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Sample records for complicates continuous wave

  1. Waves in continuous media

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilyuk, S L; Sukhinin, S V

    2017-01-01

    Starting with the basic notions and facts of the mathematical theory of waves illustrated by numerous examples, exercises, and methods of solving typical problems Chapters 1 & 2 show e.g. how to recognize the hyperbolicity property, find characteristics, Riemann invariants and conservation laws for quasilinear systems of equations, construct and analyze solutions with weak or strong discontinuities, and how to investigate equations with dispersion and to construct travelling wave solutions for models reducible to nonlinear evolution equations. Chapter 3 deals with surface and internal waves in an incompressible fluid. The efficiency of mathematical methods is demonstrated on a hierarchy of approximate submodels generated from the Euler equations of homogeneous and non-homogeneous fluids. The self-contained presentations of the material is complemented by 200+ problems of different level of difficulty, numerous illustrations, and bibliographical recommendations.

  2. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after ...

  3. Wave chaotic experiments and models for complicated wave scattering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    Wave scattering in a complicated environment is a common challenge in many engineering fields because the complexity makes exact solutions impractical to find, and the sensitivity to detail in the short-wavelength limit makes a numerical solution relevant only to a specific realization. On the other hand, wave chaos offers a statistical approach to understand the properties of complicated wave systems through the use of random matrix theory (RMT). A bridge between the theory and practical applications is the random coupling model (RCM) which connects the universal features predicted by RMT and the specific details of a real wave scattering system. The RCM gives a complete model for many wave properties and is beneficial for many physical and engineering fields that involve complicated wave scattering systems. One major contribution of this dissertation is that I have utilized three microwave systems to thoroughly test the RCM in complicated wave systems with varied loss, including a cryogenic system with a superconducting microwave cavity for testing the extremely-low-loss case. I have also experimentally tested an extension of the RCM that includes short-orbit corrections. Another novel result is development of a complete model based on the RCM for the fading phenomenon extensively studied in the wireless communication fields. This fading model encompasses the traditional fading models as its high-loss limit case and further predicts the fading statistics in the low-loss limit. This model provides the first physical explanation for the fitting parameters used in fading models. I have also applied the RCM to additional experimental wave properties of a complicated wave system, such as the impedance matrix, the scattering matrix, the variance ratio, and the thermopower. These predictions are significant for nuclear scattering, atomic physics, quantum transport in condensed matter systems, electromagnetics, acoustics, geophysics, etc.

  4. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  5. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vierinen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs; continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  6. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, J.; Chau, J. L.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  7. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. L.; Vierinen, J.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products, such as wind fields. This type of a radar would also be useful for over-the-horizon radar, ionosondes, and observations of field-aligned-irregularities.

  8. Continuing Higher Education: The Coming Wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Allan W., Ed.; King, B. Kay, Ed.

    This book, containing seven chapters and an epilogue, describes how continuing education--as a structure and a function--can become a unique tool for reorienting major universities toward confronting new societal challenges. "The Coming Wave" (Lerner) discusses relevant organizational theory to explain the special role of continuing education in…

  9. Continuous Observations and the Wave Function Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Marchewka, A

    2011-01-01

    We propose to modify the collapse axiom of quantum measurement theory by replacing the instantaneous with a continuous collapse of the wave function in finite time $\\tau$. We apply it to coordinate measurement of a free quantum particle that is initially confined to a domain $D\\subset\\rR^d$ and is observed continuously by illuminating $\\rR^d-D$. The continuous collapse axiom (CCA) defines the post-measurement wave function (PMWF)in $D$ after a negative measurement as the solution of Schr\\"odinger's equation at time $\\tau$ with instantaneously collapsed initial condition and homogeneous Dirichlet condition on the boundary of $D$. The CCA applies to all cases that exhibit the Zeno effect. It rids quantum mechanics of the unphysical artifacts caused by instantaneous collapse and introduces no new artifacts.

  10. Non Infectious Complications of Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Flayou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis has proven to be as effective as hemodialysis. However, it is associated with several complications. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and outcome of complications in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis at our center. Material and methods: A retrospective study between January 2007 and February 2015 at the nephrology, dialysis and renal transplantation department of Ibn Sina university. Predisposing factors and long-term outcomes were analyzed. Results: Fifty two mechanical complications were noted among thirty eight patients between June 2007 and February 2015. Migration was the most common (23 cases followed by obstruction, hernia and dialysate leakes in respectively 9, 7 and 6 cases. We have also noted 2 cases of hemoperitoneum, 3 catheter perforation and 2 cases of externalization. Onset time of complications was 25,4 ± 12,7 months. Conclusion: this study proves the interest of the prevention of mechanical complications in peritoneal dialysis. This requires a periodic retraining of patients and caregivers.

  11. Noninvasive continuous monitoring of digital pulse waves during hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkert, Antje; Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent hemodynamic instability during hemodialysis treatment is a frequent complication in patients with end-stage renal failure. A noninvasive method for continuous hemodynamic monitoring is needed. We used noninvasive digital photoplethysmography and an algorithm for continuous, investiga......Intermittent hemodynamic instability during hemodialysis treatment is a frequent complication in patients with end-stage renal failure. A noninvasive method for continuous hemodynamic monitoring is needed. We used noninvasive digital photoplethysmography and an algorithm for continuous......, investigator-independent, automatic analysis of digital volume pulse in 10 healthy subjects and in 20 patients with end-stage renal failure during the hemodialysis session. The reflective index was defined representing the diastolic component of the digital pulse wave. The properties of the reflective index...... were studied in healthy control subjects (n=10). An increased reflective index was due to increased peripheral pulse wave reflection (e.g., vasoconstriction). During a hemodialysis session, the reflective index increased significantly from 36+/-3 arbitrary units to 41+/-3 arbitrary units (n=20; p...

  12. [Comparative study on software demodulation for continuous wave and quasi-continuous wave wavelength modulation spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xin; Liu, Fu-Gui; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2013-12-01

    According to the modulation signal applied on laser diodes, wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) can be divided into continuous wave (CW) WMS and quasi-continuous wave (QCW) WMS. In order to deeply compare CW-WMS and QCW-WMS, we used a specific software-realized lock-in amplifier for continuous and quasi-continuous modulation signal demodulation. The invalid signal in quasi-continuous modulation spectrum was filtered off, and then the effective detection signal was demodulated to obtain the second harmonic signal (WMS-2f). It was compared with the 2f signal demodulated continuous laser modulation spectrum with software. The results show that while the same system parameters are set, the signal-to-noise of the quasi-continuous modulation spectrum is 5% higher than the continuous modulation spectrum with software demodulation measurements, and the detection limit is 11.3% lower. And without the invalid signal in quasi-continuous modulation spectrum, the standard WMS-2f signal can be demodulated, which has potential to be used for the investigation of gas absorption profile. This work has provided accurate reference for selections of the laser modulation spectroscopy.

  13. Optimal directed searches for continuous gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ming, Jing; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Aulbert, Carsten; Fehrmann, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Wide parameter space searches for long lived continuous gravitational wave signals are computationally limited. It is therefore critically important that available computational resources are used rationally. In this paper we consider directed searches, i.e. targets for which the sky position is known accurately but the frequency and spindown parameters are completely unknown. Given a list of such potential astrophysical targets, we therefore need to prioritize. On which target(s) should we spend scarce computing resources? What parameter space region in frequency and spindown should we search? Finally, what is the optimal search set-up that we should use? In this paper we present a general framework that allows to solve all three of these problems. This framework is based on maximizing the probability of making a detection subject to a constraint on the maximum available computational cost. We illustrate the method for a simplified problem.

  14. Arrayed Continuous-wave THz Photomixers

    CERN Document Server

    Bauerschmidt, S T; Döhler, G H; Lu, H; Gossard, A C; Preu, S

    2013-01-01

    We present both chip-scale and free space coherent arrays of continuous-wave THz photomixers. By altering the relative phases of the exciting laser signals, the relative THz phase between the array elements can be tuned, allowing for beam steering. The constructive interference of the emission of N elements leads to an increase of the focal intensity by a factor of NxN while reducing the beam width by ~1/N, below the diffraction limit of a single source. Such array architectures strongly improve the THz power distribution for stand-off spectroscopy and imaging systems while providing a huge bandwidth at the same time. We demonstrate this by beam profiles generated by a free space 2x2 and a 4x1 array for a transmission distance of 4.2 meters. Spectra between 70 GHz and 1.1 THz have been recorded with these arrays.

  15. Stochastic generation of continuous wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trulsen, J.; Dysthe, K. B.; Pécseli, Hans

    1983-01-01

    Wave packets of electromagnetic or Langmuir waves trapped in a well between oscillating reflectors are considered. An equation for the temporal evolution of the probability distribution for the carrier wave number is derived, and solved analytically in terms of moments in the limits of long...

  16. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  17. Continuous wave MRI of heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Andrew J.; Davies, Gareth R.; Hutchison, James M. S.; Lurie, David J.

    2003-08-01

    A prototype continuous wave MRI system operating at 7 T has been used successfully to study a variety of heterogeneous materials exhibiting T 2 relaxation values ranging from 10 μs to 50 ms. Two-dimensional images of a poly(methly methacrylate) (PMMA) resolution phantom (T 2=38 μs) exhibited a spatial resolution of approximately 1 mm at a magnetic field gradient strength of 200 mT/m. The technique was used to study the hydration, drying, and subsequent water penetration properties of cement samples made from ordinary Portland cement, and revealed inhomogeneities arising from the cure conditions. Sandstone samples from an oil reservoir in the North Sea were also studied; structure within these materials, arising from the sedimentary bed layering in the reservoir, was found to have an effect on their water transport properties. A section from a confectionery bar (T 2* approximately 50-60 ms) was also imaged, and its internal structure could be clearly discerned.

  18. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  19. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  20. Solitary Wave Generation from Constant Continuous Wave in Asymmetric Oppositely Directed Waveguide Coupler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazantseva E.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a model which describes asymmetric oppositely directed nonlinear coupler it was observed in numerical simulations a phenomenon of solitary wave generation from the input constant continuous wave set at the entrance of a waveguide with negative refraction. The period of solitary wave formation decreases with increase of the continuum wave amplitude.

  1. The Q-factor of a continuous-wave laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichhorn, M.; Pollnau, Markus

    We define the finite Q-factor of a continuous-wave lasing resonator as the energy of coherent photons stored in the resonator at a given time over the energy of these coherent photons lost per oscillation cycle.

  2. Generation of magnetosonic waves over a continuous spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lunjin; Sun, Jicheng; Lu, Quanming; Gao, Xinliang; Xia, Zhiyang; Zhima, Zeren

    2016-02-01

    Magnetosonic waves, also known as equatorial noise emission, were found to have discrete frequency structures, which is consistent with instability caused by proton ring distribution. Nonetheless, nondiscrete structure, i.e., a broadband spectrum over a continuous frequency range, has been reported. We investigate the question whether proton ring distribution can generate nondiscrete spectra for perpendicularly propagating magnetosonic waves. We propose discrete and nondiscrete characteristics of the local instability for explaining the observation of discrete, continuous, and mixed spectra. The criterion for transition from discrete and continuous instability is given, γ >˜ Ωh/2, where γ is wave growth rate and Ωh is proton cyclotron frequency. The condition is verified by particle-in-cell simulation using more realistic electron-to-proton mass ratio and speed of light than in previous studies. Such criterion of generating a continuous spectrum can be tested against simultaneous in situ measurement of wave and particle. We also find that the modes at low Ωh harmonics, including the fundamental Ωh, can be still excited through nonlinear wave-wave coupling, even when they are neutral modes (γ = 0) according to the linear kinetic theory. Comparison with magnetosonic waves in cold plasma limit and electromagnetic ion Bernstein mode is also discussed.

  3. Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semicoherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first-order spindown values down to -7.86×10-8Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. The 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic center are ˜3.35×10-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  4. Detecting Beyond-Einstein Polarizations of Continuous Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Isi, Maximiliano; Weinstein, Alan J.; Mead, Carver; Pitkin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The direct detection of gravitational waves with the next-generation detectors, like Advanced LIGO, provides the opportunity to measure deviations from the predictions of general relativity. One such departure would be the existence of alternative polarizations. To measure these, we study a single detector measurement of a continuous gravitational wave from a triaxial pulsar source. We develop methods to detect signals of any polarization content and distinguish between them in a model-indepe...

  5. Continuous Dependence on the Density for Stratified Steady Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    There are two distinct regimes commonly used to model traveling waves in stratified water: continuous stratification, where the density is smooth throughout the fluid, and layer-wise continuous stratification, where the fluid consists of multiple immiscible strata. The former is the more physically accurate description, but the latter is frequently more amenable to analysis and computation. By the conservation of mass, the density is constant along the streamlines of the flow; the stratification can therefore be specified by prescribing the value of the density on each streamline. We call this the streamline density function. Our main result states that, for every smoothly stratified periodic traveling wave in a certain small-amplitude regime, there is an L ∞ neighborhood of its streamline density function such that, for any piecewise smooth streamline density function in that neighborhood, there is a corresponding traveling wave solution. Moreover, the mapping from streamline density function to wave is Lipschitz continuous in a certain function space framework. As this neighborhood includes piecewise smooth densities with arbitrarily many jump discontinues, this theorem provides a rigorous justification for the ubiquitous practice of approximating a smoothly stratified wave by a layered one. We also discuss some applications of this result to the study of the qualitative features of such waves.

  6. Continuity waves in fully resolved simulations of settling particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, Daniel; Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Fully resolved simulations of 500 to 2,000 particles settling in a fluid have been conducted with the Physalis method. A new approach to the reconstruction of pseudo-continuum fields is described and is used to examine the results with the purpose of identifying concentration waves. The velocity of concentration waves is successfully deduced from the simulations. A comparison of the results with continuity wave theory shows good agreement. Several new insights about the particle microstructure conditionally averaged on volume fraction and velocity are also described. This work is supported by NSF award CBET1335965.

  7. Continuous-terahertz-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ruixue; Zuo, Shasha; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research and potentially in clinical practice. We present a continuous-terahertz (THz)-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications, in which an infrared (IR) laser is integrated into a 0.2-THz reflection-mode continuous-THz-wave imaging system to induce surface plasmon polaritons on the nanoparticles and further improve the intensity of the reflected signal from the water around the nanoparticles. A strong and rapid increment of the reflected THz signal in the nanoparticle solution upon the IR laser irradiation is demonstrated, using either gold or silver nanoparticles. This low-cost, simple, and stable continuous-THz-wave molecular imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and practical imaging applications; in particular, it shows great promise for cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug-delivery monitoring.

  8. Fluorescence excitation by enhanced plasmon upconversion under continuous wave illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasgin, Mehmet Emre; Salakhutdinov, Ildar; Kendziora, Dania; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Turkpence, Deniz; Piantanida, Luca; Fruk, Ljiljana; Lazzarino, Marco; Bek, Alpan

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate effective background-free continuous wave nonlinear optical excitation of molecules that are sandwiched between asymmetrically constructed plasmonic gold nanoparticle clusters. We observe that near infrared photons are converted to visible photons through efficient plasmonic second harmonic generation. Our theoretical model and simulations demonstrate that Fano resonances may be responsible for being able to observe nonlinear conversion using a continuous wave light source. We show that nonlinearity enhancement of plasmonic nanostructures via coupled quantum mechanical oscillators such as molecules can be several orders larger as compared to their classical counterparts.

  9. Toward continuous-wave operation of organic semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandanayaka, Atula S. D.; Matsushima, Toshinori; Bencheikh, Fatima; Yoshida, Kou; Inoue, Munetomo; Fujihara, Takashi; Goushi, Kenichi; Ribierre, Jean-Charles; Adachi, Chihaya

    2017-01-01

    The demonstration of continuous-wave lasing from organic semiconductor films is highly desirable for practical applications in the areas of spectroscopy, data communication, and sensing, but it still remains a challenging objective. We report low-threshold surface-emitting organic distributed feedback lasers operating in the quasi–continuous-wave regime at 80 MHz as well as under long-pulse photoexcitation of 30 ms. This outstanding performance was achieved using an organic semiconductor thin film with high optical gain, high photoluminescence quantum yield, and no triplet absorption losses at the lasing wavelength combined with a mixed-order distributed feedback grating to achieve a low lasing threshold. A simple encapsulation technique greatly reduced the laser-induced thermal degradation and suppressed the ablation of the gain medium otherwise taking place under intense continuous-wave photoexcitation. Overall, this study provides evidence that the development of a continuous-wave organic semiconductor laser technology is possible via the engineering of the gain medium and the device architecture. PMID:28508042

  10. Operational experience with room temperature continuous wave accelerator structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimov, A. S.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Piskarev, I. M.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Tiunov, A. V.

    1993-05-01

    The paper reports the results of the computer simulation of parameters of the on-axis coupled accelerator structure for the continuous wave racetrack microtron. The operational experience with the accelerating sections on the basis of the on-axis coupled structure is described.

  11. Coherence manifestation in a continuous-wave laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichhorn, M.; Pollnau, Markus

    We extend the existing theory of continuous-wave lasers by systematically considering spontaneous emission. In a simple rate-equation approach, the laser eigenvalue, defined as the ratio of coherent photons coupled out of the resonator divided by the number of photons coupled in via spontaneous

  12. Continuous wave carbon dioxide treatment of balanitis xerotica obliterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemberg, S K; Jacobs, H

    1982-05-01

    Herein is presented the first case of balanitis xerotica obliterans treated successfully by carbon dioxide-continuous wave (CW-CO2) laser vaporization. This method appears to be a safe addition to other well-known treatment modalities, offering minimal postoperative discomfort, preservation of anatomic landmarks and function, and excellent cosmetic results.

  13. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  14. Cluster Observations of Non-Time Continuous Magnetosonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon N.; Demekhov, Andrei G.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Ganushkina, Natalia Y.; Sibeck, David G.; Balikhin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial magnetosonic waves are normally observed as temporally continuous sets of emissions lasting from minutes to hours. Recent observations, however, have shown that this is not always the case. Using Cluster data, this study identifies two distinct forms of these non temporally continuous use missions. The first, referred to as rising tone emissions, are characterized by the systematic onset of wave activity at increasing proton gyroharmonic frequencies. Sets of harmonic emissions (emission elements)are observed to occur periodically in the region +/- 10 off the geomagnetic equator. The sweep rate of these emissions maximizes at the geomagnetic equator. In addition, the ellipticity and propagation direction also change systematically as Cluster crosses the geomagnetic equator. It is shown that the observed frequency sweep rate is unlikely to result from the sideband instability related to nonlinear trapping of suprathermal protons in the wave field. The second form of emissions is characterized by the simultaneous onset of activity across a range of harmonic frequencies. These waves are observed at irregular intervals. Their occurrence correlates with changes in the spacecraft potential, a measurement that is used as a proxy for electron density. Thus, these waves appear to be trapped within regions of localized enhancement of the electron density.

  15. Enhanced continuous-wave four-wave mixing efficiency in nonlinear AlGaAs waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiratikul, Paveen; Wathen, Jeremiah J; Porkolab, Gyorgy A; Wang, Bohan; He, Lei; Murphy, Thomas E; Richardson, Christopher J K

    2014-11-03

    Enhancements of the continuous-wave four-wave mixing conversion efficiency and bandwidth are accomplished through the application of plasma-assisted photoresist reflow to reduce the sidewall roughness of sub-square-micron-modal area waveguides. Nonlinear AlGaAs optical waveguides with a propagation loss of 0.56 dB/cm demonstrate continuous-wave four-wave mixing conversion efficiency of -7.8 dB. Narrow waveguides that are fabricated with engineered processing produce waveguides with uncoated sidewalls and anti-reflection coatings that show group velocity dispersion of +0.22 ps²/m. Waveguides that are 5-mm long demonstrate broadband four-wave mixing conversion efficiencies with a half-width 3-dB bandwidth of 63.8-nm.

  16. Detecting Beyond-Einstein Polarizations of Continuous Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Isi, Maximiliano; Mead, Carver; Pitkin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The direct detection of gravitational waves with the next generation detectors, like Advanced LIGO, provides the opportunity to measure deviations from the predictions of General Relativity. One such departure would be the existence of alternative polarizations. To measure these, we study a single detector measurement of a continuous gravitational wave from a triaxial pulsar source. We develop methods to detect signals of any polarization content and distinguish between them in a model independent way. We present LIGO S5 sensitivity estimates for 115 pulsars.

  17. Detecting continuous gravitational waves with superfluid $^4$He

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, S; Pikovski, I; Schwab, K C

    2016-01-01

    Direct detection of gravitational waves is opening a new window onto our universe. Here, we study the sensitivity to continuous-wave strain fields of a kg-scale optomechanical system formed by the acoustic motion of superfluid helium-4 parametrically coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity. This narrowband detection scheme can operate at very high $Q$-factors, while the resonant frequency is tunable through pressurization of the helium in the 0.1-1.5 kHz range. The detector can therefore be tuned to a variety of astrophysical sources and can remain sensitive to a particular source over a long period of time. For reasonable experimental parameters, we find that strain fields on the order of $h\\sim 10^{-23} /\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ are detectable. We show that the proposed system can significantly improve the limits on gravitational wave strain from nearby pulsars within a few months of integration time.

  18. A full-wave Helmholtz model for continuous-wave ultrasound transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Tomi; Malinen, Matti; Kaipio, Jari P; White, Phillip Jason; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-03-01

    A full-wave Helmholtz model of continuous-wave (CW) ultrasound fields may offer several attractive features over widely used partial-wave approximations. For example, many full-wave techniques can be easily adjusted for complex geometries, and multiple reflections of sound are automatically taken into account in the model. To date, however, the full-wave modeling of CW fields in general 3D geometries has been avoided due to the large computational cost associated with the numerical approximation of the Helmholtz equation. Recent developments in computing capacity together with improvements in finite element type modeling techniques are making possible wave simulations in 3D geometries which reach over tens of wavelengths. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a full-wave solution of the 3D Helmholtz equation for modeling of continuous-wave ultrasound fields in an inhomogeneous medium. The numerical approximation of the Helmholtz equation is computed using the ultraweak variational formulation (UWVF) method. In addition, an inverse problem technique is utilized to reconstruct the velocity distribution on the transducer which is used to model the sound source in the UWVF scheme. The modeling method is verified by comparing simulated and measured fields in the case of transmission of 531 kHz CW fields through layered plastic plates. The comparison shows a reasonable agreement between simulations and measurements at low angles of incidence but, due to mode conversion, the Helmholtz model becomes insufficient for simulating ultrasound fields in plates at large angles of incidence.

  19. Propagation characteristics of ultrasonic guided waves in continuously welded rail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenqing; Sheng, Fuwei; Wei, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Rail defects cause numerous railway accidents. Trains are derailed and serious consequences often occur. Compared to traditional bulk wave testing, ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs) can provide larger monitoring ranges and complete coverage of the waveguide cross-section. These advantages are of significant importance for the non-destructive testing (NDT) of the continuously welded rail, and the technique is therefore widely used in high-speed railways. UGWs in continuous welded rail (CWR) and their propagation characteristics have been discussed in this paper. Finite element methods (FEMs) were used to accomplish a vibration modal analysis, which is extended by a subsequent dispersion analysis. Wave structure features were illustrated by displacement profiles. It was concluded that guided waves have the ability to detect defects in the rail via choice of proper mode and frequency. Additionally, thermal conduction that is caused by temperature variation in the rail is added into modeling and simulation. The results indicated that unbalanced thermal distribution may lead to the attenuation of UGWs in the rail.

  20. Tapered Diode-pumped continuous-wave alexandrite laser

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Tapered diode-pumped continuous-wave alexandrite laser Ersen Beyatli,1 Ilyes Baali,2 Bernd Sumpf,3 Götz Erbert,3 Alfred Leitenstorfer,4 Alphan Sennaroglu,1 and Umit Demirbas2,4,* 1Laser Research Laboratory, Departments of Physics and Electrical-Electronics Engineering, Koç University, Rumelifeneri, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey 2Laser Technology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Antalya International University, 07190 Dosemealti, Antalya,...

  1. Continuous wave infrared laser deposition of organic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaginuma, Seiichiro [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Jun [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Haemori, Masamitsu [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Itaka, Kenji [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Univesity of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Yuji [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kondo, Michio [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Koinuma, Hideomi [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Univesity of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    We developed a continuous-wave infrared laser molecular beam epitaxy (CW-IR-LMBE) optimized for the fabrication of organic semiconductor films. The crystal quality of these organic thin films deposited by CW-IR-LMBE was substantially the same as those deposited by thermal evaporation. Due to the possibility of quick switching of evaporation sources, CW-IR-LMBE is especially advantageous for rapid screening of composition, thickness, and fabrication parameters in materials and device optimization based on combinatorial technology.

  2. Polarization decoherence differential frequency-modulated continuous-wave gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Zheng, Gang; Han, Liwei; Luo, Jianhua; Teng, Fei; Wang, Bing; Song, Ping; Gao, Kun; Hou, Zhiqing

    2014-12-01

    A polarization decoherence differential frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) gyroscope is presented. The impact of coherent polarization crosstalk noise on the differential FMCW gyro is analyzed. In order to suppress coherent polarization crosstalk noise, a novel method was proposed to produce two incoherent orthogonal polarization narrow band beams from laser diode. In this way, the random drift has been reduced about one order.

  3. Spike wave location and density disturb sleep slow waves in patients with CSWS (continuous spike waves during sleep).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölsterli Heinzle, Bigna K; Fattinger, Sara; Kurth, Salomé; Lebourgeois, Monique K; Ringli, Maya; Bast, Thomas; Critelli, Hanne; Schmitt, Bernhard; Huber, Reto

    2014-04-01

    In CSWS (continuous spike waves during sleep) activation of spike waves during slow wave sleep has been causally linked to neuropsychological deficits, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms are still unknown. In healthy subjects, the overnight decrease of the slope of slow waves in NREM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep has been linked to brain recovery to regain optimal cognitive performance. Here, we investigated whether the electrophysiologic hallmark of CSWS, the spike waves during sleep, is related to an alteration in the overnight decrease of the slope, and if this alteration is linked to location and density of spike waves. In a retrospective study, the slope of slow waves (0.5-2 Hz) in the first hour and last hour of sleep (19 electroencephalography [EEG] electrodes) of 14 patients with CSWS (3.1-13.5 years) was calculated. The spike wave "focus" was determined as the location of highest spike amplitude and the density of spike waves as spike wave index (SWI). There was no overnight change of the slope of slow waves in the "focus." Instead, in "nonfocal" regions, the slope decreased significantly. This difference in the overnight course resulted in a steeper slope in the "focus" compared to "nonfocal" electrodes during the last hour of sleep. Spike wave density was correlated with the impairment of the overnight slope decrease: The higher the SWI, the more hampered the slope decrease. Location and density of spike waves are related to an alteration of the physiologic overnight decrease of the slow wave slope. This overnight decrease of the slope was shown to be closely related to the recovery function of sleep. Such recovery is necessary for optimal cognitive performance during wakefulness. Therefore we propose the impairment of this process by spike waves as a potential mechanism leading to neuropsychological deficits in CSWS. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals

  4. Photonic-integrated circuit for continuous-wave THz generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Michael; Göbel, Thorsten; Stanze, Dennis; Troppenz, Ute; Soares, Francisco; Grote, Norbert; Schell, Martin

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate a photonic-integrated circuit for continuous-wave (cw) terahertz (THz) generation. By comprising two lasers and an optical phase modulator on a single chip, the full control of the THz signal is enabled via a unique bidirectional operation technique. Integrated heaters allow for continuous tuning of the THz frequency over 570 GHz. Applied to a coherent cw THz photomixing system operated at 1.5 μm optical wavelength, we reach a signal-to-noise ratio of 44 dB at 1.25 THz, which is identical to the performance of a standard system based on discrete components.

  5. Continuous-wave four-wave mixing in cm-long Chalcogenide microstructured fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brès, Camille-Sophie; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Radic, Stojan

    2011-12-12

    We present the experimental demonstration of broadband four-wave mixing in a 2.5 cm-long segment of AsSe Chalcogenide microstructured fiber. The parametric mixing was driven by a continuous-wave pump compatible with data signal wavelength conversion. Four-wave mixing products over more than 70 nm on the anti-stoke side of the pump were measured for 345 mW of pump power and 1.5 dBm of signal power. The ultrafast signal processing capability was verified through wavelength conversion of 1.4 ps pulses at 8 GHz repetition rate. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  6. Continuous-wave terahertz light from optical parametric oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowade, Rosita

    2010-12-15

    Continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) are working horses for spectroscopy in the near and mid infrared. However, in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 to 10 THz), the pump threshold is more than 100 W due to the high absorption in nonlinear crystals and thus exceeds the power of standard cw single-frequency pump sources. In this thesis the first cw OPO capable of generating terahertz radiation is demonstrated. To overcome the high threshold, the signal wave of a primary infrared process is resonantly enhanced to serve as the pump wave for a cascaded parametric process with one wave being at the terahertz frequency level. A terahertz output power of more than two microwatts is measured and tuning is achieved from 1.3 to 1.7 THz. This terahertz source emits a narrow-band, diffraction-limited beam which remains mode-hop free over more than one hour. Such a device inhibits high potential for applications in areas like astronomy, telecommunications or high-resolution spectroscopy. (orig.)

  7. Surgical aspects and complications of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion with an implantable pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveman, Jan Willem; Logtenberg, Susan J. J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Blomme, Adri M.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) with an implantable pump is safe and effective in selected subjects with diabetes. Our aim was to assess surgical experience and complications with CIPII. We performed a retrospective longitudinal observational cohort study of patients that started

  8. Surgical aspects and complications of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion with an implantable pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveman, Jan Willem; Logtenberg, Susan J. J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Blomme, Adri M.

    Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) with an implantable pump is safe and effective in selected subjects with diabetes. Our aim was to assess surgical experience and complications with CIPII. We performed a retrospective longitudinal observational cohort study of patients that started

  9. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves in LIGO and Virgo Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riles, Keith; LIGO Scientific Collaboration Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration have carried out searches for periodic continuous gravitational waves. These analyses range from targeted searches for gravitational-wave signals from known pulsars, for which precise ephemerides from radio or X-ray observations are available, to all-sky searches for unknown neutron stars, including stars in unknown binary systems. Between these extremes lie directed searches for known stars of unknown spin frequency or for new unknown sources at specific locations. These different types of searches will be presented, including final results from the Initial LIGO and Virgo data runs and, where available, new results from searches of early Advanced LIGO data. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation grant PHY-1505932.

  10. Exploring the complexity of the childhood trait-psychopathology association: Continuity, pathoplasty, and complication effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Marleen; De Clercq, Barbara; De Caluwé, Elien; Verbeke, Lize

    2016-02-01

    Four different models have been generally proposed as plausible etiological explanations for the relation between personality and psychopathology, namely, the vulnerability, complication, pathoplasty, and spectrum or continuity model. The current study entails a joint investigation of the continuity, pathoplasty, and complication models to explain the nature of the associations between early maladaptive traits and psychopathology over time in 717 referred and community children (54.4% girls), aged from 8 to 14 years. Across a 2-year time span, maladaptive traits and psychopathology were measured at three different time points, thereby relying on comprehensive and age-specific dimensional operationalizations of both personality symptoms and psychopathology. The results demonstrate overall compelling evidence for the continuity model, finding more focused support for pathoplasty and complication effects for particular combinations of personality symptoms and psychopathology dimensions. As expected, the continuity associations were found to be more robust for those personality-psychopathology associations that are conceptually closer, such as the emotional instability/introversion-internalizing problems association and the disagreeableness-externalizing problems association. Continuity associations were also stronger when personality was considered from a maladaptive rather than from a general trait perspective. The implication of the findings for the treatment of psychopathology and personality symptoms are briefly discussed.

  11. Terahertz Transmission Imaging with 2.52 THz Continuous Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Tong Guan; De-Wei Zheng; Min Hu; Wen-Jie Fu; Yu-Meng Cui; Xiang Fan; Liang Zhang; Ye Yuan; Jing-Yuan Xu; Yuan Li

    2013-01-01

    In this article, two terahertz transmission imaging systems are built with a 2.52 THz continuous wave laser and two types of sensors. One is array scanning system using a 124×124 pyro-electric array camera as the detector; the other is a point-wise scanning system utilizing a Golay cell as the detector. The imaging speed and quality is briefly analyzed. Terahertz (THz) imaging results demonstrate that the array scanning system has higher imaging speed with lower resolution. The point-wise scanning system has higher imaging quality with lower speed.

  12. High-power pulse trains excited by modulated continuous waves

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan; Li, Lu; Malomed, Boris A

    2015-01-01

    Pulse trains growing from modulated continuous waves (CWs) are considered, using solutions of the Hirota equation for solitons on a finite background. The results demonstrate that pulses extracted from the maximally compressed trains can propagate preserving their shape and forming robust arrays. The dynamics of double high-power pulse trains produced by modulated CWs in a model of optical fibers, including the Raman effect and other higher-order terms, is considered in detail too. It is demonstrated that the double trains propagate in a robust form, with frequencies shifted by the Raman effect.

  13. Optical Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave (FMCW) Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Jesse

    2005-01-01

    This book introduces the optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interferometry - a new field of optics that is derived from radar. The study of optical FMCW interference not only updates our knowledge about the nature of light, but also creates an advanced technology for precision measurements. The principles, applications and signal processing of optical FMCW interference are systematically discussed. This book is intended for scientists and engineers in both academia and industry. It is especially suited to professionals who are working in the field of measurement instruments.

  14. Continuous-wave organic dye lasers and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Ofer; Chua, Song-Liang; Zhen, Bo; Lee, Jeongwon; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-16

    An organic dye laser produces a continuous-wave (cw) output without any moving parts (e.g., without using flowing dye streams or spinning discs of solid-state dye media to prevent photobleaching) and with a pump beam that is stationary with respect to the organic dye medium. The laser's resonant cavity, organic dye medium, and pump beam are configured to excite a lasing transition over a time scale longer than the associated decay lifetimes in the organic dye medium without photobleaching the organic dye medium. Because the organic dye medium does not photobleach when operating in this manner, it may be pumped continuously so as to emit a cw output beam. In some examples, operation in this manner lowers the lasing threshold (e.g., to only a few Watts per square centimeter), thereby facilitating electrical pumping for cw operation.

  15. Continuous-wave four-wave mixing with linear growth based on electromagnetically dual induced transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahua Li(李家华); Wenxing Yang(杨文星); Jucun Peng(彭菊村)

    2004-01-01

    Using Schrodinger-Maxwell formalism, we propose and analyze a continuous-wave four-wave mixing (FWM) scheme for the generation of coherent light in a six-level atomic system based on electromagnetically dual induced transparency. We derive the corresponding explicit analytical expressions for the generated mixing field. We find that the scheme greatly enhances FWM production efficiency and is also capable of inhibiting and delaying the onset of the detrimental three-photon destructive interference by choosing the proper decay rate in the second electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) process.In addition, such an optical process also provides possibilities for producing short-wave-length coherent radiation at low pump intensities.

  16. Searches for continuous gravitational waves from nine young supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barclay, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio,, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dartez, L; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fuentes-Tapia, S; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Hee, S; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Le, J; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; McWilliams, S; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moore, B; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Pai, S; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patrick, Z; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Post, A; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quiroga, G; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Reula, O; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sawadsky, A; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szczepanczyk, M; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C van den; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Xie, S; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, Q; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth LIGO science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of ten. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering F-statistic. We found no credible gravitational-wave signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as $4\\times10^{-25}$ on intrinsic strain, $2\\times10^{-7}$ on fiducial ellipticity, and $4\\times10^{-5}$ on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  17. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10-25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10-7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10-5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  18. Search for continuous gravitational waves: improving robustness versus instrumental artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Keitel, David; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Leaci, Paola; Siddiqi, Maham

    2013-01-01

    The standard multi-detector F-statistic for continuous gravitational waves is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artifacts, for example monochromatic sinusoidal disturbances (lines). This vulnerability to line artifacts arises because the F-statistic compares the signal hypothesis to a Gaussian-noise hypothesis, and hence is triggered by anything that resembles the signal hypothesis more than Gaussian noise. Various ad-hoc veto methods to deal with such line artifacts have been proposed and used in the past. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that includes an explicit alternative hypothesis to model disturbed data. We introduce a simple line model that defines lines as signal candidates appearing only in one detector. This allows us to explicitly compute the odds between the signal hypothesis and an extended noise hypothesis, resulting in a new detection statistic that is more robust to instrumental artifacts. We present and discuss results from Monte-Carlo tests on both simulated data and on det...

  19. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Frequency modulated continuous wave lidar performance model for target detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Bosq, Todd W.; Preece, Bradley L.

    2017-05-01

    The desire to provide the warfighter both ranging and reflected intensity information is increasing to meet expanding operational needs. LIDAR imaging systems can provide the user with intensity, range, and even velocity information of a scene. The ability to predict the performance of LIDAR systems is critical for the development of future designs without the need to conduct time consuming and costly field studies. Performance modeling of a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) LIDAR system is challenging due to the addition of the chirped laser source and waveform mixing. The FMCW LIDAR model is implemented in the NV-IPM framework using the custom component generation tool. This paper presents an overview of the FMCW Lidar, the customized LIDAR components, and a series of trade studies using the LIDAR model.

  1. Stability Analysis of Continuous Waves in Nonlocal Random Nonlinear Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim A. Molchan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the competing cubic-quintic nonlinearity model, stability (instability of continuous waves in nonlocal random non-Kerr nonlinear media is studied analytically and numerically. Fluctuating media parameters are modeled by the Gaussian white noise. It is shown that for different response functions of a medium nonlocality suppresses, as a rule, both the growth rate peak and bandwidth of instability caused by random parameters. At the same time, for a special form of the response functions there can be an ''anomalous'' subjection of nonlocality to the instability development which leads to further increase of the growth rate. Along with the second-order moments of the modulational amplitude, higher-order moments are taken into account.

  2. Simulations of nonlinear continuous wave pressure fields in FOCUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Hamilton, Mark F.; McGough, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    The Khokhlov - Zabolotskaya - Kuznetsov (KZK) equation is a parabolic approximation to the Westervelt equation that models the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinearity. Although the KZK equation is only valid in the far field of the paraxial region for mildly focused or unfocused transducers, the KZK equation is widely applied in medical ultrasound simulations. For a continuous wave input, the KZK equation is effectively modeled by the Bergen Code [J. Berntsen, Numerical Calculations of Finite Amplitude Sound Beams, in M. F. Hamilton and D. T. Blackstock, editors, Frontiers of Nonlinear Acoustics: Proceedings of 12th ISNA, Elsevier, 1990], which is a finite difference model that utilizes operator splitting. Similar C++ routines have been developed for FOCUS, the `Fast Object-Oriented C++ Ultrasound Simulator' (http://www.egr.msu.edu/˜fultras-web) to calculate nonlinear pressure fields generated by axisymmetric flat circular and spherically focused ultrasound transducers. This new routine complements an existing FOCUS program that models nonlinear ultrasound propagation with the angular spectrum approach [P. T. Christopher and K. J. Parker, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 488-499 (1991)]. Results obtained from these two nonlinear ultrasound simulation approaches are evaluated and compared for continuous wave linear simulations. The simulation results match closely in the farfield of the paraxial region, but the results differ in the nearfield. The nonlinear pressure field generated by a spherically focused transducer with a peak surface pressure of 0.2MPa radiating in a lossy medium with β = 3.5 is simulated, and the computation times are also evaluated. The nonlinear simulation results demonstrate acceptable agreement in the focal zone. These two related nonlinear simulation approaches are now included with FOCUS to enable convenient simulations of nonlinear pressure fields on desktop and laptop computers.

  3. Magneto-acoustic imaging by continuous-wave excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunqi, Zhang; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Tao, Yin; Zhipeng, Liu

    2016-07-01

    The electrical characteristics of tissue yield valuable information for early diagnosis of pathological changes. Magneto-acoustic imaging is a functional approach for imaging of electrical conductivity. This study proposes a continuous-wave magneto-acoustic imaging method. A kHz-range continuous signal with an amplitude range of several volts is used to excite the magneto-acoustic signal and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The magneto-acoustic signal amplitude and phase are measured to locate the acoustic source via lock-in technology. An optimisation algorithm incorporating nonlinear equations is used to reconstruct the magneto-acoustic source distribution based on the measured amplitude and phase at various frequencies. Validation simulations and experiments were performed in pork samples. The experimental and simulation results agreed well. While the excitation current was reduced to 10 mA, the acoustic signal magnitude increased up to 10(-7) Pa. Experimental reconstruction of the pork tissue showed that the image resolution reached mm levels when the excitation signal was in the kHz range. The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected magneto-acoustic signal was improved by more than 25 dB at 5 kHz when compared to classical 1 MHz pulse excitation. The results reported here will aid further research into magneto-acoustic generation mechanisms and internal tissue conductivity imaging.

  4. Design of continuous long slot leaky-wave antenna for millimeter wave application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Shanwei; Zhang Yan; Liu Juan; Zhang Jiangling

    2007-01-01

    A simple and efficient design scheme of the continuous long slot leaky-wave antenna is developed. The key steps involved in the scheme are summarized. First, the cut-off frequencies of slot waveguides with different slot offsets are obtained by 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Second, the attenuation function αra is estimated by the aperture distribution, and the attenuation function αrs is determined by the slot radiation.Finally, the attenuation function αra is combined with the attenuation function αrs by the coefficient K. And an example in Ka band is presented. Moreover, the return loss of the E-plane Tee-junction (ET) and the radiation pattern of leaky-wave antenna are simulated. The scheme is verified by comparing with the experimental result.

  5. Non-infectious complications of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: evaluation with peritoneal computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camsari, T.; Celik, A.; Ozaksoy, D.; Salman, S.; Cavdar, C.; Sifil, A. [Ilica Mahallesi Karakizli Sokak, Onay Apartmani, Izmir (Turkey)

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the non-infectious complications of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) using peritoneal computed tomography (PCT). Twenty symptomatic patients were included in the study. Initially 2000 ml of dialysate fluid was infused into the peritoneal cavity and standard peritoneal computed cavity and standard peritoneal computed tomography (SPCT) serial scans with 10 mm thickness were performed from the mid-thoracic region to the genital organs. Afterwards, 100 ml of non-ionic contrast material containing 300 mg/ml iodine was injected through the catheter and was distributed homogeneously in the intra-abdominal dialysate fluid by changing the positions of the patients; after waiting for 2-4 h, the CT scan was repeated as peritoneal contrast computed tomography (PCCT). In patients (n = 20) both SPCT and PCCT revealed 90 % (n = 18) pathological findings. But PCCT showed 60 % (n = 12) additional pathological findings. We believe that PCT is beneficial for evaluation of non-infectious complications of CAPD. But PCCT is superior to SPCT in evaluating non-infectious complications encountered in patients on CAPD treatment. (author)

  6. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Improving robustness versus instrumental artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, David; Prix, Reinhard; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Leaci, Paola; Siddiqi, Maham

    2014-03-01

    The standard multidetector F-statistic for continuous gravitational waves is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artifacts, for example monochromatic sinusoidal disturbances ("lines"). This vulnerability to line artifacts arises because the F-statistic compares the signal hypothesis to a Gaussian-noise hypothesis, and hence is triggered by anything that resembles the signal hypothesis more than Gaussian noise. Various ad-hoc veto methods to deal with such line artifacts have been proposed and used in the past. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that includes an explicit alternative hypothesis to model disturbed data. We introduce a simple line model that defines lines as signal candidates appearing only in one detector. This allows us to explicitly compute the odds between the signal hypothesis and an extended noise hypothesis, resulting in a new detection statistic that is more robust to instrumental artifacts. We present and discuss results from Monte-Carlo tests on both simulated data and on detector data from the fifth LIGO science run. We find that the line-robust statistic retains the detection power of the standard F-statistic in Gaussian noise. In the presence of line artifacts it is more sensitive, even compared to the popular F-statistic consistency veto, over which it improves by as much as a factor of two in detectable signal strength.

  7. Higher Order Mode Coupler Heating in Continuous Wave Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyak, N.; Awida, M.; Hocker, A.; Khabibobulline, T.; Lunin, A.

    Electromagnetic heating due to higher order modes (HOM) propagation is particularly a concern for continuous wave (CW) particle accelerator machines. Power on the order of several watts could flow out of the cavity's HOM ports in CW operations. The upgrade of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS-II) at SLAC requires a major modification of the design of the higher order mode (HOM) antenna and feed through of the conventional ILC elliptical 9-cell cavity in order to utilize it for LCLS-II. The HOM antenna is required to bear higher RF losses, while relatively maintaining the coupling level of the higher order modes. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the heating expected in the HOM coupler with a thorough thermal quench study in comparison with the conventional ILC design. We discuss also how the heat will be removed from the cavity through RF cables with specially designed cooling straps. Finally, we report on the latest experimental results of cavity testing in vertical and horizontal cryostats.

  8. Continuous-wave Raman Lasing in Aluminum Nitride Microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xianwen; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Lai; Wang, Jian; Han, Yanjun; Hao, Zhibiao; Li, Hongtao; Luo, Yi; Yan, Jianchang; Wei, Tongbo; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Junxi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first investigation on continuous-wave Raman lasing in high-quality-factor aluminum nitride (AlN) microring resonators. Although wurtzite AlN is known to exhibit six Raman-active phonons, single-mode Raman lasing with low threshold and high slope efficiency is demonstrated. Selective excitation of A$_1^\\mathrm{TO}$ and E$_2^\\mathrm{high}$ phonons with Raman shifts of $\\sim$612 and 660 cm$^{-1}$ is observed by adjusting the polarization of the pump light. A theoretical analysis of Raman scattering efficiency within ${c}$-plane (0001) of AlN is carried out to help account for the observed lasing behavior. Bidirectional lasing is experimentally confirmed as a result of symmetric Raman gain in micro-scale waveguides. Furthermore, second-order Raman lasing with unparalleled output power of $\\sim$11.3 mW is obtained, which offers the capability to yield higher order Raman lasers for mid-infrared applications.

  9. Characterization of Chirped Pump Four-Wave Mixing in Nonlinear Fibers using only Continuous-Wave-Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads; Guan, Pengyu; Møller-kristensen, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel fiber characterization method that reveals the four-wave mixing bandwidth for chirped pump operation, using two tunable continuous-wave-lasers. The method accurately predicts the bandwidth for optical time lenses with broadband multi-carrier input......We propose a novel fiber characterization method that reveals the four-wave mixing bandwidth for chirped pump operation, using two tunable continuous-wave-lasers. The method accurately predicts the bandwidth for optical time lenses with broadband multi-carrier input...

  10. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  11. Continuous-wave laser particle conditioning: Thresholds and time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew; Ogloza, Albert; Olson, Kyle; Talghader, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    The optical absorption of contaminants on high reflectivity mirrors was measured using photo thermal common-path interferometry before and after exposure to high power continuous-wave laser light. The contaminants were micron-sized graphite flakes on hafnia-silica distributed Bragg reflectors illuminated by a ytterbium-doped fiber laser. After one-second periods of exposure, the mirrors demonstrated reduced absorption for irradiances as low as 11 kW cm-2 and had an obvious threshold near 20 kW cm-2. Final absorption values were reduced by up to 90% of their initial value for irradiances of 92 kW cm-2. For shorter pulses at 34 kW cm-2, a minimum exposure time required to begin absorption reduction was found between 100 μs and 200 μs, with particles reaching their final minimum absorption value within 300 ms. Microscope images of the surface showed agglomerated particles fragmenting with some being removed completely, probably by evaporation for exposures between 200 μs to 10 ms. Exposures of 100 ms and longer left behind a thin semi-transparent residue, covering much of the conditioned area. An order of magnitude estimate of the time necessary to begin altering the surface contaminants (also known as "conditioning") indicates about 200 μs seconds at 34 kW cm-2, based on heating an average carbon particle to its sublimation temperature including energy loss to thermal contact and radiation. This estimation is close to the observed exposure time required to begin absorption reduction.

  12. Statistical reconstruction algorithms for continuous wave electron spin resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissos, Imry; Levit, Michael; Feuer, Arie; Blank, Aharon

    2013-06-01

    Electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI) is an important branch of ESR that deals with heterogeneous samples ranging from semiconductor materials to small live animals and even humans. ESRI can produce either spatial images (providing information about the spatially dependent radical concentration) or spectral-spatial images, where an extra dimension is added to describe the absorption spectrum of the sample (which can also be spatially dependent). The mapping of oxygen in biological samples, often referred to as oximetry, is a prime example of an ESRI application. ESRI suffers frequently from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which results in long acquisition times and poor image quality. A broader use of ESRI is hampered by this slow acquisition, which can also be an obstacle for many biological applications where conditions may change relatively quickly over time. The objective of this work is to develop an image reconstruction scheme for continuous wave (CW) ESRI that would make it possible to reduce the data acquisition time without degrading the reconstruction quality. This is achieved by adapting the so-called "statistical reconstruction" method, recently developed for other medical imaging modalities, to the specific case of CW ESRI. Our new algorithm accounts for unique ESRI aspects such as field modulation, spectral-spatial imaging, and possible limitation on the gradient magnitude (the so-called "limited angle" problem). The reconstruction method shows improved SNR and contrast recovery vs. commonly used back-projection-based methods, for a variety of simulated synthetic samples as well as in actual CW ESRI experiments.

  13. LDRD final report on continuous wave intersubband terahertz sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samora, Sally; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Young, Erik W.; Fuller, Charles T.; Stephenson, Larry L.; Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.

    2005-02-01

    There is a general lack of compact electromagnetic radiation sources between 1 and 10 terahertz (THz). This a challenging spectral region lying between optical devices at high frequencies and electronic devices at low frequencies. While technologically very underdeveloped the THz region has the promise to be of significant technological importance, yet demonstrating its relevance has proven difficult due to the immaturity of the area. While the last decade has seen much experimental work in ultra-short pulsed terahertz sources, many applications will require continuous wave (cw) sources, which are just beginning to demonstrate adequate performance for application use. In this project, we proposed examination of two potential THz sources based on intersubband semiconductor transitions, which were as yet unproven. In particular we wished to explore quantum cascade lasers based sources and electronic based harmonic generators. Shortly after the beginning of the project, we shifted our emphasis to the quantum cascade lasers due to two events; the publication of the first THz quantum cascade laser by another group thereby proving feasibility, and the temporary shut down of the UC Santa Barbara free-electron lasers which were to be used as the pump source for the harmonic generation. The development efforts focused on two separate cascade laser thrusts. The ultimate goal of the first thrust was for a quantum cascade laser to simultaneously emit two mid-infrared frequencies differing by a few THz and to use these to pump a non-linear optical material to generate THz radiation via parametric interactions in a specifically engineered intersubband transition. While the final goal was not realized by the end of the project, many of the completed steps leading to the goal will be described in the report. The second thrust was to develop direct THz QC lasers operating at terahertz frequencies. This is simpler than a mixing approach, and has now been demonstrated by a few groups

  14. Intraperitoneal pseudocyst formation: complication of fungal peritonitis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahpazova, E; Ruso, B; Kuzmanovska, D

    2007-10-01

    A 14-year-old girl, with end-stage renal disease on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) the last 4 years, after an episode of Candida albicans was switched to hemodialysis. One month later she came back because of a palpable-painful abdominal mass and abdominal distention. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound examination demonstrated a demarkated fluid collection in the lower abdomen and pelvis. The cyst was drained percutaneously and the culture disclosed candida albicans which was treated with fluconasole. Two months later, the girl was admitted again with the same symptoms. An investigative laparotomy was undergone and the cyst was drained again. Fluid cultures were negative. CT abdomen examination six months later was negative for cyst relapse. In conclusion, intraperitoneal pseudocyst is a serious complication of CAPD. Surgical intervention may be preferable to percutaneous drainage.

  15. Intraperitoneal pseudocyst formation: Complication of fungal peritonitis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahpazova, E; Ruso, B; Kuzmanovska, D

    2007-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl, with end-stage renal disease on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) the last 4 years, after an episode of Candida albicans was switched to hemodialysis. One month later she came back because of a palpable painful abdominal mass and abdominal distention. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound examination demonstrated a demarkated fluid collection in the lower abdomen and pelvis. The cyst was drained percutaneously and the culture disclosed candida albicans which was treated with fluconasole. Two months later, the girl was admitted again with the same symptoms. An investigative laparotomy was undergone and the cyst was drained again. Fluid cultures were negative. CT abdomen examination six months later was negative for cyst relapse. In conclusion, intraperitoneal pseudocyst is a serious complication of CAPD. Surgical intervention may be preferable to percutaneous drainage. PMID:19582199

  16. Detailed Characterization of Continuous-Wave and Pulsed-Pump Four-Wave Mixing in Nonlinear Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads; Galili, Michael; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    We explore the parametric gain differences for continuous-wave and pulse-pumped four-wave mixing, using various highly nonlinear fibers. Detailed simulations support our findings that the dispersion slope determines the experimentally observed differences, limiting the pulsed-pump performance....

  17. Continuous reversal of Hanle resonances of counter-propagating pulse and continuous-wave field

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrijević, Jelena; Jelenković, Branislav M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study propagation dynamics of the two counter-propagating lasers, the continuous-wave (CW) laser and the pulse of another laser, when both lasers are tuned to the $F_{g}=2 \\rightarrow F_{e}=1$ transition in $^{87}$Rb, and therefore can develop Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in Rb vapor. We calculate transmission of both lasers as a function of applied magnetic field, and investigate how the propagation of the pulse affects the transmission of the CW laser. And vice versa, we have found conditions when the Gaussian pulse can either pass unchanged, or be significantly absorbed in the vacuum Rb cell. This configuration is therefore suitable for the convenient control of the pulse propagation and the system is of interest for optically switching of the laser pulses. In terms of the corresponding shapes of the coherent Hanle resonances, this is equivalent to turning the coherent resonance from Hanle EIT into electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) peak. There is the range...

  18. Tunable, continuous-wave single-resonant optical parametric oscillator with output coupling for resonant wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong-Hua, Zheng; Bao-Fu, Zhang; Zhong-Xing, Jiao; Biao, Wang

    2016-01-01

    We present a continuous-wave singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator with 1.5% output coupling of the resonant signal wave, based on an angle-polished MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN), pumped by a commercial Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm. The output-coupled optical parametric oscillator delivers a maximum total output power of 4.19 W with 42.8% extraction efficiency, across a tuning range of 1717 nm in the near- and mid-infrared region. This indicates improvements of 1.87 W in output power, 19.1% in extraction efficiency and 213 nm in tuning range extension in comparison with the optical parametric oscillator with no output coupling, while at the expense of increasing the oscillation threshold by a factor of ˜ 2. Moreover, it is confirmed that the finite output coupling also contributes to the reduction of the thermal effects in crystal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61308056, 11204044, 11232015, and 11072271), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20120171110005 and 20130171130003), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. 14lgpy07), and the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, China (Grant No. ZHD201203).

  19. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface waves

    OpenAIRE

    Gagarina, E; Vegt, van der, N.F.A.; Ambati, V.R.; Bokhove, O.

    2013-01-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles' variational principle for water waves together with a space-time finite element discretization that is continuous in space and discontinuous in time. The key features of this formulation are: (i) a discrete variational approach that gives rise to conservation of discrete energy and phase space and prese...

  20. Continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system with stably tunable beat source using optical switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jaesung

    2017-01-01

    A tunable beat source has been made using an optical switch module. A stably-tunable beat source for continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system was implemented by simply connecting 16 coaxial distributed feedback laser diodes to an optical switch. The terahertz frequency was rapidly changed without frequency drifts by changing the optical path. The continuous wave terahertz frequency was tuned from 0.05 to 0.8 THz in steps of 50 GHz or 0.4 nm. We measured continuous wave terahertz waveforms emitted from the photomixers using the switched optical beat source. We also calculated the terahertz frequency peaks by taking fast Fourier transforms of the measured terahertz waveforms. By equipping the implemented tunable beat source with an optical switch, a continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system was constructed and used to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy for nondestructive tests using the spectra of two type of Si wafers with different resistivity.

  1. Extracorporeal Shock-wave Lithotripsy Success Rate and Complications: Initial Experience at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. Al-Marhoon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with Modularis Vario Siemens in the management of patients with renal and ureteral stones.Methods: Between 2007 and 2009, 225 outpatients were treated with Siemens Modularis Vario lithotripter at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Stone size, location, total number of shockwaves, stone-free rate, complications and adjunctive interventions were investigated. Chi-Square and Logistic Regression analyses were used, with p<0.05 set as the level of significance.Results: Of the 225 initial consecutive patients who underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, 192 (85% had renal stones and 33 (15% had ureteric stones. The mean±SD stone size was 11.3 ± 4.5 mm, while the mean age of the patients was 39.9 ± 12.8 years with 68.5% males. The mean renal stone size was 11.6 ± 4.7 mm; a mean of 1.3 sessions was required. The mean ureteric stone size was 9.9 ± 3 mm; and a mean of 1.3 sessions was required. Treatment success (defined as complete clearance of ureteric stones, stone-free or clinically insignificant residual fragments of <4 mm for renal stones was 74% for renal stones and 88% for ureteric stones. Additional extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and ureteroscopy were the most adjunctive procedures used for stone clearance. Complications occurred in 74 patients (38.5% with renal stones and 13 patients (39.4% with uretetric stones. The most common complication was loin pain (experienced by 16.7% with renal stones and 21% with ureteric stones. Severe renal colic mandating admission occurred in 2% of patients with renal stones and 6% of patients with ureteric stones. In patients with renal stone, steinstrasse occurred in 3.6% and infection post extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in 0.5%. Using Multivariate Logistic Regression analysis, factors found to have significant effect on complete stone clearance were serum creatinine (p=0.004 and the number of

  2. The effect of nonuniform motion on the Doppler spectrum of scattered continuous-wave waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Addison, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a widely treated phenomena in both radar and sonar for objects undergoing uniform motion. There are many different models (Censor has written a history of the subject) one can use to derive the Doppler effect. The treatment of non-uniform motion is not widely discussed in the literature of radar and sonar. Some authors argue it is negligible, while others refer to work dating back to Kelly in the early sixties. The treatment by Kelly, based on waveform analysis in acoustics, is difficult to justify in electromagnetism. Using the language of waveform analysis it is difficult to determine when approximations are justified by the physics of the waveform interaction and when they aren't. By returning to electromagnetic considerations in the derivation and subsequent analysis, issues associated with the correct physics and proper approximations become transparent. We present a straight forward analysis of the non-uniform Doppler effect based on the relativistic mirror (moving boundary) that is undergoing arbitrary motion. The resultant structure of the scattered waveform provides a simple representation of the effect of non-uniform motion on the scattered waveform that can be more easily analyzed. This work is a continuation of earlier work done by Censor, De Smedt, and Cooper. This analysis is independent of narrow-band assumptions so it is completely general. Non-uniform motion can produce two types of effects associated with the Doppler spectrum, a baseband line that isn't straight and micro-Doppler off of the baseband that produces complicated sideband behavior. Complicated baseband and micro-Doppler are illustrated by using the example of a particular waveform, the continuous wave (CW) which is analyzed for a number of examples of interest to the radar community. Application of this information is then discussed.

  3. Wave Equations about Displacement, Velocity, Stress and Strain in FGM with Constituents Varied Continuously and Smoothly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Hongxin; ZHANG Qingjie

    2008-01-01

    The wave equations about displacement, velocity, stress and strain in functionally gradient material (FGM) with constituents varied continuously and smoothly were established. Four kinds of waves are of linear second-order partial differential equation of hyperbolic type and have the same characteristic curve at the plane of X,t. In general, the varying mode of stress is different from that of displacement and velocity at the front of wave. But in a special case that the product of density p and elastic modulus E of the material remains unchanged, the three wave equations have a similar expression and they have a similar varying mode in the front of wave.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Non-Linear Wave Propagation in Waters of Mildly Varying Topography with Complicated Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪生; 洪广文; 丁平兴; 曹振轶

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of different forms of mild slope equations for non-linear wave are analyzed, and new non-linear theoretic models for wave propagation are presented, with non-linear terms added to the mild slope equations for non-stationary linear waves and dissipative effects considered. Numerical simulation models are developed of non-linear wave propagation for waters of mildly varying topography with complicated boundary, and the effects are studied of different non-linear corrections on calculation results of extended mild slope equations. Systematical numerical simulation tests show that the present models can effectively reflect non-linear effects.

  5. Continuous short-wave (radio-frequency) diathermy.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Continuous shortwave diathermy is the technique of choice when uniform marked elevation of temperature is required in the deep tissues. This heating can be targeted accurately by using an appropriate applicator positioned correctly. SWD also allows superficial structures to be heated selectively, although for this the various methods of surface heating are usually preferable. Sub-acute or chronic conditions respond best to continuous shortwave diathermy which, when used properly, can be as ef...

  6. Continuous control of ionization wave chaos by spatially derived feedback signals

    CERN Document Server

    Mausbach, T; Piel, A; Atipo, A; Pierre, T; Bonhomme, G; Mausbach, Th.; Klinger, Th.; Pierre, Th.

    1997-01-01

    In the positive column of a neon glow discharge, two different types of ionization waves occur simultaneously. The low-dimensional chaos arising from the nonlinear interaction between the two waves is controlled by a continuous feedback technique. The control strategy is derived from the time-delayed autosynchronization method. Two spatially displaced points of observation are used to obtain the control information, using the propagation characteristics of the chaotic wave.

  7. Continuous short-wave (radio-frequency) diathermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goats, G C

    1989-06-01

    Continuous shortwave diathermy is the technique of choice when uniform marked elevation of temperature is required in the deep tissues. This heating can be targeted accurately by using an appropriate applicator positioned correctly. SWD also allows superficial structures to be heated selectively, although for this the various methods of surface heating are usually preferable. Sub-acute or chronic conditions respond best to continuous shortwave diathermy which, when used properly, can be as effective as ultrasound. Acute lesions are better treated with pulsed shortwave diathermy. Continuous shortwave diathermy can help to relieve pain and muscle spasm, resolve inflammatory states and reduce swelling, promote vasodilation, increase the compliance of connective tissue, increase joint range and decrease joint stiffness.

  8. Continuous-wave wavelength conversion in a photonic crystal fiber with two zero-dispersion wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.V.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Nielsen, C.K.;

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous-wave wavelength conversion through four-wave mixing in an endlessly single mode photonic crystal fiber. Phasematching is possible at vanishing pump power in the anomalous dispersion regime between the two zero-dispersion wavelengths. By mixing appropriate pump and idler...

  9. A Wave-Optics Approach to Paraxial Geometrical Laws Based on Continuity at Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, J.; Nistal, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a derivation of the paraxial geometrical laws starting from a wave-optics approach, in particular by using simple continuity conditions of paraxial spherical waves at boundaries (discontinuities) between optical media. Paraxial geometrical imaging and magnification laws, under refraction and reflection at boundaries, are derived for…

  10. Continuity Conditions on Schrodinger Wave Functions at Discontinuities of the Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, David

    1979-01-01

    Several standard arguments which attempt to show that the wave function and its derivative must be continuous across jump discontinuities of the potential are reviewed and their defects discussed. (Author/HM)

  11. Complications in skin grafts when continuing antithrombotic therapy prior to cutaneous surgery requiring skin grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarjis, Reem Dina; Jørgensen, Lone; Finnerup, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The risk of postoperative bleeding and wound healing complications in skin grafts among anticoagulated patients undergoing cutaneous surgery has not been firmly established. The objective was to examine the literature and assess the risk of postoperative bleeding or wound healing...... studies were of prospective and retrospective design. Most of the reviewed studies suggest that the use of antithrombotic therapy can increase the risk of bleeding complications in skin grafts. These complications are only wound threatening and not life threatening. Therefore, this is of concern mostly...... complications in skin grafts among anticoagulated patients, compared with patients who discontinue or patients who are not receiving antithrombotic therapy prior to cutaneous surgery requiring skin grafting. A systematic review examining the effect of antithrombotic therapy on cutaneous surgery was performed...

  12. Time reversal of continuous-wave, monochromatic signals in elastic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Brian E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulrich, Timothy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Experimental observations of spatial focusing of continuous-wave, steady-state elastic waves in a reverberant elastic cavity using time reversal are reported here. Spatially localized focusing is achieved when multiple channels are employed, while a single channel does not yield such focusing. The amplitude of the energy at the focal location increases as the square of the number of channels used, while the amplitude elsewhere in the medium increases proportionally with the number of channels used. The observation is important in the context of imaging in solid laboratory samples as well as problems involving continuous-wave signals in Earth.

  13. A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliá, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kucharczyk, C; Kudla, S; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Roux, A Le; Leaci, P; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levine, B; Lewis, J B; Lhuillier, V; Li, T G F; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lloyd, D; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Luan, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Mokler, F; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R; Necula, V; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; Larcher, W Ortega; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Ou, J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pindor, B; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poole, V; Poux, C; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Roever, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Soden, K; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stevens, D; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vlcek, B; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vrinceanu, D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wibowo, S; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrony, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Reaching ~3.35 x 10^-25 at ~150 Hz, those upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  14. Transcranial direct current stimulation in refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep: a controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Edina T; Terney, Daniella; Atkins, Mary D

    2011-01-01

    Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) decreases cortical excitability. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether cathodal tDCS could interrupt the continuous epileptiform activity. Five patients with focal, refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep were ...

  15. Neuronal Networks in Children with Continuous Spikes and Waves during Slow Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groening, Kristina; Moehring, Jan; Moeller, Friederike; Boor, Rainer; Brodbeck, Verena; Michel, Christoph M.; Rodionov, Roman; Lemieux, Louis; Stephani, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep is an age-related disorder characterized by the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges during at least greater than 85% of sleep and cognitive deficits associated with this electroencephalography pattern. The pathophysiological mechanisms of continuous spikes and…

  16. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for cystine urolithiasis in children: outcome and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavković, Andjelka; Radovanović, Miladin; Sirić, Zlatko; Vlajković, Marina; Stefanović, Vladisav

    2002-01-01

    The Siemens Lithostar Litotriptor was used to treat 6 children with cystine nephrolithiasis, previously treated by open surgery. Five children had renal calculi (3 multiple caliceal, 2 pelvis) and one had ureteral calculus. Stone size ranged from 0.2-2.5 cm in diameter, and stone burden was from 0.24 to 10.81 cm3 per kidney. From one to 4 ESWL sessions per unit were applied, with a total of 1,800 to 12,000 shock waves. The stone free rate at 3 months was 50%. A complete elimination was obtained with cystine stones in renal pelvis and ureter, however, up to 4 ESWL treatments failed in caliceal stones. Rather location of cystine calculi than previous surgery was associated with ESWL success rate. Two patients with positive urine cultures were successfully treated with appropriate antibiotics before ESWL was attempted. Perirenal hematoma was major complication demonstrated by radionuclide scintigraphy in one patient, and resolved spontaneously by 3 months. In the combined treatment of cystine urolithiasis in children ESWL, as auxillary procedure, was safe and effective in pelvis stone but failed in caliceal stones. Medical dissolution for retained fragments was found effective.

  17. Linear Growth of Continuous-Wave Four-Wave Mixing with Dual Induced Transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Yi; LI Jia-Hua

    2005-01-01

    Using Schrodinger-Maxwell formalism, we propose and analyze an optical four-wave mixing (FWM) scheme for the generation of coherent light in a coherent six-level atomic medium based on dual electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We show that the significantly enhanced conversion efficiency enabled by ultraslow propagation of pump waves has no direct relationship with the single-photon detuning, which is different from the FWM with a single EIT. The most important feature is that our scheme is also capable of inhibiting and delaying the onset of the detrimental three-photon destructive interference that looks like a recent scheme [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 243902] andmay be used for generating short-wave-length coherent radiation.

  18. Low-power continuous-wave four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in AlGaAs-nanowaveguide microresonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultavewuti, Pisek; Pusino, Vincenzo; Sorel, Marc; Stewart Aitchison, J

    2015-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced wavelength conversion in a Q∼7500 deeply etched AlGaAs-nanowaveguide microresonator via degenerate continuous-wave four-wave mixing with a pump power of 24 mW. The maximum conversion efficiency is -43  dB and accounts for 12 dB enhancement compared to that of a straight nanowaveguide. The experimental results and theoretical predictions agree very well and show optimized conversion efficiency of -15  dB. This work represents a step toward realizing a fully integrated optical devices for generating new optical frequencies.

  19. Efficient continuous-wave four-wave mixing in bandgap-engineered AlGaAs waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, Jeremiah J; Apiratikul, Paveen; Richardson, Christopher J K; Porkolab, Gyorgy A; Carter, Gary M; Murphy, Thomas E

    2014-06-01

    We present a side-by-side comparison of the nonlinear behavior of four passive AlGaAs ridge waveguides where the bandgap energy of the core layers ranges from 1.60 to 1.79 eV. By engineering the bandgap to suppress two-photon absorption, minimizing the linear loss, and minimizing the mode area, we achieve efficient wavelength conversion in the C-band via partially degenerate four-wave mixing with a continuous-wave pump. The observed conversion efficiency [Idler(OUT)/Signal(IN)=-6.8  dB] is among the highest reported in passive semiconductor or glass waveguides.

  20. Continuous-wave anti-Stokes Raman laser based on phase-matched nondegenerate four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate phase-matched nondegenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) in a high-finesse optical cavity using a gaseous Raman-active medium pumped by two independent continuous-wave lasers. Efficient upconversion is achieved for pump beams at different wavelengths under phase-matched conditions by optimizing the total dispersion of the hydrogen-filled optical cavity. The independent control of the pump-beam polarizations leads to further enhancement of the upconversion efficiency arising from a larger Raman gain than that in degenerate FWM. This approach offers a promising alternative for a narrow-linewidth tunable light source for highly precise laser spectroscopy.

  1. Low-power continuous-wave four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in AlGaAs-nanowaveguide microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Kultavewuti, Pisek; Sorel, Marc; Aitchison, J Stewart

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced wavelength conversion in a Q=7500 deeply etched AlGaAs-nanowaveguide microresonator via degenerate continuous-wave four-wave mixing with a pump power of 24 mW. The maximum conversion efficiency is -43 dB and accounts for 12 dB enhancement compared to that of a straight nanowaveguide. The experimental results and theoretical predictions agree very well and show optimized conversion efficiency of -15 dB. This work represents a step toward realizing a fully integrated optical devices for generating new optical frequencies.

  2. Continuous leaky-wave scanning using periodically modulated spoof plasmonic waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Gu Sheng; Ma, Hui Feng; Cai, Ben Geng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-07-12

    The plasmonic waveguide made of uniform corrugated metallic strip can support and guide spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) with high confinements. Here, we propose periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide composed of non-uniform corrugated metallic strip to convert SSPPs to radiating waves, in which the main beam of radiations can steer continuously as the frequency changes. To increase the radiation efficiency of the periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide at the broadside, an asymmetrical plasmonic waveguide is further presented to reduce the reflections and realize continuous leaky-wave scanning. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the radiation efficiency can be improved greatly and the main beam of leaky-wave radiations can steer from the backward quadrant to the forward quadrant, passing through the broadside direction, which generally is difficult to be realized by the common leaky-wave antennas.

  3. Energy of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic waves with point and continuous spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, M.; Fukumoto, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Energy of waves (or eigenmodes) in an ideal fluid and plasma is formulated in the noncanonical Hamiltonian context. By imposing the kinematical constraint on perturbations, the linearized Hamiltonian equation provides a formal definition of wave energy not only for eigenmodes corresponding to point spectra but also for singular ones corresponding to a continuous spectrum. The latter becomes dominant when mean fields have inhomogeneity originating from shear or gradient of the fields. The energy of each wave is represented by the eigenfrequency multiplied by the wave action, which is nothing but the action variable and, moreover, is associated with a derivative of a suitably defined dispersion relation. The sign of the action variable is crucial to the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation in Hamiltonian systems of finite degrees of freedom [M. G. Krein, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. A 73, 445 (1950)]. Krein's idea is extended to the case of coalescence between point and continuous spectra.

  4. Correction of walk-off-induced wavefront distortion for continuous-wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hongxin; Chen, Guozhu; Wu, Yue; Shen, Yong; Liu, Qu

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the wave front distortion in critically phase-matched continuous-wave (CW) second harmonic generation (SHG). Due to the walk-off effect in the nonlinear crystal, the generated second harmonic is extremely elliptical and quite non-Gaussian, which causes a very low matching and coupling efficiency in experiment. Cylindrical lenses and walk-off compensating crystals are adopted to correct distorted wave fronts, and obtain a good TEM00 mode efficiently. Theoretically, we simulate the correction effect of 266-nm laser generated with SHG. The experiment results accord well with the theoretical simulation and an above 80% TEM00 component is obtained for 266-nm continuous-wave laser with a 4.8°-walk-off angle in beta barium borate (BBO) crystal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91436103) and Research Programme of National University of Defense Technology, China (Grant No. JC15-02-03).

  5. Continuous-wave Terahertz Imaging Applied to Detect Infestations Caused by Insects in Grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuojun Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Detection infestations caused by insects in grain are important control measures for ensuring storage longevity, seed quality and food safety. The efficiency of the continuous wave terahertz imaging method to detect infestations caused by insects in wheat kernels was determined in this study. A continuous wave terahertz experimental setup was designed for recording of THz images corresponding to different infestations caused by different life stages of insects. The experimental results indicate that the absorbance is generally highest for un-infested wheat kernels and decreased at later growth stages from THz pseudo-color images. Our study intended to demonstrate how the method of continuous wave Terahertz imaging could be applied to detect Infestations Caused by Insects in Grain.

  6. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagarina, E.; Ambati, V. R.; van der Vegt, J. J. W.; Bokhove, O.

    2014-10-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves using the potential flow approximation. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles' variational principle for water waves together with a finite element discretization that is continuous in space and discontinuous in time. One novel feature of this variational finite element approach is that the free surface evolution is variationally dependent on the mesh deformation vis-à-vis the mesh deformation being geometrically dependent on free surface evolution. Another key feature is the use of a variational (dis)continuous Galerkin finite element discretization in time. Moreover, in the absence of a wave maker, it is shown to be equivalent to the second order symplectic Störmer-Verlet time stepping scheme for the free-surface degrees of freedom. These key features add to the stability of the numerical method. Finally, the resulting numerical scheme is verified against nonlinear analytical solutions with long time simulations and validated against experimental measurements of driven wave solutions in a wave basin of the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands.

  7. Advanced sine wave modulation of continuous wave laser system for atmospheric CO2 differential absorption measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Joel F; Nehrir, Amin R

    2014-01-01

    A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate online and offline wavelength transmitted and received channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit optimal autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit with zero off mainlobe values to within numerical precision. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not significantly degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  8. Time series analysis of continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneou......The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra...

  9. Endoscopic or Surgical Approach to Cure Pancreatitis and Its Complications: The History Continues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic and surgical treatment are the two main techniques for the treatment of pancreatitis, mainly represented by the persistent pain not responding to medical treatment and the complications associated with pain, such as pseudocysts and ductal stenosis. However, the dilemma is related to the procedures we use to treat these complications: surgical or endoscopic approach? Probably the treatment of choice is based on the expertise available in the various centers, but we also need an evidence-based approach. Thus, in 2007 [1], I commented on the paper of Cahen et al. [2] with enthusiasm for two reasons: the first was that, for the first time, a comparative study on the long term results of endoscopic vs. surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis patients was carried out, and the second was that the follow-up period was sufficient to assess the results of the two different treatments, not only from a medical point of view but also considering the patient reported outcomes using the SF-36 questionnaire. For the same reasons, I invite you to read, with attention, the paper of Varadarajulu et al. [3] reporting the data of the clinical outcomes of EUS-guided cystgastrostomy in comparison to surgical cystgastrostomy for the management of patients with uncomplicated pancreatic pseudocysts; the authors also evaluated the cost analysis of each treatment modality. Unfortunately, this was a retrospective case-controlled study carried out in a tertiary-referral center.

  10. Possible complication regarding phosphorus removal with a continuous flow biofilm system: Diffusion limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, C.M.; Arnz, P.; Henze, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion limitation of phosphate possibly constitutes a serious problem regarding the use of a biofilm reactor for enhanced biological phosphorus removal. A lab-scale reactor for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate was operated in a continuous alternating mode of operation. For a steady...

  11. Transcranial direct current stimulation in refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep: a controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Edina T; Terney, Daniella; Atkins, Mary D;

    2011-01-01

    Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) decreases cortical excitability. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether cathodal tDCS could interrupt the continuous epileptiform activity. Five patients with focal, refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep were...... recruited. Cathodal tDCS and sham stimulation were applied to the epileptic focus, before sleep (1 mA; 20 min). Cathodal tDCS did not reduce the spike-index in any of the patients....

  12. Low-power continuous-wave nonlinear optics in doped silica glass integrated waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, M.; Razzari, L.; Duchesne, D.; Morandotti, R.; Yang, Z.; Liscidini, M.; Sipe, J. E.; Chu, S.; Little, B. E.; Moss, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Photonic integrated circuits are a key component of future telecommunication networks, where demands for greater bandwidth, network flexibility, and low energy consumption and cost must all be met. The quest for all-optical components has naturally targeted materials with extremely large nonlinearity, including chalcogenide glasses and semiconductors, such as silicon and AlGaAs (ref. 4). However, issues such as immature fabrication technology for chalcogenide glass and high linear and nonlinear losses for semiconductors motivate the search for other materials. Here we present the first demonstration of nonlinear optics in integrated silica-based glass waveguides using continuous-wave light. We demonstrate four-wave mixing, with low (5 mW) continuous-wave pump power at λ = 1,550 nm, in high-index, doped silica glass ring resonators. The low loss, design flexibility and manufacturability of our device are important attributes for low-cost, high-performance, nonlinear all-optical photonic integrated circuits.

  13. Coherently combining short data segments for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, Evan

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments. For misaligned detectors, however, thi...

  14. Generation of continuous-wave THz radiation by use of quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Korsunsky, E A

    1999-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generation of continuous-wave THz radiation. The scheme requires a medium where three discrete states in a $\\Lambda $ configuration can be selected, with the THz-frequency transition between the two lower metastable states. We consider the propagation of three-frequency continuous-wave electromagnetic (e.m.) radiation through a $\\Lambda $ medium. Under resonant excitation, the medium absorption can be strongly reduced due to quantum interference of transitions, while the nonlinear susceptibility is enhanced. This leads to very efficient energy transfer between the e.m. waves providing a possibility for THz generation. We demonstrate that the photon conversion efficiency is approaching unity in this technique.

  15. A wave-optics approach to paraxial geometrical laws based on continuity at boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñares, J.; Nistal, M. C.

    2011-09-01

    We present a derivation of the paraxial geometrical laws starting from a wave-optics approach, in particular by using simple continuity conditions of paraxial spherical waves at boundaries (discontinuities) between optical media. Paraxial geometrical imaging and magnification laws, under refraction and reflection at boundaries, are derived for several instructive cases and without using Fresnel diffraction theory. The primary aim is to provide a complementary insight into the standard axiomatic approach of paraxial geometrical optics and likewise to allow the introduction of some wave imaging concepts, such as the transmittance function, with a notable didactic interest for advanced subjects such as Fourier optics. This approach provides a more homogeneous vision of classical optics in which the use of the optical field continuity conditions at a boundary is a usual requirement as is clearly seen, for example, in the case of the derivation of Fresnel formulas. The work is particularly intended for university physics teachers and pregraduate and first year postgraduate students.

  16. A Continuous Millimeter-Wave Imaging Scanner for Art Conservation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Younus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A monochromatic continuous millimeter-wave imaging system coupled with an infrared temperature sensor has been used to investigate artistic objects such as painting artworks or antiquities preserved at the museum of Aquitaine. Especially, 2D and 3D analyses have been performed in order to reveal the internal structure of a nearly 3500-year-old sealed Egyptian jar.

  17. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for linear free surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambati, V.R.; Vegt, van der J.J.W.; Bokhove, O.

    2008-01-01

    A new variational (dis)continuous Galerkin finite element method is presented for the linear free surface gravity water wave equations. We formulate the space-time finite element discretization based on a variational formulation analogous to Luke's variational principle. The linear algebraic system

  18. Study on 660-nm quasi-continuous-wave intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang(王涛); Jianquan Yao(姚建铨); Baigang Zhang(张百钢); Guiyan Zang(臧贵艳); Peng Wang(王鹏); Yizhong Yu(于意仲)

    2003-01-01

    A quasi-continuous-wave intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser which operates at 660 nm is studied.By using a flat-flat laser cavity, 2 Kr-lamps, KTP crystal and an acousto-optically Q-switch, 2-W outputpower at 660 nm is obtained. The relationship between laser cavity length and output power is analyzed.

  19. Spatial averaging-effects on turbulence measured by a continuous-wave coherent lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob;

    2009-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused continuous-wave coherent Doppler lidar on observed wind turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is described and analysed. For the first time, comparisons of lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneously obtained from a mast...

  20. Diode-pumped intracavity optical parametric oscillator in pulsed and continuous-wave operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Skettrup, Torben; Petersen, O.B.;

    2002-01-01

    An intracavity optical parametric oscillator is investigated in pulsed and continuous-wave operation. The intracavity optical parametric oscillator is based on Yb:YAG as the laser material and a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal as the nonlinear material. Tuneable idler output powers above...

  1. Continuous-wave broadband emitter based on a transition-metal-ion-doped waveguide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, M.; Salathé, R.P.; Bhutta, T.; Shepherd, D.P.; Eason, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the suitability of a simple continuous-wave-pumped transition-metal-ion-doped waveguide as a broadband light source in the wavelength region 600–1000 nm for interferometric applications. Spatially coherent (single mode in the confined direction), spectrally broadband (~130-nm FWHM) lu

  2. Continuous-wave Optically Pumped Lasing of Hybrid Perovskite VCSEL at Green Wavelength

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-05-08

    We demonstrate the lasing of a perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser at green wavelengths, which operates under continuous-wave optical pumping at room-temperature by embedding hybrid perovskite between dielectric mirrors deposited at low-temperature.

  3. Above room temperature continuous wave operation of a broad-area quantum-cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semtsiv, M. P.; Masselink, W. T.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a broad-area (w ≈ 30 μm) quantum-cascade laser operating in a continuous wave mode up to heat-sink temperatures beyond +100 °C. The room-temperature emission wavelength is 4.6 μm. The temperature gradient in the active region of such a wide laser stripe is essentially perpendicular to the epitaxial layers and the resulting steady-state active region temperature offset scales approximately with the square of the number of cascades. With only 10 cascades in the active region, the threshold electrical power density in the current quantum-cascade laser in the continuous-wave mode is as low as Vth × Ith = 3.8 V × 0.9 kA/cm2 = 3.4 kW/cm2 at room temperature for 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe. A 4 mm-long one-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe delivers in continuous-wave mode above 0.6 W at +20 °C and above 1.3 W at -27 °C (cooled with a single-stage Peltier element). A 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe demonstrates continuous-wave lasing up to at least +102 °C (375 K). The thermal conductance, Gth, ranges between 235 W/K cm2 and 140 W/K cm2 for temperatures between -33 °C and +102 °C. This demonstration opens the route for continuous-wave power scaling of quantum-cascade lasers via broad-area laser ridges.

  4. Continuous particle focusing in a waved microchannel using negative dc dielectrophoresis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ming

    2012-07-26

    We present a waved microchannel for continuous focusing of microparticles and cells using negative direct current (dc) dielectrophoresis. The waved channel is composed of consecutive s-shaped curved channels in series to generate an electric field gradient required for the dielectrophoretic effect. When particles move electrokinetically through the channel, the experienced negative dielectrophoretic forces alternate directions within two adjacent semicircular microchannels, leading to a focused continuous-flow stream along the channel centerline. Both the experimentally observed and numerically simulated results of the focusing performance are reported, which coincide acceptably in proportion to the specified dimensions (i.e. inlet and outlet of the waved channel). How the applied electric field, particle size and medium concentration affect the performance was studied by focusing polystyrene microparticles of varying sizes. As an application in the field of biology, the focusing of yeast cells in the waved mcirochannel was tested. This waved microchannel shows a great potential for microflow cytometry applications and is expected to be widely used before different processing steps in lab-on-A-chip devices with integrated functions. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ˜2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semimajor axes of the orbit from ˜0.6×10-3 ls to ˜6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3×10-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for circular binary orbits, the upper limits obtained remain valid for orbital eccentricities as large as 0.9. In addition, upper limits are placed on continuous gravitational wave emission from the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1 between 20 Hz and 57.25 Hz.

  6. Acute Hydrothorax Complicating continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kechrid Mohammad

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here hydrothorax that occurred in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD and highlight the problems of diagnosis and management. A 48 years-old man with history of obstructive uropathy secondary to urolithiasis was stared on CAPD when he reached end-stage renal failure. Two months later, he was admitted with two days history of shortness of breath on exertion and dry cough increasing in supine position. Chest examination was suggestive of right sided pleural effusion confusion confirmed by chest X-ray. Radioisotope Technetium 99m labeled albumin instilled through the peritoneal catheter was detected in the right pleural fluid confirming the peritoneo-pleural leak. The peritoneal dialysis (PD was discontinued and the patient was switched to hemodialysis. The pleural effusion subsided and has not recurred for the following three years.

  7. Continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers with frequency-shifted feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyakh, A., E-mail: arkadiy.lyakh@ucf.edu [Pranalytica, Inc., 1101 Colorado Ave., Santa Monica, CA 90401 (United States); NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, 12424 Research Pkwy, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 304 Scorpius St, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); Barron-Jimenez, R.; Dunayevskiy, I.; Go, R.; Tsvid, G.; Patel, C. Kumar N., E-mail: patel@pranalytica.com [Pranalytica, Inc., 1101 Colorado Ave., Santa Monica, CA 90401 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Operation of continuous wave quantum cascade lasers with a frequency-shifted feedback provided by an acousto-optic modulator is reported. Measured linewidth of 1.7 cm{sup −1} for these devices, under CW operating conditions, was in a good agreement with predictions of a model based on frequency-shifted feedback seeded by spontaneous emission. Linewidth broadening was observed for short sweep times, consistent with sound wave grating period variation across the illuminated area on the acousto-optic modulator. Standoff detection capability of the AOM-based QCL setup was demonstrated for several solid materials.

  8. An Einstein@home search for continuous gravitational waves from Cassiopeia A

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Sylvia J.; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Wette, Karl; Allen, Bruce; Bock, Oliver; Keitel, David; Krishnan, Badri; Machenschalk, Bernd; Shaltev, Miroslav; Siemens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational-wave emission in a broad frequency range (between 50 and 1000 Hz) from the central compact object of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The data comes from the sixth science run of LIGO and the search is performed on the volunteer distributed computing network Einstein@Home. We find no significant signal candidate, and set the most constraining upper limits to date on the gravitational-wave emission from Cas A, w...

  9. Complications of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Urinary Stones: To Know and to Manage Them—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro D’Addessi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the possible complications after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL and to suggest how to manage them, the significant literature concerning SWL treatment and complications was analyzed and reviewed. Complications after SWL are mainly connected to the formation and passage of fragments, infections, the effects on renal and nonrenal tissues, and the effects on kidney function. Each of these complications can be prevented adopting appropriate measures, such as the respect of the contraindications and the recognition and the correction of concomitant diseases or infection, and using the SWL in the most efficient and safe way, tailoring the treatment to the single case. In conclusion, SWL is an efficient and relatively noninvasive treatment for urinary stones. However, as with any other type of therapy, some contraindications and potential complications do exist. The strictness in following the first could really limit the onset and danger of the appearance of others, which however must be fully known so that every possible preventive measure be implemented.

  10. Limitations On The Creation of Continuously Surfable Waves Generated By A Pressure Source Moving In A Circular Path

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmied, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this work was to investigate the novel idea to produce continuous breaking waves, whereby a pressure source was rotated within an annular wave pool. The concept was that the pressure source generates non-breaking waves that propagate inward to the inner ring of t

  11. A prospective study of levetiracetam efficacy in epileptic syndromes with continuous spikes-waves during slow sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkins, Mary; Nikanorova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the add-on effect of levetiracetam (LEV) treatment on the EEG and clinical status of children with continuous spikes-waves during slow sleep (CSWS).......To evaluate the add-on effect of levetiracetam (LEV) treatment on the EEG and clinical status of children with continuous spikes-waves during slow sleep (CSWS)....

  12. Analysis of S Wave Propagation Through a Nonlinear Joint with the Continuously Yielding Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhen; Sheng, Qian; Leng, Xianlun

    2017-01-01

    Seismic wave propagation through joints that are embedded in a rock mass is a critical issue for aseismic issues of underground rock engineering. Few studies have investigated nonlinear joints with a continuously yielding model. In this paper, a time-domain recursive method (TDRM) for an S wave across a nonlinear Mohr-Coulomb (MC) slip model is extended to a continuously yielding (CY) model. Verification of the TDRM-based results is conducted by comparison with the simulated results via a built-in model of 3DEC code. Using parametric studies, the effect of normal stress level, amplitude of incident wave, initial joint shear stiffness, and joint spacing is discussed and interpreted for engineering applications because a proper in situ stress level (overburden depth) and acceptable quality of surrounding rock mass are beneficial for seismic stability issues of underground rock excavation. Comparison between the results from the MC model and the CY model is presented both for an idealized impulse excitation and a real ground motion record. Compared with the MC model, complex joint behaviors, such as tangential stiffness degradation, normal stress dependence, and the hysteresis effect, that occurred in the wave propagation can be described with the CY model. The MC model seems to underestimate the joint shear displacement in a high normal stress state and in a real ground motion excitation case.

  13. Resonantly pumped continuous-wave mode-locked Ho:YAP laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, X. M.; Lin, W. M.; Cui, Z.; Yao, B. Q.; Li, H.; Dai, T. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report a continuous-wave mode-locked Ho:YAP laser for the first time to our knowledge. Mode-locked pulse was produced by using an acousto-optic modulator. A 1.91-μm Tm-fiber laser as the pump source, at incident pump power of 25.9 W, the maximum output power of 2.87 W at 2117.8 nm was achieved in continuous-wave mode-locked regime. Pulse as short as 254.8 ps was obtained at repetition frequency of 81.52 MHz. In addition, the beam quality factor M 2 value of 1.6 was obtained.

  14. Helicopter downwash measured by continuous-wave Doppler lidars with agile beam steering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Angelou, Nikolas; Hansen, Per

    2012-01-01

    A ground-based remote sensing short-range WindScanner with agile beam steering based on a modified ZephIR continuous-wave wind lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) and a double prism arrangement has recently been developed at the Department of Wind Energy at the DTU Risø campus. The WindScanner me......A ground-based remote sensing short-range WindScanner with agile beam steering based on a modified ZephIR continuous-wave wind lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) and a double prism arrangement has recently been developed at the Department of Wind Energy at the DTU Risø campus. The Wind...

  15. Generation of pulsed and continuous-wave squeezed light with 87Rb vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Imad H; Messin, Gaétan; Grangier, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    We present experimental studies on the generation of pulsed and continuous-wave squeezed vacuum via nonlinear rotation of the polarization ellipse in a (87)Rb vapor. Squeezing is observed for a wide range of input powers and pump detunings on the D1 line, while only excess noise is present on the D2 line. The maximum continuous-wave squeezing observed is -1.4 +/- 0.1 dB (-2.0 dB corrected for losses). We measure -1.1 dB squeezing at the resonance frequency of the (85)Rb F = 3 --> F' transition, which may allow the storage of squeezed light generated by (87)Rb in a (85)Rb quantum memory. Using a pulsed pump, pulsed squeezed light with -1 dB of squeezing for 200 ns pulse widths is observed at 1 MHz repetition rate.

  16. A partial reconstruction scheme for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography with reflection geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Rusha; Dutta, Pranab K

    2015-01-01

    Image quality and photon measurement with good SNR (signal to noise ratio) in continuous wave diffuse optical tomography depend on the source detector density and sensitivity of photo detector. For large volume objects, it is difficult to obtain detectable light intensity with good SNR over the whole boundary. As an alternative, instead of the full boundary, the measurements are taken over a semi circle as in reflection geometry and a partial reconstruction scheme for the same is proposed in this paper. The cross-sectional optical parameters are reconstructed for different half of the sample with modified boundary conditions and finally the average of all the reconstructions are considered as the final reconstructed image. Simulation and experimental results have been illustrated to validate the proposed method. The main advantage of this scheme is to improve signal to noise ratio which controls the quality of reconstruction in actual phantoms. The use of continuous wave measurement makes the system cost effective as well.

  17. Constraints on Individual Supermassive Black Hole Binaries from Pulsar Timing Array Limits on Continuous Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Schutz, Katelin

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are placing increasingly stringent constraints on the strain amplitude of continuous gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black hole binaries on subparsec scales. In this paper, we incorporate independent measurements of the dynamical masses $M_{\\rm bh}$ of supermassive black holes in specific galaxies at known distances and leverage this additional information to further constrain whether or not those galaxies could host a detectable supermassive black hole binary. We estimate the strain amplitudes from individual binaries as a function of binary mass ratio for two samples of nearby galaxies: (1) those with direct dynamical measurements of $M_{\\rm bh}$ in the literature, and (2) the 116 most massive early-type galaxies (and thus likely hosts of the most massive black holes) within 108 Mpc from the MASSIVE Survey. Our exploratory analysis shows that the current PTA upper limits on continuous waves can already constrain the mass ratios of hypothetical black hole binaries in a...

  18. High power, low divergent, substrate emitting quantum cascade ring laser in continuous wave operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a surface grating coupled substrate emitting quantum cascade ring laser with high power room temperature continuous wave operation at 4.64 μm. A second order surface metal/semiconductor distributed-feedback grating is used for in-plane feedback and vertical out-coupling. A device with 400 μm radius ring cavity exhibits an output power of 202 mW in room temperature continuous wave operation. Single mode operation with a side mode suppression ratio of 25 dB is obtained along with a good linear tuning with temperature. The far field measurement exhibits a low divergent concentric ring beam pattern with a lobe separation of ∼0.34°, which indicates that the device operates in fundamental mode (n = 1.

  19. Continuous Wave Phase-Sensitive Four-Wave Mixing in Silicon Waveguides With Reverse-Biased p-i-n Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Ros, Francesco; Vukovic, Dragana; Gajda, A.

    2013-01-01

    Phase-sensitive four-wave mixing is experimentally demonstrated using continuous wave pumps in silicon waveguides with p-i-n junctions. The reverse biasing allows decreasing the free carrier lifetime, enabling a phase-sensitive extinction ratio in excess of 15 dB.......Phase-sensitive four-wave mixing is experimentally demonstrated using continuous wave pumps in silicon waveguides with p-i-n junctions. The reverse biasing allows decreasing the free carrier lifetime, enabling a phase-sensitive extinction ratio in excess of 15 dB....

  20. A Feasibility Study for Life Signs Monitoring via a Continuous-Wave Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Soldovieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a feasibility study for life signs detection using a continuous-wave radar working in the band around 4 GHz. The data-processing is carried out by using two different data processing approaches, which are compared about the possibility to characterize the frequency behaviour of the breathing and heartbeat activity. The two approaches are used with the main aim to show the possibility of monitoring the vital signs activity in an accurate and reliable way.

  1. Characterization of a Continuous Wave Laser for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    OF A CONTINUOUS WAVE LASER FOR RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS by Sunny G. Lau June 2015 Thesis...IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Sunny G. Lau 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...200 words) The application of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) to nuclear forensics involves the use of lasers to selectively ionize

  2. Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave RADAR for Objects Mapping in Enclosed Spaces Using Smartphones and Arduino Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Magen Numhauser, Jonathan; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-06-01

    Based on previous studies and using mobile portable device, we were able to realize a portable system capable of detecting metallic objects in a room surrounded by walls while also extracting the approximate position of such objects. Our hardware included only a smartphone device connected to several Arduino components and we were applying frequency-modulated continuous-wave electronics in each of the Arduino devices.

  3. Real-time, continuous-wave terahertz imaging by a pyroelectric camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yang; Shuangchen Ruan; Min Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Real-time, continuous-wave terahertz (THz) imaging is demonstrated. A 1.89-THz optically-pumped farinfrared laser is used as the illumination source, and a 124 × 124 element room-temperature pyroelectric camera is adopted as the detector. With this setup, THz images through various wrapping materials are shown. The results show that this imaging system has the potential applications in real-time mail and security inspection.

  4. Diode-pumped intracavity optical parametric oscillator in pulsed and continuous-wave operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Skettrup, Torben; Petersen, O.B.;

    2002-01-01

    An intracavity optical parametric oscillator is investigated in pulsed and continuous-wave operation. The intracavity optical parametric oscillator is based on Yb:YAG as the laser material and a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal as the nonlinear material. Tuneable idler output powers above...... 200 mW are obtained in both modes of operation with 13.5 W of incident diode pump power. The idler output was tuned in the wavelength range 3820-4570 nm....

  5. Improvement of sensitivity in continuous wave near infra-red spectroscopy systems by using silicon photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Roberto; Libertino, Sebania; Sanfilippo, Delfo; Fallica, Giorgio; Lombardo, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally analyze the signal-to-noise ratio of continuous wave (CW) near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) reflectance systems based on light emitting diodes and silicon photomultipliers for high performance low cost NIRS biomedical systems. We show that under suitable experimental conditions such systems exhibit a high SNR, which allows an SDS of 7 cm, to our knowledge the largest ever demonstrated in a CW-NIRs system.

  6. Interlaminar damage of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminate under continuous wave laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Chi; Wu, Chen-Wu; Huang, Yi-Hui; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The interlaminar damages were investigated on the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite laminate under laser irradiation. Firstly, the laminated T700/BA9916 composites were exposed to continuous wave laser irradiation. Then, the interface cracking patterns of such composite laminates were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed to compute the interface stress of the laminates under laser irradiation. And the effects of the laser parameters on the interlaminar damage were discussed.

  7. Two micron continuous wave laser vaporesection for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Jun Fu; Bao-Fa Hong; Yong Yang; Jiang-Ping Gao; Lei Zhang; Wei Cai; Yao-Fu Chen; Xiao-Xiong Wang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor. I'm Wei-Jun Fu, from Department of Urology, Chi-nese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, Beijing, China. We write to you to present an observation on the safety and clini-cal effects of RevoLix 70 W 2 micron continuous wave laser vaporesection for the treatment of obstructive be-nign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

  8. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati, E-mail: dhakal@jlab.org; Ciovati, Gianluigi, E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org; Myneni, Ganapati R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  9. Continuous-wave operation of a room-temperature Tm: YAP-pumped Ho: YAG laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We report a continuous-wave (CW) 2.1-μm Ho:YAG laser operating at room temperature pumped by a diode-pumped 1.94-?m Tm:YAP laser.The maximum output power of 1.5 W is obtained from Ho:YAG laser,corresponding to Tm-to-Ho slope efficiency of 17.9% and diode-to-He conversion efficiency of 5.6%.

  10. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for linear free surface waves

    OpenAIRE

    Ambati, V.R.; Vegt, van der, N.F.A.; Bokhove, O.

    2008-01-01

    A new variational (dis)continuous Galerkin finite element method is presented for the linear free surface gravity water wave equations. We formulate the space-time finite element discretization based on a variational formulation analogous to Luke's variational principle. The linear algebraic system of equations resulting from the finite element discretization is symmetric with a very compact stencil. To build and solve these equations, we have employed PETSc package in which a block sparse ma...

  11. High power all-solid-state quasi-continuous-wave tunable Ti: sapphire laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zou; Xin Ding; Yue Zou; Hongmei Ma; Wuqi Wen; Peng Wang; Jianquan Yao

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a high power, all-solid-state, quasi-continuous-wave tunable Ti:sapphire laser system pumped by laser diode (LD) pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The maximum tuned output power of 4.2 W (797 nm) and tuned average power of 3.7 W were achieved when fixing the Ti:sapphire broadband output power at 5.0 W and applying 750-850 nm broadband coated mirror.

  12. Er-doped fiber ring laser gyroscopes operating in continuous waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingren Qian; Jue Su; Xuxu Wang; Bing Zhu

    2007-01-01

    A direction related polarizer was inserted into a ring laser cavity to eliminate one of the two eigen-modes as well as spatial hole burning of the gain medium in a bidirectional Er-doped fiber ring laser. Thus, a fiber ring laser gyroscope (FRLG) operating in continuous wave was demonstrated. A beat signal of over 30-dB noise was observed and a good inear relation between the beat frequency shift and cavity rotation rate was obtained.

  13. Fourier Deconvolution Methods for Resolution Enhancement in Continuous-Wave EPR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, George H; Poyner, Russell R

    2015-01-01

    An overview of resolution enhancement of conventional, field-swept, continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectra using Fourier transform-based deconvolution methods is presented. Basic steps that are involved in resolution enhancement of calculated spectra using an implementation based on complex discrete Fourier transform algorithms are illustrated. Advantages and limitations of the method are discussed. An application to an experimentally obtained spectrum is provided to illustrate the power of the method for resolving overlapped transitions.

  14. Dynamic acousto-elastic test using continuous probe wave and transient vibration to investigate material nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiras, J N; Vu, Q A; Lott, M; Payá, J; Garnier, V; Payan, C

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the dynamic acousto-elastic effect of a continuous high frequency wave for investigating the material nonlinearity upon transient vibration. The approach is demonstrated on a concrete sample measuring 15×15×60cm(3). Two ultrasonic transducers (emitter and receiver) are placed at its middle span. A continuous high frequency wave of 500kHz propagates through the material and is modulated with a hammer blow. The position of the hammer blow on the sample is configured to promote the first bending mode of vibration. The use of a continuous wave allows discrete time extraction of the nonlinear behavior by a short-time Fourier transform approach, through the simultaneous comparison of a reference non-modulated signal and an impact-modulated signal. The hammer blow results in phase shifts and variations of signal amplitude between reference and perturbed signals, which are driven by the resonant frequency of the sample. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of the relaxation mechanisms (modulus and attenuation recovery) is conducted to untangle the coupled fast and slow hysteretic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Matched Template Signal Processing for Continuous Wave Laser Tracking of Space Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S.; Ward, R.; Roberts, L.; Fleddermann, R.; Francis, S.; McClellend, D.; Shaddock, D.; Smith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The build up of space junk in Earth's orbit space is a growing concern as it shares the same orbit as many currently active satellites. As the number of objects increase in these orbits, the likelihood of collisions between satellites and debris will increase [1]. The eventual goal is to be able to maneuver space debris to avoid such collisions. We at SERC aim to accomplish this by using ground based laser facilities that are already being used to track space debris orbit. One potential method to maneuver space debris is using continuous wave lasers and applying photon pressure on the debris and attempt to change the orbit. However most current laser ranging facilities operates using pulsed lasers where a pulse of light is sent out and the time taken for the pulse to return back to the telescope is measured after being reflected by the target. If space debris maneuvering is carried out with a continuous wave laser then two laser sources need to be used for ranging and maneuvering. The aim of this research is to develop a laser ranging system that is compatible with the continuous wave laser; using the same laser source to simultaneously track and maneuver space debris. We aim to accomplish this by modulating the outgoing laser light with pseudo random noise (PRN) codes, time tagging the outgoing light, and utilising a matched filter at the receiver end to extract the various orbital information of the debris.

  16. Clinical effects of continuous high volume hemofiltration on severe acute pancreatitis complicated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wang; Wei-Qin Li; Wei Zhou; Ning Li; Jie-Shou Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficiency of continuous high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS).METHODS: A total of 28 SAP patients with an average of 14.36±3.96 APACHE Ⅱ score were involved. Diagnostic criteria for SAP standardized by the Chinese Medical Association and diagnostic criteria for MODS standardized by American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) were applied for inclusion. HVHF was started 6.0±6.1 (1-30) days after onset of the disease and sustained for at least 72 hours, AN69 hemofilter (1.2 m2)was changed every 24 hours. The ultrafiltration rate during HVHF was 4 000 mi/h, blood flow rate was 250-300 mi/min,and the substitute fluid was infused with pre-dilution. Low molecular weight heparin was used for anticoagulation.RESULTS: HVHF was well tolerated in all the patients, and lasted for 4.04±3.99 (3-24) days. 20 of the patients survived,6 patients died and 2 of the patients quited for financial reason.The ICU mortality was 21.4%. Body temperature, heart rate and breath rate decreased significantly after HVHF.APACHE Ⅱ score was 14.4±3.9 before HVHF, and 9.9±4.3after HVHF, which decreased significantly (P<0.01). Partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood before HVHF was 68.5±19.5 mmHg, and increased significantly after HVHF,which was 91.9±25 mmHg (P<0.01). During HVHF the hemodynamics was stable, and serum potassium, sodium,chlorine, glucose and pH were at normal level.CONCLUSION: HVHF is technically possible in SAP patients complicated with MODS. It does not appear to have detrimental effects and may have beneficial effects.Continuous HVHF, which seldom disturbs the hemodynamics and causes few side-effects, is expected to become a beneficial adjunct therapy for SAP complicated with MODS.

  17. Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars in binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadors, Grant David

    2014-09-01

    Gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) seek to observe ripples in space predicted by General Relativity. Black holes, neutron stars, supernovae, the Big Bang and other sources can radiate gravitational waves. Original contributions to the LIGO effort are presented in this thesis: feedforward filtering, directed binary neutron star searches for continuous waves, and scientific outreach and education, as well as advances in quantum optical squeezing. Feedforward filtering removes extraneous noise from servo-controlled instruments. Filtering of the last science run, S6, improves LIGO's astrophysical range (+4.14% H1, +3.60% L1: +12% volume) after subtracting noise from auxiliary length control channels. This thesis shows how filtering enhances the scientific sensitivity of LIGO's data set during and after S6. Techniques for non-stationarity and verifying calibration and integrity may apply to Advanced LIGO. Squeezing is planned for future interferometers to exceed the standard quantum limit on noise from electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations; this thesis discusses the integration of a prototype squeezer at LIGO Hanford Observatory and impact on astrophysical sensitivity. Continuous gravitational waves may be emitted by neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binary systems such as Scorpius X-1. The TwoSpect directed binary search is designed to detect these waves. TwoSpect is the most sensitive of 4 methods in simulated data, projecting an upper limit of 4.23e-25 in strain, given a year-long data set at an Advanced LIGO design sensitivity of 4e-24 Hz. (-1/2). TwoSpect is also used on real S6 data to set 95% confidence upper limits (40 Hz to 2040 Hz) on strain from Scorpius X-1. A millisecond pulsar, X-ray transient J1751-305, is similarly considered. Search enhancements for Advanced LIGO are proposed. Advanced LIGO and fellow interferometers should detect gravitational waves in the coming decade. Methods in these

  18. Evaluation of weld porosity in laser beam seam welds: optimizing continuous wave and square wave modulated processes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew; Faraone, Kevin M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Roach, Robert Allen; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-02-01

    Nd:YAG laser joining is a high energy density (HED) process that can produce high-speed, low-heat input welds with a high depth-to-width aspect ratio. This is optimized by formation of a ''keyhole'' in the weld pool resulting from high vapor pressures associated with laser interaction with the metallic substrate. It is generally accepted that pores form in HED welds due to the instability and frequent collapse of the keyhole. In order to maintain an open keyhole, weld pool forces must be balanced such that vapor pressure and weld pool inertia forces are in equilibrium. Travel speed and laser beam power largely control the way these forces are balanced, as well as welding mode (Continuous Wave or Square Wave) and shielding gas type. A study into the phenomenon of weld pool porosity in 304L stainless steel was conducted to better understand and predict how welding parameters impact the weld pool dynamics that lead to pore formation. This work is intended to aid in development and verification of a finite element computer model of weld pool fluid flow dynamics being developed in parallel efforts and assist in weld development activities for the W76 and future RRW programs.

  19. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  20. Experimental imaging research on continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haochong; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin

    2014-09-01

    The terahertz (THz) imaging is an advanced technique on the basis of the unique characteristics of terahertz radiation. Due to its noncontact, non-invasive and high-resolution capabilities, it has already shown great application prospects in biomedical observation, sample measurement, and quality control. The continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography is a combination of terahertz technology and in-line digital holography of which the source is a continuous-wave terahertz laser. Over the past decade, many researchers used different terahertz sources and detectors to undertake experiments. In this paper, the pre-process of the hologram is accomplished after the holograms' recording process because of the negative pixels in the pyroelectric detector and the air vibration caused by the chopper inside the camera. To improve the quality of images, the phase retrieval algorithm is applied to eliminate the twin images. In the experiment, the pin which terahertz wave can't penetrate and the TPX slice carved letters "THz" are chosen for the samples. The amplitude and phase images of samples are obtained and the twin image and noise in the reconstructed images are suppressed. The results validate the feasibility of the terahertz in-line digital holographic imaging technique. This work also shows the terahertz in-line digital holography technique's prospects in materials science and biological samples' detection.

  1. Coherently combining data between detectors for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, E.; Riles, K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments, e.g., by up to 42% over a single detector for an all-sky search. For misaligned detectors, however, this improvement requires careful attention when marginalizing over unknown polarization parameters. In addition, care must be taken in correcting for differential detector velocity due to the Earth’s rotation for high signal frequencies and widely separated detectors.

  2. Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves from Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sylvia J.; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Wette, Karl; Allen, Bruce; Bock, Oliver; Keitel, David; Krishnan, Badri; Machenschalk, Bernd; Shaltev, Miroslav; Siemens, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    We report the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational-wave emission in a broad frequency range (between 50 and 1000 Hz) from the central compact object of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The data come from the sixth science run of LIGO, and the search is performed on the volunteer distributed computing network Einstein@Home. We find no significant signal candidate and set the most constraining upper limits to date on the gravitational-wave emission from Cas A, which beat the indirect age-based upper limit across the entire search range. At 170 Hz (the most sensitive frequency range), we set 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational-wave amplitude h0 of ˜2.9 ×10-25, roughly twice as constraining as the upper limits from previous searches on Cas A. The upper limits can also be expressed as constraints on the ellipticity of Cas A; with a few reasonable assumptions, we show that at gravitational-wave frequencies greater than 300 Hz we can exclude an ellipticity of ≳10-5.

  3. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr\\Hoczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A Le; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Luijten, E; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyers, P; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Milde, S; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moesta, P; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quiroga, G; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yang, Z; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO Science Run and the second and third Virgo Science Runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ~2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semi-major axes of the orbit from ~0.6e-3 ls to ~6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3e-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for ci...

  4. Searches for continuous gravitational wave signals and stochastic backgrounds in LIGO and Virgo data

    CERN Document Server

    Palomba, C

    2012-01-01

    We present results from searches of recent LIGO and Virgo data for continuous gravitational wave signals (CW) from spinning neutron stars and for a stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB). The first part of the talk is devoted to CW analysis with a focus on two types of searches. In the targeted search of known neutron stars a precise knowledge of the star parameters is used to apply optimal filtering methods. In the absence of a signal detection, in a few cases, an upper limit on strain amplitude can be set that beats the spindown limit derived from attributing spin-down energy loss to the emission of gravitational waves. In contrast, blind all-sky searches are not directed at specific sources, but rather explore as large a portion of the parameter space as possible. Fully coherent methods cannot be used for these kind of searches which pose a non trivial computational challenge. The second part of the talk is focused on SGWB searches. A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to be ...

  5. Hidden Markov model tracking of continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star with wandering spin

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorova, S; Melatos, A; Moran, W; Evans, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational wave searches for continuous-wave signals from neutron stars are especially challenging when the star's spin frequency is unknown a priori from electromagnetic observations and wanders stochastically under the action of internal (e.g. superfluid or magnetospheric) or external (e.g. accretion) torques. It is shown that frequency tracking by hidden Markov model (HMM) methods can be combined with existing maximum likelihood coherent matched filters like the F-statistic to surmount some of the challenges raised by spin wandering. Specifically it is found that, for an isolated, biaxial rotor whose spin frequency walks randomly, HMM tracking of the F-statistic output from coherent segments with duration T_drift = 10d over a total observation time of T_obs = 1yr can detect signals with wave strains h0 > 2e-26 at a noise level characteristic of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO). For a biaxial rotor with randomly walking spin in a binary orbit, whose orbital...

  6. Generation of multipartite continuous-variable entanglement via atomic spin wave: Heisenberg-Langevin approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xihua; Shang, Jie; Xue, Bolin; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Min

    2014-05-19

    We conduct theoretical studies on the effects of various parameters on generation of multipartite continuous-variable entanglement via atomic spin wave induced by the strong coupling and probe fields in the Λ-type electromagnetically induced transparency configuration in a realistic atomic ensemble by using the Heisenberg-Langevin formalism. It is shown that the increase of the atomic density and/or Rabi frequencies of the scattering fields, as well as the decrease of the coherence decay rate of the lower doublet would strengthen the degree of multipartite entanglement. This provides a clear evidence that the creation of multicolor multipartite entangled narrow-band fields to any desired number with a long correlation time can be achieved conveniently by using atomic spin wave in an atomic ensemble with large optical depth, which may find interesting applications in quantum information processing and quantum networks.

  7. Continuous-wave terahertz multi-plane in-line digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haochong; Wang, Dayong; Li, Weihua; Rong, Lu; Taylor, Zachary D.; Deng, Qinghua; Li, Bin; Wang, Yunxin; Wu, Weidong; Panezai, Spozmai

    2017-07-01

    Terahertz digital holography is a non-scanning and real time method for reconstructing the absorption and phase distributions of the wave-front diffracted by a given sample simultaneously in the terahertz region. A continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holographic multi-plane imaging method is presented here for achieving a three-dimensional shape of a specific portion of a sample with the best possible focus. The three enhancement techniques of synthetic aperture, autofocusing and phase retrieval are applied to the single plane recordings for achieving a high resolution, good quality and optimally focused reconstructed image. Later, multi-plane reconstructed images are processed with the threshold mask and a three dimensional profile of the sample is obtained. Experimental verification confirms that the proposed method is a valid tool for acquiring multi-plane information of a target in the terahertz range.

  8. Dealing with Instrumental Lines in Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves in LIGO Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Orion; LIGO-Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Although the first observing run of Advanced LIGO (O1) gave us two definitive detections of gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers, searches for a continuous-wave (CW) source are computationally very demanding and still ongoing. CW sources are expected to be much weaker, requiring integration of the signal for several months. PowerFlux is one analysis pipeline designed for such searches; in following up outliers, the program uses a loosely coherent algorithm to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and to separate astrophysical signals from instrumental artifacts. Unfortunately, the O1 data has many sharp spectral artifacts (lines) that create spurious outliers in the low-frequency region, 20-135 Hz. The effects of these lines on the PowerFlux analysis will be discussed, along with methods used to mitigate those effects, including a line-cleaning process. Prospects for contending with instrumental line effects in the second observing run (O2) will also be presented.

  9. Searches for continuous gravitational waves with the LIGO and Virgo detector

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration have carried out joint searches in LIGO and Virgo data for periodic continuous gravitational waves. These analyses range from targeted searches for gravitational-wave signals from known pulsars, for which precise ephemerides from radio or X-ray observations are used in matched filters, to all-sky searches for unknown neutron stars, including stars in binary systems. Between these extremes lie directed searches for known stars of unknown spin frequency or for new unknown sources at specific locations, such as near the galactic center or in globular clusters. Recent and ongoing searches of each type will be summarized, along with prospects for future searches using data from the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors.

  10. A novel method for analyzing complicated quantum behaviors of light waves in oscillating turbulent plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2014-11-03

    Quantum dynamics of light waves traveling through a time-varying turbulent plasma is investigated via the SU(1,1) Lie algebraic approach. Plasma oscillations that accompany time-dependence of electromagnetic parameters of the plasma are considered. In particular, we assume that the conductivity of plasma involves a sinusoidally varying term in addition to a constant one. Regarding the time behavior of electromagnetic parameters in media, the light fields are modeled as a modified CK (Caldirola-Kanai) oscillator that is more complex than the standard CK oscillator. Diverse quantum properties of the system are analyzed under the consideration of time-dependent characteristics of electromagnetic parameters. Quantum energy of the light waves is derived and compared with the counterpart classical energy. Gaussian wave packet of the field whose probability density oscillates with time like that of classical states is constructed through a choice of suitable initial condition and its quantum behavior is investigated in detail. Our development presented here provides a useful way for analyzing time behavior of quantized light in complex plasma.

  11. Dependence of s-waves on continuous dimension: The quantum oscillator and free systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, K.B. [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 48-3, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62251 (Mexico); Aceves-de-la-Cruz, F. [Departamento de Fisica, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara, Jalisco 44430 (Mexico)

    2006-12-15

    Wavefunctions with rotational symmetry (i.e., zero angular momentum) in D dimensions, are called s-waves. In quantum quadratic systems (free particle, harmonic and repulsive oscillators), their radial parts obey Schroedinger equations with a fictitious centrifugal (for integer D{>=}4) or centripetal (for D = 2) potential. These Hamiltonians close into the three-dimensional Lorentz algebra so(2,1), whose exceptional interval corresponds to the critical range of continuous dimensions 0continuous-D dimensions, where the extension structure is maintained in the limit of continuous spectra. Finally, we compute the free time evolution of the expectation values of the Hamiltonian, dilatation generator, and square radius between three distinct sets of 'heat'-diffused localized eigenstates. This provides a simple group-theoretic description of the purported contraction/expansion of Gaussian-ring s-waves in D>0 dimensions. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Non-Markovian dynamics in pulsed and continuous wave atom lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Breuer, H P; Kappler, B; Petruccione, F

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of atom lasers with a continuous output coupler based on two-photon Raman transitions is investigated. With the help of the time-convolutionless projection operator technique the quantum master equations for pulsed and continuous wave (cw) atom lasers are derived. In the case of the pulsed atom laser the power of the time-convolutionless projection operator technique is demonstrated through comparison with the exact solution. It is shown that in an intermediate coupling regime where the Born-Markov approximation fails the results of this algorithm agree with the exact solution. To study the dynamics of a continuous wave atom laser a pump mechanism is included in the model. Whereas the pump mechanism is treated within the Born-Markov approximation, the output coupling leads to non-Markovian effects. The solution of the master equation resulting from the time-convolutionless projection operator technique exhibits strong oscillations in the occupation number of the Bose-Einstein condensate. These os...

  13. Hidden Markov model tracking of continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star with wandering spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, S.; Sun, L.; Melatos, A.; Moran, W.; Evans, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Gravitational wave searches for continuous-wave signals from neutron stars are especially challenging when the star's spin frequency is unknown a priori from electromagnetic observations and wanders stochastically under the action of internal (e.g., superfluid or magnetospheric) or external (e.g., accretion) torques. It is shown that frequency tracking by hidden Markov model (HMM) methods can be combined with existing maximum likelihood coherent matched filters like the F -statistic to surmount some of the challenges raised by spin wandering. Specifically, it is found that, for an isolated, biaxial rotor whose spin frequency walks randomly, HMM tracking of the F -statistic output from coherent segments with duration Tdrift=10 d over a total observation time of Tobs=1 yr can detect signals with wave strains h0>2 ×10-26 at a noise level characteristic of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO). For a biaxial rotor with randomly walking spin in a binary orbit, whose orbital period and semimajor axis are known approximately from electromagnetic observations, HMM tracking of the Bessel-weighted F -statistic output can detect signals with h0>8 ×10-26. An efficient, recursive, HMM solver based on the Viterbi algorithm is demonstrated, which requires ˜103 CPU hours for a typical, broadband (0.5-kHz) search for the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1, including generation of the relevant F -statistic input. In a "realistic" observational scenario, Viterbi tracking successfully detects 41 out of 50 synthetic signals without spin wandering in stage I of the Scorpius X-1 Mock Data Challenge convened by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration down to a wave strain of h0=1.1 ×10-25, recovering the frequency with a root-mean-square accuracy of ≤4.3 ×10-3 Hz .

  14. Characteristics of ZnO nanostructures synthesized by sonochemical reaction: Effects of continuous and pulse waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widiyastuti, W., E-mail: widi@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Machmudah, Siti; Kusdianto,; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Kampus ITS Sukolilo Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Nanostructured ZnO was synthesized by a sonochemical reaction. Ultrasonic irradiation were set up in continuous, pulse in 3 seconds on and a second off (on:off=3:1), and pulse in 2 seconds on and a second off (on:off=2:1) wave modes for 1.5 hours. The characteristics of particles generated by these modes such as morphology, crystallinity, FTIR, photoluminescence, and photocatalytic activity to degrade methylene blue were compared. Zinc nitrate and ammonia water-based solutions were selected as chemicals without the addition of other surfactants. The morphology of the generated ZnO particles could be tuned from flower-like, needle- or hairy-like, and spherical structures by changing the mode of ultrasonic irradiation from continuous, on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes, respectively. The generated particles indicated that a wurtzite structure of ZnO in a hexagonal phase was formed. The crystalline sizes of particles generated in continuous, on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes were 28, 27, 24 nm. A similar position of reduction peak of FTIR in all samples indicated that no differences in particles chemical bonding characteristics. Photoluminescence intensity was also decreased with changes the wave mode from continuous to pulse. Photocatalytic activity was also evaluated resulting in particles synthesized by continuous mode had the highest methylene blue degradation degree following by on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes.

  15. Effectiveness of combining plasma exchange with continuous hemodiafiltration on acute Fatty liver of pregnancy complicated by multiple organ dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yu-Feng; Meng, Mei; Zeng, Juan; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Jin-Jiao; Ren, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Ji-Cheng; Zhu, Wen-Ying; Wang, Chun-Ting

    2012-06-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare disease of progressive hepatic insufficiency and secondary systemic complications that induce significant maternal risk. The application of combining plasma exchange (PE) and continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) is a novel concept for patients with AFLP. Since 2002, we have utilized the combination of PE with CHDF as adjunctive medical therapy for 11 AFLP patients with multiple organ dysfunction. Before PE and CHDF initiation, four patients had signs and symptoms of encephalopathy, four required ventilatory support, and all 11 were developing liver failure, significant renal compromise, and coagulopathy. PE combined with CHDF for patients was initiated a mean of 2 days postpartum (range, days 0-3). Daily or every other day PE combined with CHDF was undertaken on two to eight occasions for each of the 11 patients. Ten patients responded with composite clinical and laboratory improvement and were discharged to the ward, then cured and discharged from hospital; one patient died of septic shock. Average duration of hospitalization was 17 days (range, days 9-38) from time of admission to discharge; the average duration of intensive care unit was 10 days (range, days 4-23). No significant PE- and CHDF-related complications occurred. These results indicate that combing PE and CHDF in a series-parallel circuit is an effective and safe treatment for patients with severe AFLP. This finding may have important implications for the development of an effective treatment for patients with AFLP suffering multiple organ dysfunction. © 2012, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2012, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Reflection and Transmission of the Level Step to the Waves in a Linear and Continuous Layer Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Xiao-ning; LI Qiang

    2006-01-01

    The reflection and transmission of the level step to the water waves in the linear and continuous layer liquid were studied in this paper. Based on the matching method of the eigenfunction and a Boussinesq approximation, the analytical expression of the diffraction was obtained and the computing methods of the reflection and transmission energy of the level step were proposed. For the incident wave with a frequency greater than that of the flotage, there is only one mode of plane traveling wave in the flow field. In the range of this greater frequency, the linear and continuous delamination effect will affect the reflection and transmission energy of the floating rectangular box. When the frequency of the incident wave is less than the flotage frequency, the energy of the plane traveling wave with infinite modes in the flow field will change into the energy of different modes for each incident wave of different modes.

  17. Unravelling the noise: the discrimination of wave function collapse models under time-continuous measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Duarte, O. S.; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the notion that environmental noise is in principle observable, while fundamental noise due to spontaneous localization would not be, we study the estimation of the diffusion parameter induced by wave function collapse models under continuous monitoring of the environment. We take into account finite measurement efficiencies and, in order to quantify the advantage granted by monitoring, we analyse the quantum Fisher information associated with such a diffusion parameter, identify optimal measurements in limiting cases, and assess the performance of such measurements in more realistic conditions.

  18. Sum-frequency generation of continuous-wave light at 194 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeland, D J; Cruz, F C; Bergquist, J C

    1997-06-20

    Over 2 mW of continuous-wave tunable 194-nm light is produced by sum-frequency mixing approximately 500 mW of 792-nm and 500 mW of 257-nm radiation in beta-barium borate (BBO). The powers in both fundamental beams are enhanced in separate ring cavities whose optical paths overlap in the Brewster-cut BBO crystal. Due to the higher circulating fundamental powers, the sum-frequency-generated power is nearly 2 orders of magnitude greater than previously reported values.

  19. [Multi-harmonic analysis of quasi-continuous-wave laser modulation absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ru-bin; Du, Zhen-hui; Meng, Fan-li; Li, Jin-yi; Gao, Dong-yu; Xu, Xiao-bin; Chen, Wen-liang; Xu, Ke-xin

    2012-03-01

    Numerous harmonic components such as multiple frequency, sum frequency and difference frequency of multiple modulation signals were found in quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) diode laser modulation absorption spectroscopy. Then, the authors analyzed these harmonic components' existence in terms of non-linear interactions of laser and gas absorption line. And the signals' characteristics were studied experimentally. The results shows that there are some sum frequency and difference frequency components that have larger amplitudes compared to the second harmonic wavelength modulation spectroscopy signal (2f-WMS) commonly used in tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS), and it may improve the detection sensitivity of QCW modulation spectroscopy.

  20. Piecewise continuous distribution function method in the theory of wave disturbances of inhomogeneous gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vereshchagin, D.A. [Theoretical Physics Department, Kaliningrad State University, A. Nevsky st. 14, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Leble, S.B. [Theoretical Physics Department, Kaliningrad State University, A. Nevsky st. 14, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation) and Theoretical Physics and Mathematical Methods Department, Gdansk University of Technology, ul. Narutowicza 11/12, Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: leble@mifgate.pg.gda.pl; Solovchuk, M.A. [Theoretical Physics Department, Kaliningrad State University, A. Nevsky st. 14, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: solovchuk@yandex.ru

    2006-01-02

    The system of hydrodynamic-type equations for a stratified gas in gravity field is derived from BGK equation by method of piecewise continuous distribution function. The obtained system of the equations generalizes the Navier-Stokes one at arbitrary Knudsen numbers. The problem of a wave disturbance propagation in a rarefied gas is explored. The verification of the model is made for a limiting case of a homogeneous medium. The phase velocity and attenuation coefficient values are in an agreement with former fluid mechanics theories; the attenuation behavior reproduces experiment and kinetics-based results at more wide range of the Knudsen numbers.

  1. Continuous-Wave Single-Photon Transistor Based on a Superconducting Circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriienko, Oleksandr; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2016-01-01

    We propose a microwave frequency single-photon transistor which can operate under continuous wave probing and represents an efficient single microwave photon detector. It can be realized using an impedance matched system of a three level artificial ladder-type atom coupled to two microwave cavities...... and the appearance of a photon flux leaving the second cavity through a separate input-output port. The proposal does not require time variation of the probe signals, thus corresponding to a passive version of a single-photon transistor. The resulting device is robust to qubit dephasing processes, possesses low dark...

  2. Specifics of short-wavelength generation in a continuous wave fiber optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobina, E. A.; Mishra, V.; Kablukov, S. I.; Singh, S. P.; Varshney, S. K.; Babin, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate factors limiting short-wavelength generation and therefore tuning range of the continuous wave all-fiber optical parametric oscillator based on birefringent photonic crystal fiber pumped by a tunable linearly polarized ytterbium-doped fiber laser. Influence of the longitudinal dispersion fluctuations in the fiber on the threshold of the fiber optical parametric oscillators is numerically studied. It is shown that even low fluctuations (<0.5 nm) of the zero dispersion wavelength in 18 m-long fiber result in a significant increase of the threshold at large parametric shifts.

  3. Low-Cost Fabrication of Printed Electronics Devices through Continuous Wave Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña, Pol; Arrese, Javier; González-Torres, Sergio; Fernández-Pradas, Juan Marcos; Cirera, Albert; Serra, Pere

    2017-09-06

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique that allows printing inks from a liquid film in a similar way to inkjet printing but with fewer limitations concerning ink viscosity and loading particle size. In this work, we prove that liquid inks can be printed through LIFT by using continuous wave (CW) instead of pulsed lasers, which allows a substantial reduction in the cost of the printing system. Through the fabrication of a functional circuit on both rigid and flexible substrates (plastic and paper), we provide a proof-of-concept that demonstrates the versatility of the technique for printed electronics applications.

  4. Emphysematous pyelonephritis: A rare life-threatening complication after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Ho; Chung, Dong Jin; Yeo, Dong Myung; Sonh, Dong Wan; Hahn, Sung Tae [Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN), caused by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), has not been reported in the literature; and the mechanism of this disease is unknown. Although many studies have conjectured about the various causes of EPN, ESWL was not one of them. The patient in this report was a 65-year-old woman with a past medical history of diabetes; the patient underwent an ESWL that caused the EPN. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an EPN case that was caused by ESWL.

  5. Frequency stabilization of the non resonant wave of a continuous-wave singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Ly, Aliou; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental technique allowing to stabilize the frequency of the non resonant wave in a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) down to the kHz level, much below the pump frequency noise level. By comparing the frequency of the non resonant wave with a reference cavity, the pump frequency noise is imposed to the frequency of the resonant wave, and is thus subtracted from the frequency of the non resonant wave. This permits the non resonant wave obtained from such a SRO to be simultaneously powerful and frequency stable, which is usually impossible to obtain when the resonant wave frequency is stabilized.

  6. Comparison of photosensitivity in germanium doped silica fibers using 244 nm and 266 nm continuous wave lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo; Varming, Poul; Liu, B.;

    2001-01-01

    Diode pumped continuous-wave UV lasers offer an interesting alternative to frequency doubled argon-ion lasers. We report the first photosensitivity comparison using these lasers on deuterium loaded standard telecommunication fibers and unloaded experimental fibers....

  7. Self-referencing a continuous-wave laser with electro-optic modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Beha, Katja; Del'Haye, Pascal; Coillet, Aurélien; Diddams, Scott A; Papp, Scott B

    2015-01-01

    We phase-coherently measure the frequency of continuous-wave (CW) laser light by use of optical-phase modulation and f-2f nonlinear interferometry. Periodic electro-optic modulation (EOM) transforms the CW laser into a continuous train of picosecond optical pulses. Subsequent nonlinear-fiber broadening of this EOM frequency comb produces a supercontinuum with 160 THz of bandwidth. A critical intermediate step is optical filtering of the EOM comb to reduce electronic-noise-induced decoherence of the supercontinuum. Applying f-2f self-referencing with the supercontinuum yields the carrier-envelope offset frequency of the EOM comb, which is precisely the difference of the CW laser frequency and an exact integer multiple of the EOM pulse repetition rate. Here we demonstrate absolute optical frequency metrology and synthesis applications of the self-referenced CW laser with <5E-14 fractional accuracy and stability.

  8. Continuous-wave non-classical light with GHz squeezing bandwidth

    CERN Document Server

    Ast, Stefan; Mehmet, Moritz; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Eberle, Tobias; Schnabel, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Squeezed states can be employed for entanglement-based continuous-variable quantum key distribution, where the secure key rate is proportional to the bandwidth of the squeezing. We produced a non-classical continuous-wave laser field at the telecommunication wavelength of 1550 nm, which showed squeezing over a bandwidth of more than 2 GHz. The experimental setup used parametric down-conversion via a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystal (PPKTP). We did not use any resonant enhancement for the funda- mental wavelength, which should in principle allow a production of squeezed light over the full phase-matching bandwidth of several nanometers. We measured the squeezing to be up to 0.3 dB below the vacuum noise from 50 MHz to 2 GHz limited by the measuring bandwidth of the homodyne detector. The squeezing strength was possibly limited by thermal lensing inside the non-linear crystal.

  9. An Einstein@home search for continuous gravitational waves from Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Sylvia J; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Wette, Karl; Allen, Bruce; Bock, Oliver; Keitel, David; Krishnan, Badri; Machenschalk, Bernd; Shaltev, Miroslav; Siemens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational-wave emission in a broad frequency range (between 50 and 1000 Hz) from the central compact object of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The data comes from the sixth science run of LIGO and the search is performed on the volunteer distributed computing network Einstein@Home. We find no significant signal candidate, and set the most constraining upper limits to date on the gravitational-wave emission from Cas A, which beat the indirect age-based upper limit across the entire search range. At around 170 Hz (the most sensitive frequency range), we set 90% confidence upper limits of $\\sim\\!\\!~2.9\\times 10^{-25}$, roughly twice as constraining as the upper limits from previous searches on Cas A. The upper limits can also be expressed as constraints on the ellipticity of Cas A; with a few reasonable assumptions, we show that at gravitational-wave frequencies greater than 300~Hz, we can exclude an ellipticity of $\\gtrsim\\!\\!~10^{-5}$.

  10. Relationship between prenatal care and maternal complications in women with preeclampsia: implications for continuity and discontinuity of prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Ming; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Cheng, Po-Jen

    2012-12-01

    Prenatal care is associated with better pregnancy outcome and may be a patient safety issue. However, no studies have investigated the types and quality of prenatal care provided in northern Taiwan. This retrospective study assessed whether the hospital-based continuous prenatal care model at tertiary hospitals reduced the risk of perinatal morbidity and maternal complications in pre-eclampsia patients. Of 385 pre-eclampsia patients recruited from among 23,665 deliveries, 198 were classified as patients with little or no prenatal care who received traditional, individualized, and physician-based discontinuous prenatal care (community-based model), and 187 were classified as control patients who received tertiary hospital-based continuous prenatal care. The effects on perinatal outcome were significantly different between the two groups. The cases in the hospital-based care group were less likely to be associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight, very low birth weight, and intrauterine growth restriction. After adjustment of confounding factors, the factors associated with pregnant women who received little or no prenatal care by individualized physician groups were diastolic blood pressure ≥ 105 mmHg, serum aspartate transaminase level ≥ 150 IU/L, and low-birth-weight deliveries. This study also demonstrated the dose-response effect of inadequate, intermediate, adequate, and intensive prenatal care status on fetal birth weight and gestational periods (weeks to delivery). The types of prenatal care may be associated with different pregnancy outcomes and neonatal morbidity. Factors associated with inadequate prenatal care may be predictors of pregnancy outcome in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ashton, G.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Branco, V.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M. D.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez, J.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between -1.0 ×10-10 and +1.5 ×10-11 Hz /s , and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short fast Fourier transforms, of length 8192 s, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, in both the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each data set a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer fast Fourier transforms followed by a further incoherent analysis, still based on the FrequencyHough transform. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, and therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90% confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted, on data of ground-based interferometric detectors, at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about 1 0-24 and 2 ×10-23 at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of ˜2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below 80 Hz.

  12. High speed video shooting with continuous-wave laser illumination in laboratory modeling of wind - wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Caulliez, Guillemette; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim

    2014-05-01

    Three examples of usage of high-speed video filming in investigation of wind-wave interaction in laboratory conditions is described. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) and at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m, wind velocity up to 10 m/s). A combination of PIV-measurements, optical measurements of water surface form and wave gages were used for detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. The modified PIV-method is based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by particles and high-speed video. During the experiments on the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS Green (532 nm) CW laser with 1.5 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint (VS-Fast) was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz. Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved using conditional in phase averaging like in [1]. In the experiments on the LASIF more powerful Argon laser (4 Wt, CW) was used as well as high-speed camera with higher sensitivity and resolution: Optronics Camrecord CR3000x2, frame rate 3571 Hz, frame size 259×1696 px. In both series of experiments spherical 0.02 mm polyamide particles with inertial time 7 ms were used for seeding airflow. New particle seeding system based on utilization of air pressure is capable of injecting 2 g of particles per second for 1.3 - 2.4 s without flow disturbance. Used in LASIF this system provided high particle density on PIV-images. In combination with high-resolution camera it allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from

  13. Stable, continuous-wave, intracavity, optical parametric oscillator pumped by a semiconductor disk laser (VECSEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothard, D J M; Hopkins, J-M; Burns, D; Dunn, M H

    2009-06-22

    We report relaxation oscillation free, true continuous-wave operation of a singly-resonant, intracavity optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based upon periodically-poled, MgO-doped LiNbO3 and pumped internal to the cavity of a compact, optically-excited semiconductor disk laser (or VECSEL). The very short upper-laser-state lifetime of this laser gain medium, coupled with the enhancing effect of the high-finesse pump laser cavity in which the OPO is located, enables a low threshold, high efficiency intracavity device to be operated free of relaxation oscillations in continuous-wave mode. By optimizing for low-power operation, parametric threshold was achieved at a diode-laser power of only 1.4 W. At 8.5 W of diode-laser power, 205 mW of idler power was extracted, indicating a total down-converted power of 1.25 W, and hence a down-conversion efficiency of 83%.

  14. Continuous-wave mid-infrared photonic crystal light emitters at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Binbin; Qiu, Jijun; Shi, Zhisheng

    2017-01-01

    Mid-infrared photonic crystal enhanced lead-salt light emitters operating under continuous-wave mode at room temperature were investigated in this work. For the device, an active region consisting of 9 pairs of PbSe/Pb0.96Sr0.04Se quantum wells was grown by molecular beam epitaxy method on top of a Si(111) substrate which was initially dry-etched with a two-dimensional photonic crystal structure in a pattern of hexagonal holes. Because of the photonic crystal structure, an optical band gap between 3.49 and 3.58 µm was formed, which matched with the light emission spectrum of the quantum wells at room temperature. As a result, under optical pumping, using a near-infrared continuous-wave semiconductor laser, the device exhibited strong photonic crystal band-edge mode emissions and delivered over 26.5 times higher emission efficiency compared to the one without photonic crystal structure. The output power obtained was up to 7.68 mW (the corresponding power density was 363 mW/cm2), and a maximum quantum efficiency reached to 1.2%. Such photonic crystal emitters can be used as promising light sources for novel miniaturized gas-sensing systems.

  15. Methylphenidate and continuous spike and wave during sleep in a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Volney L; Shankar, Maithreyi; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Bridgemohan, Carolyn H; Torres, Alcy R

    2013-07-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is the most common neurobehavioral disorder in children and frequently associated with epilepsy. For patients with both conditions, methylphenidate remains a mainstay in the treatment of behavioral problems. Most studies demonstrate that methylphenidate is effective in treating children with well-controlled epilepsy, and that methylphenidate does not increase the risk of having seizures in patients with EEG abnormalities without epilepsy. However, in patients with active seizures, the results are somewhat contradictory. This article presents the case of a young girl with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and behavioral problems on Depakote (valproic acid) who had an abnormal EEG with left centroparietal spikes but no history of electrographic seizures. She experienced a convulsion the day after her first dose of methylphenidate, and repeat EEG demonstrated continuous spike and slow wave during sleep. This case report suggests that children with continuous spike and slow wave during sleep may have a higher risk of developing seizures with methylphenidate treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impulsively Generated Sausage Waves in Coronal Tubes with Transversally Continuous Structuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Li, Bo; Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiong, Ming; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2016-12-01

    The frequency dependence of the longitudinal group speeds of trapped sausage waves plays an important role in determining impulsively generated wave trains, which have often been invoked to account for quasi-periodic signals in coronal loops. We examine how the group speeds ({v}{gr}) depend on angular frequency (ω) for sausage modes in pressureless coronal tubes with continuous transverse density distributions by solving the dispersion relation pertinent to the case where the density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form occurs in a transition layer of arbitrary thickness. We find that in addition to the transverse lengthscale l and density contrast {ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}, the group speed behavior also depends on the detailed form of the density inhomogeneity. For parabolic profiles, {v}{gr} always decreases with ω first before increasing again, as happens for the much studied top-hat profiles. For linear profiles, however, the behavior of the ω -{v}{gr} curves is more complex. When {ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}≲ 6, the curves become monotonical for large values of l. On the other hand, for higher density contrasts, a local maximum {v}{gr}\\max exists in addition to a local minimum {v}{gr}\\min when coronal tubes are diffuse. With time-dependent computations, we show that the different behavior of group speed curves, the characteristic speeds {v}{gr}\\min and {v}{gr}\\max in particular, is reflected in the temporal evolution and Morlet spectra of impulsively generated wave trains. We conclude that the observed quasi-periodic wave trains not only can be employed to probe such key parameters as density contrasts and profile steepness, but also have the potential to discriminate between the unknown forms of the transverse density distribution.

  17. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajnulina, M.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M. [innoFSPEC-VKS, Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Böhm, M. [innoFSPEC-InFaSe, University of Potsdam, Am Mühlenberg 3, 14476 Golm (Germany); Blow, K. [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Rieznik, A. A. [Instituto Tecnologico de Buenos Aires and CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs.

  18. Bandwidth scaling of a phase-modulated continuous-wave comb through four-wave mixing in a silicon nano-waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Metcalf, Andrew J; Company, Victor Torres; Wu, Rui; Fan, Li; Varghese, Leo T; Qi, Minghao; Weiner, Andrew M

    2014-11-15

    We demonstrate an on-chip four-wave mixing (FWM) scheme in a silicon nanowaveguide to scale the bandwidth of a frequency comb generated by phase modulation of continuous-wave (CW) lasers. The FWM process doubles the bandwidth of the initial comb generated by the modulation of a CW laser. For example, a wavelength-tunable frequency comb with >100 comb lines spaced by 10 GHz within a bandwidth of 5 dB is generated.

  19. Effect of scanning speed on continuous wave laser scribing of metal thin films: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, AmirHossein; Koohian, Ata; Madanipour, Khosro

    2017-01-01

    In this paper continuous wave laser scribing of the metal thin films have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. A formulation is presented based on parameters like beam power, spot size, scanning speed and fluence thresholds. The role of speed on the transient temperature and tracks width is studied numerically. By using two frameworks of pulsed laser ablation of thin films and laser printing on paper, the relation between ablation width and scanning speed has been derived. Furthermore, various speeds of the focused 450 nm continuous laser diode with an elliptical beam spot applied to a 290 nm copper thin film coated on glass, experimentally. The beam power was 150 mW after spatial filtering. By fitting the theoretical formulation to the experimental data, the threshold fluence and energy were obtained to be 13.2 J mm-2 and 414~μ J respectively. An anticipated theoretical parameter named equilibrium~border was verified experimentally. It shows that in the scribing of the 290 nm copper thin film, at a distance where the intensity reaches about 1/e of its maximum value, the absorbed fluence on the surface is equal to zero. Therefore the application of continuous laser in metal thin film ablation has different mechanism from pulsed laser drilling and beam scanning in printers.

  20. Continuity and asymptotic behaviors for a shallow water wave model with moderate amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shouming; Qiao, Zhijun; Mu, Chunlai; Wei, Long

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study continuity and persistence for a nonlinear evolution equation describing the free surface of shallow water wave with a moderate amplitude, which was proposed by Constantin and Lannes [7]. By the approach for approximate solutions and well-posedness estimates, we obtain two sequences of solution for Constantin-Lannes equation, which are bounded in the Sobolev space Hs (R) with s > 3 / 2, and the distance between the two sequences is lower-bounded by a positive constant for any time t, but converges to zero at the initial time. This implies that the solution map is not uniformly continuous. Furthermore, the solution map for Constantin-Lannes equation is shown Hölder-continuous in Hr-topology for all 0 ≤ r < s with exponent α depending on s and r. In addition, we also investigate the asymptotic behaviors of the strong solutions to Constantin-Lannes equation at infinity within its lifespan provided the initial data in weighted Lϕp : =Lp (R ,ϕp dx) spaces.

  1. Design and Fabrication of a Chip-based Continuous-wave Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Power, E P; Vanderelzen, B; Herrera-Fierro, P; Murphy, R; Yalisove, S M; Raithel, G

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for a continuous-wave (CW) atom laser on a chip and describe the process used to fabricate the device. Our design aims to integrate quadrupole magnetic guiding of ground state Rb atoms with continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling to create a continuous Bose-Einstein condensate; out-coupled atoms from the condensate should realize a CW atom laser. We choose a geometry with three wires embedded in a spiral pattern in a silicon subtrate. The guide features an integrated solenoid to mitigate spin-flip losses and provide a tailored longitudinal magnetic field. Our design also includes multiple options for atom interferometry: accomodations are in place for laser-generated atom Fabry-Perot and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, and a pair of atomic beam X-splitters is incorporated for an all-magnetic atom Mach-Zehnder setup. We demonstrate the techniques necessary to fabricate our device using existing micro- and nano-scale fabrication equipment, and discuss future options for modified desi...

  2. Simulation of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation based on the parameterization of continuously spectral gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG KaiMing; ZHANG ShaoDong; YI Fan; CHEN ZeYu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of previous parameterization schemes, considering both the wave breaking and absorbed at critical level, a parameterization with a continuous spectrum of gravity waves is realized by intro-ducing a momentum flux density function for the wave spectrum, and then the parameterization scheme of the gravity waves is improved. Choosing parameter values of the background atmosphere and waves based on the observations, a more realistic equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO)driven by the incorporated drag from the planetary and gravity waves can be simulated. The numerical results indicate that the forcing magnitude of the planetary and gravity waves varies with the wind field,and in some phases of the QBO, the contribution of the gravity waves is comparable with that of the planetary waves. After the QBO is steadily formed, its amplitude and period and wind configuration are relevant to the effect of vertical diffusion and the momentum flux distribution with spectrum, however,independent of the initial background wind field. Moreover, for any given nonzero initial background wind, a steady QBO can be finally generated due to the incorporated drag from the planetary and grav-ity waves.

  3. 50 MHz continuous wave interferometer observations of the unstable mid-latitude E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the conversion of SESCAT (Sporadic-E SCATter experiment, a bistatic 50 MHz continuous wave (CW Doppler radar located on the island of Crete, Greece, to a single (east-west baseline interferometer. The first results show that SESCAT, which provides high quality Doppler spectra and excellent temporal resolution, has its measurement capabilities enhanced significantly when operated as an interferometer, as it can also study short-term dynamics of localized scattering regions within mid-latitude sporadic E-layers. The interferometric observations reveal that the aspect sensitive area viewed by the radar often contains a few zonally located backscatter regions, presumably blobs or patches of unstable metallic ion plasma, which drift across the radar field-of-view with the neutral wind. On average, these active regions of backscatter have mean zonal scales ranging from a few kilometers to several tens of kilometers and drift with westward speeds from ~ 20 m/s to 100 m/s, and occasionally up to 150 m/s. The cross-spectral analysis shows that mid-latitude type 1 echoes occur much more frequently than has been previously assumed and they originate in single and rather localized areas of elevated electric fields. On the other hand, typical bursts of type 2 echoes are often found to result from two adjacent regions in azimuth undergoing the same bulk motion westwards but producing scatter of opposite Doppler polarity, a fact that contradicts the notion of isotropic turbulence to which type 2 echoes are attributed. Finally, quasi-periodic (QP echoes are observed simply to be due to sequential unstable plasma patches or blobs which traverse across the radar field-of-view, sometimes in a wave-like fashion.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; mid-latitude ionosphere; plasma waves and instabilities

  4. Impulsively generated sausage waves in coronal tubes with transversally continuous structuring

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hui; Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiong, Ming; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the longitudinal group speeds of trapped sausage waves plays an important role in determining impulsively generated wave trains, which have often been invoked to account for quasi-periodic signals in coronal loops. We examine how the group speeds ($v_{\\rm gr}$) depend on angular frequency ($\\omega$) for sausage modes in pressureless coronal tubes with continuous transverse density distributions by solving the dispersion relation pertinent to the case where the density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form takes place in a transition layer of arbitrary thickness. We find that in addition to the transverse lengthscale $l$ and density contrast $\\rho_{\\rm i}/\\rho_{\\rm e}$, the group speed behavior depends also on the detailed form of the density inhomogeneity. For parabolic profiles, $v_{\\rm gr}$ always decreases with $\\omega$ first before increasing again, as happens for the much studied top-hat profiles. For linear profiles, however, the behavior of the $\\omega-v_{\\rm gr}$ curves is more c...

  5. Continuous-wave, two-crystal, singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, G K; Aadhi, A; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2013-04-22

    We present theoretical and experimental study of a continuous-wave, two-crystal, singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (T-SRO) comprising two identical 30-mm-long crystals of MgO:sPPLT in a four- mirror ring cavity and pumped with two separate pump beams in the green. The idler beam after each crystal is completely out-coupled, while the signal radiation is resonant inside the cavity. Solving the coupled amplitude equations under undepleted pump approximation, we calculate the maximum threshold reduction, parametric gain acceptance bandwidth and closest possible attainable wavelength separation in arbitrary dual-wavelength generation and compare with the experimental results. Although the T-SRO has two identical crystals, the acceptance bandwidth of the device is equal to that of a single-crystal SRO. Due to the division of pump power in two crystals, the T-SRO can handle higher total pump power while lowering crystal damage risk and thermal effects. We also experimentally verify the high power performance of such scheme, providing a total output power of 6.5 W for 16.2 W of green power at 532 nm. We verified coherent energy coupling between the intra-cavity resonant signal waves resulting Raman spectral lines. Based on the T-SRO scheme, we also report a new technique to measure the temperature acceptance bandwidth of the single-pass parametric amplifier across the OPO tuning range.

  6. Search for continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in globular cluster NGC 6544

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Sigurdsson, S.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We describe a directed search for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth initial LIGO science run. The target was the nearby globular cluster NGC 6544 at a distance of ≈2.7 kpc . The search covered a broad band of frequencies along with first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky position. The search coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over a time span of 9.2 days using the matched-filtering F -statistic. We found no gravitational-wave signals and set 95% confidence upper limits as stringent as 6.0 ×10-25 on intrinsic strain and 8.5 ×10-6 on fiducial ellipticity. These values beat the indirect limits from energy conservation for stars with characteristic spin-down ages older than 300 years and are within the range of theoretical predictions for possible neutron-star ellipticities. An important feature of this search was use of a barycentric resampling algorithm which substantially reduced computational cost; this method is used extensively in searches of Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector data.

  7. Application of autofocusing methods in continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haochong; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Zhou, Xun; Li, Zeyu; Wang, Yunxin

    2015-07-01

    Terahertz digital holography is a combination of terahertz imaging and digital holography. During reconstruction, the key point is to find accurately the propagation distance from which the distribution of focused samples can be reconstructed. In this paper, we use a continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holographic imaging system to record holograms. Moreover, the autofocusing algorithms through which the reconstructed distance can be calculated are applied to the reconstruction. The in-line schematic is beneficial to the terahertz wave imaging, which, however, inevitably produces the object's twin image. In the refocusing process, both the reconstructed image with low signal-to-noise ratio and contrast and the twin image induce the formation of false peaks corresponding to improper distances on the autofocusing curves. To restrain the disturbance factors and improve the accuracy of the judgment, a phase retrieval method is implemented in the reconstruction. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the autofocusing method with phase retrieval in terahertz in-line digital holographic imaging system. The proposed method provides an automated and efficient evaluation which helps to obtain the optimized propagation distance.

  8. Search for continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in globular cluster NGC 6544

    CERN Document Server

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Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O E S; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Setyawati, Y; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J; Sigurdsson, S

    2016-01-01

    We describe a directed search for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth LIGO science run. The target was the nearby globular cluster NGC 6544 at a distance of 2.7 kpc. The search covered a broad band of frequencies along with first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky position. The search coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over a time span of 9.2 days using the matched-filtering F-statistic. We found no gravitational-wave signals and set 95% confidence upper limits as stringent as 6.0 X 10^{-25} on intrinsic strain and 8.5 X 10^{-6} on fiducial ellipticity. These values beat the indirect limits from energy conservation for stars with characteristic spindown ages older than 300 years and are within the range of theoretical predictions for possible neutron-star ellipticities. An important feature of this search was use of a barycentric resampling algorithm which substantially reduced computational cost; this method will be used extensively in searches of Adv...

  9. A model of continuous granular medium. Waves in the reduced Cosserat continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Lalin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the description of vibrational properties of deformable bodies, it is usually assumed that the size of the oscillating particles is negligible in comparison with the average distance between them, so to describe the kinematics of such media only the displacement vector is used. In the majority of work is considered that when the independent rotational degrees of freedom are taken into account it become necessary to introduce the couple stress. Such models of continuous media are well known, for example, moment theory of elasticity or Cosserat media.A distinctive feature of the reduced Cosserat medium is that the stress tensor is asymmetric, and in static problems, this tensor becomes symmetric. Thus, in statics the reduced Cosserat media is indistinguishable from the the classical continuum in which the rotational degrees of freedom are not independent, as they are expressed in terms of displacement and the stress tensor is symmetric.In this paper we investigate the wave motion of a three-dimensional, isotropic, elastic reduced Cosserat medium, the characteristic velocities of wave propagation are finding, we also construct and analyze the dispersion curve for the dynamic equations.

  10. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xingjiang; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Yanjun; Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five percent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio $\\gtrsim$ 30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW meas...

  11. Glassy behavior in a one-dimensional continuous-wave erbium-doped random fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Lima, Bismarck C.; Pincheira, Pablo I. R.; Moura, André L.; Gagné, Mathieu; Raposo, Ernesto P.; de Araújo, Cid B.; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-07-01

    The photonic analog of the paramagnetic to spin-glass phase transition in disordered magnetic systems, signaled by the phenomenon of replica symmetry breaking, has been reported using random lasers as the photonic platform. We report here a demonstration of replica symmetry breaking in a one-dimensional photonic system consisting of an erbium-doped random fiber laser operating in the continuous-wave regime. The system is based on a unique random fiber grating system which plays the role of random scattering, providing the disordered feedback mechanism. The clear transition from a photonic paramagnetic to a photonic spin-glass phase, characterized by the Parisi overlap parameter, was verified and indicates the glassy random-fiber-laser behavior.

  12. Solutions of kW Continuous-wave All-fiber Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Dapeng; Li Libo; Liu Xiaoxu [Wuhan Raycus Fiber Laser Technologies Co., Ltd, Wuhan (China); Min Dayong, E-mail: dyan@raycuslaser.com [Wuhan HuaGong Laser Engineering Co., Ltd, Wuhan (China)

    2011-02-01

    Solutions of kW continuous-wave (CW) all-fiber laser are proposed. In our solutions, master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration is applied. Output power of master oscillator is 10W, and then is amplified to 70W with 1st pre-amplifier and next scaled up to 400W. Finally, 400W fiber laser is used as a basic power unit, and 1000W all-fiber laser can be achieved by means of beam combining with large core double clad fiber (DCF) combiner. In this solution, fiber laser has good stability and reliability for dispersion coupling of pump source and inhibition of photon darkening effect in the fiber. In addition, this solution assures us realize a 1000W all-fiber laser product easily, and the cost is low.

  13. Five-wave-packet quantum error correction based on continuous-variable cluster entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuhong; Su, Xiaolong; Tian, Caixing; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2015-10-01

    Quantum error correction protects the quantum state against noise and decoherence in quantum communication and quantum computation, which enables one to perform fault-torrent quantum information processing. We experimentally demonstrate a quantum error correction scheme with a five-wave-packet code against a single stochastic error, the original theoretical model of which was firstly proposed by S. L. Braunstein and T. A. Walker. Five submodes of a continuous variable cluster entangled state of light are used for five encoding channels. Especially, in our encoding scheme the information of the input state is only distributed on three of the five channels and thus any error appearing in the remained two channels never affects the output state, i.e. the output quantum state is immune from the error in the two channels. The stochastic error on a single channel is corrected for both vacuum and squeezed input states and the achieved fidelities of the output states are beyond the corresponding classical limit.

  14. Parameter-space metric of semicoherent searches for continuous gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, Holger J

    2010-01-01

    Continuous gravitational-wave (CW) signals such as emitted by spinning neutron stars are an important target class for current detectors. However, the enormous computational demand prohibits fully-coherent broadband all-sky searches for prior unknown CW sources over wide ranges of parameter space and for year-long observation times. More efficient hierarchical "semicoherent" search strategies divide the data into segments much shorter than one year, which are analyzed coherently; then detection statistics from different segments are combined incoherently. To optimally perform the incoherent combination, understanding of the underlying parameter-space structure is requisite. This problem is addressed here by using new coordinates on the parameter space, which yield the first analytical parameter-space metric for the incoherent combination step. This semicoherent metric applies to broadband all-sky surveys (also embedding directed searches at fixed sky position) for isolated CW sources. Furthermore, the additio...

  15. Retrieving wind statistics from average spectrum of continuous-wave lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Branlard

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to experimentally demonstrate that the time-average Doppler spectrum of a continuous-wave (cw lidar is proportional to the probability density function of the line-of-sight velocities. This would open the possibility of using cw lidars for the determination of the second-order atmospheric turbulence statistics. An atmospheric field campaign and a wind tunnel experiment are carried out to show that the use of an average Doppler spectrum instead of a time series of velocities determined from individual Doppler spectra significantly reduces the differences with the standard deviation measured using ordinary anemometers, such as ultra-sonic anemometers or hotwires. The proposed method essentially removes the spatial averaging effect intrinsic to the cw lidar systems.

  16. Continuous-wave and actively Q-switched Nd:LSO crystal lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, S.; Li, D.; Xu, X.; Wang, Z.; Yu, H.; Xu, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, L.; Xu, X.

    2012-04-01

    With a fiber coupled laser diode array as the pump source, Nd-doped Lu2SiO5 (Nd:LSO) crystal lasers at 4F3/2→4I11/2 and 4F3/2→4I13/2 transitions were demonstrated. The active Q-switched dual-wavelength lasers at about 1.08 μm, as well as continuous-wave (CW) and active Q-switched lasers at 1357 nm are reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Considering the small emission cross-sections and long fluorescence lifetime, this material possesses large energy storage ability and excellent Q-switched properties. The special emission wavelength at 1357 nm will have promising applications to be used in many fields, such as THz generation, pumping of Cr3+:LiSAF, repumping of strontium optical clock, laser Doppler velocimeter and distributed fiber sensor.

  17. Phase-sensitive cascaded four-wave mixing processes for generating continuous-variable entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Jing, Jietai

    2017-03-20

    Quantum entanglement shared by different parties enhances their capabilities to communicate, which is the core content of continuous-variable quantum optics and quantum information science. Here, we study an experimentally feasible scheme for generating quantum entanglement of bipartite and tripartite cases based on phase-sensitive cascaded four-wave mixing processes in rubidium vapor. Quantum entanglement of bipartite and tripartite cases in our system, which can be manipulated by the phases and the intensity gains of the input beams, is predicted. We also find a sufficient optimal single-condition criterion to give a valid description for genuine tripartite quantum entanglement in our system. The sufficient optimal single-condition criterion is convenient and can be extended to genuine multipartite entanglement.

  18. Non-contact physiological signal detection using continuous wave Doppler radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Dengyu; He, Tan; Hu, Boping; Li, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show non-contact physiological signal monitoring system based on continuous-wave (CW) Doppler radar, which is becoming highly attractive in the field of health care monitoring of elderly people. Two radar signal processing methods were introduced in this paper: one to extract respiration and heart rates of a single person and the other to separate mixed respiration signals. To verify the validity of the methods, physiological signal is obtained from stationary human subjects using a CW Doppler radar unit. The sensor operating at 24 GHz is located 0.5 meter away from the subject. The simulation results show that the respiration and heart rates are clearly extracted, and the mixed respiration signals are successfully separated. Finally, reference respiration and heart rate signals are measured by an ECG monitor and compared with the results tracked by the CW Doppler radar monitoring system.

  19. Stimulated Brillouin scattering continuous wave phase conjugation in step-index fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Steven M; Spring, Justin B; Russell, Timothy H

    2008-07-21

    Continuous wave (CW) stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation in step-index optical fibers was studied experimentally and modeled as a function of fiber length. A phase conjugate fidelity over 80% was measured from SBS in a 40 m fiber using a pinhole technique. Fidelity decreases with fiber length, and a fiber with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.06 was found to generate good phase conjugation fidelity over longer lengths than a fiber with 0.13 NA. Modeling and experiment support previous work showing the maximum interaction length which yields a high fidelity phase conjugate beam is inversely proportional to the fiber NA(2), but find that fidelity remains high over much longer fiber lengths than previous models calculated. Conditions for SBS beam cleanup in step-index fibers are discussed.

  20. Highly Nonlinear Luminescence Induced by Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Surfaces with Continuous-Wave Laser Illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    We report on highly nonlinear luminescence being observed from individual spherical gold nanoparticles immobilized on a borosilicate glass surface and illuminated by continuous-wave (CW) lasers with relatively low power. The nonlinear luminescence shows optical super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit in three dimensions compared to the scatting of the excitation laser light. The luminescence intensity from most nanoparticles is proportional to the 5th--7th power of the excitation laser power and has wide excitation and emission spectra across the visible wavelength range. Strong nonlinear luminescence is only observed near the glass surface. High optical nonlinearity excited by low CW laser power is related to a long-lived dark state of the gold nanoparticles, where the excitation light is strongly absorbed. This phenomenon has potential biological applications in super-resolution and deep tissue imaging.

  1. Nonlinear continuous-wave optical propagation in nematic liquid crystals: Interplay between reorientational and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Laudyn, Urszula A.; Piccardi, Armando; Kwasny, Michał; Klus, Bartlomiej; Karpierz, Mirosław A.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2017-07-01

    We investigate nonlinear optical propagation of continuous-wave (CW) beams in bulk nematic liquid crystals. We thoroughly analyze the competing roles of reorientational and thermal nonlinearity with reference to self-focusing/defocusing and, eventually, the formation of nonlinear diffraction-free wavepackets, the so-called spatial optical solitons. To this extent we refer to dye-doped nematic liquid crystals in planar cells excited by a single CW beam in the highly nonlocal limit. To adjust the relative weight between the two nonlinear responses, we employ two distinct wavelengths, inside and outside the absorption band of the dye, respectively. Different concentrations of the dye are considered in order to enhance the thermal effect. The theoretical analysis is complemented by numerical simulations in the highly nonlocal approximation based on a semi-analytic approach. Theoretical results are finally compared to experimental results in the Nematic Liquid Crystals (NLC) 4-trans-4'-n-hexylcyclohexylisothiocyanatobenzene (6CHBT) doped with Sudan Blue dye.

  2. Diode-pumped continuous wave tunable and graphene Q-switched Tm:LSO lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, T L; Zhao, S Z; Yang, K J; Li, G Q; Li, D C; Zhao, J; Qiao, W C; Hou, J; Yang, Y; He, J L; Zheng, L H; Wang, Q G; Xu, X D; Su, L B; Xu, J

    2013-10-21

    We have investigated the lasing characteristics of Tm:LSO crystal in three operation regimes: continuous wave (CW), wavelength tunable and passive Q-switching based on graphene. In CW regime, a maximum output power of 0.65 W at 2054.9 nm with a slope efficiency of 21% was achieved. With a quartz plate, a broad wavelength tunable range of 145 nm was obtained, corresponding to a FWHM of 100 nm. By using a graphene saturable absorber mirror, the passively Q-switched Tm:LSO laser produced pulses with duration of 7.8 μs at 2030.8 nm under a repetition rate of 7.6 kHz, corresponding to pulse energy of 14.0 μJ.

  3. Five-wave-packet quantum error correction based on continuous-variable cluster entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuhong; Su, Xiaolong; Tian, Caixing; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2015-10-26

    Quantum error correction protects the quantum state against noise and decoherence in quantum communication and quantum computation, which enables one to perform fault-torrent quantum information processing. We experimentally demonstrate a quantum error correction scheme with a five-wave-packet code against a single stochastic error, the original theoretical model of which was firstly proposed by S. L. Braunstein and T. A. Walker. Five submodes of a continuous variable cluster entangled state of light are used for five encoding channels. Especially, in our encoding scheme the information of the input state is only distributed on three of the five channels and thus any error appearing in the remained two channels never affects the output state, i.e. the output quantum state is immune from the error in the two channels. The stochastic error on a single channel is corrected for both vacuum and squeezed input states and the achieved fidelities of the output states are beyond the corresponding classical limit.

  4. High-efficiency frequency doubling of continuous-wave laser light

    CERN Document Server

    Ast, Stefan; Schönbeck, Axel; Lastzka, Nico; Steinlechner, Jessica; Eberle, Tobias; Mehmet, Moritz; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observation of high efficiency frequency doubling of 1550 nm continuous-wave laser light in a nonlinear cavity containing a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystal (PPKTP). The fundamental field had a power of 1.10 W and was converted into 1.05 W at 775 nm, yielding a total external conversion efficiency of (95 \\pm 1)%. The latter value is based on the measured depletion of the fundamental field being consistent with the absolute values derived from numerical simulations. According to our model, the conversion efficiency achieved was limited by the non-perfect mode-matching into the nonlinear cavity and the pump power available. Our result shows that cavity-assisted frequency conversion based on PPKTP is well suited for low-decoherence frequency conversion of quantum states of light.

  5. PP-waves from rotating and continuously distributed D3-branes

    CERN Document Server

    Brandhuber, A

    2002-01-01

    We study families of PP-wave solutions of type-IIB supergravity that have (light-cone) time dependent metrics and RR five-form fluxes. They arise as Penrose limits of supergravity solutions that correspond to rotating or continuous distributions of D3-branes. In general, the solutions preserve sixteen supersymmetries. On the dual field theory side these backgrounds describe the BMN limit of N=4$ SYM when some scalars in the field theory have non-vanishing expectation values. We study the perturbative string spectrum and in several cases we are able to determine it exactly for the bosons as well as for the fermions. We find that there are special states for particular values of the light-cone constant P_+.

  6. Continuous-Wave Single-Photon Transistor Based on a Superconducting Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriienko, Oleksandr; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a microwave frequency single-photon transistor which can operate under continuous wave probing and represents an efficient single microwave photon detector. It can be realized using an impedance matched system of a three level artificial ladder-type atom coupled to two microwave cavities connected to input-output waveguides. Using a classical drive on the upper transition, we find parameter space where a single photon control pulse incident on one of the cavities can be fully absorbed into hybridized excited states. This subsequently leads to series of quantum jumps in the upper manifold and the appearance of a photon flux leaving the second cavity through a separate input-output port. The proposal does not require time variation of the probe signals, thus corresponding to a passive version of a single-photon transistor. The resulting device is robust to qubit dephasing processes, possesses low dark count rate for large anharmonicity, and can be readily implemented using current technology.

  7. Challenges in noise removal from Doppler spectra acquired by a continuous-wave lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelou, Nikolas; Foroughi Abari, Farzad; Mann, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the required post processing of Doppler spectra, acquired from a continuous-wave coherent lidar at high sampling rates (400 Hz) and under rapid scanning of the laser beam. In particular, the necessary steps followed for extracting the wind speed from such Doppler spectra...... are presented. A method for determining the background noise spectrum without interrupting the transmission of the laser beam is described. Moreover, the dependency between the determination of the threshold of a Doppler spectrum with low signal-to-noise ratios and the characteristics of the wind flow...... are investigated and a systematic approach for removing the noise is outlined. The suggested post processing procedures are applied to two sample time series acquired by a short-range WindScanner during one second each....

  8. Significant performance enhancement in continuous wave terahertz photomixers based on fractal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, H.; Heidarzadeh, H.; Rostami, A.; Rostami, G.; Dolatyari, M.

    2017-01-01

    A photoconductive fractal antenna significantly improves the performance of photomixing-based continuous wave (CW) terahertz (THz) systems. An analysis has been carried out for the generation of CW-THz radiation by photomixer photoconductive antenna technique. To increase the active area for generation and hence the THz radiation power we used interdigitated electrodes that are coupled with a fractal tree antenna. In this paper, both semiconductor and electromagnetic problems are considered. Here, photomixer devices with Thue-Morse fractal tree antennas in two configurations (narrow and wide) are discussed. This new approach gives better performance, especially in the increasing of THz output power of photomixer devices, when compared with the conventional structures. In addition, applying the interdigitated electrodes improved THz photocurrent, considerably. It produces THz radiation power several times higher than the photomixers with simple gap.

  9. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  10. Dual-frequency injection-locked continuous-wave near-infrared laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gavara, Trivikramarao; Sasaki, Yusuke; Kawashima, Takuya; Hamano, Hiroaki; Yoshizaki, Ryo; Fujimura, Yuki; Yoshii, Kazumichi; Ohae, Chiaki; Katsuragawa, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    We report a dual-frequency injection-locked continuous-wave near-infrared laser. The entire system consists of a Ti:sapphire ring laser as a power oscillator, two independent diode-lasers employed as seed lasers, and a master cavity providing a frequency reference. Stable dual-frequency injection-locked oscillation is achieved with a maximum output power of 2.8 W. As fundamental performance features of this laser system, we show its single longitudinal/transverse mode characteristics and practical power stability. Furthermore, as advanced features, we demonstrate arbitrary selectivity of the two frequencies and flexible control of their relative powers by simply manipulating the seed lasers.

  11. Continuous-wave optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-09-11

    We report an optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter operating in continuous-wave (CW) with a power density threshold of ∼89  kW/cm2. The device has an active region of CH3NH3PbBr3 embedded in a dielectric microcavity; this feat was achieved with a combination of optimal spectral alignment of the optical cavity modes with the perovskite optical gain, an adequate -factor of the microcavity, adequate thermal stability, and improved material quality with a smooth, passivated, and annealed thin active layer. Our results signify a way towards efficient CW perovskite emitter operation and electrical injection using low-cost fabrication methods for addressing monolithic optoelectronic integration and lasing in the green gap.

  12. Continuous-wave optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-09-11

    We report an optically pumped green perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitter operating in continuous-wave (CW) with a power density threshold of ~89 kW/cm. The device has an active region of CHNHPbBr embedded in a dielectric microcavity; this feat was achieved with a combination of optimal spectral alignment of the optical cavity modes with the perovskite optical gain, an adequate Q-factor of the microcavity, adequate thermal stability, and improved material quality with a smooth, passivated, and annealed thin active layer. Our results signify a way towards efficient CW perovskite emitter operation and electrical injection using low-cost fabrication methods for addressing monolithic optoelectronic integration and lasing in the green gap.

  13. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229 nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, Yushi; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the 4th harmonic using two successive second harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier as a fundamental source, we demonstrated magneto-optical trapping of all stable Cd isotopes including isotopes $^{111}$Cd and $^{113}$Cd, which are applicable to optical lattice clocks.

  14. Pseudo-random noise-continuous-wave laser radar for surface and cloud measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin

    2005-03-01

    Laser radar (lidar) application may require an instrument with compact size, long life of the components, low consumption and eye-safety. One possibility to achieve these features is to use a continuous-wave (cw) diode laser as lidar transmitter. A practical way to perform range-resolved measurements with a cw laser diode is the pseudo-random noise (PRN) modulation. This paper presents a compact PRN-cw lidar, using a 370-mW cw diode laser and an APD as detector. Daytime measurements of cloud base and topographic surface are demonstrated with the PRN-cw lidar technique, where the range detection exceeds 2 km. The detection of the topographic surface is performed with integration time of some tens of milliseconds during daytime and some tens of microseconds during night-time.

  15. A sliding coherence window technique for hierarchical detection of continuous gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, Holger J

    2011-01-01

    A novel hierarchical semicoherent technique is presented for all-sky surveys for continuous gravitational-wave sources, such as rapidly spinning non-axisymmetric neutron stars. Analyzing year-long detector data sets over realistic ranges of parameter space using fully-coherent matched-filtering is computationally prohibitive. Thus more efficient, so-called hierarchical techniques are essential. Traditionally, the standard hierarchical approach consists of dividing the data into non-overlapping segments of which each is coherently analyzed and subsequently the matched-filter outputs from all segments are combined incoherently. The present work proposes to break the data into subsegments being shorter than the desired maximum coherence time span (size of the coherence window). Then matched-filter outputs from the different subsegments are efficiently combined by "sliding" the coherence window in time: Subsegments whose time-stamps are closer than coherence window size are combined coherently, otherwise incohere...

  16. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy based on quasi-continuous-wave diode lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rubin Qi; Zhenhui Du; Dongyu Gao; Jinyi Li; Kexin Xu

    2012-01-01

    A modified wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) based on the self-heating effect of the tunable diode laser when driven in quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) mode is investigated.A near-infrared distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser working at the QCW mode is employed as the QCW light source,and CO2 is selected as the target gas.The characteristic of the QCW second harmonic (2f) line profile is analyzed through a comparison with that of the traditional CW WMS with the same system.A noise-equivalent absorbance of 3.2× 10-5 Hz-1/2 for CO2 at 1.58 μm is obtained with 18-m optical path.The QCW WMS lowers the dependence on lasers and expands selectivity,thus verifying the feasibility of the method.%A modified wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) based on the self-heating effect of the tunable diode laser when driven in quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) mode is investigated. A near-infrared distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser working at the QCW mode is employed as the QCW light source, and CO2 is selected as the target gas. The characteristic of the QCW second harmonic (2f) line profile is analyzed through a comparison with that of the traditional CW WMS with the same system. A noise-equivalent absorbance of 3.2×l0-5 Hz-1/2 for CO2 at 1.58 μm is obtained with 18-m optical path. The QCW WMS lowers the dependence on lasers and expands selectivity, thus verifying the feasibility of the method.

  17. Surface Wave Tomography with Spatially Varying Smoothing Based on Continuous Model Regionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanming; Yao, Huajian

    2017-03-01

    Surface wave tomography based on continuous regionalization of model parameters is widely used to invert for 2-D phase or group velocity maps. An inevitable problem is that the distribution of ray paths is far from homogeneous due to the spatially uneven distribution of stations and seismic events, which often affects the spatial resolution of the tomographic model. We present an improved tomographic method with a spatially varying smoothing scheme that is based on the continuous regionalization approach. The smoothness of the inverted model is constrained by the Gaussian a priori model covariance function with spatially varying correlation lengths based on ray path density. In addition, a two-step inversion procedure is used to suppress the effects of data outliers on tomographic models. Both synthetic and real data are used to evaluate this newly developed tomographic algorithm. In the synthetic tests, when the contrived model has different scales of anomalies but with uneven ray path distribution, we compare the performance of our spatially varying smoothing method with the traditional inversion method, and show that the new method is capable of improving the recovery in regions of dense ray sampling. For real data applications, the resulting phase velocity maps of Rayleigh waves in SE Tibet produced using the spatially varying smoothing method show similar features to the results with the traditional method. However, the new results contain more detailed structures and appears to better resolve the amplitude of anomalies. From both synthetic and real data tests we demonstrate that our new approach is useful to achieve spatially varying resolution when used in regions with heterogeneous ray path distribution.

  18. Age-Dependency of Location of Epileptic Foci in "Continuous Spike-and-Waves during Sleep": A Parallel to the Posterior-Anterior Trajectory of Slow Wave Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölsterli Heinzle, Bigna Katrin; Bast, Thomas; Critelli, Hanne; Huber, Reto; Schmitt, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep (CSWS) occurs during childhood and is characterized by an activation of spike wave complexes during slow wave sleep. The location of epileptic foci is variable, as is etiology. A relationship between the epileptic focus and age has been shown in various focal epilepsies following a posterior-anterior trajectory, and a link to brain maturation has been proposed. We hypothesize that in CSWS, maximal spike wave activity, corresponding to the epileptic focus, is related to age and shows a posterior-anterior evolution. In a retrospective cross-sectional study on CSWS (22 EEGs of 22 patients aged 3.1–13.5 years), the location of the epileptic focus is related to age and follows a posterior-anterior course. Younger patients are more likely to have posterior foci than older ones. We propose that the posterior-anterior trajectory of maximal spike waves in CSWS might reflect maturational changes of maximal expression of sleep slow waves, which follow a comparable course. Epileptic spike waves, that is, “hyper-synchronized slow waves” may occur at the place where the highest and therefore most synchronized slow waves meet brain tissue with an increased susceptibility to synchronization. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Variational space–time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface water waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagarina, E.; Ambati, V.R.; Vegt, van der J.J.W.; Bokhove, O.

    2014-01-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves using the potential flow approximation. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles’ variational principle for water waves together with a finite element

  20. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagarina, E.; Vegt, van der J.J.W.; Ambati, V.R.; Bokhove, O.

    2013-01-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles' variational principle for water waves together with a space-time finite element discretization that is cont

  1. Systematic effects from an ambient-temperature, continuously rotating half-wave plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essinger-Hileman, T.; Kusaka, A.; Appel, J. W.; Choi, S. K.; Crowley, K.; Ho, S. P.; Jarosik, N.; Page, L. A.; Parker, L. P.; Raghunathan, S.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Visnjic, K.

    2016-09-01

    We present an evaluation of systematic effects associated with a continuously rotating, ambient-temperature half-wave plate (HWP) based on two seasons of data from the Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) experiment located in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The ABS experiment is a microwave telescope sensitive at 145 GHz. Here we present our in-field evaluation of celestial (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plus galactic foreground) temperature-to-polarization leakage. We decompose the leakage into scalar, dipole, and quadrupole leakage terms. We report a scalar leakage of ˜0.01%, consistent with model expectations and an order of magnitude smaller than other CMB experiments have been reported. No significant dipole or quadrupole terms are detected; we constrain each to be ABS survey and focal-plane layout before any data correction such as so-called deprojection. This demonstrates that ABS achieves significant beam systematic error mitigation from its HWP and shows the promise of continuously rotating HWPs for future experiments.

  2. Continuous-Wave Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscope for Imaging Actin Cytoskeleton in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Neupane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy provides a new opportunity to study fine sub-cellular structures and highly dynamic cellular processes, which are challenging to observe using conventional optical microscopy. Using actin as an example, we explored the feasibility of using a continuous wave (CW-STED microscope to study the fine structure and dynamics in fixed and live cells. Actin plays an important role in cellular processes, whose functioning involves dynamic formation and reorganization of fine structures of actin filaments. Frequently used confocal fluorescence and STED microscopy dyes were employed to image fixed PC-12 cells (dyed with phalloidin- fluorescein isothiocyante and live rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS transfected with actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP. Compared to conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, CW-STED microscopy shows improved spatial resolution in both fixed and live cells. We were able to monitor cell morphology changes continuously; however, the number of repetitive analyses were limited primarily by the dyes used in these experiments and could be improved with the use of dyes less susceptible to photobleaching. In conclusion, CW-STED may disclose new information for biological systems with a proper characteristic length scale. The challenges of using CW-STED microscopy to study cell structures are discussed.

  3. Performance of a continuously rotating half-wave plate on the POLARBEAR telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Satoru; Aguilar, Mario; Akiba, Yoshiki; Arnold, Kam; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Beckman, Shawn; Boettger, David; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Ducout, Anne; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Fujino, Takuro; Galitzki, Nicholas; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Halverson, Nils W.; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hattori, Kaori; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; Lee, Adrian T.; Leon, David; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Matsumura, Tomotake; Navaroli, Martin; Nishino, Haruki; Paar, Hans; Peloton, Julien; Poletti, Davide; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ross, Colin; Siritanasak, Praween; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takatori, Sayuri; Teply, Grant

    2017-05-01

    A continuously rotating half-wave plate (CRHWP) is a promising tool to improve the sensitivity to large angular scales in cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements. With a CRHWP, single detectors can measure three of the Stokes parameters, I, Q and U, thereby avoiding the set of systematic errors that can be introduced by mismatches in the properties of orthogonal detector pairs. We focus on the implementation of CRHWPs in large aperture telescopes (i.e. the primary mirror is larger than the current maximum half-wave plate diameter of ~0.5 m), where the CRHWP can be placed between the primary mirror and focal plane. In this configuration, one needs to address the intensity to polarization (I→P) leakage of the optics, which becomes a source of 1/f noise and also causes differential gain systematics that arise from CMB temperature fluctuations. In this paper, we present the performance of a CRHWP installed in the {\\scshape Polarbear} experiment, which employs a Gregorian telescope with a 2.5 m primary illumination pattern. The CRHWP is placed near the prime focus between the primary and secondary mirrors. We find that the I→P leakage is larger than the expectation from the physical properties of our primary mirror, resulting in a 1/f knee of 100 mHz. The excess leakage could be due to imperfections in the detector system, i.e. detector non-linearity in the responsivity and time-constant. We demonstrate, however, that by subtracting the leakage correlated with the intensity signal, the 1/f noise knee frequency is reduced to 32 mHz (l ~ 39 for our scan strategy), which is very promising to probe the primordial B-mode signal. We also discuss methods for further noise subtraction in future projects where the precise temperature control of instrumental components and the leakage reduction will play a key role.

  4. Effects of continuous-wave, pulsed, and sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated microwaves on brain energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, A P; Joines, W T; Allis, J W

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the effects of continuous-wave, sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated, and pulsed square-wave-modulated 591-MHz microwave exposures on brain energy metabolism was made in male Sprague-Dawley rats (175-225 g). Brain NADH fluorescence, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration, and creatine phosphate (CP) concentration were determined as a function of modulation frequency. Brain temperatures of animals were maintained between -0.1 and -0.4 degrees C from the preexposure temperature when subjected to as much as 20 mW/cm2 (average power) CW, pulsed, or sinusoidal-amplitude modulated 591-MHz radiation for 5 min. Sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated exposures at 16-24 Hz showed a trend toward preferential modulation frequency response in inducing an increase in brain NADH fluorescence. The pulse-modulated and sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated (16 Hz) microwaves were not significantly different from CW exposures in inducing increased brain NADH fluorescence and decreased ATP and CP concentrations. When the pulse-modulation frequency was decreased from 500 to 250 pulses per second the average incident power density threshold for inducing an increase in brain NADH fluorescence increased by a factor of 4--ie, from about 0.45 to about 1.85 mW/cm2. Since brain temperature did not increase, the microwave-induced increase in brain NADH and decrease in ATP and CP concentrations was not due to hyperthermia. This suggests a direct interaction mechanism and is consistent with the hypothesis of microwave inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain function of ATP production.

  5. Contrast-enhanced continuous-terahertz-wave imaging based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Zuo, Shasha; Wang, Ruixue; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-04-18

    We present a novel contrast-enhanced continuous-terahertz-wave imaging modality based on magnetic induction heating of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), which yields a highly sensitive increment in the reflection terahertz (THz) signal in SPIO solution upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field. In the differential and relative refection change focal-plane images before and after alternating magnetic field exposure, a dramatic contrast is demonstrated between water with and without SPIOs. This low-cost, simple, and stable contrast-enhanced continuous-THz-wave imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and real-time imaging application.

  6. Quasi continuous-wave lasing in organic thin-film semiconductors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanadanayaka, Atula S. D.; Yoshida, Kou; Ribierre, Jean-Charles; Matsushima, Toshinori; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-09-01

    Since the discovery of organic solid-state lasers, great efforts have been devoted to the development of continuous-wave (cw) lasing in organic materials. However, the operation of organic solid-state lasers under optical cw excitation or pulse excitation at a very high repetition rate (quasi-cw excitation) is extremely challenging. In this work, we have demonstrated quasi-continuous-wave (quasi-cw) surface-emitting lasing in a distributed feedback device which combines a second-order grating with an organic thin film of a host material 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (CBP) blended with an organic laser dye 4,4'-bis[(N-carbazole)styryl]biphenyl (BSBCz). When pumping the device with optical picosecond pulse excitation, the quasi-cw laser operation maintained up to a repetition rate of 8 MHz. The lasing threshold was around 0.25 μJ cm-2 which was almost independent of the repetition rates. For our laser devices, the maximum repetition rate (8 MHz) is the highest ever reported, and the lasing threshold (0.25 μJ cm-2) is the lowest ever reported. These superior quasi-cw lasing characteristics in BSBCz are accomplished by the less generation of triplet excitons via intersystem crossing because a photoluminescence quantum yield of the blend film is nearly 100% and there is no significant spectral overlap between laser and triplet absorption.[1,2] Triplet quenchers, generally used for the fabrication of organic thin-film lasers, were not necessary in our devices because of negligible accumulation of triplet excitons and a small spectral overlap between emission and triplet absorption. Therefore, we believe that BSBCz is the most promising candidate for the first realization of electrically pumped organic laser diodes in terms of optical characteristics. However, electrical characteristics such as charge carrier mobility, charge carrier capture cross section, etc., are also extremely important and will need further investigation and enhancement for realization of

  7. Contralateral acute epidural haematoma following evacuation of a chronic subdural haematoma with burr-hole craniostomy and continuous closed system drainage: a rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panourias, Ioannis G; Skandalakis, Panajiotis N

    2006-06-01

    Chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is one of the most frequent causes for neurosurgical intervention. Although the prognosis is generally good and treatment modalities are well established, some devastating intracranial haematomas can complicate its evacuation. The authors report here a case of an acute epidural haematoma occurring after evacuation of a contralateral chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) with burr-hole craniostomy and continuous closed system drainage without irrigation. Since this is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication, clinicians should suspect its occurrence when an unexpected postoperative course is demonstrated.

  8. Scintigraphic diagnosis of infectious complications in renal failure patients undergoing hemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis or renal transplant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Vicente, Ana Maria; Ruiz Solis, Sebastian; Soriano Castrejon, Angel; Poblete Garcia, Victor Manuel; Talavera Rubio, Maria del Prado; Rodado Marina, Sonia; Cortes Romera, Montserrat [Ciudad Real General Hospital (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2005-10-15

    Patients with end-stage renal disease have two therapeutic options, dialysis and renal transplantation. Infectious complications occurring in such patients will not only condition the effectiveness of such treatments, but are among the main causes of morbidity and mortality in such cases. Knowledge of the advantages and limitations of nuclear techniques is essential for management of these conditions. (author)

  9. Developing a narrow-line laser spectrometer based on a tunable continuous-wave dye laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Bi, Jin [Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Fang [College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li, Liufeng; Chen, Lisheng [Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan 430071, China and Laboratory of Atomic Frequency Standards, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-08-15

    We present the development of a dye-laser-based spectrometer operating at 550–600 nm. The spectrometer will be used to detect an ultra-narrow clock transition ({sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0}) in an Ytterbium optical lattice clock and perform high-resolution spectroscopy of iodine molecules trapped in the sub-nanometer channels of zeolite crystal (AlPO{sub 4}-11). Two-stage Pound-Drever-Hall frequency stabilization is implemented on the tunable continuous-wave dye laser to obtain a reliable operation and provide stable laser radiations with two different spectral linewidths. In the first-stage frequency locking, a compact home-built intracavity electro-optic modulator is adopted for suppressing fast frequency noise. With an acquisition time of 0.1 s the 670-kHz linewidth of the free-running dye laser is reduced to 2 kHz when locked to a pre-stabilization optical cavity with a finesse of 1170. When the pre-stabilized laser is locked to a high-finesse optical cavity, a linewidth of 1.4 Hz (2 s) is observed and the frequency stability is 3.7 × 10{sup −15} (3 s). We also measure and analyze the individual noise contributions such as those from residual amplitude modulation and electronic noise. The ongoing upgrades include improving long-term frequency stability at time scales from 10 to 100 s and implementing continuous frequency scan across 10 GHz with radio-frequency precision.

  10. Comparing the Effect of Continuous and Intermittent Irrigation Techniques on Complications of Arterial Catheter and Partial Thromboplastin Time in Patients Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Arta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different approaches are available to irrigate the arterial catheter, such as continuous and intermittent techniques. However, there is a disagreement regarding the most appropriate method. Aim: this study aimed to compare the effect of two continuous and intermittent irrigation methods on complications of arterial catheter and partial thromboplastin time (PTT in patients with coronary artery bypass (CABG surgery. Method: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 participants undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in open-heart surgery ICU at Imam Reza hospital in Mashhad, Iran, in 2016. In continuous group, the arterial catheter was continuously irrigated with heparin solution at the rate of 2cc/h, and in the intermittent group with a syringe containing 5cc heparin solution every 3 hours. In both groups, catheter was monitored and recorded every 3 hours (until 48 hours and 3 times from enrollment in terms of complications of partial thromboplastin time. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: The findingsof independent t-test showed that the two groups are homogeneous in age (P =0.48. The result of Fisher's exact test revealed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of average incidence of complications during the first 24 hours (P=0.55 and second 24 hours (P=0.55 after catheterization. Also during the 48 hours after surgery, independent t-test results showed no statistically significant difference in partial thromboplastin time (P=0.53 between the two groups. Implications for Practice: According to the results of the research based on the lack of difference between continuous and intermittent irrigation methods up to 48 hours after catheter replacement in terms of arterial catheter complications, further long-term follow-up researches are recommended.

  11. A comparison between a time domain and continuous wave small animal optical imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, S; Gheysens, O; Levin, C S; Gambhir, S S

    2008-01-01

    We present a phantom study to evaluate the performance of the eXplore Optix (Advanced Research Technologies-GE Healthcare), the first commercially available time-domain tomography system for small animal fluorescence imaging, and compare its capabilities with the widely used IVIS 200 (Xenogen Corporation-Caliper) continuous wave planar imaging system. The eXplore Optix, based on point-wise illumination and collection scheme, is found to be a log order more sensitive with significantly higher detection depth and spatial resolution as compared with the wide-area illumination IVIS 200 under the conditions tested. A time-resolved detection system allows the eXplore Optix to measure the arrival time distribution of fluorescence photons. This enables fluorescence lifetime measurement, absorption mapping, and estimation of fluorescent inclusion depth, which in turn is used by a reconstruction algorithm to calculate the volumetric distribution of the fluorophore concentration. An increased acquisition time and lack of ability to image multiple animals simultaneously are the main drawbacks of the eXplore Optix as compared with the IVIS 200.

  12. High-speed Brillouin imaging via continuous-wave stimulated Brillouin scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Itay; Bilenca, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy is a noncontact technique for characterizing the mechanical properties of materials. Typically, Brillouin spectrometers have been realized using scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometers that measure, with long acquisition times, spontaneous Brillouin scattering from the samples. In the last few years, the use of virtually imaged phase array (VIPA) etalons for constructing Brillouin spectrometers has enabled to acquire spontaneous Brillouin spectra means for high-speed Brillouin analysis of materials. In this talk, we will present a different approach for high-speed Brillouin material analysis. The method uses continuous-wave stimulated Brillouin scattering (CW-SBS) to measure stimulated Brillouin gain (SBG) spectra of materials at filter and a lock-in detector, resulting in an improved signal-to-noise ratio that enables to significantly shorten acquisition times. We will show that this improvement, combined with micrometer-step-size spatial scanning of the sample, provides precise Brillouin profiles of layered liquids at 30-milliseconds pixel-dwell-time, facilitating Brillouin profilometry analysis of materials at high speed.

  13. Sodium vapor cell laser guide star experiments for continuous wave model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreros Bustos, Felipe; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Budker, Dmitry; Lewis, Steffan; Rochester, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Recent numerical simulations and experiments on sodium Laser Guide Star (LGS) have shown that a continuous wave (CW) laser with circular polarization and re-pumping should maximize the fluorescent photon return flux to the wavefront sensor for adaptive optics applications. The orientation and strength of the geomagnetic field in the sodium layer also play an important role affecting the LGS return ux. Field measurements of the LGS return flux show agreement with the CW LGS model, however, fluctuations in the sodium column abundance and geomagnetic field intensity, as well as atmospheric turbulence, induce experimental uncertainties. We describe a laboratory experiment to measure the photon return flux from a sodium vapor cell illuminated with a 589 nm CW laser beam, designed to approximately emulate a LGS under controlled conditions. Return flux measurements are carried out controlling polarization, power density, re-pumping, laser linewidth, and magnetic field intensity and orientation. Comparison with the numerical CW simulation package Atomic Density Matrix are presented and discussed.

  14. Continuous Spikes and Waves during Sleep: Electroclinical Presentation and Suggestions for Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Sánchez Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous spikes and waves during sleep (CSWS is an epileptic encephalopathy characterized in most patients by (1 difficult to control seizures, (2 interictal epileptiform activity that becomes prominent during sleep leading to an electroencephalogram (EEG pattern of electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES, and (3 neurocognitive regression. In this paper, we will summarize current epidemiological, clinical, and EEG knowledge on CSWS and will provide suggestions for treatment. CSWS typically presents with seizures around 2–4 years of age. Neurocognitive regression occurs around 5-6 years of age, and it is accompanied by subacute worsening of EEG abnormalities and seizures. At approximately 6–9 years of age, there is a gradual resolution of seizures and EEG abnormalities, but the neurocognitive deficits persist in most patients. The cause of CSWS is unknown, but early developmental lesions play a major role in approximately half of the patients, and genetic associations have recently been described. High-dose benzodiazepines and corticosteroids have been successfully used to treat clinical and electroencephalographic features. Corticosteroids are often reserved for refractory disease because of adverse events. Valproate, ethosuximide, levetiracetam, sulthiame, and lamotrigine have been also used with some success. Epilepsy surgery may be considered in a few selected patients.

  15. Frequency doubled high-power disk lasers in pulsed and continuous-wave operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Sascha; Hangst, Alexander; Stolzenburg, Christian; Zawischa, Ivo; Sutter, Dirk; Killi, Alexander; Kalfhues, Steffen; Kriegshaeuser, Uwe; Holzer, Marco; Havrilla, David

    2012-03-01

    The disk laser with multi-kW output power in infrared cw operation is widely used in today's manufacturing, primarily in the automotive industry. The disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Additionally, the disk laser is ideally suited for frequency conversion due to its polarized output with negligible depolarization losses. Laser light in the green spectral range (~515 nm) can be created with a nonlinear crystal. Pulsed disk lasers with green output of well above 50 W (extracavity doubling) in the ps regime and several hundreds of Watts in the ns regime with intracavity doubling are already commercially available whereas intracavity doubled disk lasers in continuous wave operation with greater than 250 W output are in test phase. In both operating modes (pulsed and cw) the frequency doubled disk laser offers advantages in existing and new applications. Copper welding for example is said to show much higher process reliability with green laser light due to its higher absorption in comparison to the infrared. This improvement has the potential to be very beneficial for the automotive industry's move to electrical vehicles which requires reliable high-volume welding of copper as a major task for electro motors, batteries, etc.

  16. Highly efficient 1063-nm continuous-wave laser emission in Nd:GdVO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupei, V; Pavel, N; Sato, Y; Taira, T

    2003-12-01

    Highly efficient 1-microm continuous-wave laser emission in 3-mm-thick, 0.5- and 1.0-at. % Nd:GdVO4 crystals longitudinally pumped at 879 nm into the laser emitting level is reported. Under Ti:sapphire pumping, the slope efficiency in absorbed power is approximately 80% for both crystals, while the slope efficiency, the optical-to-optical efficiency (at 1700-mW pump power), and the laser threshold in incident power are 79%, 78%, and 31 mW for 0.5-at. % Nd and 80%, 77%, and 40 mW for 1.0-at. % Nd, respectively. The slope efficiency is close to the quantum defect limit, the difference being fully accounted for by the residual optical losses. Under 879-nm diode laser pumping, the slope efficiency and the optical-to-optical efficiency in absorbed power of the 0.5-at. % Nd:GdVO4 crystal are 60% and 53%, owing to poorer superposition of the pumped and the laser mode volumes.

  17. Line-robust statistics for continuous gravitational waves: safety in the case of unequal detector sensitivities

    CERN Document Server

    Keitel, David

    2014-01-01

    The multi-detector F-statistic is close to optimal for detecting continuous gravitational waves (CWs) in Gaussian noise. However, it is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artefacts, for example quasi-monochromatic disturbances ('lines'), which resemble a CW signal more than Gaussian noise. In a recent paper [KPPLS2014], a Bayesian model selection approach was used to derive line-robust detection statistics for CW signals, generalising both the F-statistic and the F-statistic consistency veto technique and yielding improved performance in line-affected data. Here we investigate a generalisation of the assumptions made in that paper: if a CW analysis uses data from two or more detectors with very different sensitivities, the line-robust statistics could be less effective. We investigate the boundaries within which they are still safe to use, in comparison with the F-statistic. Tests using synthetic draws show that the optimally-tuned version of the original line-robust statistic remains safe in most ...

  18. Line-robust statistics for continuous gravitational waves: safety in the case of unequal detector sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, David; Prix, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    The multi-detector F-statistic is close to optimal for detecting continuous gravitational waves (CWs) in Gaussian noise. However, it is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artefacts, for example quasi-monochromatic disturbances (‘lines’), which resemble a CW signal more than Gaussian noise. In a recent paper (Keitel et al 2014 Phys. Rev. D 89 064023), a Bayesian model selection approach was used to derive line-robust detection statistics for CW signals, generalizing both the F-statistic and the F-statistic consistency veto technique and yielding improved performance in line-affected data. Here we investigate a generalization of the assumptions made in that paper: if a CW analysis uses data from two or more detectors with very different sensitivities, the line-robust statistics could be less effective. We investigate the boundaries within which they are still safe to use, in comparison with the F-statistic. Tests using synthetic draws show that the optimally-tuned version of the original line-robust statistic remains safe in most cases of practical interest. We also explore a simple idea on further improving the detection power and safety of these statistics, which we, however, find to be of limited practical use.

  19. Damage analysis of CMOS electro-optical imaging system by a continuous wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sunghee; Jhang, Kyung-Young; Shin, Wan-Soon

    2016-08-01

    EOIS (electro-optical imaging system) is vulnerable to laser beam because EOIS focuses the incident laser beam onto the image sensor via lens module. Accordingly, the laser-induced damage of EOIS is necessary to be identified for the counter-measure against the laser attack. In this study, the damage of CMOS EOIS and image sensor induced by CW (continuous wave) NIR (near infrared) laser was experimentally investigated. When the laser was emitted to CMOS EOIS, a temporary damage was occurred first such as flickering or dazzling and then a permanent damage was followed as the increase of laser irradiance and irradiation time. If the EIOS is composed of the optical equipment made of heatresistant material, laser beam can penetrate the lens module of EOIS without melting the lens and lens guide. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the damage of CMOS image sensor by the CW laser and we performed experimentally investigation of damage on the CMOS image sensor similar with case of CMOS EOIS. And we analyzed the experiment results by using OM (optical microscopy) and check the image quality through tomography. As the increase of laser irradiance and irradiation time, the permanent damage such as discoloration and breakdown were sequentially appeared.

  20. Systematic effects from an ambient-temperature, continuously-rotating half-wave plate

    CERN Document Server

    Essinger-Hileman, T; Appel, J W; Choi, S K; Crowley, K; Jarosik, N; Page, L A; Parker, L P; Raghunathan, S; Simon, S M; Staggs, S T; Visnjic, K

    2016-01-01

    We present an evaluation of systematic effects associated with a continuously-rotating, ambient-temperature half-wave plate (HWP) based on two seasons of data from the Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) experiment located in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The ABS experiment is a microwave telescope sensitive at 145 GHz. The HWP allows for rejection of unpolarized atmospheric fluctuations and ground pickup, as well as clear separation of celestial polarization from intensity. In a previous paper, we demonstrated 30 dB rejection of atmospheric fluctuations on timescales of 500 s. Here we present our in-field evaluation of celestial (CMB plus galactic foreground) temperature-to-polarization leakage. We decompose the leakage into scalar, dipole, and quadrupole leakage terms. We report a scalar leakage of ~0.01%, consistent with model expectations and an order of magnitude smaller than other CMB experiments have reported. No significant dipole or quadruple terms are detected; we constrain each to be < 0.06% (95% confide...

  1. Parameter-space metric of semicoherent searches for continuous gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletsch, Holger J.

    2010-08-01

    Continuous gravitational-wave (CW) signals such as emitted by spinning neutron stars are an important target class for current detectors. However, the enormous computational demand prohibits fully coherent broadband all-sky searches for prior unknown CW sources over wide ranges of parameter space and for yearlong observation times. More efficient hierarchical “semicoherent” search strategies divide the data into segments much shorter than one year, which are analyzed coherently; then detection statistics from different segments are combined incoherently. To optimally perform the incoherent combination, understanding of the underlying parameter-space structure is requisite. This problem is addressed here by using new coordinates on the parameter space, which yield the first analytical parameter-space metric for the incoherent combination step. This semicoherent metric applies to broadband all-sky surveys (also embedding directed searches at fixed sky position) for isolated CW sources. Furthermore, the additional metric resolution attained through the combination of segments is studied. From the search parameters (sky position, frequency, and frequency derivatives), solely the metric resolution in the frequency derivatives is found to significantly increase with the number of segments.

  2. Increase of Carrier-to-Noise Ratio in GPS Receivers Caused by Continuous-Wave Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increased use of personal private devices (PPDs is drawing greater attention to the effects of continuous-wave interference (CWI on the performance of global positioning system (GPS receivers. The effective carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N0, an essential index of GNSS receiver performance, is studied in this paper. Receiver tracking performance deteriorates in the presence of interference. Hence, the effective C/N0, which measures tracking performance, decreases. However, simulations and bench tests have shown that the effective C/N0 may increase in the presence of CWI. The reason is that a sinusoidal signal is induced by the CWI in the correlator and may be tracked by the carrier tracking loop. Thus, the effective carrier power depends on the power of the signal induced by the CWI, and the effective C/N0 increases with the power of the CWI. The filtering of the CWI in the carrier tracking loop correlator and its effect on the phase locked loop (PLL tracking performance are analyzed. A mathematical model of the effect of the CWI on the effective C/N0 is derived. Simulation results show that the proposed model is more accurate than existing models, especially when the jam-to-signal ratio (JSR is greater than 30 dBc.

  3. Comparison of femtosecond laser and continuous wave UV sources for protein-nucleic acid crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecko, Christopher J; Munson, Katherine M; Saunders, Abbie; Sun, Guangxing; Begley, Tadhg P; Lis, John T; Webb, Watt W

    2007-01-01

    Crosslinking proteins to the nucleic acids they bind affords stable access to otherwise transient regulatory interactions. Photochemical crosslinking provides an attractive alternative to formaldehyde-based protocols, but irradiation with conventional UV sources typically yields inadequate product amounts. Crosslinking with pulsed UV lasers has been heralded as a revolutionary technique to increase photochemical yield, but this method had only been tested on a few protein-nucleic acid complexes. To test the generality of the yield enhancement, we have investigated the benefits of using approximately 150 fs UV pulses to crosslink TATA-binding protein, glucocorticoid receptor and heat shock factor to oligonucleotides in vitro. For these proteins, we find that the quantum yields (and saturating yields) for forming crosslinks using the high-peak intensity femtosecond laser do not improve on those obtained with low-intensity continuous wave (CW) UV sources. The photodamage to the oligonucleotides and proteins also has comparable quantum yields. Measurements of the photochemical reaction yields of several small molecules selected to model the crosslinking reactions also exhibit nearly linear dependences on UV intensity instead of the previously predicted quadratic dependence. Unfortunately, these results disprove earlier assertions that femtosecond pulsed laser sources provide significant advantages over CW radiation for protein-nucleic acid crosslinking.

  4. Picosecond pulses from wavelength-swept continuous-wave Fourier domain mode-locked lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Todor, Sebastian; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Klein, Thomas; Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast lasers have a crucial function in many fields of science; however, up to now, high-energy pulses directly from compact, efficient and low-power semiconductor lasers are not available. Therefore, we introduce a new approach based on temporal compression of the continuous-wave, wavelength-swept output of Fourier domain mode-locked lasers, where a narrowband optical filter is tuned synchronously to the round-trip time of light in a kilometre-long laser cavity. So far, these rapidly swept lasers enabled orders-of-magnitude speed increase in optical coherence tomography. Here we report on the generation of ~60-70 ps pulses at 390 kHz repetition rate. As energy is stored optically in the long-fibre delay line and not as population inversion in the laser-gain medium, high-energy pulses can now be generated directly from a low-power, compact semiconductor-based oscillator. Our theory predicts subpicosecond pulses with this new technique in the future.

  5. Detection of foreign bodies in foods using continuous wave terahertz imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Ki; Choi, Sung-Wook; Han, Seong-Tae; Woo, Deog Hyun; Chun, Hyang Sook

    2012-01-01

    Foreign bodies (FBs) in food are health hazards and quality issues for many food manufacturers and enforcement authorities. In this study, continuous wave (CW) terahertz (THz) imaging at 0.2 THz with an output power of 10 mW was compared with X-ray imaging as techniques for inspection of food for FBs. High-density FBs, i.e., aluminum and granite pieces of various sizes, were embedded in a powdered instant noodle product and detected using THz and X-ray imaging. All aluminum and granite pieces (regular hexahedrons with an edge length of 1 to 5 mm) were visualized by both CW THz and X-ray imaging. THz imaging also detected maggots (length = 8 to 22 mm) and crickets (length = 35 and 50 mm), which were embedded in samples as low density FBs. However, not all sizes of maggot pieces embedded in powdered instant noodle were detected with X-ray imaging, although larger crickets (length = 50 mm and thickness = 10 mm) were detected. These results suggest that CW THz imaging has potential for detecting both high-density and low-density FBs embedded in food.

  6. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadhira, Vebi, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, Deddy, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Juliastuti, E., E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Sutiswan, Adeline, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id [Instrumentation and Control Research Group, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10 40132 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  7. Threshold response using modulated continuous wave illumination for multilayer 3D optical data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, A.; Christenson, C. W.; Khattab, T. A.; Wang, R.; Twieg, R. J.; Singer, K. D.

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve a high capacity 3D optical data storage medium, a nonlinear or threshold writing process is necessary to localize data in the axial dimension. To this end, commercial multilayer discs use thermal ablation of metal films or phase change materials to realize such a threshold process. This paper addresses a threshold writing mechanism relevant to recently reported fluorescence-based data storage in dye-doped co-extruded multilayer films. To gain understanding of the essential physics, single layer spun coat films were used so that the data is easily accessible by analytical techniques. Data were written by attenuating the fluorescence using nanosecond-range exposure times from a 488 nm continuous wave laser overlapping with the single photon absorption spectrum. The threshold writing process was studied over a range of exposure times and intensities, and with different fluorescent dyes. It was found that all of the dyes have a common temperature threshold where fluorescence begins to attenuate, and the physical nature of the thermal process was investigated.

  8. Measuring the Absolute Height and Profile of the Mesospheric Sodium Layer using a Continuous Wave Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, D J; Redfern, R M; Ageorges, N; Fews, H

    2003-01-01

    We have developed and tested a novel method, based on LIDAR, of measuring the height and profile of the mesospheric sodium layer using a continuous wave laser. It is more efficient than classical LIDAR as the laser is on for 50% of the time, and so can in principle be used during laser guide star adaptive optics observations. It also has significant advantages over direct imaging techniques because it does not require a second telescope, is almost independent of the atmospheric conditions, and avoids triangulation problems in determining the height. In the long term, regular monitoring using this method would allow a valuable database of sodium layer profiles, heights, and return flux measurements to be built up which would enable observatory staff astronomers to schedule observations optimally. In this paper we describe the original experiment carried out using the ALFA laser guide star system at Calar Alto Observatory in Spain. We validate the method by comparing the LIDAR results with those obtained from s...

  9. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D V; Andersen, M; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Ashton, G; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Branco, V; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M D; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J M; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Germain, V; Ghosh, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez, J; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hoelscher-Obermaier, J; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Karlen, J L; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kerrigan, J; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J T; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, J P; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Lewis, J B; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Madden-Fong, D X; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N M; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, A; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Okounkova, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W E; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C T; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patrick, Z; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J H; Poggiani, R; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rodger, A S; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Santiago-Prieto, I; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffery, P; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepanczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C van den; van der Schaaf, L; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, M; Wade, L E; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, K J; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between $-1.0 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s and $+1.5 \\times 10^{-11}$ Hz/s, and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT), of length 8192 seconds, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, both in the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each dataset a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and...

  10. Nitinol laser cutting: microstructure and functional properties of femtosecond and continuous wave laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, C. A.; Tuissi, A.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal processing can affect the properties of smart materials, and the correct selection of the best manufacturing technology is fundamental for producing high tech smart devices, containing embedded functional properties. In this work cutting of thin superelastic Nitinol plates using a femtosecond (fs) and continuous wave (CW) laser was studied. Diamond shaped elements were cut to characterize the kerf qualitative features; microstructural analysis of the cross sections allowed identification of thermal damage characteristics introduced into the material during the laser processes. A thermally undamaged microstructure was observed for fs laser cutting, while CW was seen to be characterized by a large heat-affected zone. Functional properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and tensile testing of laser cut microelements and of the reference material. It was seen that the martensitic transformation behavior of Nitinol is not affected by fs regime, while cw cutting provokes an effect equivalent to a high temperature thermal treatment in the material surrounding the cutting kerf, degradating the material properties. Finally, tensile testing indicated that superelastic performances were guaranteed by fs regime, while strong reduction of the recoverable strain was detected in the CW processed sample.

  11. Investigation of turbulence measurements with a continuous wave, conically scanning LiDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Mikkelsen, T.; Courtney, M.

    2009-03-15

    LIDAR systems are getting more and more accurate and reliable. It has been shown many times that the mean horizontal wind speed measured by a lidar over flat terrain compares very well with that measured by a cup anemometer. But can a lidar measure turbulence? Here we investigate the case of a continuous wave, conically scanning Zephir lidar. First, the wind speed standard deviation measured by such a lidar gives on average 80% of the standard deviation measured by a cup anemometer. This difference is due to the spatial averaging inherently made by a cw conically scanning lidar. The spatial averaging is done in two steps: 1) the weighted averaging of the wind speed in the probe volume of the laser beam; 2) the averaging of the wind speeds occurring on the circular path described by the conically scanning lidar. Therefore the standard deviation measured by a lidar resolves only the turbulence structures larger than a length scale depending on the circle diameter and the mean wind speed (range of magnitude: 100m). However, the Zephir lidar gives another turbulence quantity, the so-called turbulence parameter, which can resolve turbulence structures with a smaller length scale. In this paper, we suggest a volumetric filtering of the turbulence to represent the effect of the spatial averaging operated by a lidar when measuring the wind speed. We then evaluate this model by comparing the theoretical results to experimental data obtained with several Zephir systems, for both turbulence quantities. (au)

  12. Development of GaAs Gunn Diodes and Their Applications to Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seok-Gyu; Han, Min; Baek, Yong-Hyun; Ko, Dong-Sik; Baek, Tae-Jong; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Jin-Ho; Lee, Seong-Dae; Kim, Mi-Ra; Chae, Yeon-Sik; Kathalingam, Adaikalam; Rhee, Jin-Koo

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we have designed and fabricated the GaAs Gunn diodes for a 94 GHz waveguide voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) which is one of the important parts in a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar application. For fabrication of the high power GaAs Gunn diodes, we adopted a graded gap injector which enhances the output power and conversion efficiency by effectively removing the dead-zone. We have measured RF characteristics of the fabricated GaAs Gunn diodes. The operating current, oscillation frequency, and output power of the fabricated GaAs Gunn diodes are presented as a function of the anode diameters. The operating current increases with anode diameters, whereas the oscillation frequency decreases. The higher oscillation frequency was obtained from 60 µm anode diameters of the fabricated Gunn GaAs diodes and higher power was obtained from 68 µm. Also, for application of the 94 GHz FMCW radar system, we have fabricated the 94 GHz waveguide VCO. From the fabricated GaAs Gunn diodes of anode diameter of 60 µm, we have obtained the improved VCO performance.

  13. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  14. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  15. A CO trace gas detection system based on continuous wave DFB-QCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jingmin; Yu, Haiye; Sun, Yujing; Wang, Yiding

    2017-05-01

    A compact and mobile system was demonstrated for the detection of carbon monoxide (CO) at trace level. This system adopted a high-power, continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) operating at ∼22 °C as excitation source. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) as well as second harmonic detection was used to isolate complex, overlapping spectral absorption features typical of ambient pressures and to achieve excellent specificity and high detection sensitivity. For the selected P(11) absorption line of CO molecule, located at 2099.083 cm-1, a limit of detection (LoD) of 26 ppb by volume (ppbv) at atmospheric pressure was achieved with a 1 s acquisition time. Allan deviation analysis was performed to investigate the long term performance of the CO detection system, and a measurement precision of 3.4 ppbv was observed with an optimal integration time of approximate 114 s, which verified the reliable and robust operation of the developed system.

  16. Robust and efficient 19F heteronuclear dipolar decoupling using refocused continuous-wave rf irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Joachim M.; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2013-01-01

    Refocused continuous wave (rCW) decoupling is presented as an efficient and robust means to obtain well-resolved magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra of low-γ spins, such as 13C dipolar coupled to fluorine. The rCW decoupling sequences, recently introduced for 1H decoupling, are very robust towards large isotropic and anisotropic shift ranges as often encountered for 19F spins. In rCW decoupling, the so-called refocusing pulses inserted into the CW irradiation eliminate critical residual second- and third-order dipolar coupling and dipolar-coupling against chemical shielding anisotropy cross-terms in the effective Hamiltonian through time-reversal (i.e. refocusing). As important additional assets, the rCW decoupling sequences are robust towards variations in rf amplitudes, operational at low to high spinning speeds, and easy to set-up for optimal performance experimentally. These aspects are demonstrated analytically/numerically and experimentally in comparison to state-of-the-art decoupling sequences such as TPPM, SPINAL-64, and frequency-swept variants of these.

  17. Characterization/Selection of a Continuous Wave Laser for RIMS Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sunny; Alves, F.; Karunasiri, G.; Smith, C.; Isselhardt, B.

    2015-03-01

    The effort to implement the technology of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) to problems of nuclear forensics involves the use of multiple lasers to selectively ionize the elements of concern. While current systems incorporate pulsed lasers, we present the results of a feasibility study to determine alternative (Continuous Wave) laser technologies to be employed for analysis of the actinides and fission products of debris from a nuclear detonation. RIMS has the potential to provide rapid isotope ratio quantification of the actinides and important fission products for post detonation nuclear forensics. The current approach to ionize uranium and plutonium uses three Ti-Sapphire pulsed lasers capable of a fundamental wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. In this work, we describe the use of a COTS CW laser to replace one of the pulsed lasers used for the second resonance excitation step of plutonium near 847.282 nm. We characterize the critical laser parameters necessary to achieve high precision isotope ratio measurements including the stability over time of the mean wavelength, bandwidth and spectral mode purity. This far narrower bandwidth laser provides a simpler setup, more robust hardware (greater mobility), and more efficient use of laser irradiance.

  18. Design, fabrication, and beam commissioning of a continuous-wave four-rod rf quadrupole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X. J.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhang, X. H.; Du, H.; Li, Z. S.; Li, X. N.; Jiang, P. Y.; Yang, Y. Q.; Ma, L. Z.; Wu, J. X.; Xu, Z.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Meng, J.; Zhou, Z. Z.; Yao, Q. G.; Cai, G. Z.; Lu, W.; Wang, H. N.; Chen, W. J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, X. W.; Xie, W. J.; Lu, Y. R.; Zhu, K.; Liu, G.; Yan, X. Q.; Gao, S. L.; Wang, Z.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    A new heavy-ion linac within a continuous-wave (CW) 4-rod radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) was designed and constructed as the injector for the separated-sector cyclotron (SSC) at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou (HIRFL). In this paper, we present the development of and the beam commissioning results for the 53.667 MHz CW RFQ. In the beam dynamics design, the transverse phase advance at zero current, σ0 ⊥ , is maintained at a relatively high level compared with the longitudinal phase advance (σ0 ∥ ) to avoid parametric resonance. A quasi-equipartitioning design strategy was applied to control the emittance growth and beam loss. The installation error of the electrodes was checked using a FARO 3D measurement arm during the manufacturing procedure. This method represents a new approach to measuring the position shifts of electrodes in a laboratory environment and provides information regarding the manufacturing quality. The experimental results of rf measurements exhibited general agreement with the simulation results obtained using CST code. During on-line beam testing of the RFQ, two kinds of ion beams (40Ar 8 + and 16O5+ ) were transported and accelerated to 142.8 keV /u , respectively. These results demonstrate that the SSC-Linac has made a significant progress. And the design scheme and technology experiences developed in this work can be applied to other future CW RFQs.

  19. High-power Yb-doped continuous-wave and pulsed fibre lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B N Upadhyaya

    2014-01-01

    High-power laser generation using Yb-doped double-clad fibres with conversion efficiencies in excess of 80% have attracted much attention during the last decade due to their inherent advantages in terms of very high efficiency, no misalignment due to in-built intracore fibre Bragg gratings, low thermal problems due to large surface to volume ratio, diffraction-limited beam quality, compactness, reliability and fibre-optic beam delivery. Yb-doped fibres can also provide a wide emission band from ∼1010 nm to ∼1170 nm, which makes it a versatile laser medium to realize continuous-wave (CW), Q-switched short pulse, and mode-locked ultrashort pulse generation for various applications. In this article, a review of Yb-doped CW and pulsed fibre lasers along with our study on self-pulsing dynamics in CW fibre lasers to find its role in high-power fibre laser development and the physical mechanisms involved in its generation has been described. A study on the generation of high-power CWfibre laser of 165Woutput power and generation of high peak power nanosecond pulses from acousto-optic Q-switched fibre laser has also been presented.

  20. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhira, Vebi; Kurniadi, Deddy; Juliastuti, E.; Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-01

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  1. European Pulsar Timing Array Limits on Continuous Gravitational Waves from Individual Supermassive Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Babak, Stanislav; Sesana, Alberto; Brem, Patrick; Rosado, Pablo A; Taylor, Stephen R; Lassus, Antoine; Hessels, Jason W T; Bassa, Cees G; Burgay, Marta; Caballero, R Nicolas; Champion, David J; Cognard, Ismael; Desvignes, Gregory; Gair, Jonathan R; Guillemot, Lucas; Janssen, Gemma H; Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Kramer, Michael; Lazarus, Patrick; Lee, K J; Lentati, Lindley; Liu, Kuo; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; Oslowsky, Stefan; Perrodin, Delphine; Possenti, Andrea; Purver, Mark B; Sanidas, Sotiris; Smits, Roy; Stappers, Ben; Theureau, Gilles; Tiburzi, Caterina; van Haasteren, Rutger; Vecchio, Alberto; Verbiest, Joris P W

    2015-01-01

    We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\\times 10^{-15}10^9$M$_\\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA lim...

  2. Fabrication of room temperature continuous-wave operation GaN-based ultraviolet laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Degang; Yang, Jing; Liu, Zongshun; Chen, Ping; Zhu, Jianjun; Jiang, Desheng; Shi, Yongsheng; Wang, Hai; Duan, Lihong; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Hui

    2017-06-01

    Two kinds of continuous-wave GaN-based ultraviolet laser diodes (LDs) operated at room temperature and with different emission wavelengths are demonstrated. The LDs epitaxial layers are grown on GaN substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, with a 10 × 600 μm2 ridge waveguide structure. The electrical and optical characteristics of the ultraviolet LDs are investigated under direct-current injection at room temperature. The stimulated emission peak wavelength of first LD is 392.9 nm, the threshold current density and voltage is 1.5 kA/cm2 and 5.0 V, respectively. The output light power is 80 mW under the 4.0 kA/cm2 injection current density. The stimulated emission peak wavelength of second LD is 381.9 nm, the threshold current density the voltage is 2.8 kA/cm2 and 5.5 V, respectively. The output light power is 14 mW under a 4.0 kA/cm2 injection current density. Projects the supported by the National Key R&D Program of China (Nos. 2016YFB0401801, 2016YFB0400803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61674138, 61674139, 61604145, 61574135, 61574134, 61474142, 61474110, 61377020, 61376089), the Science Challenge Project (No. JCKY2016212A503), and the One Hundred Person Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Continuous-wave radar to detect defects within heat exchangers and steam generator tubes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassersharif, Bahram (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Caffey, Thurlow Washburn Howell; Jedlicka, Russell P. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Garcia, Gabe V. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2003-01-01

    A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The experimental program resulted in a completed product development schedule and the design of an experimental apparatus for studying handling of the probe and data acquisition. These tests were completed as far as the prototypical probe performance allowed. The prototype probe design did not have sufficient sensitivity to detect a defect signal using the defined radar technique and did not allow successful completion of all of the project milestones. The best results from the prototype probe could not detect a tube defect using the radar principle. Though a more precision probe may be possible, the cost of design and construction was beyond the scope of the project. This report describes the probe development and the status of the design at the termination of the project.

  4. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-16

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  5. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  6. Discretization of continuous convolution operators for accurate modeling of wave propagation in digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Nikhil; Liebling, Michael; Blu, Thierry

    2013-10-01

    Discretization of continuous (analog) convolution operators by direct sampling of the convolution kernel and use of fast Fourier transforms is highly efficient. However, it assumes the input and output signals are band-limited, a condition rarely met in practice, where signals have finite support or abrupt edges and sampling is nonideal. Here, we propose to approximate signals in analog, shift-invariant function spaces, which do not need to be band-limited, resulting in discrete coefficients for which we derive discrete convolution kernels that accurately model the analog convolution operator while taking into account nonideal sampling devices (such as finite fill-factor cameras). This approach retains the efficiency of direct sampling but not its limiting assumption. We propose fast forward and inverse algorithms that handle finite-length, periodic, and mirror-symmetric signals with rational sampling rates. We provide explicit convolution kernels for computing coherent wave propagation in the context of digital holography. When compared to band-limited methods in simulations, our method leads to fewer reconstruction artifacts when signals have sharp edges or when using nonideal sampling devices.

  7. Deep drilling of silica glass by continuous-wave laser backside irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Saito, Namiko; Matsusaka, Souta; Chiba, Akira; Morita, Noboru

    2016-04-01

    We propose a novel method for drilling of silica glass based on the continuous-wave laser backside irradiation (CW-LBI) phenomenon. The method allows drilling to be performed by single-shot irradiation using a CW laser. A spindle-shaped emission is generated in the bulk glass and is then guided to the glass surface, and at the instant that the beam reaches the surface, the glass material is ejected. The glass ejection process occurs for a time of ~250 μs. A hole that is similar in shape to that of the spindle-shaped emission is left. The hole length tended to increase linearly with increasing laser power. The laser power dependence of the spindle-shaped emission propagation velocity is also linear, and the velocity increases with increasing laser power. The hole diameters were smaller in the case where the laser focus position was set on the glass surface, and these diameters increased with increasing defocusing. The maximum hole depth reached more than 5 mm. Through-hole drilling was demonstrated using a 3-mm-thick glass substrate.

  8. Design, fabrication, and beam commissioning of a continuous-wave four-rod rf quadrupole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new heavy-ion linac within a continuous-wave (CW 4-rod radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ was designed and constructed as the injector for the separated-sector cyclotron (SSC at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou (HIRFL. In this paper, we present the development of and the beam commissioning results for the 53.667 MHz CW RFQ. In the beam dynamics design, the transverse phase advance at zero current, σ_{0⊥}, is maintained at a relatively high level compared with the longitudinal phase advance (σ_{0∥} to avoid parametric resonance. A quasi-equipartitioning design strategy was applied to control the emittance growth and beam loss. The installation error of the electrodes was checked using a FARO 3D measurement arm during the manufacturing procedure. This method represents a new approach to measuring the position shifts of electrodes in a laboratory environment and provides information regarding the manufacturing quality. The experimental results of rf measurements exhibited general agreement with the simulation results obtained using CST code. During on-line beam testing of the RFQ, two kinds of ion beams (^{40}Ar^{8+} and ^{16}O^{5+} were transported and accelerated to 142.8  keV/u, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SSC-Linac has made a significant progress. And the design scheme and technology experiences developed in this work can be applied to other future CW RFQs.

  9. Continuous sheathless microparticle and cell patterning using CL-SSAWs (conductive liquid-based standing surface acoustic waves)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeonghun; Kim, Jae Young; Lim, Chae Seung

    2017-01-01

    We present continuous, sheathless microparticle patterning using conductive liquid (CL)-based standing surface acoustic waves (SSAWs). Conventional metal electrodes patterned on a piezoelectric substrate were replaced with electrode channels filled with a CL. The device performance was evaluated with 5-μm fluorescent polystyrene particles at different flow rate and via phase shifting. In addition, our device was further applied to continuous concentration of malaria parasites at the sidewalls of the fluidic channel.

  10. Continuous sheathless microparticle and cell patterning using CL-SSAWs (conductive liquid-based standing surface acoustic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghun Nam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present continuous, sheathless microparticle patterning using conductive liquid (CL-based standing surface acoustic waves (SSAWs. Conventional metal electrodes patterned on a piezoelectric substrate were replaced with electrode channels filled with a CL. The device performance was evaluated with 5-μm fluorescent polystyrene particles at different flow rate and via phase shifting. In addition, our device was further applied to continuous concentration of malaria parasites at the sidewalls of the fluidic channel.

  11. Including the pulsar-term in continuous gravitational-wave searches using pulsar timing arrays: a blessing and a curse

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Stephen; Gair, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We describe several new techniques which accelerate Bayesian searches for continuous gravitational-wave emission from supermassive black-hole binaries using pulsar timing arrays. These techniques mitigate the problematic increase of search-dimensionality with the size of the pulsar array which arises from having to include an extra parameter per pulsar as the array is expanded. This extra parameter corresponds to searching over the phase of the gravitational-wave as it propagates past each pulsar so that we can coherently include the pulsar-term in our search strategies. Our techniques make the analysis tractable with powerful evidence-evaluation packages like MultiNest. We find good agreement of our techniques with the parameter-estimation and Bayes factor evaluation performed with full signal templates, and conclude that these techniques make excellent first-cut tools for detection and characterisation of continuous gravitational-wave signals with pulsar timing arrays. Crucially, at low to moderate signal-t...

  12. Estimating a continuous p-wave velocity profile with constant squared-slowness gradient models from seismic field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    We inverted seismic field data for a continuous, laterally invariant P-wave velocity profile. Instead of the usual approach that involves horizontal layers with piecewise constant densities and velocities, we consider models of one or two layers with a constant gradient of the squared slowness above

  13. An assessment of the potential of continuous-wave ranging for measuring the distance to a highly reflective, infinite sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, C. P.; Bailey, M. C.; Czerner, M. J.; Dudley, K. L.; Vedeler, E.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a continuous-wave, distance-measuring technique for measuring the distance from a spacecraft antenna to a highly ionized plasma surface is examined. The reflection coefficient angle is computed for several aperture models. It is concluded that aperture size and the presence of a nonablating dielectric cover over the antenna are critical factors.

  14. Mid-infrared continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy of molecular ions using an optical parametric oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbraak, H.; Ngai, A.K.Y.; Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Linnartz, H.

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive infrared detection scheme is presented in which continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy is used to record rovibrational spectra of molecular ions in direct absorption through supersonically expanding planar plasma. A cw optical parametric oscillator is used as a light source and

  15. Distinguishing transient signals and instrumental disturbances in semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves with line-robust statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, David

    2016-05-01

    Non-axisymmetries in rotating neutron stars emit quasi-monochromatic gravitational waves. These long-duration ‘continuous wave’ signals are among the main search targets of ground-based interferometric detectors. However, standard detection methods are susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artefacts that resemble a continuous-wave signal. Past work [Keitel, Prix, Papa, Leaci and Siddiqi 2014, Phys. Rev. D 89 064023] showed that a Bayesian approach, based on an explicit model of persistent single-detector disturbances, improves robustness against such artefacts. Since many strong outliers in semi-coherent searches of LIGO data are caused by transient disturbances that last only a few hours or days, I describe in a recent paper [Keitel D 2015, LIGO-P1500159] how to extend this approach to cover transient disturbances, and demonstrate increased sensitivity in realistic simulated data. Additionally, neutron stars could emit transient signals which, for a limited time, also follow the continuous-wave signal model. As a pragmatic alternative to specialized transient searches, I demonstrate how to make standard semi-coherent continuous-wave searches more sensitive to transient signals. Focusing on the time-scale of a single segment in the semi-coherent search, Bayesian model selection yields a simple detection statistic without a significant increase in computational cost. This proceedings contribution gives a brief overview of both works.

  16. Relationship between serum albumin and pulse wave velocity in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Tao Cheng

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Li-Tao Cheng1, Li-Jun Tang1,2, Hui-Min Chen1,3, Wen Tang1, Tao Wang11Division of Nephrology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, China; 2Division of Nephrology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Ji’nan, China; 3Division of Cardiology, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, ChinaBackground: Hypoalbuminemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality in dialysis patients, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Meanwhile, increased pulse wave velocity (PWV, the marker of arterial stiffness, has been proved to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease. The relationship between serum albumin and PWV in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients (CAPD was studied.Methods: Sixty-two CAPD patients were studied. The average age was 63 ± 12 years and dialysis duration was 23 ± 22 months. Serum albumin, C-reactive protein (CRP, and carotid-femoral PWV were measured.Results: Among these patients, 43.5% were men. The mean serum albumin concentration was 37 ± 4 g/L and PWV was 11.9 ± 2.3 m/s. PWV positively correlated with age (r = 0.35, P < 0.01, diabetes (yes = 1, no = 0; r = 0.292, P < 0.05, systolic blood pressure (SBP; r = 0.493, P < 0.001 and CRP (r = 0.295, P < 0.05, but negatively correlated with serum albumin (r = −0.357, P < 0.01. In multiple regression analysis, SBP (β = 0.615, P < 0.001, age (β = 0.414, P < 0.01, albumin (β = −0.315, P < 0.05 and total cholesterol (β = 0.275, P < 0.05 were independent determinants of PWV. In a non-inflamed subgroup (CRP < 3 mg/L, n = 30, albumin still negatively correlated with PWV (r = −0.66, P < 0.001.Conclusion: Serum albumin inversely correlated with increased PWV in CAPD patients, suggesting that increased arterial stiffness might be the link between hypoalbuminemia and increased cardiovascular mortality in dialysis patients.Keywords: hypoalbuminemia, cardiovascular events, pulse wave velocity, arterial

  17. Relationship between prenatal care and maternal complications in women with preeclampsia: Implications for continuity and discontinuity of prenatal care

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Ming Liu; Shuenn-Dyh Chang; Po-Jen Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal care is associated with better pregnancy outcome and may be a patient safety issue. However, no studies have investigated the types and quality of prenatal care provided in northern Taiwan. This retrospective study assessed whether the hospital-based continuous prenatal care model at tertiary hospitals reduced the risk of perinatal morbidity and maternal complications in pre-eclampsia patients. Materials and Methods: Of 385 pre-eclampsia patients recruited from among 23...

  18. Bandwidth scaling and spectral flatness enhancement of optical frequency combs from phase-modulated continuous-wave lasers using cascaded four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supradeepa, V R; Weiner, Andrew M

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a new cascaded four-wave mixing technique that scales up the bandwidth of frequency combs generated by phase modulation of a continuous-wave (CW) laser while simultaneously enhancing the spectral flatness. As a result, we demonstrate a 10 GHz frequency comb with over 100 lines in a 10 dB bandwidth in which a record 75 lines are within a flatness of 1 dB. The cascaded four-wave mixing process increases the bandwidth of the initial comb generated by the modulation of a CW laser by a factor of five. The broadband comb has approximately quadratic spectral phase, which is compensated upon propagation in single-mode fiber, resulting in a 10 GHz train of 940 fs pulses.

  19. Generation of whistler waves by continuous HF heating of the upper ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B.; Najmi, A. C.; Parrot, M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-07-01

    Broadband VLF waves in the frequency range 7-10 kkHz and 15-19 kHz, generated by F region CW HF ionospheric heating in the absence of electrojet currents, were detected by the DEMETER satellite overflying the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) transmitter during HAARP/BRIOCHE campaigns. The VLF waves are in a frequency range corresponding to the F region lower lybrid (LH) frequency and its harmonic. This paper aims to show that the VLF observations are whistler waves generated by mode conversion of LH waves that were parametrically excited by HF-pump-plasma interaction at the upper hybrid layer. The paper discusses the basic physics and presents a model that conjectures (1) the VLF waves observed at the LH frequency are due to the interaction of the LH waves with meter-scale field-aligned striations—generating whistler waves near the LH frequency; and (2) the VLF waves at twice the LH frequency are due to the interaction of two counterpropagating LH waves—generating whistler waves near the LH frequency harmonic. The model is supported by numerical simulations that show good agreement with the observations. The (Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions results and model discussions are complemented by the Kodiak radar, ionograms, and stimulated electromagnetic emission observations.

  20. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  1. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  2. Photo-ignition process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and ferrocene by continuous wave Xe lamp illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primiceri, Patrizio; Longo, Daniele; Strafella, Luciano; Carlucci, Paolo; Lomascolo, Mauro; Cretì, Arianna; Mele, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Summary This work aims to investigate and characterize the photo-ignition phenomenon of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures by using a continuous wave (CW) xenon (Xe) light source, in order to find the power ignition threshold by employing a different type of light source as was used in previous research (i.e., pulsed Xe lamp). The experimental photo-ignition tests were carried out by varying the weight ratio of the used mixtures, luminous power, and wavelength range of the incident Xe light by using selective optical filters. For a better explanation of the photo-induced ignition process, the absorption spectra of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures and ferrocene only were obtained. The experimental results show that the luminous power (related to the entire spectrum of the Xe lamp) needed to trigger the ignition of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures decreases with increasing metal nanoparticles content according to previously published results when using a different type of light source (i.e., pulsed vs CW Xe light source). Furthermore, less light power is required to trigger photo-ignition when moving towards the ultraviolet (UV) region. This is in agreement with the measured absorption spectra, which present higher absorption values in the UV–vis region for both MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures and ferrocene only diluted in toluene. Finally, a chemo-physical interpretation of the ignition phenomenon is proposed whereby ferrocene photo-excitation, due to photon absorption, produces ferrocene itself in its excited form and is thus capable of promoting electron transfer to MWCNTs. In this way, the resulting radical species, FeCp2+∙ and MWCNT−, easily react with oxygen giving rise to the ignition of MWCNT/ferrocene samples.

  3. Welding Stainless Steels and Refractory Metals Using Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Nd:YAG Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Pong, R; Gauthier, M D

    2004-09-27

    This report provides an overview of a series of developmental welding studies performed on a 2.2 kW Rofin Sinar DY-022 Diode Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG welder at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Several materials systems, ranging from refractory metals, such as commercially pure tantalum and vanadium, to austenitic stainless steels, including both 304L and 21-6-9 grades, are examined. Power input and travel speed are systematically varied during the welding of each materials system, and the width, depth, and cross sectional area of the resulting weld fusion zones are measured. These individual studies are undertaken in order to characterize the response of the welder to changes in these welding parameters for a range of materials and to determine the maximum depth of penetration of which this welder is capable in each materials system. The maximum weld depths, which are on the order of 5.4 mm, are observed in the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel at the maximum laser power setting (2200 W) and a slow travel speed (6.4 mm/sec). The next highest weld depth is observed in the 304L stainless steel, followed by that observed in the vanadium and, finally, in the tantalum. Porosity, which is attributed to the collapse of the keyhole during welding, is also observed in the welds produced in tantalum, vanadium, and 304L stainless steel. Only the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel welds displayed little or no porosity over the range of welding parameters. Comparisons with similar laser welding systems are also made for several of these same materials systems. When compared with the welds produced by these other systems, the LLNL system typically produces welds of an equivalent or slightly higher depth.

  4. Quantum State Engineering of Light with Continuous-wave Optical Parametric Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Olivier; Liu, Jianli; Huang, Kun; Barbosa, Felippe; Fabre, Claude; Laurat, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Engineering non-classical states of the electromagnetic field is a central quest for quantum optics1,2. Beyond their fundamental significance, such states are indeed the resources for implementing various protocols, ranging from enhanced metrology to quantum communication and computing. A variety of devices can be used to generate non-classical states, such as single emitters, light-matter interfaces or non-linear systems3. We focus here on the use of a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator3,4. This system is based on a non-linear χ2 crystal inserted inside an optical cavity and it is now well-known as a very efficient source of non-classical light, such as single-mode or two-mode squeezed vacuum depending on the crystal phase matching. Squeezed vacuum is a Gaussian state as its quadrature distributions follow a Gaussian statistics. However, it has been shown that number of protocols require non-Gaussian states5. Generating directly such states is a difficult task and would require strong χ3 non-linearities. Another procedure, probabilistic but heralded, consists in using a measurement-induced non-linearity via a conditional preparation technique operated on Gaussian states. Here, we detail this generation protocol for two non-Gaussian states, the single-photon state and a superposition of coherent states, using two differently phase-matched parametric oscillators as primary resources. This technique enables achievement of a high fidelity with the targeted state and generation of the state in a well-controlled spatiotemporal mode. PMID:24961685

  5. Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time From Bioimpedance and Continuous Wave Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxi, Dilpreet; Redout, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-04-01

    We have developed and tested a new architecture for pulse transit time (PTT) estimation at the central arteries using electrical bioimpedance, electrocardiogram, and continuous wave radar to estimate cuffless blood pressure. A transmitter and receiver antenna are placed at the sternum to acquire the arterial pulsation at the aortic arch. A four-electrode arrangement across the shoulders acquires arterial pulse across the carotid and subclavian arteries from bioimpedance as well as a bipolar lead I electrocardiogram. The PTT and pulse arrival times (PATs) are measured on six healthy male subjects during exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Using linear regression, the estimated PAT and PTT values are calibrated to the systolic and mean as well as diastolic blood pressure from an oscillometric device. For all subjects, the Pearson correlation coefficients for PAT-SBP and PTT-SBP are -0.66 (p = 0.001) and -0.48 (p = 0.0029), respectively. Correlation coefficients for individual subjects ranged from -0.54 to -0.9 and -0.37 to -0.95, respectively. The proposed system architecture is promising in estimating cuffless arterial blood pressure at the central, proximal arteries, which obey the Moens-Korteweg equation more closely when compared to peripheral arteries. An important advantage of PTT from the carotid and subclavian arteries is that the PTT over the central elastic arteries is measured instead of the peripheral arteries, which potentially reduces the changes in PTT due to vasomotion. Furthermore, the sensors can be completely hidden under a patients clothes, making them more acceptable by the patient for ambulatory monitoring.

  6. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ. While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS. Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O^{5+} ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  7. A continuous record of intereruption velocity change at Mount St. Helens from coda wave interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotovec-Ellis, Alicia J.; Gomberg, Joan S.; Vidale, John; Creager, Ken C.

    2014-01-01

    In September 2004, Mount St. Helens volcano erupted after nearly 18 years of quiescence. However, it is unclear from the limited geophysical observations when or if the magma chamber replenished following the 1980–1986 eruptions in the years before the 2004–2008 extrusive eruption. We use coda wave interferometry with repeating earthquakes to measure small changes in the velocity structure of Mount St. Helens volcano that might indicate magmatic intrusion. By combining observations of relative velocity changes from many closely located earthquake sources, we solve for a continuous function of velocity changes with time. We find that seasonal effects dominate the relative velocity changes. Seismicity rates and repeating earthquake occurrence also vary seasonally; therefore, velocity changes and seismicity are likely modulated by snow loading, fluid saturation, and/or changes in groundwater level. We estimate hydrologic effects impart stress changes on the order of tens of kilopascals within the upper 4 km, resulting in annual velocity variations of 0.5 to 1%. The largest nonseasonal change is a decrease in velocity at the time of the deep Mw = 6.8 Nisqually earthquake. We find no systematic velocity changes during the most likely times of intrusions, consistent with a lack of observable surface deformation. We conclude that if replenishing intrusions occurred, they did not alter seismic velocities where this technique is sensitive due to either their small size or the finite compressibility of the magma chamber. We interpret the observed velocity changes and shallow seasonal seismicity as a response to small stress changes in a shallow, pressurized system.

  8. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  9. Photo-ignition process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and ferrocene by continuous wave Xe lamp illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Paolo; Primiceri, Patrizio; Longo, Daniele; Strafella, Luciano; Carlucci, Paolo; Lomascolo, Mauro; Cretì, Arianna; Mele, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to investigate and characterize the photo-ignition phenomenon of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures by using a continuous wave (CW) xenon (Xe) light source, in order to find the power ignition threshold by employing a different type of light source as was used in previous research (i.e., pulsed Xe lamp). The experimental photo-ignition tests were carried out by varying the weight ratio of the used mixtures, luminous power, and wavelength range of the incident Xe light by using selective optical filters. For a better explanation of the photo-induced ignition process, the absorption spectra of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures and ferrocene only were obtained. The experimental results show that the luminous power (related to the entire spectrum of the Xe lamp) needed to trigger the ignition of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures decreases with increasing metal nanoparticles content according to previously published results when using a different type of light source (i.e., pulsed vs CW Xe light source). Furthermore, less light power is required to trigger photo-ignition when moving towards the ultraviolet (UV) region. This is in agreement with the measured absorption spectra, which present higher absorption values in the UV-vis region for both MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures and ferrocene only diluted in toluene. Finally, a chemo-physical interpretation of the ignition phenomenon is proposed whereby ferrocene photo-excitation, due to photon absorption, produces ferrocene itself in its excited form and is thus capable of promoting electron transfer to MWCNTs. In this way, the resulting radical species, FeCp2 (+∙) and MWCNT(-), easily react with oxygen giving rise to the ignition of MWCNT/ferrocene samples.

  10. Photo-ignition process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and ferrocene by continuous wave Xe lamp illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Visconti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to investigate and characterize the photo-ignition phenomenon of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures by using a continuous wave (CW xenon (Xe light source, in order to find the power ignition threshold by employing a different type of light source as was used in previous research (i.e., pulsed Xe lamp. The experimental photo-ignition tests were carried out by varying the weight ratio of the used mixtures, luminous power, and wavelength range of the incident Xe light by using selective optical filters. For a better explanation of the photo-induced ignition process, the absorption spectra of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures and ferrocene only were obtained. The experimental results show that the luminous power (related to the entire spectrum of the Xe lamp needed to trigger the ignition of MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures decreases with increasing metal nanoparticles content according to previously published results when using a different type of light source (i.e., pulsed vs CW Xe light source. Furthermore, less light power is required to trigger photo-ignition when moving towards the ultraviolet (UV region. This is in agreement with the measured absorption spectra, which present higher absorption values in the UV–vis region for both MWCNT/ferrocene mixtures and ferrocene only diluted in toluene. Finally, a chemo-physical interpretation of the ignition phenomenon is proposed whereby ferrocene photo-excitation, due to photon absorption, produces ferrocene itself in its excited form and is thus capable of promoting electron transfer to MWCNTs. In this way, the resulting radical species, FeCp2+∙ and MWCNT−, easily react with oxygen giving rise to the ignition of MWCNT/ferrocene samples.

  11. Continuous Wave Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy Inside a Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Jose L.; Cueto, Maite

    2013-06-01

    Hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCF) have raised new opportunities to study light-matter interaction. Dielectric or metallic capillaries are intrinsically lossy, making poor light guides. In contrast, HCPCFs can guide light quite efficiently, due to the band-gap effect produced by an array of smaller channels which surrounds a central hollow core with a few μm diameter. The tight confinement of light inside the core, that can be filled with gases, as well as a long interaction length, enhance multiple nonlinear phenomena, making it possible to devise new ways to do low signal level spectroscopy, as is the case of high resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS). A. Owyoung demonstrated high resolution continuous wave SRS in 1978. Shortly afterwards, seeking higher sensitivity, he developed the quasi-continuous SRS technique (a high peak power pump laser, interacting with a low power cw probe laser). That variant remains today the best compromise between resolution and sensitivity for gas-phase Raman spectroscopy. In this work, we show the possibility of fully cw stimulated Raman spectroscopy, using a gas cell built around a HCPCF to overcome the limitations posed by the weakness of the stimulated Raman effect when not using pulsed sources. The interaction length (1.2 m), longer than that of a multiple pass refocusing cell, and the narrow diameter of the core (4.8 μm), can compensate for the much lower laser powers used in the cw set-up. The experimental complexity is considerably reduced and the instrumental resolution is at the 10's of MHz level, limited, with our fiber, by transit time effects. At present, we have demonstrated the feasibility of the experiment, a sensitivity enhancement of ˜ 6000 over the single focus regime, and a spectral resolution better than 0.005 wn in the unresolved Q-branch of the ν_1 component of the Fermi dyad of CO_2 at 1388 wn. Other examples of rotationally resolved spectra will be shown: the Q branch of O_2 at 1555 wn

  12. Searches for continuous gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 and XTE J1751-305 in LIGO's sixth science run

    CERN Document Server

    Meadors, Grant David; Riles, Keith; Creighton, Teviet; Robinet, Florent

    2016-01-01

    Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) and X-ray transient (XTE) J1751-305 are Low-Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) that may emit continuous gravitational waves detectable in the band of ground-based interferometric observatories. Neutron stars in LMXBs could reach a torque-balance steady-state equilibrium in which angular momentum addition from infalling matter from the binary companion is balanced by angular momentum loss, conceivably due to gravitational-wave emission. Torque-balance predicts a scale for detectable gravitational-wave strain based on observed X-ray flux. This paper describes a search for Sco X-1 and XTE J1751-305 in LIGO Science Run 6 data using the TwoSpect algorithm, based on searching for orbital modulations in the frequency domain. While no detections are claimed, the most stringent upper limits to date on continuous gravitational-wave emission from Sco X-1 are obtained, spanning gravitational wave frequencies from 40 to 2040 Hz and projected semi-major axes from 0.90 to 1.98 light-seconds. At optimal strai...

  13. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation

    CERN Document Server

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed $c$ depending on position $\\mathbf{r}$. In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path $\\ell^*$, scattering phase functi...

  14. Self-organized micro-holes on titania based sol-gel films under continuous direct writing with a continuous wave ultraviolet laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhti, S.; Destouches, N.; Gamet, E.; Reynaud, S. [University of Lyon, F. 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); CNRS, UMR 5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, 18 Rue Pr. Lauras F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France); University of Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Balan, L. [Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, CNRS UMR 7361, Universite de Haute Alsace, 15 rue Jean Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse (France)

    2013-05-27

    The microstructuring of titania based sol-gel films is investigated by direct writing with a continuous wave ultraviolet laser beam emitting at 244 nm. Depending on the exposure conditions, the films exhibit a volume expansion, a volume shrinkage, a self-shaped delamination, or are damaged. This paper is mainly focused on the regime where spontaneous local delamination occurs, which corresponds to a narrow range of laser irradiances and writing speeds. In this regime, self-organized round-shape micro-holes opened on the substrate are generated.

  15. Scintigraphic diagnosis of infectious complications in renal failure patients undergoing hemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis or renal transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María García Vicente

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage renal disease have two therapeutic options, dialysis and renal transplantation. Infectious complications occurring in such patients will not only condition the effectiveness of such treatments, but are among the main causes of morbidity and mortality in such cases. Knowledge of the advantages and limitations of nuclear techniques is essential for management of these conditions.Pacientes em estágio final de doença renal têm duas opções terapêuticas, diálise e transplante renal. Complicações infecciosas que ocorrem em cada paciente são as principais causas de morbidade e mortalidade nestes casos. Conhecimentos das vantagens e limitações de técnicas nucleares são essenciais para o acompanhamento nestas condições.

  16. Transurethral dividing vaporesection for the treatment of large volume benign prostatic hyperplasia using 2 micron continuous wave laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Dong-chong; YANG Yong; WEI Zhi-tao; HONG Bao-fa; ZHANG Xu

    2010-01-01

    Background The safety and efficiency of transurethral laser resection of the prostate to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia have been verified. However, this method does still not manage large volume prostates efficiently. To tackle this problem, we have designed a method of "transurethral dividing vaporesection of prostate" using a 2 micron continuous wave laser. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of this method in the management of large prostates (>80 ml).Methods In this study, 45 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia with a median prostatic volume of (123.7±26.7) ml (range, 80.2-159.8 ml) were treated by the same surgeon under epidural anesthesia. During the surgery, superapubic catheters were needed, and saline solution was used for irrigation. First, the prostate was divided longitudinally into several parts from the bladder neck to the prostatic apex, and then gradually incised transversely chip by chip. Intraoperative blood transfusion rate, postoperative complications, maximum urinary flow rate, International Prostate Symptom Score and quality of life scores were recorded for statistical analysis using SPSS 16.0 software.Results Intraoperatively, no transurethral resection syndrome was observed, and no blood transfusions were needed.The resected prostatic chips were easily flushed out of the bladder through the resectoscope sheath without the use of a morcellator. Median vaporesection time was (95.0±13.2) minutes (range, 75-120 minutes), and the median retrieved and removed prostatic tissue were (25.2±5.1) g (range, 15.5-34.7 g) and (75.4±16.4) g (range, 43.8-106.1 g), respectively. Median catheter time and hospital stay were (3.3±0.9) days (range, 3-5 days) and (4.8±1.8) days (range, 3-9 days), respectively. After a follow-up of 6 to 12 months, two patients had stress urinary incontinence and three had anterior urethral strictures. Satisfactory improvement was seen in maximum urinary flow rate, International Prostate

  17. Continuous-Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy in a Pulsed Uniform Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawoos, Shameemah; Suas-David, Nicolas; Suits, Arthur

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a new approach that couples a pulsed uniform supersonic flow with high sensitivity continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (UF-CRDS) operated in the near infrared (NIR). This combination is related to the CRESU technique developed in France and used for many years to study reaction kinetics at low temperature, and to the microwave based chirped-pulse uniform supersonic flow spectrometer (CPUF) developed in our group which has successfully demonstrated the use of pulsed uniform supersonic flow to probe reaction dynamics at temperatures as low as 22 K. CRDS operated with NIR permits access to the first overtones of C-H and O-H stretching/bending which, in combination with its extraordinary sensitivity opens new experiments complementary to the CPUF technique. The UF-CRDS apparatus (Figure) utilizes the pulsed uniform flow produced by means of a piezo-electric stack valve in combination with a Laval nozzle. At present, two machined aluminum Laval nozzles designed for carrier gases Ar and He generate flows with a temperature of approximately 25 K and pressure around 0.15 mbar. This flow is probed by an external cavity diode laser in the NIR (1280-1380 nm). Laval nozzles designed using a newly developed MATLAB-based program will be used in the future. A detailed illustration of the novel UF-CRDS instrumentation and its performance will be presented along with future directions and applications. I. Sims, J. L. Queffelec, A. Defrance, C. Rebrion-Rowe, D. Travers, P. Bocherel, B. Rowe, I. W. Smith, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 4229-4241, (1994). C. Abeysekera, B. Joalland, N. Ariyasingha, L. N. Zack, I. R. Sims, R. W. Field, A. G. Suits, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 1599-1604, (2015). N. Suas-David, T. Vanfleteren, T. Foldes, S. Kassi, R. Georges, M. Herman, J. Phys. Chem.A, 119, 10022-10034, (2015). C. Abeysekera, B. Joalland, Y. Shi, A. Kamasah, J. M. Oldham, A. G. Suits, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 116107, (2014).

  18. SeismicWaveTool: Continuous and discrete wavelet analysis and filtering for multichannel seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiana-Merino, J. J.; Rosa-Herranz, J. L.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; Martinez-Espla, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    A MATLAB-based computer code has been developed for the simultaneous wavelet analysis and filtering of multichannel seismic data. The considered time-frequency transforms include the continuous wavelet transform, the discrete wavelet transform and the discrete wavelet packet transform. The developed approaches provide a fast and precise time-frequency examination of the seismograms at different frequency bands. Moreover, filtering methods for noise, transients or even baseline removal, are implemented. The primary motivation is to support seismologists with a user-friendly and fast program for the wavelet analysis, providing practical and understandable results. Program summaryProgram title: SeismicWaveTool Catalogue identifier: AENG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 611072 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 14688355 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB (MathWorks Inc.) version 7.8.0.347 (R2009a) or higher. Wavelet Toolbox is required. Computer: Developed on a MacBook Pro. Tested on Mac and PC. No computer-specific optimization was performed. Operating system: Any supporting MATLAB (MathWorks Inc.) v7.8.0.347 (R2009a) or higher. Tested on Mac OS X 10.6.8, Windows XP and Vista. Classification: 13. Nature of problem: Numerous research works have developed a great number of free or commercial wavelet based software, which provide specific solutions for the analysis of seismic data. On the other hand, standard toolboxes, packages or libraries, such as the MathWorks' Wavelet Toolbox for MATLAB, offer command line functions and interfaces for the wavelet analysis of one-component signals. Thus, software usually is focused on very specific problems

  19. Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

    2000-06-05

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

  20. Real-time continuous-wave imaging with a 1.63THz OPTL and a pyroelectric camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; RUAN Shuang-chen; ZHANG Min; ZHANG Wei

    2008-01-01

    Real-time continuous-wave terahertz imaging is demonstrated with a 1.63 THz (184.31 μm) optically-pumped terahertz laser (OPTL) and a 124 × 124 element room-temperature pyroelectric camera. Transmission-mode THz imaging is presented for the samples hidden in various wrapping materials. These experimental results reveal the possibility to construct a simple real-time THz imaging system applied to nondestructive inspection.

  1. Thermal effects of continuous wave CO sub 2 laser exposure on human teeth: An in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miserendino, L.J.; Neiburger, E.J.; Walia, H.; Luebke, N.; Brantley, W.

    1989-07-01

    The thermal effects of continuous wave carbon dioxide laser irradiation on human teeth were investigated. Internal temperature changes were monitored by means of electrical thermistors implanted within the pulp chambers of 20 extracted, unerupted human molar teeth. One-hundred test exposures at various powers and durations were obtained. Linear regression/correlation analysis of the data suggests a direct relationship between the independent variable, exposure energy (joules), and the dependent variable, internal temperature, under the conditions of this study.

  2. Real-time implementation of frequency-modulated continuous-wave synthetic aperture radar imaging using field programmable gate array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, Yachao; Hu, Guibin; Xing, Mengdao

    2015-06-01

    A new miniature linear frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar which mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle is presented. It allows the accomplishment of high resolution synthetic aperture radar imaging in real-time. Only a Kintex-7 field programmable gate array from Xilinx is utilized for whole signal processing of sophisticated radar imaging algorithms. The proposed hardware architecture achieves remarkable improvement in integration, power consumption, volume, and computing performance over its predecessor designs. The realized design is verified by flight campaigns.

  3. Watt-Level Continuous-Wave Emission from a Bi-Functional Quantum Cascade Laser/Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-18

    materials, which makes their integration on Si particularly dicult. Heterogeneous integration using transfer techniques allows both single device and wafer...mixing process and low dispersion in this device. At higher currents the spectrum widens to about 80 cm−1. The spectra at the bias of highest WPE is...Elliott, S. N.; Sobiesierski, A.; Seeds , A. J.; Ross, I.; Smowton, P. M.; Liu, H. Electrically pumped continuous-wave IIIV quantum dot lasers on silicon

  4. Continuous wave channel waveguide lasers in Nd:LuVO4 fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yingying; Dong, Ningning; Macdonald, John; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Huaijin; Kar, Ajoy K

    2012-01-30

    Buried channel waveguides in Nd:LuVOlaser writing with the double-line technique. The photoluminescence properties of the bulk materials were found to be well preserved within the waveguide core region. Continuous-wave laser oscillation at 1066.4 nm was observed from the waveguide under ~809 nm optical excitation, with the absorbed pump power at threshold and laser slope efficiency of 98 mW and 14%, respectively.

  5. Broadband Continuous-Wave Multi-Harmonic Optical Comb Based on a Frequency Division-by-Three Optical Parametric Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Yin Lin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a multi-watt broadband continuous-wave multi-harmonic optical comb based on a frequency division-by-three singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator. This cw optical comb is frequency-stabilized with the help of a beat signal derived from the signal and frequency-doubled idler waves. The measured frequency fluctuation in one standard deviation is ~437 kHz. This is comparable to the linewidth of the pump laser which is a master-oscillator seeded Yb:doped fiber amplifier at ~1064 nm. The measured powers of the fundamental wave and the harmonic waves up to the 6th harmonic wave are 1.64 W, 0.77 W, 3.9 W, 0.78 W, 0.17 W, and 0.11 W, respectively. The total spectral width covered by this multi-harmonic comb is ~470 THz. When properly phased, this multi-harmonic optical comb can be expected to produce by Fourier synthesis a light source consisting of periodic optical field waveforms that have an envelope full-width at half-maximum of 1.59 fs in each period.

  6. A non-intrusive and continuous-in-space technique to investigate the wave transformation and breaking over a breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Simone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To design longshore breakwaters, the evaluation of the wave motion transformations over the structures and of the energy they are able to absorb, dissipate and reflect is necessary. To characterize features and transformations of monochromatic wave trains above a breakwater, both submerged and emerged, we have designed and developed a non-intrusive and continuous-in-space technique, based on Image Analysis, and carried out an experimental campaign, in a laboratory flume equipped with a wave-maker, in order to test it. The investigation area was lighted with a light sheet and images were recorded by a video-camera. The working fluid was seeded with non buoyant particles to make it bright and clearly distinct from dark background and breakwater. The technique, that is based on a robust algorithm to identify the free surface, has showed to properly work also in prohibitive situations for traditional resistive probes (e.g., very shallow waters and/or breaking waves and to be able to measure the free surface all over the investigation field in a non-intrusive way. Two kind of analysis were mainly performed, a statistical and a spectral one. The peculiarities of the measurement technique allowed to describe the whole wave transformation and to supply useful information for design purposes.

  7. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-11-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed c depending on position r . In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path ℓ*, scattering phase function f , and anisotropy factor g . Discarding the operator term in the wave equation is shown to have a significant impact on f and g , yet limited to the low-frequency regime, i.e., when the correlation length of the disorder ℓc is smaller than or comparable to the wavelength λ . More surprisingly, discarding the operator part has a significant impact on the transport mean-free path ℓ* whatever the frequency regime. When the scalar and operator terms have identical amplitudes, the discrepancy on the transport mean-free path is around 300 % in the low-frequency regime, and still above 30 % for ℓc/λ =103 no matter how weak fluctuations of the disorder are. Analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the wave equation and Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-11-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed c depending on position r. In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path ℓ^{*}, scattering phase function f, and anisotropy factor g. Discarding the operator term in the wave equation is shown to have a significant impact on f and g, yet limited to the low-frequency regime, i.e., when the correlation length of the disorder ℓ_{c} is smaller than or comparable to the wavelength λ. More surprisingly, discarding the operator part has a significant impact on the transport mean-free path ℓ^{*} whatever the frequency regime. When the scalar and operator terms have identical amplitudes, the discrepancy on the transport mean-free path is around 300% in the low-frequency regime, and still above 30% for ℓ_{c}/λ=10^{3} no matter how weak fluctuations of the disorder are. Analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the wave equation and Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Different photodynamic effect between continuous wave and pulsed laser irradiation modes in k562 cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, V. V.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Knyazev, N. A.; Rusanov, A. A.; Dubina, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a cancer treatment method is used primarily continuous mode laser radiation. At high power density irradiation occurs intense consumption of molecular oxygen and this caused hypoxic tumor tissue, which leads to inefficiency PDT. In this paper, pulsed and continuous irradiation modes during PDT photosensitizer Radachlorin were compared. A mathematical model for the generation of singlet oxygen 1O2 in tumor cells during photodynamic therapy with tissue oxygenation was developed. Our study theoretically and experimentally demonstrates the increased singlet oxygen generation efficiency in a pulsed irradiation mode compared to continuous wave mode with the same power density 20mW/cm2. Experimental in vitro showed that pulsed irradiation mode mostly induces apoptosis k562 tumor cells at irradiation doses of k562 1.25 - 2.5J/cm2 while the continuous mode induced necrosis.

  10. Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary E. Rochau and Thurlow W.H. Caffey, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0740; Bahram Nassersharif and Gabe V. Garcia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001; Russell P. Jedlicka, Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001

    2003-05-01

    OAK B204 Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003. A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The technique is 100% volumetric, and may find smaller defects, more rapidly, and less expensively than present methods. The project described in this report was a joint development effort between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) funded by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the project was to research, design, and develop a new concept utilizing a continuous wave radar to detect defects inside metallic tubes and in particular nuclear plant steam generator tubing. The project was divided into four parallel tracks: computational modeling, experimental prototyping, thermo-mechanical design, and signal detection and analysis.

  11. Performance of a small, graphite electrode, multistage depressed collector with a 500-W, continuous wave, 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling wave tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramins, Peter; Lesny, Gary G.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Peet, Shelly

    1988-01-01

    A small, isotropic graphite multistage depressed collector (MDC) and a short permanent magnet refocuser were designed, fabricated, and evaluated in conjunction with a 500-W, continuous-wave (CW), 4.8 to 9.6 GHz traveling wave tube (TWT). A novel performance optimization system and technique were used to optimize the TWT-MDC performance for saturated broad-band operation. The MDC performance was evaluated in both four- and three-stage configurations. Average TWT overall and four-stage collector efficiencies of 43.8 and 82.6 percent, respectively, were obtained for saturated octave-bandwidth operation. The isotropic graphite electrode material performed well, and shows considerable promise. However, considerably more test experience is required before definitive conclusions on its suitability for space and airborne TWT's can be made.

  12. Continuing Disparities in Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Complications Between Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt Australians With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy M.E.; Hunt, Kerry; McAullay, Daniel; Chubb, Stephen A.P.; Sillars, Brett A.; Bruce, David G.; Davis, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether disparities in the nature and management of type 2 diabetes persist between Aboriginal and the majority Anglo-Celt patients in an urban Australian community. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Baseline data from the observational Fremantle Diabetes Study collected from 1993 to 1996 (phase I) and from 2008 to 2011 (phase II) were analyzed. Patients characterized as Aboriginal or Anglo-Celt by self-report and supporting data underwent comprehensive assessment, including questionnaires, examination, and biochemical testing in a single laboratory. Generalized linear modeling with age/sex adjustment was used to examine differences in changes in variables in the two groups between phases I and II. RESULTS The indigenous participants were younger at entry and at diabetes diagnosis than the Anglo-Celt participants in both phases. They were also less likely to be educated beyond primary level and were more likely to be smokers. HbA1c decreased in both groups over time (Aboriginal median 9.6% [interquartile range 7.8–10.7%] to 8.4% [6.6–10.6%] vs. Anglo-Celt median 7.1% [6.2–8.4%] to 6.7% [6.2–7.5%]), but the gap persisted (P = 0.65 for difference between phases I and II by ethnic group). Aboriginal patients were more likely to have microvascular disease in both phases. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial index ≤0.90 or lower-extremity amputation) increased in Aboriginal but decreased in Anglo-Celt participants (15.8–29.7 vs. 30.7–21.5%; P = 0.055). CONCLUSIONS Diabetes management has improved for Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt Australian patients, but disparities in cardiovascular risk factors and complications persist. PMID:22815295

  13. "Virginia Woolf's The waves: a lyrical 'sense of continuity' in a sea of dissociation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Theresa K

    2007-01-01

    The Waves, written in 1931 by Virginia Woolf, is an astounding depiction of an internal landscape richly full of dissociative phenomena. Although applauded for its genius and considered by many to be her highest literary achievement, critics complained that the language of the characters seemed artificial and a departure from the usual interior monologue appearing in other works that utilized stream of consciousness writing at the time. Woolf believed this work to be misunderstood as she often felt herself. This paper illustrates how The Waves might metaphorically connote the internal experiences of dissociating. The narrative of the novel illuminates the mapping of Woolf's internal system as it changes across a life span. Woolf deftly submerged not only the facts of her personal life in The Waves but, more important, revealed through both her literary method and language the dissociative nature of her own mind. By extrapolating from Woolf's autobiographies, journals, and letters, the parallels between fact and fiction become apparent.

  14. Predicting location-specific extreme coastal floods in the future climate by introducing a probabilistic method to calculate maximum elevation of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of water level variations and wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijala, Ulpu; Björkqvist, Jan-Victor; Johansson, Milla M.; Pellikka, Havu

    2017-04-01

    Future coastal management continuously strives for more location-exact and precise methods to investigate possible extreme sea level events and to face flooding hazards in the most appropriate way. Evaluating future flooding risks by understanding the behaviour of the joint effect of sea level variations and wind waves is one of the means to make more comprehensive flooding hazard analysis, and may at first seem like a straightforward task to solve. Nevertheless, challenges and limitations such as availability of time series of the sea level and wave height components, the quality of data, significant locational variability of coastal wave height, as well as assumptions to be made depending on the study location, make the task more complicated. In this study, we present a statistical method for combining location-specific probability distributions of water level variations (including local sea level observations and global mean sea level rise) and wave run-up (based on wave buoy measurements). The goal of our method is to obtain a more accurate way to account for the waves when making flooding hazard analysis on the coast compared to the approach of adding a separate fixed wave action height on top of sea level -based flood risk estimates. As a result of our new method, we gain maximum elevation heights with different return periods of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of both phenomena, "the green water". We also introduce a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the properties and functioning of our method. The sensitivity test is based on using theoretical wave distributions representing different alternatives of wave behaviour in relation to sea level variations. As these wave distributions are merged with the sea level distribution, we get information on how the different wave height conditions and shape of the wave height distribution influence the joint results. Our method presented here can be used as an advanced tool to minimize over- and

  15. Searches for continuous gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 and XTE J1751-305 in LIGO's sixth science run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadors, G. D.; Goetz, E.; Riles, K.; Creighton, T.; Robinet, F.

    2017-02-01

    Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) and x-ray transient XTE J1751-305 are low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) that may emit continuous gravitational waves detectable in the band of ground-based interferometric observatories. Neutron stars in LMXBs could reach a torque-balance steady-state equilibrium in which angular momentum addition from infalling matter from the binary companion is balanced by angular momentum loss, conceivably due to gravitational-wave emission. Torque balance predicts a scale for detectable gravitational-wave strain based on observed x-ray flux. This paper describes a search for Sco X-1 and XTE J1751-305 in LIGO science run 6 data using the TwoSpect algorithm, based on searching for orbital modulations in the frequency domain. While no detections are claimed, upper limits on continuous gravitational-wave emission from Sco X-1 are obtained, spanning gravitational-wave frequencies from 40 to 2040 Hz and projected semimajor axes from 0.90 to 1.98 light-seconds. These upper limits are injection validated, equal any previous set in initial LIGO data, and extend over a broader parameter range. At optimal strain sensitivity, achieved at 165 Hz, the 95% confidence level random-polarization upper limit on dimensionless strain h0 is approximately 1.8 ×10-24. The closest approach to the torque-balance limit, within a factor of 27, is also at 165 Hz. Upper limits are set in particular narrow frequency bands of interest for J1751-305. These are the first upper limits known to date on r -mode emission from this XTE source. The TwoSpect method will be used in upcoming searches of Advanced LIGO and Virgo data.

  16. The Wiley Spinal Catheter-Over-Needle System for Continuous Spinal Anesthesia: A Case Series of 5 Cesarean Deliveries Complicated by Paresthesias and Headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Christine P; Carvalho, Brendan; Riley, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter devices using a catheter-over-needle design and softer flexible material have been introduced to clinical practice with the aim of reducing some of the complications such as postdural puncture headaches and paresthesias seen with previous versions of intrathecal catheters. We present a case series of 5 cesarean deliveries using the Wiley Spinal intrathecal system (Epimed, Johnstown, New York), which was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The intrathecal catheter system consists of a flexible 23-gauge intrathecal cannula over a 27-gauge pencil-point spinal needle. The placement of the intrathecal catheter was successful in all 5 cases; however, paresthesias in 3 cases and postdural puncture headaches in 2 cases complicated the placement and use of the device. Although the unique catheter-over-needle design facilitates the use of smaller-gauge spinal needles for dural puncture and larger-gauge catheters for medication administration, this case series using the Wiley Spinal suggests that paresthesias and postdural puncture headaches may still limit its widespread utilization. Future studies are needed to determine the true incidence of complications and to determine the role of continuous spinal anesthesia in the obstetric population.

  17. Analysis on influence of seismic travelling wave effect on semi-active control for long-span rigid-continuous bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xing-jun; LI Xiao-jun; ZHOU Guo-liang

    2006-01-01

    The analysis approach of semi-active control for long-span rigid-continuous bridge under seismic travelling wave input is established. Magnetorheological dampers are set on the positions of the bridge bearings. The semi-active control calculation and analysis are performed for a five-span rigid-continuous bridge under seismic travelling waves with different apparent surface velocities. The results indicate that travelling wave effect remarkably influences the uncontrolled seismic responses, the semi-active control seismic responses and vibration control effects for the long-span rigid-continuous bridge. It is disadvantageous to the responses of the beams and the piers under the travelling wave input with lower apparent surface velocity, and travelling wave effect can decrease the vibration control effects evidently. Therefore, the travelling wave effect should be considered for the selection of the parameter values of semi-active control system in order to get the designing control effect.

  18. Triply-resonant Continuous Wave Parametric Source with a Microwatt Pump

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Aude; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Debuisschert, Thierry; Lian, Jin; Sokolov, Sergey; Mosk, Allard P; de Rossi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a nanophotonic parametric light source with a record high normalized conversion efficiency of $3\\times 10^6\\, W^{-2}$, owing to resonantly enhanced four wave mixing in coupled high-Q photonic crystal resonators. The rate of spontaneously emitted photons reaches 14 MHz.

  19. Comparing continuous wave progressive saturation EPR and time domain saturation recovery EPR over the entire motional range of nitroxide spin labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Robert D; Canaan, Stephane; Gladden, James A; Gelb, Michael H; Mailer, Colin; Robinson, Bruce H

    2004-07-01

    The measurement of spin-lattice relaxation rates from spin labels, such as nitroxides, in the presence and absence of spin relaxants provides information that is useful for determining biomolecular properties such as nucleic acid dynamics and the interaction of proteins with membranes. We compare X-band continuous wave (CW) and pulsed or time domain (TD) EPR methods for obtaining spin-lattice relaxation rates of spin labels across the entire range of rotational motion to which relaxation rates are sensitive. Model nitroxides and spin-labeled biological species are used to illustrate the potential complications that arise in extracting relaxation data under conditions typical to biological experiments. The effect of super hyperfine (SHF) structure is investigated for both CW and TD spectra. First and second harmonic absorption and dispersion CW spectra of the nitroxide spin label, TEMPOL, are all fit simultaneously to a model of SHF structure over a range of microwave amplitudes. The CW spectra are novel because all harmonics and microwave phases were acquired simultaneously using our homebuilt CW/TD spectrometer. The effect of the SHF structure on the pulsed free induction decay (FID) and pulsed saturation recovery spectrum is shown for both protonated and deuterated TEMPOL. We present novel pulsed saturation recovery measurements on biological molecules, including spin-lattice relaxation rates of spin-labeled proteins and spin-labeled double-stranded DNA. The impact of structure and dynamics on relaxation rates are discussed in the context of each of these examples. Collisional relaxation rates with oxygen and transition metal paramagnetic relaxants are extracted using both continuous wave and time domain methods. The extent of the errors inherent in the CW method and the advantages of pulsed methods for unambiguously measuring collisional relaxation rates are discussed. Spin-lattice relaxation rates, determined by both CW and pulsed methods, are used to determine

  20. Lengthened superstimulatory treatment in cattle: Evidence for rescue of follicles within a wave rather than continuous recruitment of new follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Guerra, A; Tribulo, A; Yapura, J; Adams, G P; Singh, J; Mapletoft, R J

    2015-08-01

    A study was designed to compare the effects of a conventional (4 days) versus a lengthened (7 days) superstimulation protocol on follicle dynamics and to test the hypothesis that superstimulatory treatment only rescues small follicles within the wave. Nonlactating beef cows received a progesterone-releasing intravaginal device [PRID] and were superstimulated with 400-mg FSH on the day of follicle ablation-induced wave emergence (Day 0). The control group (n = 5) received FSH over 4 days, whereas the long group (n = 5) received FSH over 7 days. PGF was administered twice on Day 2 (control group) or 5 (long group), and PRIDs were removed 24 hours after the first PGF. Cows received 25-mg LH 24 hours after PRID removal. The cows chosen for the present study represented a subset from a larger group of 24 cows in which superovulation results were obtained and published. Cows in the present study were those with the lowest antral follicle counts at the time of wave emergence in order to facilitate tracking of individual follicles. Daily ultrasonographic examinations monitored follicle diameters and numbers. A reduction (P protocols rescue small antral follicles present at the time of wave emergence; there was no evidence for continuous recruitment of new follicles. Results also provide rationale for the hypothesis that a lengthened treatment protocol is associated with greater follicle maturation and capacity to ovulate.

  1. Generation and distribution of a wide-band continuously tunable millimeter-wave signal with an optical external modulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guohua; Yao, Jianping; Seregelyi, J.; Paquet, S.; Belisle, C.

    2005-10-01

    A new technique to generate and distribute a wide-band continuously tunable millimeter-wave signal using an optical external modulator and a wavelength-fixed optical notch filter is proposed. The optical intensity modulator is biased to suppress the odd-order optical sidebands. The wavelength-fixed optical notch filter is then used to filter out the optical carrier. Two second-order optical sidebands are obtained at the output of the notch filter. A millimeter-wave signal that has four times the frequency of the microwave drive signal is generated by beating the two second-order optical sidebands at a photodetector. Since no tunable optical filter is used, the system is easy to implement. A system using an LiNbO3 intensity modulator and a fiber Bragg grating filter is built. A stable and high spectral purity millimeter-wave signal tunable from 32 to 50 GHz is obtained by tuning the microwave drive signal from 8 to 12.5 GHz. The integrity of the generated millimeter-wave signal is maintained after transmission over a 25-km standard single-mode fiber. Theoretical analysis on the harmonic suppression with different modulation depths and filter attenuations is also discussed.

  2. Continuous-wave optical parametric oscillation tunable up to 8 μm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Ingo; Fürst, Josef Urban; Hanka, Kevin; Buse, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate the first cw OPO emitting mid-infrared light at wavelengths up to 8 μm. This device is based on a 3.5-mm-diameter whispering gallery resonator made of silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe2) pumped by a compact distributed feedback laser diode emitting light at 1.57 μm wavelength. Phase-matching is achieved for a c-cut resonator disk pumped with extraordinarily polarized light at this wavelength. The oscillation thresholds are in the mW region, while the output power ranges from 10 to 800 μW. Wavelength tuning is achieved via changing the radial mode number of the pump wave and by changing the resonator temperature. Simulations predict that whispering gallery OPOs based on AgGaSe2 with diameters around 2 mm can generate idler waves exceeding 10 μm wavelength.

  3. Lactoferrin acute-phase protein and proteinase inhibitors in blood of patients with Q-wave myocardial infraction complicated by acute heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Belokoneva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 153 patients with Q-wave noncomplicated and complicated myocardial infraction have been examined. Blood serum was studied for acute-phase proteins (alfa-2-macroglobulin (MG, alfa-1-antitrypsin (ATr, and lactoferrin (LF in 97 patients ((57.9 ± 1.06 years old. Blood was sampled at the 1st, 7th, and 14th days after myocardial infraction. The decrease of MG in acute phase was observed in patients with cardiogenic shock. Increased concentrations of LF and unchanged MG level at the 1—7 days were observed at pulmonary edema.

  4. Internal Gravity Waves in the Strait of Luzon: Dispersion Studies Using Fourier and Continuous Wavelet Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-09

    are compared to results from Korteweg D’Vries theory. Good agreement is obtained for dispersion estimates using wavelet analysis and those from KdV ...analysis and those from KdV theory. 1 Background Internal waves (IWs) occur throughout the world’s oceans and seas. Well known examples in- clude IWs...recognize that KdV theory describes a two-layer model and the IWs under Understanding the Earth as a Complex System 235 investigation occur in a

  5. Semicoherent searches for continuous gravitational waves: improving robustness versus transient disturbances and increasing sensitivity to transient signals

    CERN Document Server

    Keitel, David

    2015-01-01

    The vulnerability of standard detection methods for long-duration quasi-monochromatic gravitational waves from non-axisymmetric rotating neutron stars ('continuous waves', CWs) to single-detector instrumental artifacts was addressed in past work [Keitel, Prix, Papa, Leaci and Siddiqi, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064023 (2014)] by a Bayesian approach. An explicit model of persistent single-detector disturbances led to a generalized detection statistic with improved robustness against such artifacts. Since many strong outliers in semicoherent searches of LIGO data are caused by transient disturbances that last only a few hours, we extend this approach to cover transient disturbances, and demonstrate increased robustness in realistic simulated data. Besides long-duration CWs, neutron stars could also emit transient signals which, for a limited time, also follow the CW signal model (tCWs). As a pragmatic alternative to specialized transient searches, we demonstrate how to make standard semicoherent CW searches more sensitiv...

  6. Investigation of thermally-induced phase mismatching in continuous-wave second harmonic generation: a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Mousave, Laleh; Nadgaran, Hamid

    2010-08-30

    A fraction of the fundamental beam energy deposited into nonlinear crystals to generate second harmonic waves (SHW) causes a temperature gradient within the crystal. This temperature inhomogeneity can alter the refractive index of the medium leading to a well-known effect called thermal dispersion. Therefore, the generated SHW suffers from thermal lensing and a longitudinal thermal phase mismatching. In this work by coupling the heat equation with second harmonic generation (SHG) formalism applied to type-II configuration along with walk-off effect, we investigate the continuous wave (CW) SHW beam profile and conversion efficiency when a non-linear KTP crystal is under induced thermal load. We have demonstrated for average and high powers, the thermal de-phasing lead to considerable reduction in SHG compared to an ideal case in which induced heat is neglected.

  7. Exploring Structure, Dynamics, and Topology of Nitroxide Spin-Labeled Proteins Using Continuous-Wave Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenbach, Christian; López, Carlos J; Hideg, Kálmán; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2015-01-01

    Structural and dynamical characterization of proteins is of central importance in understanding the mechanisms underlying their biological functions. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) combined with continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW EPR) spectroscopy has shown the capability of providing this information with site-specific resolution under physiological conditions for proteins of any degree of complexity, including those associated with membranes. This chapter introduces methods commonly employed for SDSL and describes selected CW EPR-based methods that can be applied to (1) map secondary and tertiary protein structure, (2) determine membrane protein topology, (3) measure protein backbone flexibility, and (4) reveal the existence of conformational exchange at equilibrium.

  8. High-efficiency multipass Ti:sapphire amplifiers for a continuous-wave single-mode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, P; Estable, F; Salin, F; Poizat, J P; Grangier, P; Brun, A

    1991-02-01

    We present the amplification of a continuous-wave single-mode ring dye laser in Ti:sapphire. A peak gain of 2 x 10(6) has been obtained in a passive multipass amplifier, which yielded 20-nsec pulses of 0.7-mJ energy at 780 nm. We discuss the advantages of this passive multipass amplifier in comparison with a regenerative amplifier that we have also developed. By second-harmonic generation we obtained high-peak-power UV pulses from the amplified single-mode laser.

  9. A scheme for recording a fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Jiang, Biqiang

    2015-04-01

    A scheme for recording fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave (CW) laser is described and demonstrated experimentally, which employs delayed-time fibers and angular multiplexing technique and can realize the variable temporal resolution at nanosecond scale and different measured depths of object field at certain temporal resolution. The actual delay-time is controlled by two delayed-time fibers with different lengths. The object field information in two different states can be simultaneously recorded in a composite hologram. This scheme is also suitable for recording fast process at picosecond scale, by using an electro-optic modulator.

  10. Field test of an all-semiconductor laser-based coherent continuous-wave Doppler lidar for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Dellwik, Ebba; Hu, Qi

    The wind energy industry is gaining interest in prevision of the rotor inflow for turbine control. The potential benefits are increased power production due to better alignment of the rotor to the mean wind direction as well as prolonged lifetime of the turbine due to load reductions. Several lidar......-produced all-semiconductor laser. The instrument is a coherent continuous-wave lidar with two fixed-focus telescopes for launching laser beams in two different directions. The alternation between the telescopes is achieved by a novel switching technique without any moving parts. Here, we report results from...

  11. Accumulating microparticles and direct-writing micropatterns using a continuous-wave laser-induced vapor bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yajian; Liu, Hui; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Cong; Wang, Shuming; Cao, Jingxiao; Zhu, Shining

    2011-11-21

    Through the enhanced photothermal effect, which was achieved using a silver film, a low power weakly focused continuous-wave laser (532 nm) was applied to create a vapor bubble. A convective flow was formed around the bubble. Microparticles dispersed in water were carried by the convective flow to the vapor bubble and accumulated on the silver film. By moving the laser spot, we easily manipulated the location of the bubble, allowing us to direct-write micropatterns on the silver film with accumulated particles. The reported simple controllable accumulation method can be applied to bimolecular detection, medical diagnosis, and other related biochip techniques.

  12. Characteristic time scales of coalescence of silver nanocomposite and nanoparticle films induced by continuous wave laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paeng, Dongwoo; Grigoropoulos, Costas P., E-mail: cgrigoro@berkeley.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Lee, Daeho [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gachon University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-18

    In-situ optical probing has been performed to analyze and compare the characteristic coalescence time scales of silver ion-doped polyvinylalcohol nanocomposite (Ag-PVA NC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone-capped silver nanoparticle (Ag-PVP NP) films subjected to continuous wave laser irradiation. The Ag-PVA NC yielded conductive metallic patterns by photothermal reduction of PVA, formation of nanoparticles from silver ions and their subsequent coalescence. On the other hand, Ag-PVP NP thin films produced conductive patterns through only coalescence of nanoparticles. Upon laser irradiation, Ag-PVA NC and Ag-PVP NP films exhibited different coalescence characteristics.

  13. SiOx Ink-Repellent Layer Deposited by Radio Frequency(RF) Plasmas in Continuous Wave and Pulse Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang; FU Ya-bo; PANG Hua; ZHANG Yue-fei; ZHANG Guang-qiu

    2007-01-01

    Low surface energy layers,proposed application for non-water printing in computer to plate (CTP) technology,are deposited in both continuous wave and pulse radio frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as precursor.It is found that the plasma mode dominates the polymer growth rate and the surface composition.Derived from the spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and combined with printable test it is concluded that concentration of Si in coatings plays an important role for the ink printability and the ink does not adhere on the surface with high silicon concentration.

  14. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO sub 2 Doppler lidar measurements. 1. Algorithm description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothermel, J. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA)); Bowdle, D.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville (USA)); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Worcestershire (England)); Woodfield, A.A. (Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedfordshire (England))

    1991-03-20

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kingdom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 {mu}m using an airborne continuous wave focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). The heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: Set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  15. Dual-wavelength, two-crystal, continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, G K; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2011-08-15

    We report a cw optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in a novel architecture comprising two nonlinear crystals in a single cavity, providing two independently tunable pairs of signal and idler wavelengths. Based on a singly resonant oscillator design, the device permits access to arbitrary signal and idler wavelength combinations within the parametric gain bandwidth and reflectivity of the OPO cavity mirrors. Using two identical 30 mm long MgO:sPPLT crystals in a compact four-mirror ring resonator pumped at 532 nm, we generate two pairs of signal and idler wavelengths with arbitrary tuning across 850-1430 nm, and demonstrate a frequency separation in the resonant signal waves down to 0.55 THz. Moreover, near wavelength-matched condition, coherent energy coupling between the resonant signal waves, results in reduced operation threshold and increased output power. A total output power >2.8 W with peak-to-peak power stability of 16% over 2 h is obtained. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. A Phase-Locked Loop Continuous Wave Sonic Anemometer-Thermometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Weller, F. W.; Busings, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A continuous wake sonic anemometer-thermometer has been developed for simultaneous measurements of vertical velocity and temperature. The phase angle fluctuations are detected by means of a monolithic integrated phase-locked loop, the latter feature providing for inexpensive and accurate electron......A continuous wake sonic anemometer-thermometer has been developed for simultaneous measurements of vertical velocity and temperature. The phase angle fluctuations are detected by means of a monolithic integrated phase-locked loop, the latter feature providing for inexpensive and accurate...

  17. Automatically tunable continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator for high-resolution spectroscopy and sensitive trace-gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, A. K. Y.; Persijn, S. T.; von Basum, G.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2006-11-01

    We present a high-power (2.75 W), broadly tunable (2.75-3.83 μm) continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator based on MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate. Automated tuning of the pump laser, etalon and crystal temperature results in a continuous wavelength coverage up to 450 cm-1 per poling period at water in human breath were measured using photoacoustics. Methane (at 3.2 μm) and ethane (at 3.3 μm) were detected using cavity ring-down spectroscopy with detection limits of 0.16 and 0.07 parts per billion by volume, respectively. A recording of 12CH4 and 13CH4 isotopes of methane shows the ability to detect both species simultaneously at similar sensitivities.

  18. Narrow-band search of continuous gravitational-wave signals from Crab and Vela pulsars in Virgo VSR4 data

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ashton, G; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barclay, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio,, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dartez, L; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fuentes-Tapia, S; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Hee, S; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Le, J; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; McWilliams, S; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moore, B; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Pai, S; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patrick, Z; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Post, A; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quiroga, G; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Reula, O; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sawadsky, A; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Serafinelli, R; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szczepanczyk, M; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C van den; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Xie, S; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, Q; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a coherent narrow-band search for continuous gravitational-wave signals from the Crab and Vela pulsars conducted on Virgo VSR4 data. In order to take into account a possible small mismatch between the gravitational wave frequency and two times the star rotation frequency, inferred from measurement of the electromagnetic pulse rate, a range of 0.02 Hz around two times the star rotational frequency has been searched for both the pulsars. No evidence for a signal has been found and 95$\\%$ confidence level upper limits have been computed both assuming polarization parameters are completely unknown and that they are known with some uncertainty, as derived from X-ray observations of the pulsar wind torii. For Vela the upper limits are comparable to the spin-down limit, computed assuming that all the observed spin-down is due to the emission of gravitational waves. For Crab the upper limits are about a factor of two below the spin-down limit, and represent a significant improv...

  19. Narrow-band search of continuous gravitational-wave signals from Crab and Vela pulsars in Virgo VSR4 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a coherent narrow-band search for continuous gravitational-wave signals from the Crab and Vela pulsars conducted on Virgo VSR4 data. In order to take into account a possible small mismatch between the gravitational-wave frequency and two times the star rotation frequency, inferred from measurement of the electromagnetic pulse rate, a range of 0.02 Hz around two times the star rotational frequency has been searched for both the pulsars. No evidence for a signal has been found and 95% confidence level upper limits have been computed assuming both that polarization parameters are completely unknown and that they are known with some uncertainty, as derived from x-ray observations of the pulsar wind torii. For Vela the upper limits are comparable to the spin-down limit, computed assuming that all the observed spin-down is due to the emission of gravitational waves. For Crab the upper limits are about a factor of 2 below the spin-down limit, and represent a significant improvement with respect to past analysis. This is the first time the spin-down limit is significantly overcome in a narrow-band search.

  20. Narrow-Band Search of Continuous Gravitational-Wave Signals from Crab and Vela Pulsars in Virgo VSR4 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a coherent narrow-band search for continuous gravitational-wave signals from the Crab and Vela pulsars conducted on Virgo VSR4 data. In order to take into account a possible small mismatch between the gravitational wave frequency and two times the star rotation frequency, inferred from measurement of the electromagnetic pulse rate, a range of 0.02 Hz around two times the star rotational frequency has been searched for both the pulsars. No evidence for a signal has been found and 95% confidence level upper limits have been computed both assuming polarization parameters are completely unknown and that they are known with some uncertainty, as derived from X-ray observations of the pulsar wind torii. For Vela the upper limits are comparable to the spin-down limit, computed assuming that all the observed spin-down is due to the emission of gravitational waves. For Crab the upper limits are about a factor of two below the spin-down limit, and represent a significant improvement with respect to past analysis. This is the first time the spin-down limit is significantly overcome in a narrow-band search.

  1. Experimental research on spectrum and imaging of continuous-wave terahertz radiation based on interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tie-Lin; Yuan, Hui; Kong, Ling-Qin; Zhao, Yue-Jin; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2016-08-01

    A system for measuring terahertz spectrum is proposed based on optical interferometer theory, and is experimentally demonstrated by using a backward-wave oscillator as the terahertz source. A high-resolution, high-precision interferometer is constructed by using a pyroelectric detector and a chopper. The results show that the spectral resolution is better than 1 GHz and the relative error of frequency is less than 3%. The terahertz energy density distribution is calculated by an inverse Fourier transform and tested to verify the feasibility of the interferometric approach. Two kinds of carbon-fiber composites are imaged. The results confirm that the interferometer is useful for transmission imaging of materials with different thickness values. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61377109 and 11374007).

  2. A Frequency Diverse Gen2 RFID System with Isolated Continuous Wave Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chin Liu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The “Gen2” specification for UHF passive RFID systems released by EPCglobal has become an intense research interest. A Gen2 tag derives its power from the RF wave emitted by a Gen2 RFID reader and responds its modulated backscatter signals to the reader. Due to the large propagation loss, the accessible range of a Gen2 tag is hence limited. Moreover, the readability of a Gen2 tag is often influenced by the multipath fading problem. In order to mitigate the problems, a multi-carrier UHF passive RFID system utilizing the frequency diverse backscatter ability of a Gen2 tag is proposed in a prior work. In this work, a thorough analysis of the system is given. Especially, the appropriate powers of the transceiver and CWEs are derived to make the system more feasible in practical applications.

  3. Refocused continuous-wave decoupling: A new approach to heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Joachim M.; Nielsen, Anders B.; Bjerring, Morten; van Eck, Ernst R. H.; Kentgens, Arno P. M.; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-12-01

    A novel strategy for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented, which eliminates residual static high-order terms in the effective Hamiltonian originating from interactions between oscillating dipolar and anisotropic shielding tensors. The method, called refocused continuous-wave (rCW) decoupling, is systematically established by interleaving continuous wave decoupling with appropriately inserted rotor-synchronized high-power π refocusing pulses of alternating phases. The effect of the refocusing pulses in eliminating residual effects from dipolar coupling in heteronuclear spin systems is rationalized by effective Hamiltonian calculations to third order. In some variants the π pulse refocusing is supplemented by insertion of rotor-synchronized π/2 purging pulses to further reduce the residual dipolar coupling effects. Five different rCW decoupling sequences are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art decoupling methods. The rCW decoupling sequences benefit from extreme broadbandedness, tolerance towards rf inhomogeneity, and improved potential for decoupling at relatively low average rf field strengths. In numerical simulations, the rCW schemes clearly reveal superior characteristics relative to the best decoupling schemes presented so far, which we to some extent also are capable of demonstrating experimentally. A major advantage of the rCW decoupling methods is that they are easy to set up and optimize experimentally.

  4. Continuous-wave to pulse regimes for a family of passively mode-locked lasers with saturable nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikandé, Alain M.; Voma Titafan, J.; Essimbi, B. Z.

    2017-10-01

    The transition dynamics from continuous-wave to pulse regimes of operation for a generic model of passively mode-locked lasers with saturable absorbers, characterized by an active medium with non-Kerr nonlinearity, are investigated analytically and numerically. The system is described by a complex Ginzburg–Landau equation with a general m:n saturable nonlinearity (i.e {I}m/{(1+{{Γ }}I)}n, where I is the field intensity and m and n are two positive numbers), coupled to a two-level gain equation. An analysis of stability of continuous waves, following the modulational instability approach, provides a global picture of the self-starting dynamics in the system. The analysis reveals two distinct routes depending on values of the couple (m, n), and on the dispersion regime: in the normal dispersion regime, when m = 2 and n is arbitrary, the self-starting requires positive values of the fast saturable absorber and nonlinearity coefficients, but negative values of these two parameters for the family with m = 0. However, when the spectral filter is negative, the laser can self-start for certain values of the input field and the nonlinearity saturation coefficient Γ. The present work provides a general map for the self-starting mechanisms of rare-earth doped figure-eight fiber lasers, as well as Kerr-lens mode-locked solid-state lasers.

  5. The effect of timing noise on targeted and narrow-band coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ashton, G; Prix, R

    2014-01-01

    Most continuous gravitational-wave searches use Taylor expansions in the phase to model the spindown of neutron stars. Studies of pulsars demonstrate that their electromagnetic (EM) emissions suffer from timing noise, small deviations in the phase from Taylor expansion models. How the mechanism producing EM emission is related to any continuous gravitational-wave (CW) emission is unknown; if they either interact or are locked in phase then the CW will also experience timing noise. Any disparity between the signal and the search template used in matched filtering methods will result in a loss of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), referred to as 'mismatch'. In this work we assume the CW suffers a similar level of timing noise to its EM counterpart. We inject and recover fake CW signals, which include timing noise generated from observational data on the Crab pulsar. Measuring the mismatch over durations of order ~ 10 months, the effect is for the most part found to be small. This suggests recent so-called 'narrow-ban...

  6. Selective mucosal ablation using CO2 laser for the development of novel endoscopic submucosal dissection: comparison of continuous wave and nanosecond pulsed wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, K.; Watanabe, S.; Obata, D.; Hazama, H.; Morita, Y.; Matsuoka, Y.; Kutsumi, H.; Azuma, T.; Awazu, K.

    2010-02-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is accepted as a minimally invasive treatment technique for small early gastric cancers. Procedures are carried out using some specialized electrosurgical knifes with a submucosal injection solution. However it is not widely used because its procedure is difficult. The objective of this study is to develop a novel ESD method which is safe in principle and widely used by using laser techniques. In this study, we used CO2 lasers with a wavelength of 10.6 μm for mucosal ablation. Two types of pulse, continuous wave and pulsed wave with a pulse width of 110 ns, were studied to compare their values. Porcine stomach tissues were used as a sample. Aqueous solution of sodium hyaluronate (MucoUpR) with 50 mg/ml sodium dihydrogenphosphate is injected to a submucosal layer. As a result, ablation effect by CO2 laser irradiation was stopped because submucosal injection solution completely absorbed CO2 laser energy in the invasive energy condition which perforates a muscle layer without submucosal injection solution. Mucosal ablation by the combination of CO2 Laser and a submucosal injection solution is a feasible technique for treating early gastric cancers safely because it provides a selective mucosal resection and less-invasive interaction to muscle layer.

  7. Design, fabrication, and performance of brazed, graphite electrode, multistage depressed collectors with 500-W, continuous wave, 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramins, Peter; Ebihara, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A small, isotropic graphite electrode, multistage depressed collector (MDC) was designed, fabricated, and evaluated in conjunction with a 500-W, continuous wave (CW), 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling-wave tube (TWT). The carbon electrode surfaces were used to improve the TWT overall efficiency by minimizing the secondary electron emission losses in the MDC. The design and fabrication of the brazed graphite MDC assembly are described. The brazing technique, which used copper braze filler metal, is compatible with both vacuum and the more commonly available hydrogen atmosphere brazing furnaces. The TWT and graphite electrode MCC bakeout, processing, and outgassing characteristics were evaluated and found to be comparable to TWT's equipped with copper electrode MDC's. The TWT and MDC performance was optimized for broadband CW operation at saturation. The average radiofrequency (RF), overall, and MDC efficiencies were 14.9, 46.4, and 83.6 percent, respectively, across the octave operating band. A 1500-hr CW test, conducted without the use of an appendage ion pump, showed no gas buildup and excellent stability of the electrode surfaces.

  8. Search of the Orion spur for continuous gravitational waves using a loosely coherent algorithm on data from LIGO interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ashton, G.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Branco, V.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Bustillo, J. Calderón; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M. D.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez, J.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    We report results of a wideband search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars within the Orion spur towards both the inner and outer regions of our Galaxy. As gravitational waves interact very weakly with matter, the search is unimpeded by dust and concentrations of stars. One search disk (A) is 6.87° in diameter and centered on 2 0h1 0m54.7 1s+3 3 ° 3 3'25.2 9'' , and the other (B) is 7.45° in diameter and centered on 8h3 5m20.6 1s-4 6 ° 4 9'25.15 1''. We explored the frequency range of 50-1500 Hz and frequency derivative from 0 to -5 ×10-9 Hz /s . A multistage, loosely coherent search program allowed probing more deeply than before in these two regions, while increasing coherence length with every stage. Rigorous follow-up parameters have winnowed the initial coincidence set to only 70 candidates, to be examined manually. None of those 70 candidates proved to be consistent with an isolated gravitational-wave emitter, and 95% confidence level upper limits were placed on continuous-wave strain amplitudes. Near 169 Hz we achieve our lowest 95% C.L. upper limit on the worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude h0 of 6.3 ×10-25, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.4 ×10-24 for all polarizations and sky locations.

  9. Continuous wave superconducting radio frequency electron linac for nuclear physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Charles E.

    2016-12-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, has been actively serving the nuclear physics research community as a unique forefront international resource since 1995. This cw electron linear accelerator (linac) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has continued to evolve as a precision tool for discerning the structure and dynamics within nuclei. Superconducting rf (SRF) technology has been the essential foundation for CEBAF, first as a 4 GeV machine, then 6 GeV, and currently capable of 12 GeV. We review the development, implementation, and performance of SRF systems for CEBAF from its early beginnings to the commissioning of the 12 GeV era.

  10. 2D continuous spectrum of shear Alfven waves in the presence of a magnetic island

    CERN Document Server

    Biancalani, Alessandro; Pegoraro, Francesco; Zonca, Fulvio

    2010-01-01

    The radial structure of the continuous spectrum of shear Alfven modes is calculated in the presence of a magnetic island in tokamak plasmas. Modes with the same helicity of the magnetic island are considered in a slab model approximation. In this framework, with an appropriate rotation of the coordinates the problem reduces to 2 dimensions. Geometrical effects due to the shape of the flux surface’s cross section are retained to all orders. On the other hand, we keep only curvature effects responsible of the beta induced gap in the low-frequency part of the continuous spectrum. New continuum accumulation points are found at the O-point of the magnetic island. The beta-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (BAE) continuum accumulation point is found to be positioned at the separatrix flux surface. The most remarkable result is the nonlinear modification of the BAE continuum accumulation point frequency.

  11. Searching for Survivors through Random Human-Body Movement Outdoors by Continuous-Wave Radar Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Qi, Fugui; Liu, Miao; Li, Zhao; Liang, Fulai; Jing, Xijing; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    It is a major challenge to search for survivors after chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions. At present, biological radar can be used to achieve this goal by detecting the survivor's respiration signal. However, owing to the random posture of an injured person at a rescue site, the radar wave may directly irradiate the person's head or feet, in which it is difficult to detect the respiration signal. This paper describes a multichannel-based antenna array technology, which forms an omnidirectional detection system via 24-GHz Doppler biological radar, to address the random positioning relative to the antenna of an object to be detected. Furthermore, since the survivors often have random body movement such as struggling and twitching, the slight movements of the body caused by breathing are obscured by these movements. Therefore, a method is proposed to identify random human-body movement by utilizing multichannel information to calculate the background variance of the environment in combination with a constant-false-alarm-rate detector. The conducted outdoor experiments indicate that the system can realize the omnidirectional detection of random human-body movement and distinguish body movement from environmental interference such as movement of leaves and grass. The methods proposed in this paper will be a promising way to search for survivors outdoors.

  12. Continuous-wave spatial quantum correlations of light induced by multiple scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Huck, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    and reflectance. Utilizing frequency-resolved quantum noise measurements, we observe that the strength of the spatial quantum correlation function can be controlled by changing the quantum state of an incident bright squeezed-light source. Our results are found to be in excellent agreement with the developed......We present theoretical and experimental results on spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light. A continuous-mode quantum theory is derived that enables determining the spatial quantum correlation function from the fluctuations of the total transmittance...

  13. Nearly-octave wavelength tuning of a continuous wave fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Yang, Xuezong; Pan, Weiwei; Cui, Shuzhen; Feng, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The wavelength tunability of conventional fiber lasers are limited by the bandwidth of gain spectrum and the tunability of feedback mechanism. Here a fiber laser which is continuously tunable from 1 to 1.9 μm is reported. It is a random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser, pumped by a tunable Yb doped fiber laser. The ultra-wide wavelength tunability is enabled by the unique property of random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser that both stimulated Raman scattering gain and Rayleigh scattering feedback are available at any wavelength. The dispersion property of the gain fiber is used to control the spectral purity of the laser output. PMID:28198414

  14. Continuous resonant four-wave mixing in double- Lambda level configurations of Na2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, S.; Hinze, U.; Tiemann, E.; Wellegehausen, B.

    1996-08-01

    Efficient continuous resonant frequency mixing omega 4= omega 1- omega 2 + omega 3 in Na2 has been realized. A bichromatic field ( lambda 1 =488 nm, lambda 2=525 nm), generated by an Ar+ -laser-pumped Na 2 Raman laser, and radiation at lambda 3=655 nm from a dye laser interact resonantly with corresponding transitions X1 Sigma +g(v=3,J= 43) \\rightarrow B 1 Pi u(6,43) \\rightarrow X 1 Sigma +g(13, 43) \\rightarrow A 1 Sigma +g(24, 44) in a test Na2 heat pipe. For input powers of 200, 25, and 400 mW an output beam of as much as 0.2 mW at lambda 4=599 nm has been observed. Measured parameter dependences indicate an influence of interference effects. This is directly related to the discussion of lasing without inversion.

  15. Continuous Tera-Hertz wave transmission spectroscopy of Nb double superconducting split-ring resonator array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, JunWei; Liu, RuiYuan; Zhou, YuRong; Li, YanRong; Wang, YunPing

    2012-02-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of two Nb double superconducting split-ring samples with different thicknesses on MgO substrates was measured by a continuous Tera-Hertz spectrometer. The transmission curves of two different samples with the thicknesses of 50 and 150 nm at 7.5 K show dips at 480, 545 GHz, respectively, which origin from the different capacities and inductances of the samples. For the sample of 50 nm, the dip shifts to lower frequency, also decreases in depth and increases in width with temperature or field increasing below T c of Nb film, while the sample of 150 nm does not show such a phenomenon. This thickness-dependent transmission behavior is due to the kinetic inductance and conductivity change of superfluid electrons in Nb film and may suggest a practical tunable THz filter based on the thinner samples.

  16. Detection of aqueous glucose based on a cavity size- and optical-wavelength-independent continuous-wave photoacoustic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camou, S; Haga, T; Tajima, T; Tamechika, E

    2012-06-01

    Toward the achievement of noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood glucose level, we developed a new measurement method based on the continuous-wave photoacoustic (CW-PA) technique and performed the first validation in vitro with calibrated aqueous glucose solutions. The PA technique has been studied in the past but exclusively based on the pulse setup since the CW one exhibits dependence on the cavity dimensions, which is not compatible with the final application requirements. This paper describes a new strategy relying on the monitoring of the resonant-frequency relative shift induced by the change of glucose concentrations rather than amplitude signal levels at a fixed frequency. From in vitro results, we demonstrate a stable and reproducible response to glucose at various cavity dimensions and optical wavelengths, with a slope of 0.19 ±0.01%/g/dL. From theoretical considerations, this method is consistent with a relative acoustic velocity measurement, which also explains the aforementioned stability. The proposed method then resolves most of the issues usually associated with the CW-PA technique and makes it a potential alternative for the noninvasive and continuous monitoring of glycemia levels. However, experimental determination of sensor responses to albumin and temperature as two potential interferents shows similar levels, which points to the selectivity to glucose as a major issue we should deal with in future development.

  17. Continuous spontaneous localization wave function collapse model as a mechanism for the emergence of cosmological asymmetries in inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañate, Pedro; Pearle, Philip; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The inflationary account for the emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure falls short of actually explaining the generation of primordial anisotropies and inhomogeneities. This description starts from a symmetric background, and invokes symmetric dynamics, so it cannot explain asymmetries. To generate asymmetries, we present an application of the continuous spontaneous localization model of wave function collapse in the context of inflation. This modification of quantum dynamics introduces a stochastic nonunitary component to the evolution of the inflaton field perturbations. This leads to passage from a homogeneous and isotropic stage to another, where the quantum uncertainties in the initial state of inflation transmute into the primordial inhomogeneities and anisotropies. We show, by proper choice of the collapse-generating operator, that it is possible to achieve compatibility with the precise observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  18. Continuous-wave Raman generation in a diode-pumped Nd3+:KGd(WO4)2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidovich, A A; Grabtchikov, A S; Lisinetskii, V A; Burakevich, V N; Orlovich, V A; Kiefer, W

    2005-07-01

    Continuous-wave Raman generation in a compact solid-state laser system pumped by a multimode diode laser is demonstrated. The Stokes radiation of stimulated Raman scattering at 1.181 microm is generated as a result of self-frequency conversion of the 1.067 microm laser radiation in Nd3+:KGd(WO4)2 crystal placed in the cavity. The Raman threshold was measured at 1.15 W of laser diode power. The highest output power obtained at the Stokes wavelength was 54 mW. The anomalous delay of Raman generation relative to the start of laser generation (the oscillation buildup) due to slow accumulation of Stokes photons in the cavity at low Raman gain and Raman threshold dependence not only on the laser intensity but also on the time of laser action are observed.

  19. All-solid-state continuous-wave laser systems for ionization, cooling and quantum state manipulation of beryllium ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, H -Y; Kienzler, D; Keitch, B C; de Clercq, L E; Negnevitsky, V; Home, J P

    2013-01-01

    We describe laser systems for photoionization, Doppler cooling and quantum state manipulation of beryllium ions. For photoionization of neutral beryllium, we have developed a continuous-wave 235 nm source obtained by two stages of frequency doubling from a diode laser at 940 nm. The system delivers up to 400 mW at 470 nm and 28 mW at 235 nm. For control of the beryllium ion, three laser wavelengths at 313 nm are produced by sum-frequency generation and second-harmonic generation from four infrared fiber lasers. Up to 7.2 W at 626 nm and 1.9 W at 313 nm are obtained using two pump beams at 1051 and 1551 nm. Intensity fluctuations below 0.5 % per hour (during 8 hours of operation) have been measured at a 313 nm power of 1 W. These systems are used to load beryllium ions into a segmented ion trap.

  20. Spectroscopic properties and continuous-wave laser operation of Yb:Bi₄ Si₃ O₁₂ crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Chen, Yujin; Huang, Jianhua; Gong, Xinghong; Lin, Yanfu; Luo, Zundu; Huang, Yidong

    2014-09-08

    Yb3+:Bi4Si3O12 single crystal with Yb3+ concentration of 5.7 at.% has been grown successfully by the Czochralski method. The energy level positions of Yb3+ in Bi4Si3O12 crystal were determined based on the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The peak absorption cross-section is 0.98 × 10−20 cm2 at 976 nm and the peak emission cross-section is 0.57 × 10−20 cm2 at 1035 nm. The fluorescence lifetime of the excited multiplet is 1.26 ms. Diode-pumped continuous-wave laser operation around 1038 nm has been demonstrated in the Yb3+:Bi4Si3O12 crystal with a slope efficiency of 27% and maximum output power of 240 mW.

  1. Study on an onboard data storage system for frequency-modulated continuous-wave synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haishan; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang; Gu, Chengfei; Liu, Zhaohe

    2016-07-01

    The airborne frequency-modulated continuous-wave synthetic aperture radar presents an enormous technical challenge on the design of data storage system due to its characteristics of high-data rate, small size, light weight, and low-power consumption. There are two main problems for the high-speed storage under the miniature requirement. One is the unpredictable response time of the flash translation layer in the CompactFlash card. The other is the relatively long response time of the file system. This paper designs a data storage system in a real-time signal processor. Two techniques called configurable buffer structure and FPFQA (FAT pre- and FDT quasiallocation) are presented to overcome these two problems. The evaluated performance indicates that the size, power consumption, and weight meet the miniature requirement, while the function of the high-speed data storage with approximately 121 MB/s storage speed and real-time file management are realized.

  2. Efficient continuous-wave nonlinear frequency conversion in high-Q Gallium Nitride photonic crystal cavities on Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, Mohamed Sabry; Carlin, Jean-François; Minkov, Momchil; Gerace, Dario; Savona, Vincenzo; Grandjean, Nicolas; Galli, Matteo; Houdré, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    We report on nonlinear frequency conversion from the telecom range via second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) in suspended gallium nitride slab photonic crystal (PhC) cavities on silicon, under continuous-wave resonant excitation. Optimized two-dimensional PhC cavities with augmented far-field coupling have been characterized with quality factors as high as 4.4$\\times10^{4}$, approaching the computed theoretical values. The strong enhancement in light confinement has enabled efficient SHG, achieving normalized conversion efficiency of 2.4$\\times10^{-3}$ $W^{-1}$, as well as simultaneous THG. SHG emission power of up to 0.74 nW has been detected without saturation. The results herein validate the suitability of gallium nitride for integrated nonlinear optical processing.

  3. Flow speed of the ablation vapors generated during laser drilling of CFRP with a continuous-wave laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, S.; Freitag, C.; Boley, S.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2017-03-01

    The hot plume of ablation products generated during the laser drilling process of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with a continuous-wave laser beam was analyzed by means of high-speed imaging. The formation of compression shocks was observed within the flow of the evaporated material, which is an indication of flow speeds well above the local speed of sound. The flow speed of the hot ablation products can be estimated by analyzing the position of these compression shocks. We investigated the temporal evolution of the flow speed during the drilling process and the influence of the average laser power on the flow speed. The flow speed increases with increasing average laser powers. The moment of drilling through the material changes the conditions for the drilling process and was confirmed to influence the flow speed of the ablated material. Compression shocks can also be observed during laser cutting of CFRP with a moving laser beam.

  4. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229  nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Yushi; Yarborough, J M; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-15

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the fourth harmonic using two successive second-harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier (TA) as a fundamental source, we demonstrated magneto-optical trapping of all stable Cd isotopes including isotopes Cd111 and Cd113, which are applicable to optical lattice clocks.

  5. Continuous-wave laser operation of diode-pumped Tm-doped Gd3Ga5O12 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Lan, Jinglong; Zhou, Zhiyong; Guan, Xiaofeng; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Wang, Yan; Tu, Chaoyang

    2017-04-01

    We report on a diode-pumped Tm:Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG) laser at 2004 nm operated in continuous-wave mode with two-mirror linear cavity configuration. The maximum output power reaches 0.58 W with laser threshold absorbed pump power of about 0.39 W and overall slope efficiency of about 18.4%, which is believed to be the highest output power for Tm:GGG laser up to now. The Tm:GGG laser shows obvious thermally induced saturation of the output power, which indicated that power and efficiency scaling could be furtherly realized by more efficient thermal removal of the laser crystal.

  6. Analysis of single point and continuous wave of condensation root filling techniques by micro-computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Angerame

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present microtomographic study was to investigate the quality of root canal filling and the voids formation in canals of extracted teeth instrumented with a simultaneous technique and filled with two different methods. Twenty-four single-rooted teeth were assigned to two experimental groups (no. = 12; canals were shaped with NiTi rotary files, irrigated with NaOCl and filled either with the single point (group 1 or the continuous wave of condensation technique (group 2. Specimens underwent microtomographic scanning. Collected data were statistically analyzed by nonparametric methods. Void mean percentages were found to be limited and similar between the two groups; the single point technique led to greater sealer thickness in partially oval canals.

  7. Contrast improvement of continuous wave diffuse optical tomography reconstruction by hybrid approach using least square and genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Rusha; Dutta, Pranab K

    2015-07-01

    Reconstruction of the absorption coefficient of tissue with good contrast is of key importance in functional diffuse optical imaging. A hybrid approach using model-based iterative image reconstruction and a genetic algorithm is proposed to enhance the contrast of the reconstructed image. The proposed method yields an observed contrast of 98.4%, mean square error of 0.638×10⁻³, and object centroid error of (0.001 to 0.22) mm. Experimental validation of the proposed method has also been provided with tissue-like phantoms which shows a significant improvement in image quality and thus establishes the potential of the method for functional diffuse optical tomography reconstruction with continuous wave setup. A case study of finger joint imaging is illustrated as well to show the prospect of the proposed method in clinical diagnosis. The method can also be applied to the concentration measurement of a region of interest in a turbid medium.

  8. Optical coherence photoacoustic microscopy (OC-PAM) with an intensity-modulated continuous-wave broadband light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Wen, Rong; Li, Yiwen; Jiao, Shuliang

    2016-06-01

    We developed an optical coherence photoacoustic microscopy system using an intensity-modulated continuous-wave superluminescent diode with a center wavelength of 840 nm. The system can accomplish optical coherence tomography (OCT) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) simultaneously. Compared to the system with a pulsed light source, this system is able to achieve OCT imaging with quality as high as conventional spectral-domain OCT. Since both of the OCT and PAM images are generated from the same group of photons, they are intrinsically registered in the lateral directions. The system was tested for multimodal imaging the vasculature of mouse ear in vivo by using gold nanorods as contrast agent for PAM, as well as excised porcine eyes ex vivo. The OCT and PAM images showed complimentary information of the sample.

  9. Continuous-wave supercontinuum laser based on an erbium-doped fiber ring cavity incorporating a highly nonlinear optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Han; Takushima, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2005-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel erbium-doped fiber based continuous-wave (cw) supercontinuum laser. The laser has a simple ring-cavity structure incorporating an erbium-doped fiber and a highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber (HNL-DSF). Differently from previously demonstrated cw supercontinuum sources based on single propagation of a strong Raman pump laser beam through a highly nonlinear fiber, erbium gain inside the cavity generates a seed light oscillation, and the oscillated light subsequently evolves into a supercontinuum by nonlinear effects such as modulation instability and stimulated Raman scattering in the HNL-DSF. High quality of the depolarized supercontinuum laser output with a spectral bandwidth larger than 250 nm is readily achieved.

  10. Low-threshold room-temperature continuous-wave operation of a terahertz difference-frequency quantum cascade laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazuue; Ito, Akio; Hitaka, Masahiro; Dougakiuchi, Tatsuo; Edamura, Tadataka

    2017-08-01

    The performance of a room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) terahertz source based on intracavity difference-frequency generation in a mid-infrared (λ ∼ 6.8 µm) quantum cascade laser with a dual-upper-state active region is reported. The fabricated buried heterostructure device, with a two-section buried distributed feedback grating, operates at two mid-infrared wavelengths and demonstrates a terahertz output of 2.92 THz with a very low threshold current density of 0.89 kA/cm2 in pulsed operation. Consequently, despite an epitaxial-side-up mounting configuration, the device achieves CW operation at room temperature in which a low CW threshold current density of 1.3 kA/cm2 is obtained.

  11. Distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers operating in continuous-wave mode at λ ≈ 7.6 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinchuan, Zhang; Lijun, Wang; Wanfeng, Liu; Fengqi, Liu; Lihua, Zhao; Shenqiang, Zhai; Junqi, Liu; Zhanguo, Wang

    2012-02-01

    Distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in continuous-wave (CW) mode emitting at λ ≈ 7.6 μm are presented. Holographic lithography was used to fabricate the first-order distributed feedback grating. For a high-reflectivity-coated QCL with 14.5-μm-wide and 3-mm-long cavity, CW output powers of 300 mW at 85 K and still 10 mW at 270 K are obtained. Single-mode emission with a side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of about 30 dB and a wide tuning range of ~300 nm in the temperature range from 85 to 280 K is observed.

  12. A double-beam magnetron-injection gun for third-harmonic continuous wave 1-THz gyrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glyavin, M. [Faculty of Radiophysics, N. I. Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS), Nizhny Novgorod 603600 (Russian Federation); Research Center for Development of Far Infrared Region, University of Fukui (FIR FU), Fukui-shi 910-8507 (Japan); Manuilov, V. [Faculty of Radiophysics, N. I. Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Research Center for Development of Far Infrared Region, University of Fukui (FIR FU), Fukui-shi 910-8507 (Japan); Idehara, T. [Research Center for Development of Far Infrared Region, University of Fukui (FIR FU), Fukui-shi 910-8507 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    The concept of a continuous wave 1-kW/1-THz gyrotron operated at the third cyclotron harmonic of the transverse electric TE{sub 9,7} operating mode has been developed. To suppress the mode competition effects in a terahertz gyrotron, we propose a scheme with two generating helical electron beams (HEBs) formed in a double-beam triode magnetron-injection gun (MIG), where both emitters of the electron beams are located on a common cathode of the conventional MIG. An optimal geometry of the MIG electrodes is found. It is shown that in a proposed scheme two HEBs having close pitch factors and a moderate velocity spread can be formed. This makes them suitable for high-efficiency single-mode generation in the high frequency gyrotron at high harmonic.

  13. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Foroughi Abari, Farzad; Mann, Jakob;

    2014-01-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both...... leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift...... has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2....

  14. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeier Pedersen, A.; Abari, C. F.; Mann, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2014-06-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2.

  15. High Efficient Continuous-Wave Ho: YAG Laser Pumped by a Diode-pumped Tm: YLF Laser at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Xiao-Ming; YAO Bao-Quan; ZHANG Yun-Jun; SONG Cheng-Wei; GAO Jing; JU You-Lun; WANG Yue-Zhu

    2008-01-01

    We present a high efficient continuous wave Ho:YAG laser pumped by a diode-pumped Tm:YLF laser with a Fabry-Perot etalon tuning at 1.91 μm. The maximum output power reaches 7.2 W when the absorbed pump power is 10.8 W.The slope efficiency (relative to the absorbed power) is 74.1%,and the Tm:YLF to Ho:YAG optical conversion efficiency of 60%,then the diode-to-Holmium optical conversion efficiency achieved is 21.0%.The wavelength is 2090 nm when the transmission of output coupler is larger than 20%.The beam quality factor is M2 ~ 1.15 measured by the travelling knife-edge method.

  16. A highly efficient directional molecular white-light emitter driven by a continuous-wave laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemann, Nils W.; Eußner, Jens P.; Beyer, Andreas; Koch, Stephan W.; Volz, Kerstin; Dehnen, Stefanie; Chatterjee, Sangam

    2016-06-01

    Tailored light sources have greatly advanced technological and scientific progress by optimizing the emission spectrum or color and the emission characteristics. We demonstrate an efficient spectrally broadband and highly directional warm-white-light emitter based on a nonlinear process driven by a cheap, low-power continuous-wave infrared laser diode. The nonlinear medium is a specially designed amorphous material composed of symmetry-free, diamondoid-like cluster molecules that are readily obtained from ubiquitous resources. The visible part of the spectrum resembles the color of a tungsten-halogen lamp at 2900 kelvin while retaining the superior beam divergence of the driving laser. This approach of functionalizing energy-efficient state-of-the-art semiconductor lasers enables a technology complementary to light-emitting diodes for replacing incandescent white-light emitters in high-brilliance applications.

  17. Surface-emitting terahertz quantum cascade lasers with continuous-wave power in the tens of milliwatt range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Gangyi, E-mail: gangyi.xu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France); Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Li, Lianhe; Giles Davies, A.; Linfield, Edmund H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 2JT (United Kingdom); Isac, Nathalie; Halioua, Yacine; Colombelli, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.colombelli@u-psud.fr [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-03-03

    We demonstrate efficient surface-emitting terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers with continuous wave output powers of 20–25 mW at 15 K and maximum operating temperatures of 80–85 K. The devices employ a resonant-phonon depopulation active region design with injector, and surface emission is realized using resonators based on graded photonic heterostructures (GPHs). GPHs can be regarded as energy wells for photons and have recently been implemented through grading the period of the photonic structure. In this paper, we show that it is possible to keep the period constant and grade instead the lateral metal coverage across the GPH. This strategy ensures spectrally single-mode operation across the whole laser dynamic range and represents an additional degree of freedom in the design of confining potentials for photons.

  18. Spectrally-bounded continuous-wave supercontinuum generation in a fiber with two zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Abrardi, Laura; Corredera, Pedro; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel; Mussot, Arnaud

    2008-04-28

    A common issue in fiber-based supercontinuum (SC) generation under continuous-wave pumping is that the spectral width of the resulting source is related to the input power of the pump laser used. An increase of the input pump power leads to an increase of the spectral width obtained at the fiber output, and therefore, the average power spectral density (APSD) over the SC spectrum does not grow according to the input power. For some applications it would be desired to have a fixed spectral width in the SC and to increase the average PSD proportionally to the input pump power. In this paper we demonstrate experimentally that SC generation under continuous-wave (CW) pumping can be spectrally bounded by using a fiber with two zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). Beyond a certain pump power, the spectral width of the SC source remains fixed, and the APSD of the SC grows with the pump power. In our experiment we generate a reasonably flat, spectrally-bounded SC spanning from 1550 nm to 1700 nm. The spectra l width of the source is shown to be constant between 3 and 6 W of pump power. Over this range, the increase in input power is directly translated in an increase in the output APSD. The experimental results are confirmed by numerical simulations, which also highlight the sensitivity of this configuration to variations in the fiber dispersion curve. We believe that these results open the way for tailoring the spectral width of high-APSD CW SC by adjusting the fiber dispersion.

  19. Mechanistic investigation of doxycycline photosensitization by picosecond-pulsed and continuous wave laser irradiation of cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, C.R.; Hefetz, Y.; Gillies, R.; Wimberly, J.; Dalickas, G.; Hasan, T. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1990-04-15

    In order to elucidate the photophysical mechanisms of cellular phototoxicity sensitized by doxycycline, MGH-U1 human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro were treated with 20.7 microM doxycycline and irradiated with either a pulsed (lambda = 355 nm, pulse duration = 24 ps) or a continuous wave (lambda = 351 nm) laser. Cumulative radiant exposure and irradiance were systematically varied in experiments with both lasers. Phototoxicity was assessed by epifluorescence microscopy of unfixed cells using rhodamine 123 labeling of mitochondria. With the continuous wave source, the cumulative radiant exposure required for induction of phototoxic injury was independent of irradiance. With the 24-ps-pulsed source, a significantly lower cumulative radiant exposure was required to induce the phototoxicity when the peak irradiance was 5.8 x 10(7) or 1.3 x 10(8) watts cm-2 compared with when peak irradiance was either lower (6.0 x 10(6) watts cm-2) or higher (7.6 x 10(8) watts cm-2). The measured fluorescence lifetimes of doxycycline in buffered saline solution were longer than the laser pulse duration of 24 ps. The increased efficiency of photosensitization at the optimal peak irradiance in the ps domain appears to result from sequential multiphoton absorption involving higher excited states of the singlet manifold. At the highest irradiance studied, on the other hand, reduced efficiency of photosensitization is attributed to increased photodegradation of doxycycline from higher excited states by processes such as photoionization. A model consistent with these observations is presented along with calculations, based on simple rate equations, that fit the essentials of the proposed model.

  20. The Effectiveness of Prophylactic Antibiotics with Oral Levofloxacin against Post-Shock Wave Lithotripsy Infectious Complications: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Yang, Stephen Shei-Dei; Chang, Shang-Jen

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in reduction of infections after shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) in patients undergoing shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). The study was a randomized control trial. Between 2012 and 2014, patients with pre-operative sterile urine undergoing SWL were randomly assigned by the randomization ratio of 1:1 to receive prophylactic antibiotics with single-dose oral levofloxacin (500 mg) or no treatment (control group), respectively. Urinalysis and urine cultures were obtained between post-operative day five and seven, respectively. Pyuria was defined as ≥10 white blood cells per high power field (WBC/hpf). Significant bacteriuria was defined as ≥10(5) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) uropathogens. Febrile urinary tract infection (fUTI) was defined as body temperature higher than 38.0°C with pyuria or significant bacteriuria within seven days after SWL treatment. Initially, 274 patents underwent randomization with 135 and 139 patients in the levofloxacin and control group, respectively. A total of 206 patients (106 with placebo and 100 with levofloxacin) with complete follow-up of urinalysis were eligible for analysis. The rates of post-operative pyuria were not significantly different in patients with and without prophylaxis (8% versus 4.7%, p = 0.33). Moreover, there was also no significant difference in rates of bacteriuria in patients with and without prophylaxis (1% versus 0%, p = 0.49). Patients without follow-up urinalysis and urine culture received telephone survey. Among them, there was only one patient reporting post-SWL fever in the levofloxacin group (0.7%) compared with none (0%) in the control group (p = 0.49). As the results of the interim analysis revealed no benefit of levofloxacin in preventing post-SWL pyuria, bacteriuria, and fUTI, we terminated the study early before the pre-planned sample size was achieved. The incidence of asymptomatic and fUTI is low in patients with pre

  1. Treatment of lower urethral calculi with extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy and pneumatic ureteroscopic lithotripsy: a comparison of effectiveness and complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟惟德; 曾广翘; 蔡岳斌; 戴奇山; 胡建波; 魏鸿蔼

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy and incidence of complications of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) compared with pneumatic ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) in the treatment of lower uretheral calculi. Methods From August 1997 to June 1999, 210 patients with lower ureteric calculi were treated with ESWL and the other 180 with URSL. The stones were fragmented with pneumatic lithotripter. The outcome was assessed by evacuation, retreatment and complication rates.Results ESWL for lower ureteric calculi resulted in a stone evacuation rate of 78.1%, compared with 93.3% for URSL (P<0.05). ESWL had a retreatment rate of 11.9% and a perforation rate of 0, while URSL caused perforation of ureters in 3.3% of patients and a refreatment of 2.2%. Conclusion For the management of lower ureteric calculi, ESWL provides a non-invasive, simple and safe option, and URSL has a higher stone evacuation rate but causes ureter perforation more frequently than ESWL does. Both ESWL and URSL have their respective advantages. It is recommended, however, that URSL be extensively developed for better treatment efficacy, given that the operator has an adequate technical background.

  2. Pulsed and continuous wave mobile phone exposure over left versus right hemisphere: effects on human cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarala, Christian; Takio, Fiia; Rintee, Taija; Laine, Matti; Koivisto, Mika; Revonsuo, Antti; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2007-05-01

    The possible effects of continuous wave (CW) and pulse modulated (PM) electromagnetic field (EMF) on human cognition was studied in 36 healthy male subjects. They performed cognitive tasks while exposed to CW, PM, and sham EMF. The subjects performed the same tasks twice during each session; once with left-sided and once with right-sided exposure. The EMF conditions were spread across three testing sessions, each session separated by 1 week. The exposed hemisphere, EMF condition, and test order were counterbalanced over all subjects. We employed a double-blind design: both the subject and the experimenter were unaware of the EMF condition. The EMF was created with a signal generator connected via amplifier to a dummy phone antenna, creating a power output distribution similar to the original commercial mobile phone. The EMF had either a continuous power output of 0.25 W (CW) or pulsed power output with a mean of 0.25 W. An additional control group of 16 healthy male volunteers performed the same tasks without any exposure equipment to see if mere presence of the equipment could have affected the subjects' performance. No effects were found between the different EMF conditions, separate hemisphere exposures, or between the control and experimental group. In conclusion, the current results indicate that normal mobile phones have no discernible effect on human cognitive function as measured by behavioral tests.

  3. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien-Chih Liu, James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  5. Focusing vibrating targets in frequency-modulation continuous-wave-synthetic aperture radar with Doppler keystone transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxin; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Jinping; Lei, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Vibrating targets generally induce sinusoidal micro-Doppler modulation in high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR). They could cause defocused and ghost results by conventional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes a method on vibrating target imaging in frequency-modulation continuous-wave (FMCW) SAR systems. The continuous motion of sensor platform during pulse time is considered in the signal model. Based on Bessel series expansion of the signal in the azimuth direction, the influence of platform motion on the azimuth frequency is eliminated after dechirp and deskew. In addition, the range walk is compensated in the two-dimensional frequency domain by Doppler keystone transform. Next, using range cell migration correction, the azimuth quadratic phase compensation and the range curvature correction are made in range-Doppler domain for the focus of paired echoes. The residual video phase of paired echoes is eliminated, and vibration parameters are estimated to compensate in the sinusoidal modulation phase. Then the deghosted image of vibrating targets can be obtained. The proposed method is applicable to multiple targets with various vibrating states due to no need of a priori knowledge of targets. Finally, simulations are carried out to validate the effectiveness of the method in FMCW-SAR imaging of vibrating targets.

  6. 连续旋转爆震波传播模态试验%Experiment on the propagation mode of continuous rotating detonation wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    通过保持空气流量不变、改变H2/air当量比开展了连续旋转爆震对比试验,发现随当量比的降低出现三种传播模态:在较高的当量比(0.90~1.86)下,连续旋转爆震波以同向传播模态传播;在较低的当量比(≈0.75)下,则以双波对撞模态传播;在中间工况,则以上述混合模态维持传播。分析了不同传播模态下的高频压力特征,并初步分析了传播模态的转换机制:当量比较高时,爆震强度较高,传播过程中的损失和速度亏损相对较小,爆震波以同向传播模态维持传播;当量比较低时,爆震强度较低,传播过程中的损失和速度亏损较大,此时无法维持同向传播模态,而以双波对撞模态传播,这是由于双波对撞模态中的激波对撞产生高温环境,有利于燃烧放热,其可能是连续旋转爆震的极限传播模态。%Experiments on continuous rotating detonation wave of H2/air were performed with constant air mass flow rate and varied H2/air equivalence ratio(ER).Three different propagation modes of the continuous rotating detonation wave were found as the decreasing of ER,namely, one direction mode at high ER from 0.90 to 1.86,two-wave collision propagation mode at low ER of about 0.75,hybrid mode of one direction mode and two-wave collision propagation mode at middle ER.The propagation characteristics of the high-frequency pressures were analyzed and the mode transition mechanism of continuous rotating detonation wave was preliminarily studied.With a higher ER,the strength of the detonation wave is increased and the loss and velocity deficit during the propagation are relatively small,and the continuous rotating detonation wave can be sustained in the one direction mode;while with a lower ER,the strength of the continuous rotating detonation wave is reduced and the influence of the loss and velocity deficit during the propagation is relatively enlarged

  7. 太赫兹波脉冲成像和连续波成像技术研究%Investigation of Terahertz Continuous Wave Imaging and Pulse Wave Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈素果; 侯磊; 楼骁; 董陈岗; 施卫

    2013-01-01

    介绍了太赫兹(THz)连续波成像和脉冲波成像的原理,报道了自主研制的连续太赫兹波及脉冲太赫兹波成像系统:太赫兹连续波成像方面,分别使用研制的辉光放电探测器(GDD)和商业化的肖特基二极管对同一物体成像,结果表明GDD是一种成本低、成像效果好的室温太赫兹波探 测器;在太赫兹脉冲波成像方面,利用研制的SI-GaAs光电导天线作为太赫兹源,对金属环成像,分析了频率对的振幅图像和相位图像的影响.%In this paper,the principle of THz continuous wave imaging and THz pulse wave imaging are introduced.THz continuous wave and THz pulse wave imaging system developed self-independently are reported.In continuous wave imaging,the glow discharge detector (GDD) developed by our group and a commercial Schottky diodes are used as the detectors for THz continuous wave imaging,and the results indicate that GDD is a potential THz continuous wave room-temperature detector with low cost and high imaging quality.In THz pulse imaging,the SI-GaAs photoconductive antenna developed by our group is used as a pulse THz source to carry out the pulse imaging of a metal ring.The THz amplitude imaging and phase imaging at different frequencies are analyzed.

  8. Novel directed search strategy to detect continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in low- and high-eccentricity binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaci, Paola; Astone, Pia; D'Antonio, Sabrina; Frasca, Sergio; Palomba, Cristiano; Piccinni, Ornella; Mastrogiovanni, Simone

    2017-06-01

    We describe a novel, very fast and robust, directed search incoherent method (which means that the phase information is lost) for periodic gravitational waves from neutron stars in binary systems. As a directed search, we assume the source sky position to be known with enough accuracy, but all other parameters (including orbital ones) are supposed to be unknown. We exploit the frequency modulation due to source orbital motion to unveil the signal signature by commencing from a collection of time and frequency peaks (the so-called "peakmap"). We validate our algorithm (pipeline), adding 131 artificial continuous-wave signals from pulsars in binary systems to simulated detector Gaussian noise, characterized by a power spectral density Sh=4 ×10-24 Hz-1 /2 in the frequency interval [70, 200] Hz, which is overall commensurate with the advanced detector design sensitivities. The pipeline detected 128 signals, and the weakest signal injected (added) and detected has a gravitational-wave strain amplitude of ˜10-24, assuming one month of gapless data collected by a single advanced detector. We also provide sensitivity estimations, which show that, for a single-detector data covering one month of observation time, depending on the source orbital Doppler modulation, we can detect signals with an amplitude of ˜7 ×10-25. By using three detectors, and one year of data, we would easily gain a factor 3 in sensitivity, translating into being able to detect weaker signals. We also discuss the parameter estimate proficiency of our method, as well as computational budget: sifting one month of single-detector data and 131 Hz-wide frequency range takes roughly 2.4 CPU hours. Hence, the current procedure can be readily applied in ally-sky schemes, sieving in parallel as many sky positions as permitted by the available computational power. Finally, we introduce (ongoing and future) approaches to attain sensitivity improvements and better accuracy on parameter estimates in view of the

  9. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  10. Continuous wavelet analysis of postprandial EGGs suggests sustained gastric slow waves may be slow to develop in infants with colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G W; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M; Hulls, C M

    2017-03-01

    Electrogastrography in conjunction with Fast Fourier transform has limited success in detecting low grade abnormalities in gastric electrophysiological activity owing to the non-stationarity of the signal. Analysis by continuous wavelet transform is suitable for non-stationary signals and was used to analyse EGG activity in babies with and without colic. Thirty minute postprandial EGG recordings were obtained from 23 sleeping breast-fed infants with clinically validated recurrent colic and 26 breast-fed non-colicky infants. Continuous wavelet transform analysis (CWT) identified three principal frequency components. The mean, standard deviation, and the number of frequency maxima that fell below one standard deviation from the mean were determined for each infant and each frequency. Three component frequencies in the ranges 1.4-2.5 cpm, 2.5-4.0 cpm, and 4.0-15 cpm were found in all EGGs. Pairwise comparisons of the characteristics of each of the frequency ranges by univariate analyses showed significant differences between colicky and non-colicky subjects only in the number of maxima in the mid range of frequencies that lay below one standard deviation from the mean. However, CWT based on all frequencies allowed discrimination of the EGGS of colicky from non-colicky babies on a basis of number of frequency maxima below one standard deviation from the mean in the midrange of frequencies and in the mean and standard deviation in the low range of frequencies that was likely a harmonic of the midrange. CWT allowed distinction of EGG signals from colicky and healthy babies. The results indicate that colic may result from tardiness in the establishment of coherent propagation of the gastric slow wave in colicky babies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Non-contact continuous-wave diffuse optical tomographic system to capture vascular dynamics in the foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Jennifer W.; Kim, Hyun K.; Khalil, Michael A.; Fong, Christopher J.; Marone, Alessandro; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic optical tomographic imaging has shown promise in diagnosing and monitoring peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which affects 8 to 12 million in the United States. PAD is the narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the lower extremities. Prolonged reduced blood flow to the foot leads to ulcers and gangrene, which makes placement of optical fibers for contact-based optical tomography systems difficult and cumbersome. Since many diabetic PAD patients have foot wounds, a non-contact interface is highly desirable. We present a novel non-contact dynamic continuous-wave optical tomographic imaging system that images the vasculature in the foot for evaluating PAD. The system images at up to 1Hz by delivering 2 wavelengths of light to the top of the foot at up to 20 source positions through collimated source fibers. Transmitted light is collected with an electron multiplying charge couple device (EMCCD) camera. We demonstrate that the system can resolve absorbers at various locations in a phantom study and show the system's first clinical 3D images of total hemoglobin changes in the foot during venous occlusion at the thigh. Our initial results indicate that this system is effective in capturing the vascular dynamics within the foot and can be used to diagnose and monitor treatment of PAD in diabetic patients.

  12. Continuous wave operation of distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers with low threshold voltage and low power consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Caneau, Catherine; LeBlanc, Herve P.; Coleman, Sean; Hughes, Lawrence C.; Zah, Chung-en

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrated the room temperature continuous wave (CW) operation of mid-infrared distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) made of strain balanced GaInAs/AlInAs material on InP substrates for sensing CO2 isotope and N2O gas for potential applications that need battery powered portable devices in a sensor network. For the former device at 4.35 μm wavelength, we demonstrated a low threshold voltage of less than 8 V for battery operation and a near circular far field pattern with small divergent angles of 33 by 28 degrees full width at half maximum (FWHM) in vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, for easy collimation. For the latter device at 4.5 μm wavelength, we demonstrated a low CW threshold power consumption of 0.7 W at 20 °C. A side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 30 dB was achieved within the whole operating current and temperature ranges for both lasers.

  13. Theoretical and experimental investigations of quasi-continuous wave diode arrays side-pumped Yb:YAG slab laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Hai-Sheng; Yan Ping; Gong Ma-Li; Liu Qiang

    2004-01-01

    An analytical model of quasi-continuous wave (quasi-CW) diode array side-pumped slab laser for Yb:YAG oscillator in long-pulse free-running has been developed based on the CW model. In this model we first introduce a new parameter,pump pulse width, and make the model available for use in the quasi-CW model. We also give an analytical equation of laser delay time to calculate the laser pulse width. A detailed model is also presented for a new structure laser design, taking account of the geometry of Yb:YAG slab. A quasi-CW diode array side-pumped Yb:YAG slab laser is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Experiments yield a quasi-CW output energy up to 20.36 mJ with the laser pulse width of 654.55μs at 1049 nm when the diode arrays operate at 25 Hz and 1 ms pulse width. The crystal dimensions are 3 mm×8 mm× 1 mm and the doping density is 10 at.%. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of the theoretical model.

  14. Modulated and continuous-wave operations of low-power thulium (Tm:YAP) laser in tissue welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilici, Temel; Tabakoğlu, Haşim Ozgür; Topaloğlu, Nermin; Kalaycioğlu, Hamit; Kurt, Adnan; Sennaroglu, Alphan; Gülsoy, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Our aim is to explore the welding capabilities of a thulium (Tm:YAP) laser in modulated and continuous-wave (CW) modes of operation. The Tm:YAP laser system developed for this study includes a Tm:YAP laser resonator, diode laser driver, water chiller, modulation controller unit, and acquisition/control software. Full-thickness incisions on Wistar rat skin were welded by the Tm:YAP laser system at 100 mW and 5 s in both modulated and CW modes of operation (34.66 Wcm(2)). The skin samples were examined during a 21-day healing period by histology and tensile tests. The results were compared with the samples closed by conventional suture technique. For the laser groups, immediate closure at the surface layers of the incisions was observed. Full closures were observed for both modulated and CW modes of operation at day 4. The tensile forces for both modulated and CW modes of operation were found to be significantly higher than the values found by conventional suture technique. The 1980-nm Tm:YAP laser system operating in both modulated and CW modes maximizes the therapeutic effect while minimizing undesired side effects of laser tissue welding. Hence, it is a potentially important alternative tool to the conventional suturing technique.

  15. Nondestructive testing potential evaluation of a terahertz frequency-modulated continuous-wave imager for composite materials inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofani, Edison; Friederich, Fabian; Wohnsiedler, Sabine; Matheis, Carsten; Jonuscheit, Joachim; Vandewal, Marijke; Beigang, René

    2014-03-01

    The sub-terahertz (THz) frequency band has proved to be a noteworthy option for nondestructive testing (NDT) of nonmetal aeronautics materials. Composite structures or laminates can be inspected for foreign objects (water or debris), delaminations, debonds, etc., using sub-THz sensors during the manufacturing process or maintenance. Given the harmless radiation to the human body of this frequency band, no special security measures are needed for operation. Moreover, the frequency-modulated continuous-wave sensor used in this study offers a very light, compact, inexpensive, and high-performing solution. An automated two-dimensional scanner carrying three sensors partially covering the 70- to 320-GHz band is operated, using two complementary measurement approaches: conventional focused imaging, where focusing lenses are used; and synthetic aperture (SA) or unfocused wide-beam imaging, for which lenses are no longer needed. Conventional focused imagery offers finer spatial resolutions but imagery is depth-limited due to the beam waist effect, whereas SA measurements allow imaging of thicker samples with depth-independent but coarser spatial resolutions. The present work is a compendium of a much larger study and describes the key technical aspects of the proposed imaging techniques and reports on results obtained from human-made samples (A-sandwich, C-sandwich, solid laminates) which include diverse defects and damages typically encountered in aeronautics multilayered structures. We conclude with a grading of the achieved results in comparison with measurements performed by other NDT techniques on the same samples.

  16. Reducing temperature dependence of the output energy of a quasi-continuous wave diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kangin; Kim, Youngjung; Lee, Sijin; Kwon, Jin Hyuk; Gwak, Jin Seog; Yi, Jonghoon

    2013-08-20

    It is demonstrated by numerical modeling that spectrally dispersed compound pumping diodes and low-loss pumping chamber reduced the temperature dependence of the output energy of quasi-continuous wave diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers considerably. Several compound diodes with different spectral profiles were tested for pumping. The laser energy was calculated as a function of diode temperature from -30°C to 60°C. When a compound diode with a flat-top spectrum was used for pumping, the mean laser energy was 83% of the maximum energy of a Nd:YAG laser pumped by a diode with a narrow bandwidth. In addition, a compound diode with three emission lines was tested for pumping. When the wavelength gap between the adjacent emission lines of the pumping diode was in the range of 3-10 nm, the mean energy of the Nd:YAG laser became similar to that of a Nd:YAG laser pumped by a diode with a flat-top spectrum.

  17. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications.

  18. Efficient 2(nd) and 4(th) harmonic generation of a single-frequency, continuous-wave fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudmeyer, Thomas; Imai, Yutaka; Masuda, Hisashi; Eguchi, Naoya; Saito, Masaki; Kubota, Shigeo

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate efficient cavity-enhanced second and fourth harmonic generation of an air-cooled, continuous-wave (cw), single-frequency 1064 nm fiber-amplifier system. The second harmonic generator achieves up to 88% total external conversion efficiency, generating more than 20-W power at 532 nm wavelength in a diffraction-limited beam (M(2) crystal operated at 25 degrees C. The fourth harmonic generator is based on an AR-coated, Czochralski-grown beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO) crystal optimized for low loss and high damage threshold. Up to 12.2 W of 266-nm deep-UV (DUV) output is obtained using a 6-mm long critically phase-matched BBO operated at 40 degrees C. This power level is more than two times higher than previously reported for cw 266-nm generation. The total external conversion efficiency from the fundamental at 1064 nm to the fourth harmonic at 266 nm is >50%.

  19. Tunable continuous wave emission via phase-matched second harmonic generation in a ZnSe microcylindrical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, N.; Healy, N.; Sparks, J. R.; Badding, J. V.; Horak, P.; Peacock, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode microresonators made from crystalline materials are of great interest for studies of low threshold nonlinear phenomena. Compared to amorphous materials, crystalline structures often exhibit desirable properties such as high indices of refraction, high nonlinearities, and large windows of transparency, making them ideal for use in frequency comb generation, microlasing and all-optical processing. In particular, crystalline materials can also possess a non-centrosymmetric structure which gives rise to the second order nonlinearity, necessary for three photon processes such as frequency doubling and parametric down-conversion. Here we report a novel route to fabricating crystalline zinc selenide microcylindrical resonators from our semiconductor fibre platform and demonstrate their use for tunable, low power continuous wave second harmonic generation. Visible red light is observed when pumped with a telecommunications band source by a process that is phase-matched between different higher order radial modes, possible due to the good spatial overlap between the pump and signal in the small volume resonator. By exploiting the geometrical flexibility offered by the fibre platform together with the ultra-wide 500–22000 nm transmission window of the ZnSe material, we expect these resonators to find use in applications ranging from spectroscopy to quantum information systems. PMID:26135636

  20. Systematic analysis of DNA damage induction and DNA repair pathway activation by continuous wave visible light laser micro-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Muster

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser micro-irradiation can be used to induce DNA damage with high spatial and temporal resolution, representing a powerful tool to analyze DNA repair in vivo in the context of chromatin. However, most lasers induce a mixture of DNA damage leading to the activation of multiple DNA repair pathways and making it impossible to study individual repair processes. Hence, we aimed to establish and validate micro-irradiation conditions together with inhibition of several key proteins to discriminate different types of DNA damage and repair pathways using lasers commonly available in confocal microscopes. Using time-lapse analysis of cells expressing fluorescently tagged repair proteins and also validation of the DNA damage generated by micro-irradiation using several key damage markers, we show that irradiation with a 405 nm continuous wave laser lead to the activation of all repair pathways even in the absence of exogenous sensitization. In contrast, we found that irradiation with 488 nm laser lead to the selective activation of non-processive short-patch base excision and single strand break repair, which were further validated by PARP inhibition and metoxyamine treatment. We conclude that these low energy conditions discriminated against processive long-patch base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair as well as double strand break repair pathways.

  1. An all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data set

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X -J; Wen, L; Coles, W A; Wang, J -B; Shannon, R M; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Kerr, M; Levin, Y; Madison, D R; Osłowski, S; Ravi, V; Toomey, L; van Straten, W

    2014-01-01

    We present results of an all-sky search in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) Data Release 1 data set for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in the frequency range from $5\\times 10^{-9}$ to $2\\times 10^{-7}$ Hz. Such signals could be produced by individual supermassive binary black hole systems in the early stage of coalescence. We phase up the pulsar timing array data set to form, for each position on the sky, two data streams that correspond to the two GW polarizations and then carry out an optimal search for GW signals on these data streams. Since no statistically significant GWs were detected, we place upper limits on the intrinsic GW strain amplitude $h_0$ for a range of GW frequencies. For example, at $10^{-8}$ Hz our analysis has excluded with $95\\%$ confidence the presence of signals with $h_0\\geqslant 1.7\\times 10^{-14}$. Our new limits are about a factor of four more stringent than those of Yardley et al. (2010) based on an earlier PPTA data set and a factor of two better than those reported in...

  2. Novel directed search strategy to detect continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in low- and high-eccentricity binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leaci, Paola; D'Antonio, Sabrina; Frasca, Sergio; Palomba, Cristiano; Piccinni, Ornella; Mastrogiovanni, Simone

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel, very fast and robust, directed search incoherent method for periodic gravitational waves (GWs) from neutron stars in binary systems. As directed search, we assume the source sky position to be known with enough accuracy, but all other parameters are supposed to be unknown. We exploit the frequency-modulation due to source orbital motion to unveil the signal signature by commencing from a collection of time and frequency peaks. We validate our pipeline adding 131 artificial continuous GW signals from pulsars in binary systems to simulated detector Gaussian noise, characterized by a power spectral density Sh = 4x10^-24 Hz^-1/2 in the frequency interval [70, 200] Hz, which is overall commensurate with the advanced detector design sensitivities. The pipeline detected 128 signals, and the weakest signal injected and detected has a GW strain amplitude of ~10^-24, assuming one month of gapless data collected by a single advanced detector. We also provide sensitivity estimations, which show that,...

  3. Highspeed laser welding of steel using a high-power single-mode continuous-wave fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel, J.; Loeschner, U.; Schwind, S.; Hartwig, L.; Schille, J.; Exner, H.; Huebner, P.; Eysert, A.

    2013-02-01

    Since a few years, high brilliance laser sources find their way into laser material processing. Laser micro processing by applying high brilliance laser radiation up to 3 kW of continuous wave laser power in combination with ultrafast beam deflection systems has been successfully demonstrated in 2008 for the first time. In the fields of laser welding, high brilliant laser radiation was mainly used for micro welding, but up to now the macro range is still insufficiently investigated. Hence, this study reports on detailed investigations of high speed laser welding of different steel grades, performed with a high power single mode fiber laser source. The laser beam was deflected relative to the sample by using both a fast galvanometer scanner system with f-theta focusing objective and a linear axis in combination with a welding optic, respectively. In the study, the mainly process influencing parameters such as laser power, welding speed, thickness of the metal sheets, angle of incidence and laser beam spot size were varied in a wide range. The weld seam quality was evaluated by structural analyses, static tensile tests and EDX measurements. Finally, the laser welding process has been optimized for different weld seam geometries, for example bead-on-plate welds and butt welds.

  4. Decoupling of automatic control systems in a continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kumada, Masaharu; Itoh, Kouichi; Fujii, Hirotada

    2004-08-01

    This article describes a systematic approach to decoupling automatic tuning control (ATC) and automatic matching control (AMC) systems in continuous-wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for animal experiments. This technique enables us to improve the stability of CW-EPR spectroscopy even if the animal is moving during the data acquisition of EPR spectra. The control systems are formulated to allow the behavior of interference between them to be investigated, since they are generally coupled due to the characteristics of the microwave resonator. The stability of the entire control system in a 1.1 GHz CW-EPR spectrometer is evaluated with the generalized Nyquist stability criterion. We compare the EPR spectra of a triarylmethyl (TAM) radical that is dosed in anesthetized mice in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to test the precompensator for decoupling the ATC and AMC systems. The experimental findings suggest that the present technique is useful for improving the SNR of EPR spectra in animal experiments. The SNR of the measured EPR spectra was improved by about 50% with the precompensator.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometer at 1.57 Micrometer for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the earth's carbon cycle is essential for diagnosing current and predicting future climates, which requires precise global measurements of atmospheric CO2 through space missions. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission will provide accurate global atmospheric CO2 measurements to meet carbon science requirements. The joint team of NASA Langley Research Center and ITT Exelis, Inc. proposes to use the intensity-modulated, continuous-wave (IM-CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) approach for the ASCENDS mission. Prototype LAS instruments have been developed and used to demonstrate the power, signal-to-noise ratio, precision and accuracy, spectral purity, and stability of the measurement and the instrument needed for atmospheric CO2 observations from space. The ranging capability from laser platform to ground surfaces or intermediate backscatter layers is achieved by transmitted range-encoded IM laser signals. Based on the prototype instruments and current lidar technologies, space LAS systems and their CO2 column measurements are analyzed. These studies exhibit a great potential of using IM-CW LAS system for the active space CO2 mission ASCENDS.

  6. Ruby Emission in the Range 400-800 nm with Excitation by Continuous-Wave CO2 Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, V. M.; Kiselev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal emission spectra of ruby single crystals in the range 400-800 nm were studied experimentally as functions of the intensity at 10.6 μm of exciting pulses ( 0.5 s) from a continuous-wave electrical-discharge CO2 laser. Spectra at excitation intensity 1-20 kW/cm2 were superpositions of the thermal emission continuum of the sapphire crystal lattice in the range 600-800 nm and selective emission spectra of Cr3+ that were observed for the first time for ruby and consisted of R-lines at 695 nm; N-lines at 715 nm; 2 T 1, 4 T 2 → 4 A 2 transition bands at 672 and 643 nm; and 4 T 1, 2 T 2 → 4 A 2 transition bands at 530 and 490 nm that were not observed in the luminescence spectrum. Time dependences of the shapes of selective emission spectra, quenching and shifts of the R 1 line, and the temperature dependence of ruby luminescence spectra were investigated.

  7. Design of an 81.25 MHz continuous-wave radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator for Low Energy Accelerator Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Lu, Liang; Xu, Xianbo; Sun, Liepeng; Zhang, Zhouli; Dou, Weiping; Li, Chenxing; Shi, Longbo; He, Yuan; Zhao, Hongwei

    2017-03-01

    An 81.25 MHz continuous wave (CW) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed for the Low Energy Accelerator Facility (LEAF) at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). In the CW operating mode, the proposed RFQ design adopted the conventional four-vane structure. The main design goals are providing high shunt impendence with low power losses. In the electromagnetic (EM) design, the π-mode stabilizing loops (PISLs) were optimized to produce a good mode separation. The tuners were also designed and optimized to tune the frequency and field flatness of the operating mode. The vane undercuts were optimized to provide a flat field along the RFQ cavity. Additionally, a full length model with modulations was set up for the final EM simulations. Following the EM design, thermal analysis of the structure was carried out. In this paper, detailed EM design and thermal simulations of the LEAF-RFQ will be presented and discussed. Structure error analysis was also studied.

  8. Photobleaching and phototoxicity of KillerRed in tumor spheroids induced by continuous wave and pulsed laser illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Daria S; Shirmanova, Marina V; Dudenkova, Varvara V; Subochev, Pavel V; Turchin, Ilya V; Zagaynova, Elena V; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Shakhov, Boris E; Kamensky, Vladislav A

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate photobleaching of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed in tumor spheroids upon pulsed and continuous wave (CW) laser irradiation and to analyze the mechanisms of cancer cell death after the treatment. We observed the light-dose dependent mechanism of KillerRed photobleaching over a wide range of fluence rates. Loss of fluorescence was limited to 80% at light doses of 150 J/cm(2) and more. Based on the bleaching curves, six PDT regimes were applied for irradiation using CW and pulsed regimes at a power density of 160 mW/cm(2) and light doses of 140 J/cm(2) , 170 J/cm(2) and 200 J/cm(2). Irradiation of KillerRed-expressing spheroids in the pulsed mode (pulse duration 15 ns, pulse repetition rate 10 Hz) induced predominantly apoptotic cell death, while in the case of CW mode the cancer cells underwent necrosis. In general, these results improve our understanding of photobleaching mechanisms in GFP-like proteins and show the importance of appropriate selection of treatment mode for PDT with KillerRed. Representative fluorescence image of two KillerRed-expressing spheroids before and immediately after CW irradiation.

  9. Room-temperature continuous-wave electrically injected InGaN-based laser directly grown on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Zhou, Kun; Sun, Qian; Liu, Jianping; Feng, Meixin; Li, Zengcheng; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Liqun; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Shuming; Ikeda, Masao; Liu, Sheng; Yang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Silicon photonics would greatly benefit from efficient, visible on-chip light sources that are electrically driven at room temperature. To fully utilize the benefits of large-scale, low-cost manufacturing foundries, it is highly desirable to grow direct bandgap III-V semiconductor lasers directly on Si. Here, we report the demonstration of a blue-violet (413 nm) InGaN-based laser diode grown directly on Si that operates under continuous-wave current injection at room temperature, with a threshold current density of 4.7 kA cm-2. The heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on Si is confronted with a large mismatch in both the lattice constant and the coefficient of thermal expansion, often resulting in a high density of defects and even microcrack networks. By inserting an Al-composition step-graded AlN/AlGaN multilayer buffer between the Si and GaN, we have not only successfully eliminated crack formation, but also effectively reduced the dislocation density. The result is the realization of a blue-violet InGaN-based laser on Si.

  10. Reconstruction of the first derivative EPR spectrum from multiple harmonics of the field-modulated continuous wave signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    Selection of the amplitude of magnetic field modulation for continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) often is a trade-off between sensitivity and resolution. Increasing the modulation amplitude improves the signal-to-noise ratio, S/N, at the expense of broadening the signal. Combining information from multiple harmonics of the field-modulated signal is proposed as a method to obtain the first derivative spectrum with minimal broadening and improved signal-to-noise. The harmonics are obtained by digital phase-sensitive detection of the signal at the modulation frequency and its integer multiples. Reconstruction of the first derivative EPR line is done in the Fourier conjugate domain where each harmonic can be represented as the product of the Fourier transform of the 1st derivative signal with an analytical function. The analytical function for each harmonic can be viewed as a filter. The Fourier transform of the 1st derivative spectrum can be calculated from all available harmonics by solving an optimization problem with the goal of maximizing the S/N. Inverse Fourier transformation of the result produces the 1st derivative EPR line in the magnetic field domain. The use of modulation amplitude greater than linewidth improves the S/N, but does not broaden the reconstructed spectrum. The method works for an arbitrary EPR line shape, but is limited to the case when magnetization instantaneously follows the modulation field, which is known as the adiabatic approximation. PMID:21349750

  11. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO sub 2 Doppler lidar measurements. 2. Algorithm performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothermel, J. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA)); Bowdle, D.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville (USA)); Vaughan, J.M. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Worcestshire (England))

    1991-03-20

    The performance of an algorithm to calculate aerosol backscatter coefficients, from measurements with an airborne continuous wave focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar, is described relative to flight hardware settings and operating characteristics, and theoretical considerations. The algorithm (described in paper 1) is used to analyze measurements by the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS), operated by the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE) and Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), United Kingdom. Under optimum signal conditions, backscatter signals are located unambiguously and the backscatter coefficients are accurately determined. Under marginal or subthreshold conditions, with a degraded system sensitivity, false alarms (mistaking noise for signal) occur. Parametric studies show that the false alarm rate under these conditions depends on the search window size and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) threshold for valid signals. Carefully selected diagnostic parameters are used to estimate the combined sensitivity of the flight hardware system and algorithm. Less than 1% of backscatter measurements for flights over approximately 5 years have been found to be below the measurement sensitivity when the LATAS flight hardware controls were set for optimum sensitivity.

  12. A continuous microwave discharge maintained by two crossing millimeter-wave beams in hydrogen and argon: numerical simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, V. V.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Vikharev, A. L.; Radishev, D. B.; Kozlov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of numerical simulation of a continuous microwave discharge in two crossing wave beams of 30 GHz radiation in a mixture of hydrogen and argon are presented. The model describes the steady state of the gas discharge in Ar-H2-H through the self-consistent solution of the following equations: Maxwell’s equations, the electron balance equation, the transport of hydrogen atoms in the ternary mixture, the heat conduction equation and the equation of state of ideal gas. In Maxwell’s equations the effect of the plasma is taken into account through the conduction current. It is assumed that the generation of electrons occurs due to ionization processes and their loss occurs due to processes of electron-ion recombination and ambipolar diffusion. In the model the heat transfer is considered to be due to gas thermal conductivity and transfer of dissociation energy through the flow of hydrogen atoms. The gas pressure is assumed to be constant, and convection effects are neglected. The other approximations and reductions used in the model are discussed. The adequacy of the obtained model is confirmed by comparing the calculation results to experimental data. For comparison the distributions of gas temperature along the substrate in the center of the discharge and the atomic hydrogen flow to the substrate are used. The temperature is experimentally obtained through the analysis of the optical emission of the C2 Swan line. The atomic hydrogen flow to the substrate is measured from the etching of graphite samples imbedded into the substrate. The possibility of obtaining large-area uniform plasma layers in hydrogen with a small addition of methane is predicted. The applications of such gas discharge are discussed.

  13. Low power continuous wave-laser seed irradiation effect on Moringa oleifera germination, seedling growth and biochemical attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urva; Shafique, Hina; Jamil, Yasir; Haq, Zia Ul; Mujahid, Tamveel; Khan, Aman Ullah; Iqbal, Munawar; Abbas, Mazhar

    2017-05-01

    Recently, laser application in agriculture has gained much attention since plant characteristics were improved significantly in response of pre-sowing seed treatment. Pre-sowing laser seed treatment effects on germination, seedling growth and mineral profile were studied in Moringa olifera. M. olifera healthy seeds were exposed to 25, 50, 75mJ low power continuous wave laser light and grown under greenhouse conditions. The seedling growth and biochemical attributes were evaluated from 10-day-old seedlings. The germination parameters (percentage, mean germination time), vigor index, seedling growth (root length, seedling length, shoot fresh weight, root fresh weight, shoot dry weight, root dry weight) enhanced considerably. The laser energy levels used for seed irradiation showed variable effects on germination, seedling growth and mineral profile. The mineral contents were recorded to be higher in seedling raised from laser treated seeds, which were higher in roots versus shoots and leaves. The effect of laser treatment on seedling fat, nitrogen and protein content was insignificant and at higher energy level both nitrogen and protein contents decreased versus control. Results revealed that M. olifera germination, seedling growth and mineral contents were enhanced and optimum laser energy level has more acceleratory effect since at three laser energy levels the responses were significantly different. Overall the laser energy levels effect on germination and seedling growth was found in following order; 75mJ>50mJ>25mJ, where as in case of fat, protein and nitrogen contents the trend was as; 25mJ>50mJ and 75mJ. However, this technique could possibly be used to improve the M. olifera germination, seedling growth, and minerals contents where germination is low due to unfavorable conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Finite element modeling of light propagation in turbid media under illumination of a continuous-wave beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aichen; Lu, Renfu; Xie, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy provides a means for measuring the optical properties of biological tissues, based on analytical solutions to diffusion approximation for semi-infinite media under the normal illumination of an infinitely small light beam. The method is, however, prone to error in measurement because the actual boundary condition and light beam often deviate from that used in deriving the analytical solutions. It is therefore important to quantify the effect of different boundary conditions and light beams on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance in order to improve the measurement accuracy of the technique. This research was aimed at using finite element method (FEM) to model light propagation in turbid media, subjected to normal illumination by a continuous-wave beam of infinitely small or finite size. Three types of boundary conditions [i.e., partial current (PCBC), extrapolated (EBC), and zero (ZBC)] were evaluated and compared against Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, since MC could provide accurate fluence rate and diffuse reflectance. The effect of beam size was also investigated. Overall results showed that FEM provided results as accurate as those of the analytical method when an appropriate boundary condition was applied. ZBC did not give satisfactory results in most cases. FEM-PCBC yielded a better fluence rate at the boundary than did FEM-EBC, while they were almost identical in predicting diffuse reflectance. Results further showed that FEM coupled with EBC effectively simulated spatially resolved diffuse reflectance under the illumination of a finite size beam. A large beam introduced more error, especially within the region of illumination. Research also confirmed an earlier finding that a light beam of less than 1 mm diameter should be used for estimation of optical parameters. FEM is effective for modeling light propagation in biological tissues and can be used for improving the optical property measurement by the spatially resolved

  15. Non-invasive optical monitoring of the newborn piglet brain using continuous-wave and frequency-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Sergio; Hueber, Dennis; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Gratton, Enrico; Rosenfeld, Warren; Stubblefield, Phillip G.; Maulik, Dev; Stankovic, Miljan R.

    1999-06-01

    We have used continuous-wave (CW) and frequency-domain spectroscopy to investigate the optical properties of the newborn piglet brain in vivo and non-invasively. Three anaesthetized, intubated, ventilated and instrumented newborn piglets were placed into a stereotaxic instrument for optimal experimental stability, reproducible probe-to-scalp optical contact and 3D adjustment of the optical probe. By measuring the absolute values of the brain absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at two wavelengths (758 and 830 nm), frequency-domain spectroscopy provided absolute readings (in contrast to the relative readings of CW spectroscopy) of cerebral haemoglobin concentration and saturation during experimentally induced perturbations in cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation. Such perturbations included a modulation of the inspired oxygen concentration, transient brain asphyxia, carotid artery occlusion and terminal brain asphyxia. The baseline cerebral haemoglobin saturation and concentration, measured with frequency-domain spectroscopy, were about 60% and 42 µM respectively. The cerebral saturation values ranged from a minimum of 17% (during transient brain asphyxia) to a maximum of 80% (during recovery from transient brain asphyxia). To analyse the CW optical data, we have (a) derived a mathematical relationship between the cerebral optical properties and the differential pathlength factor and (b) introduced a method based on the spatial dependence of the detected intensity (dc slope method). The analysis of the cerebral optical signals associated with the arterial pulse and with respiration demonstrates that motion artefacts can significantly affect the intensity recorded from a single optode pair. Motion artefacts can be strongly reduced by combining data from multiple optodes to provide relative readings in the dc slope method. We also report significant biphasic changes (initial decrease and successive increase) in the reduced scattering coefficient measured

  16. Portable hyperspectral imager with continuous wave green laser for identification and detection of untreated latent fingerprints on walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Okuda, Hidekazu; Nagaoka, Takashi; Akiba, Norimitsu; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Ichikawa, Fumihiko; Torao, Akira; Sota, Takayuki

    2015-09-01

    Untreated latent fingerprints are known to exhibit fluorescence under UV laser excitation. Previously, the hyperspectral imager (HSI) has been primarily evaluated in terms of its potential to enhance the sensitivity of latent fingerprint detection following treatment by conventional chemical methods in the forensic science field. In this study however, the potential usability of the HSI for the visualization and detection of untreated latent fingerprints by measuring their inherent fluorescence under continuous wave (CW) visible laser excitation was examined. Its potential to undertake spectral separation of overlapped fingerprints was also evaluated. The excitation wavelength dependence of fluorescent images was examined using an untreated palm print on a steel based wall, and it was found that green laser excitation is superior to blue and yellow lasers' excitation for the production of high contrast fluorescence images. In addition, a spectral separation method for overlapped fingerprints/palm prints on a plaster wall was proposed using new images converted by the division and subtraction of two single wavelength images constructed based on measured hyperspectral data (HSD). In practical tests, the relative isolation of two overlapped fingerprints/palm prints was successful in twelve out of seventeen cases. Only one fingerprint/palm print was extracted for an additional three cases. These results revealed that the feasibility of overlapped fingerprint/palm print spectral separation depends on the difference in the temporal degeneration of each fluorescence spectrum. The present results demonstrate that a combination of a portable HSI and CW green laser has considerable potential for the identification and detection of untreated latent fingerprints/palm prints on the walls under study, while the use of HSD makes it practically possible for doubly overlapped fingerprints/palm prints to be separated spectrally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  17. Design of a New Water Load for S-band 750 kW Continuous Wave High Power Klystron Used in EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liang; LIU Fukun; SHAN Jiafang; KUANG Guangli

    2007-01-01

    In order to test the klystrons operated at a frequency of 3.7 GHz in a continuous wave (CW) mode,a type of water load to absorb its power up to 750 kW is presented.The distilled water sealed with an RF ceramic window is used as the absorbent.At a frequency range of 70 MHz,the VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio) is below 1.2,and the rise in temperature of water is about 30℃ at the highest power level.

  18. Histologic evaluation of laser lipolysis comparing continuous wave vs pulsed lasers in an in vivo pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Jessica R; Veerappan, Anna; Chen, Bo; Mirkov, Mirko; Sierra, Ray; Spiegel, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate acute and delayed laser effects of subdermal lipolysis and collagen deposition using an in vivo pig model and to compare histologic findings in fatty tissue after continuous wave diode (CW) vs pulsed laser treatment. Three CW lasers (980, 1370, and 1470 nm) and 3 pulsed lasers (1064, 1320, and 1440 nm) were used to treat 4 Göttingen minipigs. Following administration of Klein tumescent solution, a laser cannula was inserted at the top of a 10 × 2.5-cm rectangle and was passed subdermally to create separate laser "tunnels." Temperatures at the surface and at intervals of 4-mm to 20-mm depths were recorded immediately after exposure and were correlated with skin injury. Full-thickness cutaneous biopsy specimens were obtained at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after exposure and were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and trichrome stain. Qualitative and semiquantitative histopathologic evaluations were performed with attention to vascular damage, lipolysis, and collagen deposition. Skin surface damage occurred at temperatures exceeding 46°C. Histologic examination at 1 day after exposure showed hemorrhage, fibrous collagen fiber coagulation, and adipocyte damage. Adipocytes surrounded by histiocytes, a marker of lipolysis, were present at 1 week and 1 month after exposure. Collagen deposition in subdermal fatty tissue and in reticular dermis of some specimens was noted at 1 week and had increased at 1 month. Tissue treated with CW laser at 1470 nm demonstrated greater hemorrhage and more histiocytes at damage sites than tissue treated with pulsed laser at 1440 nm. There was a trend toward more collagen deposition with pulsed lasers than with CW lasers, but this was not statistically significant. Histopathologic comparison between results of CW laser at 980 nm vs pulsed laser at 1064 nm showed the same trend. Hemorrhage differences may result from pulse duration variations. A theoretical calculation estimating temperature rise in vessels supported this

  19. Resistance to torsional failure and cyclic fatigue resistance of ProTaper Next, WaveOne, and Mtwo files in continuous and reciprocating motion: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N O Varghese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resistance to torsional failure and cyclic fatigue resistance of ProTaper Next (PTN, WaveOne, and Mtwo files in continuous and reciprocating motion. Settings and Design: Randomized control trial in a tertiary care setting. Subjects and Methods: A total of 10 new size 25.06 taper PTN X2, 25.06 taper Mtwo files, and 25.08 taper WaveOne primary files each was selected. A custom fabricated cyclic fatigue testing device with a 70° angle of curvature and 3 mm width; curvature starting at 6 mm from the tip was used. All instruments were rotated and reciprocated till fracture occurred and time till fracture of each instrument was recorded in seconds. For torsional failure testing 5 mm tip of each file was embedded in composite resin block and uniform torsional stresses (300 rpm, 2.0 Ncm were applied repetitively by an endodontic motor with auto stop mode until file succumbed to torsional failure. Number of load applications leading to failure was recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using t-test for equality of means, Pearson correlation, and ANOVA test. Results: All the files showed superior resistance to cyclic fatigue in reciprocating motion when compared with continuous rotation mode. WaveOne primary files displayed maximum resistance to cyclic fatigue both in continuous and reciprocating motion. WaveOne primary files also demonstrated maximum resistance to torsional failure followed by PTN with Mtwo files exhibiting least resistance. Conclusions: Operating files in reciprocating motion enhances their cyclic fatigue resistance. WaveOne files showed maximum resistance to cyclic fatigue and torsional failure due to their cross-sectional diameter coupled M-Wire technology.

  20. Continuous-wave and Q-switched operation of a compact, diode-pumped Yb3+:KY(WO4)2 planar waveguide laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, F M; Lagatsky, A A; Kurilchick, S V; Kisel, V E; Guretsky, S A; Luginets, A M; Kalanda, N A; Kolesova, I M; Kuleshov, N V; Sibbett, W; Brown, C T A

    2009-02-02

    A diode-pumped LPE-grown Yb:KYW planar waveguide laser is demonstrated in a microchip monolithic cavity configuration. Output powers as high as 148 mW and thresholds as low as 40 mW were demonstrated during continuous-wave operation. Pulses of 170 ns duration with maximum pulse energy of 44 nJ at a 722 kHz repetition rate were generated when Q-switched using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

  1. High-power and high-efficiency operation of an all-solid-state,quasi-continuous-wave,titanium sapphire laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanfu Wei(魏权夫); Xin Ding(丁欣); Wuqi Wen(温午麒); Lijuan Fan(范丽娟); Jianquan Yao(姚建铨)

    2004-01-01

    High-power and high-efficiency operation of an all-solid-state, quasi-continuous-wave, titanium sapphire laser is obtained with a diode-laser-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser as the pump source. A maximum output power of 2.5 W is obtained for 16-W power of 532-nm pump light. A much higher conversion efficiency of 15.7% is obtained when at the maximum output power.

  2. Evaluating some indicators for identifying mountain waves situations in snow days by means of numerical modeling and continuous data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jose Luis; Posada, Rafael; Hierro, Rodrigo; García-Ortega, Eduardo; Lopez, Laura; Gascón, Estibaliz

    2013-04-01

    Madrid - Barajas airport is placed at 70 km away from the Central System and snow days and mountains waves are considered as risks days for landing operations. This motivated the study of mesoscale factors affecting this type of situations. The availability of observational data gathered during three consecutives winter campaigns in the Central System along with data from high-resolution numerical models, have allowed the evaluation of the environmental conditions necessary for mountain waves formations in snow days and were characterized from observational data and numerical simulations. By means of Meteosat Second Generation satellite images, lee clouds were observed in 25 days corresponding to the 2008-2011 winter seasons. Six of them, which also presented NW low level flow over the mountain range, were analyzed. Necessary conditions for oscillations as well as vertical wave propagation were studied from radiometer data and MM5 model simulations. From radiometer data the presence of stable environment in the six selected events is confirmed. From MM5 model, dynamic conditions allowing the flow to cross the mountain range were evaluated in three different locations around the mountain range. Simulations of vertical velocity show that MM5 model is able to detect mountain waves. The waves present in the six selected events are examined. Tropospheric were able to forecast energy release associated with the mountain waves. The vertical wavelength presented a high variability due to intense background winds at high tropospheric levels. The average values estimated for λz were between 3 and 12 km. The intrinsic period estimated was around 30 and 12 km. The simulations were able to forecast energy release associated with mountain waves. Acknowledgments: This study was supported by the Plan Nacional de I+D of Spain, through the grants CGL2010-15930, Micrometeo IPT-310000-2010-022 and the Junta de Castilla y León through the grant LE220A11-2.

  3. Complications - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications - national data. This data set includes national-level data the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  4. Complications - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Complications measures - state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and...

  5. Complications - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications - provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)...

  6. Pregnancy Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy complications Complications of pregnancy are health problems that ... pregnancy. Expand all | Collapse all Health problems before pregnancy Before pregnancy, make sure to talk to your ...

  7. Results of an all-sky high-frequency Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves in LIGO 5th Science Run

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Avneet; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Zhu, Sylvia; Pletsch, Holger; Allen, Bruce; Bock, Oliver; Maschenchalk, Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Siemens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We present results of a high-frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from isolated compact objects in LIGO's 5th Science Run S5 data, using the computing power of the Einstein@Home volunteer computing project. This is the only dedicated continuous gravitational wave search that probes this high frequency range on S5 data. We find no significant candidate signal, so we set 90%-confidence level upper-limits on continuous gravitational wave strain amplitudes. At the lower end of the search frequency range, around 1250 Hz, the most constraining upper-limit is $5.0\\times 10^{-24}$, while at the higher end, around 1500 Hz, it is $6.2\\times 10^{-24}$. Based on these upper-limits, and assuming a fiducial value of the principal moment of inertia of $10^{38}$kg$\\,$m$^2$, we can exclude objects with ellipticities higher than roughly $2.8\\times10^{-7}$ within 100 pc of Earth with rotation periods between 1.3 and 1.6 milliseconds.

  8. Results of an all-sky high-frequency Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves in LIGO's fifth science run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avneet; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Zhu, Sylvia; Pletsch, Holger; Allen, Bruce; Bock, Oliver; Maschenchalk, Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Siemens, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a high-frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from isolated compact objects in LIGO's fifth science run (S5) data, using the computing power of the Einstein@Home volunteer computing project. This is the only dedicated continuous gravitational wave search that probes this high-frequency range on S5 data. We find no significant candidate signal, so we set 90% confidence level upper limits on continuous gravitational wave strain amplitudes. At the lower end of the search frequency range, around 1250 Hz, the most constraining upper limit is 5.0 ×10-24, while at the higher end, around 1500 Hz, it is 6.2 ×10-24. Based on these upper limits, and assuming a fiducial value of the principal moment of inertia of 1038 kg m2 , we can exclude objects with ellipticities higher than roughly 2.8 ×10-7 within 100 pc of Earth with rotation periods between 1.3 and 1.6 milliseconds.

  9. The continuing need for drug development and clinical trials in type 2 diabetes and its complications: introduction to the RDS special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Itamar; Gallwitz, Baptist

    2011-01-01

    The increased burden of type 2 diabetes (T2D) necessitates the need for effective and safe novel drugs to treat this epidemic disease and its complications. By compiling this RDS Special Issue, our aim was to provide a comprehensive and critical overview on recent, ongoing, and future developments in this field. In collaboration with distinguished and renowned experts, we analyzed and discussed the most important advances in the field of incretin-based therapies, their extraglycemic effects, cardiovascular actions, and specific properties of the central nervous system. Another important drug class currently in development, the SGLT-2 inhibitors, and the role of the kidney in T2D are topics also covered by this issue. In addition to drug developments, new physiological insights into the understanding of the organ pathophysiology in T2D are presented that may eventually lead to additional therapeutic targets for obesity, T2D, and chronic inflammation acting on the brain, cardiovascular system, and pancreatic islets. The outcome of this Special Issue is a comprehensive reference work including bundled knowledge and expert opinions on the various aspects of the disease and its possible therapy strategies available now and in the near future. However, despite the advances delivered by modern incretin-based therapies today, there are still many limitations associated with efficacy data, application routes, and safety issues, which prevent the decline in diabetes complication rates. We conclude that further drug development and clinical trials are required to overcome these limitations, and to counteract the movement towards higher incidence rates of T2D and its complications.

  10. Efficiency Comparison for Continuous Mass-lumped and Discontinuous Galerkin Finite-elements for 3D Wave Propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minisini, S.; Zhebel, E.; Kononov, A.; Mulder, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    The spreading adoption of computationally intensive techniques such as Reverse Time Migration and Full Waveform Inversion increases the need of efficiently solving the three-dimensional wave equation. Common finite-difference discretization schemes lose their accuracy and efficiency in complex geol

  11. Implementation of an F-statistic all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Virgo VSR1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Borkowski, K.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J. P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorosh, O.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J. D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.

    2014-08-01

    We present an implementation of the F-statistic to carry out the first search in data from the Virgo laser interferometric gravitational wave detector for periodic gravitational waves from a priori unknown, isolated rotating neutron stars. We searched a frequency f0 range from 100 Hz to 1 kHz and the frequency dependent spindown f1 range from -1.6({{f}_{0}}/100\\;Hz)\\times {{10}^{-9}} Hz s-1 to zero. A large part of this frequency-spindown space was unexplored by any of the all-sky searches published so far. Our method consisted of a coherent search over two-day periods using the ℱ-statistic, followed by a search for coincidences among the candidates from the two-day segments. We have introduced a number of novel techniques and algorithms that allow the use of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm in the coherent part of the search resulting in a fifty-fold speed-up in computation of the F-statistic with respect to the algorithm used in the other pipelines. No significant gravitational wave signal was found. The sensitivity of the search was estimated by injecting signals into the data. In the most sensitive parts of the detector band more than 90% of signals would have been detected with dimensionless gravitational-wave amplitude greater than 5\\times {{10}^{-24}}.

  12. Laser-tissue interaction of a continuous-wave 2-μm, 3-μm cascade oscillation fiber laser: sharp incision with controlled coagulation layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tsunenori; Sumiyoshi, Tetsumi; Naruse, Kyota; Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Shunichi; Kikuchi, Makoto; Kasamatsu, Tadashi; Sekita, Hitoshi; Obara, Minoru

    2000-06-01

    We studied coagulation layer controlled incision with newly developed continuous wave 2 micrometer, 3 micrometer cascade oscillation fiber laser in vitro. Since this laser device simultaneously oscillates 2 micrometer and 3 micrometer radiation, we could change tissue interaction by arranging power ratio of 2 micrometer to 3 micrometer radiation. About one watt of total irradiation power with various power ratios was focused to extracted fresh porcine myocardium or anesthetized rabbit on an automatic moving stage to obtain line incision. Macro photograph and microscopic histology were used to observe tissue interaction phenomenon. The incised specimen showed that precise cutting groove with thin coagulation layer was attained by a 3 micrometer based radiation, meanwhile addition of 2 micrometer radiation to 3 micrometer radiation made coagulation layer thicker. A heat conduction simulator using finite-element method was used to qualitatively explain obtained coagulation layer thickness. This precise incision with controllable side coagulation layer may effective to control bleeding during incision, for instance, for skin, liver, and kidney incisions. Pure continuous wave radiation of 2 micrometer and 3 micrometer may eliminate stress wave induced tissue damage which is frequently found in Ho:YAG and/or Er:YAG tissue interactions. Moreover, sapphire fiber might offer flexible power delivery to this new laser to establish endoscopic application and/or to improved beam handling.

  13. Temperature increase effects on a double-pass cavity type II second-harmonic generation: a model for depleted Gaussian continuous waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Jalil-Abadi, Fatemeh Sedaghat; Rezaee, Mostafa Mohammad; Motazedian, Alireza; Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the effect of temperature increase on the efficiency of a double-pass cavity type II second-harmonic generation (SHG) is investigated. To this end, a depleted wave model describing the continuous-wave SHG process with fundamental Gaussian waves was developed. First, six coupled equations were proposed to model a double-pass cavity to generate the second harmonic of a Gaussian fundamental wave in type II configuration. Then, the effect of temperature increase in the nonlinear crystal due to the optical absorption was modeled. To do this, a mismatched phase arising from changes in refractive indices was added to the coupled equations. Although the nondepleted assumption is usually used in such problems, a simultaneous solving of coupled equations with assumption of fundamental beam depletion was performed. The results were obtained by a homemade code written in Intel Fortran, and show how the efficiency of the SHG process decreases when the crystal is warmed up by 5, 10, and 15 K. Dramatic reductions in SHG efficiency were observed due to small changes in temperature. The results show excellent agreement with the experimental data [Opt. Commun.173, 311-314 (2000)].

  14. Comparison of continuous-wave terahertz wave generation and bias-field-dependent saturation in GaAs:O and LT-GaAs antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejian; Li, Yu-tai; Yang, Mong-huan; Cheung, Wing Yiu; Pan, Ci-Ling; Chan, Kam Tai

    2009-04-01

    Terahertz wave (THz) photoconductive (PC) antennas were fabricated on oxygen-implanted GaAs (GaAs:O) and low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs). The measured cw THz power at 0.358 THz from the GaAs:O antenna is about twice that from the LT-GaAs antenna under the same testing conditions, with the former showing no saturation up to a bias of 40 kV/cm, while the latter is already beginning to saturate at 20 kV/cm. A modified theoretical model incorporating bias-field-dependent electron saturation velocity is employed to explain the results. It shows that GaAs:O exhibits a higher electron saturation velocity, which may be further exploited to generate even larger THz powers by reducing the ion dosage and optimizing the annealing process in GaAs:O.

  15. A search of the Orion spur for continuous gravitational waves using a "loosely coherent" algorithm on data from LIGO interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D V; Andersen, M; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Ashton, G; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; 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Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J M; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Germain, V; Ghosh, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez, J; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hoelscher-Obermaier, J; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Karlen, J L; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelecsenyi, N; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kerrigan, J; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J T; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, J P; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Lewis, J B; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; 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Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2015-01-01

    We report results of a wideband search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars within the Orion spur towards both the inner and outer regions of our Galaxy. As gravitational waves interact very weakly with matter, the search is unimpeded by dust and concentrations of stars. One search disk (A) is $6.87^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $20^\\textrm{h}10^\\textrm{m}54.71^\\textrm{s}+33^\\circ33'25.29"$, and the other (B) is $7.45^\\circ$ in diameter and centered on $8^\\textrm{h}35^\\textrm{m}20.61^\\textrm{s}-46^\\circ49'25.151"$. We explored the frequency range of 50-1500 Hz and frequency derivative from $0$ to $-5\\times 10^{-9}$ Hz/s. A multi-stage, loosely coherent search program allowed probing more deeply than before in these two regions, while increasing coherence length with every stage. Rigorous followup parameters have winnowed initial coincidence set to only 70 candidates, to be examined manually. None of those 70 candidates proved to be consistent with an isolated gravitational wave em...

  16. Automated Microwave Complex on the Basis of a Continuous-Wave Gyrotron with an Operating Frequency of 263 GHz and an Output Power of 1 kW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Morozkin, M. V.; Tsvetkov, A. I.; Lubyako, L. V.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Kuftin, A. N.; Zapevalov, V. E.; V. Kholoptsev, V.; Eremeev, A. G.; Sedov, A. S.; Malygin, V. I.; Chirkov, A. V.; Fokin, A. P.; Sokolov, E. V.; Denisov, G. G.

    2016-02-01

    We study experimentally the automated microwave complex for microwave spectroscopy and diagnostics of various media, which was developed at the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in cooperation with GYCOM Ltd. on the basis of a gyrotron with a frequency of 263 GHz and operated at the first gyrofrequency harmonic. In the process of the experiments, a controllable output power of 0 .1 -1 kW was achieved with an efficiency of up to 17 % in the continuous-wave generation regime. The measured radiation spectrum with a relative width of about 10 -6 and the frequency values measured at various parameters of the device are presented. The results of measuring the parameters of the wave beam, which was formed by a built-in quasioptical converter, as well as the data obtained by measuring the heat loss in the cavity and the vacuum output window are analyzed.

  17. Quasi-continuous-wave 589-nm radiation based on intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:GGG/BaWO4 Raman laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaojun; Cong, Zhenhua; Men, Shaojie; Rao, Han; Xia, Jinbao; Zhang, Sasa; Zhang, Huaijin

    2016-07-01

    Quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) 589-nm radiation was realized based on a frequency-doubled crystalline Raman laser. The fundamental wave with macro-micro-pulse trains was generated from an acousto-optically Q-switched QCW diode side-pumped Nd:GGG laser. Intracavity Raman conversion was accomplished by a BaWO4 crystal and the second harmonic generation was finished by a KTP crystal. Under a pumping power of 126.0 W with a macro-pulse frequency of 300 Hz and duration of 300 μs, the maximum 589 nm output power of 4.2 W was obtained at a micro-pulse frequency of 33.3 kHz. The micro-pulse width was 13.6 ns.

  18. Study on the acceptance, complications and continuation rate of post-partum family planning using the post placental intrauterine contraceptive device among women delivering at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajya Lakshmi Bai Gujju

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post placental intrauterine contraceptive device use in India showed that most women were satisfied with their choice of immediate insertion of an IUCD and the rates of complications were relatively low. The large proportion of women accepting the method to limit future childbearing indicates the important place post placental IUCD hold. This study was done to evaluate the acceptance of intrauterine contraceptive device as an immediate family planning method following delivery. The complications associated with it were identified and continuation rates were assessed. Methods: Women admitted for delivery in a tertiary care hospital were included in the study. Only women who fulfilled the medical eligibility criteria were included in the study. Results: A total of 4209 women were counseled of which 780 (18.5% women accepted the method, 3429 declined. Out of the 780 cases, 764 came for follow up, and 16 were lost to follow up, spontaneous expulsion was seen in 2 (0.2% cases, removal was done on request in 1 case and continuation was seen in 761 (97.56% women. Conclusions: The Post placental intrauterine contraceptive device is safe to insert immediately after delivery. It has good acceptance with minimal expulsion and very high continuation rates. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 388-391

  19. Stock culture heterogeneity rather than new mutational variation complicates short-term cell physiology studies of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahku, Ranno; Peebo, Karl; Valgepea, Kaspar; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2011-09-01

    Nutrient-limited continuous cultures in chemostats have been used to study microbial cell physiology for over 60 years. Genome instability and genetic heterogeneity are possible uncontrolled factors in continuous cultivation experiments. We investigated these issues by using high-throughput (HT) DNA sequencing to characterize samples from different phases of a glucose-limited accelerostat (A-stat) experiment with Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 and a duration regularly used in cell physiology studies (20 generations of continuous cultivation). Seven consensus mutations from the reference sequence and five subpopulations characterized by different mutations were detected in the HT-sequenced samples. This genetic heterogeneity was confirmed to result from the stock culture by Sanger sequencing. All the subpopulations in which allele frequencies increased (betA, cspG/cspH, glyA) during the experiment were also present at the end of replicate A-stats, indicating that no new subpopulations emerged during our experiments. The fact that ~31 % of the cells in our initial cultures obtained directly from a culture stock centre were mutants raises concerns that even if cultivations are started from single colonies, there is a significant chance of picking a mutant clone with an altered phenotype. Our results show that current HT DNA sequencing technology allows accurate subpopulation analysis and demonstrates that a glucose-limited E. coli K-12 MG1655 A-stat experiment with a duration of tens of generations is suitable for studying cell physiology and collecting quantitative data for metabolic modelling without interference from new mutations.

  20. Cataract complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yorston

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Any eye surgeon, no matter how experienced, will occasionally encounter a serious cataract complication. Although complications may be devastating for the patient and are always distressing for the surgeon, are they really a major issue for VISION 2020? The evidence says that they are.

  1. Continuous-wave and Q-switched performance of an Yb:YAG/YAG composite thin disk ceramic laser pumped with 970-nm laser diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Cai; Jun Zhou; Hongming Zhao; Yunfeng Qi; Qihong Lou; Jingxing Dong; Yunrong Wei

    2008-01-01

    Using front face-pumped compact active mirror laser (CAMIL) structure, we have demonstrated an Yb:YAG/YAG composite ceramic disk laser with pumping wavelength at 970 nm. The laser has been operated in both continuous-wave (CW) and Q-switching modes. Under CW operation, laser output power of 1.05 W with 2% transmission output coupler was achieved at the wavelength of 1031 nm. Qswitched laser output was gotten by using an acousto-optic Q-switch. The repetition rate ranged from 1 to 30 kHz and the pulse width varied from 166 to 700 ns.

  2. Room temperature continuous wave operation of 1.33-μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser with high output power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Han; Hongling Peng; Ronghan Wu; Zhichuan Niu; Haiqiao Ni; Shiyong Zhang; Xiaohong Yang; Yun Du; Cunzhu Tong; Huan Zhao; Yingqiang Xu

    2006-01-01

    @@ Continuous wave operation of a semiconductor laser diode based on five stacks of InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded within strained InGaAs quantum wells as an active region is demonstrated. At room temperature, 355-Mw output power at ground state of 1.33-1.35μm for a 20-μm ridge-waveguide laser without facet coating is achieved. By optimizing the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth conditions,the QD density per layer is raised to 4 × 1010 cm-2. The laser keeps lasing at ground state until the temperature reaches 65 ℃.

  3. Diode-pumped continuous-wave and femtosecond Cr:LiCAF lasers with high average power in the near infrared, visible and near ultraviolet

    OpenAIRE

    Demirbas, Umit; Baali, Ilyes; Acar, Durmus Alp Emre; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous-wave (cw), cw frequency-doubled, cw mode-locked and Q-switched mode-locked operation of multimode diode-pumped Cr:LiCAF lasers with record average powers. Up to 2.54 W of cw output is obtained around 805 nm at an absorbed pump power of 5.5 W. Using intracavity frequency doubling with a BBO crystal, 0.9 W are generated around 402 nm, corresponding to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 12%. With an intracavity birefringent tuning plate, the fundamental and ...

  4. Widely tunable, narrow line width and low optical noise continuous-wave all fiber Er:Yb co-doped double-clad ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesmi, Khmaies; Bahloul, Faouzi; Semaan, Georges; Meng, Yichang; Salhi, Mohamed; Sanchez, François

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report a widely tunable, narrow linewidth, low noise continuous-wave double-clad Er:Yb doped fiber ring laser. Tunability is demonstrated in wide range spanning from 1520 to almost 1620 nm covering the C and L spectral bands. The cavity design is optimized in order to achieve the largest tuning range with very high optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The output coupling ratio greatly influences the tuning range of the laser while the position of the spectral filter determines the SNR. The obtained laser exhibits a tuning range over 98 nm with a nearly constant SNR of about 58.5 dB.

  5. Continuous-wave yellow laser generation at 578 nm by intracavity sum-frequency mixing of thin disk Yb:YAG laser and Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gangfei; Yang, Jianming; Tan, Huiming; Tian, Yubing; Yao, Wenming; Ju, Qiaojun; Zhang, Long; Chen, Jiansheng; Wu, Xiaodong; Gao, Jing

    2017-07-01

    We report a continuous-wave yellow laser at 578 nm obtained by doubly resonant intracavity sum-frequency mixing of thin disk Yb:YAG laser and Nd:YAG laser with a LBO nonlinear crystal. Single-wavelength laser operation at 578 nm by using a silica etalon as a wavelength selector and dual-wavelength operation at 578 nm and 582 nm are obtained with maximum output powers of 100 mW and 136 mW, respectively. The single wavelength operating power stability value in 30 min was 4.7%, which was improved ∼21.6%, compared with that of dual-wavelength operation.

  6. Brain perfusion monitoring with frequency-domain and continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy: a cross-correlation study in newborn piglets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, G.; Katz, A.; Alfano, R.R. [Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers and New York State Center for Advanced Technology for Ultrafast Photonic Materials and Applications Department of Electrical Engineering and Physics, The City College of the City University of New York, 138th Street and Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Kofinas, A.D.; Kofinas, D.A.; Beyer, D. [Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Medicine, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, The Affiliate of Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 121 De Kalb Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Stubblefield, P.G. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Boston University School of Medicine, 1 Boston Medical Center Place, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Rosenfeld, W.; Maulik, D. [Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Pediatrics, Winthrop University Hospital, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 251 First Street, Mineola, New York 11501 (United States); Stankovic, M.R. [Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Medicine, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, The Affiliate of Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 121 De Kalb Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Boston University School of Medicine, 1 Boston Medical Center Place, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Pediatrics, Winthrop University Hospital, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 251 First Street, Mineola, New York 11501 (United States)

    2000-11-01

    The newborn piglet brain model was used to correlate continuous-wave (CW) and frequency-domain (FD) near-infrared spectroscopy. Six ventilated and instrumented newborn piglets were subjected to a series of manipulations in blood oxygenation with the effects on brain perfusion known to be associated with brain hypoxia-ischaemia. An excellent agreement between the CW and FD was demonstrated. This agreement improved when the scattering properties (determined by the FD device) were employed to calculate the differential pathlength factor, an important step in CW data processing. (author)

  7. Numerical Optimisation in Non Reacting Conditions of the Injector Geometry for a Continuous Detonation Wave Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, T.; Davidenko, D.; Dupoirieux, F.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the methodology and the results of a numerical study, which is aimed at the investigation and optimisation of different means of fuel and oxidizer injection adapted to rocket engines operating in the rotating detonation mode. As the simulations are achieved at the local scale of a single injection element, only one periodic pattern of the whole geometry can be calculated so that the travelling detonation waves and the associated chemical reactions can not be taken into account. Here, separate injection of fuel and oxidizer is considered because premixed injection is handicapped by the risk of upstream propagation of the detonation wave. Different associations of geometrical periodicity and symmetry are investigated for the injection elements distributed over the injector head. To analyse the injection and mixing processes, a nonreacting 3D flow is simulated using the LES approach. Performance of the studied configurations is analysed using the results on instantaneous and mean flowfields as well as by comparing the mixing efficiency and the total pressure recovery evaluated for different configurations.

  8. Implementation of an F-statistic all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Virgo VSR1 data

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Borkowski, K; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorosh, O; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A Le; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Luijten, E; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyers, P; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Milde, S; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moesta, P; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quiroga, G; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yang, Z; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    We present an implementation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic to carry out the first search in data from the Virgo laser interferometric gravitational wave detector for periodic gravitational waves from a priori unknown, isolated rotating neutron stars. We searched a frequency $f_0$ range from 100 Hz to 1 kHz and the frequency dependent spindown $f_1$ range from $-1.6\\,(f_0/100\\,{\\rm Hz}) \\times 10^{-9}\\,$ Hz/s to zero. A large part of this frequency - spindown space was unexplored by any of the all-sky searches published so far. Our method consisted of a coherent search over two-day periods using the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic, followed by a search for coincidences among the candidates from the two-day segments. We have introduced a number of novel techniques and algorithms that allow the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm in the coherent part of the search resulting in a fifty-fold speed-up in computation of the $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic with respect to the algorithm used in the other pipelines. No ...

  9. Continuous-wave near-photon counting spectral imaging detector in the mid-infrared by upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Low noise upconversion of IR images by three-wave mixing, can be performed with high efficiency when mixing the object radiation with a powerful laser field inside a highly non-linear crystal such as periodically poled Lithium Niobate. Since IR cameras are expensive and have high levels of intrin......Low noise upconversion of IR images by three-wave mixing, can be performed with high efficiency when mixing the object radiation with a powerful laser field inside a highly non-linear crystal such as periodically poled Lithium Niobate. Since IR cameras are expensive and have high levels...... high-end IR cameras have read noise of hundreds of electrons. The dark noise for infrared cameras based on semiconductor materials is also substantially higher than for silicon cameras, typical values being millions of electrons per pixel per second for cryogenically cooled cameras whereas peltier...... cooled CCD cameras have dark noise measured in fractions of electrons per pixel per second. An ideal solution thus suggest the combination of an efficient low noise image wavelength conversion system combined with low noise silicon based cameras for low noise imaging in the IR region. We discuss image...

  10. Continuously Phase-Modulated Standing Surface Acoustic Waves for Separation of Particles and Cells in Microfluidic Channels Containing Multiple Pressure Nodes

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Junseok; Kang, Byungjun; Lee, Hyungsuk

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes continuously phase-modulated standing surface acoustic waves (CPM-SSAW) and its application for particle separation in multiple pressure nodes. A linear change of phase in CPM-SSAW applies a force to particles whose magnitude depends on their size and contrast factors. During continuous phase modulation, we demonstrate that particles with the target dimension are translated in the direction of moving pressure nodes, whereas smaller particles show oscillatory movements. The rate of phase modulation is optimized for separation of target particles from the relationship between mean particle velocity and period of oscillation. The developed technique is applied to separate particles of the target dimension from the particle mixture. Furthermore, we also demonstrate human keratinocyte cells can be separated in the cell and bead mixture. The separation technique is incorporated with a microfluidic channel spanning multiple pressure nodes, which is advantageous over separation in a single pressu...

  11. Continuously phase-modulated standing surface acoustic waves for separation of particles and cells in microfluidic channels containing multiple pressure nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junseok; Rhyou, Chanryeol; Kang, Byungjun; Lee, Hyungsuk

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes continuously phase-modulated standing surface acoustic waves (CPM-SSAW) and its application for particle separation in multiple pressure nodes. A linear change of phase in CPM-SSAW applies a force to particles whose magnitude depends on their size and contrast factors. During continuous phase modulation, we demonstrate that particles with a target dimension are translated in the direction of moving pressure nodes, whereas smaller particles show oscillatory movements. The rate of phase modulation is optimized for separation of target particles from the relationship between mean particle velocity and period of oscillation. The developed technique is applied to separate particles of a target dimension from the particle mixture. Furthermore, we also demonstrate human keratinocyte cells can be separated in the cell and bead mixture. The separation technique is incorporated with a microfluidic channel spanning multiple pressure nodes, which is advantageous over separation in a single pressure node in terms of throughput.

  12. Hierarchical follow-up of sub-threshold candidates of an all-sky Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves on LIGO sixth science run data

    CERN Document Server

    Papa, Maria Alessandra; Walsh, Sinéad; Di Palma, Irene; Allen, Bruce; Astone, Pia; Bock, Oliver; Creighton, Teviet D; Keitel, David; Machenschalk, Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Siemens, Xavier; Singh, Avneet; Zhu, Sylvia J; Schutz, Bernard F

    2016-01-01

    We report results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves with frequency between 50 and 510 Hz from isolated compact objects, i.e. neutron stars. A new hierarchical multi-stage approach is taken, supported by the computing power of the Einstein@Home project, allowing to probe more deeply than ever before. 16 million sub-threshold candidates from the initial search [LVC,arXiv:1606.09619] are followed up in three stages. None of those candidates is consistent with an isolated gravitational wave emitter, and 90% confidence level upper limits are placed on the amplitudes of continuous waves from the target population. Between 170.5 and 171 Hz we set the most constraining 90% confidence upper limit on the strain amplitude h0 at 4.3x10-25 , while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve an upper limit of 7.6x10-25. These are the most constraining all-sky upper limits to date and constrain the ellipticity of rotating compact objects emitting at 300 Hz at a distance D to less than 6x10-7 [d/100...

  13. Hierarchical follow-up of subthreshold candidates of an all-sky Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves on LIGO sixth science run data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Maria Alessandra; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Walsh, Sinéad; Di Palma, Irene; Allen, Bruce; Astone, Pia; Bock, Oliver; Creighton, Teviet D.; Keitel, David; Machenschalk, Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Siemens, Xavier; Singh, Avneet; Zhu, Sylvia J.; Schutz, Bernard F.

    2016-12-01

    We report results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves with frequency between 50 and 510 Hz from isolated compact objects, e.g., neutron stars. A new hierarchical multistage approach is taken, supported by the computing power of the Einstein@Home project, allowing us to probe more deeply than ever before. 16 million subthreshold candidates from the initial search [LIGO Scientific and Virgo Collaborations, Phys. Rev. D 94, 102002 (2016)] are followed up in four stages. None of those candidates is consistent with an isolated gravitational wave emitter, and 90% confidence level upper limits are placed on the amplitudes of continuous waves from the target population. Between 170.5 and 171 Hz, we set the most constraining 90% confidence upper limit on the strain amplitude h0 at 4.3 ×10-25 , while at the high end of our frequency range, we achieve an upper limit of 7.6 ×10-25 . These are the most constraining all-sky upper limits to date and constrain the ellipticity of rotating compact objects emitting at 300 Hz at a distance D to less than 6 ×10-7 [D/100 pc ] .

  14. Room-temperature continuous-wave operation of Ti:sapphire buried channel-waveguide lasers fabricated via proton implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grivas, C.; Shepherd, D.P.; Eason, R.W.; Laversenne, L.; Moretti, P.; Borca, C.N.; Pollnau, M.

    2006-01-01

    Fabrication and laser operation of proton-implanted Ti:sapphire buried channel waveguides is reported for the first time to our knowledge. Without any postimplantation annealing of the structures, continuous laser operation near 780 nm was demonstrated at room temperature at an absorbed pump power t

  15. Elimination of continuous-wave component in a figure-eight fiber laser based on a polarization asymmetrical NOLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Escobar, E.; Bello-Jiménez, M.; Pottiez, O.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; López-Estopier, R.; Duran-Sánchez, M.; García Ramírez, M. A.; Kuzin, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    The operation of a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) with polarization-dependent transmission was analyzed to perform high-quality ultrashort optical pulses in a figure-eight fiber laser configuration. The design of the NOLM is based on a symmetrical coupler, a loop of highly twisted low-birefringence fiber and a quarter-wave retarder (QWR) to provide polarization asymmetry. Pedestal-free optical pulses were obtained by careful adjustment of the NOLM low-power transmission, which is easily realized in our setup by rotation of the QWR. The laser is capable of operating in both the conventional soliton and the noise-like pulse regimes. Optical pulses as short as 1.39 ps were observed at the fundamental repetition frequency of 0.8 MHz. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is demonstrated by the elimination of low-intensity radiation at the laser output.

  16. Comparative evaluation of continuous intercostal nerve block or epidural analgesia on the rate of respiratory complications, intensive care unit, and hospital stay following traumatic rib fractures: a retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Todd Britt, Ryan Sturm, Rick Ricardi, Virginia Labond Department of Emergency Medicine, Genesys Regional Medical Center, Grand Blanc, MI, USA Background: Thoracic trauma accounts for 10%–15% of all trauma admissions. Rib fractures are the most common injury following blunt thoracic trauma. Epidural analgesia improves patient outcomes but is not without problems. The use of continuous intercostal nerve blockade (CINB may offer superior pain control with fewer side effects. This study's objective was to compare the rate of pulmonary complications when traumatic rib fractures were treated with CINB vs epidurals. Methods: A hospital trauma registry provided retrospective data from 2008 to 2013 for patients with 2 or more traumatic rib fractures. All subjects were admitted and were treated with either an epidural or a subcutaneously placed catheter for continuous intercostal nerve blockade. Our primary outcome was a composite of either pneumonia or respiratory failure. Secondary outcomes included total hospital days, total ICU days, and days on the ventilator. Results: 12.5% (N=8 of the CINB group developed pneumonia or had respiratory failure compared to 16.3% (N=7 in the epidural group. No statistical difference (P=0.58 in the incidence of pneumonia or vent dependent respiratory failure was observed. There was a significant reduction (P=0.05 in hospital days from 9.72 (SD 9.98 in the epidural compared to 6.98 (SD 4.67 in the CINB group. The rest of our secondary outcomes showed no significant difference. Conclusion: This study did not show a difference in the rate of pneumonia or ventilator-dependent respiratory failure in the CINB vs epidural groups. It was not sufficiently powered. Our data supports a reduction in hospital days when CINB is used vs epidural. CINB may have advantages over epidurals such as fewer complications, fewer contraindications, and a shorter time to placement. Further studies are needed to confirm these statements

  17. Hydraulic continuity and biological effects of low strength very low frequency electromagnetic waves: Case of microbial biofilm growth in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Merlin; Noamen, Omri; Evelyne, Gonze; Eric, Valette; Gilles, Cauffet; Marc, Henry

    2015-10-15

    This study aims to elucidate the interactions between water, subjected to electromagnetic waves of very low frequency (VLF) (kHz) with low strength electromagnetic fields (3.5 mT inside the coils), and the development of microbial biofilms in this exposed water. Experimental results demonstrate that in water exposed to VLF electromagnetic waves, the biomass of biofilm is limited if hydraulic continuity is achieved between the electromagnetic generator and the biofilm media. The measured amount of the biofilm's biomass is approximately a factor two lower for exposed biofilm than the non-exposed biofilm. Measurements of electromagnetic fields in the air and simulations exhibit very low intensities of fields (electromagnetic generator. Exposure to electric and magnetic fields of the quoted intensities cannot explain thermal and ionizing effects on the biofilm. A variable electrical potential with a magnitude close to 20 mV was detected in the tank in hydraulic continuity with the electromagnetic generator. The application of quantum field theory may help to explain the observed effects in this case.

  18. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  19. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  20. Diphtheria Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  1. COMPLICATIONS OF PERCUTANEOUS NEPHROLITHOTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The increasing global prevalence of nephrolithiasis continues to burden the health care delivery systems of developing nations. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL is considered the standard treatment for many types of calculi. This study focuses on the complications of PCNL in private practice setting at a peripheral center using the modified Clavien system and role of Guy’s stone score as a predictor of stone free rate and complications. METHODS This is a prospective cohort study of 480 patients who underwent PCNL during August 2011 to July 2015. The complications were classified according to modified Clavien system and correlated with the stone complexity as per the Guy’s stone score. RESULTS It was found that overall 120 complications were reported in 480 patients with the incidence of complications of Grade I, II, IIIa, IIIb, IVb being 48 (10%, 38 (7.9%, 15 (3.5%, 12 (2.5% and 4 (0.8% respectively. As per the Guy’s stone score there were 336, 104 and 40 cases belonging to GSS I, II and III respectively. All grades of complications were more common in GSS II and III. The stone clearance was found to be complete in 95%, 82% and 75% of GSS I, II, III respectively. CONCLUSION The stone complexity is related to complication rate and GSS helps to predict stone free rate and complications

  2. Application of a Hough Search for Continuous Gravitational Waves on Data from the Fifth LIGO Science Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Ceron, E. A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Kanner, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hertz with the first derivative of frequency in the range