients (98%) had no hemorrhage following splenectomy, and the mortality rate (0.34%) in this group was significantly lower (P splenectomy, including pneumonia pancreatitis, gastric fistula, gastric flatulence, and thrombocytosis, in patients with postoperative hemorrhage were significantly higher than those without hemorrhage (P splenectomy, 14 patients with post-splenectomy hemorrhage were grouped into two groups: splenic trauma (n = 9, group I) and portal hypertension (n = 5, group II). The median interval between splenectomy and diagnosis of hemorrhage was 15.5 hours (range, 7.25–19.5 hours). No differences were found between groups I and II in terms of incidence of postoperative hemorrhage, time of hemorrhage after splenectomy, volume of hemorrhage, and mortality of hemorrhage, except transfusion. Intra-abdominal hemorrhage after splenectomy is associated with higher hospital mortality rate and complications. Early massive intraperitoneal hemorrhage is often preceded by earlier sentinel bleeding; careful clinical inquiry and ultrasonography are the mainstays of early diagnosis. PMID:23438277

  9. Ingestion of caustic substances and its complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Celso Martins Mamede

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Caustic substances cause tissue destruction through liquefaction or coagulation reactions and the intensity of destruction depends on the type, concentration, time of contact and amount of the substance ingested. OBJECTIVES: To analyze the complications in patients who ingested caustic substances and correlate them with the amount of caustic soda ingested. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: University hospital, a referral center. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 239 patients who ingested caustic soda. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: The amount of granulated caustic substance ingested was measured as tablespoonfuls and the following complications were analyzed: esophagitis, esophageal stenosis and progression to cancer, fistulas, perforations, stomach lesions, brain abscesses, and death. Stenosis was classified as mild, moderate or severe according to the radiological findings. RESULTS: We observed an 89.3% incidence of esophagitis; 72.6% of the cases involved progression to stenosis and 1% died during the acute phase. Stenosis was mild in 17.6% of cases, moderate in 59.3% and severe in 23%. The incidence of stenosis was 80.8% in women and 62.5% in men. The incidence of stenosis was 46.9% in the group that ingested "fragments" and 93.6% in the group that ingested one or more tablespoonfuls of caustic substances. Among subjects who ingested one or more tablespoonfuls, 32.2% developed lesions of the stomach-duodenum, whereas the ingestion of "fragments" was not sufficient to induce these lesions. There was no correlation between the intensity of lesions of the esophagus and of the stomach. Progression to cancer of the esophagus occurred in 1.8% of cases, death during the chronic phase in 1.4%, perforations in 4.6%, fistulas in 0.9%, and brain abscesses in 1.4%. CONCLUSIONS: The complications were related to the amount of caustic soda ingested. Small amounts caused esophagitis or stenosis and large amounts increased the risk of fistulas, perforations and

  10. Digestive Tract Complications of Renal Cryoablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kanichiro, E-mail: shimikan@jikei.ac.jp [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kashiwa Hospital (Japan); Mogami, Takuji [Ichikawa General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo Dental College (Japan); Michimoto, Kenkichi; Kameoka, Yoshihiko; Tokashiki, Tadashi; Kurata, Naoki [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kashiwa Hospital (Japan); Miki, Jun; Kishimoto, Koichi [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Kashiwa Hospital (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    We report a case each of duodenorenal and colorenal fistula that arose after computed tomography-guided percutaneous cryoablation (PCA) for renal cell carcinoma and use imaging and endoscopic findings to analyze their causes and mechanisms. Both complications occurred though the edge of the iceball did not touch the intestinal wall, and patients’ symptoms and fistula formation occurred several days after the PCA procedure. Based on imaging and endoscopy findings, we suspected the colorenal fistula resulted from bowel injury caused by ischemia from the occlusion of small vessels at the procedure’s low temperature. Both cases were resolved conservatively without surgical intervention.

  11. Atlas of Illustrative Cases of Tattoo Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    proposed Bispebjerg University Hospital ('Tattoo Clinic') diagnostic system of tattoo complications, a system reported to the 11th revision of the WHO disease classification system. Cases include allergies predominantly seen in red tattoos manifesting the characteristic patterns of plaque elevation......'. Bacterial infections are also illustrated. The technical hazards of tattooing and sequels as well as unwanted effects of tattoo removal by lasers are shown along with severe scarring following tattoo removal by caustics. This atlas is a tutorial in modern medical and surgical treatments of tattoo...

  12. Ordered mesoporous silica materials with complicated structures

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2012-05-01

    Periodically ordered mesoporous silicas constitute one of the most important branches of porous materials that are extensively employed in various chemical engineering applications including adsorption, separation and catalysis. This short review gives an introduction to recently developed mesoporous silicas with emphasis on their complicated structures and synthesis mechanisms. In addition, two powerful techniques for solving complex mesoporous structures, electron crystallography and electron tomography, are compared to elucidate their respective strength and limitations. Some critical issues and challenges regarding the development of novel mesoporous structures as well as their applications are also discussed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Post legalisation challenge: minimizing complications of abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, N; Sharma, S; Paudel, J

    2004-01-01

    Abortion has been legalized in Nepal since September 2002 by 11th amendment to the Muluki Ain. The present study was conducted in Paropakar Shree Panch Indra Rajya Laxmi Devi Maternity Hospital to assess the magnitude of induced abortion, its causes and the types of complications, in the post legalization phase. Prospective descriptive analyses of the patients who were admitted with history of induced abortion from 16th Dec 2003 to 13th March 2004 was carried out. A total of 305 cases of abortion complications were admitted during the three-month study period, which is 39.7% of the total gynaecological admissions (768). Of these 31 (10.25%) patients had history of induced abortion. Half of the induced abortion cases (52%) were of age group 21-29 yrs and 42% had three or more children. 39% of the cases had history of induced abortion at more than 12 weeks and almost half of the cases (48%) had history of family planning. The most common reason for seeking abortion was too many children (59%) followed by illegitimate pregnancy (16%). Twenty-one patients gave history of abortion being performed by doctors and the most common method used was D and C (75%). 77% of cases presented as incomplete abortion and one case presented with uterine perforation, bowel injury and peritonitis. Twenty patients had evacuation under sedation while five had manual vacuum aspiration (MVA); one patient required laparatomy. In two third of the patients intravenous fluid and antibiotics were used. Four patients required blood transfusion. Abortion complications constitute almost 40% of the total gynaecological admissions. Ten percent of the abortion cases had history of induced abortion. Medical persons, mainly doctors, performed most of the cases of induced abortion and D and C was the most commonly used method. However the patients had faced various types of complications. Untrained provider, resulting in serious life threatening injuries, performed more than a third of the cases of

  14. Radiographic complications of biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miketic, L.M.; Bahnson, R.R.; Ernstoff, M.S.; Kirkwood, J.M.; Nair, S.; Logan, T.; Downs, M.A.; Neuhart, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Biologic response modifiers, such as the interferons, are increasingly used in the treatment of cancer as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy. In certain malignancies, particularly renal cell carcinoma, they are becoming agents of choice due to higher tumor response rate. The authors have reviewed 202 patients. Protocols include interferon, interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, and monoclonal antibodies. The radiology of significant clinical complications is discussed, especially the vascular leak syndrome often seen with interleukin administration and the cardiac toxicity of interferon. Less common abnormalities include progressive splenomegaly in one interferon study and a hemorrhagic episode caused by tumor necrosis factor

  15. Acute complications of the ileum jejunum lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.; Ruso, L.; Rodriguez, G.; Plazzotta, C.; Rondan, M.; Balboa, O.; Di Leoni, F.

    2004-01-01

    Small intestine lymphoma is a entity whose incidence fluctuates between 1 and 4% of all malignant tumors of digestive tract.Its usual clinical presentation is in the form of acute abdominal symptomatology thus determining that the surgeon generally comes across them in urgency services.The surgical treatment is established under these circumstances,oftentimes lacking and established etiologic diagnosis,Anatomy-pathologic confirmation renders possible setting up adjuvant treatment on the basis of chemo and radio therapy.There follows a retrospective analysis of six clinical cases which had the appearance of acute abdominal symptomatology and were subject to urgency surgery, there being no complications nor operative mortality

  16. Failures and complications of thoracic drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Thoracic drainage is a surgical procedure for introducing a drain into the pleural space to drain its contents. Using this method, the pleura is discharged and set to the physiological state which enables the reexpansion of the lungs. The aim of the study was to prove that the use of modern principles and protocols of thoracic drainage significantly reduces the occurrence of failures and complications, rendering the treatment more efficient. Methods. The study included 967 patients treated by thoracic drainage within the period from January 1, 1989 to June 1, 2000. The studied patients were divided into 2 groups: group A of 463 patients treated in the period from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1994 in whom 386 pleural drainage (83.36% were performed, and group B of 602 patients treated form January 1, 1995 to June 1, 2000 in whom 581 pleural drainage (96.51% were performed. The patients of the group A were drained using the classical standards of thoracic drainage by the general surgeons. The patients of the group B, however, were drained using the modern standards of thoracic drainage by the thoracic surgeons, and the general surgeons trained for this kind of the surgery. Results. The study showed that better results were achieved in the treatment of the patients from the group B. The total incidence of the failures and complications of thoracic drainage decreased from 36.52% (group A to 12.73% (group B. The mean length of hospitalization of the patients without complications in the group A was 19.5 days versus 10 days in the group B. The mean length of the treatment of the patients with failures and complications of the drainage in the group A was 33.5 days versus 17.5 days in the group B. Conclusion. The shorter length of hospitalization and the lower morbidity of the studied patients were considered to be the result of the correct treatment using modern principles of thoracic drainage, a suitable surgical technique, and a

  17. Complications of cirrhosis. A 50 years flashback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    In patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, it is largely the frequency and severity of complications relating to the diseased liver, degree of portal hypertension and hemodynamic derangement that determine the prognosis. It can be considered as a multiple organ failure that apart from...... the liver involves the heart, lungs, kidneys, the immune systems and other organ systems. Progressive fibrosis of the liver and subsequent metabolic impairment leads to a systemic and splanchnic arteriolar vasodilatation. With the progression of the disease development of portal hypertension leads...

  18. Unusual infectious mononucleosis complicated by vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srimanta Kumar Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious mononucleosis (IM is a clinical syndrome caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. It manifests as fever, pharyngitis, malaise, adenopathy, and atypical lymphocytosis. Cardiovascular complications are thought to be rare in IM. There are very few case reports of EBV-associated vasculitides, like Kawasaki disease and systemic polyarteritis nodosa, however, involvement of the large caliber arteries like the aorta and its branches have been reported only scarcely. Myocarditis also is rare as an early manifestation of EBV infection. We present here a rare case of IM, presented initially with acute myocarditis and later with large-vessels arteritis.

  19. Theatrical Complicity as a Medium of Emancipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Rosendal

    2015-01-01

    How do we find a solution when we ourselves are the problem? This is the question posed by two contemporary performances that frame the spectator as an accomplice in the exploitation and representation of suffering and violence in a globalized and mediatized world: Sálo (2010), based on Pier Paolo...... are analysed and compared as elaborately structured games of observation, where the spectators are made to observe their own acts of spectating as complicity in the reproduction of violence caused by theatrical representation. Jaques Rancière’s paradox of the spectator and Josette Féral’s concept...

  20. Individual Risk and Prevention of Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Doctors who are consulted about health and tattoo risks have an important role in the prevention of an individual's tattoo complications. Tattooing is a tremendous exposure of the human body to needle operation, particles, and chemicals. The risk is related to a person's health condition, level o...... about tattoos, tattoo problems, how to reduce risk, and a checklist for the tattoo customer before decision-making. The sheets with keynote information are useful aids for doctors giving advice to persons curious about acquiring a tattoo....

  1. Late complications following cryotherapy of lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, W E; Morse, P H; Nantawan, P

    1977-10-01

    We observed 341 patients who had received cryotherapy for lattice degeneration in order to identify possible late complications. Sequelae such as retinal tears posterior to an operculum or flap tears within treated areas showed that treatment did not necessarily prevent subsequent vitreous traction. Moreover, the newly created flap tears may extend beyond the treated area and can cause retinal detachment. Even scleral buckling did not necesserily prevent further traction. Therefore, we concluded that when cryotherapy is used to treat lattice degeneration, an adequate margin of surrounding retina should be treated and the treatment should extend to the ora serrata.

  2. Urinary Derivations: Radiological Anatomy and Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Escartin, I.; Zapater, C.; Riazuelo, G.; Canon, R.; Solanas, S.; Garcia de Jalon, A.

    2003-01-01

    Cystectomy with urine derivation is a common procedure in the treatment of transition cell carcinoma of the bladder. We present radiological findings (ultrasound scan, computerized tomography (CT) and urography) from the surgical reconstruction techniques most often performed by the Urology staff of our hospital as well as some of the complications which occur. The above-mentioned techniques are basically divided into two types: incontinent derivations, of which we highlight the Bicker-Wallace technique and continent ones. The latter can either be ortho topic, with urethral anastomosis (Hauptmann's technique), or heterotopic, with urine excretion through the anus (Mains II technique) or employing a self-catheter (Mainz I technique). (Author) 7 refs

  3. EQUILIBRE GLYCEMIQUE ET COMPLICATIONS MACROANGIOPATHIQUES DU DIABETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyse BORDIER

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available La question de l’efficacité d’un équilibre glycémique optimal dans la prévention des complications macroangiopathiques du diabète a fait l’objet d’une récente polémique. Si les faits sont clairs pour la microangiopathie notamment au cours du diabète de type 1, ils paraissent moins certains pour les complications cardiovasculaires du diabète de type 2. Cette constatation vient de l’intrication des autres facteurs de risque cardiovasculaires qui sont très fréquents chez ces patients. Cependant, les études de suivi sur une longue durée s’inscrivent en faveur de l’intérêt d’un bon équilibre glycémique sur les complications macroangiopathiques. Les résultats négatifs sur la mortalité de l’étude ACCORD et les inquiétudes concernant la rosiglitazone ont conduit à la mise en place d’études sur la sécurité d’utilisation des nouvelles molécules. Tous ces travaux ont abouti à la démonstration de l’absence de risque des iDPP-4 et de l’effet très positif de certaines molécules de la classe des analogues du GLP-1 et des iSGLT2.Il reste à espérer que la récente mise au point de l’Académie de Médecine soulignant que les complications du diabète de type 2 exigent une prévention multifactorielle qui passe obligatoirement par un contrôle optimisé de l'équilibre glycémique mette fin à une polémique inutile et dangereuse pour nos malades.

  4. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  5. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles. Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  6. Intracerebral hematoma complicating herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sainz, Aida; Escalza-Cortina, Inés; Guio-Carrión, Laura; Matute-Nieves, Alexandra; Gómez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carbayo-Lozano, Guillermo; Garcia-Monco, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    To describe two patients who developed an intracranial hematoma as a complication of temporal lobe encephalitis due to herpes simplex type 1 virus, and to review the literature. The first patient, a 45-year-old woman developed a brain hematoma in the location of the encephalitic lesion on day 9 after the onset of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) that required surgical evacuation. The second patient, a 53-year-old woman was being treated for HSE; on day 8 after admission a temporal lobe hematoma with midline shift was disclosed due to persistent headache. Both patients survived but were left with sequelae. We conducted a PubMed/MEDLINE search from 1986 to April 2013 on this topic. We have found 20 additional cases reported in the literature and review their characteristics. Hemorrhage was present on admission in 35% of pooled patients, and consistently involved the area of encephalitis. Clinical presentation of intracranial hemorrhage overlapped the encephalitic symptoms in two-thirds of the patients. Half of patients underwent surgery. Overall, mortality rate was low (5.2%), and half of patients fully recovered. Intracranial bleeding, although infrequent, can complicate the evolution of herpes simplex encephalitis and should be borne in mind since its presence may require neurosurgery. Although its presentation may overlap the encephalitic features, the lack of improvement or the worsening of initial symptoms, particularly during the second week of admission, should lead to this suspicion and to perform a neuroimaging study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Healthcare and complicity in Australian immigration detention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essex, Ryan

    2016-06-01

    Australian immigration detention has received persistent criticism since its introduction almost 25 years ago. With the recent introduction of offshore processing, these criticisms have intensified. Riots, violence, self-harm, abuse and devastating mental health outcomes are all now well documented, along with a number of deaths. Clinicians have played a central role working in these environments, faced with the overarching issue of delivering healthcare while facilitating an abusive and harmful system. Since the re-introduction of offshore processing a number of authors have begun to discuss the possibility of a boycott. While taking such action may lead to change, further discussion is needed, not only in relation to the impact of a boycott, but whether it is possible for clinicians to engage with this system in more productive, ethical ways. This article utilises a framework proposed by Lepora and Goodin (On complicity and compromise, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2013) that provides a structured approach to examine complicity and seeks to explore how clinicians have engaged with Australian immigration detention and ultimately whether they should continue to do so.

  8. Metabolic complications associated with use of diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Biff F

    2011-11-01

    Diuretics are commonly used therapeutic agents that act to inhibit sodium transport systems along the length of the renal tubule. The most effective diuretics are inhibitors of sodium chloride transport in the thick ascending limb of Henle. Loop diuretics mobilize large amounts of sodium chloride and water and produce a copious diuresis with a sharp reduction of extracellular fluid volume. As the site of action of diuretics moves downstream (thiazide and potassium-sparing diuretics), their effectiveness declines because the transport systems they inhibit have low transport capacity. Depending on the site of action diuretics can influence the renal handling of electrolyte-free water, calcium, potassium, protons, sodium bicarbonate, and uric acid. As a result, electrolyte and acid-base disorders commonly accompany diuretic use. Glucose and lipid abnormalities also can occur, particularly with the use of thiazide diuretics. This review focuses on the biochemical complications associated with the use of diuretics. The development of these complications can be minimized with careful monitoring, dosage adjustment, and replacement of electrolyte losses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical treatment of gynecomastia: complications and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Chang; Fu, Ju-Peng; Chang, Shun-Cheng; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen

    2012-11-01

    Gynecomastia is defined as the benign enlargement of the male breast. Multiple surgical options have been used to improve outcomes. The aim of this study was to analyze the surgical approaches to the treatment of gynecomastia and their outcomes over a 10-year period. All patients undergoing surgical correction of gynecomastia in our department between 2000 and 2010 were included for retrospective evaluation. The data were analyzed for etiology, stage of gynecomastia, surgical technique, complications, risk factors, and revision rate. The surgical result was evaluated with self-assessment questionnaires. A total of 41 patients with 75 operations were included. Techniques included subcutaneous mastectomy alone or with additional ultrasound-assisted liposuction (UAL) and isolated UAL. The surgical revision rate for all patients was 4.8%. The skin-sparing procedure gave good surgical results in grade IIb and grade III gynecomastia with low revision and complication rates. The self-assessment report revealed a good level of overall satisfaction and improvement in self-confidence (average scores 9.4 and 9.2, respectively, on a 10-point scale). The treatment of gynecomastia requires an individualized approach. Subcutaneous mastectomy combined with UAL could be used as the first choice for surgical treatment of grade II and III gynecomastia.

  10. [Endocrine complications of cystic fibrosis in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanet, M; Wieliczko, M-C

    2012-05-01

    Since the 20 last years, the median age of survival has dramatically improved in children suffering from cystic fibrosis and complications such as growth retardation, pubertal delay and low bone mineral density are now more often than not observed in affected adolescents. The severity of the disease and the poor nutritional status due to pancreatic insufficiency and malabsorption are commonly implicated but recent data suggest that the disease could also play a role though the alteration of the chlore chanel (CFTR). Furthermore an increase prevalence of glucose intolerance and diabetes due to the progressive β cells destruction is observed in these children that make the life sometimes difficult for these adolescents already affected by an heavy chronic disease. The monitoring of the children should thus now become pluridisciplinary and include regular clinical evaluation of height and pubertal status, mineral bone density by DEXA and OGTT every two years since 10 years of age. Therefore, in addition to the standard treatment of cystic fibrosis is now added the vitamin D supplementation, the subcutaneous insulin therapy and may be the growth hormone that could be a new therapeutic demonstrating beneficial effects in these chronic disease. However further studies need to be performed to improve the management of these new endocrine complications more and more frequent in children and adolescents suffering from cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute fatal metabolic complications in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, A S; Milan, A M; Gallagher, J A; Ranganath, L R

    2016-03-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder of tyrosine metabolism that results from a defect in an enzyme called homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. The result of this is that homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates in the body. HGA is central to the pathophysiology of this disease and the consequences observed; these include spondyloarthropathy, rupture of ligaments/muscle/tendons, valvular heart disease including aortic stenosis and renal stones. While AKU is considered to be a chronic progressive disorder, it is clear from published case reports that fatal acute metabolic complications can also occur. These include oxidative haemolysis and methaemoglobinaemia. The exact mechanisms underlying the latter are not clear, but it is proposed that disordered metabolism within the red blood cell is responsible for favouring a pro-oxidant environment that leads to the life threatening complications observed. Herein the role of red blood cell in maintaining the redox state of the body is reviewed in the context of AKU. In addition previously reported therapeutic strategies are discussed, specifically with respect to why reported treatments had little therapeutic effect. The potential use of nitisinone for the management of patients suffering from the acute metabolic decompensation in AKU is proposed as an alternative strategy.

  12. Prevention of the Musculoskeletal Complications of Hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Rodriguez-Merchan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia is an inherited disorder of clotting factor deficiencies resulting in musculoskeletal bleeding, including hemarthroses, leading to musculoskeletal complications. The articular problems of hemophiliac patients begin in infancy. These include: recurrent hemarthroses, chronic synovitis, flexion deformities, hypertrophy of the growth epiphyses, damage to the articular cartilage, and hemophilic arthropathy. The most commonly affected joints are the ankle, the knee, and the elbow. Hematologic prophylactic treatment from ages 2 to 18 years could avoid the development of hemophilic arthropathy if the concentration of the patient's deficient factor is prevented from falling below 1% of normal. Hemarthroses can be prevented by the administration of clotting factor concentrates (prophylaxis. However, high costs and the need for venous access devices in younger children continue to complicate recommendations for universal prophylaxis. Prevention of joint arthropathy needs to focus on prevention of hemarthroses through prophylaxis, identifying early joint disease through the optimal use of cost-effective imaging modalities and the validation of serological markers of joint arthropathy. Screening for effects on bone health and optimal management of pain to improve quality of life are, likewise, important issues. Major hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilic synovitis should be treated aggressively to prevent hemophilic arthropathy.

  13. Acute pyelonephritis can have serious complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Joanne; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2010-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) may predominantly involve the lower urinary tract, i.e. acute cystitis, or upper urinary tract consisting of the renal pelvis and kidney,, i.e. acute pyelonephritis The incidence of acute pyelonephritis is higher in young women than in men but the incidence in men over 65 is similar to that in older women. Women have up to a 10% risk of recurrent acute pyelonephritis in the year following a first acute episode. The equivalent risk in men is 6%. Acute pyelonephritis may be uncomplicated and resolve without serious sequelae. A minority of episodes may be complicated by acute kidney injury, papillary necrosis, renal or perinephric abscess or the development of emphysematous pyelonephritis. Acute pyelonephritis is generally caused by microorganisms ascending from the urethra via the bladder into the upper urinary tract. Rarely the kidney may be seeded by blood-borne infection. Ecoli is the most common uropathogen causing pyelonephritis accounting for 70-90% of infections. Species of Enterococci, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Proteus and Staphylococci are responsible for the remaining infections. There is a rising incidence in the community of UTI with bacteria that produce extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes. These ESBL bacteria have developed resistance to antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporins and increasingly to quinolones. Risk factors for uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis include recent sexual intercourse, acute cystitis, stress incontinence and diabetes and for complicated acute pyelonephritis include pregnancy, diabetes, anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract and renal calculi.

  14. A Rare Complication of Hyperplastic Gastric Polyp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Nayudu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperplastic gastric polyps are incidentally diagnosed during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. They are known to cause gastric outlet obstruction and chronic blood loss leading to iron deficiency anemia. However, hyperplastic gastric polyp presenting as acute severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding is very rare. To the best of our knowledge, there have been two cases of hyperplastic gastric polyps presenting as acute gastrointestinal bleeding in the medical literature. We present a case of a 56-year-old African American woman who was admitted to our hospital with symptomatic anemia and sepsis. The patient developed acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding during her hospital stay. She underwent emergent endoscopy, but bleeding could not be controlled. She underwent emergent laparotomy and wedge resection to control the bleeding. Biopsy of surgical specimen was reported as hyperplastic gastric polyp. We recommend that physicians should be aware of this rare serious complication of hyperplastic gastric polyps as endoscopic polypectomy has diagnostic and therapeutic benefits in preventing future complications including bleeding.

  15. Osteoarticular complications in sicklemic patients after childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potente, G.

    1988-01-01

    The osteoarticular complications of drepanocytosis-thalassemia (DT) include: 1) infarction, or avascular necrosis (AVN), common at all ages; 2) acute septic arthritis and hematogenous osteomyelitis, that usually affect infants and children. Early diagnosis and treatment of the osteoarticular infectious complications is imperative, to maximize the chances of a favorable outcome, and to prevent the sequelae, i.e. pathological fractures, chronic osteomyelitis. Early roentgenographic features of involved areas are similar in acute osteomyelitis and in AVN-both of which cause painfull bone crises, so as to make osteomyelites (OM) a diagnostic challenge. Four cases of DT are reported. The patients, 17 to 37 years old, presented with bone infarcts. One of them (the youngest) had also multiple osteomyelitis of long bones. The 99m-Tc-MDP bone scans, performed only on the youngest patient, affected by OM, revealed increased uptake in both AVN and in OM locations, without differential diagnostic features. After a review of the literature, a diagnostic protocol is suggested, based on 99m-Tc-nanocolloid marrow scintigraphy for the early differential diagnosis between acute OM (normal or slightly-increased uptake), chronic OM (markedly increased uptake) and AVN (decreased uptake). Furthermore, MR imaging is stressed as the most promising tool, in the next future, for this kind of different diagnosis

  16. Bilateral Psoas Haematomata Complicating Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Akoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The challenge in managing patients undergoing renal transplantation is how to achieve optimum levels of anticoagulation to avoid both clotting and postoperative bleeding. We report a rare case of severe postoperative retroperitoneal bleeding including psoas haematomata complicating renal transplantation. Case Report. SM, a 55-year-old female, had a past history of aortic valve replacement, cerebrovascular event, and thoracic aortic aneurysm and was on long-term warfarin that was switched to enoxaparin 60 mg daily a week prior to her living donor transplantation. Postoperatively, she was started on a heparin infusion, but this was complicated by a large retroperitoneal bleed requiring surgical evacuation on the first postoperative day. Four weeks later, she developed features compatible with acute femoral neuropathy and a CT scan revealed bilateral psoas haematomata. Following conservative management, she made steady progress and was discharged home via a community hospital 94 days after transplantation. At her last visit 18 months after transplantation, she had returned to full fitness with excellent transplant function. Conclusion. Patients in established renal failure who require significant anticoagulation are at increased risk of bleeding that may involve prolonged hospitalisation and more protracted recovery and patients should be carefully counselled about this.

  17. Obstetrical complications of endometriosis, particularly deep endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Inversetti, Annalisa; Schimberni, Matteo; Viganò, Paola; Giorgione, Veronica; Candiani, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few years, a new topic in the field of endometriosis has emerged: the potential impact of the disease on pregnancy outcomes. This review aims to summarize in detail the available evidence on the relationship between endometriosis, particularly deep endometriosis (DE), and obstetrical outcomes. Acute complications of DE, such as spontaneous hemoperitoneum, bowel perforation, and uterine rupture, may occur during pregnancy. Although these events represent life-threatening conditions, they are rare and unpredictable. Therefore, the current literature does not support any kind of prophylactic surgery before pregnancy to prevent such complications. Results on the impact of DE on obstetrical outcomes are debatable and characterized by several limitations, including small sample size, lack of adjustment for confounders, lack of adequate control subjects, and other methodologic flaws. For these reasons, it is not possible to draw conclusions on this topic. The strongest evidence shows that DE is associated with higher rates of placenta previa; for other obstetrical outcomes, such as miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm birth and hypertensive disorders, results are controversial. Although it is unlikely that surgery of DE may modify the impact of the disease on the course of pregnancy, no study has yet investigated this issue. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Complications of bone tumors after multimodal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapeero, L.G., E-mail: lshapeero@usuhs.edu [Department of Radiology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Bone and Soft Tissue Program, United States Military Cancer Institute, 6900 Georgia Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20307 (United States); Poffyn, B. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Visschere, P.J.L. [Department of Radiology and Magnetic Resonance/MR-1K12 IB, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Sys, G. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Uyttendaele, D. [Department of Radiology and Magnetic Resonance/MR-1K12 IB, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vanel, D. [Department of Radiology, Rizzoli Institute, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Forsyth, R. [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, K.L. [Department of Radiology and Magnetic Resonance/MR-1K12 IB, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To define and compare the complications of bone tumors after resection, extracorporeal irradiation and re-implantation, with or without radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Eighty patients (40 males and 40 females, ages 4-77 years) with 61 malignant and 19 benign bone tumors were evaluated for local and distant complications after treatment. Two groups of patients were studied: (1) 53 patients had resection without (43 patients) or with external beam radiotherapy (RadRx) (10 patients) and (2) 27 patients underwent extracorporeal irradiation and re-implantation without (22 patients) or with RadRx (5 patients). Patient follow-up varied from 1 month to 13.63 years with mean follow-up of 4.7 years. Imaging studies included bone and chest radiography, spin echo T1- and T2-weighted (or STIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), computed tomography (CT) for thoracic and abdominopelvic metastases and 3-phase technetium-99m-labeled-methylene-diphosphonate (Tc99m MDP) scintigraphy for bone metastases. Results: DCE-MRI differentiated the rapidly enhancing recurrences, residual tumors and metastases from the slowly enhancing inflammation, and the non-enhancing seromas and fibrosis. Recurrences, metastases (mainly to lung and bone), and seromas were greater than twice as frequent in patients after resection than after ECCRI. Although 11.3% of post-resection patients had residual tumor, no ECRRI-treated patient had residual tumor. In contrast, after ECRRI, infection was almost three times as frequent and aseptic loosening twice as frequent as compared with the post-resection patients. Bones treated with RadRx and/or ECRRI showed increased prevalence of fractures and osteoporosis. In addition, muscle inflammation was more common in the externally irradiated patient as compared with the patient who did not receive this therapy. However, another soft tissue complication, heterotopic ossification, was rare in the

  19. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggott, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references

  20. Managment of orbital complications of sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkurt, Fazil Emre; Ozkurt, Zeynep Gursel; Gul, Aylin; Akdag, Mehmet; Sengul, Engin; Yilmaz, Beyhan; Yuksel, Harun; Meric, Faruk

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We reported on the clinical approaches of ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology departments in the treatment of the orbital complications of sinusitis. We also included an in-depth literature review. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 51 patients from January 2008 to January 2014. The records were evaluated for age, gender, type of orbital complications, symptoms, predisposing factors, imaging studies, medical and surgical management, culture results, and follow-up information. SPSS version 15.0 software (Statistical Analysis, The Statistical Package for Social Sciences Inc, Chicago, IL) was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria, with available medical records, for the study (29 male, 22 female). Thirty-two (62.7%) were diagnosed with preseptal cellulitis and 19 (37.3%) with postseptal cellulitis. After a detailed evaluation, 15 were diagnosed with a subperiosteal abscess (SPA), and 4 were diagnosed with orbital cellulitis. The age and gender was similar for the two groups. Five patients with medial SPA were treated with endoscopic sinus surgery, one patient with inferior SPA was treated with external surgery, and six patients with other localizations were treated with a combination of endoscopic sinus surgery and external surgery. All patients presented with periorbital erythema and edema. The length of hospitalization and duration of symptoms were similar in both groups. Visual acuity was between 1/10 to 10/10 (mean 7/10) and statistically significant for preseptal and postseptal cellulitis groups (p<0.001). All patients received intravenous antibiotics upon the first day of admission. Conclusion: Orbital complications of acute sinusitis required intensive follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. A contrast-enhanced paranasal sinus computerized tomography (CT) scan can detect the extent of the infection. An initial trial of intravenosus (IV) antibiotics may be appropriate when close

  1. Managment of orbital complications of sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazil Emre Ozkurt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We reported on the clinical approaches of ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology departments in the treatment of the orbital complications of sinusitis. We also included an in-depth literature review. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 51 patients from January 2008 to January 2014. The records were evaluated for age, gender, type of orbital complications, symptoms, predisposing factors, imaging studies, medical and surgical management, culture results, and follow-up information. SPSS version 15.0 software (Statistical Analysis, The Statistical Package for Social Sciences Inc, Chicago, IL was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria, with available medical records, for the study (29 male, 22 female. Thirty-two (62.7% were diagnosed with preseptal cellulitis and 19 (37.3% with postseptal cellulitis. After a detailed evaluation, 15 were diagnosed with a subperiosteal abscess (SPA, and 4 were diagnosed with orbital cellulitis. The age and gender was similar for the two groups. Five patients with medial SPA were treated with endoscopic sinus surgery, one patient with inferior SPA was treated with external surgery, and six patients with other localizations were treated with a combination of endoscopic sinus surgery and external surgery. All patients presented with periorbital erythema and edema. The length of hospitalization and duration of symptoms were similar in both groups. Visual acuity was between 1/10 to 10/10 (mean 7/10 and statistically significant for preseptal and postseptal cellulitis groups (p<0.001. All patients received intravenous antibiotics upon the first day of admission. Conclusion: Orbital complications of acute sinusitis required intensive follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. A contrast-enhanced paranasal sinus computerized tomography (CT scan can detect the extent of the infection. An initial trial of intravenosus (IV antibiotics may be appropriate when

  2. Colostomy closure: how to avoid complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Marc A.; Lawal, Taiwo A.; Peña, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Colostomy is an operation frequently performed in pediatric surgery. Despite its benefits, it can produce significant morbidity. In a previous publication we presented our experience with the errors and complications that occurred during cases of colostomy creation. We now have focused in the morbidity related to the colostomy closure. The technical details that might have contributed to the minimal morbidity we experienced are described. Methods The medical records of 649 patients who underwent colostomy closure over a 28-year period were retrospectively reviewed looking for complications following these procedures. Our perioperative protocol for colostomy closure consisted in: clear fluids by mouth and repeated proximal stoma irrigations 24 h prior to the operation. Administration of IV antibiotics during anesthesia induction and continued for 48 h. Meticulous surgical technique that included: packing of the proximal stoma, plastic drape to immobilize the surgical field, careful hemostasis, emphasis in avoiding contamination, cleaning the edge of the stomas to allow a good 2-layer, end-to-end anastomosis with separated long-term absorbable sutures, generous irrigation of the peritoneal cavity and subsequent layers with saline solution, closure by layers to avoid dead space, and avoidance of hematomas. No drains and no nasogastric tubes were used. Oral fluids were started the day after surgery and patients were discharged 48–72 h after the operation. Results The original diagnoses of the patients were: anorectal malformation (583), Hirschsprung’s disease (53), and others (13). 10 patients (1.5%) had complications: 6 had intestinal obstruction (5 due to small bowel adhesions, 1 had temporary delay of the function of the anastomosis due to a severe size discrepancy between proximal and distal stoma with a distal microcolon) and 4 incisional hernias. There were no anastomotic dehiscences or wound infection. There was no bleeding, no anastomotic

  3. Complications of nasogastric tube placement--don't blow it.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, S

    2012-04-01

    Preventable complications maybe associated with the placement of nasogastric tubes. Our report raises awareness of the potentially fatal complications that can occur. We also recommend an approach for clinicians which maybe used to avoid significant patient morbidity.

  4. Pattern of Complicated Unsafe Abortions in Niger Delta University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    of cases of complicated unsafe abortion managed at the. Niger Delta University ... previous termination of pregnancy and 87.3% of the patients had ... and outcome were obtained. ... life-threatening complications, post- abortion family planning.

  5. Bilateral primary adrenocortical carcinoma complicated by Addisonian crisis: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, M.; Nolan, R.L.; Hong, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    Primary adrenal carcinoma is a rare malignancy. Primary adrenal insufficiency (i.e. Addison's disease) is a rare complication of bilateral infiltration. We report a case of primary bilateral adrenal carcinoma complicated by an episode of primary adrenal insufficiency. (author)

  6. Diabetes Care: 10 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes care: 10 ways to avoid complications Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes is a serious disease. Following ...

  7. Computerized tomographic evaluation of aortic prosthetic graft complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, D.; Kalmar, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized tomography has been found to be an accurate and sensitive method of diagnosing complications of synthetic aortic grafts. Complications in this series of four cases included aortoesophageal fistula, aortoduodenal fistula, pseudoaneurysm, and retroperitoneal hematoma. 6 references, 5 figures

  8. Auto-immune haematological complications occurring during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Auto-immune haematological complications occurring during treatment for malignant Iymphoproliferative diseases are described in 5 patients. There appeared to be a temporal relationship between the development of these complications and the administration of chemotherapeutic drugs or extensive radiotherapy.

  9. Mediterranean spotted fever and hearing impairment: a rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Rossio

    2015-06-01

    We describe a case of Rickettsia conorii that was complicated with hearing loss and did not respond to specific treatment. Hearing loss is a rare event, but clinicians should be aware of this complication.

  10. Complications associated with radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Pérez, J M; García Barquín, P M; Villanueva Marcos, A J; García Bolao, J I; Bastarrika Alemañ, G

    Radiofrequency ablation is an efficacious alternative in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who do not respond to or are intolerant to at least one class I or class III antiarrhythmic drug. Although radiofrequency ablation is a safe procedure, complications can occur. Depending on the location, these complications can be classified into those that affect the pulmonary veins themselves, cardiac complications, extracardiac intrathoracic complications, remote complications, and those that result from vascular access. The most common complications are hematomas, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms at the puncture site. Some complications are benign and transient, such as gastroparesis or diaphragmatic elevation, whereas others are potentially fatal, such as cardiac tamponade. Radiologists must be familiar with the complications that can occur secondary to pulmonary vein ablation to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Scoring system to distinguish uncomplicated from complicated acute appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atema, J. J.; van Rossem, C. C.; Leeuwenburgh, M. M.; Stoker, J.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-operative management may be an alternative for uncomplicated appendicitis, but preoperative distinction between uncomplicated and complicated disease is challenging. This study aimed to develop a scoring system based on clinical and imaging features to distinguish uncomplicated from complicated

  12. New coeliac disease treatments and their complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Luis; Rodríguez-Martín, Laura; León, Francisco; Jorquera, Francisco; Vivas, Santiago

    2018-03-01

    The only accepted treatment for coeliac disease is strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. This type of diet may give rise to reduced patient quality of life with economic and social repercussions. For this reason, dietary transgressions are common and may elicit intestinal damage. Several treatments aimed at different pathogenic targets of coeliac disease have been developed in recent years: modification of gluten to produce non-immunogenic gluten, endoluminal therapies to degrade gluten in the intestinal lumen, increased gluten tolerance, modulation of intestinal permeability and regulation of the adaptive immune response. This review evaluates these coeliac disease treatment lines that are being researched and the treatments that aim to control disease complications like refractory coeliac disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Gaucher disease: haematological presentations and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alison S; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, required for the degradation of glycosphingolipids. Clinical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, bone disease and a bleeding diathesis, frequently resulting in presentation to haematologists. Historically managed by splenectomy, transfusions and orthopaedic surgery, the development of specific therapy in the form of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy in the 1990s has resulted in dramatic improvements in haematological and visceral disease. Recognition of complications, including multiple myeloma and Parkinson disease, has challenged the traditional macrophage-centric view of the pathophysiology of this disorder. The pathways by which enzyme deficiency results in the clinical manifestations of this disorder are poorly understood; altered inflammatory cytokine profiles, bioactive sphingolipid derivatives and alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment have been implicated. Further elucidating these pathways will serve to advance our understanding not only of GD, but of associated disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Pulmonary complications of malaria: An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón Estévanez, Itxasne; Górgolas Hernández-Mora, Miguel

    2016-04-15

    Malaria is the most important parasitic disease worldwide, being a public health challenge in more than 90 countries. The incidence of pulmonary manifestations has increased in recent years. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most severe form within the pulmonary complications of malaria, with high mortality despite proper management. This syndrome manifests with sudden dyspnoea, cough and refractory hypoxaemia. Patients should be admitted to intensive care units and treated with parenteral antimalarial drug treatment and ventilatory and haemodynamic support without delay. Therefore, dyspnoea in patients with malaria should alert clinicians, as the development of respiratory distress is a poor prognostic factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiovascular complications of obesity in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, F; Palomba, S; Cascella, T; Savastano, S; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly important worldwide health problem, representing the major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The increase in the prevalence of obesity, particularly among younger age groups, is likely to have long-term implications for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the years to come, especially at a young age. Obesity plays a central role in the insulin resistance (IR) syndrome and increases the risk of atherosclerotic CVD. The present review will examine the relationships among cardiovascular risk (CVR) factors during the childhood-adolescence-adulthood transition. In fact, the relation between obesity, in particular visceral obesity and CVD, appears to develop at a relatively young age. The foremost physical consequence of obesity is atherosclerotic CVD, and an intriguing example of obesity-related cardiovascular complications affecting young women is the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

  16. Incidence of gallstone disease and complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review was to describe the epidemiology of gallstone disease in the era of ultrasound screening and laparoscopic cholecystectomy. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent general population cohorts, including ultrasound screenings, have contributed to our understanding...... of formation and clinical course of gallstone disease. Cohorts of symptomatic gallstone disease have been informative about symptom recurrence and need of treatment. Preventive targets for gallstone formation may include obesity and the associated metabolic changes. The presence of gallstone disease is best...... described as a continuum from asymptomatic to symptomatic disease, with the latter including both pain attacks and complicated disease. Symptomatic disease causes a persistent high risk of symptom recurrence and need of cholecystectomy. The majority of gallstone carriers will remain asymptomatic and about...

  17. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. V. Grigoryevskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC annually afflicts 63–65 thousand people in Russia and 1.04 million worldwide, which amounts to 12.8% of all notified cases of neoplasms. In LC patients, infectious complications are characterized by a severe course; destruction foci, decay cavities, and abscess may form.All give rise to difficulties in making a diagnosis and in choosing a treatment policy. Infections caused by P. aeruginosa, A. baumanii, bacteria of the family Enterobacteriacae, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp present the greatest problem in inpatients with LC. The early diagnosis of infectiouscomplications and the use of adequate schemes of antibiotic prevention and therapy promote a reduction in mortality from infection in this categoryof patients and expand the possibilities of their specific antitumor treatment.

  18. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. V. Grigoryevskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC annually afflicts 63–65 thousand people in Russia and 1.04 million worldwide, which amounts to 12.8% of all notified cases of neoplasms. In LC patients, infectious complications are characterized by a severe course; destruction foci, decay cavities, and abscess may form.All give rise to difficulties in making a diagnosis and in choosing a treatment policy. Infections caused by P. aeruginosa, A. baumanii, bacteria of the family Enterobacteriacae, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp present the greatest problem in inpatients with LC. The early diagnosis of infectiouscomplications and the use of adequate schemes of antibiotic prevention and therapy promote a reduction in mortality from infection in this categoryof patients and expand the possibilities of their specific antitumor treatment.

  19. Neurologic Complications of Psychomotor Stimulant Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Psychomotor stimulants are drugs that act on the central nervous system (CNS) to increase alertness, elevate mood, and produce a sense of well-being. These drugs also decrease appetite and the need for sleep. Stimulants can enhance stamina and improve performance in tasks that have been impaired by fatigue or boredom. Approved therapeutic applications of stimulants include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), narcolepsy, and obesity. These agents also possess potent reinforcing properties that can result in excessive self-administration and abuse. Chronic use is associated with adverse effects including psychosis, seizures, and cerebrovascular accidents, though these complications usually occur in individuals with preexisting risk factors. This chapter reviews the adverse neurologic consequences of chronic psychomotor stimulant use and abuse, with a focus on two prototypical stimulants methamphetamine and cocaine. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pregnancy at 65, risks and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailja Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old postmenopausal pregnant woman was referred with antepartum hemorrhage at 29 weeks of gestation. Postadmission diagnosed with chronic hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease, and placenta previa. Her pregnancy was terminated by cesarean delivery at 32 weeks as she had a bout of bleeding per vaginum. Most of the placenta was adherent with no plane of cleavage; therefore, cesarean hysterectomy was performed. Baby birth weight was 1650 g and was shifted to nursery for observation and mother needed Intensive Care Unit care postcesarean. On the 15th day, both healthy mother and baby were discharged. Although pregnancy is possible in postmenopausal women with hormone support but the incidence of complications remain very high. It raises a need for developing well-laid guidelines for performing in vitro fertilization in older age group women.

  1. Is the world simple or complicated

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    1998-01-01

    Stop some particle physicists in the street and they will soon be trying to persuade you that the world is altogether simple and symmetrical. But stop a biologist, an economist, or a social scientist and they will tell you quite the opposite: the world is a higgledy-piggledy collection of complexities that owes little to symmetry and displays precious little simplicity. So who is right : is the world really complicated or is it simple ? We shall look at the reasoning that leads to these different conclusions, show why we got different answers to our question, and look at some of the recent developments that have taken place in the study of systems from sand-piles to music on the border between order and chaos. We shall also look at some of the connections between our aesthetic sensibilities and the structure of scientific theories.

  2. Recurrent Admissions for Diabetic Foot Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang CL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot complications are a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Patients who undergo recurrent admissions for the same diabetic foot problems represent a difficult subgroup to treat. From July 2007 to June 2008, there were 38 such patients who were admitted recurrently. Eighteen patients (47% were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgical treatment. Eighteen patients (47% received treatment as necessary but were still readmitted for recurrent infection at the same wound site. Assessment of patients’ compliance to outpatient treatment was found to be generally lacking. As a significant proportion were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgery, a trained counselor may be suitable in counselling patients for debridement or amputation surgery.

  3. Hyperparathyroidism complicating pregnancy: A diagnostic challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S N Jibhkate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT is a rare etiology of hypercalcemia-induced pancreatitis, contributing about 0.4% to 1.5% of cases in the general population and up to 13% of cases during pregnancy. PHPT that occurs during pregnancy is a challenging diagnosis as the physiological changes in calcium homeostasis mask the symptoms of hypercalcemia. PHPT during pregnancy often remains undiagnosed and untreated, and may result in serious clinical implications for the mother and fetus. Most clinicians consider surgery within the second trimester of pregnancy as the treatment of choice in this group of patients. This article refers to a case of a 24-year married woman in whom PHPT was diagnosed for the first time in postpartum period. She succumbed to complications on Day 20 postpartum. Pathological findings revealed metastatic calcification in lungs, pancreas and uterine vessels, chronic pancreatitis and renal cortical necrosis.

  4. Pulmonary complications of endocrine and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Carlos E; Zirbes, Jacquelyn

    2012-03-01

    There are many important respiratory manifestations of endocrine and metabolic diseases in children. Acute and chronic pulmonary infections are the most common respiratory abnormalities in patients with diabetes mellitus, although cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are also possible. Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 may be indistinguishable from cystic fibrosis (CF) unless serum aldosterone, plasma renin activity, and urinary electrolytes are measured and mutation analysis rules out CF. Hypo- and hyperthyroidism may alter lung function and affect the central respiratory drive. The thyroid hormone plays an essential role in lung development, surfactant synthesis, and lung defence. Complications of hypoparathyroidism are largely due to hypocalcaemia. Laryngospasm can lead to stridor and airway obstruction. Ovarian tumours, benign or malignant, may present with unilateral or bilateral pleural effusions. Metabolic storage disorders, primarily as a consequence of lysosomal dysfunction from enzymatic deficiencies, constitute a diverse group of rare conditions that can have profound effects on the respiratory system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis complicated with intestinal volvulus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenmayor, Carmen Elena; Gainza, Carlos; García, Maryori; Zambrano, Richard; Torres, Gledys; Hernández, Yohanys; García, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis is a rare condition in which multiple gas-filled cysts are found within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract either in the subserosa or submucosa. Its pathogenesis is uncertain and several pathogenic mechanisms have been proposed to explain its origin. The case of a male patient of 46 years with previous diagnosis of pneumatosis cystic intestinalis, who consulted for abdominal pain, vomiting and fever (39 °C) is presented. By the time of admission ther were signs of peritoneal irritation. The X-ray abdominal reported distension and intestinal hydro-air levels. Exploratory laparotomy was performed and revealed small bowel volvulus with strangulation of some intestinal segment. Histological diagnosis was pneumatosis cystic intestinalis complicated with Infarction trans-mural by intestinal volvulus. The patient evolved satisfactorily.

  6. Complications of umbilical vein catherisation. Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bothur-Nowacka, J.; Czech-Kowalska, J.; Gruszfeld, D.; Nowakowska-Rysz, M.; Dobrzanska, A.; Kosciesza, A.; Polnik, D.

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical vein catheterization is a relatively easy procedure performed routinely on the neonate intensive care units. It provides a fast central vein access, but some complications have been described in the literature. Case Reports: We presented a case report of a premature infant (34 hbd) with extravasation of the parenteral nutrition and drugs to the liver after umbilical vein catheterization. Fever and increasing biochemical markers of infection were observed. USG revealed a heterogenic, well-limited space of 4 cm in diameter, located in the right lobe of the liver. CT excluded liver abscess. Considering neoplastic process or incorrect location of the catheter of the central vein, we performed liver biopsy. Results: Cytological and biochemical analysis of the aspirated fluid revealed extravasation of parenteral nutrition to the liver.Our case confirms the necessity of controlling a proper location of the central catheter right after its insertion and during hospitalization. (authors)

  7. Primary Pulmonary Amebiasis Complicated with Multicystic Empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amebiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. While most infections are asymptomatic, the disease could manifest clinically as amebic dysentery and/or extraintestinal invasion in the form of amebic liver abscess or other more rare manifestations such as pulmonary, cardiac, or brain involvement. Herein we are reporting a case of a 24-year-old male with history of Down syndrome who presented with severe right side pneumonia complicated with multicystic empyema resistant to regular medical therapy. Further investigation revealed a positive pleural fluid for E. histolytica cysts and trophozoites. The patient was diagnosed with primary pleuropulmonary amebiasis and he responded promptly to surgical drainage and metronidazole therapy. In patients from endemic areas all physicians should keep a high index of suspicion of amebiasis as a cause of pulmonary disease.

  8. Hemobilia. An unusual complication of liver trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baeza Herrera Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemobilia is a complication following a hepatic trauma. It is common in adults, but it is very rare in children. Clinically it is characterized by a triad including jaundice, inter- mittent abdominal pain and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Case report. We report a case of hemobilia in a four-year-old boy who sustained an abdominal blunt trauma caused by a motor vehicle. He had to be operated. A laparotomy disclosed a ruptured spleen which required a splenorraphy. He was subsequently discharged. Eighteen days later he was readmitted presenting with the classic triad. A computed tomography (CT scan showed an image sug- gestive of hemobilia. Management was conservative. The child had an uneventful course.

  9. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progressi...

  10. Real money: complications and hospital costs in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmila, Mark R; Jakubus, Jill L; Maggio, Paul M; Wahl, Wendy L; Dimick, Justin B; Campbell, Darrell A; Taheri, Paul A

    2008-08-01

    Major postoperative complications are associated with a substantial increase in hospital costs. Trauma patients are known to have a higher rate of complications than the general surgery population. We used the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) methodology to evaluate hospital costs, duration of stay, and payment associated with complications in trauma patients. Using NSQIP principles, patient data were collected for 512 adult patients admitted to the trauma service for > 24 hours at a Level 1 trauma center (2004-2005). Patients were placed in 1 of 3 groups: no complications (none), >or=1 minor complication (minor, eg, urinary tract infection), or >or=1 major complication (major, eg, pneumonia). Total hospital charges, costs, payment, and duration of stay associated with each complication group were determined from a cost-accounting database. Multiple regression was used to determine the costs of each type of complication after adjusting for differences in age, sex, new injury severity score, Glasgow coma scale score, maximum head abbreviated injury scale, and first emergency department systolic blood pressure. A total of 330 (64%) patients had no complications, 53 (10%) had >or= 1 minor complication, and 129 (25%) had >or= 1 major complication. Median hospital charges increased from $33,833 (none) to $81,936 (minor) and $150,885 (major). The mean contribution to margin per day was similar for the no complication and minor complication groups ($994 vs $1,115, P = .7). Despite higher costs, the patients in the major complication group generated a higher mean contribution to margin per day compared to the no complication group ($2,168, P costs when adjusted for confounding variables was $19,915 for the minor complication group (P costs associated with traumatic injury provides a window for assessing the potential cost reductions associated with improved quality care. To optimize system benefits, payers and providers should develop integrated

  11. Optimal management of complications associated with achondroplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Penny J Ireland,1 Verity Pacey,2,3 Andreas Zankl,4 Priya Edwards,1 Leanne M Johnston,5 Ravi Savarirayan6 1Queensland Paediatric Rehabilitation Service, Royal Children’s Hospital, Herston, Brisbane, Queensland, 2Physiotherapy Department, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, 3Department of Health Professions, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 4Genetic Medicine, Children’s Hospital, Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, 5School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, 6Victorian Clinical Genetics Service, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Abstract: Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, resulting in disproportionate short stature, and affects over 250,000 people worldwide. Individuals with achondroplasia demonstrate a number of well-recognized anatomical features that impact on growth and development, with a complex array of medical issues that are best managed through a multidisciplinary team approach. The complexity of this presentation, whereby individual impairments may impact upon multiple activity and participation areas, requires consideration and discussion under a broad framework to gain a more thorough understanding of the experience of this condition for individuals with achondroplasia. This paper examines the general literature and research evidence on the medical and health aspects of individuals with achondroplasia and presents a pictorial model of achondroplasia based on The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF. An expanded model of the ICF will be used to review and present the current literature pertaining to the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiorespiratory, and ear, nose, and throat impairments and complications across the lifespan, with discussion on the impact of these impairments upon activity and participation performance. Further research is required to

  12. Objective threshold for distinguishing complicated tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Estimating the likelihood of human error in a reliable manner is really important for enhancing the safety of a large process control system such as Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). In this regard, from the point of view of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), various kinds of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) methods have been used for several decades in order to systematically evaluate the effect of human error on the safety of NPPs. However, one of the recurrence issues is to determine the level of an important Performance Shaping Factor (PSF) by using a clear and objective manner with respect to the context of a given task. Unfortunately, there is no such criterion for a certain PSF such as the complexity of a task. For this reason, in this study, an objective criterion that is helpful for identifying a complicated task is suggested based on the Task Complexity (TACOM) measure. To this end, subjective difficulty scores rated by high speed train drivers are collected. After that, subjective difficulty scores are compared with the associated TACOM scores being quantified based on tasks to be conducted by high speed train drivers. As a result, it is expected that high speed train drivers feel a significant difficulty when they are faced with tasks of which the TACOM scores are greater than 4.2. Since TACOM measure is a kind of general tool to quantify the complexity of tasks to be done by human operators, it is promising to conclude that this value can be regarded as a common threshold representing what a complicated task is.

  13. Knife conization: Indications, complications and cytopathologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ghaemmaghami

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women.Conization of the cervix is one of the best diagnostic and therapeutic modality in preinvasive lesion of the cervix. Methods: In this retrospective study we have evaluated the indications,complications, cytopathologic results, diagnostic and therapeutic value of 44 patients who underwent cervical conization. Results: Age of the study group ranged from 18 to 75 (mean=43.18, SD=±11.4, and their parity ranged from 0 to 10 (mean 4-5, SD=±2-3. Ten cases (22.7% were menopauses. The main indication was inability to visualize the entire T.zone (19 cases/43.2% that was more prevalent in menopauses (50%/5cases in menopauses and 41.2% /14 cases in premenopauses. Bleeding occurred in 2 cases (4.5% and urinary infection in 1 case (2.3%. The most common histologic result after conization was mild dysplasia in 23 cases (52.3%. The most common colposcopic biopsy result was moderate dysplasia in 16 cases (36.4%.The most common pap smear result was HSIL in 16 cases (36.4%. Two cases (4.5% had invasive cancer in colposcopic- biopsy: one of them had ASCUS in the pap and another one had HSIL. Four cases (9.1% had invasive cancer in histologic report: one of which had ASCUS on the pap and the others had HSIL. Conclusion: Pap smear in screening of cervical cancer are not reliable and colposcopy is more acceptable in LSIL and ASCUS. Gynecologists should develop the skill to perform an accurate knife conization because the classical indications for conization continue to be valid and it has a low complication rate.

  14. Gossypiboma complicated with paraspinal abscess and lumbar sinus: An uncommon complication of posterior lumbar spinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tripathy, Pradipta; Das, Pulin Bihari; Mohapatra, Debahuti

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old female presented with the complaint of purulent discharging sinus over posterior lumbar area following one month of lumbar spinal surgery for prolapsed intervertebral disc. Gossypiboma complicated with paraspinal abscess and sinus track formation over posterior lumbar area was diagnosed in magnetic resonance imaging which was confirmed in re- exploration of lumbar spinal operative site.

  15. Management of inflammatory complications in third molar surgery: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pain, swelling and trismus are common complications associated with third molar surgery. These complications have been reported to have an adverse effect on the quality of life of patients undergoing third molar surgery. Objective: To review the different modalities of minimizing inflammatory complications in ...

  16. Hard and soft tissue surgical complications in dental implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Shahid R

    2015-05-01

    This article discusses surgical complications associated with the placement of dental implants, specifically focusing on how they occur (etiology), as well as their management and prevention. Dental implant surgical complications can be classified into those of hard and soft tissues. In general, complications can be avoided with thorough preoperative treatment planning and proper surgical technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pattern and determinants of obstetric complications among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The number of antenatal care visits also significantly predicted the likelihood of obstetric complications. Binomial logistic regression analysis predicted that the more the number of antenatal care visits the less likely the occurrence of obstetric complications, with 4 or more visits reducing obstetric complications 14 times.

  18. Management of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielubanza, Elodi J; Mazur, Daniel J; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an overview of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) from a urologic point of view. Discussion includes the evaluation and workup a complicated UTI through history, physical examination, laboratory analysis, and radiographic studies. Specific types of complicated UTI, such as urinary obstruction and renal abscess, are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric ventriculoperitoneal shunts and their complications: An analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Agarwal

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: With this retrospective review of complications of VP shunts, age at initial shunt insertion and the interval between the age of initial shunt placement and onset of complications were the most important patient-related predictors of shunt failure. The different predominant etiological factors responsible for early and late shunt failure were infective and mechanical complications, respectively.

  20. Compartment syndrome and popliteal vascular injury complicating unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Nanne Pieter; Van Raay, Jos J. J. A. M.; van Horn, Jim R.

    Popliteal vascular injury and the compartment syndrome of the leg are rare but important complications of knee arthroplasties. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance in preventing the devastating complications of these conditions. To our knowledge, these complications have not

  1. Prevention and treatment of complications following percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolarikos, Andreas; de la Rosette, Jean

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to identify classification and grading systems of percutaneous nephrolithotomy-related complications and evidence for the prevention and treatment of these complications. RECENT FINDINGS: A total complication rate of up to 83% following percutaneous

  2. Focal neuronal gigantism: a rare complication of therapeutic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughen, J R; Bourne, T D; Aregawi, D; Shah, L M; Schiff, D

    2009-11-01

    Radiation therapy, a mainstay in the treatment of many brain tumors, results in a variety of well-documented acute and chronic complications. Isolated cortical damage following irradiation represents an extremely rare delayed therapeutic complication, described only twice in the medical literature. We report this rare delayed complication in a patient following treatment of a right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

  3. Complications of lumbar puncture in a child treated for leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, Melanie; Delpierre, Isabelle; Damry, Nash; Christophe, Catherine; Azzi, Nadira; Sekhara, Tayeb

    2005-01-01

    Lumbar puncture may lead to neurological complications. These include intracranial hypotension, cervical epidural haematomas, and cranial and lumbar subdural haematomas. MRI is the modality of choice to diagnose these complications. This report documents MRI findings of such complications in a child treated for leukaemia. (orig.)

  4. Alcohol consumption and risk of microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes patients; the EURODIAB Prospective Complications study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Kruidhof, J.S.; Grobbee, D.E.; Chaturvedi, N.; Fuller, J.H.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between alcohol consumption and risk of microvascular complications (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy) in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study. METHODS: The EURODIAB Prospective

  5. Association study of obstetrical complication and depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the correlation between obstetrical complications and depressive disorder.Methods:Depressive disorder probands and their adult sibling were diagnosed using CCMD-3 criteria.Obstetrical data from maternal reports were scored,applying published scales that take into account number and severity of complication.Results:The scores of obstetric complication and prenatal complications and low birth weight were significantly worse in probands than siblings without depressive disorders.Conclusion:Results suggest obstetric complications are etiologically significant in depressive disorder.

  6. Imaging findings of liposuction with an emphasis on postsurgical complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong Jin [Dept. of mergency Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Eun; Baek, Song Ee [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction.

  7. Complications of an implantable venous access port: Prevention and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Tae Seok; Song, Myung Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, In Ho [Dept. Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Chungang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Placement of an implantable venous access port (IVAP) is a popular procedure for repeated and intermittent chemotherapy in patients with malignancy. In this article, we present various IVAP related complications. In addition, we review the technical tips to prevent and manage the complications. It is important that the operator should keep the mechanism of the complications in mind, perform a careful procedure for prevention, and manage the complication properly and immediately in case of its development for safety and satisfaction of the patients Complications of an implantable venous access port: Prevention and treatment.

  8. Intraoperative complications in pediatric neurosurgery: review of 1807 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lindert, Erik J; Arts, Sebastian; Blok, Laura M; Hendriks, Mark P; Tielens, Luc; van Bilsen, Martine; Delye, Hans

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimal literature exists on the intraoperative complication rate of pediatric neurosurgical procedures with respect to both surgical and anesthesiological complications. The aim of this study, therefore, was to establish intraoperative complication rates to provide patients and parents with information on which to base their informed consent and to establish a baseline for further targeted improvement of pediatric neurosurgical care. METHODS A clinical complication registration database comprising a consecutive cohort of all pediatric neurosurgical procedures carried out in a general neurosurgical department from January 1, 2004, until July 1, 2012, was analyzed. During the study period, 1807 procedures were performed on patients below the age of 17 years. RESULTS Sixty-four intraoperative complications occurred in 62 patients (3.5% of procedures). Intraoperative mortality was 0.17% (n = 3). Seventy-eight percent of the complications (n = 50) were related to the neurosurgical procedures, whereas 22% (n = 14) were due to anesthesiology. The highest intraoperative complication rates were for cerebrovascular surgery (7.7%) and tumor surgery (7.4%). The most frequently occurring complications were cerebrovascular complications (33%). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative complications are not exceptional during pediatric neurosurgical procedures. Awareness of these complications is the first step in preventing them.

  9. NEONATAL COMPLICATIONS OF PREMATURE RUPTURE OF MEMBRANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nili AA. Shams Ansari

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature rupture of membranes (PROM is one of the most common complications of pregnancy that has a major impact on neonatal outcomes. With respect to racial, nutritional and cultural differences between developed and developing countries, this study was conducted to detect the prevalence of neonatal complications following PROM and the role of the duration of rupture of membranes in producing morbidities and mortalities in these neonates in our hospital. Among 2357 pregnant women, we found 163 (6.91% cases of premature rupture of the fetal membranes in Tehran Vali-e-Asr Hospital during April 2001 to April 2002. Route of delivery was cesarean section in 65.6% of women. Urinary tract infection occured in 1.8%, maternal leukocytosis and fever in 20.2% and 5.5%, chorioamnionitis in 6.1%, fetal tachycardia in 1.2% and olygohydramnios in 4.9%. Gestational age in 138 (86% of neonates was less than 37 completed weeks. Thirty five infants (21.47% had respiratory distress syndrome and 33 (20.245% had clinical sepsis. Pneumonia in 6 (3.7% and skeletal deformity in 7 (4.294% were seen. Rupture of membrane of more than 24 hours duration occurred in 71 (43.6% of the patients. Comparison of morbidities between two groups of neonates and their mothers according to the duration of PROM (less and more than 24 hours showed significant differences in NICU admission, olygohydramnios, maternal fever, leukocytosis and chorioamnionitis rates (p24 hr of PROM with an odds ratio of 2.68 and 2.73, respectively. Positive blood and eye cultures were detected in 16 cases during 72 hours of age. Staphylococcus species, klebsiella, E.coli and streptococcus were the predominant organisms among positive blood cultures. Mortality was seen in 18 (11% of neonates because of respiratory failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, septic shock, and a single case of congenital toxoplasmosis. In this study, the prevalence of prematurity, sepsis and prolonged rupture of membrane

  10. Hyperemesis gravidarum complicated by Wernicke encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Güney

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is a potentially fatal but reversible medical emergency. WE usually remains unrecognized in obstetric patients. Aim of the present study is to report a rare case of hyperemesis gravidarum that is complicated by WE. CASE: A 29 years-old, gravida 2, para 1 woman was admitted to Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Süleyman Demirel University in 2007 with an one week history of convulsions and confusion. The patient had nausea and vomiting accompanied by weight loss of 8 kg since she was pregnant. Symptoms of nausea and vomiting became severe in the last weeks. The patient had ataxia, nystagmus, confusion and general muscle weakness. Laboratory examinations were normal, except potassium levels (2.4 mmol/l and ketonuria. There was no diagnosed lesion in the radiological examinations. The patient was diagnosed as WE, and she had replacement therapy with potassium and thiamine for 7 seven days. The patient responded well and was discharged. CONCLUSION: Hyperemesis gravidarum may cause WE which can be diagnosed clinically. Thiamine should be supplemented to pregnant women with prolonged vomiting to prevent development of WE.

  11. Optimal management of complications associated with achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Penny J; Pacey, Verity; Zankl, Andreas; Edwards, Priya; Johnston, Leanne M; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, resulting in disproportionate short stature, and affects over 250,000 people worldwide. Individuals with achondroplasia demonstrate a number of well-recognized anatomical features that impact on growth and development, with a complex array of medical issues that are best managed through a multidisciplinary team approach. The complexity of this presentation, whereby individual impairments may impact upon multiple activity and participation areas, requires consideration and discussion under a broad framework to gain a more thorough understanding of the experience of this condition for individuals with achondroplasia. This paper examines the general literature and research evidence on the medical and health aspects of individuals with achondroplasia and presents a pictorial model of achondroplasia based on The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). An expanded model of the ICF will be used to review and present the current literature pertaining to the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiorespiratory, and ear, nose, and throat impairments and complications across the lifespan, with discussion on the impact of these impairments upon activity and participation performance. Further research is required to fully identify factors influencing participation and to help develop strategies to address these factors. PMID:25053890

  12. [Posttraumatic complications after pediatric ankle injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F J; Linhart, W E

    2013-08-01

    Ankle sprains are common injuries in childhood and are generally harmless. However, fractures of the ankle joint are rare, but complications (persistent rotational or axial deformity, alteration of growth of the distal tibia or fibula, or joint deformity) can lead to serious problems during growth. The clinical relevance of growth disturbances at the distal tibia or fibula depends on the age at the time of fracture more than on the fracture type, severity of dislocation, or interponated material in the fracture gap. Both stimulation and inhibition of growth are possible. Inhibition of growth at the distal tibial growth plate regularly leads to varus deformity and shortening. This is of clinical importance as this type of growth disturbance is the most common. Valgus deformity is rare, mostly due to persistent axial deviation of an insufficiently reduced fracture. Transitional fractures always occur at the time of growth plate closure; thus, growth disturbances do not play a role. Transitional fractures could be overlooked or treated insufficiently, leading to a step or gap of the joint surface.

  13. Bitter and sweet tasting molecules: It's complicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pizio, Antonella; Ben Shoshan-Galeczki, Yaron; Hayes, John E; Niv, Masha Y

    2018-04-19

    "Bitter" and "sweet" are frequently framed in opposition, both functionally and metaphorically, in regard to affective responses, emotion, and nutrition. This oppositional relationship is complicated by the fact that some molecules are simultaneously bitter and sweet. In some cases, a small chemical modification, or a chirality switch, flips the taste from sweet to bitter. Molecules humans describe as bitter are recognized by a 25-member subfamily of class A G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as TAS2Rs. Molecules humans describe as sweet are recognized by a TAS1R2/TAS1R3 heterodimer of class C GPCRs. Here we characterize the chemical space of bitter and sweet molecules: the majority of bitter compounds show higher hydrophobicity compared to sweet compounds, while sweet molecules have a wider range of sizes. Importantly, recent evidence indicates that TAS1Rs and TAS2Rs are not limited to the oral cavity; moreover, some bitterants are pharmacologically promiscuous, with the hERG potassium channel, cytochrome P450 enzymes, and carbonic anhydrases as common off-targets. Further focus on polypharmacology may unravel new physiological roles for tastant molecules. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Amyloidosis complicating spondyloarthropathies: Study of 15 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muguruza, Samantha; Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Holgado, Susana; Saenz-Sarda, Xavier; Mateo, Lourdes; Tena, Xavier; Olivé, Alejandro

    2015-10-21

    Secondary amyloidosis (AA) is a rare complication of rheumatic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of symptomatic amyloidosis AA in patients with spondyloarthropathy. Retrospective study (1984-2013). We reviewed the medical records of patients with spondyloarthropathy who had a histological diagnosis of amyloidosis AA (15 patients). We identified 1.125 patients with spondyloarthropathies. Fifteen (1.3%) patients with amyloidosis AA were recruited. It was suspected in 14 patients (93.3%) because of nephrotic syndrome in most of them: 14 were symptomatic (93.3%): 5 (33.3%) ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 5 (33.3%) spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), 4 (26.7%) psoriatic arthritis, and one (6.7%) reactive arthritis. The mean disease duration was 23.9 years. Mortality after one and 5 years of follow-up was 30 and 50% respectively. The frequency of clinical amyloidosis AA in our patients was 1.3%. There was a marked male predominance, with AS or IBD. Clinical amyloidosis was diagnosed at a relatively late stage in spondyloarthropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Epilepsy surgery in children: outcomes and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Hwang, Yong-Seung; Kim, Ki Joong; Chae, Jong Hee; Kim, In-One; Cho, Byung-Kyu

    2008-04-01

    Ideal epilepsy surgery would eliminate seizures without causing any functional deficits. The aim of the present study was to assess seizure outcomes and complications after epilepsy surgery in children with intractable epilepsy. Data obtained in 134 children (75 boys and 59 girls) age 17 years or younger who underwent epilepsy surgery at Seoul National University Children's Hospital between 1993 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Epilepsy surgery included temporal resection (59 cases), extratemporal resection (56 cases), functional hemispherectomy (7 cases), callosotomy (9 cases), multiple subpial transection (1 case), and disconnection of a hamartoma (2 cases). The mean follow-up duration was 62.3 months (range 12-168 months). The overall seizure-free rate was 69% (93 of 134 cases). The seizure-free rate was significantly higher in children who underwent temporal resection than in those in whom extratemporal resection was performed (88 vs 55%, p surgery is an effective and safe therapeutic modality in childhood. In children with extratemporal epilepsy, more careful interpretation of clinical and investigative data is needed to achieve favorable seizure outcome.

  16. A Dermal Piercing Complicated by Mycobacterium fortuitum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins-Markle, Leslie; Kelly, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dermal piercings have recently become a fashion symbol. Common complications include hypertrophic scarring, rejection, local infection, contact allergy, and traumatic tearing. We report a rare case of Mycobacterium fortuitum following a dermal piercing and discuss its medical implications and treatments. Case. A previously healthy 19-year-old woman presented complaining of erythema and edema at the site of a dermal piercing on the right fourth dorsal finger. She was treated with a 10-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and one course of cephalexin by her primary care physician with incomplete resolution. The patient stated that she had been swimming at a local water park daily. A punch biopsy around the dermal stud was performed, and cultures with sensitivities revealed Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient was treated with clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin for two months receiving full resolution. Discussion. Mycobacterium fortuitum is an infrequent human pathogen. This organism is a Runyon group IV, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria, often found in water,soil, and dust. Treatment options vary due to the size of the lesion. Small lesions are typically excised, while larger lesions require treatment for 2–6 months with antibiotics. We recommend a high level of suspicion for atypical mycobacterial infections in a piercing resistant to other therapies. PMID:24073343

  17. A Dermal Piercing Complicated by Mycobacterium fortuitum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dermal piercings have recently become a fashion symbol. Common complications include hypertrophic scarring, rejection, local infection, contact allergy, and traumatic tearing. We report a rare case of Mycobacterium fortuitum following a dermal piercing and discuss its medical implications and treatments. Case. A previously healthy 19-year-old woman presented complaining of erythema and edema at the site of a dermal piercing on the right fourth dorsal finger. She was treated with a 10-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and one course of cephalexin by her primary care physician with incomplete resolution. The patient stated that she had been swimming at a local water park daily. A punch biopsy around the dermal stud was performed, and cultures with sensitivities revealed Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient was treated with clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin for two months receiving full resolution. Discussion. Mycobacterium fortuitum is an infrequent human pathogen. This organism is a Runyon group IV, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria, often found in water,soil, and dust. Treatment options vary due to the size of the lesion. Small lesions are typically excised, while larger lesions require treatment for 2–6 months with antibiotics. We recommend a high level of suspicion for atypical mycobacterial infections in a piercing resistant to other therapies.

  18. Complications of decorative tattoos: recognition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Carolina; Shinohara, Michi M

    2014-12-01

    Tattooing is an ancient practice that enjoys continued popularity. Although a modern, professionally performed tattoo is generally safe, complications can occur. A skin biopsy of all tattoo reactions is recommended as some tattoo reactions have systemic implications. Tattoo-related infections are seen days to decades after tattooing, and range from acute pyogenic infections to cutaneous tuberculosis. In particular, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections happen in tattoos with increasing frequency and are introduced at the time of tattooing through contaminated ink or water used to dilute inks. Despite a transition in tattoo pigments from metal salts to industrial azo dyes, hypersensitivity reactions also persist, and include eczematous, granulomatous, lichenoid, and pseudoepitheliomatous patterns (among others). Granulomatous tattoo reactions can be a clue to cutaneous or systemic sarcoidosis, particularly in the setting of interferon use. Pseudoepitheliomatous tattoo reactions have substantial overlap with squamous cell carcinoma and keratoacanthoma, making diagnosis and management difficult. Other malignancies and their benign mimics can occur in tattoos, raising questions about the safety of tattoo ink and its role in carcinogenesis.

  19. [Infectious complications during treatments with interleukin-2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morère, J F; Darras, C; Boaziz, C; Mihaila, L; Breau, J L; Scavizzi, M; Israël, L

    1993-03-13

    Between January 1989 and May 1991, 97 patients were treated with interleukin 2 in the Oncology Department of the Avicenne Hospital (Bobigny, France). IL 2 was given over 5 days by continuous infusion through an implantable port. Ten patients (4 males, 6 females), mean age 46 years (36-67) with various cancers (breast 3, kidney 1, melanoma 1, colorectal 5), developed infection: 4 local infections around the port, 1 phlebitis, 4 septicemias, 1 bacteremia were observed. In 9 cases blood cultures were positive: Staphylococcus aureus 5, Staphylococcus epidermidis 3, Streptococcus G 1. In 5 cases the same pathogen was isolated from the port and from the blood. The mean leucocyte count was 10,627/mm3 at the time of infection. The delay between the beginning of interleukin 2 treatment and the infection was 3 months. The mean dose of IL 2 administered before infection was 456 million IU. In all cases infection was controlled without lethal complication by antibiotics and catheter removal. This high incidence (8 percent) of staphylococcal infection is partly due to the skin toxicity of IL 2 and to depressed neutrophil chemotactic response. Prophylactic antibiotics are warranted during IL 2 intravenous therapy.

  20. Painless thyroiditis complicating with hypercalcemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewjitcharoen, Yotsapon; Lumlertgul, Nuttha

    2012-01-01

    Severe hypercalcemia has rarely been reported in patients with hyperthyroidism. Although the pathogenesis is not clear; it is believed to be due to activation of osteoclasts resulting in excessive bone resorption. To recognize the unusual cause of hypercalcemia from painless thyroiditis, which could manifest with transient hyperthyroidism in the early stage. A 70-year-old woman presented with watery diarrhea, nausea and vomiting and significant weight loss for two months. Initially, she was misdiagnosed as having Graves'disease from her clinical presentation and thyroid function tests. Oral propylthiouracil was given to treat hyperthyroidism. However two weeks after discharge, she developed altered consciousness due to severe hypercalcemia. After combined treatment of hypercalcemia and severe hyperthyroidism, her symptoms resolved quickly. Later on, her thyroid function tests switched to subclinical hypothyroid at two months after initial presentation. No concurrent pathological conditions could be found to explain the other causes of hypercalcemia. Therefore, painless thyroiditis complicated with severe hypercalcemia was subsequently diagnosed based on her clinical course. Hypercalcemic encephalopathy is an uncommon manifestation of hyperthyroidism that should be kept in mind in patients who demonstrated clinical pictures of hyperthyroidism and alteration of consciousness. Moreover the present case emphasizes the consideration of painless thyroiditis as a differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism because anti-thyroid medications were not indicated in this condition.

  1. [Predictive factors of complications during CT-guided transthoracic biopsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine-Delaruelle, C; Souquet, P-J; Gamondes, D; Pradat, E; de Leusse, A; Ferretti, G R; Couraud, S

    2017-04-01

    CT-guided transthoracic core-needle biopsy (TTNB) is frequently used for the diagnosis of lung nodules. The aim of this study is to describe TTNBs' complications and to investigate predictive factors of complications. All consecutive TTNBs performed in three centers between 2006 and 2012 were included. Binary logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Overall, 970 TTNBs were performed in 929 patients. The complication rate was 34% (life-threatening complication in 6%). The most frequent complications were pneumothorax (29% included 4% which required chest-tube) and hemoptysis (5%). The mortality rate was 0.1% (n=1). In multivariate analysis, predictive factor for a complication was small target size (AOR=0.984; 95% CI [0.976-0.992]; P<0.001). This predictive factor was also found for occurrence of life-threatening complication (AOR=0.982; [0.965-0.999]; P=0.037), of pneumothorax (AOR=0.987; [0.978-0.995]; P=0.002) and of hemoptysis (AOR=0.973; [0.951-0.997]; P=0.024). One complication occurred in one-third of TTNBs. The proportion of life-threatening complication was 6%. A small lesion size was predictive of complication occurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Complications after orthognathic surgery: our experience on 423 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friscia, Marco; Sbordone, Carolina; Petrocelli, Marzia; Vaira, Luigi Angelo; Attanasi, Federica; Cassandro, Francesco Maria; Paternoster, Mariano; Iaconetta, Giorgio; Califano, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Orthognathic surgery is widely used to correct dentofacial discrepancies. However, this procedure presents numerous possible complications. The aim of our study is to review intraoperative and postoperative complications related to orthognathic surgery based upon a 10-year period in the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Federico II University of Naples. Medical records of 423 patients who undergone orthognathic surgery in a 10-year period were retrospectively analyzed and complications was noted. Statistical analysis was conduced in order to understand if the type of surgical procedure influenced complications rate. One hundred eighty-five complications in 143 (33.8%) of the 423 treated patients were reported. Complications detected were nerve injury (49 cases, 11.9%), infections (10 cases, 2.4%), complications related to fixation plates or screws (30 cases, 7.1%), bad split osteotomy (8 cases, 1.9%), secondary temporo-mandibular joint disorders (36 cases, 8.5%), dental injuries (21 cases, 5%), condilar resorption (2 cases, 0.5%), and necessity of a second-time surgery (24 cases, 5.7%). Serious complications seem to be quite rare in orthognathic surgery. Some of the surgical complications found are related to the surgeon experience and not strictly to the risks of the operation itself. Understanding potential complications allows the surgeon to guarantee safe care through early intervention and correctly inform the patient in the preoperative colloquy.

  3. Analysis of laparoscopic port site complications: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Somu; Augustine, Alfred Joseph; Shibumon, Mundunadackal Madhavan; Pai, Manohar Varadaraya

    2013-04-01

    The rate of port site complications following conventional laparoscopic surgery is about 21 per 100,000 cases. It has shown a proportional rise with increase in the size of the port site incision and trocar. Although rare, complications that occur at the port site include infection, bleeding, and port site hernia. To determine the morbidity associated with ports at the site of their insertion in laparoscopic surgery and to identify risk factors for complications. Prospective descriptive study. In the present descriptive study, a total of 570 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgeries for various ailments between August 2009 and July 2011 at our institute were observed for port site complications prospectively and the complications were reviewed. Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out in the present study. The statistical software, namely, SPSS 15.0 was used for the analysis of the data. Of the 570 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery, 17 (3%) had developed complications specifically related to the port site during a minimum follow-up of three months; port site infection (PSI) was the most frequent (n = 10, 1.8%), followed by port site bleeding (n = 4, 0.7%), omentum-related complications (n = 2; 0.35%), and port site metastasis (n = 1, 0.175%). Laparoscopic surgeries are associated with minimal port site complications. Complications are related to the increased number of ports. Umbilical port involvement is the commonest. Most complications are manageable with minimal morbidity, and can be further minimized with meticulous surgical technique during entry and exit.

  4. Minimizing complications of ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty: an initial experience with no related complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbetts, J B

    1998-10-01

    Numerous complications and increased operating times were reported with ultrasonically assisted lipoplasty in the first several months after introduction of the technology in the United States. The purpose of this study was to review early reported complications and management regimens, evaluate possible causes of problems, and apply indications and techniques to attempt to minimize complications during an initial experience with this technique beginning in January of 1997. Seven specific indications and modifications of existing techniques were developed and applied to an initial clinical series of 70 consecutive patients who underwent ultrasound-assisted suction lipoplasty between January 10, 1997, and August 1, 1997. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 7 months. No perioperative or postoperative complication occurred in any patient in this series. In this series of ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty cases, application of the following criteria resulted in a series of 70 patients with 1 to 7-month follow-up without complications: (1) selecting patients with well localized fat deposits who were no more than 20 percent above their ideal body weight; (2) infusing a solution of Ringer's Lactate containing 1 cc of 1:1000 epinephrine per 1000 cc into the area of fat removal, stopping infusion when the tissues first become firm, not infusing to marked tissue turgor or skin induration; (3) restricting the level of energy application to a minimum of 1 cm from the undersurface of the dermis; (4) limiting ultrasonic energy application in each area to approximately 1 minute per estimated 100 cc of total aspirate in a wet to superwet environment; (5) not performing ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty in the same area as another procedure that could potentially compromise tissue vascularity; (6) using a Lysonix 2000 generator and 5-mm golf tee tip probe at a power setting of 8 to apply ultrasonic energy to the area of fat removal, ceasing energy application when tissue resistance to the passage

  5. Complications of deep brain stimulation: a collective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Danny T M; Zhu, Xian Lun; Yeung, Jonas H M; Mok, Vincent C T; Wong, Edith; Lau, Clara; Wong, Rosanna; Lau, Christine; Poon, Wai S

    2009-10-01

    Since the first deep brain stimulation (DBS) performed for movement disorder more than a decade ago, DBS has become a standard operation for advanced Parkinson's disease. Its indications are expanding to areas of dystonia, psychiatric conditions and refractory epilepsy. Additionally, a new set of DBS-related complications have arisen. Many teams found a slow learning curve from this complication-prone operation. We would like to investigate complications arising from 100 DBS electrode insertions and its prevention. We performed an audit in all DBS patients for operation-related complications in our centre from 1997 to 2008. Complications were classified into operation-related, hardware-related and stimulation-related. Operation-related complications included intracranial haemorrhages and electrode malposition. Hardware-related complications included fracture of electrodes, electrode migration, infection and erosion. Stimulation-related complications included sensorimotor conditions, psychiatric conditions and life-threatening conditions. From 1997 to the end of 2008, 100 DBS electrodes were inserted in 55 patients for movement disorders, mostly for Parkinsons disease (50 patients). There was one symptomatic cerebral haemorrhage (1%) and two electrode malpositions (2%). Meticulous surgical planning, use of microdriver and a reliable electrode anchorage device would minimise this group of complications. There were two electrode fractures, one electrode migration and one pulse-generator infection which contributed to the hardware-related complication rate of 5%. There were no sensorimotor or life-threatening complications in our group. However, three patients suffered from reversible psychiatric symptoms after DBS. DBS is, on the one hand, an effective surgical treatment for movement disorders. On the other hand, it is a complication-prone operation. A dedicated "Movement Disorder Team" consisting of neurologists, neurophysiologists, functional neurosurgeons

  6. [Traumatic spinal complications of cervical arthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstichel, P; Berthelot, J L; Randriananja, H; Crozier, S; Masson, C

    1996-02-17

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is usually a chronic and progressive disease. In a few cases, however, dramatic tetraplegia sometimes occurs after even minor injury. We report seven patients (6 males, 1 female, aged from 41 to 63), who suffered from acute myelopathy after an injury. In 5 cases, the injury revealed the cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A hyperextension of the cervical spine was found in 5 cases. The injury was severe in only one case, but there was no bony abnormalities, except arthrosis. The most common cause was a fall. In contrast, severe tetraplegia was found in 4 cases. Spontaneous, but incomplete, recuperation occurred in 4 patients. In all 7 cases, CT scan and MRI showed congenital cervical stenosis associated with cervical spondylosis. The level of disco-osteophytic changes was mainly in C4, C5, C6. On T2-weighted spin-echo image, an increased signal intensity was present in the cord of 3 patients, but was not correlated with the severity of the symptoms, nor with improvement. Surgical treatment was performed in 6 cases: 3 laminectomies, 3 anterior or antero-lateral approaches. Improvement after operative decompression was observed in all but one case, even when the motor or sensory deficit persists for more than one year. Motricity of the inferior limbs improved better than the other deficits, perhaps because of the location of non-reversible lesions in the spinal gray matter. The acute medullary syndrome of cervical spondylotic myelopathy is serious and can cause major handicaps. This complication justifies a preventive surgical attitude when medullar signs are moderate, and cervical imagery shows a spondylotic compression of the cord with congenital stenosis.

  7. Outcome of pregnancy complicated by threatened abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongol, A; Mool, S; Tiwari, P

    2011-01-01

    Threatened abortion is the most common complication in the first half of pregnancy. Most of these pregnancies continue to term with or without treatment. Spontaneous abortion occurs in less than 30% of these women. Threatened abortion had been shown to be associated with increased incidence of antepartum haemorrhage, preterm labour and intra uterine growth retardation. This study was to asses the outcome of threatened abortion following treatment. This prospective study was carried out in Dhulikhel Hospital - Kathmandu University Hospital from January 2009 till May 2010. Total 70 cases of threatened abortion were selected, managed with complete bed rest till 48 hrs of cessation of bleeding, folic acid supplementation, uterine sedative, and hormonal treatment till 28 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonogram was performed for diagnosis and to detect the presence of subchorionic hematoma. Patients were followed up until spontaneous abortion or up to delivery of the fetus. The measures used for the analysis were maternal age, parity, gestational age at the time of presentation, previous abortions, presence of subchorionic hematoma, complete abortion, continuation of pregnancy, antepartum hemorrhage, intrauterine growth retardation and intrauterine death of fetus. Out of 70 cases subchorionic haematoma was found in 30 (42.9%) cases. There were 12 (17.1%) patients who spontaneously aborted after diagnosis of threatened abortion during hospital stay, 5 (7.1%) aborted on subsequent visits while 53 (75.8%) continued pregnancy till term. Among those who continued pregnancy intrauterine growth retardation was seen in 7 (13.2%), antepartum hemorrhage in 4 (7.5%), preterm premature rupture of membrane in 3 (5.66%) and IUD in 3 (5.66%). Spontaneous abortion was found more in cases with subchorionic hematoma of size more than 20 cm2. In cases of threatened abortion with or without the presence of subchorionic hematoma, prognostic outcome is better following treatment with bed rest

  8. [Ovarian cancer. II. Procedures, histology, and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpakowski, M; Nowak, M; Malinowski, A; Romanowicz, H; Wieczorek, A; Szpakowski, A; Raczkowska, Z; Władziński, J; Wilczyński, J R; Kamiński, T; Maciołek-Blewniewska, G

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to analyse the operative procedures and complications in patients operated for the first time for ovarian cancer. A retrospective review of patients' charts with ovarian cancer operated at the Department of Gynaecological Surgery of Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital-Research Institute in 1990-1999 was conducted. We analysed the data of women operated for the first time for this disease. In every case we tried to perform radical operation consisted of hysterectomy with bilateral adnexectomy, omentectomy, appendectomy (if needed), and additionally optimal debulking in advanced cancer. Between January 1990 and December 1999, 107 patients were operated for the first time for ovarian cancer. FIGO staging was as follows: I--13.1%, II--14.95%, III--59.8%, IV--12.15%. The most frequent findings on histology were serous (39.3%), endometrioid (26.2%), undifferentiated (11.2%) and clear cell cancers (10.7%). In 60.7% of cases we performed hysterectomy with bilateral adnexectomy, in 15.0% bilateral adnexectomy, in 4.7% of patients cytoreductive tumorectomy, and in 19.6% of cases only excisions for histology were taken. 69.0% of patients underwent also omentectomy and 42.6% appendectomy. In 58.9% of patients we performed radical operation; its incidence significantly decreased with the increase of FIGO staging: I--100%, II--87.5%, III--51.6%, IV--15.4% (p serous and endometrioid ovarian cancer. The great majority of patients was diagnosed to late and operated in III and IV stage of the disease, but in almost 60% of cases radical operation was performed.

  9. Neurological complications of drug abuse: pathophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, J; Haapaniemi, H M; Hillbom, M

    2000-11-01

    Drug abuse is associated with a variety of neurological complications. The use of certain recreational drugs shows a marked temporal association with the onset of both haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes, the majority of which develop within minutes to 1 h after the administration of the index drug. Delayed onset of stroke has also been observed. Acute, severe elevation of blood pressure, cardiac dysrhythmias, cerebral vasospasm, vasculitis, embolization due to infective endocarditis or dilated cardiomyopathy, embolization due to foreign material injected with the diluents under non-sterile conditions and 'street drug' contaminants with cardiovascular effects have been suggested as possible underlying mechanisms. Rupture of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations have been detected in up to half of the patients with haemorrhagic stroke due to cocaine abuse. The less common findings reported have included a mycotic cerebrovascular aneurysm in a patient with infective endocarditis and haemorrhagic stroke. In addition to stroke, cocaine seems to provoke vascular headache. Seizures precipitated by recreational drug abuse are usually caused by acute intoxication in contrast to the withdrawal seizures encountered in subjects with alcohol abuse. Movement disorders and cerebral atrophy correlating with the duration of abuse have been described. Snorting of organic solvents may cause encephalopathy. Cases of spongiform leukoencephalopathy in heroin addicts have also been reported. Peripheral neuropathy is occasionally precipitated by drug poisoning after intravenous administration. Impurities of the drug, risky administration techniques, and the use of mixtures of various drugs, frequently with simultaneous alcohol drinking, should be taken into account when assessing the background of the adverse event as well as the overall lifestyle of the addicted subjects.

  10. Continuum shell-model with complicated configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.W.; Hoehn, J.

    1977-05-01

    The traditional shell model has been combined with the coupled channels method in order to describe resonance reactions. For that purpose the configuration space is divided into two subspaces (Feshbach projection method). Complicated shell-model configurations can be included into the subspace of discrete states which contains the single particle resonance states too. In the subspace of scattering states the equation of motion is solved by using the coupled channels method. Thereby the orthogonality between scattering states and discrete states is ensured. Resonance states are defined with outgoing waves in all channels. By means of simple model calculations the special role of the continuum is investigated. In this connection the energy dependence of the resonance parameters, the isospin mixture via the continuum, threshold effect, as well as the influence of the number of channels taken into account on the widths, positions and dipole strengths of the resonance are discussed. The model is mainly applied to the description of giant resonances excited by the scattering of nucleons and photo-nucleus processes (source term method) found in reactions on light nuclei. The giant resonance observed in the 15 N(p,n) reaction is explained by the inclusion of 2p-2h states. The same is true for the giant resonance in 13 C(J = 1/2, 3/2) as well as for the giant resonance built on the first 3 - state in 16 O. By means of a correlation analysis for the reduced widths amplitudes an access to the doorway conception is found. (author)

  11. Statins and risk of poststroke hemorrhagic complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIsaac, Rachael L.; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H.; Siegerink, Bob; Bath, Philip M.; Endres, Matthias; Lees, Kennedy R.; Nolte, Christian H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether statin treatment before or after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) affects the risk of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), postacute ICH, and mortality within 90 days. Methods: Data were sought from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive, an international repository of clinical trials data. Using propensity score matching, we retrospectively compared patients with prior statin treatment and newly initiated statin within 3 days after AIS to patients without statin exposure. Outcomes of interest were acute symptomatic ICH (sICH), any acute ICH, postacute ICH, and mortality during follow-up of 3 months. Results: A total of 8,535 patients (mean age 70 years, 54% male, median baseline NIH Stroke Scale score 13) were analyzed. After propensity score matching, prior statin use was not strongly associated with sICH (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–2.14) or any ICH (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.92–1.98). There was no evidence of an interaction between prior statin use and thrombolysis. New initiation of statins was not associated with postacute ICH (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.60, 95% CI 0.70–3.65). There was a signal towards lower 90-day mortality in patients with prior statin use (adjusted HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.70–1.00) and especially early initiation of statins (adjusted HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.46–0.97). Conclusions: Statin use prior to AIS was not associated with early hemorrhagic complications, irrespective of treatment with thrombolysis. New initiation of statin treatment early after AIS did not affect risk of postacute ICH, but might be associated with reduced mortality. PMID:27016519

  12. Antibiotics to prevent complications following tooth extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, Giovanni; Figini, Lara; Sardella, Andrea; Carrassi, Antonio; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Furness, Susan

    2012-11-14

    The most frequent indications for tooth extractions are dental caries and periodontal infections, and these extractions are generally done by general dental practitioners. Antibiotics may be prescribed to patients undergoing extractions to prevent complications due to infection. To determine the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the development of infectious complications following tooth extractions. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 25 January 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE via OVID (1948 to 25 January 2012), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 25 January 2012) and LILACS via BIREME (1982 to 25 January 2012). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. We included randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trials of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing tooth extraction(s) for any indication. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias for the included studies and extracted data. We contacted trial authors for further details where these were unclear. For dichotomous outcomes we calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using random-effects models. For continuous outcomes we used mean differences (MD) with 95% CI using random-effects models. We examined potential sources of heterogeneity. The quality of the body of evidence has been assessed using the GRADE tool. This review included 18 double-blind placebo-controlled trials with a total of 2456 participants. Five trials were assessed at unclear risk of bias, thirteen at high risk, and none at low risk of bias. Compared to placebo, antibiotics probably reduce the risk of infection in patients undergoing third molar extraction(s) by approximately 70% (RR 0.29 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.50) P antibiotics to prevent one infection following extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. There is evidence that antibiotics may reduce

  13. Complications Following Primary and Revision Transsphenoidal Surgeries for Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, James G.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Wineland, Andre; Nepple, Kenneth G.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Getz, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to determine the incidence of major complications following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. Major complications included endocrinopathic, skull base, orbital, hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, respiratory failure, and death. Secondarily, this study aimed to examine factors associated with the occurrence of complications. Study Design Retrospective cohort analysis of California and Florida all-payer databases from 2005-2008. Methods The major complication rate following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery was calculated. Bivariate analyses were performed to investigate the relationship of patient characteristics with complication occurrence, and a multivariate model was constructed to determine risk factors associated with these complications. Results 5,277 primary cases and 192 revision cases met inclusion criteria. There was a non-significant absolute difference of 3.09% (95% CI −11.00 to 16.14) between the rate of complications following primary (n=443; 8.39%) and revision (n=22; 11.46%) surgeries. Multivariate analyses showed that patients with Medicare (OR=1.74; 95% CI 1.17 to 2.61), Medicaid (OR=2.13; 95% CI 1.59 to 2.86), or a malignant neoplasm (OR=3.10; 95% CI 1.62 to 5.93) were more likely to have complications. Conclusions The rate of major complications following transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is lower than earlier retrospective reports. The overall complication rate following revision surgery was not significantly different from primary surgery. Insurance status and a diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm were associated with a higher rate of complications. PMID:25263939

  14. Vascular complications of prosthetic inter-vertebral discs

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Kevin J.; Ross, E. Raymond S.; Norris, Heather; McCollum, Charles N.

    2006-01-01

    Five consecutive cases of prosthetic inter-vertebral disc displacement with severe vascular complications on revisional surgery are described. The objective of this case report is to warn spinal surgeons that major vascular complications are likely with anterior displacement of inter-vertebral discs. We have not been able to find a previous report on vascular complications associated with anterior displacement of prosthetic inter-vertebral discs. In all five patients the prosthetic disc had e...

  15. Complications in Endovascular Neurosurgery: Critical Analysis and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Mazur, Marcus D; Park, Min S; Kilburg, Craig; Moran, Christopher J; Hardman, Rulon L; Couldwell, William T; Taussky, Philipp

    2016-11-01

    Precisely defining complications, which are used to measure overall quality, is necessary for critical review of delivery of care and quality improvement in endovascular neurosurgery, which lacks common definitions for complications. Furthermore, in endovascular interventions, events that may be labeled complications may not always negatively affect outcome. Our objective is to provide precise definitions for quality evaluation within endovascular neurosurgery. Thus, we propose an endovascular-specific classification system of complications based on our own patient series. This single-center review included all patients who had endovascular interventions from September 2013 to August 2015. Complication types were analyzed, and a descriptive analysis was undertaken to calculate the incidence of complications overall and in each category. Two hundred and seventy-five endovascular interventions were performed in 245 patients (65% female; mean age, 55 years). Forty complications occurred in 39 patients (15%), most commonly during treatment of intracranial aneurysms (24/40). Mechanical complications (eg, device deployment, catheter, or closure device failure) occurred in 8/40, technical complications (eg, failure to deploy flow diverter, unintended embolization, air emboli, retroperitoneal hemorrhage, dissection) in 11/40, judgment errors (eg, patient or equipment selection) in 9/40, and critical events (eg, groin hematoma, hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications) in 12/40 patients. Only 12/40 complications (30%) resulted in new neurologic deficits, vessel injury requiring surgery, or blood transfusion. We propose an endovascular-specific classification system of complications with 4 categories: mechanical, technical, judgment errors, and critical events. This system provides a framework for future studies and quality control in endovascular neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Splenic Infarction: An Under-recognized Complication of Infectious Mononucleosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; George, Ann; Arnaout, Sami; Wang, Jennifer P; Abraham, George M

    2018-03-01

    Splenic infarction is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis. We describe 3 cases of splenic infarction attributed to infectious mononucleosis that we encountered within a 2-month period. We underscore the awareness of this potential complication of infectious mononucleosis and discuss the differential diagnosis of splenic infarction, including infectious etiologies. While symptomatic management is usually sufficient for infectious mononucleosis-associated splenic infarction, close monitoring for other complications, including splenic rupture, is mandated.

  17. Radiological features of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurley, P.D.; Halliday, K.E.; Somers, J.M.; Al-Daraji, W.I.; Ilyas, M.; Broderick, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the small bowel. The majority of patients with this anomaly will remain asymptomatic; however, several complications may occur, including obstruction, intussusception, perforation, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. These complications may produce a variety of different clinical features and radiological appearances. The purpose of this article is to review the potential imaging manifestations of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques available

  18. Radiological features of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurley, P.D. [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pthurley@doctors.org.uk; Halliday, K E; Somers, J M [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Al-Daraji, W I; Ilyas, M [Histopathology, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N J [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the small bowel. The majority of patients with this anomaly will remain asymptomatic; however, several complications may occur, including obstruction, intussusception, perforation, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. These complications may produce a variety of different clinical features and radiological appearances. The purpose of this article is to review the potential imaging manifestations of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques available.

  19. [A transparent, internal complication management concept: results and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G; Gritzbach, B; Frank, J; Marzi, I

    2010-09-01

    The acquisition of data and public discussion of complications after therapeutic procedures and surgeries is a sensitive subject, which is mostly avoided even in department meetings. However, it is evident that the broad discussion and the expression of different opinions and aspects provide useful information for continuous improvements. Therefore, we established a system for the transparent acquisition of complications in our department. Since January 2005, we systematically register operative and non-operative complications at our department, evaluate them and therefore gain a great benefit. All the complications are presented, discussed and evaluated within the weekly morbidity and mortality conferences. In 2005 and 2006, among a total number of 2730 and, respectively, 3124 operations, 102 (3.7 %) and 71 (2.3 %) complications have been registered and analysed according to different criteria. We have distinguished between complications which required surgery and complications which only required conservative treatment. There was a higher number of complications which needed surgery. In this group, the most common complications have been found in vertebral spine surgery. The groups of complications with conservative treatment were mostly related to nerve lesions and deep venous thrombosis. With the aid of the internal department evaluation of the registered data, especially the number of complications in vertebral spine surgery could be clearly reduced in 2006. The described method has created a transparency of occurring complications because each colleague is informed as well as involved in the solution process. Furthermore, it is planned to evaluate the impact of risk factors on the various performed surgeries. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Gastric band tubing-related complication during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongso, Yuni F; Beh, Han N

    2017-11-01

    In the past few decades, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is one of the most common bariatric procedures performed to treat morbid obesity. Device-related complication such as connection-tubing problem is rare. Here we present a case of gastric band tubing complication during pregnancy. This case illustrates the need to maintain high index of suspicion of gastric band device-related complication during pregnancy and early referral for bariatric surgical assessment is recommended.