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Sample records for complicated urinary tract

  1. [COMPLICATED URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN THE ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćosić, I; Ćosić, V

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections involving lower (cystitis, prostatitis) or upper (pyelonephritis, renal abscess, perinephric abscess) urinary tract. Differentiation of complicated and uncomplicated UTI is usually based on the presence of structural or functional urinary tract abnormalities, which can increase the risk of treatment failure and development of serious complications. Factors that increase the risk are foreign bodies, stones, obstruction, neurogenic bladder, kidney transplantation, immunosuppression, and pregnancy. Complicated UTI includes a spectrum of conditions that increase the risk of treatment failure, as well as of serious complications such as bacteremia and sepsis, perinephric abscess, renal impairment and emphysematous pyelonephritis. To avoid the potentially devastating outcomes, appropriate diagnostic procedures, antibiotic and surgical treatment, and appropriate follow-up are required. The incidence of complicated UTI will grow in the future due to general aging of the population, increasing incidence of diabetes, and ever growing number of immunocompromised and immunosuppressed patients. It is of key importance to recognize complicated UTI on time, and treat it wisely and aggressively to reduce duration of the disease and the risk of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Management of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection.

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    Dielubanza, Elodi J; Mazur, Daniel J; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an overview of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) from a urologic point of view. Discussion includes the evaluation and workup a complicated UTI through history, physical examination, laboratory analysis, and radiographic studies. Specific types of complicated UTI, such as urinary obstruction and renal abscess, are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving antibiotic use for complicated urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, V.

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines for antimicrobial treatment are important in the process of improving antibiotic use, because they describe appropriate antibiotic use. In this thesis, we demonstrated the value of appropriate antibiotic use (i.e. guideline adherence) in patients with a complicated urinary tract infection

  4. [Clinical trials of flomoxef in complicated urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, N; Sudoko, H; Fukuta, K; Nakano, M; Ushiyama, T; Tajima, A; Aso, Y; Masuda, H; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K

    1987-10-01

    Flomoxef (6315-S, FMOX), a new oxacephem antibiotic was studied clinically in 27 patients with complicated urinary tract infections. FMOX was intravenously administered at a dose of 1.0 g twice daily for 5 days. Clinical effect of FMOX on patients with complicated urinary tract infections were excellent in 11.5%, moderate in 57.7% and overall clinical efficacy rate was 69.2%. During the treatment with FMOX, urticaria was observed in 1 case. In laboratory tests, a decrease of RBC, Hb and Ht in 1 case, a decrease of WBC in 1 case and an elevation of GPT in another case were observed. But these abnormal values were slight and transient.

  5. 77 FR 11133 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of this guidance is to assist sponsors in the clinical development of drugs for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (c...

  6. Antibiotic resistance in children with complicated urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, B.; Kural, N.; Yarar, C.; Ak, I.; Akcar, N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to determine the resistance of antibiotics for complicated urinary tract infection (UTI), including urinary tract anomaly (UTA), for empirical antibiotic therapy of complicated UTI. Four hundred and twenty two urine isolates were obtained from 113 patients with recurrent UTI, who used prophylactic antibiotics between February 1999 and November 2004 in the Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. Reflux was found to be most important predisposing factor for recurrent UTI (31.9%). Renal scar was detected more in patients with UTA than without UTA (59.2% versus 12.4%, p<0.05). Gram-negative organisms were dominant in patients with and without UTA (91.5% and 79.2%). Enterococci and Candida spp. were more prevalent in children with UTA than without UTA (p<0.001). Isolates were significantly more resistant to ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, co-amoxiclav, ticarcillin-clvalanate and piperacillin-tazobactam in patients with UTA than without UTA. We found low resistance to ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantoin in UTI with and without UTA. Enterococci spp. was highly resistance to ampicillin and amikacin in patients with UTA. Aztreonam, meropenem and ciprofloxacin seemed to be the best choice for treatment of UTI with UTA due to Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. Nitrofurantoin and nalidixic acid may be first choice antibiotics for prophylaxis in UTI with and without UTA. The UTI with UTA caused by Enterococci spp. might not benefit from a combination of amikacin and ampicillin, it could be treated with glycopeptides. (author)

  7. Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent or Complicated Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nidal S Younish; K Qual; T Al-Awaisheh; F Al-Awaisheh; D Al-Kayed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Urinary tract infection is certainly one of the most common childhood infections. Emerging resistance to the antibiotics is not unusual. Current hospitalization for children with urinary tract infection is reserved for severe or complicated cases. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern among children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection. METHODS: A retrospective study carried out at Prince Hashem hospital, Zarqa ...

  8. Antibiotic resistance in children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, N; Quol, K; Al-Momani, T; Al-Awaisheh, F; Al-Kayed, D

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is certainly one of the most common childhood infections. Emerging resistance to the antibiotics is not unusual. Current hospitalization for children with urinary tract infection is reserved for severe or complicated cases. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern among children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection. A retrospective study carried out at Prince Hashem hospital, Zarqa city, eastern Jordan and involved 336 episodes of culture proved urinary tract infection obtained from 121 patients with recurrent UTI, who used prophylactic antibiotics during the period from April 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006. The isolated microorganisms and there antibiotics susceptibility were studied. Seventy three patients (60.3%) were found to have some forms of urinary tract anomaly, significantly more prevalent among male children Purinary tract infection (64.3% vs. 16.6%, Purinary tract infection. Proteus, Pseudomonas and Candida spp. were more prevalent in patients with complicated (Presistant to most antibiotics tested. Pediatric urine culture isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Empirical treatment with Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) or Cephalexin as the initial drug is ineffective. Nitrofurantoin and Nalidixic acid can be considered as the first line antibiotics for prophylaxis and or treatment of patients with recurrent UTI, while Meropenam and Ciprofloxacin can be used empirically in treating patients with complicated UTI.

  9. Postoperative Urinary Retention and Urinary Tract Infections Predict Midurethral Sling Mesh Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjani, Nahid; Winick-Ng, Jennifer; Welk, Blayne

    2017-01-01

    To determine if postoperative urinary retention and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were predictors of future mesh complications requiring surgical intervention after midurethral sling (MUS). Administrative data in Ontario, Canada, between 2002 and 2013 were used to identify all women who underwent a mesh-based MUS. The primary outcome was revision of the transvaginal mesh sling (including mesh removal/erosion/fistula, or urethrolysis). Two potential risk factors were analyzed: postoperative retention (within 30 days of procedure) and number of postoperative emergency room visits or hospital admissions for UTI symptoms. A total of 59,556 women had a MUS, of which 1598 (2.7%) required revision surgery. Of the 2025 women who presented to the emergency room or were admitted to hospital for postoperative retention, 212 (10.5%) required operative mesh revision. Of the 11,747 patients who had at least one postoperative UTI, 366 (3.1%) patients required operative mesh revision. In adjusted analysis, postoperative retention was significantly predictive of future reoperation (hazard ratio [HR] 3.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.97-4.02), and this difference persisted when urethrolysis was excluded as a reason for sling revision (HR 3.08, 95% CI 2.62-3.63). Similarly, in adjusted analysis, each additional postoperative hospital visit for UTI symptoms increased the risk for surgical intervention for mesh complications (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.61-1.87). Postoperative urinary retention and hospital presentation for UTI symptoms are associated with an increased risk of reoperation for MUS complications. These patients should be followed and investigated for mesh complications when appropriate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Urinary tract infections Urinary tract infections > A-Z Health Topics Urinary tract infections (PDF, ... Embed Subscribe To receive Publications email updates Submit Urinary tract infections Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are most often caused ...

  11. Cross-sectional imaging of complicated urinary infections affecting the lower tract and male genital organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tonolini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complicated urinary tract infections (C-UTIs are those associated with structural or functional genitourinary abnormalities or with conditions that impair the host defence mechanisms, leading to an increased risk of acquiring infection or failing therapy. C-UTIs occur in patients with risk factors such as neurogenic dysfunction, bladder outlet obstruction, obstructive uropathy, bladder catheterisation, urologic instrumentation or indwelling stent, urinary tract post-surgical modifications, chemotherapy- or radiation-induced damage, renal impairment, diabetes and immunodeficiency. Multidetector CT and MRI allow comprehensive investigation of C-UTIs and systemic infection from an unknown source. Based upon personal experience at a tertiary care hospital focused on the treatment of infectious illnesses, this pictorial essay reviews with examples the clinical features and cross-sectional imaging findings of C-UTIs affecting the lower urinary tract and male genital organs. The disorders presented include acute infectious cystitis, bladder mural abscesses, infections of the prostate and seminal vesicles, acute urethritis and related perineal abscesses, funiculitis, epididymo-orchitis and scrotal abscesses. Emphasis is placed on the possible differential diagnoses of lower C-UTIs. The aim is to provide radiologists greater familiarity with these potentially severe disorders which frequently require intensive in-hospital antibiotic therapy, percutaneous drainage or surgery. Teaching Points • Complicated urinary tract infections occur in patients with structural or functional risk factors. • CT and MRI comprehensively investigate complicated urinary infections and sepsis from unknown sources. • Infections of the urinary bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, urethra and scrotum are presented. • Emphasis is placed on differential diagnoses of complicated lower urogenital infections. • Unsuspected urinary infections may be detected on CT

  12. Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent or Complicated Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal S Younish

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric urine culture isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Empirical treatment with Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX or Cephalexin as the initial drug is ineffective. Nitrofurantoin and Nalidixic acid can be considered as the first line antibiotics for prophylaxis and or treatment of patients with recurrent UTI, while Meropenam and Ciprofloxacin can be used empirically in treating patients with complicated UTI. Key words: Antibiotic resistance, Complicated, Recurrent, Urinary tract infection

  13. Diagnosis of aetiology and complications of relapsing urinary tract infections via imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieden, K.; Mende, U.

    1985-01-01

    The indication and efficiency of various radiological examination methods in relapsing infections of the urinary tract, as well as the complications of such infections, are described, and characteristic and pathognomical findings are demonstrated. The diagnostic accuracy of the individual imaging methods depends on the site, size, and density of the pathological process. Accurate diagnosis also requires the incorporation of clinical findings including those established by means of clinical pathology setups. (orig.) [de

  14. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Urinary Tract Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related to the urinary tract health of women: Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) and Urinary Incontinence (UI). For information on a range of urinary tract health issues for women, men, and children, visit the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information ...

  16. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic based dosing of ciprofloxacin in complicated urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sabo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciprofloxacin is often used in treatment of complicated urinary tract infections in areas with high rates of resistance to first line agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of ciprofloxacin in standard dosing regimens in treatment of complicated urinary tract infections. Plasma concentration curves were simulated and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and post-antibiotic effect were determined. Ciprofloxacin MIC ranged from 0.0156 for Gram-negative and to 0.125-0.5 µg/mL for Gram-positive bacteria. Both dosing regimens were suitable for eradication of Gram-negative bacteria, with slight supremacy of 750 mg/12 hours over 500 mg/12 hours dosing regimen. Even though all strains were fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin, pharmaco-kinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters did not meet target thresholds for pathogens with MIC over 0.1-0.2 µg/mL regardless of the administered dose. Ciprofloxacin remains an excellent choice for treatment of complicated urinary tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, but in infection caused by Gram-positive strains, deeper analysis is necessary in order to achieve optimal results.

  17. Prenatal complicated duplex collecting system and ureterocele-Important risk factors for urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuri, Sofia; Jahnukainen, Timo; Taskinen, Seppo

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in infants with prenatally detected complicated duplex collecting system (CDS) or ureterocele. All patients with prenatally detected CDS (n=34) or single system ureterocele (n=7) who were admitted to our institution between 2003 and 2013 were enrolled in this retrospective analysis. Duplex collecting systems with ureterocele (n=13), vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) (n=20) or nonrefluxing megaureter without ureterocele (n=7) were determined as complicated. Twenty-six (63%) patients were females. The prevalence of UTI was compared to 66 controls. The median follow-up time was 5.5 (1.7-12.2) years. Eighteen (44%) patients and 3 (5%) controls had at least one UTI (pduplex collecting system associated with nonrefluxing megaureter are at high risk of UTI despite prophylactic antibiotics. In case of prenatally detected ureterocele we suggest to consider early endoscopic perforation. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Complicated catheter-associated urinary tract infections due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S M; Stickler, D J; Mobley, H L T; Shirtliff, M E

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection and are a major health concern due to the complications and frequent recurrence. These infections are often caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. Gram-negative bacterial species that cause CAUTIs express a number of virulence factors associated with adhesion, motility, biofilm formation, immunoavoidance, and nutrient acquisition as well as factors that cause damage to the host. These infections can be reduced by limiting catheter usage and ensuring that health care professionals correctly use closed-system Foley catheters. A number of novel approaches such as condom and suprapubic catheters, intermittent catheterization, new surfaces, catheters with antimicrobial agents, and probiotics have thus far met with limited success. While the diagnosis of symptomatic versus asymptomatic CAUTIs may be a contentious issue, it is generally agreed that once a catheterized patient is believed to have a symptomatic urinary tract infection, the catheter is removed if possible due to the high rate of relapse. Research focusing on the pathogenesis of CAUTIs will lead to a better understanding of the disease process and will subsequently lead to the development of new diagnosis, prevention, and treatment options.

  19. Pediatric urinary tract infection

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    Blickman, J.G.

    1991-02-06

    Acute urinary tract infection (UTI) is an important cause of morbidity in children and may be complicated by congenital urinary tract abnormalities of a functional or anatomic nature which, predispose to recurrent UTI's that in turn may lead to renal failure and hypertension. Early radiologic and ultrasonographic investigations may reveal these anatomic anomalies in particular because the urinary tract, specifically in children, is not readily accessible to adequate clinical examinations Excretory urography (EU) has been considered as the 'gold standard' of upper urinary tract visualization, while the voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) was thought to be the preferential method of imaging of the lower urinary tract. Recently, major technical advances have altered this commonly accepted diagnostic workup. Although ultrasonography, radio-nuclide scanning and urodynamics have become important contributors to the understanding of pathophysiology of UTI's their value and place in assessment of the sequence of imaging has not been comprehensively studied. This thesis deals about the optimization of the choice and the order of the different imaging techniques used in the evaluation of children, younger than six year with UTI. (author). 243 refs.; 23 figs.; 8 tabs.

  20. Pediatric urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blickman, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Acute urinary tract infection (UTI) is an important cause of morbidity in children and may be complicated by congenital urinary tract abnormalities of a functional or anatomic nature which, predispose to recurrent UTI's that in turn may lead to renal failure and hypertension. Early radiologic and ultrasonographic investigations may reveal these anatomic anomalies in particular because the urinary tract, specifically in children, is not readily accessible to adequate clinical examinations Excretory urography (EU) has been considered as the 'gold standard' of upper urinary tract visualization, while the voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) was thought to be the preferential method of imaging of the lower urinary tract. Recently, major technical advances have altered this commonly accepted diagnostic workup. Although ultrasonography, radio-nuclide scanning and urodynamics have become important contributors to the understanding of pathophysiology of UTI's their value and place in assessment of the sequence of imaging has not been comprehensively studied. This thesis deals about the optimization of the choice and the order of the different imaging techniques used in the evaluation of children, younger than six year with UTI. (author). 243 refs.; 23 figs.; 8 tabs

  1. Managing urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Saadeh, Sermin A.; Mattoo, Tej K.

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in childhood. Presence of pyuria and bacteriuria in an appropriately collected urine sample are diagnostic of UTI. The risk of UTI is increased with an underlying urological abnormality such as vesicoureteral reflux, constipation, and voiding dysfunction. Patients with acute pyelonephritis are at risk of renal scarring and subsequent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria with and without FSGS, pregnancy-related complications and even end-sta...

  2. Recommendations for the empirical treatment of complicated urinary tract infections using surveillance data on antimicrobial resistance in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningstein, Maike; van der Bij, Akke K.; de Kraker, Marlieke E. A.; Monen, Jos C.; Muilwijk, Jan; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; van Hall, Maurine A. Leverstein-; Vlaspolder, F.; Cohen Stuart, J. W. T.; van Hees, B. C.; Wintermans, R. G. F.; Altorf-van der Kuil, W.; Alblas, J.; van der Bij, A. K.; Frentz, D.; Leenstra, T.; Monen, J. C.; Muilwijk, J.; Notermans, D. W.; de Greeff, S. C.; van Keulen, P. H. J.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Mattsson, E. E.; Sebens, F. W.; Frenay, H. M. E.; Maraha, B.; Heilmann, F. G. C.; Halaby, T.; Versteeg, D.; Hendrix, R.; Schellekens, J. F. P.; Diederen, B. M. W.; de Brauwer, E. I. G. B.; Stals, F. S.; Bakker, L. J.; Dorigo-Zetsma, J. W.; van Zeijl, J. H.; Bernards, A. T.; de Jongh, B. M.; Vlaminckx, B. J. M.; Horrevorts, A.; Kuipers, S.; Moffie, B.; Brimicombe, R. W.; Jansen, C. L.; Renders, N. H. M.; Hendrickx, B. G. A.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Kaan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections (c-UTIs) are among the most common nosocomial infections and a substantial part of the antimicrobial agents used in hospitals is for the treatment of c-UTIs. Data from surveillance can be used to guide the empirical treatment choices of clinicians when treating

  3. Comparing between results and complications of doing voiding cystourethrogram in the first week following urinary tract infection and in 2-6 weeks after urinary tract infection in children referring to a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Shahsavari, Someyeh; Pakniyat, Abdolghader

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most common genitourinary disease in children so about 40% of the children with urinary tract infection suffering from reflux that caused some consequences such as pyelonephritis and kidney parenchymal injury. This research was conducted to compare the timing of voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) in children with urinary tract infection in first week and after the first week of urinary tract infection. This research is a case-control study that both case and control groups include 208 children from 1 month to 12 years old with the complain of urinary tract infection. In case group, the VCUG was performed at the first week of infection and in control group, the VCUG was performed after the first week of infection. complication such as dysuria was observed in two-thirds of children who VCUG was performed during first week after urinary tract infection. Parents stress in case group was more than the other (P=0.015). For overall, the incidence of reflux in case and control groups was 49.5% and 50%, respectively. The mean of reflux grading in right kidney in case group was lower than control group resulting in significant differences between two groups. According to higher grade of stress in parents and complications due to VCUG at the first week of urinary tract infection, it is suggested that VCUG be conducted on selective patients in the hospital at the first week of urinary tract infection and during hospitalization.

  4. Genital and Urinary Tract Defects

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    ... conditions > Genital and urinary tract defects Genital and urinary tract defects E-mail to a friend Please fill ... and extra fluids. What problems can genital and urinary tract defects cause? Genital and urinary tract defects affect ...

  5. Comparative assessment of renal Tc-99m DMSA scan and renal sonography findings in complication of urinary tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, M.; Rasekhi, A.

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is a common disease in childhood specially in female. In this study 50 patients with established diagnosis of urinary tract infection were evaluated by both renal scan with Tc-99m DMSA and renal sonography. The study revealed that most urinary tract infections are in children, female sex between 5-9 years of age. Therefore the most important complications (renal scarring) are also common in this age-sex distribution. Occurrence of renal scars increase with increasing the number of recurrent infections. Vesicoureteral reflux is one of the most important, common risk factors for renal scarring. Renal Tc-99m Dmsa scan is more sensitive than renal sonography in detecting the renal scars

  6. Kidneys and Urinary Tract

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    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidneys and Urinary Tract KidsHealth / For Teens / Kidneys and Urinary Tract What's ... a sign of diabetes . What the Kidneys and Urinary Tract Do Although the two kidneys work together to ...

  7. [Urinary tract infections in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michno, Mikolaj; Sydor, Antoni

    Review of urinary tract infections in adults including etiology, pathogenesis, classification and the most important therapeutic recommendations. Urinary tract infections are still a common clinical problem occurring more often in sexually active women, pregnancy, elderly , after catherization of a urinary bladder and urological surgery as well as in the co-existence of diabetes or nephrolithiasis. Due to the anatomical differences, women suffer more often than men. The main etiological factor is Escherichia coli, even though it plays a lesser role in the complicated infections, than in non-complicated ones. Apart from that, the infections may also be caused by atypical microbes, viruses and fungi. Relapses as well as reinfections are typical features of urinary tract infections and in some cases prolonged infections can spread from lower to upper urinary tract contributing to pyelonephritis, urosepsis or even death. These long-term infections can progress in a hidden, insidious, oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic manner leading to irreversible, progressive deterioration of renal function. They can also mask other diseases such as tuberculosis or neoplasms of the urinary tract, which leads to the delayed diagnosis and treatment. Diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections is a complex problem, often requiring specialized procedures as well as hospitalization. The choice of a therapy is determined by the type of infection, general condition, age and coexisting diseases. Rapid diagnosis and implementation of proper pharmacotherapy may shorten the time of treatment and hospitalization, preventing serious complications and reinfections.

  8. Doripenem in hospital infections: a focus on nosocomial pneumonia, complicated intra-abdominal infections, and complicated urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Shien Lo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tze Shien Lo,1 Stephanie M Borchardt,2 Justin M Welch,3 Melissa A Rohrich,3 Augusto M Alonto,4 Anne V Alonto51Infectious Diseases Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 2Research Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 3Pharmacy Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 4Infectious Diseases Department, MeritCare Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 5Department of Internal Medicine, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, North Dakota, USAAbstract: Doripenem is the latest carbapenem on the market to date. Although not an antibiotic in a new class, it offers a glimmer of hope in combating serious infections secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria when we have not seen a new class of antibacterial, particularly for Gram-negative bacteria, for more than 10 years. In vitro, doripenem exhibits a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL and Amp-C β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae and anaerobes. Doripenem also exhibits better in vitro activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to other anti-pseudomonal carbapenems. It combines the desirable activities of both imipenem and meropenem. It has similar activity to imipenem against Gram-positive pathogens and has the antimicrobial spectrum of meropenem against Gram-negative organisms. Several randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that doripenem is non-inferior to meropenem, imipenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, or levofloxacin in its efficacy and safety profile in treating a wide range of serious bacterial infections including intra-abdominal infection, complicated urinary tract infection, and nosocomial pneumonia. Due to its wide spectrum of activity and good safety profile it is susceptible to misuse leading to increasing rates of resistance

  9. Complications and Outcomes of Pregnancy and Cesarean Delivery in Women With Neuropathic Bladder and Lower Urinary Tract Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joshua D; Casey, Jessica T; Whittam, Benjamin M; Szymanski, Konrad M; Kaefer, Martin; Rink, Richard C; Schubert, Frank P; Cain, Mark P; Misseri, Rosalia

    2018-04-01

    To determine the outcomes of pregnancy and cesarean delivery (CD) in women with neuropathic bladder (NB) and pediatric lower urinary tract reconstruction (LUTR) as these women often have normal fertility and may become pregnant. We reviewed consecutive patients with NB due to spinal dysraphism who underwent LUTR, became pregnant, and had a CD at our institution from July 2001 to June 2016. We collected data on demographics, hydronephrosis, symptomatic urinary tract infection, continence, and catheterization during pregnancy. CD data included gestational age, abdominal or uterine incisions, and complications. We identified 18 pregnancies in 11 women. Fifteen live newborns were delivered via CD (53.3% term births). Thirteen of 15 patients (86.7%) developed new (10) or worsening (3) hydronephrosis. Six of 13 patients (46.2%) underwent nephrostomy tube placement. Eight of 15 patients (53.3%) developed difficulty catheterizing (66.7% via native urethra, 44.4% via catheterizable channel); 50.0% of patients required an indwelling catheter. Five of 15 patients (33.3%) developed urinary incontinence during pregnancy. Ten of 15 patients (66.7%) had a urinary tract infection (30.0% febrile). A urologist was present for all CDs: 5 were scheduled, 10 occurred emergently. Complications occurred in 40.0% (5 cystotomies, 1 bowel deserosalization, 1 vaginal laceration). All cystotomies occurred during emergent CD. Three patients (20.0%) developed urinary fistulae after emergent CD. Women with NB and LUTR have high rates of complications during pregnancy and CD, despite routine involvement of urologists. Women with prolonged labor, previous CD, or those with a history of noncompliance developed the worst complications. Based on our experience, a urologist should always be present and participate in the CD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Once daily, extended release ciprofloxacin for complicated urinary tract infections and acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talan, David A; Klimberg, Ira W; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Song, James; Kowalsky, Steven F; Church, Deborah A

    2004-02-01

    We assessed the efficacy and safety of 1,000 mg extended release ciprofloxacin orally once daily vs conventional 500 mg ciprofloxacin orally twice daily, each for 7 to 14 days, in patients with a complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) or acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis (AUP). In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, North American multicenter clinical trial adults were stratified based on clinical presentation of cUTI or AUP and randomized to extended release ciprofloxacin or ciprofloxacin twice daily. Efficacy valid patients had positive pretherapy urine cultures (105 or greater cFU/ml) and pyuria within 48 hours of study entry. Bacteriological and clinical outcomes were assessed at the test of cure visit (5 to 11 days after therapy) and the late followup visit (28 to 42 days after therapy). The intent to treat population comprised 1,035 patients (extended release ciprofloxacin in 517 and twice daily in 518), of whom 435 were efficacy valid (cUTI in 343 and AUP in 92). For efficacy valid patients (cUTI and AUP combined) bacteriological eradication rates at test of cure were 89% (183 of 206) vs 85% (195 of 229) (95% CI -2.4%, 10.3%) and clinical cure rates were 97% (198 of 205) vs 94% (211 of 225) (95% CI -1.2%, 6.9%) for extended release vs twice daily ciprofloxacin. Late followup outcomes were consistent with test of cure findings. Eradication rates for Escherichia coli, which accounted for 58% of pathogens, were 97% or greater per group. Drug related adverse event rates were similar for extended release and twice daily ciprofloxacin (13% and 14%, respectively). Extended release ciprofloxacin at a dose of 1,000 mg once daily was as safe and effective as conventional treatment with 500 mg ciprofloxacin twice daily, each given orally for 7 to 14 days in adults with cUTI or AUP. It provides a convenient, once daily, empirical treatment option.

  11. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... urinary tract infection, or UTI, you're probably thinking about peeing quite a lot. Why? Because it ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ...

  12. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals ... Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ...

  13. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ... Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ...

  14. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ... topic for: Kids Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more Partner Message ...

  15. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ... topic for: Kids Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more About Us ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections KidsHealth / For Teens / Urinary Tract Infections What's ... especially girls — visit a doctor. What Is a Urinary Tract Infection? A bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI) is ...

  17. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections ( ... Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made ...

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections ( ... Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made ...

  19. Treatment of recurrent complicated urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Hua; Huang, Fang-Liang; Fu, Lin-Shien; Chou, Chia-Man; Chien, Ya-Li; Huang, Chung-Ming; Lin, Chin-Fu; Chen, Po-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) are often caused by uropathogens with a high rate of drug resistance and are associated with a high rate of recurrence with a single pathogen. In this study, we evaluated the incidence of recurrent UTI and the drug resistance pattern of Escherichia coli in children with VUR. We also evaluated whether combination therapy comprising fosomycin plus one other antimicrobial agent is effective for treatment of recurrent UTIs. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all children with VUR who developed at least one episode of UTI during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013 at a single medical center. The effectiveness of fosfomycin plus amikicin for Enterobacteriaceae or ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was prospectively studied in six children with recurrent relapsing UTIs. The study population comprised 129 children (age range, from 1month to 15 years; mean ± standard deviation, 2.37 ± 2.91 years) with VUR who developed at least one UTI during the 10-year study period; 68 (52.7%) had recurrent UTIs. The presence of an underlying urinary tract anomaly was predictive of recurrence (p = 0.028). The rates of susceptibility of E. coli to cefazolin (p UTIs. Combination therapy with fosfomycin plus amikacin or ceftazidime was shown to be an effective therapeutic option for recurrent UTIs due to a single uropathogen. The rates of susceptibility of E. coli to commonly used antimicrobials were significantly lower in children who developed more than one episode of UTI. The empiric choice of cefazolin or cefotaxime was usually ineffective. Administration of fosfomycin plus amikacin or ceftazidime was an effective therapeutic and preventive strategy in children with VUR and recurrent relapsing UTI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and Bowel Why is it important to begin urologic care in infancy and ...

  1. Urinary tract infection - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    UTI - children; Cystitis - children; Bladder infection - children; Kidney infection - children; Pyelonephritis - children ... Craig JC. Long-term antibiotics for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection in children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev . 2011;(3):CD001534. PMID: ...

  2. Complicated urinary tract infections: practical solutions for the treatment of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallett, Ann; Hand, Kieran

    2010-11-01

    Resistance in Gram-negative bacteria has been increasing, particularly over the last 6 years. This is mainly due to the spread of strains producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) such as CTX-M enzymes or AmpC β-lactamases. Many of the isolates producing these enzymes are also resistant to trimethoprim, quinolones and aminoglycosides, often due to plasmid co-expression of other resistance mechanisms. CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli often occurs in the community and as E. coli is one of the commonest organisms causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) the choice of agents to treat these infections is diminishing. Novel combinations of antibiotics are being used in the community and broad-spectrum agents such as carbapenems are being used increasingly as empirical treatment for severe infections. Of particular concern therefore are reports in the UK of organisms that produce carbapenemases. As resistance is becoming more widespread, prudent use of antimicrobials is imperative and, as asymptomatic bacteriuria is typically benign in the elderly, antibiotics should not be prescribed without clinical signs of UTI. The use of antibiotics as suppressive therapy or long-term prophylaxis may no longer be defensible.

  3. Upper urinary tract tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandrup, Karen L; Nordling, Jørgen; Balslev, Ingegerd

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomography urography (CTU) is used widely in the work-up of patients with symptoms of urinary tract lesions. Preoperative knowledge of whether a tumor is invasive or non-invasive is important for the choice of surgery. So far there are no studies about the distinction...... of invasive and non-invasive tumors in ureter and renal pelvis based on the enhancement measured with Hounsfield Units. PURPOSE: To examine the value of CTU using split-bolus technique to distinguish non-invasive from invasive urothelial carcinomas in the upper urinary tract. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... obtained at CTU could distinguish between invasive and non-invasive lesions. No patients had a CTU within the last year before the examination that resulted in surgery. CONCLUSION: A split-bolus CTU cannot distinguish between invasive and non-invasive urothelial tumors in the upper urinary tract...

  4. Urinary Tract Infection as a Preventable Cause of Pregnancy Complications: Opportunities, Challenges, and a Global Call to Action

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Nicole M.; O'Brien, Valerie P.; Hultgren, Scott; Macones, George; Lewis, Warren G.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    The urinary tract is a common site of infection in humans. During pregnancy, urinary tract infection (UTI) is associated with increased risks of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, even when the infection is asymptomatic. By mapping available rates of UTI in pregnancy across different populations, we emphasize this as a problem of global significance. Many countries with high rates of preterm birth and neonatal mortality also have rates of UTI in pregnancy that exceed rates seen in...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an infection somewhere in your urinary tract. Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? ... bladder, your brain tells you it's time to find a bathroom. Once you're ready to pee, ...

  6. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is ...

  7. Urinary Tract and How It Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VUR) The Urinary Tract & How It Works The Urinary Tract & How It Works On this page: What is ... a person produces? Clinical Trials What is the urinary tract and how does it work? The urinary tract ...

  8. Evaluation of Screening Methods for the Detection of Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2000-05-30

    screening testsfor urinary tract infection was donefrom March 20 to May 30, 2000. A cross sectional study ... the diagnosis of urinary tract infection on the basis of pyuria alone. The minimum number of ..... infection Complicating. Pregnancy J.

  9. Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) ... How Do I Know if I Have a UTI? You may notice signs of a urinary tract ...

  11. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys two ureters (say: ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more ... & Terms of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web ...

  12. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jennifer; Briggs, Gerald G; McKeown, Anna; Bustillo, Gerardo

    2004-10-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of urinary tract infections (UTIs) during pregnancy. All aspects of UTIs, including epidemiology, pathogenesis, resistance, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, were reviewed. MEDLINE (1966-August 2003) and Cochrane Library searches were performed using the key search terms urinary tract infection, pyelonephritis, cystitis, asymptomatic bacteriuria, and resistance. All article abstracts were evaluated for relevance. Only articles pertaining to pregnancy were included. The majority of published literature were review articles; the number of original clinical studies was limited. UTIs are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy. They are characterized by the presence of significant bacteria anywhere along the urinary tract. Pyelonephritis is the most common severe bacterial infection that can lead to perinatal and maternal complications including premature delivery, infants with low birth weight, fetal mortality, preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and transient renal insufficiency. Enterobacteriaceae account for 90% of UTIs. The common antibiotics used are nitrofurantoin, cefazolin, cephalexin, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin. Therapeutic management of UTIs in pregnancy requires proper diagnostic workup and thorough understanding of antimicrobial agents to optimize maternal outcome, ensure safety to the fetus, and prevent complications that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in both the fetus and the mother.

  13. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection Among Pregnant Women and its Complications in Their Newborns During the Birth in the Hospitals of Dezful City, Iran, 2012 - 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri, Marziyeh; Lavasani, Zohreh; Norouzirad, Reza; Najibpour, Reza; Mohamadpour, Masoomeh; Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Raeisi, Mohammad; Zare Marzouni, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common disorder caused by bacterial agents in pregnancy, which can lead to important complications in newborn of such mothers in case of inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to study the prevalence of UTI among pregnant women and its complications in their newborns during the birth in the hospitals of Dezful City, Iran, during 2012 - 2013. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospecti...

  14. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz, Miguel Angel; Hernández, Antonio; Asenjo, Eloy; Herráiz, Ignacio

    2005-12-01

    Urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB), acute cystitis (AC) and acute pyelonephritis (AP), are favored by the morphological and functional changes involved in pregnancy. AB increases the risk of preterm labor, low birth weight and AP. AB should be detected by uroculture (other methods are not sufficiently effective) and treated early. Approximately 80% of cases are caused by Escherichia coli. The risks and effectiveness of the distinct antibiotic regimens should be evaluated: fosfomycin trometamol in monotherapy or as short course therapy is safe and effective for the treatment of AB and AC. AP is the most frequent cause of hospital admission for medical reasons in pregnant women and can lead to complications in 10% of cases, putting the lives of the mother and fetus at risk. Currently outpatient treatment of AP is recommended in selected cases. Adequate follow-up of pregnant women with urinary tract infections is required due to frequent recurrence.

  15. Survey of risk factors urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Women are very susceptible to urinary tract infections and pregnancy raises the risk of urinary tract infection. In general, little information on the risk factors of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is underway. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy is an important risk factor for pregnancy dire consequences. The purpose of this study is to find risk factors associated with urinary tract infection in pregnant women. Methods: The study was observational and retrospective analysis was carried on in the winter of which 310 pregnant women participated in 11 health centers in Shahrekord. Of these 155 cases (patients and 155 controls (healthy that were matched for age Information required from the health records of pregnant women and complete Czech list of researcher whose validity was confirmed by experts were gathered. Information needed by pregnant women health records and complete list researcher was collected. Czech list contains a number of possible risk factors for illness and demographic characteristics of the study participants was Statistical analysis software spss version 16 by using chi square tests and logistic regression and t analysis was performed. Results: Among the variables vomiting (p = 0/00 a history of urinary tract infection in a previous pregnancy (P =.001, CI = 1.508-4.408, OR = 2.578 abortion own history (P =.014, CI = 1.165 -3.847, OR = 2.117, respectively, the most important risk factors for urinary tract infection in pregnant women were determined. Conclusion: Prevention and treatment of vomiting in pregnancy prevention of urinary tract infections during pregnancy. Prevention of abortion can play an important role in the prevention of urinary tract infection and its complications in pregnancy. The study also revealed a number of factors can have an impact on urinary tract infection in pregnancy that has not been enough attention and it is necessary that more attention be placed on health programs and

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & ... KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary ...

  17. Urinary tract trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.E. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    From a practical point of view, a woman who has blunt injury to the pelvic area with hematuria from the lower urinary tract, has a contused or ruptured bladder. In a man, such a situation calls for retrograde urethrography to determine if the injury is in the urethra or the bladder because the two organs are investigated differently. In both sexes, such injuries are usually associated with pelvic fractures. Massive bladder displacement and severe hemorrhage should alert one to the need for pelvic angiography to find and embolize the bleeding site within the first 24 hours after injury. For blunt trauma to the upper urinary tract an intravenous urogram with tomography is still the main examination. However, a normal intravenous urogram does not exclude serious injury. Therefore, if signs or symptoms persist, a computerized tomographic (CT) examination should be performed if available. Otherwise, a radionuclide study is advisable. Non-excretion on intravenous urography with tomography calls for selective renal arteriography to delineate the etiology. There can be serious renal trauma in the absence of hematuria, which may occur with renal pedicle injury or avulsion of the ureter. Minor forniceal ruptures may occasionally mask severe posterior renal lacerations.

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? ...

  19. Radiology of trauma to kidney and lower urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorph, S.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are trauma to kidney, imaging of kidney trauma, management of renal trauma, delayed complications, trauma to the lower urinary tract, trauma to urinary bladder, radiologic diagnosis, ethiology of blunt bladder injury, urethal injury (6 refs.)

  20. Radiology of trauma to kidney and lower urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorph, S [Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are trauma to kidney, imaging of kidney trauma, management of renal trauma, delayed complications, trauma to the lower urinary tract, trauma to urinary bladder, radiologic diagnosis, ethiology of blunt bladder injury, urethal injury (6 refs.).

  1. Imaging of the Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... day urinary urgency—the inability to delay urination urinary incontinence—the accidental loss of urine blockage of urine ... can use several different imaging techniques depending on factors such as the ... urinary tract symptoms. Conventional Radiology X-ray machines have ...

  2. The urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornbury, J.R.; Weiss, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Introduction of new methods and enhancement of traditional radiologic methods have greatly influenced the use of imaging to diagnose and treat patients who have urinary tract disease. In the past, plain films of the abdomen and excretory urography were the starting point in the diagnostic imaging process. Today, either computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography may be requested initially. Choosing the appropriate method has become more complex because of the variety that confronts the physician. If physicians think critically about the selection of patients before requesting an imaging examination, they can improve their use of such examinations. First, the physician must hypothesize a differential diagnosis. Particularly important is the action of linking the use of the diagnostic test to the choice of treatment. The following paragraphs present the most frequently used (or most useful) examinations for the specific diagnostic problem situations that are discussed subsequently

  3. Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taskesen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are frequent conditions in children. Untreated urinary tract infections can lead to serious kidney problems that could threaten the life of the child. Therefore, early detection and treatment of urinary tract infection is important. In older children, urinary tract infections may cause obvious symptoms such as stomach ache and disuria. In infants and young children, UTIs may be harder to detect because of less specific symptoms. Recurrences are common in children with urinary abnormalities such as neurogenic bladder, vesicourethral reflux or those with very poor toilet and hygiene habits. This article reviews the diagnostic approach and presents the current data related to the roles of radiologic imaging, surgical correction and antibiotic prophylaxis of UTIs in children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000: 57-69

  4. Urinary tract infection as a preventable cause of pregnancy complications: opportunities, challenges, and a global call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nicole M; O'Brien, Valerie P; Hultgren, Scott; Macones, George; Lewis, Warren G; Lewis, Amanda L

    2013-09-01

    The urinary tract is a common site of infection in humans. During pregnancy, urinary tract infection (UTI) is associated with increased risks of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, even when the infection is asymptomatic. By mapping available rates of UTI in pregnancy across different populations, we emphasize this as a problem of global significance. Many countries with high rates of preterm birth and neonatal mortality also have rates of UTI in pregnancy that exceed rates seen in more developed countries. A global analysis of the etiologies of UTI revealed familiar culprits as well as emerging threats. Screening and treatment of UTI have improved birth outcomes in several more developed countries and would likely improve maternal and neonatal health worldwide. However, challenges of implementation in resource-poor settings must be overcome. We review the nature of the barriers occurring at each step of the screening and treatment pipeline and highlight steps necessary to overcome these obstacles. It is our hope that the information compiled here will increase awareness of the global significance of UTI in maternal and neonatal health and embolden governments, nongovernmental organizations, and researchers to do their part to make urine screening and UTI treatment a reality for all pregnant women.

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... urinary tract infection, or UTI, you're probably thinking about peeing quite a lot. Why? Because it ... you have a bladder infection, your doctor will order some medicine for you to take to kill ...

  6. URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN ADULTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Infection of the urinary tract (UTI) is frequently encountered in clinical practice — in the USA these ... Asymptomatic UTI is identified when organisms can be isolated in appropriate numbers .... Pregnancy ... men, so pre-treatment urine culture is.

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That Help Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for ... ll never want to have one again! To help keep those bacteria out of your urinary tract, ...

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract Troubles Girls are more likely than boys to get a UTI. That's because their urethras are much shorter than boys' urethras. The shorter urethra means bacteria can get ...

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Ahhh! That feels better. Urinary Tract Troubles Girls are more likely than boys to get a ... away properly, they stay on your skin. In girls, this means they can grow near the opening ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... five to six times a day but never think twice about? Answer: Pee! But if you have ... urinary tract infection, or UTI, you're probably thinking about peeing quite a lot. Why? Because it ...

  11. Urinary tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedberry-Ross, Sherry; Pohl, Hans G

    2008-03-01

    Urinary tract infections can be a significant source of morbidity in the pediatric population. The mainstay of evaluating urinary tract infections in children has been physical examination, urinalysis and culture, and renal and bladder sonography and contrast cystography. However, novel clinical paradigms now consider the importance of various risk factors, such as bacterial virulence and antibiotic-resistance patterns, elimination disorders, and the role of innate immunity and inflammation in determining the likelihood of renal cortical scarring.

  12. Febrile urinary tract infections: pyelonephritis and urosepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Holleman, Frits; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Complicated infections of the urinary tract (UTI) including pyelonephritis and urosepsis are also called febrile UTI. This review describes insights from the literature on this topic since July 2014. Recent studies regarding risk factors and consequences of febrile UTI confirmed existing knowledge.

  13. Urinary tract infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, L.; Janko, V.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in children which can be a source of significant morbidity. For as yet unknown reasons a minority of UTIs in children progress to renal scarring, hypertension and renal insufficiency. Clinical presentation of UTI in children may be nonspecific, and the appropriateness of certain diagnostic tests remains controversial. The diagnostic work-up should be tailored to uncover functional and structural abnormalities such as dysfunctional voiding, vesicoureteral reflux and obstructive uropathy. A more aggressive work-up is recommended for patients at greater risk for pyelonephritis and renal scarring, including infants less than one year of age. Early sequential (intravenous treatment followed by oral antibiotics) antibacterial therapy is recommended to prevent renal scarring. Routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not recommended, it may be used in patients with higher grade reflux, obstructive uropathy or recurring UTI who are at greater risk for subsequent infections and complications. (author)

  14. Survey of risk factors urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    A Dehghani; M zahedi; M moezzi; M dafei; H Falahzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Women are very susceptible to urinary tract infections and pregnancy raises the risk of urinary tract infection. In general, little information on the risk factors of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is underway. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy is an important risk factor for pregnancy dire consequences. The purpose of this study is to find risk factors associated with urinary tract infection in pregnant women. Methods: The study was observational and retrospective ...

  15. Urinary tract infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Mora, Natalia; Pachón Díaz, Jerónimo; Cordero Matía, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    Infectious complications remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among transplant recipients. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication in kidney transplant recipients with a reported incidence from 25% to 75%, varies widely likely due to differences in definition, diagnostic criteria, study design, and length of observation. We sought reviews the incidence and importance of urinary tract infection on graft survival, the microbiology with special emphasis on multidrug resistant microorganisms, the therapeutic management of UTI and the prophylaxis of recurrent UTI among solid organ transplant recipients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical trials to unify the clinical management in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of Risk Factors, Treatment and Hospital Stay in Complicated Urinary Tract Infections in Men Caused by Pseudomonas: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Selçuk Özger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is known that Pseudomonas has been isolated more frequently in health care-related urinary tract infections (UTIs. It was aimed to determine the risk factors and empiric therapies due to antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas-related male UTIs, and assess the effect of Pseudomonas isolation on treatment and length of hospital stay. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted between January 2011 and January 2013 with 228 male health care-related complicated UTI patients hospitalized in the Urology and Infectious Diseases Inpatient Clinics at Gazi University Faculty of Medicine. Three hundred UTI attacks in 228 patients were evaluated retrospectively with regard to agents. Results: Pseudomonas was isolated in 37 of 300 complicated UTI attacks in 228 male patients. Nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization were determined as the risk factors for Pseudomonas related with health care-related UTI. It was understood that nephrolithiasis increased Pseudomonas isolated UTI risk 3.5 fold and recurrent UTI increased the risk 8.9 fold. The antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas was higher than other agents. Pseudomonas related UTIs prolonged the duration of hospital stay and antibiotic treatment. Conclusion: In the presence of nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization, drugs against Pseudomonas would be appropriate empiric treatment for health care-related complicated UTI. Ciprofloxacin use should be restricted when local antibiotic resistance, which leads empiric treatment, is taken into consideration. Increases in hospital stay and antibiotic treatment duration were thought to be associated with recurrent infection frequency and high antibiotics resistance in Pseudomonas related UTIs.

  17. Urinary tract infections in women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections in women, with ... Acute cystitis refers to symptomatic infection of the bladder in the lower ... lungs in a patient with pneumonia.4. Risk factors ... use of antimicrobial agents for community-acquired UTIs has resulted in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance.

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  19. Gas in the urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, F.J.; Peka, J. de la; Perez, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Sahagun, E.

    1996-01-01

    The causes of gas in the urinary tract and the radiologic procedures employed to detect it are reviewed. The value of each in determining the diagnosis and extension of the pathological process is discussed. The characteristic images of this disorder as represented by the different techniques, are presented. (Author) 18 refs,

  20. Urinary Tract Infection in Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Hamid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common paediatric infections. By the time children are 5 years old, about 8% of girls and about 1-2% of boys have had at least one episode of UTI. UTIs are caused mainly by colonic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, followed by Klebsiella and Proteus. However, any organism that gains access to the urinary tract system may cause infection, including fungi (Candida species and viruses. In some instances, UTI results in recognition of an important underlying structural abnormality of the urinary tract. The febrile infant or child with clinically significant bacteriuria and no other site of infection to explain the fever, even in the absence of systemic symptoms has UTI. Signs and symptoms of UTIs vary depending on the child's age and on which part of the urinary tract is infected. The diagnosis of UTI is based on routine microscopic examination and culture of a properly collected urine specimen. Imaging studies are done in selected patients to identify anatomic abnormalities. Most cases of uncomplicated UTI respond readily to outpatient antibiotic treatment without further sequelae. All patients should have close follow-up to evaluate response to antibiotics and to prevent the development of long term complication.

  1. Kidneys and Urinary Tract (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidneys and Urinary Tract KidsHealth / For Parents / Kidneys and Urinary Tract What's ... Los riñones y las vías urinarias Kidneys and Urinary Tract Basics Our bodies produce several kinds of wastes, ...

  2. Cranberry in prevention of urinary tract Infections in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda-Machado Pablo Andrés

    2011-01-01

    The urinary infection tract is the most common infectious complication in pregnancy.The aim was to conduct a literature review of the evidence on effectiveness, safetyand cost effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing urinary tract infection inpregnancy. Studies suggest a potential protective effect of cranberry products againsturinary tract infection in pregnancy and there is no documented evidence of danger orcontraindication in pregnancy or lactation. The cost effectiveness of cran...

  3. Management of urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgman, D E

    1994-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent complications of pregnancy. When the lower UTIs of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis are not eradicated, the subsequent risk of the development of pyelonephritis is increased. The associated decreased maternal morbidity and fetal prematurity are the goals of a screening and treatment program for pregnant women. This clinical article presents information on the etiology, incidence, diagnosis, and management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis. Nursing implications regarding teaching are included.

  4. Chlamydia and Male Lower Urinary Tract Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Of the chlamydia species that can cause infections in humans, C. trachomatis is responsible for lower urinary tract diseases in men and women. C. trachomatis infections are prevalent worldwide, but current research is focused on females, with the burden of disease and infertility sequelae considered to be a predominantly female problem. However, a role for this pathogen in the development of male urethritis, epididymitis, and orchitis is widely accepted. Also, it can cause complications such ...

  5. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Geraldo; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Cavalli, Ricardo Carvalho

    2008-02-01

    Several factors cause urinary tract infection (UTI) to be a relevant complication of the gestational period, aggravating both the maternal and perinatal prognosis. For many years, pregnancy has been considered to be a factor predisposing to all forms of UTI. Today, it is known that pregnancy, as an isolated event, is not responsible for a higher incidence of UTI, but that the anatomical and physiological changes imposed on the urinary tract by pregnancy predispose women with asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) to become pregnant women with symptomatic UTI. AB affects 2 to 10% of all pregnant women and approximately 30% of these will develop pyelonephritis if not properly treated. However, a difficult-to-understand resistance against the identification of AB during this period is observed among prenatalists. The diagnosis of UTI is microbiological and it is based on two urine cultures presenting more than 10(5) colonies/mL urine of the same germ. Treatment is facilitated by the fact that it is based on an antibiogram, with no scientific foundation for the notion that a pre-established therapeutic scheme is an adequate measure. For the treatment of pyelonephritis, it is not possible to wait for the result of culture and previous knowledge of the resistance profile of the antibacterial agents available for the treatment of pregnant women would be the best measure. Another important variable is the use of an intravenous bactericidal antibiotic during the acute phase, with the possibility of oral administration at home after clinical improvement of the patient. At our hospital, the drug that best satisfies all of these requirements is cefuroxime, administered for 10-14 days. Third-generation cephalosporins do not exist in the oral form, all of them involving the inconvenience of parenteral administration. In view of their side effects, aminoglycosides are considered to be inadequate for administration to pregnant women. The inconsistent insinuation of contraindication of

  6. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, A; Levancini, M

    2001-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are very common during pregnancy. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen isolated from pregnant women. Ampicillin should not be used because of its high resistance to Escherichia coli. Pyelonephritis can cause morbidity and can be life-threatening to both mother and fetus. Second and third-generation cephalosporins are recommended for treatment, administered initially intravenously during hospitalization. Cultures and the study of virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli are recommended for the adequate management of pyelonephritis. The lower genital tract infection associated with pyelonephritis is responsible for the failure of antibiotic treatment. Asymptomatic bacteriuria can evolve into cystitis or pyelonephritis. All pregnant women should be routinely screened for bacteriuria using urine culture, and should be treated with nitrofurantoin, sulfixosazole or first-generation cephalosporins. Recurrent urinary infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics. Pregnant women who develop urinary tract infections with group B streptococcal infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics during labour to prevent neonatal sepsis. Preterm delivery is frequent. Evidence suggests that infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of preterm labour. Experimental models in pregnant mice support the theory that Escherichia coli propagated by the transplacental route, involving bacterial adhesins, induces preterm delivery, but this has not been demonstrated in humans. Ascending lower genital tract infections are the most probable cause of preterm delivery, but this remains to be proved.

  7. Biofabrication and biomaterials for urinary tract reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsawy MM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Moustafa M Elsawy,1–3 Achala de Mel1 1Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, Royal Free Hospital, NHS Trust, University College London (UCL, 2Division of Reconstructive Urology, University College London Hospitals (uclh, London, UK; 3Urology Department, School of Medicine, Alexandria, University, Alexandria, EgyptAbstract: Reconstructive urologists are constantly facing diverse and complex pathologies that require structural and functional restoration of urinary organs. There is always a demand for a biocompatible material to repair or substitute the urinary tract instead of using patient’s autologous tissues with its associated morbidity. Biomimetic approaches are tissue-engineering tactics aiming to tailor the material physical and biological properties to behave physiologically similar to the urinary system. This review highlights the different strategies to mimic urinary tissues including modifications in structure, surface chemistry, and cellular response of a range of biological and synthetic materials. The article also outlines the measures to minimize infectious complications, which might lead to graft failure. Relevant experimental and preclinical studies are discussed, as well as promising biomimetic approaches such as three-dimensional bioprinting. Keywords: reconstruction, biofunctionalization, tissue engineering, urinary tract

  8. Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccabona, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common query in pediatric radiology. Imaging for and after UTI is still a heavily debated topic with different approaches, as thorough evidence to decide upon a definite algorithm is scarce. This review article tries to address the clinical rational of the various approaches (general imaging, top-down or bottom-up, selected and individualized imaging concepts…), describes the available imaging modalities and the respective findings in imaging children with UTI, and proposes an imaging algorithm for the work-up of children during and after UTI discussing the "pros and cons" of the different attitudes. In summary, imaging by US is generally considered for all infants and children with a febrile or complicated (upper) UTI, particularly without previously known urinary tract anatomy. The further work-up (searching for renal scarring and assessment of vesico-ureteric reflux) is then decided according to these initial findings as well as the clinical presentation, course, and scenario.

  9. Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection - UTI) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Urinary Tract & How It Works Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection—UTI) in Adults View or Print All ... Bladder infections are the most common type of urinary tract infection (UTI), but any part of your urinary ...

  10. URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Margieva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The issues of diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections and their role in development of renal injury are being actively discussed by scientists and practicing pediatricians. The article presents the most recent data on etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of this disease. It provides recommendations on diagnosis and management of patients depending on their age. The article presents a discussion of antibacterial therapy course duration and indications for anti-relapse treatment. The study demonstrates that intravenous antibacterial therapy must be launched immediately in neonates in the event of pyretic fever; empirical antibacterial therapy must be launched immediately in older children after diagnosis of the urinary tract infection has been confirmed; subsequently, treatment ought to be corrected depending on the results of a bacteriological trial, sensitivity to antibiotics and effectiveness of the prescribed antibiotic. Along with normalization of urination rhythm and water intake schedule, antibacterial preventive therapy might be considered, if effective, in the event of recurrent nature of the urinary tract infection. 

  11. The Role of Chronic Mesh Infection in Delayed-Onset Vaginal Mesh Complications or Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections: Results From Explanted Mesh Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellano, Erin M; Nakamura, Leah Y; Choi, Judy M; Kang, Diana C; Grisales, Tamara; Raz, Shlomo; Rodriguez, Larissa V

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal mesh complications necessitating excision are increasingly prevalent. We aim to study whether subclinical chronically infected mesh contributes to the development of delayed-onset mesh complications or recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Women undergoing mesh removal from August 2013 through May 2014 were identified by surgical code for vaginal mesh removal. Only women undergoing removal of anti-incontinence mesh were included. Exclusion criteria included any women undergoing simultaneous prolapse mesh removal. We abstracted preoperative and postoperative information from the medical record and compared mesh culture results from patients with and without mesh extrusion, de novo recurrent UTIs, and delayed-onset pain. One hundred seven women with only anti-incontinence mesh removed were included in the analysis. Onset of complications after mesh placement was within the first 6 months in 70 (65%) of 107 and delayed (≥6 months) in 37 (35%) of 107. A positive culture from the explanted mesh was obtained from 82 (77%) of 107 patients, and 40 (37%) of 107 were positive with potential pathogens. There were no significant differences in culture results when comparing patients with delayed-onset versus immediate pain, extrusion with no extrusion, and de novo recurrent UTIs with no infections. In this large cohort of patients with mesh removed for a diverse array of complications, cultures of the explanted vaginal mesh demonstrate frequent low-density bacterial colonization. We found no differences in culture results from women with delayed-onset pain versus acute pain, vaginal mesh extrusions versus no extrusions, or recurrent UTIs using standard culture methods. Chronic prosthetic infections in other areas of medicine are associated with bacterial biofilms, which are resistant to typical culture techniques. Further studies using culture-independent methods are needed to investigate the potential role of chronic bacterial infections in delayed vaginal mesh

  12. Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Klijn, Aart J.; Vijverberg, Marianne A. W.

    2012-01-01

    Up to 10% of school-age children suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and/or urinary incontinence. Lower urinary tract problems are, together with asthma, the most important chronic disease of the pediatric age group. Diagnosis must discriminate among those children with functional

  13. [Spectrum and drug sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria in children with nephrotic syndrome complicated by urinary tract infection: an analysis of 97 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shao-Na; Zhang, Bi-Li; Wang, Wen-Hong; Zhang, Xuan

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the spectrum and drug sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria in children with nephrotic syndrome (NS) complicated by urinary tract infection (UTI). A retrospective analysis was performed on the spectrum and drug sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria in 97 children with NS complicated by UTI, who hospitalized from January to December, 2011. The incidence of UTI in children with NS was 36.5%. It was significantly more common in children with recurrent NS than in those with primary NS (44.0% vs 31.9%; Ppathogenic bacteria (50.5%), including Enterococcus faecium (29.4%) and Enterococcus faecalis (21.1%), followed by Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli (15.6%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.7%). Enterococcus was highly sensitive to nitrofurantoin, vacomycin and linezolid, but was highly resistant to tetracycline and moxifloxacin. More multi-resistant strains were detected in Enterococcus faecium than in Enterococcus faecalis (72% vs 17%; Pbacteria, 25% produced extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). ESBLs-producing bacteria had 100% sensitivity to imipenem, amikacin and piperacillin/tazobactam but were highly resistant to ampicillin, cefazolin and ceftriaxone. Children with recurrent NS are more susceptible to UTI than those with primary NS. Enterococcus is becoming major pathogenic bacteria for UTI in children with NS and has relatively high drug resistance, and most strains of Enterococcus faecium are multi-resistant.

  14. For reliable urine cultures in the detection of complicated urinary tract infection, do we use urine specimens obtained with urethral catheter or a nephrostomy tube?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Gülay; Deveci, Özcan; Dede, Onur; Utanğac, Mazhar; Dağgulli, Mansur; Penbegül, Necmettin; Hatipoğlu, Namık Kemal

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results of urine cultures obtained either from urethral, and percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) catheters. This study included 328 consecutive patients that underwent PCN at our institution with complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) between July 2010 and April 2015. Results of urine cultures obtained from the urethral and nephrostomy catheters were compared. This study included 152 male and 176 female patients. Mean age of the patients was 46.2±24.3 years. The main indications were obstructive uropathy due to urolithiasis complicated with pyonephrosis 145 (44%), malignant disease (n=87; 26%), pregnancy (n=26; 8%), and anatomical abnormality (n=23; 7%). One hundred and twenty three patients had diabetes mellitus. The most common causative organisms were Escherichia coli , Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Blood cultures showed the same results for the PCN and bladder urine cultures. The bladder urine culture was positive in 304 patients, while the PCN urine culture in 314 patients. PCN is an important treatment for the management of pyonephrosis. Cultures from the PCN yield valuable information that is not available from urethral urine cultures, and is a guiding tool for antibiotic therapy selection.

  15. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection Among Pregnant Women and its Complications in Their Newborns During the Birth in the Hospitals of Dezful City, Iran, 2012 - 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Marziyeh; Lavasani, Zohreh; Norouzirad, Reza; Najibpour, Reza; Mohamadpour, Masoomeh; Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Raeisi, Mohammad; Zare Marzouni, Hadi

    2015-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common disorder caused by bacterial agents in pregnancy, which can lead to important complications in newborn of such mothers in case of inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this study was to study the prevalence of UTI among pregnant women and its complications in their newborns during the birth in the hospitals of Dezful City, Iran, during 2012 - 2013. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 1132 women admitted to Dr. Ganjavian and Ayatollah Nabavi Hospitals in Dezful City, Iran, during 2012 - 2013 were randomly allocated into the case and control groups and were matched based on their age, numbers of pregnancy, sex and diseases of their children. UTI was the only difference between the two groups. Twenty-two thousand six hundred deliveries occurred within the course of this study. Due to UTI, 5% of deliveries led to hospitalization of mothers (1132 patients).Weight and height of newborn infants of mothers afflicted with UTI (P UTI in terms of type of delivery (normal and caesarean section) (P UTI in pregnant women compared to other areas of Iran represents the role of climate and weather in the prevalence of UTI. In addition, the increased number of low-birth-weight infants had a remarkable correlation with UTI, which can influence the health of the next generation.

  16. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  17. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium and is well known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls'-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition, which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis.

  18. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macejko, Amanda M; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2007-02-01

    Urinary tract infections are common complications of pregnancy; upper tract infections in particular may lead to significant morbidity for both the mother and fetus. Bacteriuria is a significant risk factor for developing pyelonephritis in pregnant women. Therefore, proper screening and treatment of bacteriuria during pregnancy is necessary to prevent complications. All women should be screened for bacteriuria in the first trimester, and women with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections or anomalies should have repeat bacteriuria screening throughout pregnancy. Treatment of bacteriuria should include 3-day therapy with appropriate antimicrobials, and women should be followed closely after treatment because recurrence may occur in up to one third of patients.

  19. URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sivalingam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections frequently affect pregnant mothers. This problem causes significant morbidity and healthcare expenditure. Three common clinical manifestations of UTIs in pregnancy are: asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli remains the most frequent organism isolated in UTIs. All pregnant mothers should be screened for UTIs in pregnancy and antibiotics should be commenced without delay. Urine culture and sensitivity is the gold standard in diagnosing UTIs. Without treatment, asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is associated with preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia and anaemia. Acute pyelonephritis can lead to maternal sepsis. Recurrent UTIs in pregnancy require prophylactic antibiotic treatment.

  20. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K.; Hunstad, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. PMID:27692880

  2. Secondary or Transient Pseudohypoaldosteronism Associated With Urinary Tract Anomaly and Urinary Infection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Krishnappa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia with hyperkalemia in infancy is a rare presentation, but may be due to aldosterone deficiency or end organ resistance to its action. There are few cases associating this condition with urinary tract infections or anatomic abnormalities that predispose to infection. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion in diagnosing secondary pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA due to its often atypical presentation. We describe ten month-old infant who presented with this condition and was found to have urinary tract infection complicating unilateral urinary tract anomaly, which may have strong association with renal tubular resistance to aldosterone.

  3. Analysis of lower urinary tract disease of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Iveth Mendóza-López

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Lower urinary tract diseases (LUTD include different conditions that affect the urinary bladder, urethra and prostate. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of different related diseases, to characterize the population affected, and to determine risk factors in dogs. The clinical cases were diagnosed with LUTD through physical examination, and clinical laboratory and imaging studies. Male dogs had a greater predisposition to present a LUTD. Dogs from 3 months to 18 years with a median of 8 years were affected, and the most affected breeds were Poodle, Labrador, German shepherd, Schnauzer, Cocker Spaniel and Chihuahua. The LUTD presented with the following frequencies: bacterial urinary tract infection 34.02%; micturition disorders 22.68%; urolithiasis 20.61%; prostatic disease 14.43%; traumatic problems 8.24%. Sixty-seven per cent of the cases were specific diseases, such as uncomplicated and complicated bacterial urinary tract infections, urinary retention of neurologic origin and silica urolithiasis.

  4. Evaluation of parental perception of childhood urinary tract infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children with possible severe complications, deserving public health interventions. Aims: To evaluate parental perception of symptoms, causes, complication and treatment of childhood UTI, and proposerelevant interventions. Methods: This is an ethicallyapproved ...

  5. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection Among Pregnant Women and its Complications in Their Newborns During the Birth in the Hospitals of Dezful City, Iran, 2012 - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Marziyeh; Lavasani, Zohreh; Norouzirad, Reza; Najibpour, Reza; Mohamadpour, Masoomeh; Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Raeisi, Mohammad; Zare Marzouni, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common disorder caused by bacterial agents in pregnancy, which can lead to important complications in newborn of such mothers in case of inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to study the prevalence of UTI among pregnant women and its complications in their newborns during the birth in the hospitals of Dezful City, Iran, during 2012 - 2013. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 1132 women admitted to Dr. Ganjavian and Ayatollah Nabavi Hospitals in Dezful City, Iran, during 2012 - 2013 were randomly allocated into the case and control groups and were matched based on their age, numbers of pregnancy, sex and diseases of their children. UTI was the only difference between the two groups. Results: Twenty-two thousand six hundred deliveries occurred within the course of this study. Due to UTI, 5% of deliveries led to hospitalization of mothers (1132 patients).Weight and height of newborn infants of mothers afflicted with UTI (P < 0.001) were significantly lower compared to newborns of healthy women (P < 0.001). There was a significant association between the two groups of pregnant women with UTI in terms of type of delivery (normal and caesarean section) (P < 0.008). Conclusions: The lower incidence of UTI in pregnant women compared to other areas of Iran represents the role of climate and weather in the prevalence of UTI. In addition, the increased number of low-birth-weight infants had a remarkable correlation with UTI, which can influence the health of the next generation. PMID:26430526

  6. Artificial urinary sphincter implantation: an important component of complex surgery for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with refractory urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Liao, Limin

    2018-01-08

    We review our outcomes and experience of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for patients with refractory urinary incontinence from different causes. Between April 2002 and May 2017, a total of 32 patients (median age, 40.8 years) with urinary incontinence had undergone artificial urinary sphincter placement during urinary tract reconstruction. Eighteen patients (56.3%) were urethral injuries associated urinary incontinence, 9 (28.1%) had neurogenic urinary incontinence and 5 (15.6%) were post-prostatectomy incontinence. Necessary surgeries were conducted before artificial urinary sphincter placement as staged procedures, including urethral strictures incision, sphincterotomy, and augmentation cystoplasty. The mean follow-up time was 39 months. At the latest visit, 25 patients (78.1%) maintained the original artificial urinary sphincter. Four patients (12.5%) had artificial urinary sphincter revisions. Explantations were performed in three patients. Twenty-four patients were socially continent, leading to the overall success rate as 75%. The complication rate was 28.1%; including infections (n = 4), erosions (n = 4), and mechanical failure (n = 1). The impact of urinary incontinence on the quality of life measured by the visual analogue scale dropped from 7.0 ± 1.2 to 2.2 ± 1.5 (P urinary sphincter implantation in our center are unique, and the procedure is an effective treatment as a part of urinary tract reconstruction in complicated urinary incontinence cases with complex etiology.

  7. Frailty and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Anne M

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of both frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms, including urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, underactive bladder, and benign prostatic hyperplasia, increases with age. However, our understanding of the relationship between frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms, both in terms of pathophysiology and in terms of the evaluation and management of such symptoms, is greatly lacking. This brief review will summarize definitions and measurement tools associated with frailty and will also review the existing state of the literature on frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms in older individuals.

  8. Recurrent urinary tract infection by burkholderia cepacia in a live related renal transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeshan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is high virulent organism usually causing lower respiratory tract infections especially in Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and post lung transplant. Urinary tract infections with Burkholderia cepacia have been associated after bladder irrigation or use of contaminated hospital objects. Post renal transplant urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complications. Recurrent urinary tract infection with Burkholderia cepacia is a rare finding. Complete anatomical evaluation is essential in case recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) after renal transplant. Vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR) and neurogenic urinary bladder was found to be important risk factors. (author)

  9. Prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Vahlensieck, W; Bauer, H W; Weidner, W; Piechota, H J; Naber, K G

    2013-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequent bacterial infections in the community and health care setting. Mostly young and, to some extent, postmenopausal women are affected by recurrent UTI (rUTI) defined as ≥3 UTI/year or ≥2 UTI/half year. In contrast, rUTI is rare in healthy men. On the other hand, rUTI are frequently found in female and male patients with complicating urological factors, e.g. urinary catheters, infection stones. Remediable predisposing factors in uncomplicated rUTI in women are rare. In complicated rUTI the success depends mainly on the possibility to eliminate or at leastimprove the complicating risk factors. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital prophylaxis, if there is close correlation with sexual intercourse, are most effective to prevent rUTI. Nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim (or cotrimoxazole), and fosfomycin trometamol are available as first-line drugs. Oral cephalosporins and quinolones should be restricted to specific indications. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the number of uropathogens in the gut and/or vaginal flora and reduces bacterial "fitness". Given the correct indication, the recurrence rate of rUTI can be reduced by about 90%. Due to possible adverse events and the concern of selecting resistant pathogens, according to the guidelines of the European Association of Urology antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered only after counselling, behavioural modification and non-antimicrobial measures have been attempted. In postmenopausal patients vaginal substitution of oestriol should be started first. Oral or parenteral immunoprophylaxis is another option in patients with rUTI. Other possibilities with varying scientific evidence are prophylaxis with cranberry products, specific plant combinations or probiotics. The prophylaxis of catheter-associated UTI should employ strategies which result in a reduction of frequency and duration of catheter drainage of the urinary tract. The currently available

  10. Prevalence of urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Batavia, Jason P; Ahn, Jennifer J; Fast, Angela M; Combs, Andrew J; Glassberg, Kenneth I

    2013-10-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common pediatric urological problem that is often associated with urinary tract infection. We determined the prevalence of a urinary tract infection history in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and its association, if any, with gender, bowel dysfunction, vesicoureteral reflux and specific lower urinary tract conditions. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of children diagnosed with and treated for lower urinary tract dysfunction, noting a history of urinary tract infection with or without fever, gender, bowel dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux in association with specific lower urinary tract conditions. Of the 257 boys and 366 girls with a mean age of 9.1 years 207 (33%) had a urinary tract infection history, including 88 with at least 1 febrile infection. A total of 64 patients underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 44 (69%). In 119 of the 207 patients all infections were afebrile and 18 underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 5 (28%). A urinary tract infection history was noted in 53% of girls but only 5% of boys (p infection history than patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder or primary bladder neck dysfunction (each p urinary tract dysfunction have a much higher urinary tract infection incidence than males. This association was most often noted for lower urinary tract conditions in which urinary stasis occurs, including detrusor underutilization disorder and dysfunctional voiding. Reflux was found in most girls with a history of febrile infections. Since reflux was identified in more than a quarter of girls with only afebrile infections who were evaluated for reflux, it may be reasonable to perform voiding cystourethrogram or videourodynamics in some of them to identify reflux. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of the effectiveness and antibiotic cost among ceftriaxone, ertapenem, and levofloxacin in treatment of community-acquired complicated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-An; Yang, Ya-Sung; Wang, Jing-Xun; Lin, Hsin-Chung; Lin, De-Yu; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Yeh, Kuo-Ming; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2016-04-01

    To study characteristics of patients with community-acquired complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) and to compare effectiveness and antibiotic cost of treatment with ceftriaxone (CRO), levofloxacin (LVX), and ertapenem (ETP). This retrospective study enrolled patients who had community-acquired cUTIs admitted to Division of Infectious Diseases in a single medical center from January 2011 to March 2013. Effectiveness, antibiotic cost, and clinical characteristics were compared among patients treated with CRO, LVX, and ETP. There were 358 eligible cases, including 139 who received CRO, 128 treated with ETP, and 91 with LVX. The most common pathogen was Escherichia coli. The susceptibilities of these three agents were higher and more superior than first-line antibiotics. Treatment with ETP was associated with a significantly shorter time to defervescence since admission (CRO: 39 hours, ETP: 30 hours, and LVX: 38 h; p = 0.031) and shorter hospitalization stay (CRO: 4 days, ETP: 3 days, and LVX: 4 days; p antibiotic costs in the CRO group were significantly lower than that in the other two groups [CRO: 62.4 United States dollars (USD), ETP: 185.33 USD, and LVX: 204.85 USD; p antibiotic is high. Using ETP, CRO, and LVX in the treatment of cUTIs for good clinical response should be suggested. Among the three agents, ETP had better susceptibility than CRO and LVX, reached defervescence sooner, and was associated with shorter hospital stays. However, using CRO in cUTIs was less expensive than the other two agents. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. urinary tract infections amongst pregnant women attending

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) constitutes a major health problem in pregnant women due to their relatively short urethra, which ... the urine samples of pregnant women prior to treatment. ... Of 500 asymptomatic pregnant women screened, 433.

  13. Management of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in paediatrics. ... Ceftriaxone, ampicillin, cefotaxime and gentamycin are the recommended parenteral antibiotics, ... and/or oral medication) and hydration status (in the case of.

  14. Radiological examination of the urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudmundsen, T.E.; Vinje, B.; Bloerstad, Oe.; Pedersen, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for imaging the urinary tract have been recorded in six Norwegian hospitals for the last 24 years. For three of the hospitals, data were collected from 1965 to 1989, and for the other three from 1966, 1971 and 1975, respectively. There was a significant reduction in the number of intravenous pyelograms, voiding cystograms, and renal angiograms, but the number of retrograde pyelograms and plain radiographs of the urinary tract remained constant. Computed tomography of the urinary tract increased during the first years, but after the introduction of ultrasonography, the number of computed tomograms decreased. Ultrasonographic examinations of the urinary tract are still rapidly increasing, and seem to have replaced some of the other imaging techniques. The present results should be taken into consideration when planning the health care for the future. (au)

  15. urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    bacterial infections in the elderly but also the most common and ... For pregnant women, urinary tract infection is the most common ... causing arthropathy in children. Urinary tract ... resistance in our environment, resistance such as β-. Urinary ...

  16. Endometrioid carcinoma of the upper urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Jagdeesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a second case of endometrioid carcinoma of the upper urinary tract presenting 17 years after hysterectomy for high grade adenocarcinoma of ovary. A 51-year-old nullipara presented to us with a complaint of hematuria. After complete work up, she underwent right radical nephro-ureterectomy with bladder cuff excision. The histology showed endometrioid carcinoma of upper urinary tract without any evidence of endometriosis.

  17. [Mechanisms of urinary tract sterility maintenance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okrągła, Emilia; Szychowska, Katarzyna; Wolska, Lidia

    2014-06-02

    Physiologically, urine and the urinary tract are maintained sterile because of physical and chemical properties of urine and the innate immune system's action. The urinary tract is constantly exposed to the invasion of microorganisms from the exterior environment, also because of the anatomical placement of the urethra, in the vicinity of the rectum. Particularly vulnerable to urinary tract infections (UTI) are women (an additional risk factor is pregnancy), but also the elderly and children. The main pathogens causing UTI are bacteria; in 70-95% of cases it is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Infections caused by viruses and fungi are less common and are associated with decreased immunity, pharmacotherapy, or some diseases. Bacteria have evolved a number of factors that facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract: the cover and cell membrane antigens O and K1, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), fimbriae, pile and cilia. On the other hand, the human organism has evolved mechanisms to hinder colonization of the urinary tract: mechanisms arising from the anatomical structure of the urinary tract, the physicochemical properties of the urine and the activity of the innate immune system, also known as non-specific, which isolates and destroys pathogens using immunological processes, and the mechanisms for release of antimicrobial substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein, mucopolysaccharides, immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, lactoferrin, lipocalin, neutrophils, cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. This review aims to analyze the state of knowledge on the mechanisms to maintain the sterility of the urinary tract used by the human organism and bacterial virulence factors to facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract.

  18. Mechanisms of urinary tract sterility maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Okrągła

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically, urine and the urinary tract are maintained sterile because of physical and chemical properties of urine and the innate immune system’s action. The urinary tract is constantly exposed to the invasion of microorganisms from the exterior environment, also because of the anatomical placement of the urethra, in the vicinity of the rectum. Particularly vulnerable to urinary tract infections (UTI are women (an additional risk factor is pregnancy, but also the elderly and children. The main pathogens causing UTI are bacteria; in 70-95% of cases it is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Infections caused by viruses and fungi are less common and are associated with decreased immunity, pharmacotherapy, or some diseases. Bacteria have evolved a number of factors that facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract: the cover and cell membrane antigens O and K1, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, fimbriae, pile and cilia. On the other hand, the human organism has evolved mechanisms to hinder colonization of the urinary tract: mechanisms arising from the anatomical structure of the urinary tract, the physicochemical properties of the urine and the activity of the innate immune system, also known as non-specific, which isolates and destroys pathogens using immunological processes, and the mechanisms for release of antimicrobial substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein, mucopolysaccharides, immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, lactoferrin, lipocalin, neutrophils, cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. This review aims to analyze the state of knowledge on the mechanisms to maintain the sterility of the urinary tract used by the human organism and bacterial virulence factors to facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract.

  19. Urinary Tract Infections in Pregnancy - Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, A; Gomes, G; Campos, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Literature review of classification, epidemiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, complications, treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTI) in pregnancy. Data Sources and Review Methods: Bibliographic research in Medline, through PubMed and Medscape, of systematic reviews, observational studies, clinical guidelines, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials published between January 1992 and December 2010. Results: Asymp...

  20. Urinary tract infection among pregnant women at Bobo-Dioulasso ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections are the first infections in pregnant women and can cause serious complications during pregnancy. In order to improve its management in low income country like Burkina Faso, we conducted a prospect cross-sectional study, to describe its epidemiological and biological aspects in pregnant women at ...

  1. Bacterial isolates and drug susceptibility patterns of urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) during pregnancy may cause complications such as pyelonephritis, hypertensive disease of pregnancy, anaemia, chronic renal failure, premature delivery and foetal mortality. This study aimed to identify the etiologic agents of UTI and to determine the patterns of antimicrobial drug susceptibility ...

  2. a seven months retrospective study on urinary tract infection among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is a significant health problem world wide, affecting all ages and both sexes. It is the most common infectious complication associated with serious risk in pregnancy and responsible for a high rate of morbidity in neonates and children. Most often antibiotics are prescribed in UTI ...

  3. Prevalence of urinary tract infection among pregnant women at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy and these infections. Untreated UTI can be associated with serious obstetric complications. This cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of UTI among symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more Partner ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and ...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... ready to pee, you relax a set of muscles at the bottom of your bladder. That lets ... topic for: Kids Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more About Us ...

  6. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  7. Urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hondt, Frederiek; Everaert, Karel

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) result in different lower urinary tract dysfunctions. Because of both the disease and the bladder drainage method, urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent conditions seen in SCI patients. Diagnosis is not always easy due to lack of symptoms. Asymptomatic bacteriuria needs no treatment. If symptoms occur, antibiotherapy is indicated. Duration depends mainly on severity of illness and upper urinary tract or prostatic involvement. Choice of antibiotherapy should be based on local resistance profiles, but fluoroquinolones seems to be an adequate empirical treatment. Prevention of UTI is important, as lots of complications can be foreseen. Catheter care, permanent low bladder pressure and clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) with hydrophilic catheters are interventions that can prevent UTI. Probiotics might be useful, but data are limited.

  8. Recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosseir, Sandy B; Lind, Lawrence R; Winkler, Harvey A

    2012-03-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections most often present with symptoms of irritative voiding. In most cases, they are caused by reinfection with a previously isolated organism. Patients with one or more symptoms of uncomplicated recurrent urinary tract infection should undergo thorough examination and screening for underlying comorbidities that increase susceptibility. When frequent reinfections, empiric treatment relapse, persistent infections, or risk factors for complicated infections are encountered, patients may benefit from urodynamics, cystoscopy, renal ultrasound, intravenous urogram, or voiding cystourethrogram to evaluate for anatomic, functional, or metabolic abnormalities affecting the urinary tract (e.g., stones, stricture, obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux, lesions, detrusor underactivity). These patients may benefit from culture-guided empiric treatment and further evaluation by urology, nephrology, or infectious disease specialists. In patients with a history of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, empiric treatment guided by local antimicrobial resistance may efficiently treat a suspected recurrence. After successful treatment of the acute infection, postcoital prophylaxis, continuous prophylaxis, or self-start empiric treatment may be selected based on frequency of recurrent infections, temporal relation to intercourse, and patient characteristics. Ancillary measures such as probiotics, cranberry products, or local estrogen replacement may also be considered. This article will review the current definition, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, work-up, treatment, treatment side effects, and prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women. A suggested algorithm for evaluation and treatment based on current literature is provided.

  9. Congenital anomalies of the urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Hans G; Belman, A Barry

    2014-01-01

    The upper urinary tract forms as a consequence of the reciprocal inductive signals between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. A clue to the timing of events leading to an abnormality of the upper urinary tract can be the presence also of associated anomalies of internal genitalia since separation of these systems occurs at about the 10th week of gestation. Prenatal sonography has facilitated the detection of urological abnormalities presenting with hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis suggests obstruction, but by itself cannot be equated with it. Instead, further radiographic imaging is required to delineate anatomy and function. Now, moreover, non-surgical management of CAKUT should be considered whenever possible. Despite the widespread use of prenatal screening sonography that usually identifies the majority of congenital anomalies of the urinary tract, many children still present with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Regardless of the etiology for the presentation, the goal of management is preservation of renal function through mitigation of the risk for recurrent UTI and/or obstruction. In the past many children underwent surgical repair aimed at normalization of the appearance of the urinary tract. Today, management has evolved such that in most cases surgical reconstruction is performed only after a period of observation - with or without urinary prophylaxis. The opinions presented in this section are not espoused by all pediatric urologists but represent instead the practice that has evolved at Children's National Medical Center (Washington DC) based significantly on information obtained by nuclear renography, in addition to sonography and contrast cystography.

  10. Urinary Tract Infection and Bacteriuria in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Alexander P; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2015-11-01

    Bacteriuria during pregnancy may be classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria, infections of the lower urinary tract (cystitis), or infections of the upper urinary tract (pyelonephritis). Lower tract bacteriuria is associated with an increased risk of developing pyelonephritis in pregnancy, which is itself associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Pregnant women should be screened for the presence of bacteriuria early in pregnancy. All bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated, and antimicrobial choice in pregnancy should reflect safety for both the mother and the fetus. After treatment of bacteriuria, patients should be followed closely due to risk of recurrent bacteriuria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The nature of immune responses to urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Soman N.; Miao, Yuxuan

    2016-01-01

    The urinary tract is constantly exposed to microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, but generally the urinary tract resists infection by gut microorganisms. This resistance to infection is mainly ascribed to the versatility of the innate immune defences in the urinary tract as the adaptive immune responses are limited, particularly when only the lower urinary tract is infected. In recent years, as the strengths and weaknesses of the immune system of the urinary tract have emerged and as the virulence attributes of uropathogens are recognized, several potentially effective and unconventional strategies to contain or prevent urinary tract infections have emerged. PMID:26388331

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary tract infection in pedeatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Sapin, Jeanne; De Parscau, Loïc; Pougnet, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in children are most often lung infections or meningitis. Urinary tract infections are much rarer. We present the case of a urinary tract infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The clinical picture was classical. The urine culture showed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine (10 4 UFC/mL; with 2 × 10 4 leucocytes/mL). The literature mentions a few cases of such infections. In some studies, the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine of children is less than 1%. Those children mostly present abnormalities of urinary tract. In our case, urinary ultrasound scan have shown the presence of an ectopic kidney in this child. The discussion between the clinician and the biologist has contributed to the discovery of this renal anomaly.

  13. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  14. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  15. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more About Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more Partner Message About Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  17. Clinical implications of the microbiome in urinary tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to outline and evaluate the most recent literature on the role of the microbiome in urinary tract diseases. High throughput molecular DNA sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes enabled the analysis of complex microbial communities inhabiting the human urinary tract. Several recent studies have identified bacterial taxa of the urinary microbiome to impact urinary tract diseases including interstitial cystitis, urgency urinary incontinence or calcium oxalate stone formation. Furthermore, treatment of urinary tract infections by antibiotics globally impacts community profiles of the intestinal microbiota and might indirectly influence human health. Alternative treatment options like application of probiotics for the treatment of urinary tract infections are currently under investigation. The urinary microbiome and its relationship to urinary tract diseases is currently under comprehensive investigation. Further studies are needed to shed light on the role of commensal microbiota for urinary tract infections.

  18. Current concepts in urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D H; Schaeffer, A J

    2004-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common infectious diseases that can be associated with substantial morbidity and significant expenditures. This review highlights the current concepts and recent advances in our understanding and management of this condition. Specific topics include pathogenesis, host factors, antimicrobial resistance, recurrent UTIs in women, diagnosis, treatment of uncomplicated and complicated UTIs, prophylaxis, catheter associated bacteriuria, pregnancy, diabetes, UTIs in men, prostatitis, and the chronic pelvic pain syndrome. UTIs can be viewed as an interaction between specific bacterial virulence factors and the patient. A new model explaining the pathogenesis of recurrent UTIs has been presented. There is a need to reconsider traditional treatment recommendations in the face of local resistance patterns, as well as the need to make better use of drugs that are currently available. Prospects for prevention of recurrent UTI include natural compounds, bacterial interference and immunization. With regard to UTI risk in women, patients can be classified based on age, and functional and hormonal status. Appropriate treatment approaches must be based on this classification. In contrast to uncomplicated UTIs, management of most complicated infections depends on clinical experience and resources at individual institutions rather than on evidence based guidelines. Asymptomatic bacteriuria generally should not be treated except in high-risk catheterized patients and in pregnancy. UTIs in men generally require formal urologic evaluation. Our understanding of the etiologies, diagnostic strategies, and treatment options for prostatitis and the chronic pelvic pain syndrome in men continues to evolve.

  19. Urinary tract infections in children: EAU/ESPU guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan S; Hoebeke, Piet; Kočvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J M; Radmayr, Christian; Tekgül, Serdar

    2015-03-01

    In 30% of children with urinary tract anomalies, urinary tract infection (UTI) can be the first sign. Failure to identify patients at risk can result in damage to the upper urinary tract. To provide recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children presenting with UTI. The recommendations were developed after a review of the literature and a search of PubMed and Embase. A consensus decision was adopted when evidence was low. UTIs are classified according to site, episode, symptoms, and complicating factors. For acute treatment, site and severity are the most important. Urine sampling by suprapubic aspiration or catheterisation has a low contamination rate and confirms UTI. Using a plastic bag to collect urine, a UTI can only be excluded if the dipstick is negative for both leukocyte esterase and nitrite or microscopic analysis is negative for both pyuria and bacteriuria. A clean voided midstream urine sample after cleaning the external genitalia has good diagnostic accuracy in toilet-trained children. In children with febrile UTI, antibiotic treatment should be initiated as soon as possible to eradicate infection, prevent bacteraemia, improve outcome, and reduce the likelihood of renal involvement. Ultrasound of the urinary tract is advised to exclude obstructive uropathy. Depending on sex, age, and clinical presentation, vesicoureteral reflux should be excluded. Antibacterial prophylaxis is beneficial. In toilet-trained children, bladder and bowel dysfunction needs to be excluded. The level of evidence is high for the diagnosis of UTI and treatment in children but not for imaging to identify patients at risk for upper urinary tract damage. In these guidelines, we looked at the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children with urinary tract infection. There are strong recommendations on diagnosis and treatment; we also advise exclusion of obstructive uropathy within 24h and later vesicoureteral reflux, if indicated. Copyright © 2014 European

  20. VIRAL ETIOLOGY OF RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Ibishev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent urinary tract infection is an actual problem of modern urology.Objective. Complex investigation of urinary tract infections including viral etiology for chronic recurrent cystitis in womenMaterials and methods. The study included 31 women with recurrent infection of urinary tract. Inclusion criteria were the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms caused by infection, severe recurrent course, the lack of anatomical and functional disorders of the urinary tract, the absence of bacterial pathogens during the study, taking into account the culture of aerobic and anaerobic culturing techniques.Results. The analysis of the clinical manifestations, the dominant in the study group were pain and urgency to urinate at 100% and 90% of women surveyed, respectively, and less frequent urination were recorded in 16.1% of patients. In general clinical examination of urine in all cases identified leukocyturia and 90% of the hematuria. By using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR in midstream urine of all examined was verified 10 types of human papilloma virus (HPV with the predominance of 16 and 18 types . Considering the presence of recurrent infectious and inflammatory processes of the urinary tract, cystoscopy with bladder biopsy was performed for all patients. When histomorphological biopsies of all patients surveyed noted the presence of the specific characteristics of HPV: papillary hyperplasia with squamous koilocytosis, pale cytoplasm and shrunken kernels. When analyzing the results of PCR biopsy data corresponded with the results of PCR in midstream urine in all biopsies was detected HPV.Conclusions. Human papillomavirus infection may be involved in the development of viral cystitis. In the etiological structure of viral cystitis, both highly oncogenic and low oncogenic HPV types can act.

  1. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your pee smells bad. These things happen because bacteria have caused an infection somewhere in your urinary ... shorter than boys' urethras. The shorter urethra means bacteria can get up into the bladder more easily ...

  2. Imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacher, Jean-Nicolas [University of Rouen, Quant-IF Laboratory, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); Rouen University Hospital Charles Nicolle, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); UFR Medecine Pharmacie de Rouen, Laboratoire Quant-If, Rouen (France); Hitzel, Anne; Vera, Pierre [University of Rouen, Quant-IF Laboratory, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); CRLCC Henri Becquerel, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rouen (France); Avni, Fred E. [Free University of Brussels, Department of Radiology, Erasmus Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    This article is focused on the controversial topic of imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection. A review of the recent literature illustrates the complementary roles of ultrasound, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The authors stress the key role of ultrasound which has recently been debated. The commonly associated vesicoureteric reflux has to be classified as congenital or secondary due to voiding dysfunction. A series of frequently asked questions are addressed in a second section. The proposed answers are not the product of a consensus but should rather be considered as proposals to enrich the ongoing debate concerning the evaluation of urinary tract infection in children. (orig.)

  3. Imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Hitzel, Anne; Vera, Pierre; Avni, Fred E.

    2005-01-01

    This article is focused on the controversial topic of imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection. A review of the recent literature illustrates the complementary roles of ultrasound, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The authors stress the key role of ultrasound which has recently been debated. The commonly associated vesicoureteric reflux has to be classified as congenital or secondary due to voiding dysfunction. A series of frequently asked questions are addressed in a second section. The proposed answers are not the product of a consensus but should rather be considered as proposals to enrich the ongoing debate concerning the evaluation of urinary tract infection in children. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of the urinary tract in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslaksen, A.; Hunskaar, S.; Hoeisaeter, P.Aa.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses the indications for imaging of the urinary tract from the general practitioners' point of view. Urography should be used in the control of patients with previous attacks of ureteral colic, in patients presenting macroscopic hematuria and as a preoperative investigation prior to extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Ultrasound should be chosen in patients with microscopic hematuria and non-specific abdominal pain. Computerized tomography should be used in cases with non-specific findings using urography and ultrasound. There are no indications for imaging in women with recurrent urinary tract infection, in men with benign prostatic hypertrophy and in the evaluation of hypertension. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  5. Urinary Tract Infections in the Older Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Urinary infection is the most common bacterial infection in elderly populations. The high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in both men and women is benign and should not be treated. A diagnosis of symptomatic infection for elderly residents of long-term care facilities without catheters requires localizing genitourinary findings. Symptomatic urinary infection is overdiagnosed in elderly bacteriuric persons with nonlocalizing clinical presentations, with substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use. Residents with chronic indwelling catheters experience increased morbidity from urinary tract infection. Antimicrobial therapy is selected based on clinical presentation, patient tolerance, and urine culture results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract infection in ... out on bacterial isolates from the urine of febrile children with sickle cell anemia ... of childhood urinary tract infections (UTI) in this environment are resistant to ...

  7. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Objective: The knowledge of antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of common etiological ... of childhood urinary tract infections (UTI) in this environment are resistant to most ... causing urinary tract infection in children with sickle.

  8. Childhood urinary tract infection in Benin City: pathogens and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Childhood urinary tract infection in Benin City: pathogens and antimicrobial ... of bacterial isolates implicated in urinary tract infection (UTI) amongst children was ... There is also an emerging resistance of common pathogens to azithromycin ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Gravas, Stavros; Fitzpatrick, John M.

    2008-01-01

    During the past decade, increasing numbers of minimally invasive treatments for managing male lower urinary tract symptoms caused by urinary tract obstruction have been positioned. On one hand, transurethral needle ablation and transurethral microwave thermotherapy bridge the gap between medical

  10. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions KidsHealth / For Parents / Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions What's in this article? ...

  11. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most urinary tract infections (UTIs) are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and travel to the bladder. ... BATHING AND HYGIENE To prevent future urinary tract infections, ... believe make infections more likely. Change your pad each time ...

  12. Urinary Tract Infection in Febrile Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Nigeria. Children with this disease have increased tendency to develop frequent and severe infections especially of the urinary tract, bones and lungs. The prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) has however not been reported in this part ...

  13. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when you do, phew! Your pee smells bad. These things happen because bacteria have caused an infection ... tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys two ureters (say: YUR- ...

  14. Preconception prophylactic of the urinary tract infection in women of high-risk groups: reserves to reduce perinatal and obstetric complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Limanskaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to reveal the effectiveness of «Novoks» manufacturing by Organosin companies in preconception treatment of urinary tract infections in women with lupus nephritis and pyelonephritis gestational history. Material and methods. The study involved 30 women with gestational pyelonephritis history and 15 women with lupus nephritis. Inclusion criteria were the presence of at least one of the clinical symptoms (pain in the lumbar region, dysuria, pain in the PST region in conjunction with microbiological criteria: number of leukocytes in the urine over a field of view of 10–15; the number of colony forming units of a microorganism > 104; sensitivity to levofloxacin as a result of urine culture. Inclusion criteria: urinalysis, urine culture with antibiotic susceptibility, clinical and biochemical blood tests, an ultrasound examination of the kidneys. All women received the drug Novaks (Organosin 500 mg once daily for 5–7 days, and the probiotic Probiz Femina 1 capsule 2 times per day till 14 days. Results. After a treatment with Novaks in combination with a probiotic Probiz-Femina (Organosin noted a progressive decrease in the degree of bacteriuria, which was manifested during a urine test research absence of bacteria and decrease the number of white blood cells. Also regressed inflammatory changes in the peripheral blood. During the control urine culture after 10 days of treatment and 1 month later, revealed no growth of pathogenic organisms in the relevant titer. Conclusions. Novoks (levofloxacin is recommended for use in preconception prevention and treatment of infectious diseases of the urinary system in women at high risk. Using microbial interference therapy using modern probiotic Probiz Femina leads to a significant improvement in intestinal microbiocenosis in antibiotic therapy, reduce contamination of the intestines and the vagina, which allows you to take drug treatment Novaks without impairing the quality of life.

  15. Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in children. The management and laboratory diagnosis of these infections pose unique challenges that are not encountered in adults. Important factors, such as specimen collection, urinalysis interpretation, culture thresholds, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, require special consideration in children and will be discussed in detail in the following review. PMID:27053673

  16. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A good proportion of pregnant women patronize traditional birth homes in Nigeria for ante-natal care. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors, and susceptibility profile of etiologic agents of urinary tract infection among ante-natal attendees in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria.

  17. Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this evaluation was to identify pitfalls in medical prescriptions of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in government healthcare facilities in Zambia. Design: This was a cross sectional and government healthcare facilities were conveniently sampled. Main outcome measures: Rate of compliance to ...

  18. Urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Several notable human pathogens cause urinary tract infections. Several factors are known to predispose an individual to developing urinary tract infections; one of the factors is pregnancy. Therefore, this research set out to determine the bacteriologic profile of urinary tract infection and the susceptibility pattern ...

  19. Urinary Tract Infections in Children : EAU/ESPU Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan S.; Hoebeke, Piet; Kocvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Radmayr, Christian; Tekgul, Serdar

    Context: In 30% of children with urinary tract anomalies, urinary tract infection (UTI) can be the first sign. Failure to identify patients at risk can result in damage to the upper urinary tract. Objective: To provide recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children presenting

  20. Comparison of Electrohydraulic and Electromagnetic Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Upper Urinary Tract Stones in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Zhong Chen

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Our study showed that elderly patients with upper urinary tract stones undergoing ESWL with EH and EM machines had comparable stone free rates and complication rates, but a higher retreatment rate was seen with EM machines.

  1. Common bacterial urinary tract infections in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, J E

    1976-09-01

    Unfortunately, there is no general consensus as to how long patients with bacteriuria or urinary tract infections should be monitored and certainly there is no agreement on how long recurrent episodes should be treated beyond ten days to two weeks. The most important points to remember are: 1. Culture the urine both at the time of therapy and during follow-up. The patient should be examined periodically for the presence of bacteruria. If bacteria cannot be eradicated, at least the physician is aware of the organism most likely causing the patient's symptoms. 2. Do not subject the patient with frequent recurrent (chronic) and complicated infections to continual antibacterial therapy, but rather, manage the acute episodes. 3. Use prophylaxis, particularly single bed-time doses for dysuria and frequency symptoms. 4. Screen for bacteriuria during pregnancy. 5. Avoid the use of catheters except where absolutely necessary. 6. Avoid systemic prophylaxis of infection in patients with catheters; rather, use closed-system drainage with antibacteri-irrigation. It is to be hoped within the next few years, studies now underway will allow specific recommendations regarding the management of asymptomatic bacteruria, the duration of therapy for recurrent infections, the prevention and treatment of L-form bacterial infections, and indications for urologic procedures.

  2. Work up of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Hillary L.; Schmidt, Bogdana

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric UTI costs the healthcare system upwards of 180 million dollars annually, and accounts for over 1.5 million clinician visits per year. Accurate and timely diagnosis of these infections is important for determining appropriate treatment and preventing long-term complications such as renal scarring, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease. Outside of the first 12 months, girls are more likely to be diagnosed with a UTI. About half of boys with UTI will be diagnosed within the first 12 months of life. The prevalence and incidence of pediatric UTI varies by age, race/ethnicity, sex and circumcision status. Diagnosis of UTI is made based on history and exam findings and confirmed with appropriately collected urine. If a bag specimen is negative, this can be used to rule out UTI without the need for confirmatory culture; however positive urinalysis tests from bag specimen warrant further investigation with a catheterized specimen or suprapubic aspiration. Urine culture is the gold standard for diagnosing UTI: Greater than 50,000 CFU on a catheterized specimen or suprapubic aspiration indicate presence of a UTI. Greater than 100,000 CFU on a voided specimen is considered a positive culture. There is no consensus on the need and optimal strategy for imaging in the setting of urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. Prompt recognition of UTI and antibiogram-based, empiric treatment or culture-based, targeted treatment should be initiated within 72 of presentation. PMID:26475948

  3. Urinary glicosaminoglycans levels in women with urinary tract infection and non urinary tract infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaribu, H. P.; Hanifa, A.; Tala, R. Z.; Ardiansyah, E.; Simanjuntak, R. Y.; Effendy, I. H.

    2018-03-01

    UTI is an infection that occurs in the urinary tract due to the proliferation of a microorganism. Female is fourteen times more vulnerable to UTI than male, because their urethra is shorter. Bladder epithelium is coated with a thin layer of glycosaminoglycans which act as a non-specific anti-adherence factor and nonspecific defense mechanisms against infection and can be found in the urine. An analytic study with cross sectional approach was conducted in 46 patients (23 with UTI and 23 non UTI) from June 2016 to determine differences in levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans between two groups. Urine samples were taken and tested for UTI and non UTI strips test. Laboratory examination of urine GAGs levels using ELISA kit for Human Glycosaminoglycans, then tabulated and analyzed using SPSS. The result showed no significant differences in the characteristics of women between two groups. There are significant differences in the mean levels of urinary GAGs in women with UTI compared with Non-UTI (69.74 ± 21.34; 21.39 ± 2.61 mg/l; p UTI incidence, with low odds ratio values and no significant difference in the mean of urinary glicosaminoglycans level based on sexual status.

  4. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Gülşah; Güven, Emine Seda G; Tekin, Yeşim B; Şentürk, Şenol; Kağitci, Mehmet; Üstüner, Işık; Mete Ural, Ülkü; Şahin, Figen K

    2016-05-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) can frequently be seen in pregnant women. Pregnancy and delivery have been considered as risk factors in the occurrence of pelvic floor dysfunction and determinants of LUTS. The main associated risk factor is parity. In the present study, we aim to determine the frequency of LUTS and urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy and the associated risk factors. This prospective study was carried out in a total of 250 women during their 28- and 40-gestational week checks. The Urinary Distress Inventory-6, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7, and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form were used to determine LUTS and its effect on quality of life. The mean age and gestational age of the participants were 29.41 ± 5.70 year (range 18-44) and 35.45 ± 2.98 weeks (range 28-40), respectively. The prevalence of LUTS was 81.6%. The prevalence of UI during pregnancy was 37.2%. Stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were diagnosed as 15.6, 4.8 and 16.8%, respectively. We found that advanced age, smoking and multiparity were risk factors associated with incontinence. Incontinence reduced pregnant women's quality of life. Lower urinary tract symptoms are commonly seen among pregnant women and these symptoms negatively affect the quality of life of pregnant women. Advanced age, smoking and multiparity were risk factors associated with urinary incontinence and LUTS. Obstetricians should be on the lookout for individual urological problems in pregnancy. Resolving any urological issues and cessation of smoking for the affected individuals will help alleviate the problem. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Urinary complications and sequelae of the cervix carcinoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleophax, J.P.; Durand, J.C.; Pilleron, J.P.; Mathieu, F.; Fenton, J.; Mathieu, G.; Rousseau, J.

    1980-01-01

    The authors describe the sequelae and urinary complications of: - radiotherapy only in 524 patients, stage I to III treated between 1960 and 1974; - 721 operations performed between 1968 and 1974, according to the protocol of treatment as used in the Fondation Curie. This reveals: - for irradiated patients, no iatrogenic damage to the upper urinary tract, whilst bladder complications were often present. No major complication was found in this group; - for operated patients, the surgical act was without harmful consequence in the 672 cases when the operation was foreseen in the initial protocol (0.6% of chief complications). On the other hand, surgery performed for persistent tumour or recurrence after exclusive radiotherapy showed 8% of chief complications. In this group they analyse the factors that might influence ureterohydronephroses, especially the extent of node dissection and associated external irradiation [fr

  6. Neuropeptides in Lower Urinary Tract (LUT) Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, neurokinin A, bradykinin, and endothelin-1 are expressed in the lower urinary tract (LUT) in both neural and non-neural (e.g., urothelium) components. LUT neuropeptide immunoreactivity is present in afferent and autonomic efferent neurons innervating the bladder and urethra and in the urothelium of the urinary bladder. Neuropeptides have tissue-specific distributions and functions in the LUT and exhibit neuroplastic changes in expression and function with LUT dysfunction following neural injury, inflammation and disease. LUT dysfunction with abnormal voiding including urinary urgency, increased voiding frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence and pain may reflect a change in the balance of neuropeptides in bladder reflex pathways. LUT neuropeptide/receptor systems may represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21290237

  7. Surgical Outcomes of Urinary Tract Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Basma; Stochino-Loi, Emanuela; Pasquier, Geoffroy; Dugardin, Fabrice; Defortescu, Guillaume; Abo, Carole; Roman, Horace

    To report the outcomes of surgical management of urinary tract endometriosis. Retrospective study based on prospectively recorded data (NCT02294825) (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). University tertiary referral center. Eighty-one women treated for urinary tract endometriosis between July 2009 and December 2015 were included, including 39 with bladder endometriosis, 31 with ureteral endometriosis, and 11 with both ureteral and bladder endometriosis. Owing to bilateral ureteral localization in 8 women, 50 different ureteral procedures were recorded. Procedures performed included resection of bladder endometriosis nodules, advanced ureterolysis, ureteral resection followed by end-to-end anastomosis, and ureteroneocystostomy. The main outcome measure was the outcome of the surgical management of urinary tract endometriosis. Fifty women presented with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) of the bladder and underwent either full-thickness excision of the nodule (70%) or excision of the bladder wall without opening of the bladder (30%). Ureteral lesions were treated by ureterolysis in 78% of the patients and by primary segmental resection in 22%. No patient required nephrectomy. Histological analysis revealed intrinsic ureteral endometriosis in 54.5% of cases. Clavien-Dindo grade III complications were present in 16% of the patients who underwent surgery for ureteral nodules and in 8% of those who underwent surgery for bladder endometriosis. Overall delayed postoperative outcomes were favorable regarding urinary symptoms and fertility. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 months and a maximum of 7 years postoperatively, with no recorded recurrences. Surgical outcomes of urinary tract endometriosis are generally satisfactory; however, the risk of postoperative complications should be taken into consideration. Therefore, all such procedures should be managed by an experienced multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2017 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian M. Abbo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections.

  9. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  10. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. Role of static fluid MR urography in detecting post urinary diversion complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Farouk Ibrahim Moustafa

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of work: The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic performance of static MR urography in detection of post cystectomy complications & the ability of static fluid MR urography in visualization of urinary tract segments. Material & methods: We prospectively reviewed 21 MR urograms with urinary diversion. The most common surgical procedures included Ileal conduit & Ileocecal neobladder diversion.Magnetic resonance urography examinations were performed with 1.5-T MR scanners. T2 weighted (static fluid MR urography techniques were done, in addition to conventional T1- and T2-weighted axial and coronal sequences. Urinary tract was divided in different parts: pelvicalyceal systems, upper, mid and lower ureteric segments & the reservoir or conduit Imaging features of the urinary collecting systems were evaluated for their visualization and complications detection. Results: T2-weighted MR urography could demonstrate 95% of urinary tract segments & together with conventional MR sequences all urinary tract segments can be visualized. Urinary diversion related complications were encountered included in 15 patients (71.4% & no urological complications were seen in 6 patients (28.6%. Conclusion: Comprehensive T2-weighted MR urography is an effective imaging method for the visualization of the urinary system and detection of early and late postoperative complications in patients with urinary diversion. Keywords: MR urography, Urinary diversion, Cancer bladder

  12. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatments for symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Juan C; Abalos, Edgardo

    2011-01-19

    Urinary tract infections, including pyelonephritis, are serious complications that may lead to significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. There is a large number of drugs, and combination of them, available to treat urinary tract infections, most of them tested in non-pregnant women. Attempts to define the optimal antibiotic regimen for pregnancy have, therefore, been problematic. The objective of this review was to determine, from the best available evidence from randomised controlled trials, which agent is the most effective for the treatment of symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy in terms of cure rates, recurrent infection, incidence of preterm delivery and premature rupture of membranes, admission to neonatal intensive care unit, need for change of antibiotic, and incidence of prolonged pyrexia. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (November 2009) and reference lists of articles. We considered all trials where the intention was to allocate participants randomly to one of at least two alternative treatments for any symptomatic urinary tract infection. Both review authors assessed trial quality and extracted data. We included 10 studies, recruiting a total of 1125 pregnant women. In most of the comparisons there were no significant differences between the treatments under study with regard to cure rates, recurrent infection, incidence of preterm delivery, admission to neonatal intensive care unit, need for change of antibiotic and incidence of prolonged pyrexia. When cefuroxime and cephradine were compared, there were better cure rates (29/49 versus 41/52) and fewer recurrences (20/49 versus 11/52) in the cefuroxime group. There was only one other statistically significant difference when comparing outpatient versus inpatient treatment. Gestational age at birth was greater in women from the outpatient group (38.86 versus 37.21), while birthweight was on average greater in the inpatient group

  14. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy - an updated overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szweda, Hanna; Jóźwik, Marcin

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of infection during pregnancy, affecting up to 10% of pregnant women. They are also recognized as the second most common ailment of pregnancy, after anemia. Three clinical types of pregnancy-related UTI are distinguished: asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), cystitis, and pyelonephritis. A particular form of ASB is the presence of Group B streptococci in the urinary tract of the pregnant woman. All clinical types of UTI may lead to serious maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, unlike in the nonpregnant female patient, all UTIs during pregnancy, including the asymptomatic infection, require treatment. In some patients, antibiotic prophylaxis should also be introduced. In the present work, we collectively summarize current practical recommendations from a number of international bodies and organizations.

  15. Diagnosis of pediatric urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Daw Tsai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is the second common infection in children. The diagnosis of UTI in infants and children can be difficult. Good history taking and physical examination are corner stones of good care of UTI. In addition, this article reviewed current evident on the methods of urine specimen collection and various diagnostic criteria to reach the diagnosis of UTI. Asian Guideline for UTI in children is highlighted to increase consensus of the diagnosis of UTI.

  16. Diagnosis of pediatric urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Jeng-Daw Tsai; Chun-Chen Lin; Stephan S. Yang

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the second common infection in children. The diagnosis of UTI in infants and children can be difficult. Good history taking and physical examination are corner stones of good care of UTI. In addition, this article reviewed current evident on the methods of urine specimen collection and various diagnostic criteria to reach the diagnosis of UTI. Asian Guideline for UTI in children is highlighted to increase consensus of the diagnosis of UTI.

  17. Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zarkotou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI are among the most common healthcare-associated infections, and potentially lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Multifaceted infection control strategies implemented as bundles can prevent nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices such as CAUTIs. The components of the CAUTI bundle proposed herein, include appropriate indications for catheterization and recommendations for the procedures of catheter insertion and catheter maintenance and care. Avoiding unnecessary urinary catheter use is the most effective measure for their prevention. To minimize the risk of CAUTI, urinary catheters should be placed only when a clinical valid indication is documented and they should be removed as soon as possible; alternatives to catheterization should also be considered. Aseptic insertion technique, maintenance of closed drainage system and strict adherence to hand hygiene are essential for preventing CAUTI. The successful implementation of the bundle requires education and training for all healthcare professionals and evaluation of surveillance data.

  18. Assessment of infective urinary tract disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixt, R.; Stokland, E.

    1998-01-01

    Urinary tracts infection (UTI) is common in children, particularly in the youngest age groups. There is a risk for progressive deterioration of renal function in these children if aggravating factors such as gross reflux and/or outflow obstruction of the urinary tract are present. In this review the pros and cons of available scintigrafic and radiological imaging techniques for the work-up of these children are presented. Ultrasound can be used in the acute phase to exclude obstruction but can not reliably show transient or permanent parenchymal lesions. The presence of reflux can be established with X-ray or direct nuclide cystography. The X-ray technique gives good morphological information and has a grading system with prognostic relevance. Both techniques are invasive and great care must be taken to keep the radiation burden down with the X-ray technique. Indirect nuclide cystography following a renographic study is non-invasive but has a lower sensitivity than direct techniques. More experience is needed with the indirect technique to evaluate the consequences of its apparently low sensitivity. Urography has a limited place in the acute work-up of urinary tract infection but can be used to look for renal scarring 1-2 years after an acute pyelonephritis. The 99m Tc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan can be used during the acute UTI to show pyelonephritic lesions with good accuracy and/or during the follow-up after six months to show permanent lesions. The acute DMSA scan can be omitted

  19. No. 250-Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Annette; Larochelle, Annick

    2017-10-01

    To provide an update of the definition, epidemiology, clinical presentation, investigation, treatment, and prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, post-coital antibiotic prophylaxis, and acute self-treatment are all efficient alternatives to prevent recurrent urinary tract infection. Vaginal estrogen and cranberry juice can also be effective prophylaxis alternatives. A search of PubMed and The Cochrane Library for articles published in English identified the most relevant literature. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date restrictions. This update is the consensus of the Sub-Committee on Urogynaecology of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Recurrent urinary tract infections need careful investigation and can be efficiently treated and prevented. Different prophylaxis options can be selected according to each patient's characteristics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. New markers of urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masajtis-Zagajewska, Anna; Nowicki, Michal

    2017-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection independent of age. It is also one of the most common causes of hospitalizations for infections among elderly people and the most common indication for antibiotic prescriptions in primary care. Both diagnostics and management of lower and upper urinary tract infections provide challenges in clinical practice due to their high prevalence and recurrence, and worldwide increase of antibiotic resistance. The clinical symptoms of UTI are often uncharacteristic or asymptomatic. The accurate diagnosis and early treatment are crucial due to risk of septicaemia and long-term consequences. Currently the diagnosis of urinary tract infection is based on the presence of clinical symptoms in combination with the results of nitrite strip test indicating the presence of bacteria in urine and semi-quantitative measurement of white blood cells count in urine. Although urine culture is the gold standard in UTI diagnostics it is both time-consuming and costly. Searching for novel biomarkers of UTI has attracted much attention in recent years. The article reviews several promising serum and urine biomarkers of UTI such as leukocyte esterase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukins, elastase alpha (1)-proteinase inhibitor, lactofferin, secretory immunoglobulin A, heparin-binding protein, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, α-1 microglobulin (α1Mg) and tetrazolium nitroblue test (TNB). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recurrent urinary tract infections in females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin, R.; Siddiqui, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated Urinary tract infections are common in adult women across the entire age spectrum, with mean annual incidence of 15% and 10% in those aged 15-39 and 40-79 years, respectively. Urinary tract infection (UTI), with its diverse clinical syndromes and affected host groups, remains one of the most common but widely misunderstood and challenging infectious diseases encountered in clinical practice. Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) present a significant problem for women and a challenge for the doctors who care for them. The diagnosis of uncomplicated UTI can be achieved best by a thorough assessment of patient symptoms with or without the addition of a urine dipstick test. Treatment should be based on the most recent guidelines, taking into account resistance patterns in the local community. The patient who suffers from recurrent UTIs can be treated safely and effectively with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, post-coital therapy, or self-initiated treatment. This review article covers the latest trends in the management of recurrent UTI among women. Further research is needed regarding rapid diagnosis of UTI, accurate presumptive identification of patients with resistant pathogens, and development of new antimicrobials for drug-resistant UTI. (author)

  2. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ).

  3. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections in Hiroshima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, L R; Phair, J P; Seki, Masafumi; Hamilton, H B; Nefzger, M D

    1964-08-19

    The present study was conducted at ABCC on a sample of Hiroshima residents systematically seleced for determining the influence on general health status of exposure to the atomic bomb of 1945. A survey for urinary infections was taken on persons in the sample examined in the ABCC clinic over a 1-year period: approximately 3000 women and 2000 men. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of urinary infection and to study the relation between bacteriuria and various aspects of the general examination, particularly blood pressure. In addition, the rates of urinary tract infection in the clinic were compared with the rates of chronic pyelonephritis at autopsy. Results showed that infections were much more common in women than in men and rose with age in both sexes. The greatest increase in the prevalence was found in women age 60 years and over was due to coliform bacteria in all but a few instances. There was no difference in hematuria, glycosuria, diabetes, serum cholesterol, blood groups, electrocardiograms, audiometry, vibrometry, hemoglobin levels or height-weight ratios. Blood pressure is higher in infected women as compared with noninfected women and the finding of higher rates for cardiac enlargement suggests that this small difference in blood pressures may have biological significance. However, the data do not permit a conclusion as to whether the urinary infections were responsible for the higher blood pressure levels, or whether the higher blood pressure levels increased the frequency of detectable infection. The difference between the clinical rates of urinary infection in men and women, and the pathological diagnosis of pyelonephritis in the same population, supports a previous suggestion that much of what is called pyelonephritis at autopsy is not due to urinary tract infection. 27 references, 2 figures, 10 tables.

  4. Colistin- and Carbapenem-Resistant Escherichia coli Harboring mcr-1 and blaNDM-5, Causing a Complicated Urinary Tract Infection in a Patient from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, José R; Patrawalla, Amee; Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mathema, Barun; Vinnard, Christopher; Dever, Lisa L; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2016-08-30

    an E. coli strain harboring both colistin (mcr-1) and carbapenem (blaNDM-5) resistance genes, originally isolated in August 2014 from urine of a patient with recurrent urinary tract infections. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the United States of a clinical bacterial isolate with both colistin and carbapenem resistance, highlighting the importance of active surveillance efforts for colistin- and carbapenem-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2016 Mediavilla et al.

  5. Urinary tract infections in women with urogynaecological symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, Marielle M. E.; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common in the field of urogynaecology. Women with persistent urinary symptoms seem more likely to have bacteriuria despite negative cultures. In this review, we will give an overview of the recent insights on the relationship between urinary tract infection and

  6. Anatomy and histology of the lower urinary tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradidarcheep, Wisuit; Wallner, Christian; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2011-01-01

    The function of the lower urinary tract is basically storage of urine in the bladder and the at-will periodic evacuation of the stored urine. Urinary incontinence is one of the most common lower urinary tract disorders in adults, but especially in the elderly female. The urethra, its sphincters, and

  7. Treatment of calculus of upper urinary tract with mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy under ultrasound guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Feng; Ye Chunhua; Wang Kanger; Sun Yan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and availability of minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL) under ultrasound guidance for treatment of calculus of upper urinary tract. Methods: The clinical data of 48 cases with calculus of upper urinary tract undergoing MPCNL were reviewed. Results: In 48 cases, cutaneous-nephric passages were successfully constructed by ultrasound guidance, stone-free rate was 90%. The average operation time was 90 minutes, the average hospitalization was 8 days. No major complications were noted. Conclusion: Under ultrasound guidance, MPCNL with holmium laser is a simply, safe and effective method for treating calculus of upper urinary tract. (authors)

  8. Clinical analysis of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-H; Li, G-Q; Guo, S-M; Che, Y-N; Wang, X; Cheng, F-T

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the related influencing factors of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A total of 343 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia admitted to this hospital from January 2013 to December 2016, were selected and treated by TURP. Patients were divided into infection group and non-infection group according to the occurrence of urinary tract infection after operation. The possible influencing factors were collected to perform univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. There were 53 cases with urinary tract infection after operation among 343 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, accounting for 15.5%. The univariate analysis displayed that the occurrence of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing TURP was closely associated with patient's age ≥ 65 years old, complicated diabetes, catheterization for urinary retention before operation, no use of antibiotics before operation and postoperative indwelling catheter duration ≥ 5 d (p urinary tract infection in patients receiving TURP (p urinary tract infection after TURP, while preoperative prophylactic utilization of anti-infective drugs can reduce the occurrence of postoperative urinary tract infection.

  9. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Hains, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  10. Fetal Urinary Tract Anomalies: Review of Pathophysiology, Imaging, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileto, Achille; Itani, Malak; Katz, Douglas S; Siebert, Joseph R; Dighe, Manjiri K; Dubinsky, Theodore J; Moshiri, Mariam

    2018-05-01

    Common fetal anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract encompass a complex spectrum of abnormalities that can be detected prenatally by ultrasound. Common fetal anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract can affect amniotic fluid volume production with the development of oligohydramnios or anhydramnios, resulting in fetal pulmonary hypoplasia and, potentially, abnormal development of other fetal structures. We provide an overview of common fetal anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract with an emphasis on sonographic patterns as well as pathologic and postnatal correlation, along with brief recommendations for postnatal management. Of note, we render an updated classification of fetal abnormalities of the kidneys and urinary tract based on the presence or absence of associated urinary tract dilation. In addition, we review the 2014 classification of urinary tract dilation based on the Linthicum multidisciplinary consensus panel.

  11. Postpartum urinary tract infection by mode of delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Tina Djernis; Krebs, Lone; Loekkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between postpartum urinary tract infection and intended mode of delivery as well as actual mode of delivery. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: All live births in Denmark between 2004 and 2010 (n=450 856). Births were classified...... was postpartum urinary tract infection (n=16 295) within 30 days post partum, defined as either a diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the National Patient Registry or redemption of urinary tract infection-specific antibiotics recorded in the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. RESULTS: We found that 4.......6% of women with intended caesarean delivery and 3.5% of women with intended vaginal delivery were treated for postpartum urinary tract infection.Women with intended caesarean delivery had a significantly increased risk of postpartum urinary tract infection compared with women with intended vaginal delivery...

  12. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy: old and new unresolved diagnostic and therapeutic problems

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszkiewicz-Rowi?ska, Joanna; Ma?yszko, Jolanta; Wieliczko, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in pregnant women and pose a great therapeutic challenge, since the risk of serious complications in both the mother and her child is high. Pregnancy is a state associated with physiological, structural and functional urinary tract changes which promote ascending infections from the urethra. Unlike the general population, all pregnant women should be screened for bacteriuria with urine culture, and asymptomatic bacteriuria must be treated in every ca...

  13. Lower urinary tract symptoms after subtotal versus total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lea Laird; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling; Gimbel, Helga

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common after hysterectomy and increase after menopause. We aimed to compare subtotal with total abdominal hysterectomy regarding LUTS, including urinary incontinence (UI) subtypes, 14 years after hysterectomy. Main results from...

  14. Risk factors for postoperative urinary tract infection following midurethral sling procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganay, Melike; Cavkaytar, Sabri; Kokanali, Mahmut Kuntay; Ozer, Irfan; Aksakal, Orhan Seyfi; Erkaya, Salim

    2017-04-01

    To identify the potential risk factors for urinary tract infections following midurethral sling procedures. 556 women who underwent midurethral sling procedure due to stress urinary incontinence over a four-year period were reviewed in this retrospective study. Of the study population, 280 women underwent TVT procedures and 276 women underwent TOT procedures. Patients were evaluated at 4-8 weeks postoperatively and were investigated for the occurrence of a urinary tract infection. Patients who experienced urinary tract infection were defined as cases, and patients who didn't were defined as controls. All data were collected from medical records. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify the risk factors for urinary tract infection. Of 556 women, 58 (10.4%) were defined as cases while 498 (89.6%) were controls. The mean age of women in cases (57.8±12.9years) was significantly greater than in controls (51.8±11.2years) (purinary tract infection, concomitant vaginal hysterectomy and cystocele repair, TVT procedure and postoperative postvoiding residual bladder volume ≥100ml were more common in cases than in controls. However, in multivariate regression analysis model presence of preoperative urinary tract infection [OR (95% CI)=0.1 (0.1-0.7); p=0.013], TVT procedure [OR (95% CI)=8.4 (3.1-22.3); p=0.000] and postoperative postvoiding residual bladder volume ≥100ml [OR (95% CI)=4.6 (1.1-19.2); p=0.036] were significant independent risk factors for urinary tract infection following midurethral slings CONCLUSION: Urinary tract infection after midurethral sling procedures is a relatively common complication. The presence of preoperative urinary tract infection, TVT procedure and postoperative postvoiding residual bladder volume ≥100ml may increase the risk of this complication. Identification of these factors could help surgeons to minimize this complicationby developing effective strategies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformations in children: A retrospective study of 34 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Chahed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the association of urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation is not rare, their management poses challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between urolithiasis and malformations of the urinary system. There were 34 patients (19 males and 15 females with a mean age of 4.8 years (range, 2 months to 14 years. All patients had urinary lithiasis with a urinary tract malformation. Abdominal pain was the most frequent clinical symptom (38%. Urinary infection was found in 7 patients (21% and macroscopic haematuria was present in 10 patients (29%. The most frequent urinary tract malformations were megaureter (8 cases, uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (7 cases and vesico-ureteric reflux (8 cases, but its malformative origin could not be confirmed. Treatment consisted of lithiasis extraction in 32 cases associated with specific treatment of the uropathy in 27 cases. Postoperative outcome was uneventful in all cases. In fact, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is not rare. Indeed, 9-34% of urinary lithiasis are noted to be associated with urinary tract malformation. Positive diagnosis relies specifically on kidney ultrasound, intravenous urography, and urethrocystography. Treatment depends on the type of urinary tract malformation, localisation and size of the urinary lithiasis. Conclusion: In conclusion, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is a frequent eventuality. Surgical intervention is the usual mode of treatment.

  16. Urinary NGAL deficiency in recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Catherine S; Johnson, Kathryn; Patel, Viral; Wax, Rebecca; Rodig, Nancy; Barasch, Jonathan; Bachur, Richard; Lee, Richard S

    2017-06-01

    Children with recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTI) often show no identifiable cause of their infections. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is known to be upregulated within the uroepithelium and kidney of patients with UTI and exhibits a localized bacteriostatic effect through iron chelation. We hypothesize that some patients with rUTI without an identifiable cause of their recurrent infections have locally deficient NGAL production. We therefore explored whether a lack of NGAL production may be a factor in the pathogenesis of rUTI. Patients seen in the urology clinic for rUTI who were tract, or other reasons that predispose to UTI, such as neurogenic bladder, the need for intermittent catheterization, or unrepaired posterior urethral valves. Control patients were healthy children enrolled from the emergency department with no history of UTI or renal dysfunction, normal urinalysis at the time of enrollment, and presenting no diagnosis associated with increased NGAL levels, such as acute kidney injury or infection. NGAL was measured by immunoblot. Fifteen cases and controls were enrolled. Median urinary NGAL levels were significantly decreased in rUTI patients compared with controls [15 (14-29) ng/ml vs 30 (27-61) ng/ml; p = 0.002)] Although comparatively diminished, measurable NGAL levels were present in all patients with rUTI. Urinary NGAL is significantly decreased in patients with compared with patients without rUTI. These data suggest that some patients with rUTI may be predisposed to UTI because of a relative local deficiency in urinary NGAL production.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Christine M; Lowder, Jerry L

    2018-01-02

    Urinary tract infections are the most common outpatient infections, but predicting the probability of urinary tract infections through symptoms and test results can be complex. The most diagnostic symptoms of urinary tract infections include change in frequency, dysuria, urgency, and presence or absence of vaginal discharge, but urinary tract infections may present differently in older women. Dipstick urinalysis is popular for its availability and usefulness, but results must be interpreted in context of the patient's pretest probability based on symptoms and characteristics. In patients with a high probability of urinary tract infection based on symptoms, negative dipstick urinalysis does not rule out urinary tract infection. Nitrites are likely more sensitive and specific than other dipstick components for urinary tract infection, particularly in the elderly. Positive dipstick testing is likely specific for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy, but urine culture is still the test of choice. Microscopic urinalysis is likely comparable to dipstick urinalysis as a screening test. Bacteriuria is more specific and sensitive than pyuria for detecting urinary tract infection, even in older women and during pregnancy. Pyuria is commonly found in the absence of infection, particularly in older adults with lower urinary tract symptoms such as incontinence. Positive testing may increase the probability of urinary tract infection, but initiation of treatment should take into account risk of urinary tract infection based on symptoms as well. In cases in which the probability of urinary tract infection is moderate or unclear, urine culture should be performed. Urine culture is the gold standard for detection of urinary tract infection. However, asymptomatic bacteriuria is common, particularly in older women, and should not be treated with antibiotics. Conversely, in symptomatic women, even growth as low as 10 2 colony-forming unit/mL could reflect infection. Resistance is

  18. A prospective study of urinary tract infection during pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, I.; Bessell, E.M.; Sokal, M.

    1989-01-01

    The frequency of urinary tract infection before and during pelvic radiotherapy was studied prospectively in 172 patients who were not catherised and had not had instrumentation for at least 4 weeks prior to radiotherapy. The incidence of urinary tract infection prior to radiotherapy was 17% and a further 17% of patients develped a urinary tract infection during radiotherapy. Mid-stream specimens of urine (MSU) should be examined for infection on a weekly basis during pelvic radiotherapy not only to identify this additional 17% of patients but also to detect those patients who have persistent urinary tract infection in spite of treatment with appropriate antibiotics. (author). 6 refs.; 1 fig.; 4 tabs

  19. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of community-acquired UTI organisms to amoxycillin and co-trimoxazole was .... Treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection in non-pregnant women. Postgrad ... Single-dose antibiotic treatment for symptomatic uri- nary tract infections in ...

  20. Assessment of infective urinary tract disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sixt, R.; Stokland, E. [Goteborg, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital/Ostra (Sweden). Dept. of Pediatric Clinical Physiology and Dept. of Pediatric Radiology

    1998-06-01

    Urinary tracts infection (UTI) is common in children, particularly in the youngest age groups. There is a risk for progressive deterioration of renal function in these children if aggravating factors such as gross reflux and/or outflow obstruction of the urinary tract are present. In this review the pros and cons of available scintigrafic and radiological imaging techniques for the work-up of these children are presented. Ultrasound can be used in the acute phase to exclude obstruction but can not reliably show transient or permanent parenchymal lesions. The presence of reflux can be established with X-ray or direct nuclide cystography. The X-ray technique gives good morphological information and has a grading system with prognostic relevance. Both techniques are invasive and great care must be taken to keep the radiation burden down with the X-ray technique. Indirect nuclide cystography following a renographic study is non-invasive but has a lower sensitivity than direct techniques. More experience is needed with the indirect technique to evaluate the consequences of its apparently low sensitivity. Urography has a limited place in the acute work-up of urinary tract infection but can be used to look for renal scarring 1-2 years after an acute pyelonephritis. The {sup 99m}Tc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan can be used during the acute UTI to show pyelonephritic lesions with good accuracy and/or during the follow-up after six months to show permanent lesions. The acute DMSA scan can be omitted.

  1. Managing lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Kenneth R; Aning, Jonathan J

    2016-04-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common and increase in prevalence with age. Up to 90% of men aged 50 to 80 may suffer from troublesome LUTS. Men may attend expressing direct concern about micturition, describing one or more LUTS and the related impact on their quality of life. Frequently men may present for other medical or urological reasons such as concern regarding their risk of having prostate cancer or erectile dysfunction but on taking a history bothersome LUTS are identified. Men may present late in the community with urinary retention: the inability to pass urine. A thorough urological history is essential to inform management. It is important to determine whether men have storage or voiding LUTS or both. All patients must have a systematic comprehensive examination including genitalia and a digital rectal examination. Investigations performed in primary care should be guided by the history and examination findings, taking into account the impact of the LUTS on the individual's quality of life. Current NICE guidelines recommend the following to be performed at initial assessment: frequency volume chart (FVC); urine dipstick to detect blood, glucose, protein, leucocytes and nitrites; and prostate specific antigen. Men should be referred for urological review if they have: bothersome LUTS which have not responded to conservative management or medical therapy; LUTS in association with recurrent or persistent UTIs; urinary retention; renal impairment suspected to be secondary to lower urinary tract dysfunction; or suspected urological malignancy. All patients not meeting criteria for immediate referral to urology can be managed initially in primary care. Based on history, examination and investigation findings an individualised management plan should be formulated. Basic lifestyle advice should be given regarding reduction or avoidance of caffeinated products and alcohol. The FVC should guide advice regarding fluid intake management and all

  2. Cystectomy and Urinary Diversion for the Management of a Devastated Lower Urinary Tract Following Prostatic Cryotherapy and/or Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Bryan S; Langenstroer, Peter; Guralnick, Michael L; Jacobsohn, Kenneth M; O'Connor, R Corey

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the outcomes and quality of life measures in men who underwent cystectomy and urinary diversion for devastating lower urinary tract toxicity after prostatic radiotherapy and/or cryotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Records of patients who underwent cystectomy and urinary diversion for the management of a devastated lower urinary tract following prostatic radiotherapy or cryotherapy were reviewed retrospectively. A postoperative, retrospective quality of life (QOL) survey was designed specific to this patient subset and obtained by telephone interview. Extirpative surgery with urinary diversion for management of a devastated lower urinary tract was performed on 15 patients with a mean age of 72 years (range 63-82). Toxicities leading to bladder removal included bladder neck contractures, prostatic necrosis, incontinence, osteomyelitis, bladder calculi, fistulae, urethral strictures, abscesses, necrotizing fasciitis, and radiation/hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean number of failed conservative, minimally invasive interventions per patients prior to cystectomy was 3.7 (range 1-12). The average time period from major complication following radiotherapy/cryotherapy to cystectomy was 29.1 months (range 5-65). The QOL survey showed all of the patients who completed the survey (n = 13) would undergo the procedure again and 11 (85%) would have undergone the procedure an average of 13.2 months sooner (range 5-36). Toxicities secondary to prostatic radiotherapy or cryotherapy may be debilitating. Our results demonstrate that cystectomy with urinary diversion can improve QOL in patients with a devastated lower urinary tract.

  3. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Ann E

    2016-12-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result from the influence of estrogen deficiency, antimicrobial therapy, contraceptives, or other causes. Interventions to reduce adverse effects on the vaginal microbiota and/or to restore protective lactobacilli may reduce the risks of UTI.

  4. Can low urinary tract symptoms influence postprostatectomy urinary incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienza, Antonio; Hevia, Mateo; Merino, Imanol; Diez-Caballero, Fernando; Rosell, David; Pascual, Juan I; Zudaire, Juan J; Robles, José E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze what kind of urinary symptoms patients have before receiving treatment by radical prostatectomy (RP), and to evaluate their influence on urinary incontinence (UI). Between 2002 and 2012, 758 consecutive patients underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa). Surgery was carried out by open retropubic RP in 545 (73.1%) of patients and laparoscopic RP in 201 (27%) by 5 surgeons who were excluded from data collection and analysis. The following symptoms were collected from the last urological check-ups or pre-operative consultation and classified as: storage symptoms, voiding symptoms, post micturition symptoms, history of acute urinary retention, benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment, history of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A total of 661 patients were included on analysis: 136 (20.6%) patients reported low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), 162 (24.5%) were considered incontinent after RP, and 45 (33.1%) of them reported LUTS before surgery. Postprostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI) was significantly different in patients with LUTS (117 [22.3%] vs. 45 [33.1%], P=0.009). The presence of any LUTS influence significantly in the appearance of PPUI (OR=1.72 [95% CI: 1.14-2.6), P=0.01). TURP is independently influential in PPUI (OR=6.13 [95% CI: 1.86-20.18], P=0.003). A patient with LUTS before surgery has an increased risk of 70% or even 200% to suffer PPUI and a patient who received treatment by TURP is 6 times at higher risk of PPUI. In conclusion, patients with LUTS are likely to present PPUI. History of TURP is influential by itself over PPUI. A good preoperative consultation is important to assess continence status and to create realistic expectations to patients before RP.

  5. Endoluminal pharmacologic stimulation of the upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Jørn Skibsted

    2013-05-01

    The experiments performed in this PhD thesis were conducted at the Institute of Experimental Surgery, Skejby Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark and at the Laboratory of Animal Science, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. The thesis is based on 3 peer review articles published in international journals and a review. Diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopic upper urinary tract procedures are usually characterised as minimal invasive procedures and associated with a low complication rate. Most often fever or pain are seen and sometimes septicaemia. However, mucosa lesion or even ureteric ruptures are known complications. Research has suggested that high renal pelvic pressures generated during these procedures, might contribute to per-/postoperative complications seen, and even possible renal parenchymal damage. Nevertheless, local administration (endoluminal) of a relaxant drug has not previously been tried in order to lower renal pelvic pressure. The purposes of this thesis were to examine the effect of local administration (endoluminal) of the nonspecific β-adrenergic agonist ISOproterenol (ISO) on: 1) The normal pressure flow relation in porcine ureter, 2) The effect of endoluminal ISO perfusion during flexible ureterorenoscopy, 3) The pressure flow relation during semirigid ureterorenoscopy and 4) The cardiovascular system. Among other receptor-types β-adrenergic receptor are located in the upper urinary tract and the activation thereof mediates smooth muscle relaxation. We have shown - in an animal experimental model - that ISO added to the irrigation fluid had significant impact on the renal pelvic pressures generated during upper urinary tract endoscopy. ISO significantly and dose dependently reduced the normal pressure flow relations by approximately 80% without concomitant cardiovascular side effects or measurable plasma levels of ISO. During flexible ureterorenoscopy 0.1 µg/ml ISO added to the irrigation fluid significantly reduced renal pelvic pressure during

  6. Work-up of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bogdana; Copp, Hillary L

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric urinary tract infection (UTI) costs the health care system more than $180 million annually, and accounts for more than 1.5 million clinician visits per year. Accurate and timely diagnosis of these infections is important for determining appropriate treatment and preventing long-term complications such as renal scarring, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease. After the first 12 months, girls are more likely to be diagnosed with a UTI. About half of boys with UTI are diagnosed within the first 12 months of life. Diagnosis of UTI is made based on history and examination findings and confirmed by urine testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intractable urinary tract infection in a renal transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokulnath, Renuka Satish

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections after renal transplantation and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or relapsing infections are not uncommon in the early post-transplant period and superadded fungal UTI can occur in these patients, posing a difficult therapeutic problem. Literature on recurrent UTI after transplant as well as the ideal approach to such patients is scanty. We present the case of a renal allograft recipient who presented with relapsing bacterial UTI complicated by systemic fungemia; also, a brief review of fungal UTI is attempted. (author)

  8. Preventing urinary tract infections in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gabrielle J; Craig, Jonathan C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children, causes them considerable discomfort, as well as distress to parents and has a tendency to recur. Approximately 20% of those children who experience one infection will have a repeat episode. Since 1975, 11 trials of long-term antibiotics compared with placebo or no treatment in 1,550 children have been published. Results have been heterogeneous, but the largest trial demonstrated a small reduction (6% absolute risk reduction, risk ratio 0.65) in the risk of repeat symptomatic UTI over 12 months of treatment. This effect was consistent across sub groups of children based upon age, gender, vesicoureteric reflux status and number of prior infections. Trials involving re-implantation surgery (and antibiotics compared with antibiotics alone) for the sub-group of children with vesicoureteric reflux have not shown a reduction in repeat UTI, with the possible exception of a very small benefit for febrile UTI. Systematic reviews have shown that circumcision reduces the risk of repeat infection but 111 circumcisions would need to be performed to prevent one UTI in unpredisposed boys. Given the need for anaesthesia and the risk of surgical complication, net clinical benefit is probably restricted to those who are predisposed (such as those with recurrent infection). Many small trials in complementary therapies have been published and many suggest some benefit, however inclusion of children is limited. Only three trials involving 394 children for cranberry products, two trials with a total of 252 children for probiotics and one trial with 24 children for vitamin A are published. Estimates of efficacy vary widely and imprecision is evident. Multiple interventions to prevent UTI in children exist. Of those, long-term low dose antibiotics has the strongest evidence base, but the benefit is small. Circumcision in boys reduces the risk substantially, but should be restricted to those at risk. There is little evidence of benefit of

  9. In vitro activity of vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) on urinary tract pathogens in uncomplicated urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, S.; Tariq, S.; Alam, M.A.; Chiragh, S.; Wazir, M.S.; Suleman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection in the community, mainly caused by Escherichia coli (E coli). Due to its high incidence and recurrence, problems are faced in the treatment with antibiotics. Cranberry being herbal remedy have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. This study was conducted to analyse in vitro activity of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on uropathogenic E coli in uncomplicated urinary tract infections. Method: In this laboratory based single group experimental study, anti-bacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate on urinary tract E coli was investigated, in vitro. Ninety-six culture positive cases of different uropathogens were identified. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate at different concentrations was prepared in distilled water and put in wells punched in nutrient agar. E coli isolates were inoculated on the plates and incubated at 37 Degree C for 24 hours. A citric acid solution of the same pH as that of Vaccinium macrocarpon was used and put in a well on the same plate to exclude the effect of pH. Results: A total of 35 isolates of E coli were identified out of 96 culture positive specimens of urine and found sensitive to Vaccinium macrocarpon (p<0.000). Results revealed that Vaccinium macrocarpon has antibacterial effect against E coli. Furthermore the antibacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon has dose response relationship. Acidic nature of Vaccinium macrocarpon due to its pH is not contributory towards its antibacterial effect. Conclusion: Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate may be used in urinary tract infection caused by E coli. (author)

  10. Lymphoma and metastases in the urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneton, J.N.; Drouillard, J.

    1989-01-01

    Kidneys lymphomas are mainly secondary and represent the most frequent localizations in the urinary tract (68%). The appearance most frequently observed with computed tomography (CT) as well as ultrasound is that of multinodular involvement or, less frequently, of contiguous involvement from retroperitoneal adenopathy in an isolate nodular or tumoral form or in an infiltrating form. The lesions are most often bilateral and involve the lymph nodes, the liver and/or the spleen, especially when the tumor is a metastasis. Lymphoma in the excreting cavities of the bladder is much less frequent. The frequent stasis does no allow obtaining satisfactory urograms for the exploration of the ureters, so that antegrade or retrograde pyelography is often necessary. The lesions of the bladder are well demonstrated by ultrasound and CT exploration. The metastases of lymphoma in the urinary tract are most frequently located in the kidneys, and represent the most frequent malignant kidney tumors. They are often non recognized clinically since they occur at late stages in cancer evolution. Their usual appearance with ultrasound and CT is that of multiple solid-type tumors. Metastases in the excreting cavities of the bladder are very rare [fr

  11. Urinary tract infection during pregnancy: current concepts on a common multifaceted problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinderi, Kallirhoe; Delkos, Dimitrios; Kalinderis, Michail; Athanasiadis, Apostolos; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis

    2018-02-06

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infection in pregnancy, increasing the risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Urinary tract infections may present as asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis or pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen associated with both symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria. If asymptomatic bacteriuria is untreated, up to 30% of mothers develop acute pyelonephritis, with an increased risk of multiple maternal and neonatal complications, such as preeclampsia, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight. Urinary tract infection is a common, but preventable cause of pregnancy complications, thus urinary tests, such as urine culture or new technologies such as high-throughput DNA sequence-based analyses, should be used in order to improve antenatal screening of pregnant women.

  12. Fungal Urinary Tract Infection in Burn Patients‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suad Yousuf Aldorkee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infection is the most common hospital-acquired infection. Fungal species are unusual causes of urinary tract infection in healthy individuals, but common in the hospital setting or among patients with predisposing diseases and structural abnormalities of the kidney and collecting system. Burn patients are susceptible to nosocomial infections owing to the immunocompromising effects of burn injury, cutaneous and respiratory tract injury, prolonged intensive care unit stays and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Objective: The study population includes adult patients of both genders who presented with different percentages of body burns. Urine sample was collected from each patient at the time of admission and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks and sent for general urine examination and urine culture to test for the possibility of fungal growth. Those who found to develop fungal UTI by urine culture during their hospitalization and had no infection at the time of admission were selected as subjects for our study. Results: 28 (18.6% patients had positive fungal culture during their hospitalization, 11 of them were males and 17 were females, the most common age of presentation was 41-50 years and the mean age ± SD was (44.4 ± 10.7 years. The most common isolated fungi were Candida albicans (64.3%, followed by Candida glabrata (21.4% and Candida tropicalis (7.1%. The majority of patients developed infection within the 2nd and 3rd weeks of hospitalization, however, those who presented with total body surface area burned > 40% developed an earlier infection within the 1st week. Female gender, urethral catheterization and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with higher risk of infection as the P values were 0.03, 0.005 and 0.004 respectively. Conclusion: Fungal urinary tract infection occurred in 18.6% of burn patients. The most common causative fungi are candida species. Advanced age, female gender, high percentage of

  13. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broseta Rico, Enrique; Jiménez Cruz, Juan Fernando

    2002-11-01

    To review the topic of urinary tract infections (UTI) during pregnancy and menopause. UTI during pregnancy and menopause have great relevance in the field of urologic infections; during pregnancy because of the particularities involved in its diagnosis and treatment and potential consequences to the fetus and mother; menopausal UTI because this group of women is numerous and represents a growing section of the general population pyramid, due to the aging of population in developed countries associated with longer life expectancies and grater demand for quality of life. We performed a bibliographic review combined with our personal experience. During pregnancy there are several functional and anatomical changes that condition not only a higher risk of UTI, but also an additional treatment difficulty due to antimicrobial pharmacokinetics alterations and potential damage to the fetus. Despite efforts to find an easy, fast and reliable test for bacteriuria detection, urine culture continues to be the first diagnostic test for its detection and follow up during pregnancy. Penicillin derivates and cephalosporins continue to be the first choice because their lack of adverse effects on either fetus or mother. Alternative options like phosphomicin and aztreonam although they show low toxicity there is need for more studies supporting their suitability for the treatment of pregnancy UTIs. Menopausal female UTI have their different features from those in younger women. Hormonal alterations derived from gonadal atrophy associate functional changes in the vaginal ecosystem, making it prone to enterobacteriaceae colonization as a first step up to the urinary tract. This associated with genitourinary tract anatomical alterations inherent t aging make UTI extraordinary prevalent in this growing segment of population. Treatment lines focus on hormonal alteration correction and proper antimicrobial prophylaxis and vaccines in a close future. UTIs during pregnancy and menopause have

  14. [Primary and secondary prevention of urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Vahlensieck, W; Bauer, H W; Weidner, W; Naber, K G; Piechota, H J

    2011-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequent bacterial infections in the community and health care setting. Mostly young and, to some extent, postmenopausal women are affected by recurrent UTI (rUTI) defined as ≥3 UTI/year. On the other hand rUTI are frequently found in patients with complicating urological factors, e.g. urinary catheters. Modifiable predisposing factors in uncomplicated rUTI in women are rare. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital prophylaxis, if there is close correlation with sexual intercourse, are most effective to prevent rUTI. Nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim (or cotrimoxazole), and fosfomycin trometamol are available as first-line drugs. Oral cephalosporins and quinolones should be restricted to specific indications. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the number of uropathogens in the gut and/or vaginal flora and reduces bacterial"fitness". Given the correct indication, the recurrence rate of rUTI can be reduced by about 90%. In postmenopausal patients vaginal substitution of oestriol should be started first. Oral or parenteral immunoprophylaxis is another option in patients with rUTI. Other possibilities with varying scientific evidence are prophylaxis with cranberries or probiotics. The prophylaxis of catheter-associated UTI or asymptomatic bacteriuria should employ strategies which result in a reduction of frequency and duration of catheter drainage of the urinary tract. The currently available catheter materials have only little influence on reducing catheter-associated rUTI.

  15. Cranberry for Urinary Tract Infection: From Bench to Bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Daglia, Maria; Izadi, Morteza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common infectious diseases which can occur in any part of the urinary tract such as bladder, kidney, ureters, and urethra. They are commonly caused by bacteria that enter through the urethra. Urinary tract infections commonly develop in the bladder and spread to renal tissues. Up to now, there are different antimicrobial agents which have beneficial role on urinary tract infections. However, most of them cause different adverse effects and therefore, much attention has been paid to the search for effective therapeutic agents with negligible adverse effects. Cranberry is known as one of the most important edible plants, which possesses potent antimicrobial effects against the bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections. Growing evidence has shown that cranberry suppresses urinary tract infections and eradicates the bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study is to critically review the available literature regarding the antimicrobial activities of cranberry against urinary tract infection microorganisms. In addition, we discuss etiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and current drugs of urinary tract infections to provide a more complete picture of this disease.

  16. Bacterial Uropathogens in Urinary Tract Infection and Antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by clinicians in developing countries. Area-specific monitoring studies aimed to gain knowledge about the type of pathogens responsible for urinary tract infections and their resistance patterns may help the clinician to ...

  17. [The role of the uretral catheter in the development of catheter- related urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A O; Govorov, A V; Shiryaev, A A; Pushkar, D Yu

    2017-12-01

    The most common source of nosocomial infection is the urinary tract, especially if they it is drained with a urethral catheter. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for at least 80% of all complicated urinary tract infections and are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. Intestinal microflora plays the leading role in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, whereas the most important risk factor for their development is the long duration of urinary catheter drainage. In the case of short-term and intermittent catheterization, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not required, but if a patient develops clinically significant infection, antibiotic therapy is required followed by definitive therapy based on culture. Urethral catheters coated with antimicrobial substances and anti-inflammatory agents can significantly reduce the adhesion and migration of bacteria, thereby reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections. Despite this, the incidence of catheter-associated infection remains high. We have reviewed recent literature related to catheter-associated urinary tract infections and the best means of preventing this condition.

  18. The innate immune response during urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John David; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Becknell, Brian; Watson, Joshua; Hains, David S

    2014-07-01

    Despite its proximity to the fecal flora, the urinary tract is considered sterile. The precise mechanisms by which the urinary tract maintains sterility are not well understood. Host immune responses are critically important in the antimicrobial defense of the urinary tract. During recent years, considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying immune homeostasis of the kidney and urinary tract. Dysfunctions in these immune mechanisms may result in acute disease, tissue destruction and overwhelming infection. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the innate immune response in the urinary tract in response to microbial assault. In doing so, we focus on the role of antimicrobial peptides-a ubiquitous component of the innate immune response.

  19. Urinary tract infections in the infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mehreen; Seed, Patrick C

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) in an infant may be the first indication of an underlying renal disorder. Early recognition and initiation of adequate therapy for UTI is important to reduce the risk of long-term renal scarring. Ampicillin and gentamicin are traditionally the empiric treatment of choice; however, local antibiotic resistance patterns should be considered. Maternal antibiotics during pregnancy also increase the risk of resistant pathogens during neonatal UTI. Long-term management after the first UTI in infants remains controversial because of lack of specific studies in this age group and the risk-benefit issues for antibiotic prophylaxis between reduced recurrent disease and emergent antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Doern, Christopher D; Godbout, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in pediatric patients. Resistance to common antibiotic agents appears to be increasing over time, although resistance rates may vary based on geographic region or country. Prior antibiotic exposure is a pertinent risk factor for acquiring resistant organisms during a first UTI and recurrent UTI. Judicious prescribing of antibiotics for common pediatric conditions is needed to prevent additional resistance from occurring. Complex pediatric patients with histories of hospitalizations, prior antibiotic exposure, and recurrent UTIs are also at high risk for acquiring UTIs due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms. Data regarding the impact of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing interpretation on UTI treatment outcomes is lacking.

  1. Novel management of urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Douglas W; Patel, Ashay S; Koff, Stephen A; Justice, Sheryl S

    2011-07-01

    To highlight observations that have suggested the need for changing the conventional approach to the evaluation and management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and vesicoureteral reflux in children and examine new alternative approaches to prevention of UTI and renal scarring based on research into host-pathogen interaction. Recent studies have questioned the traditional approach of using prophylactic antibiotics to prevent recurrence of UTI and development of renal scarring in children with vesicoureteral reflux. Ongoing research on host-pathogen interactions reveals a promising capability to analyze virulence factors in bacteria causing UTIs in children, identify highly virulent bacteria capable of causing pyelonephritis and renal injury, and to selectively target the gastrointestinal reservoirs of these bacteria for elimination using probiotics. Promising experimental studies correlating bacterial virulence with pattern of UTI and identification and characterization of a newly available probiotic capable of eradicating uropathogenic bacteria make targeted probiotic prevention of renal injury-inducing UTIs a potential therapeutic reality.

  2. Value of Ultrasound in Detecting Urinary Tract Anomalies After First Febrile Urinary Tract Infection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, Emad E; Abdelaziz, Doaa M; Sheba, Maha F; Abdel-Azeem, Yasser S

    2016-05-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract. Ultrasound is a noninvasive test that can demonstrate the size and shape of kidneys, presence of dilatation of the ureters, and the existence of anatomic abnormalities. The aim of the study is to estimate the value of ultrasound in detecting urinary tract anomalies after first attack of UTI. Methods This study was conducted at the Nephrology Clinic, New Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, from August 2012 to March 2013, and included 30 children who presented with first attack of acute febrile UTI. All patients were subjected to urine analysis, urine culture and sensitivity, serum creatinine, complete blood count, and imaging in the form of renal ultrasound, voiding cysto-urethrography, and renal scan. Results All the patients had fever with a mean of 38.96°C ± 0.44°C and the mean duration of illness was 6.23 ± 5.64 days. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had an ultrasound abnormality. The commonest abnormalities were kidney stones (15.8%). Only 2 patients who had abnormal ultrasound had also vesicoureteric reflux on cystourethrography. Sensitivity of ultrasound was 66.7%, specificity was 37.5%, positive predictive value was 21.1%, negative predictive value was 81.8%, and total accuracy was 43.33%. Conclusion We concluded that ultrasound alone was not of much value in diagnosing and putting a plan of first attack of febrile UTI. It is recommended that combined investigations are the best way to confirm diagnosis of urinary tract anomalies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Urinary Tract Infections in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. OBJECTIVE To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. EVIDENCE REVIEW A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. RESULTS The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and

  4. Surgical Management of Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor, Ronak A; Elliott, Sean P

    2017-08-01

    Surgery for patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction (nLUTD) is indicated when medical therapy fails, to correct conditions affecting patient safety, or when surgery can enhance the quality of life better than nonoperative management. Examples include failure of maximal medical therapy, inability to perform or aversion to clean intermittent catheterization, refractory incontinence, and complications from chronic, indwelling catheters. Adults with nLUTD have competing risk factors, including previous operations, obesity, poor nutritional status, complex living arrangements, impaired dexterity/paralysis, and impaired executive and cognitive function. Complications are common in this subgroup of patients requiring enduring commitments from surgeons, patients, and their caretakers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of upper urinary tract anomalies in hospitalized premature infants with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, A; Vricella, G J; Najaf, T; Coplen, D E

    2015-05-01

    The 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines address imaging after initial febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in infants >2 months of age. We sought to determine the frequency of upper urinary tract anomalies (hydronephrosis and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR)) in hospitalized premature infants with UTI. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions at a tertiary care children's hospital between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2010. We queried the records for UTI, renal ultrasound (US) and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG). We identified 3518 unique admissions. UTI occurred in 118 infants (3%). Sixty-nine (60%) had a normal US. Renal dilation was predominantly renal pelvic dilation (12%) and isolated caliectasis (22%). VUR was identified in 15 (14%) infants evaluated with a VCUG. VUR was identified in nine (12%) infants without and in seven (16%) with an abnormality on US. Reflux was identified in 7% of male and 38% of female infants with a UTI. Anatomic abnormalities of the upper urinary tract are uncommon in premature infants with a UTI that occurs during neonatal hospitalization. In concordance with the AAP guidelines, a VCUG may not be required in all NICU infants under age 2 months after a single UTI.

  6. Hyperammonemia associated with distal renal tubular acidosis or urinary tract infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clericetti, Caterina M; Milani, Gregorio P; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Bianchetti, Mario G; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Giannini, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    Hyperammonemia usually results from an inborn error of metabolism or from an advanced liver disease. Individual case reports suggest that both distal renal tubular acidosis and urinary tract infection may also result in hyperammonemia. A systematic review of the literature on hyperammonemia secondary to distal renal tubular acidosis and urinary tract infection was conducted. We identified 39 reports on distal renal tubular acidosis or urinary tract infections in association with hyperammonemia published between 1980 and 2017. Hyperammonemia was detected in 13 children with distal renal tubular acidosis and in one adult patient with distal renal tubular acidosis secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism. In these patients a negative relationship was observed between circulating ammonia and bicarbonate levels (P urinary tract infection was complicated by acute hyperammonemia and symptoms and signs of acute neuronal dysfunction, such as an altered level of consciousness, convulsions and asterixis, often associated with signs of brain edema, such as anorexia and vomiting. Urea-splitting bacteria were isolated in 28 of the 31 cases. The urinary tract was anatomically or functionally abnormal in 30 of these patients. This study reveals that both altered distal renal tubular acidification and urinary tract infection may be associated with relevant hyperammonemia in both children and adults.

  7. The Urinary Tract Microbiome in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Isabel M; Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Queipo-Ortuño, María I; Castillo, Elisabeth; Del Moral, Julia Sequeira-García; Gómez-Millán, Jaime; Yucel, Gozde; Lara, María F

    2016-11-14

    The urinary tract, previously considered a sterile body niche, has emerged as the host of an array of bacteria in healthy individuals, revolutionizing the urology research field. To review the literature on microbiome implications in the urinary tract and the usefulness of probiotics/prebiotics and diet as treatment for urologic disorders. A systematic review was conducted using PubMed and Medline from inception until July 2016. The initial search identified 1419 studies and 89 were included in this systematic review. Specific bacterial communities have been found in the healthy urinary tract. Changes in this microbiome have been observed in certain urologic disorders such as urinary incontinence, urologic cancers, interstitial cystitis, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, sexually transmitted infections, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The role of probiotics, prebiotics, and diet as treatment or preventive agents for urologic disorders requires further investigation. There is a microbiome associated with the healthy urinary tract that can change in urologic disorders. This represents a propitious context to identify new diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive microbiome-based biomarkers that could be used in clinical urology practice. In addition, probiotics, prebiotics, and diet modifications appear to represent an opportunity to regulate the urinary microbiome. We review the urinary microbiome of healthy individuals and its changes in relation to urinary disorders. The question to resolve is how we can modulate the microbiome to improve urinary tract health. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in lower urinary tract endometriosis: iconographic essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Claudio Marcio Amaral de Oliveira; Coutinho, Elisa Pompeu Dias; Ribeiro, Erica Barreiros; Domingues, Marisa Nassar Aidar; Junqueira, Flavia Pegado; Coutinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of functional endometrial tissue outside the endometrial cavity and myometrium. Although this is a frequent disease with multifactorial causes, involvement of the lower urinary tract is rare. Magnetic resonance imaging is highly sensitive, specific and accurate in the diagnosis of endometriosis in the lower urinary tract, especially for allowing the identification of lesions obscured by adhesions or with subperitoneal extension. The present iconographic essay presents the main magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lower urinary tract involvement by endometriosis. (author)

  9. Complementary and integrative therapies for lower urinary tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M

    2015-07-01

    Consumer use of integrative health care is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. Research of veterinary lower urinary tract diseases could be translated to human medicine because veterinary patients are valuable translational models for human urinary tract infection and urolithiasis. An overview of complementary therapies for lower urinary tract disease includes cranberry supplements, mannose, oral probiotics, acupuncture, methionine, herbs, or herbal preparations. Therapies evaluated in dogs and cats, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species, in vivo and in vitro, are presented for their potential use as integrative therapies for veterinary patients and/or translational research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An update on emerging therapies for urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Aneela; Alarfaj, Sumaiah; Darouiche, Rabih; Mohajer, Mayar

    2017-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common healthcare-acquired infections, and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Worldwide use of antibiotics has led to a significant rise in resistant uropathogens emanating from both hospitals and communities. The huge concern of multidrug resistance (MDR) has led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to encourage drug companies to invest in the development of new antibiotics. Area covered: In this review we summarized data on already approved antibiotics, and selected emerging therapies that are currently in phase II and III trials with emphasis on complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs). We performed our search using PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, Google Scholar and Pharmaprojects. Expert opinion: Efficacious antimicrobials are needed to overcome MDR organisms. There are several dugs in initial and later stages of development, but most of them lack full spectrum of activity against some Gram-negative organisms, particularly against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of UTI and genetic engineering of pathogens can provide new drugs to combat resistance in the future.

  11. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Cefiderocol, a Parenteral Siderophore Cephalosporin, in Healthy Subjects, Subjects with Various Degrees of Renal Function, and Patients with Complicated Urinary Tract Infection or Acute Uncomplicated Pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Nao; Katsube, Takayuki; Echols, Roger; Wajima, Toshihiro

    2018-02-01

    Cefiderocol, a novel parenteral siderophore cephalosporin, exhibits potent efficacy against most Gram-negative bacteria, including carbapenem-resistant strains. The aim of this study was to perform a population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis based on plasma cefiderocol concentrations in healthy subjects, subjects with various degrees of renal function, and patients with complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) or acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis (AUP) caused by Gram-negative pathogens and to calculate the fraction of the time during the dosing interval where the free drug concentration in plasma exceeds the MIC ( fT MIC ). Population PK models were developed with three renal function markers, body surface area-adjusted estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), absolute eGFR, and creatinine clearance, on the basis of 2,571 plasma concentrations from 91 subjects without infection and 238 patients with infection. The population PK models with each renal function marker adequately described the plasma cefiderocol concentrations. Clear relationships of total clearance (CL) to all renal function markers were observed. Body weight and disease status (with or without infection) were also significant covariates. The CL in patients with infection was 26% higher than that in subjects without infection. The fT MIC values were more than 75% in all patients (and were 100% in most patients), suggesting that a sufficient exposure to cefiderocol was provided by the tested dose regimens (2 g every 8 h as the standard dose regimen) for the treatment of cUTI or AUP caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Copyright © 2018 Kawaguchi et al.

  12. Efficacy and safety of ceftazidime-avibactam versus imipenem-cilastatin in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections, including acute pyelonephritis, in hospitalized adults: results of a prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, José A; González Patzán, Luis Demetrio; Stricklin, David; Duttaroy, Dipesh D; Kreidly, Zouheir; Lipka, Joy; Sable, Carole

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this prospective phase II, randomized, investigator-blinded study (NCT00690378) was to compare the efficacy and safety of ceftazidime-avibactam and imipenem-cilastatin in hospitalized adults with serious complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) due to Gram-negative pathogens. Patients aged between 18 and 90 years with cUTI were enrolled and stratified by infection type (acute pyelonephritis or other cUTI) and randomized 1:1 to receive intravenous ceftazidime 500 mg plus avibactam 125 mg every 8 hours or imipenem-cilastatin 500 mg every 6 hours. Patients meeting pre-specified improvement criteria after 4 days could be switched to oral ciprofloxacin. Patients were treated for a total of 7-14 days. The primary efficacy objective was a favorable microbiological response at the test-of-cure (TOC) visit 5-9 days post-therapy in microbiologically evaluable (ME) patients. Overall, 135 patients received study therapy (safety population); 62 were included in the ME population (ceftazidime-avibactam, n = 27; imipenem-cilastatin, n = 35). The predominant uropathogen was Escherichia coli. Favorable microbiological response was achieved in 70.4% of ME patients receiving ceftazidime-avibactam and 71.4% receiving imipenem-cilastatin at the TOC visit (observed difference -1.1% [95% CI: -27.2%, 25.0%]). Among ME patients with ceftazidime-resistant uropathogens, response was observed in 6/7 (85.7%) receiving ceftazidime-avibactam. Adverse events were observed in 67.6% and 76.1% of patients receiving ceftazidime-avibactam and imipenem-cilastatin, respectively. Limitations of the study include the small number of patients in the ME population. The results suggest that the efficacy and safety of ceftazidime-avibactam may be similar to that of imipenem-cilastatin.

  13. Urinary tract infection in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Raul

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection in women in general and in postmenopausal women in particular. Two groups of elderly women with recurrent UTI should be differentiated regarding age and general status: healthy, young postmenopausal women aged 50 to 70 years who are neither institutionalized or catheterized and elderly institutionalized women with or without a catheter. Bacteriuria occurs more often in elderly functionally impaired women, but in general it is asymptomatic. However, the risk factors associated with recurrent UTI in elderly women are not widely described. In a multivariate analysis it was found that urinary incontinence, a history of UTI before menopause, and nonsecretor status were strongly associated with recurrent UTI in young postmenopausal women. Another study described the incidence and risk factors of acute cystitis among nondiabetic and diabetic postmenopausal women. Independent predictors of infection included insulin-treated patients and a lifetime history of urinary infection. Borderline associations included a history of vaginal estrogen cream use in the past month, kidney stones, and asymptomatic bacteriuria at baseline. Another important factor in postmenopausal women is the potential role that estrogen deficiency plays in the development of bacteriuria. There are at least two studies showing a beneficial effect of estrogen in the management of recurrent bacteriuria in elderly women. One of these studies showed that vaginal estrogen cream reduced vaginal pH from 5.5±0.7 to 3.6±1.0, restored lactobacillus, and decreased new episodes of UTI. Another study reported similar results using an estriol vaginal ring. However, contradictory results are found in the literature. For example, additional studies found that the use of estriol-containing vaginal pessaries was less effective than oral nitrofurantoin macrocrystals in preventing UTI in postmenopausal women. Two other studies also did not find any

  14. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathophysiology of nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms in older patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Marie-Astrid; Decalf, Veerle; Kumps, Candy; Petrovic, Mirko; Goessaert, An-Sofie; Everaert, Karel

    2017-11-01

    To explore the mismatch between functional bladder capacity and nocturnal urine production, and to study the pathophysiology of an increased nocturnal urine production in older patients with urinary incontinence. The present prospective observational study included adults aged ≥65 years with urinary incontinence. Participants completed questionnaires, frequency volume charts and renal function profiles. The nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index was defined as nocturnal urine output/maximum voided volume; the nocturnal polyuria index as nocturnal/24 h urine output. The median age (n = 95) was 74 years (69-79), 87% were women and 73% had nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms (nocturnal urinary incontinence or nocturia ≥2). Participants with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms had a significantly higher nocturnal urine output (809 mL vs 650 mL; P = 0.001) and no significant difference in maximum voided volume (350 mL vs 437 mL; P = 0.079) compared with participants without nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. Participants (nocturnal polyuria index >33% [n = 56], nocturnal polyuria index >40% [n = 42], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index >1.87 [n = 51]) showed higher night-time diuresis rates, free water and sodium clearance compared with during the daytime. Controls (nocturnal polyuria index ≤33% [n = 26], nocturnal polyuria index ≤40% [n = 40], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index ≤1.87 [n = 44]) had no circadian rhythm in their diuresis rate or sodium clearance, but more nocturnal free water clearance compared with during the daytime. The majority of older adults with urinary incontinence present nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. An increased nocturnal sodium diuresis seems to be the only mechanism differentiating patients with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms from controls. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. a seven months retrospective study on urinary tract infection among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is a significant health problem world wide, ... responsible for a high rate of morbidity in neonates and children. ... predominant bacterial pathogens and their sensitivity to antibiotics so as to guide ... resistant strains.

  17. Visceral pain originating from the upper urinary tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frimodt-Møller, Poul Christian

    2010-01-01

    Pain originating from the upper urinary tract is a common problem and stone colic is one of the most intense pain conditions that can be experienced in the clinic. The pain is difficult to alleviate and often leads to medical attention. In humans, pain mechanisms of the upper urinary tract pain...... are still poorly understood, which often leads to a trial and error approach in clinical pain management. Pain from the upper urinary tract seems to have all the characteristics of pure visceral pain, including referred pain with or without hyperalgesia/trophic changes in somatic tissues and viscero......-visceral hyperalgesia. However, further studies are needed to better understand these visceral pain mechanisms with regard to optimising pain management. This review gives an introduction to visceral pain in general and upper urinary tract pain in particular, with special reference to pain pathways and pharmacological...

  18. Emphysematous cystitis: An unusual lower urinary tract infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emphysematous cystitis: An unusual lower urinary tract infection. MA Lakmichi, M Boukhar, F Barjani, O Saghir, T Hanich, B Wakrim, M Gabsi, A Elhauos, N Charif Idrissi Genouni, N Ousehal, Z Dahami, SM Moudouni, I Sarf ...

  19. Bacteraemia, urinary tract infection and malaria in hospitalised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . However, it remains unclear whether such infections are attributable to the malaria, other risk factors, or are coincidental. Objective: To determine the prevalence of bacteraemia and urinary tract infections (UTI) in febrile hospitalised children ...

  20. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI.

  1. [Lower urinary tract dysfunction in Guillain-Barre syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, A; Mohr, M; Leistner, N; Tabaza, R; Anding, R; Brehmer, B; Kirschner-Hermanns, R

    2018-02-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy frequently leads to lower urinary tract dysfunction. The available knowledge in the medical literature is limited and good recommendations for diagnosis and therapy are rare. In this study, 189 patients with GBS were screened for lower urinary tract dysfunction. In symptomatic patients, a urodynamic study was performed. Detrusor contractility, post-void residual, and changes of the symptoms over time were studied. Overall Barthel index and urinary control Barthel index as well as the relationship of time after onset of the disease and post-void residual were studied as possible screening criteria for urodynamic assessment. According to the urinary control Barthel index (BI), 115 of 189 patients (61%) presented lower urinary tract symptoms sometime during the course of disease. In 28 patients, these symptoms were temporary during the acute phase. At the time of urological assessment, 87 patients had lower urinary tract symptoms. At the end of rehabilitation, 37 had no symptoms anymore (BI 10), 20 were able to control micturition to a certain extent (BI 5), and 30 had no lower urinary tract control (BI 0). There was a significant negative correlation between post-void residual volume and overall BI (ρ -0.5823, p < 0.0001) and BI for urinary tract control (ρ -0.6430, p < 0.0001). Overall BI and BI for urinary tract control are suitable screening criteria for urodynamic assessment.

  2. Diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Schor, Nestor

    2003-01-01

    A review about recent aspects on diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection (UTI) is presented. There is a wide variation in clinical presentation of UTI which include different forms as cystitis, pyelonephritis, urethral syndrome and the clinical relevance of asymptomatic bacteriuria and low-count bacteriuria that must be distinguished from contamination. Pathogenetic aspects concerning bacterial virulence as well as host factors in susceptibility to UTI as urinary tract ob...

  3. International Spinal Cord Injury Urinary Tract Infection Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetz, L L; Cardenas, D D; Kennelly, M

    2013-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research....

  4. Renal scintigraphy in children with first febrile urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Perez, Maria Caridad; Guillen Dosal, Ana; Martinez Silva, Magaly; Hernandez Robledo, Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    The urinary tract infection is one of the most frequent bacterial infections in the childhood. Two hundred eleven children diagnosed as first febrile urinary tract infection patients were studied and performed Tc-DMSA renal scintigraphy in the acute phase of infection. The results were correlated to the duration and intensity of the fever before the diagnosis, to the acute phase reactants (hemogram, erythrosedimentation and reactive-C protein) and to the results of imaging studies (renal ultrasound and mictional uretrocystography)

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Robert C; Ryan, Stephen T

    2016-06-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction is an umbrella diagnosis that covers difficulty evacuating urine from the bladder. In its most simple form, it is either an inability to store urine or an inability to empty the bladder of urine appropriately. The normal and the abnormal bladder, the role of urodynamics in evaluation of lower urinary tract dysfunction, and the medical and behavioral management of some of these disorders are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants With Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joanna; Cruz, Andrea T; Nigrovic, Lise E; Freedman, Stephen B; Garro, Aris C; Ishimine, Paul T; Kulik, Dina M; Uspal, Neil G; Grether-Jones, Kendra L; Miller, Aaron S; Schnadower, David; Shah, Samir S; Aronson, Paul L; Balamuth, Fran

    2017-09-01

    To determine age-stratified prevalence of concomitant bacterial meningitis in infants ≤60 days with a urinary tract infection, we performed a 23-center, retrospective study of 1737 infants with urinary tract infection. Concomitant bacterial meningitis was rare, but more common in infants 0-28 days of age [0.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4%-1.9%) compared with infants 29-60 days of age (0.2%; 95% CI: 0%-0.8%).

  7. Pediatric urinary tract infections: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsori, Maria; Galanakis, Emmanouil

    2012-10-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common serious bacterial infection in childhood. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are required for the optimal clinical outcome and the prevention of long-term morbidity and sequelae. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI may seem to be easy tasks, but they remain among the most controversial issues in pediatrics. Consequently, children suspected for UTIs are investigated and treated differently in different settings. The absence of typical clinical presentation and the uncertainties in setting the index of suspicion, collecting appropriate urine samples and interpreting results, combined with different antibiotic policies in the face of increasing resistance of uropathogens, contribute to the controversy. Recently issued guidelines have attempted to settle several thorny aspects in diagnosis and treatment, but quite a few issues still remain controversial. In this review, the authors explore the current situation on diagnosis and treatment of childhood UTI in better understanding their pathogenesis and prevalence in different child populations, discuss recently evaluated diagnostic tests and the new management guidelines.

  8. Recurrent urinary tract infections in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Abdullatif; Ahmed, Kamran; Zaman, Iftikhar; Khan, Muhammad Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are more common in women and are frequently defined as ≥2 episodes in the last 6 months or ≥3 episodes in the last 12 months. In a primary care setting, 53 % of women above the age of 55 years and 36 % of younger women report a recurrence within 1 year. Thus, management and prevention of recurrent UTI is of utmost significance. This review aims to highlight the latest research in prevention strategies and suggest a management pathway. A search was conducted on MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews databases for the latest systematic reviews and high-quality randomized controlled trials. Special emphasis was placed on the remit "recurrent" and strongly adhered to. Furthermore, a Google search was conducted for current guidelines on the management of UTIs. Current prevention strategies include eliminating risk factors that increase the risk of acquiring recurrent UTI and continuous, post-coital and self-initiated antimicrobial prophylaxis. Other prospective preventative strategies, currently under trial, include use of vaccinations, D-mannose and lactobacillus (probiotics). Although risk factors should be identified and addressed accordingly, individualized antibiotic prophylaxis remains the most effective method of management. Non-antibiotic prevention strategies such as cranberry, vitamin C and methenamine salts lack strong evidence to be introduced as routine management options and as alternatives to antibiotics. Based on current evidence and guidelines, a management pathway is recommended. Emerging therapies require further evaluation before they can be recommended.

  9. The results of different diagnostic imaging studies used in children with urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nasaif, Majida Noori; Alghamdi, Ahmed Hassan; Ghamdi, Jameel Al; Al-Dammas, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) can cause significant renal scarring, which can be complicated by hypertension and renal impairment. This study describes the outcome of different imaging modalities in children with UTI and its relation to age, sex and type of UTI.

  10. Management of bacterial urinary tract infections in adult patients with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, Ruby; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are more common and tend to have a more complicated course in patients with diabetes mellitus than in the general population. The mechanisms that potentially contribute to the increased prevalence of both asymptomatic and symptomatic bacteriuria in these patients are

  11. Bifidobacterium—friend or foe? A case of urinary tract infection with Bifidobacterium species

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, Poonam; Trilligan, Cheryl; Rapose, Alwyn

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium—a commensal of the human intestine is considered non-pathogenic and has been advocated as a probiotic due to its potential beneficial effects. However, there have been case reports implicating bifidobacteria as pathogenic agents in a variety of different infectious conditions. We discuss here one such case of a complicated urinary tract infection associated with Bifidobacterium spp.

  12. The febrile child: how frequent should we investigate for urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, highlighting such causes of fever as urinary tract infection (UTI) is indispensable. This is much so as UTI not only is common in younger children and often neglected but also associated with long term complications. Methods: Children aged 6- 59months with fever of less than 2weeks were consecutively recruited.

  13. Clean intermittent catheterization and urinary tract infection: review and guide for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques; Brauner, Annelie; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Bela, Koves; Peter, Tenke; Bjerklund-Johanson, Truls E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the factors related to urinary tract infection (UTI), the most prevalent complication in patients who perform clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). METHODS We conducted a literature search then a group discussion to gather relevant information on aspects of UTI to guide

  14. [Urinary tract infections : What has been confirmed in therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, J; Stief, C G; Magistro, G

    2017-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect approximately 150 million people worldwide per year, causing annual health costs of over three billion dollars just in the USA. Every second woman experiences at least one UTI in her lifetime, with every one in four experiencing recurrence. Uncomplicated infections like single or recurrent cystitis and pyelonephritis can be distinguished from complicated disease. UTIs in men can spread to the male glands, causing prostatitis and epididymitis. Antibiotic therapy is the standard procedure for UTIs. However, the extensive and sometimes irrational use of antibiotics for the treatment of infections has led to an increase in the incidence of multiresistant pathogens in recent years. Therefore, preventive nonantibiotic approaches are of great interest. This article provides an overview of the current management of urological infections as well as an outline of nonantibiotic preventive treatment modalities.

  15. Prophylactic ciprofloxacin for catheter-associated urinary-tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wall, E. van der; Verkooyen, R.P.; Mintjes-de Groot, J.; Oostinga, J.; Dijk, Arie van; Hustinx, W.N.M.; Verbrugh, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    Patients receiving antibiotics during bladder drainage have a lower incidence of urinary-tract infections compared with similar patients not on antibiotics. However, antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with a urinary catheter is opposed because of the fear of inducing resistant bacterial strains. We

  16. Metabolomics of urinary tract infection : a multiplatform approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacchiarotta, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is a complex clinical entity a common infectious disease that encompasses a variety of clinical syndromes with a positive bacterial culture as common denominator. This thesis provides an exhaustive exploratory study of the metabolic pattern of patients affected by urinary

  17. Glycemic Control and Urinary Tract Infections in Women with Type 1 Diabetes: Results from the DCCT/EDIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenherr, Sara M; Clemens, J Quentin; Braffett, Barbara H; Cleary, Patricia A; Dunn, Rodney L; Hotaling, James M; Jacobson, Alan M; Kim, Catherine; Herman, William; Brown, Jeanette S; Wessells, Hunter; Sarma, Aruna V

    2016-10-01

    We examined the relationship between glycemic control and urinary tract infections in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Women enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study, the observational followup of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, were surveyed to assess the rate of physician diagnosed urinary tract infections in the preceding 12 months. The relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and number of urinary tract infections in the previous 12 months was assessed using a multivariable Poisson regression model. A total of 572 women were evaluated at year 17. Mean age was 50.7 ± 7.2 years, mean body mass index was 28.6 ± 5.9 kg/m(2), mean type 1 diabetes duration was 29.8 ± 5.0 years and mean glycated hemoglobin was 8.0% ± 0.9%. Of these women 86 (15.0%) reported at least 1 physician diagnosed urinary tract infection during the last 12 months. Higher glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly associated with number of urinary tract infections such that for every unit increase (1%) in recent glycated hemoglobin level, there was a 21% (p=0.02) increase in urinary tract infection frequency in the previous 12 months after adjusting for race, hysterectomy status, urinary incontinence, sexual activity in the last 12 months, peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, and nephropathy. The frequency of urinary tract infections increases with poor glycemic control in women with type 1 diabetes. This relationship is independent of other well described predictors of urinary tract infections and suggests that factors directly related to glycemic control may influence the risk of lower urinary tract infections. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Current status of 5alpha-reductase inhibitors in the management of lower urinary tract symptoms and BPH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gravas, Stavros; Oelke, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a progressive disease that is commonly associated with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and might result in complications, such as acute urinary retention and BPH-related surgery. Therefore, the goals of therapy for BPH are not only to improve LUTS

  19. Current status of 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in the management of lower urinary tract symptoms and BPH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gravas, S.; Oelke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a progressive disease that is commonly associated with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and might result in complications, such as acute urinary retention and BPH-related surgery. Therefore, the goals of therapy for BPH are not only to improve LUTS

  20. Longer Duration of Urinary Catheterization Increases Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Kahoru; Furuichi, Mihoko; Ito, Kenta; Morikawa, Yoshihiko; Watanabe, Ichiro; Shimizu, Naoki; Horikoshi, Yuho

    2018-06-13

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for 30% of healthcare-associated infections. To date, few studies have addressed pediatric catheter-associated urinary tract infection in PICUs. The aim of our study was to assess the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in relation to the duration of catheterization in the PICU. Retrospective cohort study. PICU at a tertiary children's hospital. Our study was conducted between April 2012 and June 2015 at Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center in Japan. Children in the PICU with an urethral catheter were included. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection cases were defined according to the National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. The patients' demographic data and isolated organisms were reviewed. Duration of catheterization and the catheter-associated urinary tract infection occurrence rate were analyzed. None. Among 1,890 catheterizations, 23 catheter-associated urinary tract infection cases were identified. The overall occurrence rate was 2.35/1,000 catheter-days. Among the patients with catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 13 were boys. The median age was 11 months (interquartile range, 7-35 mo), and the median duration of catheterization was 7 days (interquartile range, 5-12 d). The isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli (26.5%), Enterococcus faecalis (17.6%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.8%). Two species were isolated in each of 11 cases (47.8%). Each additional day of catheterization increased the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.10, and odds ratio adjusted for contact precaution status and surgical procedures was 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.09). Longer duration of catheterization increased the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection by 5% each day at the PICU. Prompt removal of the urethral catheter is strongly recommended whenever feasible.

  1. Recurrent urinary tract infections in an infant with antenatal Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasic, Velibor; Pota, Liljana; Gucev, Zoran

    2011-02-01

    antenatal variant of Bartter syndrome is characterized by a history of polyhydramnios, premature birth, metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, polyuria and renal salt wasting. In this report we present a premature female baby with antenatal Barter syndrome who had three episodes of urinary tract infection (UTI), without evidence for congenital anomaly of the kidneys or urinary tract. antenatal Bartter syndrome was diagnosed according to the standard criteria. Ultrasound scan and voiding cystourethrography were performed to exclude congenital anomaly of the kidneys and urinary tract. the baby presented with early hyperkalemia and acidosis. The typical biochemical features of the Bartter syndrome were observed in the second month. Despite appropriate treatment she had persistent hypercalciuria. The clinical course was complicated with recurrent episodes of febrile UTIs. Urinary tract system imaging did not demonstrate congenital anomalies. She finally died of severe dehydration, acidosis and renal failure. since no congenital anomaly of the kidneys or urinary tract was demonstrated in our patient, we believe that severe, persistent hypercalciuria is the most important risk factor for development of recurrent UTIs.

  2. Urinary tract infection in Children Hospitalized at Constanta Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pînzaru Anca Daniela

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In pediatrics, the urinary tract infection is one of the most frequent bacterial infection, representing an important health problem due to its high incidence, wide etiology, asymptomatic evolution, and multiple and sever complications, relapses and sequelae.” Material and Method: We evaluated 45 children, aged between 6 months and 16 years, diagnosed and treated for urinary tract infection at the Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital, of Constanta County, in a period of 3 years and 6 months. Results: During studied period, between January 2014 and June 2017 from a total of 9343 patients admitted to the Constanta Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital, we selected 45 children (4.81‰ diagnosed with urinary tract infection. The average age of children with urinary tract infections was 5 years and 5 months. The gender distribution revealed a 2:1 balance in girl’s favor. The most affected group of age was 1-3 years. Fever was the dominating symptom. Urine cultures were positive for 37 cases, meanwhile for eight cases had been negative. The predominant germs are E. coli for female and for male Proteus. We noticed that for E. coli the highest sensitivity is preserved to Ertapenem -15 cases, followed by Ceftriaxone and Ciprofloxacin -10 cases each, and Gentamycin -9 cases. Conclusions: Pediatric urinary tract infection should be considered in every patient under 3 years with unexplained fever.

  3. [The features in preventing recurrent lower urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzhieva, Z K; Kazilov, Yu B

    2016-08-01

    This review outlines characteristics of medications most commonly used for preventing recurrent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). It shows that the treatment and prophylaxis of UTI should be comprehensive and include the restoration of the normal urogenital tract anatomy and use in addition to antibacterial and anti-inflammatory drugs, agents, normalizing the function of the lower urinary tract, as well as drugs for local and systemic immunoprophylaxis, protection of the urothelium from recurrent infection, local hormone replacement therapy in menopause, and dietary supplements to acidify the urine.

  4. Role of scintigraphy in urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the role of radiological imaging for urinary tract infection (UTI). The gold standard has been the intravenous pyelogram (IVP). Yet, the IVP has a very limited value with only about 25% of children with pyelonephritis demonstrating abnormalities. Ultrasound (US) has recently been advocated as a replacement for the poorly sensitive and poorly specific IVP. However, comparative studies between US and IVP indicate only an equivalent sensitivity and specificity. Cortical scintigraphy with Technetium-99m glucoheptonate (99mTc GH) or 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc DMSA) has also been advocated as a means of differentiating parenchymal (pyelonephritis) from nonparenchymal (lower UTI) involvement in UTI. The clinical presentation may be misleading especially in the infant and child in whom an elevated temperature, flank pain, shaking chills, or an elevated sedimentation rate are often lacking. The clinician attempts to localize the site of infection for it has a direct bearing upon the therapy. A collecting system infection can often be eradicated with a single oral dose of an appropriate antibiotic, whereas renal parenchymal involvement requires IV therapy for an extended interval. Cortical scintigraphy can localize the site of infection with a high degree of accuracy. Recent studies report a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 81% of pyelonephritis. This is in contrast to the IVP with a sensitivity of only 24% and US with a sensitivity of only 42%. The scintigraphic appearance of parenchymal infection of the kidney is a spectrum of minimal to gross defects reflecting the degree of histologic involvement that spans from a mild infection to frank abscess. Cortical scintigraphy can be used to monitor the evolution of scarring following infection. Cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc DMSA or 99mTc GH is the method of choice for the initial evaluation of UTI. 37 references

  5. Role of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Virulence Factors in Development of Urinary Tract Infection and Kidney Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Justyna; Sokolova, Olga; Bozko, Przemyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a causative agent in the vast majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), including cystitis and pyelonephritis, and infectious complications, which may result in acute renal failure in healthy individuals as well as in renal transplant patients. UPEC expresses a multitude of virulence factors to break the inertia of the mucosal barrier. In response to the breach by UPEC into the normally sterile urinary tract, host inflammatory responses are triggered leading to cytokine production, neutrophil influx, and the exfoliation of infected bladder epithelial cells. Several signaling pathways activated during UPEC infection, including the pathways known to activate the innate immune response, interact with calcium-dependent signaling pathways. Some UPEC isolates, however, might possess strategies to delay or suppress the activation of components of the innate host response in the urinary tract. Studies published in the recent past provide new information regarding how virulence factors of uropathogenic E. coli are involved in activation of the innate host response. Despite numerous host defense mechanisms, UPEC can persist within the urinary tract and may serve as a reservoir for recurrent infections and serious complications. Presentation of the molecular details of these events is essential for development of successful strategies for prevention of human UTIs and urological complications associated with UTIs. PMID:22506110

  6. Oncological outcome, complications, lower urinary tract symptoms, and health-related quality of life after low-dose-rate salvage brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer following primary radiotherapy: a report of 8 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Miyake

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We evaluated our experience with low-dose-rate salvage brachytherapy for local recurrence after primary prostate radiotherapy, and described the changes in lower urinary tract symptoms and health-related quality of life. Material and methods: Between 2011 and 2016, eight men with local recurrence after primary prostate radiotherapy underwent iodine-125 salvage brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 110 or 145 Gy. Recurrence-free survival was evaluated with a post-treatment prostate-specific antigen profile. The toxicity and changes in lower urinary tract symptoms and health-related quality of life during the follow-up were evaluated on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0, International Prostate Symptom Score, Short Form-8, and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite, respectively. Results: The median follow-up was 12.2 months (range, 8.3-71.9 after salvage brachytherapy. Of all eight patients, two (25% experienced treatment failure, one of whom developed left seminal vesicle recurrence 36 months after salvage brachytherapy for the right seminal vesicle recurrence, while the other developed bone metastases after 6 months. The International Prostate Symptom Scores peaked at 3 months, and returned to baseline by 6 months. The scores of all domains of health-related quality of life remained unchanged during the 12-month follow-up after salvage brachytherapy. Early grade ≤ 2 genitourinary toxicity was observed in five patients (63%, and late grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity in one patient (13% having persistent diarrhea. No patient required intermittent catheterization and no grade 3 or greater toxicity occurred during follow-up. Conclusions: The present study is our experiment of eight patients undergoing salvage brachytherapy, suggesting that this modality is noninvasive, safe, and an effective salvage local treatment in selected patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate lower urinary

  7. Zinc Supplementation in Treatment of Children With Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Naziri, Mahdyieh; Taherahmadi, Hassan; Kahbazi, Manijeh; Tabaei, Aram

    2016-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is very common in children. Precocious diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important because of the permanent disease complications. Zinc increases the response to treatment in many infections. In this study, we explored the effect of zinc in treating UTI. Two hundred children with UTI were divided into 2 groups of 100 who were comparable in terms of age, sex, urine laboratory profiles, and clinical signs and symptoms. The control group received a standard treatment protocol for UTI and the intervention group received oral zinc sulfate syrup plus routine treatment of UTI. A faster recovery was observed in the patients receiving zinc, but abdominal pain was exacerbated by zinc and lasted longer. Three months after the treatment, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the time of fever stop and negative urine culture. In children with UTI, zinc supplementation has a positive effect in ameliorating severe dysuria and urinary frequency while the use of this medication is not recommended in the presence of abdominal pain.

  8. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, Phase 2 dose-ranging study comparing efficacy and safety of imipenem/cilastatin plus relebactam with imipenem/cilastatin alone in patients with complicated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Matthew; Mariyanovski, Valeri; McLeroth, Patrick; Akers, Wayne; Lee, Yu-Chieh; Brown, Michelle L; Du, Jiejun; Pedley, Alison; Kartsonis, Nicholas A; Paschke, Amanda

    2017-09-01

    The β-lactamase inhibitor relebactam can restore imipenem activity against imipenem non-susceptible pathogens. To explore relebactam's safety, tolerability and efficacy, we conducted a randomized (1:1:1), controlled, Phase 2 trial comparing imipenem/cilastatin+relebactam 250 mg, imipenem/cilastatin+relebactam 125 mg and imipenem/cilastatin alone in adults with complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI) or acute pyelonephritis, regardless of baseline pathogen susceptibility. Treatment was administered intravenously every 6 h for 4-14 days, with optional step-down to oral ciprofloxacin. The primary endpoint was favourable microbiological response rate (pathogen eradication) at discontinuation of intravenous therapy (DCIV) in the microbiologically evaluable (ME) population. Non-inferiority of imipenem/cilastatin+relebactam over imipenem/cilastatin alone was defined as lower bounds of the 95% CI for treatment differences being above -15%. At DCIV, 71 patients in the imipenem/cilastatin + 250 mg relebactam, 79 in the imipenem/cilastatin + 125 mg relebactam and 80 in the imipenem/cilastatin-only group were ME; 51.7% had cUTI and 48.3% acute pyelonephritis. Microbiological response rates were 95.5%, 98.6% and 98.7%, respectively, confirming non-inferiority of both imipenem/cilastatin + relebactam doses to imipenem/cilastatin alone. Clinical response rates were 97.1%, 98.7% and 98.8%, respectively. All 23 ME patients with imipenem non-susceptible pathogens had favourable DCIV microbiological responses (100% in each group). Among all 298 patients treated, 28.3%, 29.3% and 30.0% of patients, respectively, had treatment-emergent adverse events. The most common treatment-related adverse events across groups (1.0%-4.0%) were diarrhoea, nausea and headache. Imipenem/cilastatin + relebactam (250 or 125 mg) was as effective as imipenem/cilastatin alone for treatment of cUTI. Both relebactam-containing regimens were well tolerated. (NCT01505634).

  9. Upper urinary tract damage caused by ketamine snorting—A report of nine cases

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-Ying Lee; Yu-Chao Hsu; Chao-Yu Hsu; Eric Chieh-Lung Chou; Ching-Chia Li; Yung-Shun Juan; Mei-Yu Jang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The toxicity of ketamine to genitourinary system not only involved in lower urinary tract, which include urinary frequency, urgency, suprapubic pain, dysuria and hematuria, but also upper urinary tracts. However, the reports of ketmaine-induced upper urinary tract damage were rare. Materials and methods: Herein, we reported nine ketamine abusers presented with moderate flank pain with hydronephrosis and lower urinary tract symptoms from three medical centers located around Taiwa...

  10. Development of the lower urinary tract and its functional disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A normal development of lower urinary tract function control evolves from involuntary bladder empting (incontinence during infancy to daytime urinary continence, and finally a successful day and night continence that is generally achieved by the 5th to 7th year of age. This gradual process primarily depends on the progressive maturation of the neural control of the lower urinary tract, but it is also influenced by behavioral training that evolves through social support. Functional voiding disorders (bladder dysfunction are common problems during childhood. They are present in 5-15 % of general pediatric population, and in one-fifth of school-age children or in over one-third of patients of the pediatric urologist or nephrologist. More than half of children with bladder dysfunction have vesicoureteral reflux, and more than two-thirds have recurrent urinary tract infections. There is also a frequent association of bladder dysfunction with constipation and encopresis (dysfunctional elimination syndrome. Bladder dysfunction may cause a permanent damage to the upper urinary tract and kidneys. In addition, urinary incontinence, as the most common manifestation of bladder dysfunction can be the cause of major stress in schoolage children and have a negative effect on the child’s feeling of self-esteem. Thus, a timely detection and treatment of this group of disorders in children is highly significant.

  11. Application of multislice spiral CT in children urinary tract injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hui; Chen Jing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application value of three-dimensional reconstruction technique of multislice spiral CT(MSCT) in children urinary tract injuries. Methods: Forty-three patients with urinary tract injury performed MSCT scan, and three-dimensional reconstruction technique was used for volume rendering, maximum intensity projection and multi-planar reformation, urinary tract imaging was acquired completely. The images were reviewed by two experienced radiologists. Results: Of the 43 cases,there were 5 simple contusion of kidney, 5 contusion and laceration of kidney accompanied with subcapsular haematoma, 4 contusion and laceration of kidney accompanied with perinephric haematoma, 2 contusion and laceration of kidney accompanied with adrenal haematoma, 13 shattered kidney accompanied with extravasation of urine, 3 shattered kidney accompanied with renal pedicle injury, 6 shattered kidney accompanied with ureter injury, 2 pelvic fracture accompanied with posterior urethra split, 3 contusion of urinary bladder wall accompanied with blood clot in the urinary bladder. Conclusion: MSCT has the characteristic of high scanning speed, wide overlay scope,high image quality and thin slice scan. It is an effective modality in the evaluation of children urinary tract injuries. (authors)

  12. Pre- and post-treatment urinary tract findings in children with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caletti, María Gracia; Balestracci, Alejandro; Di Pinto, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by the kidney's inability to concentrate urine, which causes intense polyuria that may lead to urinary tract dilation. We report the morphological findings of the urinary tract in ten boys with NDI specifically addressing the presence and changes of urinary tract dilation during treatment. Patients were diagnosed at a median age of 1.6 years (range, 0.16-6.33 years) and treated with a low osmotic diet, hydrochlorothiazide-amiloride and indomethacin, which decreased the diuresis from a median of 10.5 ml/kg/h to 4.4 ml/kg/h (p < 0.001). Three patients showed normal renal ultrasound before treatment until last control, while the remaining seven showed urinary tract dilation. In this second group, dilation was reduced with treatment in four patients and disappeared in the remaining three. Children without dilation or in whom the dilation disappeared were diagnosed and treated earlier than those with persistent dilation (median 1.66 versus 4.45 years, respectively). After a median of 10.4 (range, 2.3-20.3) years of follow-up, no patients showed urological complications. Medical treatment of the disease improved the dilation in all cases, preventing its potential complications. Regardless of the good outcome of our patients, periodic urologic follow-up is recommended in NDI patients.

  13. [Recurrent urinary tract infection due to enterovesical fistula secondary to colon diverticular disease: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Natália Silva; da Silva, Lorena Luryann Cartaxo; da Silva, Leonardo Sales; da Fonseca, Luiz Antonio Cavalcante; Alexandre, Cristianne da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Enterovesical fistula are pathological connections between the bladder and pelvic intestinal segments. It consists of a rare complication of neoplastic and inflammatory pelvic disorders, in addition to iatrogenic or traumatic injuries, and correlates with both high morbidity and mortality indexes. Male patient, 61 years old, admitted at the hospital clinics featuring abdominal pain and distension, vomiting and fecal retention. Patient's pathological precedents include high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, vesical dysfunction and recurrent urinary tract infection on the past three years. Magnetic resonance imaging of abdomen and pelvis revealed enterovesical fistula in association with colon diverticular disease of the sigmoid. Management of choice consisted of partial colectomy with bowel lowering and partial cystectomy with surgical double-J stent insertion. Although consisting of a gastrointestinal primary affection, patients with enterovesical fistula usually search for medical help charging urinary tract features. In this particular case, our patient was admitted with gastrointestinal symptoms, reasoned by diagnostic delay, as the patient had already attended at multiple centers with urinary symptoms. Despite being an unusual affection, recurrent urinary tract infection associated with colon diverticular disease must always be considered at differential diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infection as it concurs with high morbidity and mortality.

  14. New paradigms of urinary tract infections: Implications for patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Horvath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs represent one of the most commonly acquired diseases among the general population as well as hospital in-patients, yet remain difficult to effectively and consistently treat. High rates of recurrence, anatomic abnormalities, and functional disturbances of the urinary tract all contribute to the difficulty in management of these infections. However, recent advances reveal important molecular and genetic factors that contribute to bacterial invasion and persistence in the urinary tract, particularly for the most common causative agent, uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Recent studies using animal models of experimental UTIs have recently provided mechanistic insight into the clinical observations that question the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in treatment. Ultimately, continuing research will be necessary to identify the best targets for effective treatment of this costly and widespread infectious disease.

  15. Urinary tract injuries during cesarean section in patients with morbid placental adherence: retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanwar, Ahmed; Al-Sayed, Helmy M; Ibrahim, Ahmed M; Elkotb, Ahmed M; Abdelshafy, Ahmed; Abdelhadi, Rasha; Abbas, Ahmed M; Abdelmenam, Hend S; Fares, Tamer; Nossair, Wael; Abdallah, Ameer A; Sabaa, Haitham; Nawara, Maii

    2017-12-03

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the cases of lower urinary tract injuries during cesarean section with or without hysterectomy in cases with morbid placental adherence. This record based retrospective study was conducted at Ain Shams University Maternity Hospital in Cairo, Egypt during the period between January 2014 and December 2016. It included all patients who had urinary tract injuries during cesarean section with or without hysterectomy in the cases with morbid placental adherence and they were collected from files of pregnant women who were admitted at hospital planned for termination of pregnancy. Patients were enrolled in four groups, Group 1: cases without urinary tract injuries. Group 2: cases with injuries to the bladder. Group 3: cases with injuries of the ureter. Group 4: cases with injuries to the bladder and ureter. This study gave us new information about the incidence of urinary tract injuries during cesarean section with morbid adherence placenta was 21.7% (Bladder 11.7%, Ureter 4.7%, and bladder with ureter 5.3%). There were various types of repair of urinary tract injury, as the following, bladder repair 10.8%, ureteric catheterization 0.9%, ureterovesical repair or reimplantation 1.5%, bladder repair and ureterovesical 1.2%, bladder repair and ureteric catheterization 2.3%, ureteric catheterization and ureterovesical 1.5 and 6.4% of cases needed urologic consultations. There is a real relation between urinary tract injury and obesity (55.3%). Bladder invasion was found in only 26.9% of all cases according to sonography findings. Most of the cases were delivered by cesarean section in 67.5%, and the remainders were delivered by cesarean hysterectomy 32.5%. About 96.5% of cases needed a blood transfusion. The morbid adherent placenta is still a challenge, which faces us as obstetricians, due to high morbidity and mortality. A multidisciplinary team is mandatory to avoid complications.

  16. Constipation in pediatric patients with lower urinary tract symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, S.; Nawaz, G.; Jamil, I.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of constipation in patients with pediatric age group presenting with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS). Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Outpatient Department of Urology in Pakistan Kidney Institute at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, from November 2012 to February 2014. Methodology: Two hundred pediatric patients presenting with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) were studied in terms of age, gender, obstructive and irritative types of LUTS along with any associated symptoms. Constipation was assessed by Bristol stool chart in these patients. Patients with exstrophy of bladder were excluded from the study. Descriptive statistics were measured for both qualitative and quantitative variables. For qualitative variables like gender, presenting symptoms, constipation and stool types, percentages and frequencies were calculated. For quantitative variables like age, percentages / mean ± SD were calculated. Results: Mean age was 6.87 ± 3.64 years with a range of 2 - 14 years. Constipation was found in 37.5% of the pediatric patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Conclusion: Constipation is frequent and overlooked problem in pediatric patients having urinary symptoms. Irritative lower urinary tract symptoms are more common. Children up to 5 years of age are the most common sufferers. Knowing the burden of constipation in such patients can help physicians in better treatment of such cases. (author)

  17. The investigation of urinary tract infections in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carty, H.; Rangr, P.

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines the role and methods used in the investigation of urinary tract infections in children. Each modality, whether it has been used in the past or begin used currently or in the future, has been discussed, together with its advantages and pitfalls. There are no hard and fast rules in the investigation of urinary tract infections. It really depends on the clinical scenario and the child. This article will hopefully provide a basis of understanding the reasons behind each investigation and their appropriate use in the child depending on their age and clinical history. (author)

  18. Pathophysiological aspects of ureterorenoscopic management of upper urinary tract calculi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, Palle J S; Pedersen, Katja V; Lildal, Søren K

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Indications for ureterorenoscopy are expanding without hard scientific evidence to support its efficacy. Therefore, it is extremely important to focus on potential harmful effects of the procedure itself. This review explores how physiology of the upper urinary tract reacts...... of the β-receptor agonist isoproterenol in the irrigation fluid has shown a potential for reducing both intrarenal pressure and ureteral tone during ureterorenoscopy. SUMMARY: Upper urinary tract physiology has unique features that may be pushed into pathophysiological processes by the unique elements...

  19. Two-picture urography in urinary tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laehde, S.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.; Suoranta, H.; Pyhtinen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Researchers analyzed separately from a urographic series 1 radiograph of the kidneys, ureters and bladder after releasing compression. The diagnosis was compared to that of the complete series in 230 consecutive urographic studies performed for recurrent urinary tract infections. The findings were in agreement in 88 per cent of the cases and no therapeutically significant change was overlooked owing to the decrease in the number of exposures. A urographic series with 2 films is described and recommended for the screening of recurrent urinary tract infections in young patients

  20. International urinary tract imaging basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Craggs, M; Kennelly, M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To create an International Urinary Tract Imaging Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets. SETTING: An international working group. METHODS: The draft of the Data Set was developed by a working group comprising members appointed...... of comparable minimal data. RESULTS: The variables included in the International Urinary Tract Imaging Basic SCI Data Set are the results obtained using the following investigations: intravenous pyelography or computer tomography urogram or ultrasound, X-ray, renography, clearance, cystogram, voiding cystogram...

  1. The role of imaging in adult acute urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.A.W.

    1997-01-01

    Imaging is required in only a minority of patients with urinary tract infection. Some patients who present with severe loin pain are imaged because ureteric colic is suspected. If urinary tract infection does not respond normally to antibiotics, imaging is undertaken to check for evidence of renal obstuction or sepsis. Finally, after the acute infection has been treated, imaging is required in some patients to check for factors pre-disposing to renal damage or to relapsing or recurrent infection. This review discusses the appropriate choice of imaging technique to use in each clinical situation and summarises the expected findings. (orig.). With 15 figs., 1 tab

  2. Urinary tract infection after voiding cystourethrogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E K; Malhotra, N R; Shannon, R; Jacobson, D L; Green, J; Rigsby, C K; Holl, J L; Cheng, E Y

    2017-08-01

    Reported rates of post-procedural urinary tract infection (ppUTI) after voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) are highly variable (0-42%). This study aimed to determine the risk of ppUTI after cystogram, and evaluate predictors of ppUTI. A retrospective cohort study of children undergoing VCUG or radionuclide cystogram (henceforth 'cystogram') was conducted. Children with neurogenic bladder who underwent cystogram in the operating room and without follow-up at the study institution were excluded. Incidence of symptomatic ppUTI within 7 days after cystogram was recorded. Predictors of ppUTI were evaluated using univariate statistics. A total of 1108 children (54% female, median age 1.1 years) underwent 1203 cystograms: 51% were on periprocedural antibiotics, 75% had a pre-existing urologic diagnosis (i.e., vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) or hydronephrosis; not UTI alone), and 18% had a clinical UTI within 30 days before cystogram. Of the cystograms, 41% had an abnormal cystogram and findings included VUR (82%), ureterocele (6%), and diverticula (6%). Twelve children had a ppUTI (1.0%; four girls, five uncircumcised boys, three circumcised boys; median age 0.9 years). Factors significantly associated with diagnosis of a ppUTI (Summary fig.) included: pre-existing urologic diagnosis prior to cystogram (12/12, 100% of patients with ppUTI), abnormal cystogram results (11/12, 92%), and use of periprocedural antibiotics (11/12, 92%). All 11 children with an abnormal cystogram had VUR ≥ Grade III. However, among all children with VUR ≥ Grade III, 4% (11/254) had a ppUTI. This is the largest study to date that has examined incidence and risk factors for ppUTI after cystogram. The retrospective nature of the study limited capture of some clinical details. This study demonstrated that the risk of ppUTI after a cystogram is very low (1.0% in this cohort). Having a pre-existing urologic diagnosis such as VUR or hydronephrosis was associated with ppUTI; therefore, children with

  3. Staphylococcus aureus urinary tract infections in children are associated with urinary tract abnormalities and vesico-ureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megged, Orli

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an uncommon cause of pediatric urinary tract infection (UTI). Data regarding urinary tract malformations in children with S. aureus UTI is limited. The medical records of all children aged 0 to 16 years at Shaare Zedek Medical Center between 2001 and 2013 and who were diagnosed with S. aureus UTI were reviewed for demographic, clinical, and laboratory data. Patients with Escherichia coli UTIs during the same period were included as controls. S. aureus was the cause of UTI in 26 children, of whom six were bacteremic. Compared to children with E. coli UTI, children with S. aureus had higher rates of abnormal findings in ultrasound (77 vs. 22%; p UTI had abnormal voiding cystourethrogram (53 vs. 23%; p UTI was significantly longer than for patients with E. coli UTI (8 vs. 2.3 days; p = 0.0003). S. aureus is an uncommon urinary pathogen among children. The finding of S. aureus UTI requires thorough search for urinary abnormalities.

  4. Scintigraphy findings in children presenting the first febrile infection of urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Perez, Maria Caridad; Piedra Bello, Misleidys; Guillen Dosal, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the more frequent bacterial infections in childhood. The aim of present research was to know the acute phase renal alterations of the first febrile infection of urinary tract

  5. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  6. Murine Double Minute 2 SNP T309G Polymorphism and Urinary Tract Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Hui; Dai, Yu; Ning, Zhongyun; Fan, Ning; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Pei; Zhang, Liyuan; Tao, Yan; Wang, Hanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Urinary tract cancer is a common cause of cancer-related death. The etiology and pathogenesis of urinary tract cancer remain unclear, with genetic and epigenetic factors playing an important role. Studies of the polymorphism of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) have shown inconclusive trends in the risk of urinary tract cancer. To clarify this inconsistency, we conducted updated meta-analyses to evaluate the role of MDM2 T309G polymorphism in urinary tract cancer susceptibility. Data sou...

  7. Urinary tract candidiasis in HIV+ patients and sensitivity patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of ... urinary tract infections is gradually on the rise and is an important public health ..... Public Hospital in São Luís, Maranhão,. Brazil. Front. Microbiol., 8: 298. DOI:.

  8. Various Concepts in the Aetiology of Recurrent Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The important role that vesico-ureteric reflux plays in the perpetuation of urinary tract infections has become increasingly evident. There is general agreement on the importance of its early detection and treatment. It is also evident that the vast majority of children with reflux have congenital anatomical abnormalities of the ...

  9. bacterial uropathogens in urinary tract infection and antibiotic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-02

    Jul 2, 2011 ... BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections ... leaves the clinicians with very few alternative options of drugs for the treatment of UTIs. As drug resistance ... can be asymptomatic or symptomatic, UTIs that .... pregnancy and stage of pregnancy, age groups and.

  10. Diversity of Urinary Tract Pathogens and Drug Resistant Isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This paper was mainly aimed to investigate drug resistance of the various urinary tract infection (UTI) pathogens from patients of different gender and age groups of Pakistanis. Method: For these purposes, urine samples of 109 patients were analyzed. Samples were screened on CLED agar. Antimicrobial ...

  11. RECONSTRUCTION OF THE URINARY TRACT IN PRUNE BELLY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    竹内, 秀雄; 小松, 洋輔; 友吉, 唯夫; 吉田, 修

    1981-01-01

    Three of five patients with prune belly syndrome which we experienced had constructive surgery of the urinary tract and had good results. In the Japanese literatures, 23 of 56 cases which had been reported up to date died. More proper treatment should be done in prune belly syndrome.

  12. Cranberry juice for urinary tract infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Ran D.

    2012-01-01

    Question Several children in my clinic are recovering from urinary tract infections (UTI). A mother of one of the children asked me if I recommended cranberry juice for children to prevent future episodes of UTI. She was given cranberry juice after she suffered from a UTI several months ago.

  13. Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.; Adang, E.M.M.; Wolters, R.J.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood urinary tract infections (UTIs) can lead to renal scarring and ultimately to terminal renal failure, which has a high impact on quality of life, survival, and health-care costs. Variation in the treatment of UTIs between practices is high. OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost-effectiveness of a

  14. How do Dutch general practitioners diagnose children's urinary tract infections?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.; Wolters, R.J.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study which tests general practitioners used to diagnose a urinary tract infection (UTI) in children and which patient characteristics were associated with test choice. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review on the diagnosis of UTIs in children in Dutch general practices who were diagnosed

  15. Management of Urinary Tract Infections in Children | Schellack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in paediatrics. UTIs present in children as fever, anorexia, vomiting, lethargy and dysuria. Approximately 80% of the time, Escherichia coli is the causative bacteria in paediatrics, however, fungal UTI caused by Candida species can occur in premature infants. With an ...

  16. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological

  17. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be

  18. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be

  19. Comparative Study on Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is associated with clinical conditions such as hypertension, anaemia, kidney failure and even death. Diagnosis and early detection of UTI are critical measures in the management of the disease. The classical microbiological culture method is hindered by long diagnostic time and characteristic ...

  20. Complete upper urinary tract obstruction caused by penetrating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complete upper urinary tract obstruction caused by penetrating pellet injury of the ureter. M.T. Gulpinar, S.K. Keskin, A Yildirim, T Caskurlu. Abstract. Ureteral injuries due to gunshots are tend to be misdiagnosed because of concomitant vascular and intraabdominal organ wounds. Our case is a 23-year old man who was ...

  1. Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotter, R.; Riccabona, M.

    2005-01-01

    Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract as well as vesicoureteral reflux involved in the disease complex of urinary tract infection/permanent renal parenchymal damage can be considered predisposing or risk factors. Two main forms can be distinguished, i.e., unstable bladder and dysfunctional voiding, while transitional forms between the two exist. Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract obstruct spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux. They are found in about 50% of cases in all children with urinary tract infection and are associated with an increased risk of developing renal parenchymal scars. They are observed during the newborn period up to school age. In the first few months of life, particularly boys with bilateral high-grade reflux and congenital renal parenchymal damage are affected. At later ages girls are also affected, but in this age group bladder instability predominates. Incontinence as the leading clinical symptom appears in approximately 70% of all cases and is closely correlated with chronic constipation. Imaging procedures in addition to urodynamic methods are of decisive importance for diagnosis and treatment, but noninvasive approaches such as sonography should be given preference. (orig.) [de

  2. Antibacterial susceptibility of some urinary tract pathogens to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection represents one of the most common diseases encountered in medical practice today and occurring from the neonate to the geriatric age group. Despite the widespread availability of antibiotics, it remains the most common bacterial infection in the human being. A total of 174 urine samples were ...

  3. [Characteristic features of urinary tract infection in malnourished children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stârcea, Magdalena; Munteanu, Mihaela; Brumariu, O

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prove a relationship between urinary tract infection and malnutrition in children 0-3 years old, hospitalized in the IVI Pediatric Clinic, Hospital St. Mary Iaşi, between January 2000 and December 2004. We have made a retrospective study for 298 infant and young children with urinary tract infection, 237 eutrophic and 61 malnourished. We studied comparatively the both groups with urinary tract infection (UTI), and we applied statistic methods for results. The statistic methods prove that relative risk for UTI increases in malnutrition, predictive positive value is 72.5%. The clinical manifestation is similar in malnourished and eutrophic, but many co morbidities were associated with dystrophic status. Malformation of urinary tract was associate two times more in malnourished child. The etiology of infection was dominated by Escherichia coli, Proteus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In malnourished children 5% of UTI was determinate by opportunist etiological agents like: Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Acinetobacter. More frequently, bacterium develops resistance of antibiotics like amino-penicilina, Trimethoprim and Cephalosporin. Accurate and fast diagnosis and treatment of UTI in infant and child with malnutrition is the best way for nutritional rehabilitation and prevention of serious consequence.

  4. Infective endocarditis following urinary tract infection caused by Globicatella sanguinis

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Saeko; Xu, Chieko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Fujii, Kotaro; Nakamura, Morio

    2017-01-01

    We report the first case of infective endocarditis following urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by Globicatella sanguinis in an 87-year-old Japanese woman with recurrent episodes of UTI. We identified the pathogen using the Rapid ID32 Strep system. Accurate identification of this infection is important and essential for the effective antimicrobial coverage to this pathogen.

  5. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Strains Causing Urinary Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli have been studied extensively over the years, but relatively little is known about what differentiates isolates causing various types of urinary tract infections. In this study, we compared the genomic profiles of 45 strains from a range...

  6. Diagnostic strategies for urinary tract infections in French general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinouani, S; de Lary de Latour, H; Joseph, J-P; Letrilliart, L

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to describe the diagnostic management procedures for detection of urinary tract infections in general practice and their correlated factors. We analyzed data from the ECOGEN study on urinary tract infections, collected in France between November 2011 and April 2012. This national cross-sectional study was carried out in general practices. Data was coded according to the International Classification of Primary Care. A total of 340 consultations or home visits were held for urinary tract infections. The five most frequent diagnostic procedures were (in descending order) clinical examination (67.6%), urine cytobacteriological examination (UCBE) (47.9%), urine dipstick test (15.6%), blood test (8.5%), and imaging (6.5%). No urine dipstick test or UCBE was performed in 43% of cases. Factors correlated with diagnostic procedures were age and gender of patients, annual number of consultations held by family physicians, and duration of consultation. Family physicians did not comply with guidelines on diagnostic management for detection of urinary tract infections. We hypothesized that this non-compliance could be due to the family physicians' environment and characteristics, and to clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibiogram of nosocomial urinary tract infections in Felege Hiwot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections increase the cost of medical care, extend hospital stay and reflect on the morbidity and mortality of the admitted patients. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common nosocomial infections in humans. Objectives: To determine the prevalence and antibiogram of nosocomial ...

  8. Incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) among pregnant women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) among 80 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics at Oluyoro Catholic Hospital (OCH), Ibadan, Nigeria, as well as the isolation and identification of the pathogens responsible for the infection. A total of 80 clean voided mid-stream urine samples were ...

  9. Antimicrobial resistance patterns in outpatient urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There is a global emergence of resistance against commonly prescribed antibiotics. Empirical antibiotic prescribing should be guided by local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Aim. To identify organisms and determine antibiotic susceptibility in urinary tract infections (UTIs) at 3 Military Hospital, Bloemfontein ...

  10. Resistance of Uropathogens in Asymptomatic Urinary Tract Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among urinary tract pathogens is useful to determine the important trend and geographical variation of uropathogens. The study evaluated the pathogen frequency, resistance rate and pattern among HIV-infected Nigerians. Midstream urine samples taken for culture ...

  11. Evaluation of female residents for urinary tract infections, Onicha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cases of urinary tract infections (UTIs) have been on the increase in our society, posing a threat to health causing economic and social burden on the populace especially among women and girls. This study was therefore carried out to assess the prevalence of UTIs among female residents of Igboeze-Onicha Community in ...

  12. Predictors of Urinary Tract Infections in Nursing Students in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dear Sir,. I read with a lot of interest, the original research paper by Vyas et al.[1] This paper tried to find out the clinical, demographic and social causes predisposing nursing students to urinary tract infections (UTI). The study has revealed the prevalence rate of UTI as >19%. The authors have mentioned that the subjects ...

  13. Urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients | Elkehili | Arab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the commonest bacterial infection occurring in renal transplant recipients, and it is associated with significant morbidity. This study aimed to assess the characteristics of all UTI episodes diagnosed in renal transplant patients who attended regularly for follow up in the nephrology ...

  14. Occurrence of Urinary Tract Infection in Adolescent and Adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is commonly experienced by women of various age groups especially elderly ones. We planned to find out the prevalent microbial strains causing UTI in slum inhabitant adolescent and adult women in Dhaka City, Bangladesh. Methods amd Materials: Urine sample was collected ...

  15. Therapeutic management of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI): A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is one of the most common diseases and a significant cause of morbidity in all age groups. There are large differences in the management of UTI with respect to definition, diagnosis and treatment. This retrospective study reviewed the diagnosis and drug treatment of UTI at the Teaching ...

  16. Factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common medical problem affecting the general population and thus commonly encountered in medical practice, with the global burden of UTIs at about 150 million people. Because uropathogens largely originate from colonic flora, they are easy to predict, and this is the ...

  17. Prevalence and drug resistance in bacteria of the urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To obtain data on the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from patients with suspected urinary tract infection in Bulawayo province, Zimbabwe. Method: Over a period of one year, 257 urine samples were analyzed for bacteria by standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolated ...

  18. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapman, M.; Ingen, J. van; Keijman, J.; Swanink, C.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient

  19. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Tract Infections in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ronald P.; Haith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance to antibiotics of "Escherichia coli" in uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTIs) in female college students. Participants: Symptomatic patients presenting to a student health service from September 2008 to December 2009. Methods: Clean catch midstream urine samples were tested for urinalysis (UA) and…

  20. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection as a Cause of Outpatient Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... predictors of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) as a cause of pediatric outpatient department ... with pediatric UTI (1,4,5). Effective management of patients suffering ..... patients. J of. Resear in Medical and Dental Sci 2014; 2(1). 17.

  1. Effect of pravastatin and fosinopril on recurrent urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, K.B.; Visser, Sipke; Hak, E.

    OBJECTIVES: Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a problem affecting both women and men. Animal experiments and in vitro studies indicate that statins might prevent recurrent UTIs. We assessed the effects of pravastatin on UTI antibiotic prescribing among adults. METHODS: A post hoc

  2. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Melissa St; Shridharani, Anand; Barboi, Alexandru C; Guralnick, Michael L; Jaradeh, Safwan S; Prieto, Thomas E; O'Connor, R Corey

    2015-12-01

    With the goal of better defining the types of bladder dysfunction observed in this population, we present the chief urologic complaints, results of urodynamic studies, and treatments of patients with dysautonomia-related urinary symptoms. All patients with dysautonomia referred to our neurourology clinic between 2005 and 2015 for management of lower urinary tract dysfunction were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient's chief urologic complaint was recorded and used to initially characterize the bladder storage or voiding symptoms. Patient evaluation included history and physical examination, urinalysis, post void bladder ultrasound, and urodynamic studies. Successful treatment modalities that subjectively or objectively improved symptoms were recorded. Of 815 patients with the diagnosis of dysautonomia, 82 (10 %) were referred for evaluation of lower urinary tract dysfunction. Mean age was 47 years (range 12-83) and 84 % were female. The chief complaint was urinary urgency ± incontinence in 61 % and hesitancy in 23 % of patients. Urodynamic findings demonstrated detrusor overactivity ± incontinence in 50 % of patients, although chief complaint did not reliably predict objective findings. Successful objective and subjective treatments were multimodal and typically non-operative. Lower urinary tract dysfunction may develop in at least 10 % of patients with dysautonomia, predominantly females. Bladder storage or voiding complaints do not reliably predict urodynamic findings. Urodynamically, most patients exhibited detrusor overactivity. The majority of patients were successfully managed with medical or physical therapy.

  3. Problems in severe bilateral urinary tract anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens

    1989-01-01

    function. There were two deaths. Five children have severe and two a moderate reduction of renal function; twenty good renal function. There were ten nephrectomies and four heminephrectomies. Seven patients had a temporary and eight a permanent urinary diversion. However, four of the latter were later...

  4. [Pyelonephritis with massive renal tissue necrosis in child with urinary tract malformation--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Bratkowska, Monika; Finke, Daria; Olejniczak, Dariusz; Midel, Anna; Tkaczyk, Marcin

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the case report is presentation of unusual and heavy clinical course of pyelonephritis with renal tissue necrosis in a child with urinary tract malformation. Nine month old girl was admitted to hospital in heavy clinical status due to pyelonephritis--urosepsis. It was complicated by acute renal insufficiency. Patient was treated by broad-spectrum antibiotics and parenteral nutrition. She was feverish for 14 days. Computed tomography done in order to exclude abdominal abscess showed massive renal tissue necrosis of on both sides. Antibiotic treatment was successful after 6 weeks. Urological evaluation revealed bilateral vesico-ureteral refluxes grade IV. Scintigraphy showed multiple scars. Patient was treated Deflux injections (twice). We noted 5 urinary tract recurrences despite antibiotic profilaxis. GFR of 75 ml/min/1.73 m2 was estimated at age of 16 m. Immunodeficiency or malignancy as background of clinical course were excluded. The case we describe presents severe clinical course of pyelonephritis due to complex urinary tract malformation that is to be considered despite based on modern publications "sparing" strategies of diagnosis and profilaxis in urinary tract malformations.

  5. Drug utilization study of antibiotics for urinary tract infections in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A drug utilization pattern of antibiotics for urinary tract infections in 200 cases above 18 years of age was done at Katuri Medical College Hospital, Guntur, India. The antibiotic sensitivity profile of the microorganism causing urinary tract infections was studied in cases diagnosed as urinary tract infection. The patients with ...

  6. Evaluation of CD4+/CD8+ status and urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of CD4+/CD8+ status and urinary tract infections associated with urinary schistosomiasis ... African Health Sciences ... by <50 ova /10ml of urine had a mean CD4+:CD8+ ratio of 1.57 while those with heavy infections as ... Key words: CD4+, CD8+, urinary tract infections, urinary schistosomiasis, rural Nigerians

  7. Congenital upper urinary tract abnormalities: new images of the same diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranhao, Carol Pontes de Miranda; Santos, Carla Jotta dos [Clinica de Medicina Nuclear e Radiologia de Maceio (MedRadiUS), AL (Brazil); Miranda, Christiana Maia Nobre Rocha de; Farias, Lucas de Padua Gomes de; Padilha, Igor Gomes, E-mail: maiachristiana@globo.com [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Congenital upper urinary tract abnormalities imply a variable clinical spectrum of morphofunctional changes ranging from asymptomatic conditions to renal failure and incompatibility with life. Computed tomography, which has overcome excretory urography imaging, has been playing a key role in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies, serving as a better guidance in the therapeutic and surgical decision-making process, besides acting as an essential tool in the identification of associated complications and aiding in the performance of minimally invasive surgery techniques. (author)

  8. Urinary tract infection among pregnant women at a secondary level hospital in Northern India

    OpenAIRE

    Shashi Kant; Ayush Lohiya; Arti Kapil; Sanjeev Kumar Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) during pregnancy is frequently associated with complications. Currently, in India, there is no regular screening for UTI, and facility for diagnosis of UTI is not available at peripheral government health centers. Objective: To estimate the proportion of pregnant women with UTI among antenatal clinic attendees in rural Haryana. Methods: Eligible participants were pregnant women attending antenatal clinic of secondary care center of rural Haryana from ...

  9. Ectopic Pelvic Kidney With Urinary Tract Infection Presenting as Lower Abdominal Pain in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Ching Lu; You-Lin Tain; Kwok-Wan Yeung; Mao-Meng Tiao

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic pelvic kidney is a rare developmental anomaly. Ectopic pelvic kidney can present without the characteristic symptoms associated with the urinary tract pathology. Ectopic pelvic kidney is usually unknown, and nonspecific vague abdominal comfort maybe the only symptom. Early detection and recognition of an ectopic kidney can prevent long-term complications. We report a 3-year-5-month-old girl with ectopic pelvic kidney who experienced intermittent episodes of lower abdominal pain for ab...

  10. Bifidobacterium--friend or foe? A case of urinary tract infection with Bifidobacterium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Poonam; Trilligan, Cheryl; Rapose, Alwyn

    2014-09-24

    Bifidobacterium-a commensal of the human intestine is considered non-pathogenic and has been advocated as a probiotic due to its potential beneficial effects. However, there have been case reports implicating bifidobacteria as pathogenic agents in a variety of different infectious conditions. We discuss here one such case of a complicated urinary tract infection associated with Bifidobacterium spp. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Clinical Options for the Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ramlakhan, Shammi; Singh, Virendra; Stone, Joanne; Ramtahal, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) are a common cause of childhood febrile illness with 7% of girls and 2% of boys having a symptomatic culture positive UTI by the age of six years. Although there are conflicting views on the long term sequelae of UTI, as well as the place of prophylaxis, the universal aims of treatment of childhood UTI remain those of symptom alleviation, prevention of systemic infection and short and longer term complications. There is good evidence of historical and emerging r...

  12. Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth G. Jepson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs. This is the third update of our review first published in 1998 and updated in 2004 and 2008. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations. METHODS: Search methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations and checked reference lists of review articles and relevant studies. Date of search: July 2012. Selection criteria: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs or quasi-RCTs of cranberry products for the prevention of UTIs. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently assessed and extracted data. Information was collected on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (incidence of symptomatic UTIs, positive culture results, side effects, adherence to therapy. Risk ratios (RR were calculated where appropriate, otherwise a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review includes a total of 24 studies (six cross-over studies, 11 parallel group studies with two arms; five with three arms, and two studies with a factorial design with a total of 4473 participants. Ten studies were included in the 2008 update, and 14 studies have been added to this update. Thirteen studies (2380 participants evaluated only cranberry juice/concentrate; nine studies (1032 participants evaluated only cranberry tablets/capsules; one study compared cranberry juice and tablets; and one study compared cranberry capsules and tablets. The comparison/control arms were placebo, no treatment, water, methenamine hippurate, antibiotics, or lactobacillus. Eleven studies were not included in the meta

  13. Pattern of urinary tract stone diseases in Mekelle, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Mekonnen Hagos

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate and analyze the pattern of patients with urinary stone diseases admitted to Mekelle Hospital. Between Sept 2003 to Sept 2006, 102 patients with urinary stone disease were admitted to Mekelle Hospital. In this descriptive retrospective audit, case notes were obtained from medical record office and were analyzed for age, sex, localization of the stone disease and the geographic back grounds. Seventy six (74.5%) of the patients were males and 26 (25.5%) were females. There were 102 (13.6%) cases of urinary stone disease admitted to Mekelle Hospital out of 750 total admissions for urological disease for intervention in the surgical ward during the study period. There were 76 (74.5%) males and 26 (25.5%) females and the sex ratio was (M: F: 2.9:1). Most (46.0%) of the urinary stone diseases were between 0-19 year age group both in males and females. The median age was 20 years (range from 2-74 years) and the mean was 25.4 years. Urinary bladder stones were the most common urinary tract stone diseases accounting for 47 (46.0%) followed by renal stones 29 (28.4%), ureteric 16 (15.6%) and urethral 10 (9.8%) stone disease; in that order of frequency. The geographical back ground of the patients with urinary tract stone disease in this report has shown that majorities (53.7%) were from urban and the remaining (44.2%) were from the rural areas. This study has depicted that urinary bladder stone diseases are the most common stone diseases affecting the younger age group. Since this is an institutional based study, it underestimates the magnitude and the pattern of urinary stone diseases at all level. Nevertheless, the audit provides useful information on the socio demographic variables, localization and the geographic back ground of the patients.

  14. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan S Gondos

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT, which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%. The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors.

  15. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondos, Adnan S; Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A; Alyousefi, Naelah A

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors.

  16. Utility of Ultrasonography for Urinary Tract Infections of Infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chul Ho; Kim, Yun Jeong [Dongnam Health Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    In this study, we investigated utility of ultrasonography for urinary tract infections of infants. The results of the research is as follows : 1. The number of infants under one year old was 100 out of 122 infants who were diagnosed as a unitary infection. The ratio of males to females was 1.7 : 1. Seventy-seven infants who underwent three kinds of radiologic examinations such as kidney sonography (51%), {sup 99m}TC DMSA-scan (42%), and VCUG (22%). 2. In comparison of correlation between kidney sonography and VCUG, the sensitivity of kidney sonography was 82% while the specificity of kidney sonography was 58%. In comparison of correlation between kidney sonography and {sup 99m}TC DMSA-scan, the sensitivity of kidney sonography was 66% while the specificity of kidney sonography was 67%. 3. Utility of kidney sonography showed the highest efficiency when we considered pain, discomfort, a sense of shame, psychological stress when infants may undergo at the examination, side-effect of a contrast agent after the examination, and complication of exposure to radiation.

  17. Utility of Ultrasonography for Urinary Tract Infections of Infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chul Ho; Kim, Yun Jeong

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated utility of ultrasonography for urinary tract infections of infants. The results of the research is as follows : 1. The number of infants under one year old was 100 out of 122 infants who were diagnosed as a unitary infection. The ratio of males to females was 1.7 : 1. Seventy-seven infants who underwent three kinds of radiologic examinations such as kidney sonography (51%), 99m TC DMSA-scan (42%), and VCUG (22%). 2. In comparison of correlation between kidney sonography and VCUG, the sensitivity of kidney sonography was 82% while the specificity of kidney sonography was 58%. In comparison of correlation between kidney sonography and 99m TC DMSA-scan, the sensitivity of kidney sonography was 66% while the specificity of kidney sonography was 67%. 3. Utility of kidney sonography showed the highest efficiency when we considered pain, discomfort, a sense of shame, psychological stress when infants may undergo at the examination, side-effect of a contrast agent after the examination, and complication of exposure to radiation.

  18. Urinary tract infections in women with urogynaecological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeman, Marielle M E; Roovers, Jan-Paul W R

    2016-02-01

    Urinary tract infections are common in the field of urogynaecology. Women with persistent urinary symptoms seem more likely to have bacteriuria despite negative cultures. In this review, we will give an overview of the recent insights on the relationship between urinary tract infection and persistent urinary symptoms and possible new therapeutic options. Recently published articles evaluated the prevalence of low-count bacteriuria (≥10 CFU/ml) or intracellular bacterial communities in women with overactive bladder symptoms (OAB). Differences in urinary microbioma observed in women with and without OAB symptoms were evaluated. In the light of these findings, current screening strategies were discussed and alternative screening methods for bacteriuria developed. Low-count bacteriuria (≥10 CFU/ml) seems to be more prevalent in women with OAB. Also intracellular bacterial communities are more commonly detected in these women. The microbioma found in women with urinary symptoms appeared to differ from healthy controls. The current screening methods might be insufficient as they are targeted at detecting uropathogenic Escherichia coli, mostly using a detection threshold of at least 10 CFU/ml and failing to detect intracellular bacterial communities. Studies evaluating the efficacy of treating women with low-count bacteriuria are limited but promising.

  19. Urinary tract injuries in laparoscopic hysterectomy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Marisa R; Bardsley, Tyler R; Sharp, Howard T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to estimate the incidence of urinary tract injuries associated with laparoscopic hysterectomy and describe the long-term sequelae of these injuries and the impact of early recognition. Studies were identified by searching the PubMed database, spanning the last 10 years. The key words "ureter" or "ureteral" or "urethra" or "urethral" or "bladder" or "urinary tract" and "injury" and "laparoscopy" or "robotic" and "gynecology" were used. Additionally, a separate search was done for "routine cystoscopy" and "gynecology." The inclusion criteria were published articles of original research referring to urologic injuries occurring during either laparoscopic or robotic surgery for gynecologic indications. Only English language articles from the past 10 years were included. Studies with less than 100 patients and no injuries reported were excluded. No robotic series met these criteria. A primary search of the database yielded 104 articles, and secondary cross-reference yielded 6 articles. After reviewing the abstracts, 40 articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed in their entirety. Of those 40 articles, 3 were excluded because of an inability to extract urinary tract injuries from total injuries. Statistical analysis was performed using a generalized linear mixed effects model. The overall urinary tract injury rate for laparoscopic hysterectomy was 0.73%. The bladder injury rate ranged from 0.05% to 0.66% across procedure types, and the ureteral injury rate ranged from 0.02% to 0.4% across procedure type. In contrast to earlier publications, which cited unacceptably high urinary tract injury rates, laparoscopic hysterectomy appears to be safe regarding the bladder and ureter. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria: is the absence of clinical signs and symptoms with the ... Whilst asymptomatic bacteriuria does not require antibiotic treatment, amoxicillin and ... proteinuria, hypertension, and complications during pregnancy.

  1. Lower urinary tract symptoms after total and subtotal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimbel, Helga; Zobbe, Vibeke; Andersen, Birthe Jakobsen

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this Danish multicenter trial was to compare the proportion of women with lower urinary tract symptoms after total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) and subtotal abdominal hysterectomy (SAH) for benign uterine disorders. A total of 319 women were randomized to TAH (n = 158) or SAH (n = 161......). Women were followed up for 1 year by strict data collection procedures, including postal questionnaires. Results were analyzed by intention-to-treat analyses. Urinary incontinence was found less often among TAH women than among SAH women. This was due to a larger reduction of the number of women...... with stress and urinary incontinence in the TAH group. No other differences were found between the two operation methods. The number of women with urinary incontinence and frequency was reduced from study entry for follow-up, while double/triple voiding was increased. Incontinent women had significantly lower...

  2. Obstetrical outcome in women with urinary tract infections in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebäck, Carin; Hansson, Sverker; Martinell, Jeanette; Milsom, Ian; Sandberg, Torsten; Jodal, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) during childhood can result in permanent renal damage, with possible implications for future pregnancies. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate pregnancy outcomes in women followed after their first UTI in childhood. A cohort of 72 parous women was followed from their first UTI in childhood up to a median age of 41 years. Clinical data were obtained from antenatal and hospital records. Renal damage was evaluated by a (99m) Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scan. Pregnancy blood pressure (BP), complications and UTIs were compared between women with and without renal damage. All women completed the investigations, 48 with and 24 without renal damage. No woman, irrespective of presence or absence of renal damage, was diagnosed with hypertension before the first pregnancy. Pregnancy-related hypertension was diagnosed in 10 of 151 pregnancies, all in women with renal damage. Preeclampsia occurred in four women. Women with renal damage had significantly higher systolic BP measured at the last antenatal visit of their first pregnancy, compared with women without renal damage (p = 0.005). During subsequent pregnancies both systolic and diastolic BP were significantly higher in women with than without renal damage (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). In this population-based follow-up study we found a large proportion of women with renal damage after UTI in childhood. Women with renal damage had significantly higher BP during pregnancy compared with women without renal damage. Pregnancy-related hypertension was recorded only in women with renal damage. However, pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia, were few. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. [Prevalence of urinary tract symptoms in women with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Carbajal-Ramírez, Angélica; Meza-Vázquez, Héctor; Moreno-Palacios, Jorge; Serrano-Brambila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of urinary tract symptoms and the impact in the quality of life in women with diabetes, the association with DM and neuropathy evolution time and glycemic control. A cohort of women from the DiabetIMSS program was evaluated from January 2011 to 2013. The personal history, time of DM diagnosis, neuropathy, urinary symptoms, glycemic control and quality of life impact were noted. A total of 169 women were evaluated. The median age was 58 years (29-85) and DM main evolution time was 9 years (0.5-31). Urinary tract symptoms were present in 128 (75.7 %) patients. Stress and urge incontinence were predominantly present (45.3 and 40.6 % respectively), followed by obstructive and irritative symptoms (25 and 10.1 % respectively). The impact in the quality of life was mild-moderate in 91.1 % of the patients. At least one criteria for neuropathy was noted in 154 (91.1 %) patients. Neuropathy evolution time was longer in the symptomatic group (12 vs 4.8 months). Symptoms were mainly present in patients with more than one year of neuropathy; p urinary tract symptoms in diabetic women. The only associated risk factor was neuropathy. No significative association was found between the rest of the factors.

  4. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...... increase for hospitalization with pneumonia associated with diabetes. The increase of risk for tuberculosis is of similar magnitude in highly developed countries, and possibly higher in low-income countries. Poor glycemic control and long diabetes duration predict higher risk for both pneumonia...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk...

  5. Clinical profile and antibiotics sensitivity in childhood urinary tract infection at Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S D; Madhup, S K

    2013-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection implies presence of actively multiplying organisms in the urinary tract. Although it is infrequently associated with mortality, it is still a significant cause of morbidity. Early diagnosis is critical to preserve renal function of growing kidney. Our purpose was to determine the clinical, microbiologic profile and antibiotic sensitivity of such infections in pediatric Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) patients at Dhulikhel Hospital. A hospital based prospective descriptive study of 135 children from 2 months to 16 years, with clinical diagnosis of urinary tract infection who visited the pediatric department of Dhulikhel Hospital over the period of 15 months were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent routine urine analysis and culture. Children with recurrent UTI underwent micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG). Children with recurrent UTI of more than two years and with feature of pyelonephritis underwent USG abdomen as well. Complications and response of the treatment was observed in all cases of UTI. All data were entered in Epidata and data analysis was done using spss 16 version. Among 135 children, 32.5% were male and 67.4% were female. Fever was the most common presenting symptom in 74.80% of patients followed by dysuria in 54.1%. Among these children 95.6% had significant pyuria and 45% had culture positive infection. Children who showed positive for bacteriuria, Escherichia coli (78.7%) was the most common organism and are more than 80% sensitive to Amikacin, Gentamicin, Ceftriaxone, Ofloxacin, Nalidixic acid, Imipenem and Vancomycin. Co-trimoxazole was the most common drug used for treatment with a mean drug respond time of (mean+/-S.D) of 2.21+/-.78 days. 2+/-. Children who had recurrent UTI were more prone to develop culture positive UTI (p=0.0001). Urinary Tract Infection in female was almost twice more common than in male. Cotrimoxazole was the most common drug used for treatment, sensitivity of this drug was less than 50% for

  6. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from patients with suspected urinary tract infection in primary care, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba, Gloria; Holm, Anne; Hansen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen causing Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). Data from the current National Surveillance program in Denmark (DANMAP) may not accurately represent the prevalence of resistant E. coli in primary care, because only urine samples from complicated......: Observational study carried out from December 2014 to December 2015. Thirty-nine general practices from The Capital Region of Denmark included adult patients with urinary tract symptoms and suspected UTI. All urine samples were sent to the central laboratory Statens Serum Institut (SSI). Significant bacteriuria...... 485 (96%) patients. According to the European Urinalysis Standards, 261 (54%) patients had positive bacteriuria. The most common uropathogen in patients with uncomplicated (uUTI) and complicated (cUTI) urinary tract infection was E. coli 105 (69%) and 76 (70%), respectively. Eighty-two (45%) of 181 E...

  7. Botanical medicines for the urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Eric

    2002-11-01

    Four important categories of urologic herbs, their history, and modern scientific investigations regarding them are reviewed. Botanical diuretics are discussed with a focus on Solidago spp (goldenrod) herb, Levisticum officinale (lovage) root, Petroselinum crispus (parsley) fruit, and Urtica dioica (stinging nettle) herb. Urinary antiseptic and anti-adhesion herbs, particularly Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (uva-uri) leaf, Juniperus spp (juniper) leaf, and Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) fruit are reviewed. The antinephrotoxic botanicals Rheum palmatum (Chinese rhubarb) root and Lespedeza capitata (round-head lespedeza) herb are surveyed, followed by herbs for symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, most notably Serenoa repens (saw palmetto) fruit, Urtica dioica root, and Prunus africana (pygeum) bark.

  8. Upper urinary tract carcinoma in Lynch syndrome cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, David G; Wagner, David G; Holmäng, Sten; Johansson, Sonny L; Lynch, Henry T

    2011-05-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome are much more likely to have generally rare upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma but not bladder urothelial carcinoma. While the risk has been quantified, to our knowledge there is no description of how this population of patients with Lynch syndrome and upper urinary tract cancer differs from the general population with upper urinary tract cancer. We obtained retrospective data on a cohort of patients with Lynch syndrome from the Hereditary Cancer Center in Omaha, Nebraska and compared the data to those on a control general population from western Sweden. These data were supplemented by a new survey about exposure to known risk factors. Of the patients with Lynch syndrome 91% had mutations in MSH2 rather than in MSH1 and 79% showed upper tract urothelial carcinoma a mean of 15.85 years after prior Lynch syndrome-type cancer. Median age at diagnosis was 62 years vs 70 in the general population (p Lynch syndrome 51% had urothelial carcinoma in the ureter while it occurred in the renal pelvis in 65% of the general population (p = 0.0013). Similar numbers of high grade tumors were found in the Lynch syndrome and general populations (88% and 74%, respectively, p = 0.1108). Upper urinary tract tumors develop at a younger age and are more likely to be in the ureter with an almost equal gender ratio in patients with Lynch syndrome. It has high grade potential similar to that in the general population. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of urinary tract pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khameneh, Zakieh Rostamzadeh; Afshar, Ali Taghizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Microbial drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of infectious diseases worldwide. The purpose of this survey is to determine the prevalence of the type of bacterial agents that cause urinary infection and to assess the antimicrobial sensitivity pattern in the Urmia Medical University, Iran. In the period between 2005 and 2006, urine cultures collected were analyzed. Positive culture was defined as growth of a single bacterial species with colony count of > 100,000 CFU/mL. Stratification was done according to age-group and gender. Statistical tests used included chi-square to evaluate differences between susceptibility rates. A total of 803 urine culture positive patients were studied of whom 81.6% were females and 18.4% were males. The common micro-organisms isolated were E. coli (78.58%), Klebsiella (5.48%), Proteus and Staphylococcus. About 89% of the E. coli isolated showed sensitivity to cephtizoxin, 83.9% to gentamycin and 83.2% to ciprofloxacin; the highest resistance was shown to ampicillin and cotrimoxazole. Surveys of this nature will give a clear idea about the bacteriologic profile in a given institution as well their antibiotic sensitivity profile. This will act as a guide to commencing empirical antibiotic treatment in patients with urinary infections until such time culture reports are available. (author)

  10. Imaging after urinary tract infection in older children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Michael P; Chow, Jeanne S; Johnson, Emilie K; Rosoklija, Ilina; Logvinenko, Tanya; Nelson, Caleb P

    2015-05-01

    There are few guidelines and little data on imaging after urinary tract infections in older children. We determined the clinical yield of renal and bladder ultrasound, and voiding cystourethrogram in older children and adolescents after urinary tract infection. We analyzed findings on voiding cystourethrogram, and renal and bladder ultrasound as well as the clinical history of patients who underwent the 2 studies on the same day between January 2006 and December 2010. We selected for study patients 5 to 18 years old who underwent imaging for urinary tract infection. Those with prior postnatal genitourinary imaging or prenatal hydronephrosis were excluded from analysis. We identified a cohort of 153 patients, of whom 74% were 5 to 8 years old, 21% were 8 to 12 years old and 5% were 12 to 18 years old. Of the patients 77% were female, 78% had a febrile urinary tract infection history and 55% had a history of recurrent urinary tract infections. Renal and bladder ultrasound findings revealed hydronephrosis in 7.8% of patients, ureteral dilatation in 3.9%, renal parenchymal findings in 20% and bladder findings in 12%. No patient had moderate or greater hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrogram showed vesicoureteral reflux in 34% of cases and bladder or urethral anomalies in 12%. Reflux was grade I, II-III and greater than III in 5.9%, 26% and 2% of patients, respectively. For any voiding cystourethrogram abnormality the sensitivity and specificity of any renal and bladder ultrasound abnormality were 0.49 (95% CI 0.37-0.62) and 0.76 (95% CI 0.66-0.84), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 0.58 (95% CI 0.44-0.71) and 0.69 (0.59-0.77), respectively. In older children with a history of urinary tract infection the imaging yield is significant. However, imaging revealed high grade hydronephrosis or high grade vesicoureteral reflux in few patients. Renal ultrasound is not reliable for predicting voiding cystourethrogram findings such as vesicoureteral

  11. Imaging of transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozmen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common urothelial neoplasm to involve the upper urinary tract and bladder. Prognosis significantly worsens with deeper invasion. The role of imaging is to detect the tiniest urothelial neoplasms while still potentially resectable and curable. In case of advance disease, imaging should identify the extent of disease. Intravenous or retrograde urography, ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging have been used for diagnosis of TCC. The diagnostic performances of these imaging modalities differ from each other. A recent review regarding imaging of TCC by Razavi et al states that the retrieved sensitivity/specificity for the detection of TCC of upper urinary tract for CT urography (CTU), MR urography, excretory urography, and retrograde urography were 96%/99%, 69%/97%, 80%/81%, and 96%/96%, respectively. For detecting bladder cancer, the retrieved sensitivity/specificity for CT cystography, MR cystography, and ultrasonography were 94%/98%, 91%/95%, and 78%/96%, respectively. They conclude that CT urography is the best imaging technique for confirming or excluding malignancy in the upper urinary tract, whereas CT cystography has the best diagnostic performance for diagnosing bladder cancer. While cystoscopy is still considered by most to be the gold-standard for evaluation of the urinary bladder, CTU is playing an increasing role in the detection of urinary bladder urothelial neoplasms. As with the upper urinary tract, bladder urothelial neoplasms typically present as a filling defect, a focal mass, or an area of abnormal focal wall thickening. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior for evaluation of the depth of tumour invasion into the bladder wall, but this knowledge may not ultimately affect treatment as feasibility for radical cystectomy depends on staging by a combination of clinical, histopathological and imaging findings. Radical cystectomy may include resection of adjacent organs

  12. Stented ureterovesical anastomosis in renal transplantation: does it influence the rate of urinary tract infections?

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    Mathe Z

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Our objective was to evaluate the impact of routine use of double-J stents on the incidence of urinary tract infection after renal transplantation. Methods We conducted a retrospective-comparative single-centre study in 310 consecutive adult deceased donor kidney recipients transplanted from 2002 to 2006. Patients were divided in two groups, with or without urinary stent implantation. To evaluate the predictive factors for UTI, donor and recipients pre- and post-transplantation data were analysed. Early urological complications and renal function within 12 months of transplantation were included as well. Results A total of 157 patients were enrolled to a stent (ST and 153 patients to a no-stent (NST group. The rate of urinary tract infection at three months was similar between the two groups (43.3% ST vs. 40.1% NST, p = 0.65. Of the identified pathogens Enterococcus and Escherichia coli were the most common species. In multivariate analysis neither age nor immunosuppressive agents, BMI or diabetes seemed to have influence on the rate of UTI. When compared to males, females had a significantly higher risk for UTI (54.0% vs. 33.5%. Conclusion Prophylactic stenting of the ureterovesical anastomosis does not increase the risk of urinary tract infection in the early postoperative period.

  13. Diagnostic value of 64-slice spiral computed tomography imaging of the urinary tract during the excretory phase for urinary tract obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-Li; Jia, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xin-Ding; Shu, Sheng-Jie; Ling, Zai-Sheng; Fan, Ting-Ting; Shen, Xiu-Fen; Zhang, Jin-Ling

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of 64-slice spiral computed tomography (CT) imaging of the urinary tract during the excretory phase for urinary tract obstruction. CT imaging of the urinary tract during the excretory phase was performed in 46 patients that had been diagnosed with urinary tract obstruction by B-mode ultrasound imaging or clinical manifestations. It was demonstrated that out of the 46 patients, 18 had pelvic and ureteral calculi, 12 cases had congenital malformations, 3 had ureteral stricture caused by urinary tract infection and 13 cases had malignant tumors of the urinary tract. The average X-ray dose planned for the standard CT scan of the urinary tract group 1 was 14.11±5.45 mSv, while the actual X-ray dose administered for the CT scan during the excretory phase group 2 was 9.01±4.56 mSv. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (t=15.36; Purinary tract during the excretory phase has a high diagnostic value for urinary tract obstruction.

  14. The urinary proteome in diabetes and diabetes-associated complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Kasper; Mischak, Harald; Rossing, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes represents one of the main chronic diseases worldwide. Diabetes and its associated complications may be detectable even at early stages in the urinary proteome. In this article we review the current literature on urinary proteomics applied to the study of diabetes and diabetic...... complications. Further, we present recent data that strongly indicate urinary proteome analysis may be a valuable tool in detecting diabetes-associated pathophysiological changes at an early stage, and also may enable assessment of disease progression and efficacy of therapy. Current data indicate that collagen......-derived peptides represent one of the main peptidic components in urine, which are consistently found at reduced levels in diabetes. It is tempting to speculate that this decrease in urinary collagen-derived peptides is related to an increase in extracellular matrix deposition which is a major complication...

  15. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens from uncomplicated urinary tract infection in a pediatric hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martínez, Briceida; Calderón-Jaimes, Ernesto; Olivar-López, Víctor; Parra-Ortega, Israel; Alcázar-López, Virginia; Castellanos-Cruz, María Del Carmen; de la Garza-López, Alicia

    Urinary tract infection in children is well recognized as a cause of acute morbidity and chronic medical conditions. As a result, appropriate use of antimicrobial agents, however, increases antibiotic resistance and complicates its treatment due to increased patient morbidity, costs, rates of hospitalization, and use of broader-spectrum antibiotics. The goal of this study was to determine antibiotic susceptibility to commonly used agents for urinary tract infection against recent urinary isolates. A total of 457 consecutive children attending the emergency room at the Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez with symptoms of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection were eligible for inclusion. Patients who had had symptoms for≥7 days and those who had had previous episodes of urinary tract infection, received antibiotics or other complicated factors were excluded. Midstream and catheter urine specimens were collected. All isolates were identified and the in vitro activities of antimicrobials were determined. The most frequently isolated urinary pathogens were as follows: Escherichia coli (E. coli) (312, 68.3%), Enterococcus spp. (42, 11%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) (40, 8.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (34, 7.5%), Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis) (21, 4.5%), Enterobacter cloacae (8, 1.7%). The resistance to trimetoprim/sulfametoxazol (%) was 73.7, 62.2, 100, 52, and 50, respectively, for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, P. mirabilis and Enterobacter spp., 92.5 for Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) and 49.9 for Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium). Ampicillin was 86.3, 45, 100, 47.9, and 66.6% for the same strains, ciprofloxacin 33.8, 9, 18.8, 0, 0%, nitrofurantoin 4.4, 13, 97.7, 70, 0%; to E. faecalis 0% and 16.7% to E. faecium. Frequently prescribed empirical agents for uncomplicated urinary tract infection demonstrate lowered in vitro susceptibilities when tested against recent clinical isolates. Copyright © 2014 Hospital

  16. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters and its common complications in different hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Davoodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs and their related complications is one of the most important problems in hospital wards. The aim of this study was to evaluate inappropriate use of IUCs and their complications among patients in Tehran, Iran. Two hundred and six consecutive patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU as well as medical and surgical wards at the Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandarabbas from September 1 to 30, 2005 and in whom IUCs were used, were studied. Data collected included age of the patients, diagnoses, reason for use of IUC and the complications related to it. Overall, 164 patients (79.6% had IUCs used appropriately while 42 of them (20.6% were catheterized unjustifiably. Inappropriate use of IUCs in the ICU, medical and surgical wards was reported in 12 (18.5%, 16 (19.0% and 14 patients (24.6%, respectively. The most common complication of IUCs was urinary tract infection, which occurred in 91 patients (44.2% and hematuria, which was seen in 3.9% of the patients. Our study suggests that inappropriate use of IUCs is prevalent, particularly in the surgical wards, and the most common complication observed was catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

  17. Acute urinary retention as a late complication of subcutaneous liquid silicone injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Luongo de Matos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute urinary retention is characterized by a sudden interruption of urinary output; urine is retained in the bladder due to either functional or obstructive anatomic factors, and cannot be voided. The main causes of acute urinary obstruction are benign prostatic hyperplasia, constipation, prostate adenocarcinoma, urethral stenosis, clot retention, neurological disorders, following surgery, calculi, drugs, or urinary tract infections. A transvestite patient, aged 55 years, described having had liquid silicone subcutaneously injected in various parts of the body, the last one four years ago. He complained of absent urinary output during the last 14 hours. The physical examination revealed skin deformation due to migration of implants; a hard nodule (characterized as a foreign body was present in the preputium and a diagnosis of acute urinary retention was made; an unsuccessful attempt to exteriorize the glans for urinary catheterization, was followed by therapeutic cystostomy. Acute urinary retention has not been mentioned in the medical literature as a complication of liquid silicone subcutaneous injection.

  18. [Diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Schor, Nestor

    2003-01-01

    A review about recent aspects on diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection (UTI) is presented. There is a wide variation in clinical presentation of UTI which include different forms as cystitis, pyelonephritis, urethral syndrome and the clinical relevance of asymptomatic bacteriuria and low-count bacteriuria that must be distinguished from contamination. Pathogenetic aspects concerning bacterial virulence as well as host factors in susceptibility to UTI as urinary tract obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux, indwelling bladder catheters, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, sexual activity, contraceptive methods, prostatism, menopause, advanced age and renal transplantation are discussed. Diagnostic criteria and the most common tests utilized for differentiation between lower and upper UTI have been reviewed. The authors conclude that a careful evaluation of the underlying factors is required for the correct diagnosis of UTI and to prevent recurrence and that appropriate strategies and specific therapeutic regimens may maximize the benefit while reducing costs and adverse reactions.

  19. [Lower urinary tract infections in men. Urethritis, cystitis and prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Marie-Céline; Schoofs, Fabian; Huttner, Benedikt; Huttner, Angela

    2017-04-12

    Recommendations for the treatment of lower non-catheter-related urinary tract infection (UTI) in men are rarely evidence-based. Their management requires the localization of the site of infection, whether it be the urethra, bladder or prostate, and includes antibiotic therapy and in most cases urological assessment. They are often associated with urinary tract procedures or anatomical or functional abnormalities. Nearly 80 % of male UTIs are caused by Enterobacteriaceae. The prevalence of broad-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strains (ESBL) and quinolone-resistant strains is increasing. The aim of this article is to define three types of lower, non-catheter-related UTI in men - urethritis, cystitis and prostatitis - their microbiology and management in Switzerland.

  20. Are probiotics effective in preventing urinary tract infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Juan; Rada, Gabriel

    2018-04-04

    Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection and recurrences are common. Probiotics have been proposed as an alternative to decrease this risk. However, it is not clear if they are really effective. To answer this question we used Epistemonikos, the largest database of systematic reviews in health, which is maintained by screening multiple information sources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, among others. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. We identified six systematic reviews including nine studies overall, of which seven were randomized trials. We concluded it is not clear whether probiotics decrease the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infection, because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  1. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy: old and new unresolved diagnostic and therapeutic problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Małyszko, Jolanta; Wieliczko, Monika

    2015-03-16

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in pregnant women and pose a great therapeutic challenge, since the risk of serious complications in both the mother and her child is high. Pregnancy is a state associated with physiological, structural and functional urinary tract changes which promote ascending infections from the urethra. Unlike the general population, all pregnant women should be screened for bacteriuria with urine culture, and asymptomatic bacteriuria must be treated in every case that is diagnosed, as it is an important risk factor for pyelonephritis in this population. The antibiotic chosen should have a good maternal and fetal safety profile. In this paper, current principles of diagnosis and management of UTI in pregnancy are reviewed, and the main problems and controversies are identified and discussed.

  2. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy: old and new unresolved diagnostic and therapeutic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małyszko, Jolanta; Wieliczko, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in pregnant women and pose a great therapeutic challenge, since the risk of serious complications in both the mother and her child is high. Pregnancy is a state associated with physiological, structural and functional urinary tract changes which promote ascending infections from the urethra. Unlike the general population, all pregnant women should be screened for bacteriuria with urine culture, and asymptomatic bacteriuria must be treated in every case that is diagnosed, as it is an important risk factor for pyelonephritis in this population. The antibiotic chosen should have a good maternal and fetal safety profile. In this paper, current principles of diagnosis and management of UTI in pregnancy are reviewed, and the main problems and controversies are identified and discussed. PMID:25861291

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Antibiotic Treatment of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, U-Syn; Lee, Seung-Ju; Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Min, Seung Ki; Lee, Heeyoung

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are infectious diseases that commonly occur in communities. Although several international guidelines for the management of UTIs have been available, clinical characteristics, etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns may differ from country to country. This work represents an update of the 2011 Korean guideline for UTIs. The current guideline was developed by the update and adaptation method. This clinical practice guideline provides recommendations for the diagnosis and management of UTIs, including asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, complicated pyelonephritis related to urinary tract obstruction, and acute bacterial prostatitis. This guideline targets community-acquired UTIs occurring among adult patients. Healthcare-associated UTIs, catheter-associated UTIs, and infections in immunocompromised patients were not included in this guideline. PMID:29637759

  4. Lower Urinary Tract Injuries Following Blunt Trauma: A Review of Contemporary Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jennifer P. L; Bultitude, Matthew F; Royce, Peter; Gruen, Russell L; Cato, Alex; Corcoran, Niall M

    2011-01-01

    Lower urinary tract trauma, although relatively uncommon in blunt trauma, can lead to significant morbidity when diagnosed late or left untreated; urologists may only encounter a handful of these injuries in their career. This article reviews the literature and reports on the management of these injuries, highlighting the issues facing clinicians in this subspecialty. Also presented is a structured review detailing the mechanisms, classification, diagnosis, management, and complications of blunt trauma to the bladder and urethra. The prognosis for bladder rupture is excellent when treated. Significant intraperitoneal rupture or involvement of the bladder neck mandates surgical repair, whereas smaller extraperitoneal lacerations may be managed with catheterization alone. With the push for management of trauma patients in larger centers, urologists in these hospitals are seeing increasing numbers of lower urinary tract injuries. Prospective analysis may be achieved in these centers to address the current lack of Level 1 evidence. PMID:22114545

  5. LOWER URINARY TRACT DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PYELONEPHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Berdichevskyy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available  As a result of this study found that the lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with chronic pyelonephritis is a consequence of the parasympathetic, visceral dysfunction with clinical manifestations in the form ARRHYTHMOLOGY syndrome, and frequent urination scant. Appointment of α1-blocker tamsulosin is accompanied by more effective in abolishing the clinical and laboratory manifestations of the disease. 

  6. Novel Approaches to Preventing Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    vaccines . In: Mobley HLT. 54. Johnson JR. Steil A. Delavari P. Canine feces as a reservoir ofextraintestinal Warren 1W, eds. Urinary tract infections...the material was subjected to analysis by Triple quadrupole ESI-MS/CID-MS experiments were electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the positive ion...prophylaxis. Characteristic of prophylactic regimens development of vaccines against these infections, containing nitrofurantoin is the frequency of side

  7. Essentials of equine renal and urinary tract physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toribio, Ramiro E

    2007-12-01

    Knowledge of urinary tract anatomy and the numerous functions of the kidney in regulating fluids, electrolytes, acid-base balance, and waste products improves the ability of the clinician to diagnose, treat, and make appropriate recommendations for the management of the horse with renal disease. Several conditions can directly or indirectly affect renal function on a temporary or permanent basis. Endogenous and exogenous compounds (eg, drugs, toxins, hemoglobin) alone or in combination with inappropriate renal blood flow can promote or exacerbate renal disease.

  8. Probiotics prophylaxis in pyelonephritis infants with normal urinary tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Joo; Cha, Jihae; Lee, Jung Won

    2016-11-01

    Pyelonephritis in infants is considered as a major factor for the formation of renal scar. To prevent recurrent pyelonephritis and renal damage, prophylaxis is extremely important. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of probiotic and antibiotic prophylaxis or no-prophylaxis in infants with pyelonephritis and normal urinary tract. Altogether 191 infants, who were diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis, proven to have normal urinary tracts and followed up for 6 months on prophylaxis, were retrospectively evaluated. According to the types of prophylaxis, the infants were divided into three groups [probiotics (Lactobacillus species), antibiotics (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, TMP/SMX), and noprophylaxis]. The incidence of recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) during 6 months after the development of pyelonephritis, main causative uropathogens, and its antimicrobial sensitivities were compared. The incidence of recurrent UTI in the probiotic group was 8.2%, which was significantly lower than 20.6% in the no-prophylaxis group (P=0.035) and was not significantly different from 10.0% of the antibiotic group (P=0.532). The significant difference between the probiotic and no-prophylaxis groups was seen only in male infants (P=0.032). The main causative organism of recurrent UTI was Escherichia coli (E.coli), which was not different among the three groups (P=0.305). The resistance rate of E. coli to TMP/SMX was 100% in the antibiotic group, which was significantly higher than 25.0% in the probiotic group and 41.7% in the no-prophylaxis group (P=0.008). Probiotic prophylaxis was more effective in infants with pyelonephritis and normal urinary tract than in those with no-prophylaxis. It could be used as a natural alternative to antibiotic prophylaxis.

  9. Mutations in DSTYK and dominant urinary tract malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Sampogna, Rosemary V; Papeta, Natalia; Burgess, Katelyn E; Nees, Shannon N; Perry, Brittany J; Choi, Murim; Bodria, Monica; Liu, Yan; Weng, Patricia L; Lozanovski, Vladimir J; Verbitsky, Miguel; Lugani, Francesca; Sterken, Roel; Paragas, Neal; Caridi, Gianluca; Carrea, Alba; Dagnino, Monica; Materna-Kiryluk, Anna; Santamaria, Giuseppe; Murtas, Corrado; Ristoska-Bojkovska, Nadica; Izzi, Claudia; Kacak, Nilgun; Bianco, Beatrice; Giberti, Stefania; Gigante, Maddalena; Piaggio, Giorgio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Vukic, Durdica Kosuljandic; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Saraga, Marijan; Gucev, Zoran; Allegri, Landino; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Casu, Domenica; State, Matthew; Scolari, Francesco; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Al-Awqati, Qais; D'Agati, Vivette D; Drummond, Iain A; Tasic, Velibor; Lifton, Richard P; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gharavi, Ali G

    2013-08-15

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and the urinary tract are the most common cause of pediatric kidney failure. These disorders are highly heterogeneous, and the etiologic factors are poorly understood. We performed genomewide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in a family with an autosomal dominant form of congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract (seven affected family members). We also performed a sequence analysis in 311 unrelated patients, as well as histologic and functional studies. Linkage analysis identified five regions of the genome that were shared among all affected family members. Exome sequencing identified a single, rare, deleterious variant within these linkage intervals, a heterozygous splice-site mutation in the dual serine-threonine and tyrosine protein kinase gene (DSTYK). This variant, which resulted in aberrant splicing of messenger RNA, was present in all affected family members. Additional, independent DSTYK mutations, including nonsense and splice-site mutations, were detected in 7 of 311 unrelated patients. DSTYK is highly expressed in the maturing epithelia of all major organs, localizing to cell membranes. Knockdown in zebrafish resulted in developmental defects in multiple organs, which suggested loss of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Consistent with this finding is the observation that DSTYK colocalizes with FGF receptors in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. DSTYK knockdown in human embryonic kidney cells inhibited FGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the principal signal downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. We detected independent DSTYK mutations in 2.3% of patients with congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract, a finding that suggests that DSTYK is a major determinant of human urinary tract development, downstream of FGF signaling. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  10. Predictors Of Non-Escherichia Coli Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Nader; Wald, Ellen R; Keren, Ron; Gotman, Nathan; Ivanova, Anastasia; Carpenter, Myra A; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to determine which children are prone to non-Escherichia coli urinary tract infection (UTIs). We included 769 children with UTI. We found that circumcised males, Hispanic children, children without fever and children with grades 3 and 4 vesicoureteral reflux were more likely to have a UTI caused by organisms other than E. coli. This information may guide clinicians in their choice of antimicrobial therapy.

  11. Antibiotic resistance patterns of outpatient pediatric urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlin, Rachel S; Shapiro, Daniel J; Hersh, Adam L; Copp, Hillary L

    2013-07-01

    We characterize the current national patterns of antibiotic resistance of outpatient pediatric urinary tract infection. We examined outpatient urinary isolates from patients younger than 18 years in 2009 using The Surveillance Network®, a database with antibiotic susceptibility results and patient demographic data from 195 United States hospitals. We determined the prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns for the 6 most common uropathogens, ie Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus. We compared differences in uropathogen prevalence between males and females using chi-square analysis. We identified 25,418 outpatient urinary isolates. E. coli was the most common uropathogen overall but the prevalence of E. coli was higher among females (83%) than males (50%, p Resistance among E. coli was highest for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (24%) but lower for nitrofurantoin (less than 1%) and cephalothin (15%). Compared to 2002 Surveillance Network data, E. coli resistance rates increased for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (from 23% to 31% in males and from 20% to 23% in females) and ciprofloxacin (from 1% to 10% and from 0.6% to 4%, respectively). E. coli remains the most common pediatric uropathogen. Although widely used, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is a poor empirical choice for pediatric urinary tract infections in many areas due to high resistance rates. First-generation cephalosporins and nitrofurantoin are appropriate narrow-spectrum alternatives given their low resistance rates. Local antibiograms should be used to assist with empirical urinary tract infection treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Urinary tract infection in children: Role of ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Sun Wha; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Joo Won

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate diagnostic usefulness of ultrasonography(US) in pediatric patient with urinary tract infection. Fifty-five children with urinary tract infection underwent renal ultrasonography and voiding cystourethrography(VCUG). The imaging findings were analyzed retrospectively. Renal sonograms were normal in 34 of 55 children(62%). Five of 34 patients with normal sonogram had vesicoureteral reflux of grade I and III on VCUG. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 21 of 55 children(38%). Sonographic findings included hydronephrosis, hyperechoic kidney, nephromegaly, altrophic kidney, renal abscess, and duplex ureter. Eleven of 21 patient with abnormal sonogram had vesicoureteral reflux of grade I to IV on VCUG. Ultrasonography is an useful and reliable initial screening examination in the investigation of children with UTI. Unfortunately US is neither sufficiently sensitive nor specific for detecting VUR. VCUG provides confirmative and valuable information about vesicoureteral reflux, and VCUG should be considered as a next modality for UTI. The combined use of sonography and VCUG provides more valuable information in urinary tract infection

  13. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections in special patient groups : women with diabetes mellitus and pregnant women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Kazemier, Brenda M.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    Purpose of reviewAsymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women with diabetes mellitus and during pregnancy are common and can have far-reaching consequences for the woman and neonate. This review describes epidemiology, risk factors, complications and treatment of UTI

  14. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections in special patient groups: women with diabetes mellitus and pregnant women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Kazemier, Brenda M.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women with diabetes mellitus and during pregnancy are common and can have far-reaching consequences for the woman and neonate. This review describes epidemiology, risk factors, complications and treatment of UTI and ASB according

  15. Evaluation of Urinary Tract Infection in Children With Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infection (UTI is the second most common bacterial infection in infancy and childhood with peaking in infancy and toilet training. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate UTI in patients with diarrhea. Patients and Methods This case-control study was conducted on 200 participants, 100 were patients with acute gastroenteritis and the other 100 were controls who referred to the clinic for routine checkup. UTI was defined as two positive urine cultures with > 105 cfu/mL. If white blood cells were more than 10/mm3 in un-centrifuged urine it would be considered pyuria and more than one microorganism in 10 oil immersion fields as bacteriuria. Analysis was conducted using SPSS ver. 16 with application of chi-square test and 0.05 as significant levels. Results The distribution of these 200 children were 115 (57.5% and 85 (42.5% for females and males respectively. The gender and age distribution in case and control groups showed non-significant association. In urine culture it was observed that 27 individuals were positive and there were seven healthy children. The number of children with positive urine culture was higher than that of their counterparts significantly (P = 0.0001. Relationship between urine culture and age groups showed that the number of participants with positive urine culture was higher in children with age of two months to two years but it was not significant (P = 0.54. Conclusions It was demonstrated that, considerable percentage of UTI existed in the gastroenteritis diseases. Early treatment of UTI in patients would reduce UTI complications.

  16. Bacteriological study of urinary tract infection in antenatal care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Ritu, Singh Brij N, Begum Rehana, Yadav Ramesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims & Objective: To isolate and diagnose the Uropathogens and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern in anti-natal care patient suffering from Urinary tract Infections. Material and Methods: 150 samples were collected by consent pregnant women between the age group of 18 to 40 years. A midstream clean catch is adequate, provided by all pregnant women’s through given careful instructions. For enumeration of bacteria we perform standard loop techniques method. The number of colonies counted or estimated, and this number used to calculate the number of viable bacteria per ml of urine. The bacterial strains were identified by colonies character stick, gram staining, morphological and biochemical character. The bacterial strains identification was done up to genus and species level. The antibiotics sensitivity test of bacterial strains was done as per CLSI guidelines by Kirby-Baure Disc Diffusion Methods. Results: The significant bactiurea was found in 50 patients among 150 patients used. The most commonly isolated bacteria was Escherichia coli 23(40% Klebsiellaaerogens 11 (22% Staphylococcus aureus 10 (20% Pseudomonas aerugenosa 4(8%.The incidence of bacteriuria among in their first pregnancy was 22.2%.The higher incidence of UTI in 2nd and 3rd trimester was found to have 31.4% & 40%. These studies were showing high level of resistance to first line antibiotics such as Cotrimaxozole. Conclusion: To minimizing the complication of the pregnant women should be educated about the physiology of pregnancy clinical presentation includes asymptomatic bacteria, acute cystitis & pyelonephritis. Pregnant women should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria by urine culture and treated with appropriate antibiotics. After the post treatment pregnant women should be examine again to confirm post treatment urine sterility.

  17. Bacteremia and meningitis among infants with urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachur, R; Caputo, G L

    1995-10-01

    A retrospective analysis of 354 patients urinary tract infections (UTIs) was performed to characterize patients with bacteremia or meningitis and to identify any objective predictors of these complications. Thirty-three patients with bacteremia were identified. Blood culture isolates included Escherichia coli (25), Staphylococcus aureus (4), enterococcus (1), group B Streptococcus (2), and Enterobacter (1). Besides one patient with group B Streptococcus bacteremia at 1.5 months of age, all bacteremias after one month of age were with E. coli. Bacteremia was limited to those < 6 months old and inversely related to age (R = 0.24, P = 0.0008). Grouped by age, the incidence of bacteremia was 21% for 0 < or = 1 month, 13% for 1.1-2.0 months, 4% for 2.1-3.0 months, and 8% for 3.1-6.0 months. Mean white blood cell count, initial temperature, initial serum bicarbonate, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were not statistically significant between bacteremic (B) and nonbacteremic (NB) patients. Statistically significant differences were noted for percentage of bands (6.2% [NB] vs. 12.3% [B] P < 0.001), total band count (1048 [NB] vs. 2252 [B] P < 0.001), and band-neutrophil ratio (0.16 [NB] vs. 0.36 [B] P = 0.01); however, no practical value for any of these measures would reliably discriminate between bacteremic and nonbacteremic patients. Four patients, all neonates, had meningitis; too few patients with meningitis were identified for analysis. In summary, bacteremia with UTIs was observed to be inversely related to age and limited to patients less than six months of age. No objective parameters were identified to distinguish patients with bacteremia at the time of presentation.

  18. Assessing Urinary Tract Junction Obstruction Defects by Methylene Blue Dye Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Kangsun

    2017-10-12

    Urinary tract junction obstruction defects are congenital anomalies inducing hydronephrosis and hydroureter. Murine urinary tract junction obstruction defects can be assessed by tracking methylene blue dye flow within the urinary system. Methylene blue dye is injected into the renal pelvis of perinatal embryonic kidneys and dye flow is monitored from the renal pelvis of the kidney through the ureter and into the bladder lumen after applying hydrostatic pressure. Dye accumulation will be evident in the bladder lumen of the normal perinatal urinary tract, but will be constrained between the renal pelvis and the end point of an abnormal ureter, if urinary tract obstructions occur. This method facilitates the confirmation of urinary tract junction obstructions and visualization of hydronephrosis and hydroureter. This manuscript describes a protocol for methylene blue dye injection into the renal pelvis to confirm urinary tract junction obstructions.

  19. Potential Misclassification of Urinary Tract-Related Bacteremia Upon Applying the 2015 Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Surveillance Definition From the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Fakih, Mohamad G; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated the surveillance definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection to include only urine culture bacteria of at least 1 × 10(5) colony-forming units/mL. Our findings suggest that the new surveillance definition may fail to capture clinically meaningful catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

  20. Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence in a geriatric cohort - a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrberger, Clemens; Madersbacher, Stephan; Jungwirth, Susanne; Fischer, Peter; Tragl, Karl-Heinz

    2012-11-01

    To assess prevalence and severity of lower urinary tract function in 85-year-old men and women. Little is known on the prevalence of lower urinary tract dysfunction in this geriatric age group, which is now the fastest growing sector of the population worldwide. The Vienna Trans-Danube Aging study (VITA) is a longitudinal, population-based study initiated in 2000 that included men/women aged 75 years living in a well-defined area in Vienna. The main purpose of the VITA study was to identify risk factors for incident Alzheimer's disease. All study participants alive in 2010 were contacted by mail to complete a detailed questionnaire on various aspects of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urinary incontinence (UI). The response rate was 68%, resulting in a total of 262 questionnaires available for analysis (men n= 96; women n= 166). All study participants were 85 years of age. Urinary incontinence defined as any involuntary loss during the past 4 weeks was reported by 24% of men and 35% of women (P= 0.04). Stress UI was more frequent in women (39%) than in men (14%, P 0.05). Nocturia more often than twice was more prevalent in men (69%) than in women (49%) (P= 0.02). Overactive bladder, according to International Continence Society criteria, was present in 55% of women and 50% of men. No difference regarding quality of life impairment as the result of LUTS and UI was noticed between sexes. A few co-morbidities were identified to correlate with UI and storage symptoms. These data provide insights into the prevalence and severity of LUTS and UI in individuals in their eighties, to our knowledge the largest population-based study in this age group. Demographic changes in upcoming decades underline the importance of a thorough understanding of lower urinary tract dysfunction in a geriatric population. © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  1. Triggered Urine Interleukin-6 Correlates to Severity of Symptoms in Nonfebrile Lower Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundén, Fredrik; Butler, Daniel; Wullt, Björn

    2017-07-01

    Objective diagnosis of symptomatic urinary tract infections in patients prone to asymptomatic bacteriuria is compromised by local host responses that are already present and the positive urine culture. We investigated interleukin-6 as a biomarker for nonfebrile urinary tract infection severity and diagnostic thresholds for interleukin-6 and 8, and neutrophils to differentiate between asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection. Patients with residual urine and neurogenic bladders due to spinal lesions included in a long-term Escherichia coli 83972 asymptomatic bacteriuria inoculation trial were monitored for 2 years. Symptom scoring and urine sampling to estimate interleukin-6 and 8, and neutrophils were performed regularly monthly and at urinary tract infection episodes. Patients were followed in the complete study for a mean of 19 months (range 10 to 27) and those with asymptomatic bacteriuria with E. coli 83972 were followed a mean of 11 months (range 4 to 19). A total of 37 nonfebrile urinary tract infection episodes with complete data on interleukin-6 and 8, neutrophils and symptom scoring were documented. Interleukin-6 was the only marker that persistently increased during urinary tract infection compared to asymptomatic bacteriuria in pooled and paired intra-individual comparisons (p urinary tract infection symptoms (p urinary tract infection episodes. However, in urinary tract infections with worse symptoms interleukin-6 and neutrophils demonstrated equal good/excellent outcomes. Triggered interleukin-6 correlated to urinary tract infection symptom severity and demonstrated a promising differential diagnostic capacity to discriminate urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria. Future studies should explore interleukin-6 as a biomarker of urinary tract infection severity and assess the treatment indication in nonfebrile urinary tract infections. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  2. Labial fusion causing urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection in a postmenopausal female: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirim, Ayhan; Hasirci, Eray

    2011-01-01

    A 73-year-old postmenopausal woman was admitted with recurrent urinary tract infection and a history of incontinence. General physical examination was normal. Complete labial fusion was noticed on genital examination. Surgical intervention was performed. This therapy alleviated incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection.

  3. Assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms in men by international prostate symptom score and core lower urinary tract symptom score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Tetsuya; Kume, Haruki; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Sugihara, Toru; Nomiya, Akira; Tsurumaki, Yuzuri; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Suzuki, Motofumi; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Yutaka; Homma, Yukio

    2012-05-01

    Study Type - Therapy (symptom prevalence). Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) has been most commonly used for the symptom assessment of men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). However, LUTS in men are so variable that they may not be fully captured by the IPSS questionnaire alone. This study has demonstrated that the Core Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Score (CLSS) questionnaire, which addresses 10 important symptoms, is an appropriate initial assessment tool for LUTS in men with various diseases/conditions. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) has been commonly used to assess lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). We have recently developed Core Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Score (CLSS). The aim of this study is to compare IPSS and CLSS for assessing LUTS in men.  Consecutive 515 men fulfilled IPSS and CLSS questionnaires. IPSS QOL Index was used as the QOL surrogate. The clinical diagnoses were BPH (n = 116), BPH with OAB wet (n =80), prostate cancer (n = 128), prostatitis (n = 68), underactive bladder (n = 8), others (n = 72), and controls (e.g., occult blood) (n = 42). Simple statistics and predictability of poor QOL (QOL Index 4 or greater) were examined. All symptom scores were significantly increased in symptomatic men compared with controls. Scores of corresponding symptoms of two questionnaires were significantly correlated (r = 0.58-0.85, all P incontinence, slow stream, straining, incomplete emptying, bladder pain and urethral pain) as independent factors. The hazard ratios for bladder pain (2.2) and urgency incontinence (2.0) were among the highest. All the nine symptoms are addressed in CLSS, while three symptoms (urgency incontinence, bladder, and urethral pain) are dismissed in IPSS. CLSS questionnaire is more comprehensive than IPSS questionnaire for symptom assessment of men with various diseases/conditions, although both questionnaires can capture

  4. "Urinary Tract Infection"-Requiem for a Heavyweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Thomas E

    2017-08-01

    "Urinary tract infection" ("UTI") is an ambiguous, expansive, overused diagnosis that can lead to marked, harmful antibiotic overtreatment. "Significant bacteriuria," central to most definitions of "UTI," has little significance in identifying individuals who will benefit from treatment. "Urinary symptoms" are similarly uninformative. Neither criterion is well defined. Bacteriuria and symptoms remit and recur spontaneously. Treatment is standard for acute uncomplicated cystitis and common for asymptomatic bacteriuria, but definite benefits are few. Treatment for "UTI" in older adults with delirium and bacteriuria is widespread but no evidence supports the practice, and expert opinion opposes it. Sensitive diagnostic tests now demonstrate that healthy urinary tracts host a ubiquitous, complex microbial community. Recognition of this microbiome, largely undetectable using standard agar-based cultures, offers a new perspective on "UTI." Everyone is bacteriuric. From this perspective, most people who are treated for a "UTI" would probably be better off without treatment. Elderly adults, little studied in this regard, face particular risk. Invasive bacterial diseases such as pyelonephritis and bacteremic bacteriuria are also "UTIs." Mindful decisions about antibiotic use will require a far better understanding of how pathogenicity arises within microbial communities. It is likely that public education and meaningful informed-consent discussions about antibiotic treatment of bacteriuria, emphasizing potential harms and uncertain benefits, would reduce overtreatment. Emphasizing the microbiome's significance and using the term "urinary tract dysbiosis" instead of "UTI" might also help and might encourage mindful study of the relationships among host, aging, microbiome, disease, and antibiotic treatment. © 2017, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. The DMSA scan in paediatric urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchfield, M.R.; Nadel, H.R.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present paper was to review the use of the dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan in urinary tract infection at British Columbia's Children's Hospital to determine the frequency of cortical defects and the association between vesico-ureteric reflux and the presence of cortical defects in children with urinary tract infection. A total of 129 consecutive children with a urinary tract infection referred for a DMSA scan in a 2-year period (January 1992-January 1994) were retrospectively studied. The results were analysed in terms of kidneys, and the incidence of cortical defects was determined. Eighty-eight patients (68%) had a radiographic micturating cysto-urethrogram within 6 months of the DMSA scan, and in this group the relationship of defects with vesico-ureteric reflux was determined. Overall, 81/258 (31%) of kidneys had a cortical defect on a DMSA scan. Of those who had a micturating cysto-urethrogram, 53/176 (30%) kidneys had vesico-ureteric reflux, and of those that had reflux, 21/53 (40%) had a cortical defect on a DMSA scan. In the group of children without reflux, 38/123 (31%) had a cortical defect. Renal cortical scan defects are common findings in paediatric urinary infection, and frequently occur in the absence of vesico-ureteric reflux. These defects represent either established scars or acute pyelonephritis that can proceed to scarring. The micturating cysto-urethro-gram alone is insufficient as a screening modality to identify those kidneys at risk of renal scarring. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. An Evidence-Based Protocol for Antibiotic Use Prior to Cystoscopy Decreases Antibiotic Use without Impacting Post-Procedural Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infection Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Justin R; Bhalla, Rohan G; Cook, J Paul; Kang, Caroline; Dmochowski, Roger; Talbot, Thomas R; Barocas, Daniel A

    2018-04-01

    Symptomatic urinary tract infection is a complication of office based cystourethroscopy. Studies are mixed regarding the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infections. Our aim was to develop and evaluate an evidence-based protocol that reduces unnecessary antibiotic use while avoiding an increase in urinary tract infections. We created a clinic antibiogram based on all urology office visits performed during a 2-year period. Bacterial resistance rates, institutional risk related data and clinical guidelines were applied to create a protocol for antibiotic administration before cystourethroscopy. We then analyzed 1,245 consecutive patients without a renal transplant who underwent outpatient cystourethroscopy, including 610 after protocol initiation. Urinary tract infection rates and antibiotic use were analyzed for an association with the protocol change using the Fisher exact test. Cultures had an overall 20% rate of resistance to fluoroquinolones, representing 40% of the cultures that grew Escherichia coli. Before the protocol change 602 of 635 patients (94.8%) received a preprocedural antibiotic compared to 426 of 610 (69.9%) after protocol initiation (p urinary tract infection prior to the protocol change while 16 (2.6%) had a urinary tract infection after the change (p = 0.69). Regarding resistance, fluoroquinolone resistant organisms grew in the cultures of 12 of 19 patients (63.2%) with a urinary tract infection before the protocol change compared to 5 of 16 (31.3%) with a urinary tract infection after the change. Recent antibiotic administration, hospitalization and chronic catheterization were associated with urinary tract infection in the entire cohort (all p ≤0.01). A local antibiogram with infection related risk data effectively risk stratifies patients before cystourethroscopy, decreasing the use of antibiotics without increasing the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association

  7. [Analysis of development, safety and efficacy of percutaneous nephrolithotomy for management of upper urinary tract calculi in pediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L P; Xu, T

    2017-08-18

    To evaluate the development, safety and efficacy of percutaneous nephrolithotomy(PNL) for management of upper urinary tract calculi in pediatric patients. In the study, 77 pediatric patients undergoing 87 PNLs through mini or standard tract for upper urinary tract calculi between January 2005 and December 2016 in Peking University People's hospital were reviewed, including 69 renal calculi, 6 upper ureteral calculi, 12 renal and upper ureteral calculi, 35 single calculi, 43 multiple calculi and 9 staghorn calculi. The development and efficacy of PNL in pediatric patients were studied by analyzing the characteristics and clinical indexes, and by reviewing the associated literature. The Clavien classification system was used to evaluate the complications after PNL. A total of 87 PNLs were performed in 77 pediatric patients. Eighty-one upper urinary tract calculi were managed through a single tract(93.1%), 5 pediatric patients were managed through 2 tracts(5.7%), and 1 pediatric patient was managed through 3 tracts(1.2%). The mean operating time was (77.0±29.8) min. The stone-free rate after one session was 100% for single calculi and 71.2% for multiple or staghorn calculi, 5(5.8%) children underwent auxiliary procedure to remove the residual calculi and the final stone-free rate of PNL was 88.5%. One of the main complications of pediatric PNL was fever. Sixteen (18.4%) had moderate fever(38-39 °C), 5 (5.7%) had high fever (39-40 °C) and there were no severe complications of infection, such as sepsis or septic shock. The mean hemoglobin loss was (10.3±16.1) g/L and the serum creatinine rise was (7.0±13.3) μmol/L. One(1.2%) pediatric patient suffered ureteroscopic lithotripsy because of the obstruction by the residual stone in ureter. No injury of organs or retroperitoneal urinary extravasation occurred. General assessment of the complications showed Clavien grade I complications in 14 (16.1%) pediatric patients, grade II in 7(8.0%) children and grade III in 1

  8. Risk factors of urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Gulfareen; Zehra, Nishat; Munir, Aftab Afroze; Haider, Ambreen

    2010-03-01

    To determine the frequency, risk factors and pattern of urinary complaints during pregnancy. A descriptive study was conducted in the Obstetric and Gynaecology Department of Isra University Hospital, Hyderabad from 1st January to 30th August 2008. Total 232 women were selected to ascertain the frequency and pattern of urinary symptoms as well as the risk factors of urinary tract infection (UTI) such as age, parity, education, past history of UTI and haemoglobin among women attending an antenatal clinic. All pregnant women irrespective of age, parity and gestational age were included, while women with known underlying renal pathology, chronic renal disease, renal transplant, diabetes or taking immunosuppressant therapy were excluded. Informed consent was taken and data collected on a self designed proforma. All the women underwent complete examination of urine. Dipstick test was performed on midstream urine and urine was cultured incase of positive dipstick test and women with urinary symptoms. Data was analyzed on SPSS version 11. Odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were calculated among the categorical parameters by applying the Fisher's exact test. Out of 232 women, 108(46.5%) reported urinary symptoms which were due to pregnancy induced changes on urinary system as no growth was obtained on urine culture, while 10 (4.3%) were due to underlying UTI. Most common urinary symptom in these women was abnormal voiding pattern 85 (40.3%) followed by irritative symptoms and voiding difficulties. Illiteracy, history of sexual activity, low socioeconomic (monthly income UTI and multiparity were found to be risk factors for UTI in these women. On complete urine examination, 222 (95.6%) patients either did not reveal any pus cells or had less than 5 WBC/HPF. Out of 108 cultures, only 10 (4.3%) specimens showed growth. E-coli was the most commonly detected organism 7 (3%) followed by S-aureus in 3 (1.3%). The common urinary symptoms encountered in the studied women were

  9. Urinary YKL-40 as a Candidate Biomarker for Febrile Urinary Tract Infection in Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Hee; Chung, Mi Hae; Bin, Joong Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Soon; Lee, Juyoung; Suh, Jin Soon

    2018-01-01

    Given that YKL-40 is a known marker of inflammation, we sought to determine its association with urinary tract infection (UTI) in febrile children. In total, 44 children aged 0 to 24 months with febrile UTI and 35 age- and sex-matched controls with fever from other causes were enrolled in the study. ELISA was performed to determine the level of YKL-40 in urine collected from each child. The ratio of urinary YKL-40 to creatinine (Cr) was higher in the children with a UTI than in the controls (PUTI was 0.88 for the urinary YKL-40/Cr ratio, 0.86 for pyuria, and 0.71 for positive nitrite on urinalysis. We applied a cut-off value of 125.23 pg/mg to urinary YKL-40/Cr for detecting UTI. Eight of nine children in the control group with pyuria had urinary YKL-40/Cr levels lower than 125.23 pg/mg, and the one child in the UTI group without pyuria or positive nitrite had a urinary YKL-40/Cr level greater than 125.23 pg/mg. Determining the levels of urinary YKL-40/Cr may help identify true cases of UTI in febrile young children, especially when they have pyuria but not nitrite, or have neither pyuria nor nitrite in the urine. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  10. Are lower urinary tract symptoms in children associated with urinary symptoms in their mothers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Ariane S; Fraga, Luis Gustavo A; Salomão, Bruno A; Oliveira, Júlia B; Seixas, Camila L; Veiga, Maria Luiza; Netto, José Murillo B; Barroso, Ubirajara

    2017-06-01

    The association between parents who suffered daytime incontinence as children and children who are incontinence has been reported. However, the association of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction in children and urinary symptoms in mothers has not been studied. To test the hypothesis that the children of mothers with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are more likely to have urinary symptoms. A cross-sectional multicenter study was conducted in two cities in Brazil. Children/adolescents of 5-17 years of age and their mothers were interviewed. Children with neurological problems, previously detected urinary tract abnormalities or who refused to sign the informed consent or assent form were excluded. The DVSS questionnaire was used to evaluate the presence of LUTS in the children and the ICIQ-OAB questionnaire was used to evaluate their mothers. Constipation in the children was investigated using the ROME III criteria. A total of 827 mother-child pairs were included, with 414 of the children (50.06%) being male. Mean age was 9.1 ± 2.9 years for the children and 35.9 ± 6.5 years for the mothers. Urinary symptoms (occurring at least once or twice a week) were present in 315 children (38.1%), incontinence in 114 (13.8%) and urinary urgency in 141 (17%). Of the mothers, 378 (45.7%) had at least one LUTS, with 103 (12.5%) having incontinence and 153 (18.5%) urgency. According to the DVSS, the overall prevalence of LUT dysfunction was 9.1%. The children's DVSS scores were significantly associated with the mothers' ICIQ-OAB scores (p urinary symptoms were 2.5 times more likely to have a child with LUT dysfunction (95%CI: 1.52-4.17; p factors of the presence of LUT dysfunction in the child. Children of mothers with incontinence and urinary urgency were also more likely to have incontinence and urgency. Mothers with typical symptoms of overactive bladder are more likely to have a child with LUT dysfunction. This correlation is also positive for the isolated symptoms

  11. International lower urinary tract function basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craggs, M.; Kennelly, M.; Schick, E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To create the International Lower Urinary Tract Function Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets. SETTING: International working group. METHODS: The draft of the Data Set was developed by a working group consisting of the members......:Variables included in the International Lower Urinary Tract Function Basic SCI Data Set are as follows: date of data collection, urinary tract impairment unrelated to spinal cord lesion, awareness of the need to empty the bladder, bladder emptying, average number of voluntary bladder emptyings per day during...... the last week, incontinence within the last 3 months, collecting appliances for urinary incontinence, any drugs for the urinary tract within the last year, surgical procedures on the urinary tract and any change in urinary symptoms within the last year. Complete instruction for data collection, data sheet...

  12. Recurrent urinary tract infections in women: How promising is the use of probiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs currently rank amongst the most prevalent bacterial infections, representing a major health hazard. UTIs in females usually start as vaginal infections and ascend to the urethra and bladder. Recurrent UTIs (rUTIs can be defined as at least three episodes of UTI in 1 year or two episodes in 6 months. Various antibiotics have been the mainstay of therapy in ameliorating the incidence of UTIs, but recurrent infections continue to afflict many women. It necessitates the exploitation of alternative antimicrobial therapy. Probiotics have been shown to be effective in varied clinical trials for long-term preventions of rUTI. Because Escherichia coli is the primary pathogen involved in UTIs which spreads from the rectum to vagina and then ascends up the sterile urinary tract, improving the gut or vaginal flora will thus impact the urinary tract. Since a healthy vaginal microbiota is mainly dominated by Lactobacillus species, in this context, exogenously administered probiotics containing Lactobacilli play a pivotal role in reducing the risk of rUTI. The concept of artificially boosting the Lactobacilli numbers through probiotic administration has long been conceived but has been recently shown to be possible. Lactobacilli may especially be useful for women with a history of recurrent, complicated UTIs or on prolonged antibiotic use. Probiotics do not cause antibiotic resistance and may offer other health benefits due to vaginal re-colonisation with Lactobacilli. However, more comprehensive research is still needed, to recommend for probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics.

  13. Recurrent urinary tract infections in women: How promising is the use of probiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varsha; Nag, Deepika; Garg, Pratibha

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) currently rank amongst the most prevalent bacterial infections, representing a major health hazard. UTIs in females usually start as vaginal infections and ascend to the urethra and bladder. Recurrent UTIs (rUTIs) can be defined as at least three episodes of UTI in 1 year or two episodes in 6 months. Various antibiotics have been the mainstay of therapy in ameliorating the incidence of UTIs, but recurrent infections continue to afflict many women. It necessitates the exploitation of alternative antimicrobial therapy. Probiotics have been shown to be effective in varied clinical trials for long-term preventions of rUTI. Because Escherichia coli is the primary pathogen involved in UTIs which spreads from the rectum to vagina and then ascends up the sterile urinary tract, improving the gut or vaginal flora will thus impact the urinary tract. Since a healthy vaginal microbiota is mainly dominated by Lactobacillus species, in this context, exogenously administered probiotics containing Lactobacilli play a pivotal role in reducing the risk of rUTI. The concept of artificially boosting the Lactobacilli numbers through probiotic administration has long been conceived but has been recently shown to be possible. Lactobacilli may especially be useful for women with a history of recurrent, complicated UTIs or on prolonged antibiotic use. Probiotics do not cause antibiotic resistance and may offer other health benefits due to vaginal re-colonisation with Lactobacilli. However, more comprehensive research is still needed, to recommend for probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics.

  14. Urinary tract infections of Escherichia coli strains of chaperone-usher system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska-Piatek, Beata M

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are a very serious health and economic problem affecting millions of people each year worldwide. The most common etiologic agent of this type of bacterial infections, involving the upper and lower urinary tract, are E. coli strains representing approximately 80% of cases. Uropathogenic E. coli strains produce several urovirulence factors which can be divided into two main types, surface virulence factors and exported virulence factors. Surface-exposed structures include mainly extracellular adhesive organelles such as fimbriae/pili necessary in adhesion, invasion, biofilm formation and cytokine induction. Among the surface-exposed polymeric adhesive structures there are three most invasive groups, type 1 pili, type P pili and Dr family of adhesins which are bioassembled via the conserved, among Gram-negative bacteria, chaperone-usher secretion system. Type 1 and P-piliated E. coli cause cystitis and pyelonephritis. The Dr family of adhesins recognizing DAF receptor is responsible for cystitis, pyelonephritis (especially in pregnant women) and diarrhoea (in infants). In addition, Dr-positive E. coli strains carry the risk of recurrent urinary tract infections. Pyelonephritis in pregnant women leads to a series of complications such as bacteremia, urosepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and even death. In the era of increasing drug resistance of bacteria, the development of vaccines, drugs termed pilicides and inhibitors of adhesion may be a promising tool in the fight against urogenital infections.

  15. Can urinary nitrite results be used to conduct antimicrobial option for urinary tract infection in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahyar, Abolfazl; Ayazi, Parviz; Froozesh, Mahta; Daneshi-Kohan, Mohammad-Mahdi; Barikani, Ameneh

    2012-06-01

    This study was performed to determine the relationship between urinary nitrite results and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs in urinary tract infection of children. In a cross-section study 119 children younger than 12 years with urinary tract infection were evaluated in Qazvin children's hospital. Patients were divided into negative and positive nitrite groups depending on urinary nitrite test result. Rates of antibiotic resistance in the two groups were compared. Sixty seven patients were in the negative nitrite group and 52 in the positive nitrite group. Resistance rates to ceftriaxone, trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, gentamicin, amikacin, nalidixic acid, cephalothin and nitrofurantoin in the nitrite negative group were 7.5%, 31.3%, 50.7%, 11.9%, 9%, 3%, 14.9% and 11.9%, respectively. These values in the nitrite positive group were 21.2%, 28.8%, 63.5%, 7.7%, 5.8%, 1.9%, 9.6%, and 3.8%, respectively (P>0.05). This study showed that there is no correlation between urinary nitrite results and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Therefore, it seems that physicians should not adjust antibiotic therapy for UTI based on nitrite results.

  16. Could Urinary Tract Infection Cause Female Stress Urinary Incontinence? A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Fatemeh; Motaghed, Zahra; Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of urinary incontinence (UI), is usually defined as leakage of urine during movement or activity which puts pressure on the bladder, such as coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting. It is reported in most countries that 15% to 40% of women struggle with SUI and its severe implications for daily life, including social interactions, sexuality, and psychological wellbeing. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between urinary tract infection and the severity of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). This research was a cross-sectional study conducted in a public urology clinic in Tehran. The study population was all females with complaints of SUI who visited the clinic during 2014. We compared Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) in two groups of patients, with and without history of urinary tract infection (UTI). According to the findings of our study, the mean VLPP was 83.10 cm H2O in the group with UTI history, and 81.29 cm H2O in those without history of UTI. The difference in VLPP between the two groups was not significant (P < 0.05), even after controlling for confounding variables including age, body mass index, history of hysterectomy and number of deliveries. Our study did not confirm a significant relationship between UTI and severity of SUI as measured by VLPP. A decisive opinion would require extensive future studies by prospective methods.

  17. DIFFERENTIAL APPROACH TO URINARY SYNDROME VERIFICATION IN MEDICOPROPHYLACTIC FACILITIES IN CHILDREN WITH URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Pleshkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary syndrome is an invariable and often the only manifestation of renal and urinary tract injury. Modern laboratory diagnostics prioritize prompt tests such as «dry chemistry» urine analysis using deep-stick tests. Study objective: to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of deep-stick tests in urinary syndrome verification in pediatric urinary tract infections (UTI. Methods: examination of a urinary sample using standard methods and prompt analysis with urine biochemical composition analyser among 66 children aging from 2 months to 16 years. From this group: 28 children had UTI and 38 other somatic diseases. Results: it has been shown that nitrite test-sticks have low diagnostic sensitivity — 69%, high prognostic value of a positive result (90% and high specificity (94%. Diagnostic sensitivity of leucocytic esterase is 73%, its’ prognostic value of a positive result — 92% and diagnostic specificity — 94%. Erythrocyteuria test had diagnostic sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 95%. Protein test had diagnostic sensitivity of 61% and prognostic value of 64% and 81% specificity. Conclusion: deep-stick test implementation with regard to specifications of this method will allow a more differential approach to it’s use in labs of medicoprophylactic facilities, also reduce the amount of time required for lab urine examinations, as well as to increase reliability of diagnostic information.Key words: children, urinary tract infections, stick-tests, «dry chemistry», diagnostic accuracy, method, urinalysis. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 89–95

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogmus, H; Demirdal, U S

    2018-06-09

    The association of vitamin D deficiency and pelvic floor dysfunction has been examined by numerous studies. Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with bladder filling and voiding functions are common in both sexes. A recent study reports a higher incidence of LTUS in men over 50 years old with vitamin D deficiency. The aim of the study is to investigate whether there is a difference in the Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms frequency between women with vitamin D deficiency and the control group or not. In this case control study, a total of 150 women who had a measured vitamin D level within a month were divided into two groups, one with a serum vitamin D deficiency and the other with a normal vitamin D level. Both groups were evaluated in terms of menopausal status, numbers of pregnancy and delivery, pelvic examination findings, pelvic floor muscle strength, level of pelvic organ prolapse, LUTS scores, and the findings were recorded. Both groups were compared for the presence of lower urinary system symptoms. The BFLUTS validated for Turkish-speaking populations was used to assess lower urinary system symptoms. Statistical analyses were performed via IBM SPSS Statistics 23.0. The results were considered significant at p D deficiency was detected in 67.3% of the participants. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding variables that could affect lower urinary system symptoms such as menopausal status, presence of pelvic organ prolapse and neonatal weight (fetal macrosomia) The Pelvic Floor Muscle Strength was significantly lower in the group with vitamin D deficiency than the control group. BFLUTS scores of premenopausal women with vitamin D deficiency were found to be similar to the control group, likewise no significant differences in the BFLUTS scores were detected in postmenopausal women. Although vitamin D deficiency causes a significant reduction in pelvic floor muscle strength, no significant correlation was found between lower

  19. Urologic evaluation of urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diokno, A C; Compton, A; Seski, J; Vinson, R

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-three antepartum patients with urinary tract infections underwent urologic evaluation as soon as the infection had been successfully treated. The evaluation included history of voiding habits, cystometry, urethral calibration and cystourethroscopy. A second phase of the urologic evaluation included an excretory urogram and repeat cystometry 10-12 weeks postpartum. Sixty percent had a history of infrequent voiding, and 90% of them had a bladder capacity greater than 450 mL. Forty-one percent of the patients had a normal bladder capacity (less than 450 mL), and 85% of this group did not have any history of infrequent voiding. The radiographic evaluation postpartum in 18 of 33 patients revealed major abnormalities in 50%. These abnormalities were seen as often and were as significant in women with asymptomatic bacteriuria as in those who presented with acute pyelonephritis. The results suggest that the large bladder seen in pregnant women may be secondary to the chronic, unphysiologic habit of infrequent voiding. Furthermore, this study reinforced the fact that most pregnant women with urinary tract infection have preexisting chronic bladder or renal abnormalities that predispose them to infection. Those at risk should be identified early through a careful history and urinalysis to determine which ones need urinary prophylaxis during pregnancy. Postpartum urologic investigation should be carried out to identify any structural or functional problems; understanding them is helpful in present and future management.

  20. Urinary tract infections in infants and children: Diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joan L; Finlay, Jane C; Lang, Mia Eileen; Bortolussi, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have resulted in major changes in the management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children. The present statement focuses on the diagnosis and management of infants and children >2 months of age with an acute UTI and no known underlying urinary tract pathology or risk factors for a neurogenic bladder. UTI should be ruled out in preverbal children with unexplained fever and in older children with symptoms suggestive of UTI (dysuria, urinary frequency, hematuria, abdominal pain, back pain or new daytime incontinence). A midstream urine sample should be collected for urinalysis and culture in toilet-trained children; others should have urine collected by catheter or by suprapubic aspirate. UTI is unlikely if the urinalysis is completely normal. A bagged urine sample may be used for urinalysis but should not be used for urine culture. Antibiotic treatment for seven to 10 days is recommended for febrile UTI. Oral antibiotics may be offered as initial treatment when the child is not seriously ill and is likely to receive and tolerate every dose. Children UTI with a renal/bladder ultrasound to identify any significant renal abnormalities. A voiding cystourethrogram is not required for children with a first UTI unless the renal/bladder ultrasound reveals findings suggestive of vesicoureteral reflux, selected renal anomalies or obstructive uropathy.

  1. The Effects of Oxidative Stress in Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergul Belge Kurutas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the effects of oxidative stress in urinary tract infection (UTI. One hundred sixty-four urine samples obtained from patients with the prediagnosis of acute UTI admitted to the Faculty of Medicine, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, were included in this study. Urine cultures were performed according to standard techniques. Urinary isolates were identified by using API ID 32E. The catalase and superoxide dismutase activity and the lipid peroxidation levels known as oxidative stress markers were measured in all urine samples. Thirty-six pathogen microorganisms were identified in positive urine cultures. These microorganisms were as follows: 23 (63.8% E coli, 5 (13.8% P mirabilis, 4 (11.1% K pneumoniae, 2 (5.5% Candida spp, 1 (2.7% S saprophyticus, and 1 (2.7% P aeruginosa. It was observed that lipid peroxidation levels were increased while catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased in positive urine cultures, compared to negative cultures. We conclude that urinary tract infection causes oxidative stress, increases lipid peroxidation level, and leads to insufficiency of antioxidant enzymes.

  2. Association Between Early Idiopathic Neonatal Jaundice and Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Murat; Sarici, S Ümit; Yurdugül, Yüksel; Akpinar, Melis; Altun, Demet; Özcan, Begüm; Serdar, Muhittin A; Sarici, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Etiologic role, incidence, demographic, and response-to-treatment characteristics of urinary tract infection (UTI) among neonates, its relationship with significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, and abnormalities of the urinary system were studied in a prospective investigation in early (≤10 days) idiopathic neonatal jaundice in which all other etiologic factors of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were ruled out. Patients and methods: Urine samples for microscopic and bacteriologic examination were obtained with bladder catheterization from 155 newborns with early neonatal jaundice. Newborns with a negative urine culture and with a positive urine culture were defined as group I and group II, respectively, and the 2 groups were compared with each other. Results: The incidence of UTI in whole of the study group was 16.7%. Serum total and direct bilirubin levels were statistically significantly higher in group II when compared with group I (P = .005 and P = .001, respectively). Decrease in serum total bilirubin level at the 24th hour of phototherapy was statistically significantly higher in group I compared with group II (P = .022). Conclusions: Urinary tract infection should be investigated in the etiologic evaluation of newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia. The possibility of UTI should be considered in jaundiced newborns who do not respond to phototherapy well or have a prolonged duration of phototherapy treatment. PMID:28469520

  3. Anatomy and histology of the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradidarcheep, Wisuit; Wallner, Christian; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F; Lamers, Wouter H

    2011-01-01

    The function of the lower urinary tract is basically storage of urine in the bladder and the at-will periodic evacuation of the stored urine. Urinary incontinence is one of the most common lower urinary tract disorders in adults, but especially in the elderly female. The urethra, its sphincters, and the pelvic floor are key structures in the achievement of continence, but their basic anatomy is little known and, to some extent, still incompletely understood. Because questions with respect to continence arise from human morbidity, but are often investigated in rodent animal models, we present findings in human and rodent anatomy and histology. Differences between males and females in the role that the pelvic floor plays in the maintenance of continence are described. Furthermore, we briefly describe the embryologic origin of ureters, bladder, and urethra, because the developmental origin of structures such as the vesicoureteral junction, the bladder trigone, and the penile urethra are often invoked to explain (clinical) observations. As the human pelvic floor has acquired features in evolution that are typical for a species with bipedal movement, we also compare the pelvic floor of humans with that of rodents to better understand the rodent (or any other quadruped, for that matter) as an experimental model species. The general conclusion is that the "Bauplan" is well conserved, even though its common features are sometimes difficult to discern.

  4. Transperitoneal laparoscopic management of urinary tract stone disease: experience in a third level hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Jaime Alejandro; García, Herney Andrés; Castillo, Diego Fernando; Carbonell, Jorge G

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical-surgical characteristics of patients who underwent laparoscopic procedures for the management of urinary tract stone disease when performing extracorporeal, percutaneous or endourological procedures was not available. A descriptive study based on information from the medical records of patients who underwent surgical laparoscopic management of urinary stone disease between January 2001 and May 2010 at a third level hospital. Epidemiological, clinical and procedure-related variables were taken from the medical records. Univariate analysis was performed with the statistical software STATA 10.1. There were 29 procedures (27 patients) for treatment of urinary stone disease in adults. The average age was 45 years. 55% of patients were men. 17 stones were found on the right side, 5 were pyelic, 19 of the proximal ureter, 4 of the medium ureter and 1 distal. All patients underwent laparoscopic surgery as first surgical option. Average operative time was 142 ± 32 minutes. Three procedures were defined as failures. Hospital stay presented a median of 2 days. There were seven complications. Laparoscopic surgery is a good surgical option for the management of urinary tract stone disease in adults.

  5. The ICS-'BPH' Study: uroflowmetry, lower urinary tract symptoms and bladder outlet obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynard, J. M.; Yang, Q.; Donovan, J. L.; Peters, T. J.; Schafer, W.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Dabhoiwala, N. F.; Osawa, D.; Lim, A. T.; Abrams, P.

    1998-01-01

    To explore the relationship between uroflow variables and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS): to define performance statistics (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values) for maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) with respect to bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) at various

  6. Drug and Vaccine Development for the Treatment and Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Hannan, Thomas J.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, affecting millions of people every year. UTI cause significant morbidity in women throughout their lifespan, in infant boys, in older men, in individuals with underlying urinary tract abnormalities, and in those that require long-term urethral catheterization, such as patients with spinal cord injuries or incapacitated individuals living in nursing homes. Serious sequelae include frequent recurrences, pyelonephritis with sepsis, renal damage in young children, pre-term birth, and complications of frequent antimicrobial use including high-level antibiotic resistance and Clostridium difficile colitis. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of UTI, but less common pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis and other enterococci frequently take advantage of an abnormal or catheterized urinary tract to cause opportunistic infections. While antibiotic therapy has historically been very successful in controlling UTI, the high rate of recurrence remains a major problem, and many individuals suffer from chronically recurring UTI, requiring long-term prophylactic antibiotic regimens to prevent recurrent UTI. Furthermore, the global emergence of multi-drug resistant UPEC in the past ten years spotlights the need for alternative therapeutic and preventative strategies to combat UTI, including anti-infective drug therapies and vaccines. In this chapter, we review recent advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the identification of promising drug and vaccine targets. We then discuss the development of new UTI drugs and vaccines, highlighting the challenges these approaches face and the need for a greater understanding of urinary tract mucosal immunity. PMID:26999391

  7. Immunohistochemical analysis of Sonic hedgehog signalling in normal human urinary tract development

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Dagan; Winyard, Paul J D; Woolf, Adrian S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of mouse mutants have demonstrated that Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling has a functional role in morphogenesis and differentiation at multiple sites within the forming urinary tract, and urinary tract malformations have been reported in humans with mutations that disrupt SHH signalling. However, there is only strikingly sparse and fragmentary information about the expression of SHH and associated signalling genes in normal human urinary tract development. We used immunohistochemistry ...

  8. Changes in Bacterial Resistance Patterns of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Rationale for Empirical Antibiotic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    İbrahim Gökçe; Neslihan Çiçek; Serçin Güven; Ülger Altuntaş; Neşe Bıyıklı; Nurdan Yıldız; Harika Alpay

    2017-01-01

    Background: The causative agent spectrum and resistance patterns of urinary tract infections in children are affected by many factors. Aims: To demonstrate antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections and changing ratio in antibiotic resistance by years. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: We analysed antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated Gram (-) bacteria during the years 2011-2014 (study period 2) in children with urinary tract infections. We...

  9. The Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolates on the Urinary Tract Pathogens to Infants In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, In Seok; Lee, Ho Seok; Kim, Won Yong

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common clinical problems in children, even though lots of treatment strategies have been tried. Many studies of the application of probiotics for urinary tract infection in female adults exist, but there is a lack of studies in children. The aims of this study were to screen probiotic strains for inhibiting the uropathogens in vitro, to find candidates for in vivo study. Nine strains of E. coli were isolated from children with urinary tract infection and six uropa...

  10. Prenatal suspicion and postnatal diagnosis of urinary tract malformation in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzemien, G.; Roszkowska-Blaim, M.; Szmigielska, A.; Wojnar, J.; Kostro, I.; Sekowska, R.; Karpinska, M.; Madzik, J.; Biejat, A.; Majkowska, Z.; Marcinski, A.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction of prenatal ultrasonography (USG) in fetus diagnostic caused early detection of congenital urinary tract abnormalities. Dilatation of renal pelvis, which is detected in ultrasonography from 16 week of gestational age is the most common abnormality in fetal urinary tract. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of congenital abnormalities in urinary tract in children with prenatal suspicion of anomalies. The retrospective study included 100 children with prenatal suspicion of congenital abnormalities in urinary tract. Changes in urinary tract were detected in ultrasonography between 18-41 (mean 32,6±5,6) week of gestational age. Unilateral dilatation of urinary tract was found in 57% fetuses, bilateral dilatation in 31%, others anomalies in 12% fetuses. Ultrasonography of urinary tract was done in all children in 1-122 (mean 17,5±20,5) day of life, cystourethrography in 93% of children, renal dynamic scintygraphy in 52%, renal static scintygraphy in 16% and urography in 39% of children. Congenital urinary tract abnormalities were detected in 63% of children. Transient dilatation of renal pelvis was observed in 25% of children. We didn't find any abnormalities in 12% patients. The most common changes in urinary tract were: ureteropelvic junction obstruction (22%), vesicoureteral reflux (15%), ureterovesical junction obstruction (7%), posterior urethral valve (7%) and polycystic renal dysplasia (7%). 33% children were qualified for invasive treatment. 1. Prenatal and postnatal ultrasonography of urinary tract allows detecting congenital abnormalities of urinary tract early age of life. 2. High percentage of abnormalities in urinary tract detected in prenatal ultrasonography orders cooperation between neonatologist, urologist and nephrologist. (author)

  11. Etiology of urinary tract infection in scholar children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroso Jr. Ubirajara

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To prospectively assess the prevalence of vesicourethral dysfunction in children over 3 years old, comparing it with the occurrence rate for other potential factors that cause urinary infection in this age range. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 36 girls and 9 boys were assessed, with mean age of 6.4 years, ranging from 3 to 13.9 years. These children were prospectively assessed regarding the presence of symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction. These data were compared with the retrospective assessment of other potential risk factors for urinary infection. Ultrasonography was performed in 28 children and voiding cystourethrogram was performed in 26 patients. RESULTS: Vesicourethral dysfunction was diagnosed in 39 (87% of the 45 children with urinary infection. Among these 39 patients, all had voiding urgency, 30 (77% had urinary incontinence, 12 (31% pollakiuria and 3 (8% presented infrequent voiding. Vaginal discharge was evidenced in 8 (22% girls and phimosis in 2 (22% boys. Obstipation was diagnosed in 10 (22% cases. Significant post-voiding residue was detected in 4 (13% of the 28 cases assessed. Vesicoureteral reflux was evidenced in 5 (19% of the 26 patients who underwent voiding cystourethrogram. In only 2 (4% cases there was not an apparent cause for the infection. CONCLUSION: Vesicourethral dysfunction is a major cause of urinary infection in children with ages above 3 years old. In cases where voiding dysfunction in not present, other predisposing factors must be assessed. However, only 4% of the patients did not present an apparent urologic cause for the infection.

  12. Digestive Tract Complications of Renal Cryoablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kanichiro, E-mail: shimikan@jikei.ac.jp [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kashiwa Hospital (Japan); Mogami, Takuji [Ichikawa General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo Dental College (Japan); Michimoto, Kenkichi; Kameoka, Yoshihiko; Tokashiki, Tadashi; Kurata, Naoki [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kashiwa Hospital (Japan); Miki, Jun; Kishimoto, Koichi [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Kashiwa Hospital (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    We report a case each of duodenorenal and colorenal fistula that arose after computed tomography-guided percutaneous cryoablation (PCA) for renal cell carcinoma and use imaging and endoscopic findings to analyze their causes and mechanisms. Both complications occurred though the edge of the iceball did not touch the intestinal wall, and patients’ symptoms and fistula formation occurred several days after the PCA procedure. Based on imaging and endoscopy findings, we suspected the colorenal fistula resulted from bowel injury caused by ischemia from the occlusion of small vessels at the procedure’s low temperature. Both cases were resolved conservatively without surgical intervention.

  13. [Nitrofurantoin--clinical relevance in uncomplicated urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-07-01

    The nitrofuran derivative nitrofurantoin has been used for more than 60 years for the antibacterial therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Despite its long application, this antibiotic retained good activity against Escherichia coli and some other pathogens of uncomplicated urinary tract infections such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus species. Nitrofurantoin therapy has been shown to be accompanied by numerous adverse drug effects. Among these, there are also serious side effects such as pulmonary reactions and polyneuropathy, which mainly occur in long-term use. Recent studies, however, have shown a good efficacy and tolerability of short-term nitrofurantoin therapy comparable to previous established standard therapeutic regimens applying cotrimoxazole or quinolones. Because of these data and the alarming resistance rates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to cotrimoxazole and quinolones that have been increased markedly in several countries, the clinical significance ofnitrofurantoin has been raised again. In many current treatment guidelines, e. g., the international clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, nitrofurantoin has been recommended as one first-line antibiotic of empiric antibacterial treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in otherwise healthy women. In Germany, however, nitrofurantoin should only be applied if more effective and less risky antibiotics cannot be used. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in the last three months of pregnancy and in patients suffering from renal impairment of each degree. Despite compatibility concerns, nitrofurantoin has also been recommended for the re-infection prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Germany and several other countries.

  14. Studies on the function of upper urinary tract, 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaka, Uichi

    1980-01-01

    In order to clarify the changes of the ureteral function after ureterolithotomy, 131 I-Hippuran renograms were recorded at 3 times before, immediately after (i.e. 1 - 2 days after) and 10 days after the lithotomy in 52 patients. The influences of preoperative hydronephrosis or urinary tract infection upon the postoperative renogram patterns were studied. The following results were obtained. 1. In the renogram findings of the preoperative 52 cases, 28 delayed excretion types, 15 obstructive types and 9 standard types were shown. 2. The postoperative renogram patterns showed a tendency of increased obstruction immediately after the operation (56.9%) irrespective of the location of the calculi in the ureter, and the recovering excretion phases became visible on the 10th postoperative day (51.1%). 3. In the findings on the postoperative renograms, a tendency of increased obstruction was noted in many of the patients of the non-hydronephrotic group than the hydronephrotic group immediately after the operation, but no statistically significant difference was noted. On the 10th postoperative day, slightly more patients of the hydronephrotic group tended to show improvements of obstruction than those of the non-hydronephrotic group, but with no statistically significant difference. 4. In the relationship between the hydronephrosis and urinary tract infection, the infection rate was 26.9% (7 out of 26) in the non-hydronephrotic group and 52.4% (11 out of 21) in the hydronephrotic group. 5. In the findings on the renograms viewed from presence of urinary tract infection, slightly more cases of increased obstruction were found out immediately after the operation in the non-infected group than in the infected group. On the 10th postoperative day, slightly more cases of improvements of obstruction were noted in the infected group than in the non-infected group, but no statistically significant difference was seen between the two groups at either of the two points. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance urography: application in urinary tract obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Malet, A.; Rue, M.; Villajos, M.; Martin, C.; Garcia, D.; Prats, J.

    1999-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) in the assessment of the upper urinary tract in patients with obstructive uropathy. Twenty-three patients suspected of having urinary tract obstruction were examined by IVU and MRU, MRU imaging was performed with a 1.0 Tesla multicoil unit. The images were obtained with two MR sequences: a) half-Fourier single shot turbo spin echo (HASTE), and b) highly T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) based on fast acquisition with the relaxation and enhancement (RARE) method. The images were examined independently by four radiologists. Two radiologists reviewed the IVU images by consensus and two reviewed the MRU images by consensus. The incidencences of dilatation and of stricture were calculated and the McNemar test was used to compare the two techniques. The mean duration of MRU was 11 minutes (range: 7 to 25 minutes), while the mean duration of IVU was 363 minutes (range: 45 to 2,160 minutes). IVU took more than 150 minutes to complete in over 50% of the patients. Twenty.one patients presented dilatation of the pyelocaliceal system. MRU disclosed the urinary tract dilatation in all 21 cases, while IVU detected it in 15 (65%: p=0.03). The causes of obstruction were neoplasm (n=9), calculi (n=6) and extrinsic stricture (n=6). MRU is much more reliable and rapid in the detection of dilatation and the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive uropathy, and could be used as an alternative to IVU in certain cases. (Author) 13 refs

  16. Risk Factors for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Renal Scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Ron; Shaikh, Nader; Pohl, Hans; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Zaoutis, Lisa; Patel, Melissa; deBerardinis, Rachel; Parker, Allison; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Pope, Marcia; Kearney, Diana; Sprague, Bruce; Barrera, Raquel; Viteri, Bernarda; Egigueron, Martina; Shah, Neha; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children who have had 1 or 2 febrile or symptomatic UTIs and received no antimicrobial prophylaxis. This 2-year, multisite prospective cohort study included 305 children aged 2 to 71 months with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) receiving placebo in the RIVUR (Randomized Intervention for Vesicoureteral Reflux) study and 195 children with no VUR observed in the CUTIE (Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) study. Primary exposure was presence of VUR; secondary exposures included bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD), age, and race. Outcomes were recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (F/SUTI) and renal scarring. Children with VUR had higher 2-year rates of recurrent F/SUTI (Kaplan-Meier estimate 25.4% compared with 17.3% for VUR and no VUR, respectively). Other factors associated with recurrent F/SUTI included presence of BBD at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-3.93]) and presence of renal scarring on the baseline (99m)Tc-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.88 [95% CI: 1.22-6.80]). Children with BBD and any degree of VUR had the highest risk of recurrent F/SUTI (56%). At the end of the 2-year follow-up period, 8 (5.6%) children in the no VUR group and 24 (10.2%) in the VUR group had renal scars, but the difference was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio: 2.05 [95% CI: 0.86-4.87]). VUR and BBD are risk factors for recurrent UTI, especially when they appear in combination. Strategies for preventing recurrent UTI include antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of BBD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Urinary YKL-40 as a Candidate Biomarker for Febrile Urinary Tract Infection in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Hee; Chung, Mi Hae; Bin, Joong Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Soon; Lee, Juyoung

    2018-01-01

    Background Given that YKL-40 is a known marker of inflammation, we sought to determine its association with urinary tract infection (UTI) in febrile children. Methods In total, 44 children aged 0 to 24 months with febrile UTI and 35 age- and sex-matched controls with fever from other causes were enrolled in the study. ELISA was performed to determine the level of YKL-40 in urine collected from each child. Results The ratio of urinary YKL-40 to creatinine (Cr) was higher in the children with a UTI than in the controls (Purinary YKL-40/Cr ratio, 0.86 for pyuria, and 0.71 for positive nitrite on urinalysis. We applied a cut-off value of 125.23 pg/mg to urinary YKL-40/Cr for detecting UTI. Eight of nine children in the control group with pyuria had urinary YKL-40/Cr levels lower than 125.23 pg/mg, and the one child in the UTI group without pyuria or positive nitrite had a urinary YKL-40/Cr level greater than 125.23 pg/mg. Conclusions Determining the levels of urinary YKL-40/Cr may help identify true cases of UTI in febrile young children, especially when they have pyuria but not nitrite, or have neither pyuria nor nitrite in the urine. PMID:29071817

  18. Duplication of the Hindgut and Lower Urinary. Tract. Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Vanessa; Tamayo, Margarita; Montoya, Claudia; Acosta, Federico; Cano, Julian; Mejia, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    A 13 year female consulted to Heatup Pad's surgery department with a history of pelvic malformations since she was born and complaining about a colostomy done five years ago. On clinical examination an anal fistula was seen as well as perineal organs duplicated including: vulva - four labia, clitoris, vaginal canal, urethra, also double gluteal cleft. Several diagnostic modalities were performed (voiding cystourethrography, urodynamic, renal scan, CT and MRI) having a diagnosis of complete duplication of the hindgut and lower urinary tract, a rare congenital anomaly that has fewer than 50 cases reported in the literature. During hospitalization she underwent successful abdominopelvic surgical Correction.

  19. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host–pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  20. Treatment failures after antibiotic therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Dessau, Ram B; Hallas, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The efficacy of sulfamethizole and pivmecillinam in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTI) has been questioned because of an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains. The aim of this study was to describe the risk of treatment failures over the last 10 years. DESIGN......: Retrospective cohort study. MATERIAL: Data were retrieved from Odense Pharmaco Epidemiological Database and consisted of women receiving sulfamethizole (n = 44,716) or pivmecillinam (n = 3093) during the period 1990-99. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prescription of a new antibiotic drug appropriate for UTI within 4...

  1. The urinary microbiome and its contribution to lower urinary tract symptoms; ICI-RS 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus J; Morris, Nicola; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Rahnama'i, Mohammad S; Marchesi, Julian R

    2017-04-01

    The microbiome is the term used for the symbiotic microbial colonisation of healthy organs. Studies have found bacterial identifiers within voided urine which is apparently sterile on conventional laboratory culture, and accordingly there may be health and disease implications. The International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society (ICI-RS) established a literature review and expert consensus discussion focussed on the increasing awareness of the urinary microbiome, and potential research priorities. The consensus considered the discrepancy between findings of conventional clinical microbiology methods, which generally rely on culture parameters predisposed towards certain "expected" organisms. Discrepancy between selective culture and RNA sequencing to study species-specific 16S ribosomal RNA is increasingly clear, and highlights the possibility that protective or harmful bacteria may be overlooked where microbiological methods are selective. There are now strong signals of the existence of a "core" urinary microbiome for the human urinary tract, particularly emerging with ageing. The consensus reviewed the potential relationship between a patient's microbiome and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whether low-count bacteriuria may be clinically significant and mechanisms which could associate micro-organisms with lower urinary tract symptoms. Key research priorities identified include the need to establish the scope of microbiome across the range of normality and clinical presentations, and gain consensus on testing protocols. Proteomics to study enzymatic and other functions may be necessary, since different bacteria may have overlapping phenotype. Longitudinal studies into risk factors for exposure, cumulative risk, and emergence of disease need to undertaken. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:850-853, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Neonatal adrenal hematoma with urinary tract infection: Risk factor or a chance association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhadi M Habeb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal adrenal hematoma is a rare finding that can be discovered incidentally or presents with various symptoms. However, urinary tract infection (UTI has not been reported in association with this condition. We report on a 4-week old child with massive unilateral adrenal hematoma discovered incidentally during a routine abdominal ultrasound scan for UTI. The mass resolved spontaneously after several months with no complications. The diagnosis and ma-nagement of infantile suprarenal mass and the possible link between this child′s UTI and the adrenal hematoma are discussed.

  3. Antibiotics for treating lower urinary tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Anita; Mori, Rintaro; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Tullus, Kjell

    2012-08-15

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in infants and children. Lower UTI is the most commonly presenting and in the majority of cases can be easily treated with a course of antibiotic therapy with no further complications. A number of antimicrobials have been used to treat children with lower UTIs; however is it unclear what are the specific benefits and harms of such treatments. This review aims to summarise the benefits and harms of antibiotics for treating lower UTI in children. We searched the Renal Group's Specialised Register (April 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 5), MEDLINE OVID SP (from 1966), and EMBASE OVID SP (from 1988) without language restriction. Date of last search: May 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in which antibiotic therapy was used to treat bacteriologically proven, symptomatic, lower UTI in children aged zero to 18 years in primary and community healthcare settings were included. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Statistical analyses were performed using the random effects model and the results expressed as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Sixteen RCTs, analysing 1,116 children were included. Conventional 10-day antibiotic treatment significantly increased the number of children free of persistent bacteriuria compared to single-dose therapy (6 studies, 228 children: RR 2.01, 95%CI 1.06 to 3.80). No heterogeneity was observed. Persistent bacteriuria at the end of treatment was reported in 24% of children receiving single-dose therapy compared to 10% of children who were randomised to 10-day therapy. There were no significant differences between groups for persistent symptoms, recurrence following treatment, or re-infection following treatment. There was insufficient data to analyse the effect of antibiotics on renal parenchymal damage, compliance, development of resistant organisms or adverse events. Despite

  4. Unenhanced helical CT in the evaluation of the urinary tract in children and young adults following urinary tract reconstruction: comparison with sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, M.T.; Elder, J.S.; Sivit, C.J.; Applegate, K.E. [Dept. of Radiology, Rainbow Babies and Children' s Hospital, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Purpose. To compare the accuracy of unenhanced, helical CT with sonography for the detection of complications of urinary tract reconstruction. Materials and methods. Forty-six kidneys in 24 patients were examined with CT and sonography. All scans were assessed for ease of renal visualization, presence of renal, ureteral, and bladder calculi, renal scars, hydronephrosis, and abdominal wall hernia. The results of both imaging modalities were independently reported. Results. CT provided excellent visualization of all 46 kidneys, while sonography provided poor visualization of 8 kidneys (17 %) (P < 0.001). CT detected calculi in 10 kidneys, 1 ureter, and 7 bladders. Sonography detected calculi in only 2 kidneys, and 2 bladders. Overall, CT detected significantly more calculi than US (18 vs 4, P = 0.01). CT detected scarring in 15 kidneys, while sonography detected scarring in 10. Hydronephrosis was detected in 6 kidneys by CT and in 8 kidneys by sonography. Three abdominal wall hernias were seen at CT that were not seen at sonography. Conclusion. CT is superior to sonography for the detection of urinary tract calculi and renal scarring. CT will demonstrate abdominal wall hernias that are unsuspected. (orig.)

  5. Risk factors for urinary tract infection in children with urinary urgency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Rhaiana; Azevedo, Roberta; Braga, Ana Aparecida Nascimento Martinelli; Veiga, Maria Luiza; Barroso, Ubirajara

    2018-01-01

    To identify which independent variable would be strong predictor of febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in children and adolescents with overactive bladder. A search was made of the institute's database for all patients diagnosed with overactive bladder over the preceding four years. Children and adolescents under 18 years of age with overactive bladder and no neurological or anatomical alterations of the lower urinary tract were included in the study. The independent variables were: sex, age, ethnicity (Brazilians of African descendence/others), the presence of urinary urgency, daytime incontinence, enuresis, frequent urination, infrequent voiding (≤3 voids/day), nocturia, holding maneuvers, straining to void, intermittent urinary flow, constipation and encopresis. An analysis was conducted to identify patients with febrile UTI and subsequently determine predictors of this condition. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Overall, 326 patients (214 girls/112 boys) were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 7.7±3.19 years (± standard deviation). The incidence of febrile UTI was 39.2%. Being female and infrequent voiding were factors significantly associated with febrile UTI, both in the univariate and multivariate analyses. These results show that being female and infrequent voiding constituted significant risk factors for a diagnosis of febrile UTI in these children. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  6. Urinary Derivations: Radiological Anatomy and Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Escartin, I.; Zapater, C.; Riazuelo, G.; Canon, R.; Solanas, S.; Garcia de Jalon, A.

    2003-01-01

    Cystectomy with urine derivation is a common procedure in the treatment of transition cell carcinoma of the bladder. We present radiological findings (ultrasound scan, computerized tomography (CT) and urography) from the surgical reconstruction techniques most often performed by the Urology staff of our hospital as well as some of the complications which occur. The above-mentioned techniques are basically divided into two types: incontinent derivations, of which we highlight the Bicker-Wallace technique and continent ones. The latter can either be ortho topic, with urethral anastomosis (Hauptmann's technique), or heterotopic, with urine excretion through the anus (Mains II technique) or employing a self-catheter (Mainz I technique). (Author) 7 refs

  7. Vaginal resection and anastomosis for treatment of vestibulovaginal stenosis in 4 dogs with recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieves, Nina R; Novo, Roberto E; Martin, Robert B

    2011-10-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION-4 dogs were evaluated because of recurrent urinary tract infections. CLINICAL FINDINGS-All dogs had recurrent urinary tract infections and similar clinical signs; 3 dogs had urinary incontinence. Digital vaginal examination revealed vestibulovaginal stenosis in all dogs, which was confirmed by results of contrast vaginourethrography. From image measurements, the vestibulovaginal ratio (ratio of the height of the vestibulovaginal junction to the maximum height of the vagina on a lateral vaginourethrogram) was calculated for each dog. Three dogs had severe stenosis (vestibulovaginal ratio, stenosis is defined as a vestibulovaginal ratio dog had moderate stenosis (vestibulovaginal ratio, 0.24; ratio range for moderate stenosis is 0.20 to 0.25). TREATMENT AND OUTCOME-All dogs were anesthetized for surgical correction of the vestibulovaginal stenosis. Vaginal resection and anastomosis of the stenosis was performed in all 4 dogs, with 1 dog also undergoing episioplasty. Complete resolution of clinical signs was apparent in 3 dogs; 1 dog had postoperative complications including pollakiuria and stranguria, which resulted in rectal and vaginal prolapse. This dog underwent ovariohysterectomy, after which clinical signs resolved. All dogs had resolution of urinary tract infections at the time of follow-up (6 to 8 months after surgery). CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Resection and anastomosis may resolve recurrent urinary tract infections in dogs with severe or moderate vestibulovaginal stenosis. Episiotomy was not necessary for success of surgical treatment, and overall, that procedure increased morbidity, the severity of intraoperative hemorrhage, and duration of surgery.

  8. Trends in cancer of the urinary bladder and urinary tract in elderly in Denmark, 2008-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thor Knak; Jensen, Niels Viggo; Jørgensen, Simon Møller

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence of cancers of the urinary bladder and urinary tract in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 with particular focus on elderly patients over age 70 years. Design Cancer of the urinary bladder and urinary...... tract was defined as ICD-10 codes C67.9, D09.0, D41.4. Data were derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause...

  9. Recommended treatment for urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercaigne, L M; Zhanel, G G

    1994-02-01

    To establish and recommend a therapeutic regimen for the treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnancy based on the published studies. An English-language literature search employing MEDLINE, Index Medicus, and bibliographic reviews of the references obtained were searched (key terms: urinary tract infection, UTI, pregnancy, bacteriuria). All identified human studies dealing with bacteriuria or UTI in pregnancy were analyzed. Limited data are available regarding the appropriate antibiotic management of UTI in pregnancy. Single-dose cure rates with amoxicillin are approximately 80 percent. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole provides cure rates of greater than 80 percent. Cephalosporins and nitrofurantoin produce variable results. We recommend separating pregnant subjects with UTI into two groups. Those with asymptomatic bacteriuria can be treated with a single dose of an antimicrobial to which the organism is susceptible. For those with symptomatic UTI, we recommend amoxicillin 500 mg tid for three days. Urine cultures should be repeated seven days following therapy to assess cure or failure. Well-designed studies need to be performed, comparing single-dose and three-day therapy for UTI in pregnancy.

  10. Cystourethrographic findings of the lower urinary tract injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, H. S.; Bae, W. K.; Cho, O. K.

    1981-01-01

    During the period of 4 years from July, 1976 to June 1980 the radiological and clinical evaluation had been made on 102 patients suffered from lower urinary tract injuries which were confirmed by the radiological examination and operation. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution of the total 102 patients (87 males and 15 females) was broad from 4 to 72 years. And most of the patient were in the age group of 20 to 49 years. 2. The most common cause of injury was traffic accident (67.6%), next blunt trauma, saddle injury, fall down respectively. 3. 46 patients of bladder injury were as follows: intraperitoneal rupture in 17, extraperitoneal rupture in 12, and contusion in 14. 4. 74 patients of urethral injury were as follows: membranous portion in 37, bulbous portion in 31, prostatic portion in 3, and penile portion in 2. Most of the cases showed extravasation of contrast media. 12 cases showed extravasation with venous intravasation. 5. Contusion or extraperitoneal rupture of the bladder, membranous urethral injury, and concommitent bladder and urethral ruptures were frequently associated with pelvic bone fracture. Intraperitoneal ruptures of the bladder and solitary ruptures of the bulbous urethra were infrequently associated with pelvic bone fracture. 6. Late sequelae of the lower urinary tract injury were stricture, fistula and stone formation

  11. The significance of ultrasonography in urinary tract infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwang Sul; Jeon, Woo Ki; Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Jeong Sook; Jeon, Jong Dong; Han, Chang Yul; Song, Moon Kab

    1990-01-01

    Urinary tract infection(UTI) is one of the major bacterial disease of children that causes morbidity and inconvenience to many patients were related to recurrent vesicoureteral reflux. Radiological examinations of the 72 patients of urinary tract infection(UTI) who were visited to Seoul Paik Hospital from Jan 1st 1986 to Jul 30th 1989, were analysed in this study. US was used as an initial study in all patients who showed acute stage of UTI and followed by IVP, VCUG, 99m Tc-DMSA scan for veslcoureteral reflex or renal scarring. If US showed obstructing lesion, no further study was performed. The resulted were as follows: 1. US is valuable as a screening procedure during the first UTI in congenital abnormalities and in particular obstructive lesions that require surgery. 2. A normal US in a child older than 5 or 6 years is meaningful as an investigation in the group of the first documented UTI uncomplicated. 3. Vesicoureteral reflex, a major factor leading to parenchymal damage in young children can not be detected reliably by US. If the US is suggestive of vesicoureteral reflex, this should be confirmed by VCUG and 99m Tc-DMSA scan for renal scarring. If the US is normal or equivocal in recurrent infection and unexplained persistent clinical findings, this should be followed by VCUG and 9 9mTc-DMSA scan

  12. Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of hospital acquired urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomially acquired infection. It is important to know the etiology and antibiotic susceptibility infectious agents to guide the initial empirical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacterial strains and their antibiotic susceptibility in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infection in a university hospital between January and June 2003. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 188 patients with positive urine culture (= 10(5 colony-forming units/mL following a period of 48 hours after admission. RESULTS: Half of patients were male. Mean age was 50.26 ± 22.7 (SD, range 3 months to 88 years. Gram-negative bacteria were the agent in approximately 80% of cases. The most common pathogens were E. coli (26%, Klebsiella sp. (15%, P. aeruginosa (15% and Enterococcus sp. (11%. The overall bacteria susceptibility showed that the pathogens were more sensible to imipenem (83%, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides; and were highly resistant to ampicillin (27% and cefalothin (30%. It is important to note the low susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42% and norfloxacin (43%. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that if one can not wait the results of urine culture, the best choices to begin empiric treatment are imipenem, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Cefalothin and ampicillin are quite ineffective to treat these infections.

  13. Modern imaging technology for childhood urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, M.; Fotter, R.

    2005-01-01

    Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection (UTI) is still a matter of debate. There are established guidelines, however new knowledge and the changed medical environment have enhanced this ongoing discussion. These new insights have impacted therapy and consequently the imaging algorithm. Modern imaging methods - particularly MRI and modern ultrasound (US) - are less invasive with a lower radiation burden. Additionally, it has been shown that VUR is a poor predictor for renal scarring out, which affects long-term results. Furthermore, the majority of UT malformations is depicted by prenatal US. The most crucial aspect of improving long-term outcome appears to be the early and reliable depiction of UTI and effective treatment to prevent renal scarring. This review tries to present this new knowledge and to discuss the potential of modern imaging. Recent changes in imaging algorithms are highlighted and an outcome-oriented algorithm that addresses these recent developments is proposed, without lightly abandoning established standards. It consists of an orienting US and - for depiction of renal involvement - amplitude coded color Doppler sonography or renal static scintigraphy (considered the gold standard, particularly for evaluating scars); in future MRI may play a role. Based on this concept, only patients with renal damage as well as patients with complex urinary tract malformations or intractable recurrent UTI may have to undergo VCUG. (orig.) [de

  14. Etiologic study of urinary tract infection in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Mery Kogika

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections were documented in 51 dogs. Several factors such as etiologic agents, localization of the infection, predisposing factors, sex, age, and breed were considered. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI was based on bacteriological investigation and it was considered positive when urine sample collected by catheterization contained more than 105 bacteria/ml. Mixed infection was found in 4 of the infected dogs, totallizing 55 isolates. Among them, Escherichia coli (35.3% was the most frequently isolated, followed by Staphylococcus sp. (23.5%, Proteus mirabilis (15.7%, Streptococcus sp. (13.7%, Klebsiella sp. (9.8%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3.9%, Enterobacter cloacae (2.0%, Citrobacter freundii (2.0% and Providencia rettgeri (2.0%. As to antimicrobial susceptibility, norfloxacin and gentamicin were successful for the treatment of gram-negative microorganisms, while the most effective drugs for gram-positive bacteria were cephalothin and nitrofurantoin. UTI was observed more frequently in Cocker Spaniel and German Shepherd; male dogs were more involved, and pyelonephritis was the predominant disease observed. Infection was seen in all ages, but the frequency was higher in middle aged dogs. Urolithiasis were observed as common predisposing or underlying factors to UTI being, cither Staphylococcus sp. or Proteus mirabilis isolated in those cases which alkaline urine pH was observed.

  15. Urinary tract infections in women: etiology and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minardi D

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniele Minardi, Gianluca d'Anzeo, Daniele Cantoro, Alessandro Conti, Giovanni MuzzonigroDepartment of Clinical and Specialist Sciences, Urology, Polytechnic University of the Marche Medical School and United Hospitals, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI are common among the female population. It has been calculated that about one-third of adult women have experienced an episode of symptomatic cystitis at least once. It is also common for these episodes to recur. If predisposing factors are not identified and removed, UTI can lead to more serious consequences, in particular kidney damage and renal failure. The aim of this review was to analyze the factors more commonly correlated with UTI in women, and to see what possible solutions are currently used in general practice and specialized areas, as well as those still under investigation. A good understanding of the possible pathogenic factors contributing to the development of UTI and its recurrence will help the general practitioner to interview the patient, search for causes that would otherwise remain undiscovered, and to identify the correct therapeutic strategy.Keywords: urinary tract infection, women, etiology, diagnosis, treatment

  16. Patients with Urinary Incontinence Appear More Likely to Develop Upper Urinary Tract Stones: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study with 8-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hsiao-Jen; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Lin, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate associations between primary urinary incontinence and development of upper urinary tract stones in a nationwide population in Taiwan. Data of 1,777 adults with primary urinary incontinence and 26,655 controls (groups A, B, and C) without urinary incontinence at study inception were retrieved from the National Health Insurance System database in Taiwan and were analyzed retrospectively. No enrolled subjects had previous diagnosis of upper urinary tract stones or spinal cord injury. All subjects were followed through end of 2009, with a minimum follow-up of 8 years. A greater percentage of study subjects (334/1777, 18.8%) developed upper urinary tract stones than that of control groups A (865/8885, 9.7%) and B (888/8885, 10%), and C (930/8885, 10.5%) (all p-values Urinary incontinence was associated with significantly increased risk of developing urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI, 1.70–2.34, p urinary tract stones (both p-values urinary incontinence was still associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI = 1.76–2.26, p urinary incontinence suggests that urinary incontinence is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones. Study findings suggest that physicians treating patients with urinary incontinence should give attention to early detection of upper urinary tract stones. PMID:27536881

  17. Patients with Urinary Incontinence Appear More Likely to Develop Upper Urinary Tract Stones: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study with 8-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hsiao-Jen; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Lin, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate associations between primary urinary incontinence and development of upper urinary tract stones in a nationwide population in Taiwan. Data of 1,777 adults with primary urinary incontinence and 26,655 controls (groups A, B, and C) without urinary incontinence at study inception were retrieved from the National Health Insurance System database in Taiwan and were analyzed retrospectively. No enrolled subjects had previous diagnosis of upper urinary tract stones or spinal cord injury. All subjects were followed through end of 2009, with a minimum follow-up of 8 years. A greater percentage of study subjects (334/1777, 18.8%) developed upper urinary tract stones than that of control groups A (865/8885, 9.7%) and B (888/8885, 10%), and C (930/8885, 10.5%) (all p-values Urinary incontinence was associated with significantly increased risk of developing urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI, 1.70-2.34, p urinary tract stones (both p-values urinary incontinence was still associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI = 1.76-2.26, p urinary incontinence suggests that urinary incontinence is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones. Study findings suggest that physicians treating patients with urinary incontinence should give attention to early detection of upper urinary tract stones.

  18. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Elderly Population With Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Chesnel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study is to compare the clinical and urodynamic characteristics of urinary disorders in multiple sclerosis (MS patients in a geriatric population with a nongeriatric population. Methods This study was conducted retrospectively between 2010 and 2016. Each patient with MS aged 65 and older was matched with 2 patients with MS aged less than 65 in sex, form of MS, and Expended Disability Status Scale (EDSS. Demographic data, urinary symptoms, treatment, quality of life, repercussion of lower urinary tract symptoms on daily life activities and psychological state and urodynamic parameters were collected. Differences between the 2 populations were evaluated using Student test, chi-square, or Fischer tests. Results Twenty-four patients with MS aged 65 and older (mean age, 69.8 years were matched with 48 patients aged less than 65 years (mean age, 49.4 years. Maximum urethral closure pressure was lower in the elderly population than in the nongeriatric population (mean±standard deviation [SD]: 35.6±18.5 cm H2O vs. 78.2±52.3 cm H2O, P<0.001. In the male population, there was no statistical difference in any other clinical or urodynamic endpoints. In the female population, voiding symptoms was more described in the nongeriatric population (Urinary Symptom Profile low stream: 3.4±3.5 vs. 1.7±2.4, P=0.04, geriatric population had less urinary treatment (P=0.05. LUTS had less impact on quality of life (Qualiveen: 1.4±1.0 vs. 2.1±0.9, P=0.02 on the geriatric population than in the nongeriatric of female MS patients. Conclusions Geriatric population of MS has few differences of urinary disorders compared to a nongeriatric population with EDSS, sex, and MS form equal. However, the psychological impact of these urinary disorders is less important in female geriatric population.

  19. Effect of urinary tract infection on the urinary metabolic characteristic as a risk factor in producing urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eskandarifar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary metabolic disorders are one of the most common causes of stone formation in children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of urinary tract infections in the urinary metabolic characteristics as a risk factor in the incidence of urolithiasis. This case-control study was conducted in 222 children with urolithiasis in the range of 6 months to 16 years old in Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran during 2012-14. Patients were divided into two groups based on those with urinary tract infection and without urinary tract infection. Then, urine samples were collected from both groups, and levels of calcium, oxalate, citrate, uric acid, creatinine, and cysteine were measured. The collected information was analyzed using software SPSS (version 16. The ratio Average levels of calcium, magnesium, oxalate, cysteine, uric acid to creatinine in urine showed no significant difference between two groups based on statistical analysis. However, the amount of citrate to creatinine in children with urinary tract infection and urolithiasis was clearly less P=0.01. The results of this study show that the urinary tract infection cannot change the urinary metabolic characteristics, but it can be considered as a risk factor in kidney stone formation due to the reduced amount of citrate in the urine.

  20. The Assessment of Urinary Metabolites in Children with Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Nain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the association between urinary tract infection (UTI and urinary metabolites. Material and Method: Eighty children aged below 14 years old who were following for recurrent UTI were enrolled into the study. Urinary calcium (Uca, oxalate (Uox, citrate (Ucit and cysteine (Ucis levels were studied in 24 hours urine samples. Hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria and hypocitraturia were identified according to the reference values. The positivity of sodium nitroprussid test was accepted as cystinuria. The results were compared between patients and control groups involving thirty children. The patients were divided into two subgroups according to the presence of renal scarring (RS on radionuclide scan. The similar comparisons were made between the subgroups. Results: There was no significant difference between the ratios of hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia and cystinuria in patient and control groups (p> 0.05. Uox/Ucr levels were significantly increased in patients compared to controls (p= 0.001 whereas Uca/Ucr and Ucit/Ucr levels were similar among study groups (p= 0. 082 and p= 0.466. There was no significant difference between RS (- and RS ( groups for hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia and cystinuria (p> 0.05. Discussion: The increase in urinary excretion of oxalate might be a risk factor for UTI. There was no evidence regarding that urinary metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia and cystinuria have affected the development of RS in the setting of UTI.

  1. [Analysis of changes in lower urinary tract symptoms with aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Norihito; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    2004-09-01

    Urination disorders start to appear in an age-dependent fashion, which contribute to the degradation of quality of life (QOL) in erderly persons. This study focused on elucidating changes of the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and changing of voiding condition with aging in the subjects, who offered the health checks. We evaluated urinary function in 225 Japanese males (age 20-79), estimated International prostate symptom score (IPSS), QOL score, uroflowmetry, prostate volume and residual urine (estimated from transabdominal ultrasonography). In addition, 539 females (age 20-89) were assigned IPSS and QOL scores. The distribution of severity of symptoms significantly changed with age in both sexes. QOL scores tended to increase in males, IPSS, prostate volume and residual urine were significantly increasing related to age, and advanced age was associated with a decline of voiding volume and Qmax. Comparison of QOL scores and IPSS criteria demonstrated a significantly positive correlation with incomplete emptying and a weak stream. A significant negative correlation was found between the QOL score and Qmax. The distribution of middle level of symptom, divided by clinical guideline for benign prostatic hyperplasia, significantly increased with age. On the other hand, in females, the QOL score seemed to be stable whilst there was a slight increase of IPSS. In contrast, frequency and incomplete emptying were significantly related to QOL scores. These investigations supported changing of lower urinary tract disorder with aging in both sexes. Since the approximate 50% of sixth and seventh decade males, classified to the middle level of symtom, which need treatment, the high incident of degradation of the LUTS with age, should predict for the future.

  2. Elevated urine levels of heparin-binding protein in children with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjölvmark, Charlott; Akesson, Per; Linder, Adam

    2012-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection diagnosis in children, and efficient diagnosis and treatment are important to avoid serious complications. In this study we investigated whether urinary levels of neutrophil-derived heparin-binding protein (HBP) can be used as a marker of UTI in children. These results were compared to those of dipstick analysis, interleukin-6 (IL-6) analysis in urine, and bacterial culturing. Seventy-eight children aged 0-18 years with fever and/or symptoms indicating UTI were enrolled in a prospective consecutive study. Urine samples were cultured and analyzed with dipstick, and concentrations of HBP and IL-6 were measured. Fifteen patients were classified as having UTI, 30 patients had fever but were diagnosed with a non-urinary tract infection, and 33 patients had neither UTI nor fever. Using a urine HBP (U-HBP) cut-off level of 32 ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity for detecting UTI were 93.3 and 90.3 %, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that U-HBP levels were a higher specificity indicator of UTI than urine white blood cell counts or urine IL-6 levels; they also showed a higher sensitivity than the results of the urine nitrite test. All patients with significant growth of clinically relevant bacteria had elevated U-HBP levels. The results indicate that rapid analysis of U-HBP can provide helpful guidance in the management of children with suspected UTI.

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections in women : focus on diabetes mellitus and pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    There is a shortage of evidence for clinical guidelines on diagnosis and management of both asymptomatic bacteriuria (the presence of bacteria in urine without symptoms of an infection) and urinary tract infections in women with diabetes and pregnant women. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract

  4. Urinary tract infections in patients with diabetes mellitus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have a higher prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) compared with patients without DM. They also more often have bacteraemia, with the urinary tract as the most common focus for these infections, as well as

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment and the development of urinary tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Koen; Visser, Sipke; Bos, Jens; Hak, Eelko

    2013-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) can reduce the urine output, especially when treatment is started. Since bacterial clearance from the urinary tract is dependent on the urine output, it was hypothesized that ACEi may also increase the risk of urinary tract infections

  6. Urinary tract cancer and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer : Risks and screening options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, RH; Kiemeney, LALM; Witjes, JA; Vasen, HFA

    Purpose: We investigate the risk of the different types of urinary tract cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families and review screening options. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively calculated the relative and cumulative risks of developing urinary tract cancer by comparing

  7. Prevalence and psychosocial impact of lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Evaline; Messelink, Bert J.; Heijnen, Lily; de Groot, Imelda J. M.

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) frequently report lower urinary tract symptoms at the outpatient rehabilitation clinic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in the Dutch male DMD population and their effect on quality of life. A

  8. Plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in children with urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittenhagen, Per; Andersen, Jesper Brandt; Hansen, Anita

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study we investigated the role of plasma levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in children with urinary tract infection.......In this prospective study we investigated the role of plasma levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in children with urinary tract infection....

  9. Pediatric urinary tract infection as a cause of outpatient clinic visits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Failure to timely diagnose and treat urinary tract infections is associated with grave long term consequences. The objectives of this study included assessing the proportion and predictors of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) as a cause of pediatric outpatient department (OPD) visits and determining common ...

  10. Do type 1 fimbriae promote inflammation in the human urinary tract?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergsten, G.; Wullt, B.; Schembri, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae have been implicated as virulence factors in animal models of urinary tract infection (UTI), but the function in human disease remains unclear. This study used a human challenge model to examine if type 1 fimbriae trigger inflammation in the urinary tract. The asymptomatic...

  11. Prevalence of recurrent urinary tract infection in children with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramayani, O. R.; Eyanoer, P. C.; Ritarwan, K.; Siregar, B.; Siregar, R. S.

    2018-03-01

    Prevalence of congenital abnormalities varies from 3.5% up to 43% in pediatrics.This wide interval is due to limited numbers of research. Limitation of data on recurrent urinary tract infection in CAKUT infants as well as symptoms which resemble other diseases makes it quite a challenge. A study of the prospective cohort was established to analyze the prevalence of recurrent UTI among CAKUT in children at Neonatal and Nephrology Paediatric Department of H.Adam Malik Hospital from 2016 to 2017.Urinalysis and urine culture were used to assess the presence of UTI. The result showed that the prevalence of UTI in CAKUT patients reached 64% in which 52% is the obstructive type and 12% non-obstructive type. Pelvic ureteric junction obstruction is the most common cause. Children with known urinary tract problems such as CAKUT are very prone to developing recurrent UTI. Due to a low survival rate of children with ESKD, new strategies are needed to prevent CAKUT, preserve renal function, and reduce associated cardiovascular morbidity. Meanwhile, children with CAKUT requires a multi-disciplinary and longer follow up.

  12. Urinary tract infection: a cohort of older people with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Laís Samara de; Ercole, Flávia Falci; Oliveira, Danilo Ulisses de; Pinto, Tatiana Saraiva; Victoriano, Mariana Avendanha; Alcoforado, Carla Lúcia Goulart Constant

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate epidemiological aspects of urinary tract infection in older patients with urinary incontinence living in long-term care institutions in Belo Horizonte. Method: Concurrent cohort held from April 1st to October 1st, 2015. The study was conducted in two long-term care institutions in the city of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, with 84 incontinent older people. Cumulative incidence of urinary tract infection was 19% (95% CI: 7.83-23.19) and the incidence density was 3.6 cases/100 people-month of follow-up period. The variables Bacteriuria and Institution presented statistical association with the occurrence of urinary tract infection. It is observed that the incidence of urinary tract infection in the study was smaller than in other similar international and national studies, however this is an important world health problem for the older population, with impact on mortality of these individuals. Avaliar aspectos epidemiológicos da infecção do trato urinário em pacientes idosos com incontinência urinária, residentes em instituições de longa permanência, de Belo Horizonte. Coorte concorrente realizada no período de 01 de abril a 01 de outubro de 2015. O estudo foi realizado em duas instituições de longa permanência, na cidade de Belo Horizonte, MG, com 84 idosos incontinentes. A incidência acumulada de infecção do trato urinário foi de 19% (IC 95%: 7,83-23,19) e a densidade de incidência foi de 3,6 casos/100 pessoas-mês de seguimento. As variáveis Bacteriúria e Instituição apresentaram associação estatística com a ocorrência de infecção do trato urinário. Observa-se que a incidência de infecção do trato urinário no estudo foi menor que em outros estudos nacionais e internacionais semelhantes, no entanto trata-se de um importante problema de saúde mundial para os idosos, com impacto na mortalidade desses indivíduos.

  13. Anatomy and Physiology of the Urinary Tract: Relation to Host Defense and Microbial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, Duane R; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-08-01

    The urinary tract exits to a body surface area that is densely populated by a wide range of microbes. Yet, under most normal circumstances, it is typically considered sterile, i.e., devoid of microbes, a stark contrast to the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts where many commensal and pathogenic microbes call home. Not surprisingly, infection of the urinary tract over a healthy person's lifetime is relatively infrequent, occurring once or twice or not at all for most people. For those who do experience an initial infection, the great majority (70% to 80%) thankfully do not go on to suffer from multiple episodes. This is a far cry from the upper respiratory tract infections, which can afflict an otherwise healthy individual countless times. The fact that urinary tract infections are hard to elicit in experimental animals except with inoculum 3-5 orders of magnitude greater than the colony counts that define an acute urinary infection in humans (105 cfu/ml), also speaks to the robustness of the urinary tract defense. How can the urinary tract be so effective in fending off harmful microbes despite its orifice in a close vicinity to that of the microbe-laden gastrointestinal tract? While a complete picture is still evolving, the general consensus is that the anatomical and physiological integrity of the urinary tract is of paramount importance in maintaining a healthy urinary tract. When this integrity is breached, however, the urinary tract can be at a heightened risk or even recurrent episodes of microbial infections. In fact, recurrent urinary tract infections are a significant cause of morbidity and time lost from work and a major challenge to manage clinically. Additionally, infections of the upper urinary tract often require hospitalization and prolonged antibiotic therapy. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of the urinary tract with an emphasis on their specific roles in host defense. We also highlight the

  14. Tissue engineering for urinary tract reconstruction and repair: Progress and prospect in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qingsong; Fu, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    Several urinary tract pathologic conditions, such as strictures, cancer, and obliterations, require reconstructive plastic surgery. Reconstruction of the urinary tract is an intractable task for urologists due to insufficient autologous tissue. Limitations of autologous tissue application prompted urologists to investigate ideal substitutes. Tissue engineering is a new direction in these cases. Advances in tissue engineering over the last 2 decades may offer alternative approaches for the urinary tract reconstruction. The main components of tissue engineering include biomaterials and cells. Biomaterials can be used with or without cultured cells. This paper focuses on cell sources, biomaterials, and existing methods of tissue engineering for urinary tract reconstruction in China. The paper also details challenges and perspectives involved in urinary tract reconstruction.

  15. Transient receptor potential channel superfamily: Role in lower urinary tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Teruyuki; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Masaki; Hiragata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Domen, Takahisa; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms associated with neurogenic bladder and overactive bladder syndrome are mediated in part by members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily. The best studied member of this superfamily is the vanilloid receptor. Other transient receptor potential channels, such as the melastatin receptor and the ankyrin receptor, are also active in the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract dysfunction. However, the detailed mechanisms by which the transient receptor potential channels contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms are still not clear, and the therapeutic benefits of modulating transient receptor potential channel activity have not been proved in the clinical setting. In the present review, to better understand the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential for lower urinary tract symptoms, we summarize the presence and role of different members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily in the lower urinary tract. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Novel Strategies in the Prevention and Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthje, Petra; Brauner, Annelie

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are one of the most common bacterial infections, especially in women and children, frequently treated with antibiotics. The alarming increase in antibiotic resistance is a global threat to future treatment of infections. Therefore, alternative strategies are urgently needed. The innate immune system plays a fundamental role in protecting the urinary tract from infections. Antimicrobial peptides form an important part of the innate immunity. They are produced by epithelial cells and neutrophils and defend the urinary tract against invading bacteria. Since efficient resistance mechanisms have not evolved among bacterial pathogens, much effort has been put into exploring the role of antimicrobial peptides and possibilities to utilize them in clinical practice. Here, we describe the impact of antimicrobial peptides in the urinary tract and ways to enhance the production by hormones like vitamin D and estrogen. We also discuss the potential of medicinal herbs to be used in the prophylaxis and the treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:26828523

  17. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Ipek Ozunan; Ozmen, Dilek; Cetinkaya, Aynur Cakmakci

    2014-07-08

    To investigate the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urinary incontinence (UI) in elementary school aged children in Manisa. Dysfunctional Voiding and Incontinence Scoring System (DVIS) which was developed in Turkey is used. A total of 416 children, 216 (51.9%) male and 200 (48.1%) female were recruited in this study. Mean age of children was 10.35 ± 2.44 years (median10 years). Daytime UI frequency was 6.7% (28 child), nocturnal incontinence 16.6% (69 child) and combined daytime and nocturnal incontinence 4.1% (17 child). There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of nocturnal and or daytime UI between male and female gender. Mean DVIS score was 2.65 ± 3.95 and gender did not affect total DVIS points. The mean ages of achieving daytime bowel and bladder control were all significantly correlated with DVIS points. DVIS points were positively correlated with the history of UI of the family. Total points were increased when the father was unemployed. UI negatively influences health related quality of life of the family and child, so it is important that awareness of the UI and symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  18. Transperitoneal laparoscopic pyeloplasty in children: does upper urinary tract anomalies affect surgical outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunhara, João Arthur; Moscardi, Paulo Renato Marcelo; Mello, Marcos Figueiredo; Andrade, Hiury Silva; Carvalho, Paulo Afonso; Cezarino, Bruno Nicolino; Dénes, Francisco Tibor; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias

    2018-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and outcomes of laparoscopic pyeloplasty in children with complex ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) and compare to children with iso-lated UPJO without associated urinary tract abnormalities. Medical records of 82 consecutive children submitted to transperitoneal laparoscopic pyeloplasty in a 12-year period were reviewed. Eleven cases were con-sidered complex, consisting of atypical anatomy including horseshoe kidneys in 6 patients, pelvic kidneys in 3 patients, and a duplex collecting system in 2 patients. Patients were di-vided into 2 groups: normal anatomy (group 1) and complex cases (group 2). Demographics, perioperative data, outcomes and complications were recorded and analyzed. Mean age was 8.9 years (0.5-17.9) for group 1 and 5.9 years (0.5-17.2) for group 2, p=0.08. The median operative time was 200 minutes (180-230) for group 1 and 203 minutes (120-300) for group 2, p=0.15. Major complications (Clavien ≥3) were 4 (5.6%) in group 1 and 1 (6.3%) in group 2, p=0.52. No deaths or early postoperative complications such as: urinoma or urinary leakage or bleeding, occurred. The success rate for radiologic improvement and flank pain improvement was comparable between the two groups. Re-garding hydronephrosis, significant improvement was present in 62 patients (93.4%) of group 1 and 10 cases (90.9%) of group 2, p=0.99. The median hospital stay was 4 days (IQR 3-4) for group 1 and 4.8 days (IQR 3-6) for group 2, p=0.27. Transperitoneal laparoscopic pyeloplasty is feasible and effective for the management of UPJO associated with renal or urinary tract anomalies. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  19. The late occurrence of urinary tract damage in patients successfully treated by radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoubek, J.; McGuire, E.J.; Noll, F.; DeLancey, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    Urinary tract complications apparently resulting from radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix can occur as long as 30 years after cessation of such treatment. Patients generally present with urinary incontinence and often are treated by standard operative methods that usually are unsuccessful. Incontinence is related to bladder fibrosis, urethral nonfunction and vesicovaginal fistuLa formation, and may be accompanied by bilateral ureteral obstruction. Of 11 patients with late complications of radiotherapy 4 had upper tract deterioration, 4 had vesicovaginal fistulas, 5 had an incompetent urethra aNd 9 had a fibrotic, noncompliant areflexive bladder. Treatment was aimed at providing adequate low pressure storage capacity and consisted of augmentation cystoplasty in 5 patients, repair of the fistula in 4 and correction of urethral dysfunction in 5. Women who complain of incontinence and/or irritable bladder symptoms with a history of radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma should be evaluated for fistuLa formation, urethral incompetence, and detrusor areflexia and fibrosis before treatment is done

  20. Epidemiology of Urinary Tract Infections in Hospitolized Children in Fatemi-Sahamieh Hospital (2005-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Shokrollahei

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesMorbidity and mortality of urinary tract infection is common in spite of prescription of effective new antibiotics. Chronic pyelonphritis is one of the important reasons of end stage renal failure. Our study is carried out on 167 children admitted in Fatemi koodacan Hospital due to urinary tract infection. Major goal of this study was determination of epidemiology of urinary tract infection.Methods This study was cross sectional descriptive and sampling method was census. Various Factors such as age, gender, causative pathogen, used antibiotics and required time for getting negative urine culture test were studied. data were collected by means questionnaire.ResultsAccording to the study urinary tract infection was more common in females (74.2% of all cases while in male neonates it is more common than females. Incidence peak of urinary tract infection is seen in children between 1-6 years old. The most common pathogens responsible to urinary tract infection was E. coli and Klebsiella. The most common background disease was vesicoureteral reflux. The most common prescribed antibiotic was ceftriaxone (65%. After 2 days of taking antibiotic the majority of patients (87.7% had negative urine culture.ConclusionIn our study E. coli and Klebsiella are the most common pathogen responsible to urinary tract infection. In our study the frequency of urinary tract infection with Proteus was low (only 1.1% in comparison with other studies. Other epidemiological indices in this study were comparable to previous studies.Keywords: Urinary Tract, Urinary Tract Infections, Children

  1. Paediatric Urinary Tract Infection: A Hospital Based Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Bhat, Javaid Ahmed; Parry, Nazir Ahmed; Shaheen, Lubna; Bhat, Sartaj Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is one of the commonly encountered entities by paediatricians. Studies have shown easy vulnerability of paediatric urinary tract in any acute febrile illness and a miss in diagnosis could have long term consequences like renal scaring with its adverse effects. Bearing these evidence based preludes in view we designed our study to know the prevalence of UTI in Kashmir province. Aim Aim of the present study was to know the prevalence of UTI in febrile children and to know the sensitivity of different imaging modalities like Renal and Urinary Bladder Ultrasonography (RUS), Voiding Cystourethrography (VCUG) and Dimercaptosuccinic Acid (DMSA) scan in diagnosing UTI. Materials and Methods A total of 304 patients, between 2 months to 10 years, with axillary temperature of ≥ 100.4oF (38oC), who did not have a definite source for their fever and who were not on antibiotics were included in the study. Detailed history and through clinical examination was done to rule out any potential or definite focus of infection as per the predesigned proforma. Routine urine examination with culture and sensitivity, followed by RUS and VCUG was done in all patients where routine urine examination was suggestive of UTI. DMSA was done in only culture proven cases after 6 months to document the renal scarring. Results Out of 304 children, 140 were males and 164 were females, UTI was present in 40 patients who had fever without any apparent cause giving a prevalence of 13.2%. Escherichia coli (E. coli) were the commonest isolated organism, followed by Klebsiella and Citrobacter species. Renal and Urinary Bladder Ultrasonography (RUS) detected Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) in 25% (10/40) while VCUG showed VUR in 55% (22/40) giving a RUS sensitivity of 45% for detecting VUR. DMSA done only after 6 months in UTI diagnosed patients showed a renal scarring in 25% (10/40) patients. Conclusion Missing a febrile paediatric UTI, can prove a future

  2. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Urinary Epithelial Cancer with Upper Urinary Tract Obstruction: Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Matsuzaki, K.; Kubo, H.; Nishitani, H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Various malignant tumors of the body show high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). In the genitourinary region, DWI is expected to have a role in detecting urinary epithelial cancer noninvasively. Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of DWI for the diagnosis of urinary epithelial cancer with upper urinary tract obstruction. Material and Methods: Twenty upper urinary tract cancers in 16 patients were evaluated by high-b-value DWI (b=800s/mm2). The signal intensity was visually evaluated, and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured. Results: All urinary epithelial cancers showed high signal intensity on DWI. The ADC in cancerous lesions was 1.31±0.27 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, which was significantly lower than that of the lumens of the ureter or renal pelvis (3.32±0.44 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s; P<0.001). Maximum intensity projection images of DWI in combination with static-fluid MR urography provided three-dimensional entire urinary tract imaging with the extension of tumors. Conclusion: DWI is useful in the tumor detection and in evaluating the tumor extension of urinary epithelial cancer in patients with upper urinary tract obstruction

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnarr, J; Smaill, F

    2008-10-01

    Symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in pregnant women. A history of previous urinary tract infections and low socioeconomic status are risk factors for bacteriuria in pregnancy. Escherichia coli is the most common aetiologic agent in both symptomatic and asymptomatic infection and quantitative culture is the gold standard for diagnosis. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria has been shown to reduce the rate of pyelonephritis in pregnancy and therefore screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria has become a standard of obstetrical care. Antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with a decrease in the incidence of low birth weight, but the methodological quality of the studies limits the strength of the conclusions that can be drawn. Debate exists in the literature as to whether treated pyelonephritis is associated with adverse fetal outcomes. There is no clear consensus in the literature on antibiotic choice or duration of therapy for infection. With increasing antibiotic resistance, consideration of local resistance rates is necessary when choosing therapy.

  4. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel–Joubert, short rib, Bardet–Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  5. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Urinary Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ka-Siong Kho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of primary extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the distal ureter, with a synchronous small cell carcinoma of the ipsilateral renal pelvis. These tumors, rarely reported in the urinary tract, are locally aggressive and have a poor prognosis. A 77-year-old male bedridden patient presented with fever and chills with left side-flank pain for 3 days. Following a diagnosis of ureteral urothelial carcinoma, hand-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision was carried out. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given after pathologic report of primary small cell carcinoma of the distal ureter and a synchronous small cell carcinoma of the ipsilateral renal pelvis. After 3 cycles of combination chemotherapy, the patient died 4 months postoperatively due to sepsis.

  6. [Diagnosis of upper urinary tract tumors. A pending challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westendarp, M; Laguna, M P; de la Rosette, J J M C

    2014-07-01

    Early diagnosis of upper urinary tract tumors is not easy. The development of endoscopic equipment has expanded the group of patients candidates for minimally invasive treatment. Only by providing accurate tumor staging and grading can clinicians decide which patients should be offered conservative therapies. We need diagnostic methods that allow us to make an early and accurate diagnosis for these lesions, as well as safe follow-up. Our proposal is to present a review of the most used diagnostic method, their features, and future diagnostic tools. The diagnostic arsenal requires further improvement. Only through accurate diagnosis, we will be able to safely provide conservative treatment. Developing new diagnostic techniques seem to move us closer to this goal even more. We propose a working algorithm on the management of these lesions.

  7. Prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Around 40-50% of women experience at least one urinary tract infection (UTI) during their lifetime and 20-30% of these have a recurrence within 3-4 months of the initial infection.¹ Recurrent UTI (usually defined as three episodes in the last 12 months or two episodes in the last 6 months) can have a considerable impact on a woman's quality of life. Each episode of acute UTI in young women is typically associated with about 6 days of symptoms, 2.4 days of restricted activities and 0.4 days of bed rest.¹ Antibacterial prophylaxis is effective in preventing recurrent episodes, but at the expense of unwanted effects and a risk of promoting bacterial resistance. Here we assess the efficacy of different antibacterial regimens and non-antibacterial alternatives (cranberry, probiotics, oestrogens, immunostimulation, hyaluronic acid and chondroitin, acupuncture and herbs) in the prevention of recurrent uncomplicated UTIs in women.

  8. Imaging of urinary tract lithiasis: who, when and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiorns, Melanie P. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Although infection remains a major aetiological factor in stone formation, especially in boys, there is increasing recognition of the numbers of children affected by a metabolic predisposition to stone formation and this proportion appears to be increasing, and hence every child who presents with urolithiasis should undergo a metabolic work-up. In a study performed in the UK, 44% of children had a metabolic abnormality, 30% were classified as infective, and 26% idiopathic. A study from Texas found a similar pattern. Coexisting urinary tract infection can of course mask underlying metabolic causes. The rate of stone recurrence is lower in children compared to adults and the majority of stone disease is now managed, as in adults, by lithotripsy or endourological techniques; open surgery has decreased dramatically. (orig.)

  9. Imaging of urinary tract lithiasis: who, when and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiorns, Melanie P.

    Although infection remains a major aetiological factor in stone formation, especially in boys, there is increasing recognition of the numbers of children affected by a metabolic predisposition to stone formation and this proportion appears to be increasing, and hence every child who presents with urolithiasis should undergo a metabolic work-up. In a study performed in the UK, 44% of children had a metabolic abnormality, 30% were classified as infective, and 26% idiopathic. A study from Texas found a similar pattern. Coexisting urinary tract infection can of course mask underlying metabolic causes. The rate of stone recurrence is lower in children compared to adults and the majority of stone disease is now managed, as in adults, by lithotripsy or endourological techniques; open surgery has decreased dramatically. (orig.)

  10. Is Escherichia coli urinary tract infection a zoonosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, L.; Garneau, P.; Bruant, G.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that the Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection (UTI) may come from meat and animals. The purpose was to investigate if a clonal link existed between E. coli from animals, meat and UTI patients. Twenty-two geographically and temporally matched B2 E. coli...... from UTI patients, community-dwelling humans, broiler chicken meat, pork, and broiler chicken, previously identified to exhibit eight virulence genotypes by microarraydetection of approximately 300 genes, were investigated for clonal relatedness by PFGE. Nine isolates were selected and tested...... for in vivo virulence in the mouse model of ascending UTI. UTI and community-dwelling human strains were closely clonally related to meat strains. Several human derived strains were also clonally interrelated. All nine isolates regardless of origin were virulent in the UTI model with positive urine, bladder...

  11. Urinary tract infections in older women: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-02-26

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and vaginal estrogen therapy effectively reduce

  12. Autonomic receptors in urinary tract: Sex and age differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latifpour, J.; Kondo, S.; O'Hollaren, B.; Morita, T.; Weiss, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    As age and sex affect the function of the lower urinary tract, we studied the characteristics of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors in various parts of lower urinary tract smooth muscle of young (6 months) and old (4 1/2-5 years) male and female rabbits. Saturation experiments performed with [3H]prazosin, [3H]yohimbine, [3H]dihydroalprenolol and [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate in rabbit bladder base, bladder dome and urethra indicate the presence of regional, sex- and age-related differences in the density of alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor density is considerably higher in the female than in the male urethra of both age groups, whereas the higher density of beta adrenergic receptors in the female than in the male bladder base is observed only in the younger animals. The density of muscarinic receptors is higher in bladder dome than in bladder base or urethra in young rabbits of both sexes. In the old animals, the density of muscarinic receptors in bladder base increases to the level observed in bladder dome. Inhibition experiments with selective adrenergic agonists and antagonists indicate that the pharmacological profiles of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in the urethra and beta adrenergic receptors in the bladder dome and bladder base are similar in both sexes and at both ages. Beta-2 adrenergic receptors are shown to be predominant in bladder base and bladder dome of rabbits. Parallel studies in rabbit urethra, adult rat cortex and neonatal rat lung show that the urethral alpha-2 adrenergic receptors are of the alpha-2A subtype

  13. Neuromodulation of the neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Parag N; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Taccola, Giuliano; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2016-11-01

    The inability to control timely bladder emptying is one of the most serious challenges among the many functional deficits that occur after a spinal cord injury. We previously demonstrated that electrodes placed epidurally on the dorsum of the spinal cord can be used in animals and humans to recover postural and locomotor function after complete paralysis and can be used to enable voiding in spinal rats. In the present study, we examined the neuromodulation of lower urinary tract function associated with acute epidural spinal cord stimulation, locomotion, and peripheral nerve stimulation in adult rats. Herein we demonstrate that electrically evoked potentials in the hindlimb muscles and external urethral sphincter are modulated uniquely when the rat is stepping bipedally and not voiding, immediately pre-voiding, or when voiding. We also show that spinal cord stimulation can effectively neuromodulate the lower urinary tract via frequency-dependent stimulation patterns and that neural peripheral nerve stimulation can activate the external urethral sphincter both directly and via relays in the spinal cord. The data demonstrate that the sensorimotor networks controlling bladder and locomotion are highly integrated neurophysiologically and behaviorally and demonstrate how these two functions are modulated by sensory input from the tibial and pudental nerves. A more detailed understanding of the high level of interaction between these networks could lead to the integration of multiple neurophysiological strategies to improve bladder function. These data suggest that the development of strategies to improve bladder function should simultaneously engage these highly integrated networks in an activity-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. International urinary tract imaging basic spinal cord injury data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Craggs, M; Kennelly, M; Schick, E; Wyndaele, J-J

    2009-05-01

    To create an International Urinary Tract Imaging Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets. An international working group. The draft of the Data Set was developed by a working group comprising members appointed by the Neurourology Committee of the International Continence Society, the European Association of Urology, the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and a representative of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets. The final version of the Data Set was developed after review and comments by members of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets, the ISCoS Scientific Committee, ASIA Board, relevant and interested international organizations and societies (around 40), individual persons with specific expertise and the ISCoS Council. Endorsement of the Data Sets by relevant organizations and societies will be obtained. To make the Data Set uniform, each variable and each response category within each variable have been specifically defined in a way that is designed to promote the collection and reporting of comparable minimal data. The variables included in the International Urinary Tract Imaging Basic SCI Data Set are the results obtained using the following investigations: intravenous pyelography or computer tomography urogram or ultrasound, X-ray, renography, clearance, cystogram, voiding cystogram or micturition cystourogram or videourodynamics. The complete instructions for data collection and the data sheet itself are freely available on the websites of both ISCoS (http://www.iscos.org.uk) and ASIA (http://www.asia-spinalinjury.org).

  15. Community acquired urinary tract infection: etiology and bacterial susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infectious diseases diagnosed. UTI account for a large proportion of antibacterial drug consumption and have large socio-economic impacts. Since the majority of the treatments begins or is done completely empirically, the knowledge of the organisms, their epidemiological characteristics and their antibacterial susceptibility that may vary with time is mandatory. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility of the community acquired UTI diagnosed in our institution and to provide a national data. METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively the results of urine cultures of 402 patients that had community acquired urinary tract infection in the year of 2003. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients in this study was 45.34 ± 23.56 (SD years. There were 242 (60.2% females and 160 (39.8% males. The most commonly isolated organism was Escherichia coli (58%. Klebsiella sp. (8.4% and Enterococcus sp.(7.9% were reported as the next most common organisms. Of all bacteria isolated from community acquired UTI, only 37% were sensitive to ampicillin, 51% to cefalothin and 52% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The highest levels of susceptibility were to imipenem (96%, ceftriaxone (90%, amikacin (90%, gentamicin (88%, levofloxacin (86%, ciprofloxacin (73%, nitrofurantoin (77% and norfloxacin (75%. CONCLUSION: Gram-negative agents are the most common cause of UTI. Fluoroquinolones remains the choice among the orally administered antibiotics, followed by nitrofurantoin, second and third generation cephalosporins. For severe disease that require parenteral antibiotics the choice should be aminoglycosides, third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones or imipenem, which were the most effective.

  16. Urinary tract infections in extended care facilities: preventive management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regal, Randolph E; Pham, Co Q D; Bostwick, Thomas R

    2006-05-01

    To provide health care professionals with an overview of interventions that may be done to reduce the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in elderly patients, especially those residing in extended care facilities. A Medline search of the English literature was performed from 1980 to January 2006 to find literature relevant to urinary tract prophylaxis. Further references were hand-searched from relevant sources. When assessing the effectiveness of various clinical interventions for reducing the incidence of UTIs in the elderly, preference was given to more recent, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized studies, but studies of less robust design also were included in the discussions when the former were lacking. Where possible, recent publications were favored over older studies. References were all reviewed by the authors and chosen to present key citations. Data selection was prioritized to address specific subtopics. Though still frequent in occurrence and quite costly in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost to the health care system, numerous measures may be taken to ameliorate the incidence of UTIs in elderly, institutionalized residents. First and foremost, establishing and adhering to good infection-control practices by health care givers and minimizing the use of indwelling catheters are essential. Adequate staffing and training are germane to this effort. Reasonably well-designed clinical studies also give credence to the use of topical estrogens and lactobacillus "probiotics" for female subgroups and cranberry juice for a wider array of patients. Vitamin C is of no proven benefit. With regard to antibiotics, with the relative paucity of data available for this patient population, concerns for resistance proliferation must be balanced against perceived gains in UTI reduction.

  17. Resistance of catheter-associated urinary tract infections to antibacterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhaz Antonija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI are the most common nosocomial infections. The worldwide data show the increasing resistance to conventional antibiotics among urinary tract pathogens. Aim. To evaluate the adequacy of initial antimicrobial therapy in relation to the antimicrobial resistance of pathogens responsible for CAUTI in Clinical Center of Banja Luka. Methods. A retrospective study on major causes of CAUTI, antibiotic resistance and treatment principles was conducted at four departments of the Clinical Center of Banja Luka from January 1st, 2000 to April 1st, 2003. Results. The results showed that 265 patients had developed CAUTI. The seven most commonly isolated microorganisms were, in descending order: E. coli (31.0%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.8%, Proteus mirabilis (12.9%, Gr. Klebsiella-Enterobacter (12.3%, Enterococcus spp. (5.2%, Pseudomonas spp. (4.3%, Serratia spp. (4.0%. The most common pathogens were highly resistant to ampicillin (64−100%, gentamycin (63−100%, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (68−100%, while some bacterias, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia spp. showed rates of ciprofloxacin resistance as high as 42.8% and 72.7%, respectively. In 55.5% of the cases, the initial antibiotic therapy was inadequate, and was corrected latter on. There were no standard therapeutic protocols for this type of nosocomial infections. Conclusion. The results of this study emphasized an urgency of the prevention and introduction of clinical protocols for better management of CAUTI. Treatment principles should better correspond to the antibiotic sensitivity of uropathogens.

  18. Urinary Tract Infection Antibiotic Trial Study Design: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmaci, Romain; Vazouras, Konstantinos; Bielicki, Julia; Folgori, Laura; Hsia, Yingfen; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Sharland, Mike

    2017-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent common bacterial infections in children. No guidance on the conduct of pediatric febrile UTI clinical trials (CTs) exist. To assess the criteria used for patient selection and the efficacy end points in febrile pediatric UTI CTs. Medline, Embase, Cochrane central databases, and clinicaltrials.gov were searched between January 1, 1990, and November 24, 2016. We combined Medical Subject Headings terms and free-text terms for "urinary tract infections" and "therapeutics" and "clinical trials" in children (0-18 years), identifying 3086 articles. Two independent reviewers assessed study quality and performed data extraction. We included 40 CTs in which a total of 4381 cases of pediatric UTIs were investigated. Positive urine culture results and fever were the most common inclusion criteria (93% and 78%, respectively). Urine sampling method, pyuria, and colony thresholds were highly variable. Clinical and microbiological end points were assessed in 88% and 93% of the studies, respectively. Timing for end point assessment was highly variable, and only 3 studies (17%) out of the 18 performed after the Food and Drug Administration 1998 guidance publication assessed primary and secondary end points consistently with this guidance. Our limitations included a mixed population of healthy children and children with an underlying condition. In 6 trials, researchers studied a subgroup of patients with afebrile UTI. We observed a wide variability in the microbiological inclusion criteria and the timing for end point assessment. The available guidance for adults appear not to be used by pediatricians and do not seem applicable to the childhood UTI. A harmonized design for pediatric UTIs CT is necessary. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Risk factors for urinary tract infection following incontinence surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Ingrid; Brubaker, Linda; Chai, Toby C; Markland, Alayne D; Menefee, Shawn A; Sirls, Larry; Sutkin, Gary; Zimmern, Phillipe; Arisco, Amy; Huang, Liyuan; Tennstedt, Sharon; Stoddard, Anne

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe risk factors for post-operative urinary tract infection (UTI) the first year after stress urinary incontinence surgery. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed on data from 1,252 women randomized in two surgical trials, Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy trial (SISTEr) and Trial Of Mid-Urethral Slings (TOMUS). Baseline recurrent UTI (rUTI; ≥3 in 12 months) increased the risk of UTI in the first 6 weeks in both study populations, as did sling procedure and self-catheterization in SISTEr, and bladder perforation in TOMUS. Baseline rUTI, UTI in the first 6 weeks, and PVR > 100 cc at 12 months were independent risk factors for UTI between 6 weeks and 12 months in the SISTEr population. Few (2.3-2.4%) had post-operative rUTI, precluding multivariable analysis. In women with pre-operative rUTI, successful surgery (negative cough stress test) at 1 year did not appear to decrease the risk of persistent rUTI. Pre-operative rUTI is the strongest risk factor for post-operative UTI.

  20. Symptomatic Shigella sonnei urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baka, S; Spathi, A; Tsouma, I; Kouskouni, E

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a case of urinary tract infection (UTI) due to Shigella sonnei during pregnancy. A 31-year-old pregnant woman was admitted complaining of left-flank tenderness, dysuria, and fever. Following examination, significant laboratory data were collected including increased leukocyte count (10,800/ul with 86% neutrophils) and C-reactive protein (9.6 mg/dl). Urinalysis revealed 30 to 50 leukocytes per high power field while from the quantitative urine culture Shigella sonnei was recovered after 24 h incubation at 37 degrees C. After a two-week course with 750 mg cefuroxime every 8 h, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms and urinary cultures were negative two weeks and one month, respectively, after completing the therapy. The gestational course was uneventful and the patient delivered a healthy baby girl at term. Shigella sonnei can be responsible for UTI during pregnancy even when no predisposing factors or an apparent source of infection can be identified.

  1. Preventing urinary tract infections after menopause without antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretto, Marta; Giannini, Andrea; Russo, Eleonora; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2017-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections in women, and increase in incidence after the menopause. It is important to uncover underlying abnormalities or modifiable risk factors. Several risk factors for recurrent UTIs have been identified, including the frequency of sexual intercourse, spermicide use and abnormal pelvic anatomy. In postmenopausal women UTIs often accompany the symptoms and signs of the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). Antimicrobial prophylaxis has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the risk of recurrent UTIs in women, but this may lead to drug resistance of both the causative microorganisms and the indigenous flora. The increasing prevalence of Escherichia coli (the most prevalent uropathogen) that is resistant to antimicrobial agents has stimulated interest in novel non-antibiotic methods for the prevention of UTIs. Evidence shows that topical estrogens normalize vaginal flora and greatly reduce the risk of UTIs. The use of intravaginal estrogens may be reasonable in postmenopausal women not taking oral estrogens. A number of other strategies have been used to prevent recurrent UTIs: probiotics, cranberry juice and d-mannose have been studied. Oral immunostimulants, vaginal vaccines and bladder instillations with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate are newer strategies proposed to improve urinary symptoms and quality of life. This review provides an overview of UTIs' prophylaxis without antibiotics, focusing on a practical clinical approach to women with UTIs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Host-pathogen interactions mediating pain of urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudick, Charles N; Billips, Benjamin K; Pavlov, Vladimir I; Yaggie, Ryan E; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Klumpp, David J

    2010-04-15

    Pelvic pain is a major component of the morbidity associated with urinary tract infection (UTI), yet the molecular mechanisms underlying UTI-induced pain remain unknown. UTI pain mechanisms probably contrast with the clinical condition of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), characterized by significant bacterial loads without lack symptoms. A murine UTI model was used to compare pelvic pain behavior elicited by infection with uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain NU14 and ASB strain 83972. NU14-infected mice exhibited pelvic pain, whereas mice infected with 83972 did not exhibit pain, similar to patients infected with 83972. NU14-induced pain was not dependent on mast cells, not correlated with bacterial colonization or urinary neutrophils. UTI pain was not influenced by expression of type 1 pili, the bacterial adhesive appendages that induce urothelial apoptosis. However, purified NU14 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent pain, whereas 83972 LPS induced no pain. Indeed, 83972 LPS attenuated the pain of NU14 infection, suggesting therapeutic potential. These data suggest a novel mechanism of infection-associated pain that is dependent on TLR4 yet independent of inflammation. Clinically, these findings also provide the rational for probiotic therapies that would minimize the symptoms of infection without reliance on empirical therapies that contribute to antimicrobial resistance.

  3. Further investigation of confirmed urinary tract infection (UTI in children under five years: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Julie

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Further investigation of confirmed UTI in children aims to prevent renal scarring and future complications. Methods We conducted a systematic review to determine the most effective approach to the further investigation of confirmed urinary tract infection (UTI in children under five years of age. Results 73 studies were included. Many studies had methodological limitations or were poorly reported. Effectiveness of further investigations: One study found that routine imaging did not lead to a reduction in recurrent UTIs or renal scarring. Diagnostic accuracy: The studies do not support the use of less invasive tests such as ultrasound as an alternative to renal scintigraphy, either to rule out infection of the upper urinary tract (LR- = 0.57, 95%CI: 0.47, 0.68 and thus to exclude patients from further investigation or to detect renal scarring (LR+ = 3.5, 95% CI: 2.5, 4.8. None of the tests investigated can accurately predict the development of renal scarring. The available evidence supports the consideration of contrast-enhanced ultrasound techniques for detecting vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR, as an alternative to micturating cystourethrography (MCUG (LR+ = 14.1, 95% CI: 9.5, 20.8; LR- = 0.20, 95%CI: 0.13, 0.29; these techniques have the advantage of not requiring exposure to ionising radiation. Conclusion There is no evidence to support the clinical effectiveness of routine investigation of children with confirmed UTI. Primary research on the effectiveness, in terms of improved patient outcome, of testing at all stages in the investigation of confirmed urinary tract infection is urgently required.

  4. High cumulative incidence of urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma after kidney transplantation in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Ju; Lian, Jong-Da; Yang, Chi-Rei; Cheng, Chi-Hung; Chen, Cheng-Hsu; Lee, Wen-Chin; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2004-06-01

    Cancer is a well-documented complication after kidney transplantation. Increased incidence of bladder cancer had been reported in long-term hemodialysis patients in Taiwan. Herein, the authors report a very high cumulative incidence of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary tract after kidney transplantation in Taiwan. The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical data, medical records, and outcome of 730 kidney transplant (KT) recipients. The cumulative incidence of TCC was computed. The Cox regression method was used to analysis the role of potential risk factors. After a mean follow-up duration of 72.2 +/- 54.4 months, 69 cancers were diagnosed in 63 (8.6%) KT recipients. Of them, 30 cases (4.1%) were TCC. The cumulative incidence for TCC was 3.0% after 3 years of graft survival, increasing to 7.2% at 6 years and 17.5% at 10 years. Compared with the general population in Taiwan, the standardized mortality ratio was 398.4 (male, 192.6; female, 875.6). Painless gross hematuria was the cardinal initial symptom in 22 (73.3%) of the 30 KT recipients with TCC. Another 4 (13.3%) KT recipients with TCC presented with chronic urinary tract infection (UTI). Bilateral nephroureterectomy with removal of bladder cuffs was performed in 18 (60%) patients. Synchronous TCC in bilateral upper urinary tracts was confirmed in 11 (36.7%) of KT recipients with TCC. The age at the time of KT, female sex, compound analgesics usage, Chinese herb usage, and underground water intake had statistical significance as risk factors (P Taiwan, with an incidence of 4.1%. This study indicates that hematuria and chronic UTI are the initial presentation of TCC in KT recipients. Carefully urologic screening is indicated for patients with high risk for TCC, including those with older age, compound analgesics usage, Chinese herbs usage, and underground water intake as well as women.

  5. Hospitalization for community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection: validation and impact assessment of a clinical prediction rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalenhoef, Janneke E; van der Starre, Willize E; Vollaard, Albert M; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Delfos, Nathalie M; Leyten, Eliane M S; Koster, Ted; Ablij, Hans C; Van't Wout, Jan W; van Dissel, Jaap T; van Nieuwkoop, Cees

    2017-06-06

    There is a lack of severity assessment tools to identify adults presenting with febrile urinary tract infection (FUTI) at risk for complicated outcome and guide admission policy. We aimed to validate the Prediction Rule for Admission policy in Complicated urinary Tract InfeCtion LEiden (PRACTICE), a modified form of the pneumonia severity index, and to subsequentially assess its use in clinical practice. A prospective observational multicenter study for model validation (2004-2009), followed by a multicenter controlled clinical trial with stepped wedge cluster-randomization for impact assessment (2010-2014), with a follow up of 3 months. Paricipants were 1157 consecutive patients with a presumptive diagnosis of acute febrile UTI (787 in validation cohort and 370 in the randomized trial), enrolled at emergency departments of 7 hospitals and 35 primary care centers in the Netherlands. The clinical prediction rule contained 12 predictors of complicated course. In the randomized trial the PRACTICE included guidance on hospitalization for high risk (>100 points) and home discharge for low risk patients (urinary tract infection, futher improvement is necessary to reduce the occurrence of secondary hospital admissions. NTR4480 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=4480 , registered retrospectively 25 mrt 2014 (during enrollment of subjects).

  6. Maternal urinary tract infection as a risk factor for neonatal urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamghorashi, Fatemeh; Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Tagarod, Zahra; Heydari, Seyed Taghi

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of maternal UTI during pregnancy with neonatal UTI. One hundred and fourteen neonates admitted to hospital were enrolled in the present study, of whom 40 were admitted for management of UTI and 74 for management of jaundice. Urinalysis and urine culture were carried out for all of the neonates. Data regarding gestational age, history of UTI in the mother during pregnancy, and urinary symptoms of neonates were collected. The mean gestational age of the neonates was 38.4 ± 1.4 weeks (range, 30 to 40 weeks) and their mean age at admission was 6.2 ± 3.8 days old (range, 1 to 25 days). The mean gestational age and birth weight of the two groups with and without UTI were 38.38 ± 1.32 weeks versus 38.41 ± 1.62 weeks and 2930.43 ± 492.15 g versus 2930 ± 447.33 g, respectively. No abnormal findings were detected on physical examinations, and none of the neonate had abnormal renal ultrasonography findings. There was a significant relationship between maternal prenatal UTI and neonatal infection; 30.0% of the neonates with UTI versus 6.8% of those without UTI had mothers with a history of UTI (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 18.3; P = .001). Our study showed an association between maternal and neonatal UTI. This indicates a possible benefit of evaluation of neonates of mothers who had UTI during pregnancy.

  7. Chronic Infections of the Urinary Tract and Bladder Cancer Risk: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Otunu, Oghenetejiri; Akhtar, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Literature on the relationship between recurrent urinary tract infections and urinary bladder carcinoma risk has been inconsistent. Therefore, we carried out this systematic review of observational studies to ascertain if there is any association between chronic urinary tract infection and urinary bladder carcinoma. A total of 10 databases were searched using Boolean: CINAHL, PUBMED, Google Scholar, Medline, Science Direct, SCIRUS, Cochrane, UK PubMed central, NHS evidence and WHO-website. The search yielded an initial hit of 3,518 articles and after screening and critical appraisal, seven studies were included for this review. Four articles reported an association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer while three concluded a weak or no association at least in one gender. Main findings in this review were that most of the studies reported an association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk. However, inferences about the causal association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk should be drawn cautiously considering the methodological limitations of case-control studies included in this review. Therefore, more empirical evidence is needed to determine the causal nature of relationships between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk.

  8. [Urinary tract infection caused by Enterobacteriaceae and its relationship with vesicoureteral reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Álvarez, Manuel; Acosta Batista, Bárbara; Pérez Córdova, Rodolfo; Hernández Robledo, Ernesto

    The first urinary tract infection can be a marker of a urinary tract anomaly, mainly vesicoureteral reflux. The aim of this work was to determine the association between isolated enterobacteria with the presence and grade of vesicoureteral reflux in neonatal patients with their first urinary tract infection. A retrospective, observational and analytic study of newborns, who were admitted to the Neonatal Department, University Pediatric Hospital "Juan Manuel Márquez," in Havana, Cuba, from 1992 to 2013 was conducted. The causal microorganism of urinary tract infection was from the Enterobacteriaceae family. They were evaluated by radio imaging. The association between the presence and grade of vesicoureteral reflux with the causal microorganism of the urinary tract infection was analyzed. Newborn infants with urinary tract infection (450) were studied. Bacterial isolations in the urine cultures corresponded to E. coli in 316 cases (70.2%). The prevalence of vesicoureteral reflux was 18.2%. The presence of bacteria corresponding to the Enterobacteriaceae family (other than E. coli) had significant risk association with vesicoureteral reflux (OR: 2.02; p urinary tract infection. However, an association between the isolation of a microorganism of the Enterobacteriaceae family different to E. coli with the presence of vesicoureteral reflux and mainly with higher grades of vesicoureteral reflux exists. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypercalciuria, a promoting factor to urinary tract infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheissari Alaleh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common diseases of urogenital tract in children. Detecting predisposing factors for UTI takes an important place in managing patients with UTI. Recently, a few studies emphasized on idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH as a predisposing factor for UTI and dysfunctional voiding. Therefore, we carried out a survey to find out whether non-calculus IH is a contributing factor in children with the first attack of pyelonephritis. Materials and Methods: This is a case-control study carried out on 60 children aged 2-11 years admitted at St Al-Zahra hospital, Isfahan, Iran, with the first episode of upper UTI and 200 age- and gender-matched normal healthy children between September 2003 and February 2005. We used second fasting spot urine sample to measure calcium and creatinine. Two urine samples were obtained one week apart to increase the accuracy of measurement. All samples were collected after at least 6 weeks of completing the treatment course of pyelonephritis. Ultrasound examination and VCUG were performed in all patients before entering the survey as case group to rule out obstruction and VUR. Results: Mean age of case and control group were 4.86 ± 3.08 years and 4.22 ± 2.9 years, respectively. The mean calcium to creatinine ratio (Ca/Cr in case and control group were 0.308 ± 0.21 and 0.208 ± 0.12 mg/mg, respectively, P < 0.001. The difference between the mean values of these two groups was significant only in age group ≤6 years, P < 0.0001 and odds ratio was 2.1 (95% CI 1.03-7.8. After determining the mean values of urine Ca/Cr ration according to both age groups and gender, it was cleared that only significant difference was related to male < 6 years. Conclusion: The likelihood of hypercalciuria should be assessed especially in male children with UTI and without any urinary tract obstruction.

  10. Surgical management of lower urinary mesh perforation after mid-urethral polypropylene mesh sling: mesh excision, urinary tract reconstruction and concomitant pubovaginal sling with autologous rectus fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ketul; Nikolavsky, Dmitriy; Gilsdorf, Daniel; Flynn, Brian J

    2013-12-01

    We present our management of lower urinary tract (LUT) mesh perforation after mid-urethral polypropylene mesh sling using a novel combination of surgical techniques including total or near total mesh excision, urinary tract reconstruction, and concomitant pubovaginal sling with autologous rectus fascia in a single operation. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 189 patients undergoing transvaginal removal of polypropylene mesh from the lower urinary tract or vagina. The focus of this study is 21 patients with LUT mesh perforation after mid-urethral polypropylene mesh sling. We excluded patients with LUT mesh perforation from prolapse kits (n = 4) or sutures (n = 11), or mesh that was removed because of isolated vaginal wall exposure without concomitant LUT perforation (n = 164). Twenty-one patients underwent surgical removal of mesh through a transvaginal approach or combined transvaginal/abdominal approaches. The location of the perforation was the urethra in 14 and the bladder in 7. The mean follow-up was 22 months. There were no major intraoperative complications. All patients had complete resolution of the mesh complication and the primary symptom. Of the patients with urethral perforation, continence was achieved in 10 out of 14 (71.5 %). Of the patients with bladder perforation, continence was achieved in all 7. Total or near total removal of lower urinary tract (LUT) mesh perforation after mid-urethral polypropylene mesh sling can completely resolve LUT mesh perforation in a single operation. A concomitant pubovaginal sling can be safely performed in efforts to treat existing SUI or avoid future surgery for SUI.

  11. Detection of PCT and urinary β2 -MG enhances the accuracy for localization diagnosing pediatric urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jian; Luan, Jiangwei; Zhu, Gaohong; Qi, Chang; Wang, Dandan

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate whether the combination of urinary beta 2 microglobulin (urinary β 2 -MG) and procalcitonin (PCT) diagnosis could enhance the localization diagnostic precision of pediatric urinary tract infection comparing with single diagnosis. A study was conducted in the Nephrology Department of Wuhan women and children's health care centre. This study incorporated 85 participants, including 35 children who were diagnosed as upper urinary tract infection (UUTI) with the symptom of fever and 50 children who conducted lower urinary tract infection (LUTI). Levels of PCT and urinary β 2 -MG in both UUTI and LUTI patients were measured and compared. The level of PCT and β 2 -MG were both significantly higher in UUTI group compared with in LUTI group. AUC of urinary β 2 -MG ROC (sensitivity of 71.4%, specificity of 90.0%) was significantly smaller than that of PCT ROC (sensitivity of 77.1%, specificity of 96.0%) in the single diagnosis. Although in the combined diagnosis, the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88.6% and 98%, respectively. Both PCT and β 2 -MG could be used to localize the UTI. Introducing urinary β 2 -MG into PCT diagnosis could increase the sensitivity and specificity of UTI lesion diagnosis in clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Predicting the Risk of Breakthrough Urinary Tract Infections: Primary Vesicoureteral Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidas, Guy; Billimek, John; Nam, Alexander; Soltani, Tandis; Kelly, Maryellen S; Selby, Blake; Dorgalli, Crystal; Wehbi, Elias; McAleer, Irene; McLorie, Gordon; Greenfield, Sheldon; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Khoury, Antoine E

    2015-11-01

    We constructed a risk prediction instrument stratifying patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux into groups according to their 2-year probability of breakthrough urinary tract infection. Demographic and clinical information was retrospectively collected in children diagnosed with primary vesicoureteral reflux and followed for 2 years. Bivariate and binary logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with breakthrough urinary tract infection. The final regression model was used to compute an estimation of the 2-year probability of breakthrough urinary tract infection for each subject. Accuracy of the binary classifier for breakthrough urinary tract infection was evaluated using receiver operator curve analysis. Three distinct risk groups were identified. The model was then validated in a prospective cohort. A total of 252 bivariate analyses showed that high grade (IV or V) vesicoureteral reflux (OR 9.4, 95% CI 3.8-23.5, p urinary tract infection (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.1-24.7, p = 0.034) and female gender (OR 2.6, 95% CI 0.097-7.11, p urinary tract infection. Subgroup analysis revealed bladder and bowel dysfunction was a significant risk factor more pronounced in low grade (I to III) vesicoureteral reflux (OR 2.8, p = 0.018). The estimation model was applied for prospective validation, which demonstrated predicted vs actual 2-year breakthrough urinary tract infection rates of 19% vs 21%. Stratifying the patients into 3 risk groups based on parameters in the risk model showed 2-year risk for breakthrough urinary tract infection was 8.6%, 26.0% and 62.5% in the low, intermediate and high risk groups, respectively. This proposed risk stratification and probability model allows prediction of 2-year risk of patient breakthrough urinary tract infection to better inform parents of possible outcomes and treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Sleep Problems are Associated with Development and Progression of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Results from REDUCE.

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    Branche, Brandee L; Howard, Lauren E; Moreira, Daniel M; Roehrborn, Claus; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L; Hopp, Martin L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2018-02-01

    Although lower urinary tract symptoms and sleep problems often develop together, to our knowledge it is unknown whether sleep disturbances are linked to lower urinary tract symptoms development and progression. As measured by the 6-item MOS-Sleep (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale) survey we examined the relationship between sleep problems, and the development and progression of lower urinary tract symptoms in the REDUCE (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) study. REDUCE was a randomized trial testing prostate cancer chemoprevention with dutasteride in men with prostate specific antigen 2.5 to 10 ng/ml and a negative biopsy. At baseline men completed MOS-Sleep and a scaled average was used to calculate the sleep score. Men were followed for 4 years and I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) was completed at baseline and every 6 months. Asymptomatic men had I-PSS less than 8 while symptomatic men had I-PSS 8 or greater. In the placebo arm of 2,588 men not receiving α-blockers or 5α-reductase inhibitors at baseline we tested the association between sleep problems and lower urinary tract symptom development and progression using Cox models. During followup lower urinary tract symptoms developed in 209 of 1,452 asymptomatic men (14%) and 580 of 1,136 (51%) with lower urinary tract symptoms demonstrated progression. On multivariable analysis higher sleep scores were suggestively associated with increased lower urinary tract symptoms in asymptomatic men (quartile 4 vs 1 HR 1.41, 95% CI 0.92-2.17, p = 0.12) and with lower urinary tract symptom progression in symptomatic men (per 10 points of sleep score HR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12, p = 0.029). Among men with lower urinary tract symptoms worse sleep scores were associated with the progression of lower urinary tract symptoms and among asymptomatic men worse sleep scores were suggestively associated with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms. If confirmed, these data suggest that sleep

  14. Probiotics in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections in children

    OpenAIRE

    Zwolińska, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections are a serious clinical problem both in adults and children. Febrile episodes of recurrent urinary tract infections may lead to the formation of renal scars and development of chronic kidney disease. Traditionally, management involved antibiotic prophylaxis introduced after a first febrile episode. Recently, however, the indications for antibiotic therapy have been narrowed down to treat cases of recurrent urinary tract infections and disorders which...

  15. An initially unidentified case of urinary tract infection due to Aerococcus urinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletis, Georgios; Chatzidimitriou, Dimitrios; Tsingerlioti, Fani; Chatzopoulou, Fani; Tzimagiorgis, Georgios

    2017-07-01

    Aerococcus urinae is a microorganism responsible for urinary tract and blood stream infections which are rarely reported in clinical practice. However, it has been proposed that the infrequency of such reports may be partially due to difficulties related to pathogen identification. We present here a case of an elderly male patient with urinary tract infection where A. urinae was initially not identified by a private microbiology laboratory. Our report highlights the need to consider A. urinae as a causative agent of urinary tract infections because if not identified and properly treated it may lead to endocarditis or septicemia.

  16. Evaluation of maternal urinary tract infection as a potential risk factor for neonatal urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalesi, Nasrin; Khosravi, Nastaran; Jalali, Ali; Amini, Leila

    2014-06-01

    To assess the relationship between maternal UTI during pregnancy and neonatal UTI. This cross-sectional study included eighty neonates referred to Ali-e-Asghar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, in 2011. The participants were divided into the study (with diagnosis of UTI; n = 40) and the control (without this type of infection; n = 40) groups. The mothers were asked about the history of UTI during pregnancy, and if the response was positive, the trimester in which UTI had occurred. Urinalysis and urine culture were carried out for all neonates. Overall, 14.9% of neonates had mothers with a positive history of UTI during their pregnancy (4.4%, 6.1%, and 4.4% during the 1(st), 2(nd), and 3(rd) trimesters, respectively). A significant relationship was detected between the occurrence of UTI in neonates and maternal UTI, so that the overall prevalence of UTI among neonates of affected mothers was significantly higher than that observed among non-infected mothers (30.0% versus 6.8%; p = 0.001). Maternal UTI resulted in 5.9-fold increased risk of neonatal UTI. In UTI group, the most common bacterial etiologies of UTI were Escherichia coli (65.9%), followed by Klebsiella (14.6%) and Staphylococci (9.8%). Our findings confirmed the association between the history of UTI in mother and occurrence of UTI in neonate, emphasizing to pay more attention for assessing and managing UTI in neonates in order to reduce the related complications.

  17. Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary flow rates in female patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chen-Hsun; Chang, Tien-Chun; Guo, Ya-Jun; Chen, Shyh-Chyan; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Huang, Kuo-How

    2011-01-01

    To investigate lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and voiding function in a cohort of hyperthyroid women. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance has been thought to cause LUTS in hyperthyroidism. Between January 2008 and December 2008, 65 newly diagnosed, untreated female hyperthyroid patients were enrolled in this study. Another 62 age-matched healthy women were enrolled as a control group. Demographics, LUTS, urinary flow rates, hyperthyroid symptoms, and serum levels of thyroid hormones were recorded before and after the medical treatment for hyperthyroidism. Compared with the control group, the hyperthyroid patients had a higher mean symptom score of frequency (1.15 ± 1.75 vs 0.31 ± 1.05, P = .01), incomplete emptying (0.91 ± 1.47 vs 0.29 ± 1.12, P = .02), straining (1.05 ± 0.85 vs 0.27 ± 0.51, P Hyperthyroid women demonstrated a lower mean peak flow rate (25.0 ± 5.3 vs 28.6 ± 6.1 mL/s, P = .02). After treatment, both LUTS and flow rates improved significantly. The severity of LUTS was associated with neither serum levels of thyroid hormone nor other hyperthyroid symptoms. Hyperthyroid women have worse LUTS and lower peak flow rates than healthy controls. However, the severity of LUTS is only mild (IPSS hyperthyroidism. The exact mechanisms of LUTS and/or lower urinary tract dysfunction in hyperthyroidism require further investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An update on new antibiotic prophylaxis and treatment for urinary tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbet, Jean Daniel; Lorrot, Mathie; Ulinski, Tim

    2017-10-01

    This review focuses on the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTI) in children and in particular its recent changes. Areas covered: Acute pyelonephritis, acute cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria or asymptomatic infections have to be clearly distinguished. Prompt treatment is required in pyelonephritis and cystitis, but not in asymptomatic bacteriuria or infection, in order to avoid selection of more virulent strains. This concept should be considered even in immunocompromised or bedridden children. In case of pyelonephritis, there should be no delay in beginning the antibiotic treatment in order to decrease the risk of long term complication, such as renal scars. Predisposing conditions for UTI, such as voiding anomalies and urinary tract malformation should be carefully evaluated. Expert opinion: One major concern is the increasing resistance to 3 rd generation cephalosporins. Therefore overconsumption in low-risk settings should be absolutely avoided. The prevalence of infections with E. coli producing extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) is increasing and pediatricians should be aware about the specific treatment options. Any recommendation about (initial) antibiotic treatment should be regularly updated and adapted to local resistance profiles and to economic factors in different health systems.

  19. Minimally invasive devices for treating lower urinary tract symptoms in benign prostate hyperplasia: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoun F

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fouad Aoun1, Quentin Marcelis,1,2 Thierry Roumeguère,2 1Department of Urology, Jules Bordet Institute, 2Department of Urology, Erasme Hospital, University Clinics of Brussels, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium Abstract: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH represents a spectrum of related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. The cost of currently recommended medications and the discontinuation rate due to side effects are significant drawbacks limiting their long-term use in clinical practice. Interventional procedures, considered as the definitive treatment for BPH, carry a significant risk of treatment-related complications in frail patients. These issues have contributed to the emergence of new approaches as alternative options to standard therapies. This paper reviews the recent literature regarding the experimental treatments under investigation and presents the currently available experimental devices and techniques used under local anesthesia for the treatment of LUTS/BPH in the vast majority of cases. Devices for delivery of thermal treatment (microwaves, radiofrequency, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and the Rezum system, mechanical devices (prostatic stent and urethral lift, fractionation of prostatic tissue (histotripsy and aquablation, prostate artery embolization, and intraprostatic drugs are discussed. Evidence for the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of these “minimally invasive procedures” is analyzed. Keywords: lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, minimally invasive therapies, new approaches, experimental therapy

  20. Prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection with probiotics: Review and research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, D; Sheridan, L; Papatsoris, A; Faruquz, Z; Barua, J M; Junaid, I; Pati, Y; Chinegwundoh, F; Buchholz, N

    2008-04-01

    The spiralling costs of antibiotic therapy, the appearance of multiresistant bacteria and more importantly for patients and clinicians, unsatisfactory therapeutic options in recurrent urinary tract infection (RUTI) calls for alternative and advanced medical solutions. So far no sufficient means to successfully prevent painful and disabling RUTI has been found. Even though long-term oral antibiotic treatment has been used with some success as a therapeutic option, this is no longer secure due to the development of bacterial resistance. One promising alternative is the use of live microorganisms (probiotics) to prevent and treat recurrent complicated and uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI).The human normal bacterial flora is increasingly recognised as an important defence to infection. Since the advent of antibiotic treatment five decades ago, a linear relation between antibiotic use and reduction in pathogenic bacteria has become established as medical conventional wisdom. But with the use of antibiotics the beneficial bacterial flora hosted by the human body is destroyed and pathogenic bacteria are selectively enabled to overgrow internal and external surfaces. The benign bacterial flora is crucial for body function and oervgrowth with pathogenic microorganisms leads to illness. Thus the concept of supporting the human body's normal flora with live microorganisms conferring a beneficial health effect is an important medical strategy.