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Sample records for complex topography zones

  1. Estimation of global daily irradiation in complex topography zones using digital elevation models and meteosat images: Comparison of the results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Durban, M. [Dpto. de Lenguajes y Computacion, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Zarzalejo, L.F.; Polo, J. [Dpto. de Energia, CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bosch, J.L.; Rosiek, S.; Batlles, F.J. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2009-09-15

    The knowledge of the solar irradiation in a certain place is fundamental for the suitable location of solar systems, both thermal and photovoltaic. On the local scale, the topography is the most important modulating factor of the solar irradiation on the surface. In this work the global daily irradiation is estimated concerning various sky conditions, in zones of complex topography. In order to estimate the global daily irradiation we use a methodology based on a Digital Terrain Model (DTM), on one hand making use of pyranometer measurements and on the other hand utilizing satellite images. We underline that DTM application employing pyranometer measurements produces better results than estimation using satellite images, though accuracy of the same order is obtained in both cases for Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and Mean Bias Error (MBE). (author)

  2. Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Complex Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Matthias; Rotach, Mathias; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Gohm, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    On a global scale the budget of carbon dioxide (CO_2) bears a quite substantial uncertainty, which is commonly understood to be mainly due to land-surface exchange processes. In this project we investigate to what extent complex topography can amplify these land-surface exchange processes. The hypothesis is that, on the meso-scale, topography adds additional atmospheric mechanisms that drive the exchange of CO2 at the surface. This sensitivity model study investigates an idealized sine shaped valley with the atmospheric numerical model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupled to the community land model (CLM) to study the effect of complex topography on the CO2 budget compared to flat terrain. The experiment is designed to estimate the effect of the topography during maximum ecosystem exchange in summer using meteorological and ecosystem conditions at solstice, the 21. of June. Systematic variation of meteorological initial conditions, plant functional types and the topography creates an ensemble that unveils the fundamental factors that dominate the differences of CO2 between simulations with topography compared to plain surfaces in the model. The sign and magnitude of the difference between the CO2 exchange over topography and over a plain simulation are strongly dependent on the CLM plant functional type, the initial temperature, the initial relative humidity, the latitude and the area height distribution of the topography. However, in this model experiment the topography is, in the mean, a sink to the CO2 budget in the order of 5% per day.

  3. Unraveling topography around subduction zones from laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, Laurent; Guillaume, Benjamin; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio; Royden, Leigh H.

    2012-03-01

    The relief around subduction zones results from the interplay of dynamic processes that may locally exceed the (iso)static contributions. The viscous dissipation of the energy in and around subduction zones is capable of generating kilometer scale vertical ground movements. In order to evaluate dynamic topography in a self-consistent subduction system, we carried out a set of laboratory experiments, wherein the lithosphere and mantle are simulated by means of Newtonian viscous materials, namely silicone putty and glucose syrup. Models are kept in their most simple form and are made of negative buoyancy plates, of variable width and thickness, freely plunging into the syrup. The surface of the model and the top of the slab are scanned in three dimensions. A forebulge systematically emerges from the bending of the viscous plate, adjacent to the trench. With a large wavelength, dynamic pressure offsets the foreside and backside of the slab by ~ 500 m on average. The suction, that accompanies the vertical descent of the slab depresses the surface on both sides. At a distance equal to the half-width of the slab, the topographic depression amounts to ~ 500 m on average and becomes negligible at a distance that equals the width of the slab. In order to explore the impact of slab rollback on the topography, the trailing edge of the plates is alternatively fixed to (fixed mode) and freed from (free mode) the end wall of the tank. Both the pressure and suction components of the topography are ~ 30% lower in the free mode, indicating that slab rollback fosters the dynamic subsidence of upper plates. Our models are compatible with first order observations of the topography around the East Scotia, Tonga, Kermadec and Banda subduction zones, which exhibit anomalous depths of nearly 1 km as compared to adjacent sea floor of comparable age.

  4. ATM Coastal Topography-Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipp, Emily S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Yates, Xan; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Texas coastline within UTM zone 15, from Matagorda Peninsula to Galveston Island, acquired October 12-13, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant

  5. ATM Coastal Topography-Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipp, Emily S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Yates, Xan; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Texas coastline within UTM zone 14, acquired October 12-13, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used

  6. Streak Tectonics associated with the Irregular Slab Topography at Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, T.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the physical features of streak tectonics (or abrasion tectonics) associated with the irregular surface topography, such as local convex rise or seamount(s), on the downgoing slab at subduction zones. Marine surveys such as sophisticated multichannel seismic experiments have revealed the detailed vertical structure of the overriding lithosphere as well as the upper-most part of downgoing slab at the fore-arc zone from the trench axis through the inclined plate interface zone at a depth of 10 - 15km. As previously, some researchers (e.g., Eguchi, 1979, 1996; Hilde, 1983; Suzan, 2010) demonstrated the influence of the surface irregular topography of the slab on the occurrence regime of greater interplate seismic events with the low-angle underthrusting slip. However, the earlier studies didn't incorporate any effects due to the spherical buckling of oceanic lithosphere with the age-dependent elastic thickness at subduction zones. In the case of a subduction zone where the slab age has gradually been decreasing or increasing, the spherical buckling of elastic shell (e.g., Eguchi, 2012) suggests that the interplate mechanical coupling strength varies with time and space. Next, we argue some tectonic features of strain-rate dependent deformation at areas surrounding an isolated-seamount on the downgoing slab, such as the quasi-static fluid lubrication, boundary lubrication or plastic deformation. We then discuss how to represent mathematically the streak process during a larger interplate seismic event at the non-uniform plate interface zone.

  7. Fractional snow-covered area parameterization over complex topography

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    N. Helbig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractional snow-covered area (SCA is a key parameter in large-scale hydrological, meteorological and climate models. Since SCA affects albedos and surface energy balance fluxes, it is especially of interest over mountainous terrain where generally a reduced SCA is observed in large grid cells. Temporal and spatial snow distributions are however difficult to measure over complex topography. We therefore present a parameterization of the SCA based on a new subgrid parameterization for the standard deviation of snow depth over complex topography. Highly-resolved snow depth data at peak of winter were used from two distinct climatic regions, in eastern Switzerland and in the Spanish Pyrenees. Topographic scaling parameters are derived assuming Gaussian slope characteristics. We use computationally cheap terrain parameters, namely the correlation length of subgrid topographic features and the mean squared slope. A scale dependent analysis was performed by randomly aggregating the alpine catchments in domain sizes ranging from 50 m to 3 km. For the larger domain sizes, snow depth was predominantly normally distributed. Trends between terrain parameters and standard deviation of snow depth were similar for both climatic regions, allowing to parameterize the standard deviation of snow depth based on terrain parameters. To make the parameterization widely applicable, we introduced the mean snow depth as a climate indicator. Assuming a normal snow distribution and spatially homogeneous melt, snow cover depletion curves were derived for a broad range of coefficients of variations. The most accurate closed form fit resembled an existing SCA parameterization. By including the subgrid parameterization for the standard deviation of snow depth, we extended the SCA parameterization for topographic influences. For all domain sizes we obtained errors lower than 10% between measured and parameterized SCA.

  8. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bottrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  9. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  10. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bottrill

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB is caused by slab steepening drawing material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate causes the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. This uplift and subsidence pattern correlates well with our modelled topography changes.

  11. 3D Numerical modelling of topography development associated with curved subduction zones

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    Munch, Jessica; Ueda, Kosuke; Burg, Jean-Pierre; May, Dave; Gerya, Taras

    2017-04-01

    Curved subduction zones, also called oroclines, are geological features found in various places on Earth. They occur in diverse geodynamic settings: 1) single slab subduction in oceanic domain (e.g. Sandwich trench in the Southern Atlantic); 2) single slab subduction in continental domain, (e.g. Gibraltar-Alboran orocline in the Western Mediterranean) 3); multi-slab subduction (e.g. Caribbean orocline in the South-East of the Gulf of Mexico). These systems present various curvatures, lengths (few hundreds to thousands of km) and ages (less than 35 Ma for Gibraltar Alboran orocline, up to 100 Ma for the Caribbean). Recent studies suggested that the formation of curved subduction systems depends on slab properties (age, length, etc) and may be linked with processes such as retreating subduction and delamination. Plume induced subduction initiation has been proposed for the Caribbean. All of these processes involve deep mechanisms such as mantle and slab dynamics. However, subduction zones always generate topography (trenches, uplifts, etc), which is likely to be influenced by surface processes. Hence, surface processes may also influence the evolution of subduction zones. We focus on different kinds of subduction systems initiated by plume-lithosphere interactions (single slab subduction/multi-slab subduction) and scrutinize their surface expression. We use numerical modeling to examine large-scale subduction initiation and three-dimensional slab retreat. We perform two kinds of simulations: 1) large scale subduction initiation with the 3D-thermomechanical code I3ELVIS (Gerya and Yuen, 2007) in an oceanic domain and 2) large scale subduction initiation in oceanic domain using I3ELVIS coupled with a robust new surface processes model (SPM). One to several retreating slabs form in the absence of surface processes, when the conditions for subduction initiation are reached (c.f. Gerya et al., 2015), and ridges occur in the middle of the extensional domain opened by slab

  12. Downscaling the Local Weather Above Glaciers in Complex Topography

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    Horak, Johannes; Hofer, Marlis; Gutmann, Ethan; Gohm, Alexander; Rotach, Mathias

    2017-04-01

    Glaciers have experienced a substantial ice-volume loss during the 20th century. To study their response to climate change, process-based glacier mass-balance models (PBGMs) are employed, which require a faithful representation of the state of the atmosphere above the glacier at high spatial and temporal resolution. Glaciers are usually located in complex topography where weather stations are scarce or not existent at all due to the remoteness of such sites and the associated high cost of maintenance. Furthermore. the effective resolution of global circulation models is too large to adequately capture the local topography and represent local weather, which is prerequisite for atmospheric input used by PBGMs. Dynamical downscaling is a physically consistent but computationally expensive approach to bridge the scale gap between GCM output and input needed by PBGMs, while statistical downscaling is faster but requires measurements for training. Both methods have their merits, however, a computationally frugal approach that does not rely on measurements is desirable, especially for long term studies of glacier response to future climate. In this study the intermediate complexity atmospheric research model (ICAR) is employed (Gutmann et al., 2016). It simplifies the wind field physics by relying on analytical solutions derived with linear theory. ICAR then advects atmospheric quantities within this wind field. This allows for computationally fast downscaling and yields a physically consistent set of atmospheric variables. First results obtained from downscaling air temperature, precipitation amount, relative humidity and wind speed to 4 × 4 km2 are presented. Preliminary ICAR is applied for a six month simulation period during five years and evaluated for three domains located in very distinct climates, namely the Southern Alps of New Zealand, the Cordillera Blanca in Peru and the European Alps using ERA Interim reanalysis data (ERAI) as forcing data set. The

  13. ATM Coastal Topography - Louisiana, 2001: UTM Zone 16 (Part 2 of 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Louisiana coastline beach face within UTM Zone 16, from Grand Isle to the Chandeleur Islands, acquired September 7 and 9, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and

  14. ATM Coastal Topography-Louisiana, 2001: UTM Zone 15 (Part 1 of 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Louisiana coastline beach face within UTM Zone 15, from Isles Dernieres to Grand Isle, acquired September 7 and 10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last

  15. Rapid mapping of ultrafine fault zone topography with structure from motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kendra; Nissen, Edwin; Saripalli, Srikanth; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; McGarey, Patrick; Scharer, Katherine M.; Williams, Patrick; Blisniuk, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) generates high-resolution topography and coregistered texture (color) from an unstructured set of overlapping photographs taken from varying viewpoints, overcoming many of the cost, time, and logistical limitations of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and other topographic surveying methods. This paper provides the first investigation of SfM as a tool for mapping fault zone topography in areas of sparse or low-lying vegetation. First, we present a simple, affordable SfM workflow, based on an unmanned helium balloon or motorized glider, an inexpensive camera, and semiautomated software. Second, we illustrate the system at two sites on southern California faults covered by existing airborne or terrestrial LiDAR, enabling a comparative assessment of SfM topography resolution and precision. At the first site, an ∼0.1 km2 alluvial fan on the San Andreas fault, a colored point cloud of density mostly >700 points/m2 and a 3 cm digital elevation model (DEM) and orthophoto were produced from 233 photos collected ∼50 m above ground level. When a few global positioning system ground control points are incorporated, closest point vertical distances to the much sparser (∼4 points/m2) airborne LiDAR point cloud are mostly 530 points/m2 and a 2 cm DEM and orthophoto were produced from 450 photos taken from ∼60 m above ground level. Closest point vertical distances to existing terrestrial LiDAR data of comparable density are mostly <6 cm. Each SfM survey took ∼2 h to complete and several hours to generate the scene topography and texture. SfM greatly facilitates the imaging of subtle geomorphic offsets related to past earthquakes as well as rapid response mapping or long-term monitoring of faulted landscapes.

  16. Influence of Topography on Root Processes in the Shale Hills-Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenstat, D. M.; Orr, A. S.; Adams, T. S.; Chen, W.; Gaines, K.

    2015-12-01

    Topography can strongly influence root and associated mycorrhizal fungal function in the Critical Zone. In the Shale Hills-Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory (SSCZO), soil depths range from more than 80 cm deep in the valley floor to about 25 cm on the ridge top. Tree height varies from about 28 m tall at the valley floor to about 17 m tall at the ridge top. Yet total absorptive root length to depth of refusal is quite similar across the hillslope. We find root length density to vary as much at locations only 1-2 m apart as at scales of hundreds of meters across the catchment. Tree community composition also varies along the hillslope, including tree species that vary widely in thickness of their absorptive roots and type of mycorrhiza (arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal). Studies of trees in a common garden of 16 tree species and in forests near SSCZO indicate that both root morphology and mycorrhizal type can strongly influence root foraging. Species that form thick absorptive roots appear more dependent on mycorrhizal fungi and thin-root species forage more by root proliferation. Ectomycorrhizal trees show more variation in foraging precision (proliferation in a nutrient-rich patch relative to that in an unenriched patch) of their mycorrhizal hyphae whereas AM trees show more variation in foraging precision by root proliferation, indicating alternative strategies among trees of different mycorrhizal types. Collectively, the results provide insight into how topography can influence foraging belowground.

  17. Simultaneous Observations of Beach and Surf-Zone Topography from a sUAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R. K.; Brodie, K. L.; Spore, N.

    2016-02-01

    Beaches and surf-zones can vary rapidly in time and space, necessitating frequent, spatially extensive observations for up-to-date knowledge on their current condition. Traditional surveying methods are expensive, can be dangerous in large wave conditions, and can lack sufficient spatial density. Existing remote sensing technologies have focused on both active sensing (airborne lidar, X-band radar) or passive sensing (electro-optical or infrared imagery) to either directly measure elevations of the beach and seafloor or exploit the optical signal of refracting and breaking waves in the surf-zone. These methods, however, can be prohibitively expensive for widespread, high temporal frequency use, or lack the spatial coverage required to quantify a large stretch of beach. UAS offer an affordable and accessible alternative, but existing COTS UAS sensor suites are not optimized for generation of bathymetry and topography at the same time. Here, we present a new approach using an inexpensive, custom multi-camera sensor designed with a wide field of view for integration on either a fixed wing of multirotor UAS platform. We introduce a processing methodology and workflow to generate a topographic pointcloud and rectified imagery of the water surface using structure from motion algorithms. The topographic pointcloud data is processed to generate a DSM of the beach and extract morphologic parameters (beach slope, dune toe, etc). Rectified imagery of the water surface is used to quantify sandbar location as well as perform a celerity based bathymetric inversion. Accuracy of this methodology is calculated by comparing processed data to lidar pointclouds, as well as photo identifiable targets on the beach and jetted into the surf zone. Funded by the USACE Military Engineering POD:A&U Program and Coastal Field Data Collection Program.

  18. Numerical modeling and analysis of the effect of complex Greek topography on tornadogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsangouras, I. T.; Pytharoulis, I.; Nastos, P. T.

    2014-07-01

    accompanied by analysis of the absolute vorticity budget. Numerical simulations revealed that the complex topography constituted an important factor during the 17 November 2007 and 12 February 2010 events, based on EHI, SRH, BRN, and MCAPE analyses. Conversely, topography around the 20 September 2011 event was characterized as the least significant factor based on EHI, SRH, BRN, and MCAPE analyses.

  19. Numerical modeling and analysis of the effect of Greek complex topography on tornado genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. T. Matsangouras

    2014-02-01

    . Numerical simulations revealed that the complex topography was denoted as an important factor during 17 November 2007 and 12 February 2010 events, based on EHI and BRN analyses. Topography around 20 September 2011 event was characterized as the least factor based on EHI, SRH, BRN analyses.

  20. A LADAR bare earth extraction technique for diverse topography and complex scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.

    2012-06-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to LADAR data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. A successful approach provides a flexible methodology (adaptable for topography and/or environment) that is capable of integrating multiple ladar point cloud data attributes. A newly developed approach (TE-SiP) uses a 2nd and 3rd order spatial derivative for each point in the DEM to determine sets of contiguous regions of similar elevation. Specifically, the derivative of the central point represents the curvature of the terrain at that position. Contiguous sets of high (positive or negative) values define sharp edges such as building edges or cliffs. This method is independent of the slope, such that very steep, but continuous topography still have relatively low curvature values and are preserved in the terrain classification. Next, a recursive segmentation method identifies unique features of homogeneity on the surface separated by areas of high curvature. An iterative selection process is used to eliminate regions containing buildings or vegetation from the terrain surface. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LADAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity. The results shown here include developed and forested regions in the Dominican Republic.

  1. Integrated approach to ecohydrology of semi-arid sites in areas of complex topography and biome transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, H. A.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Vivoni, E. R.; Bras, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Vegetation constitutes an essential link in the hydrologic cycle at the land surface - atmosphere interface. Vegetation exerts a predominant control over the partition of rainfall into soil infiltration and evapotranspiration and determines to a great extent the water budget of entire regions. Conversely, water availability has a strong influence on the vegetation dynamics, including growth rates and overall health. In semiarid areas, changes in vegetation composition can follow slight variations in climate-derived moisture availability that, in turn, have a feedback effect on the surface water and energy balance. In this study, we present an integrated approach for studying the ecohydrology of semiarid regions characterized by complex topography and transitions between different vegetation life forms (grasses, shrubs, trees). We first present a set of hypotheses on the interaction between vegetation, landscape conditions, and climate variability in biome transitions zones. These hypotheses will be tested via the combination of numerical modeling and field data collection in the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, central New Mexico. The field site is a first-order drainage basin consisting of two opposing hillslopes that differentially support a shrub-grass ecosystem and a conifer-grass community. Our modeling approaches consist of an ecohydrological module coupled to a 1-D vadose zone model as well as a more complex 3-D ecohydrological framework capable of simulating full vegetation dynamics at the watershed scale. The field instrumentation and model development efforts will be used synergistically to improve our understanding of the ecohydrology of semiarid complex watersheds. We then present an analysis of the ecohydrological model simulations driven by short- term meteorological data (~10 years) as well as by longer term, synthetically-generated climate scenarios. In particular, we will focus on the response of different vegetation communities to the

  2. Complex rupture mechanism and topography control symmetry of mass - wasting pattern, 2010 Haiti earthquake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorum, T.; van Westen, C.J.; Korup, Oliver; van der Meijde, M.; Fan, Xuanmei; van der Meer, F.D.

    2013-01-01

    The 12 January 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake occurred in a complex deformation zone at the boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. Combined geodetic, geological and seismological data posited that surface deformation was driven by rupture on the Léogâne blind thrust fault, while par

  3. Complex rupture mechanism and topography control symmetry of mass - wasting pattern, 2010 Haiti earthquake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorum, Tolga; Westen, van Cees J.; Korup, Oliver; Meijde, van der Mark; Fan, Xuanmei; Meer, van der Freek D.

    2013-01-01

    The 12 January 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake occurred in a complex deformation zone at the boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. Combined geodetic, geological and seismological data posited that surface deformation was driven by rupture on the Léogâne blind thrust fault, while par

  4. Rapid, decimeter-resolution fault zone topography mapped with Structure from Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nissen, E.; Saripalli, S.; Arrowsmith, R.; McGarey, P.; Scharer, K. M.; Williams, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in the generation of high-resolution topography have revolutionized our ability to detect subtle geomorphic features related to ground-rupturing earthquakes. Currently, the most popular topographic mapping methods are airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Though powerful, these laser scanning methods have some inherent drawbacks: airborne LiDAR is expensive and can be logistically complicated, while TLS is time consuming even for small field sites and suffers from patchy coverage due to its restricted field-of-view. An alternative mapping technique, called Structure from Motion (SfM), builds upon traditional photogrammetry to reproduce the topography and texture of a scene from photographs taken at varying viewpoints. The improved availability of cheap, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as camera platforms further expedites data collection by covering large areas efficiently with optimal camera angles. Here, we introduce a simple and affordable UAV- or balloon-based SfM mapping system which can produce dense point clouds and sub-decimeter resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) registered to geospatial coordinates using either the photograph's GPS tags or a few ground control points across the scene. The system is ideally suited for studying ruptures of prehistoric, historic, and modern earthquakes in areas of sparse or low-lying vegetation. We use two sites from southern California faults to illustrate. The first is the ~0.1 km2 Washington Street site, located on the Banning strand of the San Andreas fault near Thousand Palms. A high-resolution DEM with ~700 point/m2 was produced from 230 photos collected on a balloon platform flying at 50 m above the ground. The second site is the Galway Lake Road site, which spans a ~1 km strip of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake on the Emerson Fault. The 100 point/m2 DEM was produced from 267 photos taken with a balloon platform at a height of 60 m above the ground

  5. Grayscale lithography-automated mask generation for complex three-dimensional topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, James; Ratnayake, Dilan; McKenna, Curtis; Walsh, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Grayscale lithography is a relatively underutilized technique that enables fabrication of three-dimensional (3-D) microstructures in photosensitive polymers (photoresists). By spatially modulating ultraviolet (UV) dosage during the writing process, one can vary the depth at which photoresist is developed. This means complex structures and bioinspired designs can readily be produced that would otherwise be cost prohibitive or too time intensive to fabricate. The main barrier to widespread grayscale implementation, however, stems from the laborious generation of mask files required to create complex surface topography. We present a process and associated software utility for automatically generating grayscale mask files from 3-D models created within industry-standard computer-aided design (CAD) suites. By shifting the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) design onus to commonly used CAD programs ideal for complex surfacing, engineering professionals already familiar with traditional 3-D CAD software can readily utilize their pre-existing skills to make valuable contributions to the MEMS community. Our conversion process is demonstrated by prototyping several samples on a laser pattern generator-capital equipment already in use in many foundries. Finally, an empirical calibration technique is shown that compensates for nonlinear relationships between UV exposure intensity and photoresist development depth as well as a thermal reflow technique to help smooth microstructure surfaces.

  6. Automated bare earth extraction technique for complex topography in light detection and ranging surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.; Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Bradford, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital surface models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. Few existing algorithms can handle substantial terrain diversity without significant editing or user interaction. This effort presents a newly developed methodology that provides a flexible, adaptable tool capable of integrating multiple LiDAR data attributes for an accurate terrain assessment. The terrain extraction and segmentation (TEXAS) approach uses a third-order spatial derivative for each point in the digital surface model to determine the curvature of the terrain rather than rely solely on the slope. The utilization of the curvature has shown to successfully preserve ground points in areas of steep terrain as they typically exhibit low curvature. Within the framework of TEXAS, the contiguous sets of points with low curvatures are grouped into regions using an edge-based segmentation method. The process does not require any user inputs and is completely data driven. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LiDAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity.

  7. Airborne in situ characterization of dry urban aerosol optical properties around complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targino, Admir Créso; Noone, Kevin J.

    2006-02-01

    In situ data from the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study—NARSTO were used to describe the aerosol optical properties in an urban area whose aerosol distribution is modified as the aerosols are advected over the surrounding topography. The data consist of measurements made with a nephelometer and absorption photometer onboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Pelican aircraft. The cases investigated in this study include vertical profiles flown over coastal sites as well as sites located along some important mountain ranges in southern California. The vertical distribution of the aerosol in the Los Angeles Basin showed a complex configuration, directly related with the local meteorological circulations and the surrounding topography. High spatial and temporal variability in air pollutant concentrations within a relatively small area was found, as indicated by the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficient data. The results suggest that in areas with such complex terrain, a high spatial resolution is required in order to adequately describe the aerosol optical quantities. Principal components analysis (PCA) has been applied to aerosol chemical samples in order to identify the major aerosol types in the Los Angeles Basin. The technique yielded four components that accounted for 78% of the variance in the data set. These were indicative of marine aerosols, urban aerosols, trace elements and secondary aerosol components of traffic emissions and agricultural activities. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer model has been employed to simulate the effects that different aerosol vertical profiles have on the attenuation of solar energy. The cases examined were selected using the results of the PCA and in situ data were used to describe the atmospheric optical properties in the model. These investigations comprise a number of sensitivity tests to evaluate the effects on the results of the location of the aerosol layers as well as

  8. Aspects of Radiation Budget, Subsurface Lateral Moisture Exchange, and Vegetation Function in Areas of Complex Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. Y.; Bras, R. L.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Vivoni, E. R.

    2004-12-01

    There is evidence that topography strongly affects the state, function, and distribution of vegetation by controlling incoming solar radiation and lateral redistribution of soil moisture. However, numerical experiments studying the effects that a topography can have on vegetation have oversimplified the treatment of topography and/or the representation of vegetation. We investigate the control of topography on vegetation state and stress via detailed modeling of radiation and soil moisture budgets across the varied terrain of a watershed. A detailed vegetation-hydrology model parameterizes the processes of canopy radiative transfer and rainfall interception and couples the processes of infiltration and evapotranspiration to photosynthesis via moisture uptake through a root systems with varied profiles. The model is applied on a continuous basis to synthetic watersheds of topography dominated by either convex or concave hillslopes. The numerical analysis is carried out for several plant functional types and soils. Inferences from the spatially-distributed dynamics are used to examine topographic niches favorable to vegetation.

  9. Multi-scale variability of winds in the complex topography of southwestern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius O. Jonassen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-scale variability of winds in the complex terrain of southwestern Norway is investigated using up to 20 yr of observations from nine automatic weather stations and reanalysis data. Significant differences between the large- and local-scale winds are found. These differences are mainly governed by the large-scale topography of Southern Norway. Winds from the southeast and statically stable flow from the northwest are found to be significantly reduced at the ground level due to large-scale wake and blocking effects. Southwesterly and northeasterly winds are orographically enhanced. At a local scale, there are differences in the wind speed distributions between the surface stations, both in space and time. These differences can to a large extent be quantified in terms of the Weibull distribution function and associated with the respective geographical locations as discretised in four characteristic surface categories: offshore, inland, coast and mountain. The inland category is found to be associated with relatively low but variable wind speeds, whereas the coastal and offshore locations are dominated by more steady and stronger winds. The mountain wind speed distribution is fundamentally different from the others; it shares the variability with the inland locations but the higher average wind speed with the other categories.

  10. Ground motion in the presence of complex Topography II: Earthquake sources and 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephen; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Meremonte, Mark; Leeds, Alena L.

    2017-01-01

    Eight seismic stations were placed in a linear array with a topographic relief of 222 m over Mission Peak in the east San Francisco Bay region for a period of one year to study topographic effects. Seventy‐two well‐recorded local earthquakes are used to calculate spectral amplitude ratios relative to a reference site. A well‐defined fundamental resonance peak is observed with individual station amplitudes following the theoretically predicted progression of larger amplitudes in the upslope direction. Favored directions of vibration are also seen that are related to the trapping of shear waves within the primary ridge dimensions. Spectral peaks above the fundamental one are also related to topographic effects but follow a more complex pattern. Theoretical predictions using a 3D velocity model and accurate topography reproduce many of the general frequency and time‐domain features of the data. Shifts in spectral frequencies and amplitude differences, however, are related to deficiencies of the model and point out the importance of contributing factors, including the shear‐wave velocity under the topographic feature, near‐surface velocity gradients, and source parameters.

  11. Paleoseismological analysis on the basis of precise sea bottom topography and sonic prospecting along the normal fault in the Beppu-Haneyama Fault Zone in Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, K.; Haraguchi, T.; Yamada, K.; Yoshinaga, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The subaqueous topography of bays or lakes along the large active faults are influenced by displacement on fault and strong motion related sediments such as land slide, turbidite etc. We carried out precise topographic survey using multi-beam sonic survey, and seismic reflection survey to about 40m deep sediments in Beppu Bay, which is a pull apart basin with normal faults related to right lateral movements of Median Tectonic Line in southwest Japan. In west central Kyushu, long active fault zone named as Beppu - Haneyama Fault zone runs with E-W direction normal fault zone. The southwest boundary of Beppu Bay is a part of Beppu-Haneyama Fault zone and normal fault of pull apart basin. The multi beam sonic data show the characteristic altitude distribution (topography) of steep inclining slope from shore side to the deepest part with 70m below sea level along the coast, and also submarine slidings occurred at off Beppu and off Oita. Within those areas, several blocks of more than 100m has preserved shape and developed to sliding direction. From the viewpoint of sliding topography, sliding movements are thought sector collapse during short interval, and main cause is thought the movement of directly below active fault and related strong seismic motion. The sonic prospecting data show several reflection horizons indicating volcanic ashes and sand seams. Around two submarine sliding deposit areas, continuation of clear reflections are sparse influenced by event sedimentation and thick coarse sediments. 88 m sediment cores from 7 sites (core length: 8m to 20m long per site) from deepest part and submarine sliding area in late July this year (2015) will make clear that construction age of these topography and construction mechanism from lithological characteristics, and comparison to historical record including large earthquake occurred in 1596.

  12. Numerical modeling and analysis of the effect of complex Greek topography on tornadogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Matsangouras, I. T.; Pytharoulis, I.; P. T. Nastos

    2014-01-01

    Tornadoes have been reported in Greece over recent decades in specific sub-geographical areas and have been associated with strong synoptic forcing. While it has been established that meteorological conditions over Greece are affected at various scales by the significant variability of topography, the Ionian Sea to the west and the Aegean Sea to the east, there is still uncertainty regarding topography's importance on tornadic generation and development. The aim of th...

  13. An investigation of ozone and planetary boundary layer dynamics over the complex topography of Grenoble combining measurements and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Couach, O.; Balin, I.; Jiménez, R; P. Ristori(CEILAP); Perego, S.; Kirchner, F.; Simeonov, V.; Calpini, B.; H. Bergh

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns an evaluation of ozone (O3) and planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics over the complex topography of the Grenoble region through a combination of measurements and mesoscale model (METPHOMOD) predictions for three days, during July 1999. The measurements of O3 and PBL structure were obtained with a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, situated 20 km south of Grenoble at Vif (310 m ASL). The combined lidar observations ...

  14. Meteorological control of air pollution in a complex topography, high-altitude valley in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Pizarro, R.; Arango, C. D.; Peña, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    About two-thirds of the Latin-American population lives on the Andes. In Colombia, 70% of the population lives at altitudes over 1 km above the sea level (ASL) on a complex topography 3 Andean mountain-chain system. Understanding and properly modeling air pollution in the Tropical Andes is thus a challenging task not just because of the complexity of horizontal and vertical transport in the Intertropical Convergence Zone but because of the strong influence of regional- and local-scale circulation phenomena. The Sogamoso Valley (5 degrees 43' N, 72 degrees 55' W, 2570 m ASL), located on the Colombian Andes Eastern Mountain Chain, is one of the most industrialized regions of Colombia. Air quality in this region is affected by a heterogeneous group of emission sources, which include truck traffic, heavy industry (including steelworks and cement), medium- and small-scale industry, and around 600 low-technology, highly polluting brick and quicklime production furnaces. 24-h average PM10 concentrations frequently double the Colombian standard (150 μg/m3). Measurements and analysis conducted in 2002 found that relatively rapid changes in the regional atmospheric circulation patterns strongly influence the Sogamoso Valley air quality, including drastic PM10 concentration variations observed during periods of fairly steady emissions. The strong linear dependence of the daily temperature variation amplitude and the maximum wind speed on the daily accumulated solar radiation suggests that air quality is ultimately determined by the synoptic activation of local and mesoscale circulation patterns and meteorological conditions, including mountain and valley winds, strong anabatic and katabatic winds from the lowlands (at both sides of the Colombian Andes Eastern Mountain Chain), channeling, and radiative cooling temperature inversion. During clear sky periods, katabatic advection of pollution from furnaces on the foothills resulted in recurrent nocturnal pollution episodes with

  15. Location and moment tensor inversion of small earthquakes using 3D Green's functions in models with rugged topography: application to the Longmenshan fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Chen, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    With dense seismic arrays and advanced imaging methods, regional three-dimensional (3D) Earth models have become more accurate. It is now increasingly feasible and advantageous to use a 3D Earth model to better locate earthquakes and invert their source mechanisms by fitting synthetics to observed waveforms. In this study, we develop an approach to determine both the earthquake location and source mechanism from waveform information. The observed waveforms are filtered in different frequency bands and separated into windows for the individual phases. Instead of picking the arrival times, the traveltime differences are measured by cross-correlation between synthetic waveforms based on the 3D Earth model and observed waveforms. The earthquake location is determined by minimizing the cross-correlation traveltime differences. We then fix the horizontal location of the earthquake and perform a grid search in depth to determine the source mechanism at each point by fitting the synthetic and observed waveforms. This new method is verified by a synthetic test with noise added to the synthetic waveforms and a realistic station distribution. We apply this method to a series of M W3.4-5.6 earthquakes in the Longmenshan fault (LMSF) zone, a region with rugged topography between the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau and the western part of the Sichuan basin. The results show that our solutions result in improved waveform fits compared to the source parameters from the catalogs we used and the location can be better constrained than the amplitude-only approach. Furthermore, the source solutions with realistic topography provide a better fit to the observed waveforms than those without the topography, indicating the need to take the topography into account in regions with rugged topography.

  16. Validating the MYSTIC three-dimensional radiative transfer model with observations from the complex topography of Arizona's Meteor Crater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mayer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The MYSTIC three-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer model has been extended to simulate solar and thermal irradiances with a rigorous consideration of topography. Forward as well as backward Monte Carlo simulations are possible for arbitrarily oriented surfaces and we demonstrate that the backward Monte Carlo technique is superior to the forward method for applications involving topography, by greatly reducing the computational demands. MYSTIC is used to simulate the short- and longwave radiation fields during a clear day and night in and around Arizona's Meteor Crater, a bowl-shaped, 165-m-deep basin with a diameter of 1200 m. The simulations are made over a 4 by 4 km2 domain using a 10-m horizontal resolution digital elevation model and meteorological input data collected during the METCRAX (Meteor Crater Experiment field experiment in 2006. Irradiance (or radiative flux measurements at multiple locations inside the crater are then used to evaluate the simulations. MYSTIC is shown to realistically model the complex interactions between topography and the radiative field, resolving the effects of terrain shading, terrain exposure, and longwave surface emissions. The effects of surface temperature variations and of temperature stratification within the crater atmosphere on the near-surface longwave irradiance are then evaluated with additional simulations.

  17. Validation and Inter-comparison of Satellite Rainfall Products over East Africa's Complex Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinku, T.; Ceccato, P.; Grover-Kopec, E.; Connor, S. J.; Ropelewski, C. F.

    2006-05-01

    A relatively dense station network of about 140 stations over the highlands of Ethiopia is used to perform an extensive validation and inter-comparison of different semi-operational satellite rainfall products. The validation region is located over 5oN to 13oN, and 35oE to 40oE. It has a very complex topography with alternating valleys and mountain ranges that varies between a point at below sea level and a highest peak of about 4620 meters. The gauge data are obtained from the National Meteorological Services Agency of Ethiopia. The data used in the current research covers the period 1990 to 2004. Though the gage data has already gone through routine quality control by NMSA, it has been subjected to further quality control. The validation and inter-comparison exercise is performed for three groups of products. The first group has low spatial (2.5o) and temporal (monthly) resolutions. These include Global Precipitation Climatology (GPCP) estimates, NOAA-CPC (Climate Prediction Center) Merged Analysis (CMAP), and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) combined "TRMM and Other Sources" product (3B43). The later product has higher spatial resolution (0.25o), but has been remapped to 2.5o in order to compare it with the other products. The second group consists of products with high spatial (0.1o to 1o) and temporal (three-hourly to daily) resolutions. These products include NOAA-CPC African Rainfall Estimation Algorithm (CPC-RFE), GPCP One- Degree-Daily, and TRMM combined "TRMM and Other Satellites" product (3B42). These products are aggregated to a common one-degree and 10-daily total for comparison. The 10-day aggregation period is selected because it is the aggregation used in many operational early warning activities. The third category consists of a relatively new product (available starting from December 2002) from NOAA-CPC named CPC Morphing Technique (CMORPH). CMORPH is available at three-hourly temporal resolution and 0.25o spatial resolution, and it

  18. Detailed subglacial topography and drumlins at the marginal zone of Múlajökull outlet glacier, central Iceland: Evidence from low frequency GPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsters, Kristaps; Karušs, Jānis; Rečs, Agnis; Běrziņš, Dāvids

    2016-12-01

    New ground penetrating radar (GPR) observations on the Múlajökull surge-type outlet glacier, central Iceland, are presented. Overall 10.5 km of GPR profile lines were recorded parallel to the glacier margin in August, 2015. Detailed GPR investigations combined with high-accuracy GPS measurements allowed to build a high-resolution model of the subglacial topography. We provide new evidence of streamlined ridges beneath Múlajökull's marginal zone interpreted as drumlins and show the location of the upper edge of the drumlin field. This discovery improves understanding of the location, morphology and development of drumlins as other geophysical observations of subglacial bedforms beneath modern outlet glaciers are quite rare. The location of drumlins corresponds with the position of the major sets of crevasses in the digital elevation model (2008) suggesting the presence of additional drumlins beneath such crevasses in the ice-marginal zone. We suggest this semi-circular pattern of crevasses to be formed due to the variable glacier strain rates created by the subglacial topography. Numerous hyperbolic diffractions representing reflections of englacial channels are found in radar profiles suggesting a well-developed channelized drainage system of a surge-type glacier in its quiescence phase. The calculated thinning of the ice surface in the investigated area (0.65 km2) is on average 17.9 m during 2008-2015.

  19. Topography and tectonics of the central New Madrid seismic zone: Results of numerical experiements using a three-dimensional boundary element program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Ellis, Michael

    1994-01-01

    We present results of a series of numerical experiments designed to test hypothetical mechanisms that derive deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone. Experiments are constrained by subtle topography and the distribution of seismicity in the region. We use a new boundary element algorithm that permits calcuation of the three-dimensional deformation field. Surface displacement fields are calculated for the New Madrid zone under both far-field (plate tectonics scale) and locally derived driving strains. Results demonstrate that surface displacement fields cannot distinguish between either a far-field simple or pure shear strain field or one that involves a deep shear zone beneath the upper crustal faults. Thus, neither geomorphic nor geodetic studies alone are expected to reveal the ultimate driving mechanism behind the present-day deformation. We have also tested hypotheses about strain accommodation within the New Madrid contractional step-over by including linking faults, two southwest dipping and one vertical, recently inferred from microearthquake data. Only those models with step-over faults are able to predict the observed topography. Surface displacement fields for long-term, relaxed deformation predict the distribution of uplift and subsidence in the contractional step-over remarkably well. Generation of these displacement fields appear to require slip on both the two northeast trending vertical faults and the two dipping faults in the step-over region, with very minor displacements occurring during the interseismic period when the northeast trending vertical faults are locked. These models suggest that the gently dippling central step-over fault is a reverse fault and that the steeper fault, extending to the southeast of the step-over, acts as a normal fault over the long term.

  20. Topography and tectonics of the central New Madrid seismic zone: Results of numerical experiements using a three-dimensional boundary element program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Ellis, Michael

    1994-01-01

    We present results of a series of numerical experiments designed to test hypothetical mechanisms that derive deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone. Experiments are constrained by subtle topography and the distribution of seismicity in the region. We use a new boundary element algorithm that permits calcuation of the three-dimensional deformation field. Surface displacement fields are calculated for the New Madrid zone under both far-field (plate tectonics scale) and locally derived driving strains. Results demonstrate that surface displacement fields cannot distinguish between either a far-field simple or pure shear strain field or one that involves a deep shear zone beneath the upper crustal faults. Thus, neither geomorphic nor geodetic studies alone are expected to reveal the ultimate driving mechanism behind the present-day deformation. We have also tested hypotheses about strain accommodation within the New Madrid contractional step-over by including linking faults, two southwest dipping and one vertical, recently inferred from microearthquake data. Only those models with step-over faults are able to predict the observed topography. Surface displacement fields for long-term, relaxed deformation predict the distribution of uplift and subsidence in the contractional step-over remarkably well. Generation of these displacement fields appear to require slip on both the two northeast trending vertical faults and the two dipping faults in the step-over region, with very minor displacements occurring during the interseismic period when the northeast trending vertical faults are locked. These models suggest that the gently dippling central step-over fault is a reverse fault and that the steeper fault, extending to the southeast of the step-over, acts as a normal fault over the long term.

  1. From the Surface Topography to the Upper Mantle Beneath Central-Iberian-Zone. the Alcudia Seismic Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, R.; Ehsan, S. A.; Ayarza, P.; Martinez-Poyatos, D. J.; Simancas, J. F.; Azor, A.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2014-12-01

    Normal incidence and wide-angle seismic reflection data acquired in the Central and southern parts of the Iberia Peninsula resolve the internal architecture and constrain the distribution of the physical properties along an almost 350 km long transect that samples the major tectonic domains of the Iberian Massif, including the Central Iberian Zone (CIZ) and the associated sutures. The internal architecture down to almost 70 km depth (~15 s TWTT) is resolved by the normal incidence data set. It images a number of elements that characterize the tectonics of the study area, which is one of the best exposed fragment of the Variscan orogenic Belt. A well marked brittle-to-ductile (B2D) transition separates the crust in two, the upper and mid-lower parts, approximately, 13 km and 18 km thick, respectively. The upper crust appears to be decoupled from the mid-lower crust and responded differently to shortening. The Mohorovicic discontinuity is located at ~10.5 s (TWTT) , it is relatively thick, and highly reflective beneath the CIZ. The wide-angle seismic transect extended the lithospheric section towards the north across the Madrid Basin. This profile provides very strong constraints on the distribution of physical properties (P- and S- wave velocities, Poisson's ratio) of the upper lithosphere as well as a high resolution image of the base of the crust beneath the area. This data is one of the first datasets to present solid evidence of a relatively significant crustal thickening beneath the Madrid Basin. The crustal thickness varies from ~31 km beneath the CIZ to ~35.5 km beneath the Madrid Basin. This data set also reveals two major discontinuity levels, the B2D and the Moho, both represent levels of lithological/rheological variations. The characteristics of the the PmP and SmS seismic phases suggest further details on the internal structure of the Moho. Furthermore, low fold wide-angle P and S wave stacks reveal a marked crust-mantle transition which is most

  2. Determination of atmospheric parameters to estimate global radiation in areas of complex topography: Generation of global irradiation map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batlles, F.J.; Bosch, J.L. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Tovar-Pescador, J. [Dpto. Fisica, Universidad de Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Martinez-Durban, M. [Dpto. Ingenieria Lenguajes y Computacion, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Ortega, R. [Dpto. Edafologia y Quimica Agricola, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Miralles, I. [Dpto. Edafologia y Quimica Agricola, Universidad de Granada, 28071 Granada (Spain)

    2008-02-15

    Incoming shortwave solar radiation is an important parameter in environmental applications. A detailed spatial and temporal analysis of global solar radiation on the earth surface is needed in many applications, ranging from solar energy uses to the study of agricultural, forest and biological processes. At local scales, the topography is the most important factor in the distribution of solar radiation on the surface. The variability of the elevation, the surface orientation and the obstructions due to elevations are a source of great local differences in insolation and, consequently, in other variables as ground temperature. For this reason, several models based on GIS techniques have been recently developed, integrating topography to obtain the solar radiation on the surface. In this work, global radiation is analyzed with the Solar Analyst, a model implemented on ArcView, that computes the topographic parameters: altitude, latitude, slope and orientation (azimuth) and shadow effects. Solar Analyst uses as input parameters the diffuse fraction and the transmittance. These parameters are not usually available in radiometric networks in mountainous areas. In this work, a method to obtain both parameters from global radiation is proposed. Global radiation data obtained in two networks of radiometric stations is used: one located in Sierra Magina Natural Park (Spain) with 11 stations and another one located on the surroundings of Sierra Nevada Natural Park (Spain) with 14 stations. Daily solar irradiation is calculated from a digital terrain model (DTM), the daily diffuse fraction, K, and daily atmospheric transmittivity, {tau}. Results provided by the model have been compared with measured values. An overestimation for high elevations is observed, whereas low altitudes present underestimation. The best performance was also reported during summer months, and the worst results were obtained during winter. Finally, a yearly global solar irradiation map has been

  3. The interaction of northern wind flow with the complex topography of Crete Island – Part 1: Observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Koletsis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The island of Crete with its mountain ranges is an excellent example of a major isolated topographic feature, which significantly modifies the regional airflow as well as the pressure and temperature fields. During summer, when northerly winds are blowing over the Aegean Sea (a large number of which are characterized as Etesians, the highly complex topography of Crete plays an important role in the modification of this northern wind flow. The main objective of this study is to determine the role of the topography of Crete Island during this wind flow on the strong downslope winds at the southern parts of the island as well as on the development of a gap flow between the two highest mountains of the island (Lefka Ori and Idi. For that purpose, observational data from four meteorological stations located along the aforementioned gap are used along with QuikSCAT satellite data. The observational analysis shows that the interaction of the northern wind flow with the mountains of Crete Island produces an upstream deceleration, a leftward deflection of the air as this approaches the mountains and an intensification of the winds at the southern coasts accompanied with a temperature increase. Furthermore, the maximum of the gap flow is observed at the exit region of the gap.

  4. The interaction of northern wind flow with the complex topography of Crete Island - Part 1: Observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsis, I.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.; Bartzokas, A.

    2009-11-01

    The island of Crete with its mountain ranges is an excellent example of a major isolated topographic feature, which significantly modifies the regional airflow as well as the pressure and temperature fields. During summer, when northerly winds are blowing over the Aegean Sea (a large number of which are characterized as Etesians), the highly complex topography of Crete plays an important role in the modification of this northern wind flow. The main objective of this study is to determine the role of the topography of Crete Island during this wind flow on the strong downslope winds at the southern parts of the island as well as on the development of a gap flow between the two highest mountains of the island (Lefka Ori and Idi). For that purpose, observational data from four meteorological stations located along the aforementioned gap are used along with QuikSCAT satellite data. The observational analysis shows that the interaction of the northern wind flow with the mountains of Crete Island produces an upstream deceleration, a leftward deflection of the air as this approaches the mountains and an intensification of the winds at the southern coasts accompanied with a temperature increase. Furthermore, the maximum of the gap flow is observed at the exit region of the gap.

  5. Crop area estimation using high and medium resolution satellite imagery in areas with complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husak, G.J.; Marshall, M. T.; Michaelsen, J.; Pedreros, Diego; Funk, Christopher C.; Galu, G.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable estimates of cropped area (CA) in developing countries with chronic food shortages are essential for emergency relief and the design of appropriate market-based food security programs. Satellite interpretation of CA is an effective alternative to extensive and costly field surveys, which fail to represent the spatial heterogeneity at the country-level. Bias-corrected, texture based classifications show little deviation from actual crop inventories, when estimates derived from aerial photographs or field measurements are used to remove systematic errors in medium resolution estimates. In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid high-medium resolution technique for Central Ethiopia that combines spatially limited unbiased estimates from IKONOS images, with spatially extensive Landsat ETM+ interpretations, land-cover, and SRTM-based topography. Logistic regression is used to derive the probability of a location being crop. These individual points are then aggregated to produce regional estimates of CA. District-level analysis of Landsat based estimates showed CA totals which supported the estimates of the Bureau of Agriculture and Rural Development. Continued work will evaluate the technique in other parts of Africa, while segmentation algorithms will be evaluated, in order to automate classification of medium resolution imagery for routine CA estimation in the future.

  6. Near-real-time mapping of GNSS products from an area of complex topography for operational meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradellas, E.; Téllez, B.; Valdés, M.

    2009-04-01

    Triggering of severe convection is often focalized in areas of moisture convergence. On the other hand, the inflow of wet air usually plays an important role in the fog onset, even in typical events of radiation fog. Therefore, knowledge of the spatial distribution of atmospheric humidity is crucial to the operational forecaster, especially in the weather nowcasting at regions of complex topography. Radiosonde measurements are very sparse and present a limited time resolution of 6 or 12 hours. Near-real-time mapping of the vertically-integrated water vapour (IWV) retrieved from ground-based GNSS observations is an alternative way to present information on the horizontal distribution of humidity with a high time resolution. On average, nearly half the total atmospheric water is between sea level and a 1.5-km height. Therefore, the horizontal distribution of water vapour is strongly modulated by the topography. In the Iberian Peninsula, an area of complex topography, the penetration of shallow air masses of maritime origin through passes underneath mountain ranges is a common mechanism of moistening the air of inland regions. This fact makes difficult to build a realistic map of IWV without a high-resolution network of GNSS receivers. A method to smooth the dependence on height of the magnitude to be interpolated is presented here. The method is based on the decomposition of any IWV value into a constant statistical average and a variable part. The mean geographical distribution of IWV is computed from the dataset of daily averages at the different stations. Since this dataset usually presents some gaps, the estimation of the mean values and covariance matrix is performed together with the imputation of the missing values using an iterative method based on a regularized maximization-expectation algorithm. A linear regression yields a model accounting for the statistical dependence of the mean values on latitude, longitude and altitude. The model residuals are then

  7. A high resolution hydrodynamic model system suitable for novel harmful algal bloom modelling in areas of complex coastline and topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleynik, Dmitry; Dale, Andrew C; Porter, Marie; Davidson, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Fjordic coastlines provide sheltered locations for finfish and shellfish aquaculture, and are often subject to harmful algal blooms (HABs) some of which develop offshore and are then advected to impact nearshore aquaculture. Numerical models are a potentially important tool for providing early warning of such HAB events. However, the complex topography of fjordic shelf regions is a significant challenge to modelling. This is frequently compounded by complex bathymetry and local weather patterns. Existing structured grid models do not provide the resolution needed to represent these coastlines in their wider shelf context. In a number of locations advectively transported blooms of the ichthyotoxic dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi are of particular concern for the finfish industry. Here were present a novel hydrodynamic model of the coastal waters to the west of Scotland that is based on unstructured finite volume methodology, providing a sufficiently high resolution hydrodynamical structure to realistically simulate the transport of particles (such as K. mikimotoi cells) within nearshore waters where aquaculture sites are sited. Model-observation comparisons reveal close correspondence of tidal elevations for major semidiurnal and diurnal tidal constituents. The thermohaline structure of the model and its current fields are also in good agreement with a number of existing observational datasets. Simulations of the transport of Lagrangian drifting buoys, along with the incorporation of an individual-based biological model, based on a bloom of K. mikimotoi, demonstrate that unstructured grid models have considerable potential for HAB prediction in Scotland and in complex topographical regions elsewhere.

  8. twodee-2 : A Shallow Layer Model for Dense Gas Dispersion on Complex Topography

    OpenAIRE

    Folch, A.; COSTA, A.; Hankin, R. K. S.

    2007-01-01

    twodee-2 is a Fortran 90 code based on a previous code (twodee). It is de- 8 signed to solve the shallow water equations for fluid depth, depth-averaged horizon- 9 tal velocities and depth-averaged fluid density. The shallow layer approach used by 10 twodee-2 is a compromise between the complexity of CFD models and the simpler 11 integral models. It can be used for forecasting gas dispersion near the ground and/or 12 for hazard assessment over complex terrains. The inputs to th...

  9. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundar...

  10. Aspects of quality control of wind profiler measurements in complex topography

    OpenAIRE

    Maruri, M.; J. A. Romo; L. Gomez

    2014-01-01

    It is well known in the scientific community that some remote sensing instruments assume that sample volumes present homogeneous conditions within a defined meteorological profile. At complex topographic sites and under extreme meteorological conditions, this assumption may be fallible depending on the site, and it is more likely to fail in the lower layers of the atmosphere. This piece of work tests the homogeneity of the wind field over a boundary layer wind profiler radar...

  11. Quality aspects of the measurements of a wind profiler in a complex topography

    OpenAIRE

    Maruri, M.; J. A. Romo; L. Gomez

    2013-01-01

    It is well known amongst the scientific community that some remote sensing instruments have assumed that sample volumes present homogeneous conditions within a defined meteorological profile. At complex topographic sites and under extreme meteorological conditions, this assumption may be fallible depending on the site, and it is more likely to fail in the lower layers of the atmosphere. This piece of work tests the homogeneity of the wind field over a boundary layer wind profiler radar locate...

  12. Single molecule atomic force microscopy of aerolysin pore complexes reveals unexpected star-shaped topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianfeng; Wang, Jiabin; Hu, Jun; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel Mark; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-04-01

    Aerolysin is the paradigmatic member of a large family of toxins that convert from a water-soluble monomer/dimer into a membrane-spanning oligomeric pore. While there is x-ray crystallographic data of its water-soluble conformation, the most recent structural model of the membrane-inserted pore is based primarily on data of water-soluble tetradecamers of mutant protein, together with computational modeling ultimately performed in vacuum. Here we examine this pore model with atomic force microscopy (AFM) of membrane-associated wild-type complexes and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in water. In striking contrast to a disc-shaped cap region predicted by the present model, the AFM images reveal a star-shaped complex, with a central ring surrounded by seven radial projections. Further, the MD simulations suggest that the locations of the receptor-binding (D1) domains in the present model are not correct. However, a modified model in which the D1 domains, rather than localized at fixed positions, adopt a wide range of configurations through fluctuations of an intervening linker is compatible with existing data. Thus our work not only demonstrates the importance of directly resolving such complexes in their native environment but also points to a dynamic receptor binding region, which may be critical for toxin assembly on the cell surface.

  13. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2016-08-22

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  14. Constant-Distance Mode Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Biological Samples with Complex Topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Son N.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Laskin, Julia

    2017-01-17

    A new approach for constant distance mode mass spectrometry imaging of biological samples using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI MSI) was developed by integrating a shear-force probe with nano-DESI probe. The technical concept and basic instrumental setup as well as general operation of the system are described. Mechanical dampening of resonant oscillations due to the presence of shear forces between the probe and the sample surface enables constant-distance imaging mode via a computer controlled closed feedback loop. The capability of simultaneous chemical and topographic imaging of complex biological samples is demonstrated using living Bacillus Subtilis ATCC 49760 colonies on agar plates. The constant-distance mode nano-DESI MSI enabled imaging of many metabolites including non-ribosomal peptides (surfactin, plipastatin and iturin) and iron-bound heme on the surface of living bacterial colonies ranging in diameter from 10 mm to 13 mm with height variations of up to 0.8 mm above the agar plate. Co-registration of ion images to topographic images provided higher-contrast images. Constant-mode nano-DESI MSI is ideally suited for imaging biological samples of complex topography in their native state.

  15. Constant-Distance Mode Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Biological Samples with Complex Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Son N; Liyu, Andrey V; Chu, Rosalie K; Anderton, Christopher R; Laskin, Julia

    2017-01-17

    A new approach for constant-distance mode mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of biological samples using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) was developed by integrating a shear-force probe with the nano-DESI probe. The technical concept and basic instrumental setup, as well as the general operation of the system are described. Mechanical dampening of resonant oscillations due to the presence of shear forces between the probe and the sample surface enabled the constant-distance imaging mode via a computer-controlled closed-feedback loop. The capability of simultaneous chemical and topographic imaging of complex biological samples is demonstrated using living Bacillus subtilis ATCC 49760 colonies on agar plates. The constant-distance mode nano-DESI MSI enabled imaging of many metabolites, including nonribosomal peptides (surfactin, plipastatin, and iturin) on the surface of living bacterial colonies, ranging in diameter from 10 to 13 mm, with height variations up to 0.8 mm above the agar plate. Co-registration of ion images to topographic images provided higher-contrast images. Based on this effort, constant-mode nano-DESI MSI proved to be ideally suited for imaging biological samples of complex topography in their native states.

  16. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Steven G.; Snyder, William H.

    2017-02-01

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundary layer can have a strong influence on the concentration of pollutants within this layer. Deflections of streamlines at the height of the interface are primarily a function of hill Froude number (Fr), the ratio of mixed-layer height (zi) to terrain height (h), and the crosswind dimension of the terrain. The magnitude of the deflections increases as Fr increases and zi/h decreases. For mixing-height streamlines that are initially below the terrain top, the response is linear with Fr; for those initially above the terrain feature the response to Fr is more complex. Once Fr exceeds about 2, the terrain-related response of the mixed layer interface decreases somewhat with increasing Fr (toward more neutral flow). Deflections are also shown to increase as the crosswind dimensions of the terrain increase. Comparisons with numerical modeling, limited field data, and other laboratory measurements reported in the literature are favorable. Additionally, visual observations of dye streamers suggest that the flow structure exhibited for our elevated inversions passing over three dimensional hills is similar to that reported in the literature for continuously stratified flow over two-dimensional hills.

  17. Photoreactive DNA as a tool for studying topography of nucleotide excision repair complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrik O. I.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER is one of the major DNA repair pathways in eukaryotic cells preventing genetic abnormalities caused by DNA damage. NER removes a wide set of structurally diverse lesions such as pyrimidine dimers arising upon UV irradiation and bulky chemical adducts arising upon exposure to environmental carcinogens or chemotherapeutic drugs. In view of the extraordinarily broad substrate specificity of NER, it is of interest to understand how a certain set of proteins recognizes various DNA lesions in the context of a large excess of intact DNA. This review focuses on contribution of photoaffinity labeling technique in the study of DNA damage recognition and following stages resulting in preincision complex assembly, the key and still most unclear steps of NER.

  18. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA to estimate actual evapotranspiration under complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Gao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial scales. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at varying temporal and spatial scales under complex terrain. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA. With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM, and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can fully account for the dynamic impacts of complex terrain and changing land cover in concert with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement over time. Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  19. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    relationship between surface topography, gravity anomalies, and temperature structure of convection, Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978-2012), 88(B2), 1129-1144, doi:10.1029/JB088iB02p01129. [3] Robinson, E. M., B. Parsons, and S. F. Daly (1987), The effect of a shallow low viscosity zone on the apparent compensation of mid-plate swells, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 82(3-4), 335-348, doi:10.1016/0012-821X(87)90207-X.

  20. An investigation of ozone and planetary boundary layer dynamics over the complex topography of Grenoble combining measurements and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Couach

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns an evaluation of ozone (O3 and planetary boundary layer (PBL dynamics over the complex topography of the Grenoble region through a combination of measurements and mesoscale model (METPHOMOD predictions for three days, during July 1999. The measurements of O3 and PBL structure were obtained with a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL system, situated 20 km south of Grenoble at Vif (310 m ASL. The combined lidar observations and model calculations are in good agreement with atmospheric measurements obtained with an instrumented aircraft (METAIR. Ozone fluxes were calculated using lidar measurements of ozone vertical profiles concentrations and the horizontal wind speeds measured with a Radar Doppler wind profiler (DEGREANE. The ozone flux patterns indicate that the diurnal cycle of ozone production is controlled by local thermal winds. The convective PBL maximum height was some 2700 m above the land surface while the nighttime residual ozone layer was generally found between 1200 and 2200 m. Finally we evaluate the magnitude of the ozone processes at different altitudes in order to estimate the photochemical ozone production due to the primary pollutants emissions of Grenoble city and the regional network of automobile traffic.

  1. A modeling approach to identify the effective forcing exerted by wind on a prealpine lake surrounded by a complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, G.; Cantelli, A.; Monti, P.; Leuzzi, G.

    2017-05-01

    The representation of spatial wind distribution is recognized as a serious difficulty when modeling the hydrodynamics of lakes surrounded by a complex topography. To address this issue, we propose to force a 3-D lake model with the wind field simulated by a high-resolution atmospheric model, considering as a case study a 61 km2 prealpine lake surrounded by mountain ranges that reach 1800 m above the lake's surface, where a comprehensive data set was available in the stratified season. The improved distributed description of the wind stress over the lake surface led to a significant enhancement in the representation of the main basin-scale internal wave motions, and hence provided a reference solution to test the use of simplified approaches. Moreover, the analysis of the power exerted by the computed wind field enabled us to identify measuring stations that provide suitable wind data to be applied uniformly on the lake surface in long-term simulations. Accordingly, the proposed methodology can contribute to reducing the uncertainties associated with the definition of wind forcing for modeling purposes and can provide a rational criterion for installing representative measurement locations in prealpine lakes.

  2. Stochastic modelling of spatially and temporally consistent daily precipitation time-series over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D. E.; Fischer, A. M.; Frei, C.; Liniger, M. A.; Appenzeller, C.; Knutti, R.

    2014-07-01

    Many climate impact assessments over topographically complex terrain require high-resolution precipitation time-series that have a spatio-temporal correlation structure consistent with observations. This consistency is essential for spatially distributed modelling of processes with non-linear responses to precipitation input (e.g. soil water and river runoff modelling). In this regard, weather generators (WGs) designed and calibrated for multiple sites are an appealing technique to stochastically simulate time-series that approximate the observed temporal and spatial dependencies. In this study, we present a stochastic multi-site precipitation generator and validate it over the hydrological catchment Thur in the Swiss Alps. The model consists of several Richardson-type WGs that are run with correlated random number streams reflecting the observed correlation structure among all possible station pairs. A first-order two-state Markov process simulates intermittence of daily precipitation, while precipitation amounts are simulated from a mixture model of two exponential distributions. The model is calibrated separately for each month over the time-period 1961-2011. The WG is skilful at individual sites in representing the annual cycle of the precipitation statistics, such as mean wet day frequency and intensity as well as monthly precipitation sums. It reproduces realistically the multi-day statistics such as the frequencies of dry and wet spell lengths and precipitation sums over consecutive wet days. Substantial added value is demonstrated in simulating daily areal precipitation sums in comparison to multiple WGs that lack the spatial dependency in the stochastic process: the multi-site WG is capable to capture about 95% of the observed variability in daily area sums, while the summed time-series from multiple single-site WGs only explains about 13%. Limitation of the WG have been detected in reproducing observed variability from year to year, a component that has

  3. Validating the MYSTIC three-dimensional radiative transfer model with observations from the complex topography of Arizona's Meteor Crater

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, B; Hoch, S. W.; Whiteman, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The MYSTIC three-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer model has been extended to simulate solar and thermal irradiances with a rigorous consideration of topography. Forward as well as backward Monte Carlo simulations are possible for arbitrarily oriented surfaces and we demonstrate that the backward Monte Carlo technique is superior to the forward method for applications involving topography, by greatly reducing the computational demands. MYSTIC is used to simulate the short- and longwa...

  4. Topography Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC builds and distributes high-resolution, coastal digital elevation models (DEMs) that integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography to support NOAA's mission to...

  5. Impact of watershed topography on hyporheic exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-08-01

    Among the interactions between surface water bodies and aquifers, hyporheic exchange has been recognized as a key process for nutrient cycling and contaminant transport. Even though hyporheic exchange is strongly controlled by groundwater discharge, our understanding of the impact of the regional groundwater flow on hyporheic fluxes is still limited because of the complexity arising from the multi-scale nature of these interactions. In this work, we investigate the role of watershed topography on river-aquifer interactions by way of a semi-analytical model, in which the landscape topography is used to approximate the groundwater head distribution. The analysis of a case study shows how the complex topographic structure is the direct cause of a substantial spatial variability of the aquifer-river exchange. Groundwater upwelling along the river corridor is estimated and its influence on the hyporheic zone is discussed. In particular, the fragmentation of the hyporeic corridor induced by groundwater discharge at the basin scale is highlighted.

  6. Evaluation of solar energy resources in areas with complex topography; Evaluacion de los recursos energeticos solares en zonas de topografia compleja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batlles, F. J.; Martinez-Durban, M.; Miralles, I.; Ortega, R.; Barbero, F. J.; Lopez, G.; Tovar, J.; Puzo, D.

    2004-07-01

    On a local scale, topography is the main factor affecting the solar radiation reaching the ground. Topographical characteristics of the ground surface may give rise to higher local gradients of insolation. In this work, daily global radiation is estimated under cloudless skies in sites with complex topography. For that, a solar radiation model is used along with a digital elevation model of 20x20 m. Measurements of global radiation recorded at 14 stations located at the Northern face of the Natural Park in Sierra Nevada (Spain) during two years are available. Each radiometric station presents different topographical conditions. This allows to study the topographical influence on the solar radiation budget as well as developing of maps of global, direct and diffuse solar radiation. (Author)

  7. PLAGIOGRANITES FROM THE OPHIOLITE COMPLEXES OF DINARIDES AND VARDAR ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Majer

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical dana of plagiogranites associated with ophiolite conplexes of Central Dinaride Ophiolite Belt (CDOB and Vardar Zone Ophiolite Belt (VZOB are presented. Plagiogranites occur as dikes or small intrusive bodies in the upper part of the gabbrodolerite or diabase section in the ophiolite sequence. On the basis of normative An-Ab-Or diagram most of studied plagiogranites are classified as trondhjemites. They are typically low in K2O, Rb and MgO and contain low to moderate Al2O3, but light SiO2 and Na2O. Their ocean ridge granite normalized patterns of trace elements displaying low contents of HFS and high contents of LIL elements are very similar to those of the volcanic arc granites. But assuming that in trace element pattern elevated K2O and Rb contents are result of alteration, the studied plagiogranites have also strong similarity with typical Troodos supra-subduction ocean ridge granite. The using of Peacock indeks reveals that they are characterized by calcic character what is typical for supra-subduction ocean ridge granite. The studied plagiogranites are probably formed in extensional conditions above a subduction zone and in terms of their origin the most probably related to crystal-liquid differentiation process.

  8. Isostasy, flexure, and dynamic topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvirtzman, Zohar; Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten W.

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental scientific question is, what controls the Earth's topography? Although the theoretical principles of isostasy, flexure, and dynamic topography are widely discussed, the parameters needed to apply these principles are frequently not available. Isostatic factors controlling lithospheric buoyancy are frequently uncertain and non-isostatic factors, such as lithospheric bending towards subduction zones and dynamic topography, are hard to distinguish. The question discussed here is whether a set of simple rules that relate topography to lithospheric structure in various tectonic environments can be deduced in a way that missing parameters can be approximated; or does each area behave differently, making generalizations problematic. We contribute to this issue analyzing the Asia-Africa-Arabia-Europe domain following a top-down strategy. We compile a new crustal thickness map and remove the contribution of the crust from the observed elevation. Then, the challenge is to interpret the residual topography in terms of mantle lithosphere buoyancy and dynamics. Based on systematic relationships between tectonic environments and factors controlling topography, we argue that crustal buoyancy and mantle lithospheric density can be approximated from available geological data and that regions near mantle upwelling or downwelling are easily identified by their extreme residual topography. Yet, even for other areas, calculating lithospheric thickness from residual topography is problematic, because distinguishing variations in mantle lithosphere thickness from sub-lithospheric dynamics is difficult. Fortunately, the area studied here provides an opportunity to examine this issue. Based on the conjunction between the Afar Plume and the mid-ocean ridge in the nearby Gulf of Aden and southern Red Sea, we constrain the maximal amplitude of dynamic topography to ~ 1 km. This estimate is based on a narrow definition of dynamic topography that only includes sub

  9. “Coastal zones are some of the most complex “multiple-use” areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    “Coastal zones are some of the most complex. “multiple-use” .... which pertain to conserved marine areas are complex ..... tradeoffs, and the outcome of any analysis of such. 376 ..... DYE, A. H., BRANCH, G. M., CASTILLA, J. C. and B. A. BEN-.

  10. Corneal topography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Koch-Jensen, P.; Østerby, Ole

    1993-01-01

    The central corneal zone is depicted on keratoscope photographs using a small target aperture and a large object distance. Information on the peripheral area is included by employing a hemispherical target with a dense circular and radial pattern. On a 16 mm (R = 8 mm) reference steel sphere...

  11. Macular Retinal Ganglion Cell Complex Thickness and Its Relationship to the Optic Nerve Head Topography in Glaucomatous Eyes with Hemifield Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji T. Takagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the relationship between the macular ganglion cell complex (mGCC thickness, which is the sum of the retinal nerve fiber, ganglion cell, and inner plexiform layers, measured with a spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph and the optic nerve head topography measured with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope in glaucomatous eyes with visual field defects localized predominantly to either hemifield. Materials and Methods. The correlation between the mGCC thickness in hemispheres corresponding to hemifields with and without defects (damaged and intact hemispheres, respectively and the optic nerve head topography corresponding to the respective hemispheres was evaluated in 18 glaucomatous eyes. Results. The mGCC thickness was significantly correlated with the rim volume, mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and cross-sectional area of the retinal nerve fiber layer in both the intact and the damaged hemispheres (P<.05. Discussion. For detecting very early glaucomatous damage of the optic nerve, changes in the thicknesses of the inner retina in the macular area and peripapillary RNFL as well as rim volume changes in the optic nerve head are target parameters that should be carefully monitored.

  12. Synmagmatic deformation in the underplated igneous complex of the Ivrea-Verbano zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, J.E.; Sinigoi, S.; Negrini, L.; Demarchi, G.; Mayer, A.

    1992-01-01

    The Ivrea-Verbano zone, northern Italy, contains an igneous complex up to 10km thick that is thought to have been intruded near the interface between the continental crust and mantle during the late Paleozoic. New data indicate that this complex is pervasively deformed and concentrically foliated. The presence of analogous features in ophiolitic gabbros suggests that emplacement of the Ivrea-Verbano zone plutonic rocks involved large-scale flow of crystal mush in a dynamic, and possibly extensional, tectonic environment. -from Authors

  13. Unraveling the history of complex zoned garnets from the North Motagua Mélange (Guatemala)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barickman, M. H.; Martin, C.; Flores, K. E.; Harlow, G. E.; Bonnet, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Guatemala Suture Zone (GSZ) is situated in central Guatemala, between the North American and Caribbean plates. Two serpentinite mélanges straddle the Motagua Fault system: the North Motagua Mélange (NMM) and the South Motagua Mélange (SMM). In this study, chemically zoned garnet grains from four eclogite blocks from the NMM were analyzed by EMPA for major elements and LA-ICP-MS for trace elements to unravel the geological history of the eclogites. These eclogites typically consist of euhedral to subhedral garnets, partly retrogressed omphacite grains, and accessory minerals such as phengite and epidote as inclusions in garnet. EBSD was employed to examine apparent garnet inclusions in garnet. The garnet grains in NMM eclogites display complex chemical zonations: all grains roughly show a spessartine-rich core, an almandine-rich core and/or intermediate zone, and a pyrope and grossular-rich rim. Additionally, crystal resorption can be observed between the different zones, and the pyrope-grossular rim can display oscillatory zoning. Finally, grossular-rich zones (crystallographically syntactic) within garnet are present in all studied samples. REE and spider diagrams do not show any significant difference in the patterns of the different zones within the garnet, or indicating that the chemical environment from which each garnet zone grew was broadly the same. The lack of significant variation in LILE content indicates that a fluid influx during garnet growth is unlikely. Consequently, we interpret that garnet grains grew in a largely closed system; however, the presence of the grossular-rich zones, argues for occasional excursions into conditions when either two garnets crystallized or Ca-rich overgrowths that were largely resorbed prior to subsequent continued garnet growth.

  14. Validation of a Perceptual Distraction Model in a Complex Personal Sound Zone System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rämö, Jussi; Marsh, Steven; Bech, Søren

    2016-01-01

    tested using more complex sound systems. A listening experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of the model, using music target and speech interferer reproduced by a complex personal sound-zone system. The model was found to successfully predict the perceived distraction of a more complex......This paper evaluates a previously proposed perceptual model predicting user’s perceived distraction caused by interfering audio programmes. The distraction model was originally trained using a simple sound reproduction system for music-on-music interference situations and it has not been formally...... sound reproducing system with different target-interferer pairs than it was originally trained for. Thus, the model can be used as a tool for personal sound-zone evaluation and optimization tasks....

  15. Topography of tyrosine residues and their involvement in peroxidation of polyunsaturated cardiolipin in cytochrome c/cardiolipin peroxidase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapralov, Alexandr A; Yanamala, Naveena; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Castro, Laura; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro; Vladimirov, Yuri A; Maeda, Akihiro; Weitz, Andrew A; Peterson, Jim; Mylnikov, Danila; Demicheli, Verónica; Tortora, Verónica; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Radi, Rafael; Kagan, Valerian E

    2011-09-01

    Formation of cytochrome c (cyt c)/cardiolipin (CL) peroxidase complex selective toward peroxidation of polyunsaturated CLs is a pre-requisite for mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Tyrosine residues - via the generation of tyrosyl radicals (Tyr) - are likely reactive intermediates of the peroxidase cycle leading to CL peroxidation. We used mutants of horse heart cyt c in which each of the four Tyr residues was substituted for Phe and assessed their contribution to the peroxidase catalysis. Tyr67Phe mutation was associated with a partial loss of the oxygenase function of the cyt c/CL complex and the lowest concentration of H(2)O(2)-induced Tyr radicals in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra. Our MS experiments directly demonstrated decreased production of CL-hydroperoxides (CL-OOH) by Tyr67Phe mutant. Similarly, oxidation of a phenolic substrate, Amplex Red, was affected to a greater extent in Tyr67Phe than in three other mutants. Tyr67Phe mutant exerted high resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced oligomerization. Measurements of Tyr fluorescence, hetero-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and computer simulations position Tyr67 in close proximity to the porphyrin ring heme iron and one of the two axial heme-iron ligand residues, Met80. Thus, the highly conserved Tyr67 is a likely electron-donor (radical acceptor) in the oxygenase half-reaction of the cyt c/CL peroxidase complex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Complex zoning behavior in pyroxene in FeO-rich chondrules in the Semarkona ordinary chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rhian H.; Papike, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the properties of silicate minerals in chondrules is essential to the interpretation of chondrule formation conditions. This study is further work in a series of petrologic studies of chondrules in the least equilibrated LL chondrite, Semarkona (LL3.0). The objectives of this work are as follows: (1) to understand chondrule formation conditions and nebular processes; and (2) to use the data as a basis for understanding the effects of metamorphism in more equilibrated chondrites. FeO-rich pyroxene in the chondrules described shows complex zoning behavior. Low-Ca clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, pigeonite, and augite are all observed, in various associations with one another. Coexisting olivine phenocrysts are also FeO-rich and strongly zoned. Compositional and zoning properties are similar to those observed in boninites and are interpreted as resulting from rapid cooling of individual chondrules.

  17. Ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography for mapping bedrock topography and fracture zones: a case study in Viru-Nigula, NE Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Sibul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Geological Base Map (GBM, presenting an elongated buried valley running beneath the Varudi bog, triggered the geophysical studies near Viru-Nigula borough in northeastern Estonia. After the Geological Survey of Estonia had compiled the GBM map set, the course and extent of the valley still remained indistinct. Principally the morphology of the Varudi valley had been determined just by one borehole characterizing the 30 m thick Quaternary succession within the valley. The thickness of Quaternary sediments is, however, just a few metres in adjacent boreholes. We used ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT for acquiring extra knowledge about the extent and morphology of the Varudi structure. Ground-penetrating radar enabled us to specify the thickness and composition of Quaternary deposits, and to recognize dislocations of the bedrock blocks. As the radar images provided information on the topmost ~4 m only, ERT (Wenner and Wenner–Schlumberger arrays was applied to define deeper, down to 40 m, electrical resistivity anomalies. The ERT studies revealed two fracture zones where regular Ordovician carbonate beds have been crushed and replaced by Quaternary sediments. The Varudi valley coincides with the southern zone. Both fracture zones probably acted as groundwater flow channels and sediment pathways in the Late Pleistocene, and hence supported the creation of the Varudi bog.

  18. Metals complexation with humic acids in surface water of different natural–climatic zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu M. I.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Humic acids extracted from different soils. The stability constants of metal humates and acid dissociation constant humic acids were calculated. Forms of metals in natural waters was determined with use account their chemical composition and content and properties of organic matter. We assessed metals speciation in water objects with account for competitive reactions resulting in formation of hydroxide, hydrocarbonate, sulfate, and chloride metal complexes and obtained a competitive series of metal activity in natural waters of the zones considered.

  19. Actinomycete complexes in soils of industrial and residential zones in the city of Kirov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokikh, I. G.; Solov'eva, E. S.; Ashikhmina, T. Ya.

    2014-02-01

    The number, diversity, and structure of the actinomycetal complexes in the soils of the industrial and residential zones of the city of Kirov are considered. The total content of mobile cadmium, zinc, lead, iron, and nickel in the soils of the industrial biotopes was 1.8 and 6.0 times higher than their concentration in the soils of the residential and background zones, respectively. In the heavy metal (HM)-polluted soils, the share of actinomycetes in the total number of prokaryotes and the relative abundance of the micromono-spores in the actinomycetal complex were much higher and the species diversity of the streptomycetes was lower than these characteristics in the soils of the residential zone. The differences in the composition of the mycelial prokaryote complexes appear to be related to the selective resistance of some of their representatives to heavy metals. The possibility to select the strains resistant to HMs and suitable for use in the bioremediation of polluted soils is considered.

  20. Evidence for a deep crustal hot zone beneath the Diamante Caldera-Maipo volcanic complex, Southern Volcanic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, D.; Murray, T.; Sruoga, P.; Feineman, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction zones at convergent continental margins are dynamic environments that control the long-term evolution and interaction of the crust and residual mantle. The Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of the Andes formed as a result of volcanic activity and uplift due to the eastern subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the South American Plate. Maipo and neighboring volcanoes in the northern SVZ are unique in that the continental crust is exceptionally thick (~50 km), causing the mantle-derived magma to stall and interact with the crust at multiple levels prior to eruption. Maipo is an andesite/dacite stratovolcano that lies within the Diamante Caldera, which formed approximately 450 Ka during an explosive eruption that produced 350 km3 of rhyolitic ignimbrite. Following post-caldera reactivation Maipo has undergone a complex evolution, first erupting 86 Ka and experiencing seven eruptive events extending to historic times. The Maipo lavas represent a unique geochemical evolution resulting from fractional crystallization, crustal assimilation, and magma mixing in the lower and upper crust. By analyzing trace element compositions, major element compositions, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios in sixteen samples, we have begun to constrain the complex geochemical processes that formed this volcano and contribute to the differentiation of Andean continental crust. The major element analysis of the samples reflects the extent of differentiation resulting in dacite to andesite volcanic rock, and was used to distinguish between the seven eruptive events. The trace elements and Sr isotope ratios reflect the composition of the source rock, the extent of crustal assimilation, and the crystallization of minerals from the resulting mantle derived magma. The SiO2 weight percent (ranging from 54.3 to 68.5%) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7048 to 0.7057) show a linear correlation nearly identical to that reported by Hildreth and Moorbath (1988, CMP 98, 455-489) for nearby Cerro Marmolejo, suggesting a

  1. Suitability evaluation and spatial capacity analysis for complex topography construction land area in southwest China:a case study of Tongzi county in Guizhou province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-lei; YANG Hua; LIU Rui; GUAN Dong-jie; QIN Yue

    2016-01-01

    In the background of a new round reform and western development strategy, making suitability evaluation of construction land complex topography area in southwest China scientifically and accurately has an important guiding significance on the construction of local urban and rural development. We selected economic factor of construction, safety factor of construction, factor of the present situation of land use and ecological protection factor in Tongzicounty as evaluation indexes, and ascertained the weightof each elastic indicator using the analytic hierarchy process method. By the support of GIS and RS technology,wecombined the single-factor qualitative classification with the multi-factor weighted overlay analysis to make comprehensive suitability evaluation of construction land on the whole study area. And five different types of construction land were divided, namely, ‘excellent’, ‘very good’, ‘good’, ‘moderate’ and ‘poor’. The result shows that the area of ‘excellent’ construction land is 30.47km2(0.95%),101.46km2(3.16%) of‘very good’,550.34km2(17.16%)of ‘good’,and664.69km2 (20.72%)and 1860.65km2(58.01%)of ‘moderate’ and ‘poor’,respectively.The land space bearing capacity is a population of 791600, and the remaining population capacity is 170900 persons.

  2. Towards a first ground-based validation of aerosol optical depths from Sentinel-2 over the complex topography of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Valerio; Cremonese, Edoardo; Diémoz, Henri; Siani, Anna Maria

    2017-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is spending notable effort to put in operation a new generation of advanced Earth-observation satellites, the Sentinel constellation. In particular, the Sentinel-2 host an instrumental payload mainly consisting in a MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI) imaging sensor, capable of acquiring high-resolution imagery of the Earth surface and atmospheric reflectance at selected spectral bands, hence providing complementary measurements to ground-based radiometric stations. The latter can provide reference data for validating the estimates from spaceborne instruments such as Sentinel-2A (operating since October 2015), whose aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, can be obtained from correcting SWIR (2190 nm) reflectance with an improved dense dark vegetation (DDV) algorithm. In the Northwestern European Alps (Saint-Christophe, 45.74°N, 7.36°E) a Prede POM-02 sun/sky aerosol photometer has been operating for several years within the EuroSkyRad network by the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta), gathering direct sun and diffuse sky radiance for retrieving columnar aerosol optical properties. This aerosol optical depth (AOD) dataset represents an optimal ground-truth for the corresponding Sentinel-2 estimates obtained with the Sen2cor processor in the challenging environment of the Alps (complex topography, snow-covered surfaces). We show the deviations between the two measurement series and propose some corrections to enhance the overall accuracy of satellite estimates.

  3. Experimental Investigation of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation of Complex DNAPL Source Zones by Permanganate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderscheidt, J. L.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Siegrist, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Remediation of aquifers contaminated with organic waste chemicals that are in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids pose many challenges. The contaminated source zones are naturally heterogeneous and the unstable behavior of DNAPLs results in complex entrapment architecture. Some of the remediation schemes rely on effective delivery of treating agents to the locations where the DNAPLs are entrapped. During remediation, the source zone conditions may change, thus affecting the delivery efficiency of the treating agent. One such technology of DNAPL source zone treatment, in-situ chemical oxidation is designed to speed up remediation of a contaminant source zone by inducing increased mass transfer from DNAPL sources into the aqueous phase for subsequent destruction. Individual sources may be present as pools of high saturation, regions of disconnected ganglia at residual saturation, or some combination. Oxidation using permanganate generates manganese oxide (MnO2 (s)) precipitates. Research has shown that these solids, as with other remedial technologies, can result in permeability reductions in the bulk source zone reducing the ability for oxidant to be transported to individual sources. Solids can also form at the DNAPL-water interface, decreasing contact of the oxidant with the DNAPL source. Consequently, MnO2 (s) formation may alter the mass transfer rate from DNAPL into the aqueous phase, diminishing the magnitude of any mass depletion increase induced by oxidation. A two-dimensional intermediate scale tank experiment was performed, spatially monitoring permeability changes and relating them to MnO2 (s) distribution measured through post-oxidation soil coring. Sampling of aqueous PCE, chloride, and permanganate concentrations was used to relate changes in mass flux from DNAPL residual and pool source zones to MnO2 (s) formation. For the conditions of this experiment, MnO2 (s) formation reduced aqueous permeability in and around DNAPL sources resulting in

  4. Oceanic crust formation in the Egeria Fracture Zone Complex (Central Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Minor, Marine; Gaina, Carmen; Sigloch, Karin; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyse in detail the oceanic crust fabric and volcanic features (seamounts) formed for the last 10 million years at the Central Indian Ridge between 19 and 21 latitude south. Multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data has been collected in 2013 as part of the French-German expedition RHUM-RUM (Reunion hotspot and upper mantle - Reunion's unterer mantel). Three long profiles perpendicular on the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), south of the Egeria fracture zone, document the formation of oceanic crust since 10 million years, along with changes in plate kinematics and variations in the magmatic input. We have inspected the abyssal hill geometry and orientation along conjugate oceanic flanks and within one fracture zone segment where we could identify J-shaped features that are indicators of changes in plate kinematics. The magnetic anomaly data shows a slight asymmetry in seafloor spreading rates on conjugate flanks: while a steady increase in spreading rate from 10 Ma to the present is shown by the western flank, the eastern part displays a slowing down from 5 Ma onwards. The deflection of the anti J-shaped abyssal hill lineations suggest that the left-stepping Egeria fracture zone complex (including the Egeria, Flinders and an un-named fracture zone to the southeast) was under transpression from 9 to 6 Ma and under transtension since 3 Ma. The transpressional event was triggered by a clockwise mid-ocean ridge reorientation and a decrease of its offset, whereas the transtensional regime was probably due to a counter-clockwise change in the spreading direction and an increase of the ridge offset. The new multibeam data along the three profiles reveal that crust on the eastern side is smoother (as shown by the abyssal hill number and structure) and hosts several seamounts (with age estimations of 7.67, 6.10 and 0.79 Ma), in contrast to the rougher conjugate western flank. Considering that the western flank was closer to the Reunion plume, and therefore

  5. Thermally driven circulation in a region of complex topography: comparison of wind-profiling radar measurements and MM5 numerical predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bianco

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation of regional wind patterns in the complex terrain of Central Italy was investigated for summer fair-weather conditions and winter time periods using a radar wind profiler. The profiler is located on a site where interaction between the complex topography and land-surface produces a variety of thermally and dynamically driven wind systems. The observational data set, collected for a period of one year, was used first to describe the diurnal evolution of thermal driven winds, second to validate the Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5 that is a three-dimensional numerical model. This type of analysis was focused on the near-surface wind observation, since thermally driven winds occur in the lower atmosphere. According to the valley wind theory expectations, the site – located on the left sidewall of the valley (looking up valley – experiences a clockwise turning with time. Same characteristics in the behavior were established in both the experimental and numerical results.

    Because the thermally driven flows can have some depth and may be influenced mainly by model errors, as a third step the analysis focuses on a subset of cases to explore four different MM5 Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL parameterizations. The reason is to test how the results are sensitive to the selected PBL parameterization, and to identify the better parameterization if it is possible. For this purpose we analysed the MM5 output for the whole PBL levels. The chosen PBL parameterizations are: 1 Gayno-Seaman; 2 Medium-Range Forecast; 3 Mellor-Yamada scheme as used in the ETA model; and 4 Blackadar.

  6. Fault growth and propagation during incipient continental rifting: Insights from a combined aeromagnetic and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model investigation of the Okavango Rift Zone, northwest Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinabo, B. D.; Hogan, J. P.; Atekwana, E. A.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Modisi, M. P.

    2008-06-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEM) extracted from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data and high-resolution aeromagnetic data are used to characterize the growth and propagation of faults associated with the early stages of continental extension in the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ), northwest Botswana. Significant differences in the height of fault scarps and the throws across the faults in the basement indicate extended fault histories accompanied by sediment accumulation within the rift graben. Faults in the center of the rift either lack topographic expressions or are interpreted to have become inactive, or have large throws and small scarp heights indicating waning activity. Faults on the outer margins of the rift exhibit either (1) large throws or significant scarp heights and are considered older and active or (2) throws and scarp heights that are in closer agreement and are considered young and active. Fault linkages between major fault systems through a process of "fault piracy" have combined to establish an immature border fault for the ORZ. Thus, in addition to growing in length (by along-axis linkage of segments), the rift is also growing in width (by transferring motion to younger faults along the outer margins while abandoning older faults in the middle). Finally, utilization of preexisting zones of weakness allowed the development of very long faults (>100 km) at a very early stage of continental rifting, explaining the apparent paradox between the fault length versus throw for this young rift. This study clearly demonstrates that the integration of the SRTM DEM and aeromagnetic data provides a 3-D view of the faults and fault systems, providing new insight into fault growth and propagation during the nascent stages of continental rifting.

  7. Analysis of Proteins, Protein Complexes, and Organellar Proteomes Using Sheathless Capillary Zone Electrophoresis - Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Arseniy M.; Viner, Rosa; Santos, Marcia R.; Horn, David M.; Bern, Marshall; Karger, Barry L.; Ivanov, Alexander R.

    2017-09-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is a rapidly advancing field in the analysis of proteins, protein complexes, and macromolecular species of various types. The majority of native MS experiments reported to-date has been conducted using direct infusion of purified analytes into a mass spectrometer. In this study, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was coupled online to Orbitrap mass spectrometers using a commercial sheathless interface to enable high-performance separation, identification, and structural characterization of limited amounts of purified proteins and protein complexes, the latter with preserved non-covalent associations under native conditions. The performance of both bare-fused silica and polyacrylamide-coated capillaries was assessed using mixtures of protein standards known to form non-covalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes. High-efficiency separation of native complexes is demonstrated using both capillary types, while the polyacrylamide neutral-coated capillary showed better reproducibility and higher efficiency for more complex samples. The platform was then evaluated for the determination of monoclonal antibody aggregation and for analysis of proteomes of limited complexity using a ribosomal isolate from E. coli. Native CZE-MS, using accurate single stage and tandem-MS measurements, enabled identification of proteoforms and non-covalent complexes at femtomole levels. This study demonstrates that native CZE-MS can serve as an orthogonal and complementary technique to conventional native MS methodologies with the advantages of low sample consumption, minimal sample processing and losses, and high throughput and sensitivity. This study presents a novel platform for analysis of ribosomes and other macromolecular complexes and organelles, with the potential for discovery of novel structural features defining cellular phenotypes (e.g., specialized ribosomes). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. The Galactic Habitable Zone and the Age Distribution of Complex Life in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Lineweaver, C H; Gibson, B K; Lineweaver, Charles H.; Fenner, Yeshe; Gibson, Brad K.

    2004-01-01

    We modeled the evolution of the Milky Way to trace the distribution in space and time of four prerequisites for complex life: the presence of a host star, enough heavy elements to form terrestrial planets, sufficient time for biological evolution and an environment free of life-extinguishing supernovae. We identified the Galactic habitable zone (GHZ) as an annular region between 7 and 9 kiloparsecs from the Galactic center that widens with time and is composed of stars that formed between 8 and 4 billion years ago. This GHZ yields an age distribution for the complex life that may inhabit our Galaxy. We found that 75% of the stars in the GHZ are older than the Sun.

  9. Possible zones of oil and gas accumulation in the persalt complex of the Northern Emba. [USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The issues are examined of oil and gas presence in the persalt complex of Northern Emba and from positions of complexing of paleogeographic, paleogeomorphological and space geological materials, additional exploration criteria are formulated, which make it possible to isolate the most promising (primary) objects for exploratory operations: the salt dome structures which must be located within the ancient valleys of the Sagiz and Emba and be spatially confined to the deeply submerged troughs, and to regional discontinuous dislocations. Within the ancient valley of the Emba such objects are the group of domes of Bozob, the Kozdysay, Shukyrkol, Mistirtau, Mastyagat, the Northern Karazhar, the Akshunkol, the Dongeleksor-Koskom and the Karatyube (the northwest wing) domes and in the ancient valley of the Sagiza, the group of domes of Levite-Munaylisay. All of them are located in the zone of development of high capacity collectors and high quality caps, the majority of which are confined to the subsalt, hereditary uplifts, to the fringe zones of the deeply submerged persalt troughs and to regional discontinuous dislocations.

  10. Complex geohazard susceptibility zoning for effective landuse planning and catastroph prevention in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hradecky, P.; Baron, I.

    2012-04-01

    The Czech Geological Survey conducted projects of geological mapping and complex geohazard susceptibility zoning in Nicaragua in the years 1997-2009. For selected areas in vicinity of major cities and towns basic geological maps at a scalle 1:50,000, maps of geomorphic features (Geomorphic Inventory Maps), Morphostructural Maps of estimated fault zones, and derived Geohazard Susceptibility maps were done. These maps were prepared during field campaigns by direct field mapping, analysis of remote-sensing data, communicating the local authorities, interwieving the local inhabitants and with very close cooperation with the local partner of the projects - the Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER). The resulting maps and explanatory reports presented the dangerous natural processes that occurred in each respective area in the past and proposed preventive measures in detail. Zones evaluated as highly susceptible, e.g., to (i) mass movements, (ii) large inundations, (iii) torrential flooding, (iv) seismogenic liquefaction, etc., were presented in bold colours on the maps. Such maps and reports were presented to local authorities and inhabitants of respective cities during public breefings at the end of each mapping campaign. In such a way, areas of Pacific volcanic ridge (1997-2003), Jinotega (2004), Somoto (2005), Estelí (2006), Boaco and Santa Lucia (2007, 2008), Sebaco (2008) and Jalapa (2009) were elaborated. The maps then served to the INETER for implementation into the landuse plans, evacuation routes and other preventive measures to protect and save human lives and inftrastructure. This approach could serve as a muster for a simple, cost effective and relatively fast geohazards susceptibility evaluation of any area in any developing country. The projects also paid attention to capacity building of our Nicaraguan partners. These projects of the Czech Geological Survey were conducted as the international aid of the Czech Republic to Nicaragua

  11. Life in the Hive: Supporting Inquiry into Complexity Within the Zone of Proximal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Joshua A.; Peppler, Kylie; Phelps, David; Washington, Dianna

    2011-10-01

    Research into students' understanding of complex systems typically ignores young children because of misinterpretations of young children's competencies. Furthermore, studies that do recognize young children's competencies tend to focus on what children can do in isolation. As an alternative, we propose an approach to designing for young children that is grounded in the notion of the Zone of Proximal Development (Vygotsky 1978) and leverages Activity Theory to design learning environments. In order to highlight the benefits of this approach, we describe our process for using Activity Theory to inform the design of new software and curricula in a way that is productive for young children to learn concepts that we might have previously considered to be "developmentally inappropriate". As an illuminative example, we then present a discussion of the design of the BeeSign simulation software and accompanying curriculum which specifically designed from an Activity Theory perspective to engage young children in learning about complex systems (Danish 2009a, b). Furthermore, to illustrate the benefits of this approach, we will present findings from a new study where 40 first- and second-grade students participated in the BeeSign curriculum to learn about how honeybees collect nectar from a complex systems perspective. We conclude with some practical suggestions for how such an approach to using Activity Theory for research and design might be adopted by other science educators and designers.

  12. Changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes in the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimova, I. N.; Novikova, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Long-term studies of changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes of the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts (deep plowing, surface leveling, irrigation, and post-irrigation use) have been performed on the Privolzhskaya sand ridge and the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains. The natural morphology of solonetzic soils was strongly disturbed during their deep ameliorative plowing. At present, the soil cover consists of solonetzic agrozems (Sodic Protosalic Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), textural (clay-illuvial) calcareous agrozems (Eutric Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), agrosolonetzes (Endocalcaric Luvisols (Loamic, Aric, Cutanic, Protosodic), agrochestnut soils (Eutric Cambisols (Siltic, Aric)), and meadowchestnut soils (Haplic Kastanozems). No features attesting to the restoration of the initial profile of solonetzes have been found. The dynamics of soluble salts and exchangeable sodium differ in the agrosolonetzes and solonetzic agrozems. A rise in pH values takes place in the middle part of the soil profiles on the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains.

  13. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich liquids in the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lennart A.; Wang, Meng; Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Roberts, R. James; Veksler, Ilya V.; Cawthorn, R. Grant; Holtz, François

    2016-06-01

    The Bushveld Complex (South Africa) is the largest layered intrusion on Earth and plays a considerable role in our understanding of magmatic differentiation and ore-forming processes. In this study, we present new geochemical data for apatite-hosted multiphase inclusions in gabbroic cumulates from the Bushveld Upper Zone. Inclusions re-homogenized at high-temperature (1060-1100 °C) display a range of compositions in each rock sample, from iron-rich (35 wt.% FeOtot; 28 wt.% SiO2) to silica-rich (5 wt.% FeOtot; 65 wt.% SiO2). This trend is best explained by an immiscible process and trapping of contrasted melts in apatite crystals during progressive cooling along the binodal of a two-liquid field. The coexistence of both Si-rich and Fe-rich immiscible melts in single apatite grains is used to discuss the ability of immiscible melts to segregate from each other, and the implications for mineral and bulk cumulate compositions. We argue that complete separation of immiscible liquids did not occur, resulting in crystallization of similar phases from both melts but in different proportions. However, partial segregation in a crystal mush and the production of contrasting phase proportions from the Fe-rich melt and the Si-rich melt can be responsible for the cyclic evolution from melanocratic (Fe-Ti-P-rich) to leucocratic (plagioclase-rich) gabbros which is commonly observed in the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex where it occurs at a vertical scale of 50 to 200 m.

  14. Complex Unsaturated Zone Flow and Thermohydrologic Processes in a Regulatory Environment: A Perspective on Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedors, R. W.; Manepally, C.; Justus, P. S.; Basagaoglu, H.; Pensado, O.; Dubreuilh, P.

    2007-12-01

    An important part of a risk-informed, performance-based regulatory review of a potential license application for disposal of high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is the consideration of alternative interpretations and models of risk significant physical processes. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expects that simplified models will be abstracted from complex process-level models to conduct total-system performance assessments. There are several phases or steps to developing an abstracted model and its supporting basis from more detailed and complicated models for each area of the total system. For complex ambient and thermally perturbed flow in fractured tuffs of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, these steps c,an be summarized as (i) site characterization and observation, (ii) field and laboratory tests, (iii) conceptual model development, (iv) process-level numerical modeling, and (v) abstraction development. Each step is affected by uncertainty in (i) assessing parameters for models and (ii) conceptualization and understanding of governing processes. Because of the complexity and uncertainty, alternative interpretations and models become important aspects in the regulatory environment. NRC staff gain confidence in performance assessment model results through understanding the uncertainty in the various models. An example of a complex process in the unsaturated zone is seepage into drifts, which leads to liquid water potentially contacting waste packages. Seepage is a risk-important process for the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain because of its potential effect on waste package integrity and trainsport of potentially released radionuclides. Complexities for seepage include (i) characterization of fractures that carry flow, (ii) effect of small to intermediate scale structural features on flow, (iii) consideration of the diverse flow regimes (rivulets, film flow, capillarity) in fractures, (iv) effect of vapor transport associated

  15. Metal ion complex formation in small lakes of the Western Siberian Arctic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremleva, Tatiana; Dinu, Marina

    2017-04-01

    be predominantly in free, ionic or bound form with inorganic ligands. This state means paradox consequence that the increase of dissolved Fe content will lead to toxicity rise of other elements having less affinity to organic material. For surface waters of Western Siberian Arctic zone this situation is quite common. The total concentration of iron and aluminum ions in most lakes of tundra and northern taiga zones is approximately equal to water complexing ability. From the other side humic substances participation in inactivation of other more toxic metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni et al.) will be poor. Arctic part of Western Siberia undergoes significant anthropogenic load due to extensive oil and gas recovery in this zone. Surface waters of Western Siberia are characterized by high natural content of iron, aluminum and copper ions and anthropogenic load of heavy metals makes the situation more serious.

  16. Opposing shear senses in a subdetachment mylonite zone: Implications for core complex mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Frances J.; Platt, John P.; Platzman, Ellen S.; Grove, Marty J.; Seward, Gareth

    2010-08-01

    Global studies of metamorphic core complexes and low-angle detachment faults have highlighted a fundamental problem: Since detachments excise crustal section, the relationship between the mylonitic rocks in their footwalls and the brittle deformation in their hanging walls is commonly unclear. Mylonites could either reflect ductile deformation related to exhumation along the detachment fault, or they could be a more general feature of the extending middle crust that has been "captured" by the detachment. In the first case we would expect the kinematics of the mylonite zone to mirror the sense of movement on the detachment; in the second case both the direction and sense of shear in the mylonites could be different. The northern Snake Range décollement (NSRD) is a classic Basin and Range detachment fault with a well-documented top-east of displacement. We present structural, paleomagnetic, geochronological, and geothermometric evidence to suggest that the mylonite zone below the NSRD locally experienced phases of both east- and west-directed shear, inconsistent with movement along a single detachment fault. We therefore propose that the footwall mylonites represent a predetachment discontinuity in the middle crust that separated localized deformation above from distributed crustal flow below (localized-distributed transition (LDT)). The mylonites were subsequently captured by a moderately dipping brittle detachment that soled down to the middle crust and exhumed them around a rolling hinge into a subhorizontal orientation at the surface, producing the present-day NSRD. In this interpretation the brittle hanging wall represents a series of rotated upper crustal normal faults, whereas the mylonitic footwall represents one or more exhumed middle crustal discontinuities (LDTs).

  17. Strategic opportunities for economic development of the Baltic Sea coastal zones and sea industrial and port complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogoberidze George

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the principal dimensions in attraction of the world economy structures is coastal territories as spaces where marine potential of a state is most pronounced. In this respect, it is vital to set the priorities of development of coastal zones taking into account the changes in the strategic situation in order to maintain the components of marine potential of the Russian Federation at the level of its national interests. The article aims to develop an indicator system of assessment of coastal zone potential, and sea industrial and port facilities in order to identify the characteristic and strategic capacities of the economic development of these territories in the complex approach. The research methodology is based on the assessment of marine potential of coastal territories as an indicator of the efficacy of its marine economic complex development with using the indicator methods as a multi-factor and multi-level spatial system. The proposed system is applied to a complex analysis of coastal territories of the Russian Baltic, the estimation of a socio-economic factor of coastal zone marine potential, as well as recommendations for long-term planning of the economic development of Russia’s coastal zones of the Baltic Sea and the organization of marine activities. This methodology can help to identify a role of coastal territories in the economy and reflect perspectives and directions of strategic development of coastal zones, and sea industrial and port facilities of the Russian Federation.

  18. Evolution of a calcite marble shear zone complex on Thassos Island, Greece: microstructural and textural fabrics and their kinematic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestmann, Michel; Kunze, Karsten; Matthews, Alan

    2000-11-01

    The deformation history of a monophase calcite marble shear zone complex on Thassos Island, Northern Greece, is reconstructed by detailed geometric studies of the textural and microstructural patterns relative to a fixed reference system (shear zone boundary, SZB). Strain localization within the massive marble complex is linked to decreasing P- T conditions during the exhumation process of the metamorphic core complex. Solvus thermometry indicates that temperatures of 300-350°C prevailed during part of the shear zone deformation history. The coarse-grained marble protolith outside the shear zone is characterized by symmetrically oriented twin sets due to early coaxial deformation. A component of heterogeneous non-coaxial deformation is first recorded within the adjacent protomylonite. Enhanced strain weakening by dynamic recrystallization promoted strong localization of plastic deformation in the ultramylonite of the calcite shear zone, where high strain was accommodated by non-coaxial flow. This study demonstrates that both a pure shear and a simple shear strain path can result in similar crystallographic preferred orientations (single c-axis maximum perpendicular to the SZB) by different dominant deformation mechanisms. Separated a-axis pole figures (+ a- and - a-axis) show different density distributions with orthorhombic texture symmetry in the protolith marble and monoclinic symmetry in the ultramylonite marble consistently with the observed grain fabric symmetry.

  19. Moire topography in odontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Yeras, A.

    2001-08-01

    For several decades measurement optical techniques have been used in different branches of Science and Technology and in medicine. One of these techniques is the so-called Moire topography that allows the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moire, with which precision can be reached up to the order of the microns by the phase shift instrumentation in an original way. Advantages and disadvantages of using the Moire topography and its comparison with other techniques used in the optical metrology are presented. Also, some positive and negative aspects of the implementation of this technique are shown in dentistry.

  20. Fault zone characteristics and basin complexity in the southern Salton Trough, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Patricia; Ma, Yiran; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Fuis, Gary S.; Han, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing oblique slip at the Pacific–North America plate boundary in the Salton Trough produced the Imperial Valley (California, USA), a seismically active area with deformation distributed across a complex network of exposed and buried faults. To better understand the shallow crustal structure in this region and the connectivity of faults and seismicity lineaments, we used data primarily from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project to construct a three-dimensional P-wave velocity model down to 8 km depth and a velocity profile to 15 km depth, both at 1 km grid spacing. A VP = 5.65–5.85 km/s layer of possibly metamorphosed sediments within, and crystalline basement outside, the valley is locally as thick as 5 km, but is thickest and deepest in fault zones and near seismicity lineaments, suggesting a causative relationship between the low velocities and faulting. Both seismicity lineaments and surface faults control the structural architecture of the western part of the larger wedge-shaped basin, where two deep subbasins are located. We estimate basement depths, and show that high velocities at shallow depths and possible basement highs characterize the geothermal areas.

  1. Untangling a species complex of arid zone grasses (Triodia) reveals patterns congruent with co-occurring animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin M; Barrett, Matthew D; Krauss, Siegfried L; Thiele, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    The vast Australian arid zone formed over the last 15million years, and gradual aridification as well as more extreme Pliocene and Pleistocene climate shifts have impacted the evolution of its biota. Understanding the evolutionary history of groups of organisms or regional biotas such as the Australian arid biota requires clear delimitation of the units of biodiversity (taxa). Here we integrate evidence from nuclear (ETS and ITS) and chloroplast (rps16-trnK spacer) regions and morphology to clarify taxonomic boundaries in a species complex of Australian hummock grasses (Triodia) to better understand the evolution of Australian arid zone plants and to evaluate congruence in distribution patterns with co-occurring organisms. We find evidence for multiple new taxa in the T. basedowii species complex, but also incongruence between data sets and indications of hybridization that complicate delimitation. We find that the T. basedowii complex has high lineage diversity and endemism in the biologically important Pilbara region of Western Australia, consistent with the region acting as a refugium. Taxa show strong geographic structure in the Pilbara, congruent with recent work on co-occurring animals and suggesting common evolutionary drivers across the biota. Our findings confirm recognition of the Pilbara as an important centre of biodiversity in the Australian arid zone, and provide a basis for future taxonomic revision of the T. basedowii complex and more detailed study of its evolutionary history and that of arid Australia.

  2. Why is topography fractal?

    CERN Document Server

    Pelletier, J D

    1997-01-01

    The power spectrum S of linear transects of the earth's topography is often observed to be a power-law function of wave number k with exponent close to -2: S(k) is proportional to k^-2. In addition, river networks are fractal trees that satisfy many power-law or fractal relationships between their morphologic components. A model equation for the evolution of the earth's topography by erosional processes which produces fractal topography and fractal river networks is presented and its solutions compared in detail to real topography. The model is the diffusion equation for sediment transport on hillslopes and channels with the local diffusivity proportional to the square of the discharge. The dependence of diffusivity on discharge follows from fundamental equations of sediment transport. We study the model in two ways. In the first analysis the diffusivity is parameterized as a function of relief and a Taylor expansion procedure is carried out to obtain a differential equation for the landform elevation which i...

  3. Optimal design of an internal monitoring program for personnel in the Chornobyl exclusion zone radwaste management industrial complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, O O; Medvedev, S Yu; Novikov, O E; Andreyev, V V

    2007-01-01

    Modern state and approach regarding organisation of individual internal dose monitoring of the personnel of industrial complex for radioactive waste management at the Chornobyl exclusion zone (CEZ) is presented. Sensitivity and adequacy of the acknowledged instrumental methods is considered taking into account the features of interpretation using indirect methods in the specific working conditions of industrial complex for radioactive waste management at the CEZ. The performed analysis enables clear recommendations to be made with regard to optimum design of an internal monitoring program for personnel, including application of specific techniques.

  4. Mineral chemistry of isotropic gabbros from the Manamedu Ophiolite Complex, Cauvery Suture Zone, southern India: Evidence for neoproterozoic suprasubduction zone tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellappa, T.; Tsunogae, T.; Chetty, T. R. K.; Santosh, M.

    2016-11-01

    The dismembered units of the Neoproterozoic Manamedu Ophiolite Complex (MOC) in the Cauvery Suture Zone, southern India comprises a well preserved ophiolitic sequence of ultramafic cumulates of altered dunites, pyroxenites, mafic cumulates of gabbros, gabbro-norites and anorthosites in association with plagiogranites, isotropic gabbros, metadolerites, metabasalts/amphibolites and thin layers of ferruginous chert bands. The isotropic gabbros occur as intrusions in association with gabbroic anorthosites, plagiogranite and metabasalts/amphibolites. The gabbros are medium to fine grained with euhedral to subhedral orthopyroxenes, clinopyroxenes and subhedral plagioclase, together with rare amphiboles. Mineral chemistry of isotropic gabbros reveal that the clinopyroxenes are diopsidic to augitic in composition within the compositional ranges of En(42-59), Fs(5-12), Wo(31-50). They are Ca-rich and Na poor (Na2O < 0.77 wt%) characterized by high-Mg (Mg# 79-86) and low-Ti (TiO2 < 0.35 wt%) contents. The tectonic discrimination plots of clinopyroxene data indicate island arc signature of the source magma. Our study further confirms the suprasubduction zone origin of the Manamedu ophiolitic suite, associated with the subduction-collision history of the Neoproterozoic Mozambique ocean during the assembly of Gondwana supercontinent.

  5. Preliminary Assessment/Investigation Final Summary Report: "Dead Zone" Site, Laysan Island, Hawaiian Island NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to assess the risks that the "Laysan Dead Zone" poses to the health of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) personnel and natural...

  6. Geodynamics and ore content of basite-ultrabasite complexes of Siberian Platform southern framing rocks (Kodaro-Udokan and Muja zones of North Transbaikalye)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bair N.Abramov

    2004-01-01

    In southern framing of Siberian Platform, basite-ultrabasite intrusive complexes were forming over a long period of time (Early Proterozoic-Paleozoic Era) as a result of collisional and post-collisional processes. In Muja zone they formed mainly in island-arch geodynamic conditions, in Kodaro-Udokan zone-in continental. Most productive toward noble metals in Muja zones are basite-ultrabasites of the Dovyrensk complex, in Kodaro-Udokan basites of the Chiney complex. Gold in these formations has both mantle and crustal springs.

  7. A Unified Approach to the Recognition of Complex Actions from Sequences of Zone-Crossings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanromà, G.; Patino, L.; Burghouts, G.J.; Schutte, K.; Ferryman, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for the recognition of complex actions. Our method combines automatic learning of simple actions and manual definition of complex actions in a single grammar. Contrary to the general trend in complex action recognition, that consists in dividing recognition into two stages, our m

  8. Analysis of Wind Energy Resource Assessment Application with CFD Under the Condition of Complex Topography%复杂地形条件下应用CFD技术进行风能资源评估应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷建光

    2014-01-01

    Tis paper introduced simulated extrapolation and cross validation with the actual data between diferent anemometer tower of one project in Yunnan under the condition of complex topography. At the same time, diferent weight coefcient has been used to do multi met mast synthesis computation, it can also improve the results. Trough the actual data validation for diferent anemometer tower, it confrmed the technology of computational fuid dynamics in a complex environment with complex mountainous region under the condition of validity and reliability.%本文介绍了中国云南某地形极其复杂的风电项目不同测风塔之间进行模拟外推并与实际数据进行交叉验证的例子。同时,结合多测风塔综合技术,在不同权重情况下进行多塔综合,并对风流评估进行改进。通过对不同测风塔实际数据的验证,再次确认了计算流体力学技术在复杂环境与复杂山地条件下的有效性及可靠性。

  9. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  10. Complex methods to determine zones liable to sudden outbursts during prospecting and mining of gassy coal seams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeev, I.V.; Ivanov, B.M. [Skochinsky Institute of Mining, Lyubertsy (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Greater depth of mining and speed of development driving results in greater number of coal seams liable to outbursts. A concept for coal and gas outbursts prevention worked out in Russia provides the main idea and a practical combination of a reliable forecast of the zones liable to outbursts with optimum parameters for the technological impact on the mining of gassy coal seams. The main idea for a reliable forecast of the coal seam zones liable to outbursts allows a complex estimation of the potential outburst hazard outside the mine development impact zone depending upon the geological and geophysical investigations of the prospecting boreholes and true outburst hazard as a function of the potential outburst hazard and energy capacity and its effects upon the technology of the development of faces. Main idea of complex forecast can be developed by forming a criteria for the outburst hazard which is a function of the basic outburst hazard factors conditioned by the energy-power theory for sudden outbursts. The basic outburst hazard factors are considered as a function of empirical outburst hazard indices which make it possible to determine the forecast criteria on a statistical basis by using computers and the image recognition theory. It is possible to develop a regional (geological prospecting) and a local (periodical - in the development faces) forecast of the outburst hazard zones, and to determine the reduction degree for gas content and gas pressure on applying anti-outburst measures. Resorting to the seismoacoustic (apparatus ZUA type) and gas-dynamic (methane-control equipment) automated forecasting makes it possible to continuously control the reactions of the near-face rock mass to the technological influence. The information through the telemetry reaches the mine computer at the switchboard and is translated into a forecast. 1 tab.

  11. In vivo topography of Rap1p-DNA complex at Saccharomyces cerevisiae TEF2 UAS(RPG) during transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Veronica; La Terra, Sabrina; Bianchi, Alessandro; Shore, David; Burderi, Luciano; Di Mauro, Ernesto; Negri, Rodolfo

    2002-04-26

    We have analyzed in detail the structure of RAP1-UAS(RPG) complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells using multi-hit KMnO(4), UV and micrococcal nuclease high-resolution footprinting. Three copies of the Rap1 protein are bound to the promoter simultaneously in exponentially growing cells, as shown by KMnO(4) multi-hit footprinting analysis, causing extended and diagnostic changes in the DNA structure of the region containing the UAS(RPG). Amino acid starvation does not cause loss of Rap1p from the complex; however, in vivo UV-footprinting reveals the occurrence of structural modifications of the complex. Moreover, low-resolution micrococcal nuclease digestion shows that the chromatin of the entire region is devoid of positioned nucleosomes but is susceptible to changes in accessibility to the nuclease upon amino acid starvation. The implications of these results for the mechanism of Rap1p action are discussed. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Large-scale magmatic layering in the Main Zone of the Bushveld Complex and episodic downward magma infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ben; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Webb, Susan J.; Bybee, Grant M.

    2017-03-01

    The Bellevue drillcore intersects 3 km of Main and Upper Zone cumulates in the Northern Limb of the Bushveld Complex. Main Zone cumulates are predominately gabbronorites, with localized layers of pyroxenite and anorthosite. Some previous workers, using bulk rock major, trace and isotopic compositions, have suggested that the Main Zone crystallized predominantly from a single pulse of magma. However, density measurements throughout the Bellevue drillcore reveal intervals that show up-section increases in bulk rock density, which are difficult to explain by crystallization from a single batch of magma. Wavelet analysis of the density data suggests that these intervals occur on length-scales of 40 to 170 m, thus defining a scale of layering not previously described in the Bushveld Complex. Upward increases in density in the Main Zone correspond to upward increases in modal pyroxene, producing intervals that grade from a basal anorthosite (with 5% pyroxene) to gabbronorite (with 30-40% pyroxene). We examined the textures and mineral compositions of a 40 m thick interval showing upwardly increasing density to establish how this type of layering formed. Plagioclase generally forms euhedral laths, while orthopyroxene is interstitial in texture and commonly envelops finer-grained and embayed plagioclase grains. Minor interstitial clinopyroxene was the final phase to crystallize from the magma. Plagioclase compositions show negligible change up-section (average An62), with local reverse zoning at the rims of cumulus laths (average increase of 2 mol%). In contrast, interstitial orthopyroxene compositions become more primitive up-section, from Mg# 57 to Mg# 63. Clinopyroxene similarly shows an up-section increase in Mg#. Pyroxene compositions record the primary magmatic signature of the melt at the time of crystallization and are not an artefact of the trapped liquid shift effect. Combined, the textures and decoupled mineral compositions indicate that the upward density

  13. Topography and Landforms of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Peter G.; Warner, Michael B.

    2005-01-01

    . The data contained in this publication includes a gap filled, countrywide SRTM DEM of Ecuador projected in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) Zone 17 North projection, Provisional South American, 1956, Ecuador datum and a non gap filled SRTM DEM of the Galapagos Islands projected in UTM Zone 15 North projection. Both the Ecuador and Galapagos Islands DEMs are available as an ESRI Grid, stored as ArcInfo Export files (.e00), and in Erdas Imagine (IMG) file formats with a 90 meter pixel resolution. Also included in this publication are high and low resolution Adobe Acrobat (PDF) files of topography and landforms maps in Ecuador. The high resolution map should be used for printing and display, while the lower resolution map can be used for quick viewing and reference purposes.

  14. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  15. Carbon-water Cycling in the Critical Zone: Understanding Ecosystem Process Variability Across Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Holly [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Brooks, Paul [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-16

    One of the largest knowledge gaps in environmental science is the ability to understand and predict how ecosystems will respond to future climate variability. The links between vegetation, hydrology, and climate that control carbon sequestration in plant biomass and soils remain poorly understood. Soil respiration is the second largest carbon flux of terrestrial ecosystems, yet there is no consensus on how respiration will change as water availability and temperature co-vary. To address this knowledge gap, we use the variation in soil development and topography across an elevation and climate gradient on the Front Range of Colorado to conduct a natural experiment that enables us to examine the co-evolution of soil carbon, vegetation, hydrology, and climate in an accessible field laboratory. The goal of this project is to further our ability to combine plant water availability, carbon flux and storage, and topographically driven hydrometrics into a watershed scale predictive model of carbon balance. We hypothesize: (i) landscape structure and hydrology are important controls on soil respiration as a result of spatial variability in both physical and biological drivers: (ii) variation in rates of soil respiration during the growing season is due to corresponding shifts in belowground carbon inputs from vegetation; and (iii) aboveground carbon storage (biomass) and species composition are directly correlated with soil moisture and therefore, can be directly related to subsurface drainage patterns.

  16. On the existence of free and metal complexed sulfide in the Arabian Sea and its oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theberge, Stephen M.; Luther, George W.; Farrenkopf, Anna M.

    Free hydrogen sulfide was not detected in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea during legs D1 (September 1992) and D3 (October-November 1992) of the Netherlands Indian Ocean Programme (NIOP). However, sulfide complexed to metals was detected by cathodic stripping square wave voltammetry at 2 nM or less throughout the water column. A slight increase in sulfide was measured in the OMZ relative to the surface waters and may be related to sulfur release from organic matter during decomposition. Sulfide complexes are of two general types at low concentrations of metal and sulfide. First, metals such as Mn, Fe, Co and Ni form complexes with bisulfide ion (HS -) that are kinetically labile to dissociation and are reactive. Second, metals such as Cu and Zn form multinuclear complexes with sulfide (S 2-) that are kinetically inert to dissociation; thus, they are less reactive than free (bi)sulfide and the labile metal bisulfide complexes. Zinc and copper sulfide complexes are important in allowing hydrogen sulfide to persist in seawater which contains measurable oxygen.

  17. Satellite remote sensing of landscape freeze/thaw state dynamics for complex Topography and Fire Disturbance Areas Using multi-sensor radar and SRTM digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podest, Erika; McDonald, Kyle; Kimball, John; Randerson, James

    2003-01-01

    We characterize differences in radar-derived freeze/thaw state, examining transitions over complex terrain and landscape disturbance regimes. In areas of complex terrain, we explore freezekhaw dynamics related to elevation, slope aspect and varying landcover. In the burned regions, we explore the timing of seasonal freeze/thaw transition as related to the recovering landscape, relative to that of a nearby control site. We apply in situ biophysical measurements, including flux tower measurements to validate and interpret the remotely sensed parameters. A multi-scale analysis is performed relating high-resolution SAR backscatter and moderate resolution scatterometer measurements to assess trade-offs in spatial and temporal resolution in the remotely sensed fields.

  18. Satellite remote sensing of landscape freeze/thaw state dynamics for complex Topography and Fire Disturbance Areas Using multi-sensor radar and SRTM digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podest, Erika; McDonald, Kyle; Kimball, John; Randerson, James

    2003-01-01

    We characterize differences in radar-derived freeze/thaw state, examining transitions over complex terrain and landscape disturbance regimes. In areas of complex terrain, we explore freezekhaw dynamics related to elevation, slope aspect and varying landcover. In the burned regions, we explore the timing of seasonal freeze/thaw transition as related to the recovering landscape, relative to that of a nearby control site. We apply in situ biophysical measurements, including flux tower measurements to validate and interpret the remotely sensed parameters. A multi-scale analysis is performed relating high-resolution SAR backscatter and moderate resolution scatterometer measurements to assess trade-offs in spatial and temporal resolution in the remotely sensed fields.

  19. Toward optical coherence topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Samir; Jiang, Yanshui

    2012-03-01

    Commercial OCT systems provide pachymetry measurements. Full corneal topographic information of anterior and posterior corneal surfaces for use in cataract surgery and refractive procedures is a desirable goal and would add to the usefulness of anterior and posterior segment evaluation. While substantial progress has been made towards obtaining "average" central corneal power (D Huang), power in different meridians and topography are still missing. This is usually reported to be due to eye movement. We analyze the role of centration, eye movements and develop a model that allows for the formulation of criteria for obtaining reliable topographic data within ¼ diopter.

  20. Origin and serpentinization of ultramafic rocks of Manipur Ophiolite Complex in the Indo-Myanmar subduction zone, Northeast India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningthoujam, P. S.; Dubey, C. S.; Guillot, S.; Fagion, A.-S.; Shukla, D. P.

    2012-05-01

    The Manipur Ophiolite Complex (MOC) is part of the Manipur-Nagaland ophiolite belt (MNOB). The belt is exposed in the eastern margin of the Indo-Myanmar Ranges (IMRs), which formed by the collision between the India and Myanmar continental plates. Several contrasting views were put forward concerning the origin of the MNOB. The complex represents a dismembered ophiolite sequence with serpentinite as the largest litho-unit formed. Petrography and Raman spectroscopy of the serpentinite suggest that they are serpentinized ultramafic cumulate and peridotite. The serpentinization may have occurred at a condition of low pressure and low temperature metamorphism. Geochemical signatures of the rocks and spinel grains revealed that the protolith be an abyssal peridotite, derived from a less depleted fertile mantle melt at a MORB setting after low degree (10-15%) partial melting. The study concluded that the serpentinite may have been created at a slow-spreading ridge, rather than a supra-subduction-zone setting. These rocks were later obducted and incorporated into the IMR of Indo-Myanmar suture zone.

  1. Presynaptic calcium channels and α3-integrins are complexed with synaptic cleft laminins, cytoskeletal elements and active zone components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Steven S; Valdez, Gregorio; Sanes, Joshua R

    2010-11-01

    At chemical synapses, synaptic cleft components interact with elements of the nerve terminal membrane to promote differentiation and regulate function. Laminins containing the β2 subunit are key cleft components, and they act in part by binding the pore-forming subunit of a pre-synaptic voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(v)α) (Nishimune et al. 2004). In this study, we identify Ca(v)α-associated intracellular proteins that may couple channel-anchoring to assembly or stabilization of neurotransmitter release sites called active zones. Using Ca(v)α-antibodies, we isolated a protein complex from Torpedo electric organ synapses, which resemble neuromuscular junctions but are easier to isolate in bulk. We identified 10 components of the complex: six cytoskeletal proteins (α2/β2 spectrins, plectin 1, AHNAK/desmoyokin, dystrophin, and myosin 1), two active zone components (bassoon and piccolo), synaptic laminin, and a calcium channel β subunit. Immunocytochemistry confirmed these proteins in electric organ synapses, and PCR analysis revealed their expression by developing mammalian motor neurons. Finally, we show that synaptic laminins also interact with pre-synaptic integrins containing the α3 subunit. Together with our previous finding that a distinct synaptic laminin interacts with SV2 on nerve terminals (Son et al. 2000), our results identify three paths by which synaptic cleft laminins can send developmentally important signals to nerve terminals.

  2. Topography, complex refractive index, and conductivity of graphene layers measured by correlation of optical interference contrast, atomic force, and back scattered electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaupel, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.vaupel@zeiss.com; Dutschke, Anke [Training Application Support Center, Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Königsallee 9-21, 37081 Göttingen (Germany); Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pasupathy, Abhay [Department of Physics, Columbia University New York, 538 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Hitzel, Frank [DME Nanotechnologie GmbH, Geysostr. 13, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-11-14

    The optical phase shift by reflection on graphene is measured by interference contrast microscopy. The height profile across graphene layers on 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} on silicon is derived from the phase profile. The complex refractive index and conductivity of graphene layers on silicon with 2 nm thin SiO{sub 2} are evaluated from a phase profile, while the height profile of the layers is measured by atomic force microscopy. It is observed that the conductivity measured on thin SiO{sub 2} is significantly greater than on thick SiO{sub 2}. Back scattered electron contrast of graphene layers is correlated to the height of graphene layers.

  3. Historical seismicity near Chagos - A complex deformation zone in the equatorial Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The historical seismicity of the Chagos region of the Indian Ocean is analyzed, using earthquake relocation methods and a moment variance technique to determine the focal mechanisms of quakes occurring before 1964. Moment variance analysis showed a thrust faulting mechanism associated with the earthquake of 1944 near the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge; a strike-slip mechanism was associated with a smaller 1957 event occurring west of the Chagos Bank. The location of the 1944 event, one of the largest intraplate earthquakes known (1.4 x 10 to the 27th dyne/cm), would imply that the Chagos seismicity is due to a zone of tectonic deformation stretching across the equatorial Indian Ocean. The possibility of a slow diffuse boundary extending west of the Central Indian Ridge is also discussed. This boundary is confirmed by recent plate motion studies which suggest that it separates the Australian plate from a single Indo-Arabian plate.

  4. Global snowline and mountain topography: a contrasted view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Herman, Frédéric; Valla, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The examination of the relationship between Earth's topography and present and past climate (i.e., long-term elevation of glaciers Equilibrium Line Altitude) reveals that the elevation of mountain ranges may be limited or controlled by glaciations (e.g. Porter, 1989). This is of prime importance, because glacial condition would lead to a limit the mountain development, hence the accumulation of gravitational energy and prevent the development of further glacial conditions as well as setting the erosion in (peri)glacial environments. In this study, we examine the relationships between topography and the global Equilibrium Line Altitude of alpine glaciers around the world (~ long term snowline, i.e. the altitude where the ice mass balance is null). This analysis reinforce a global study previously published (Champagnac et al., 2012), and provide a much finer view of the climate-topography-tectonics relationships. Specifically, two main observations can be drawn: 1) The distance between the (averaged and maximum) topography, and the ELA decreases pole ward the poles, and even become reversed (mean elevation above to ELA) at high latitude. Correlatively, the elevation of very large portion of land at mid-latitude cannot be related to glaciations, simply because it was never glaciated (large distance between topography and long-term mean ELA). The maximum distance between the ELA and the topography is greater close to the equator and decreases poleward. In absence of glacial and periglacial erosion, this trend cannot have its origin in glacial and periglacial processes. Moreover, the ELA elevation shows a significant (1000~1500m) depression in the intertropical zone. This depression of the ELA is not reflected at all in the topography 2) The distribution of relief on Earth, if normalized by the mean elevation of mountain ranges (as a proxy for available space to create relief, see Champagnac et al., 2012 for details) shows a latitudinal band of greater relief between

  5. Root zone of a continental rift: the Neoproterozoic Kebnekaise Intrusive Complex, northern Swedish Caledonides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsch, Moritz; Svenningsen, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Mafic magmatic rocks formed between ca. 615 and 560 Ma along the Neoproterozoic margins of Baltica and Laurentia are classically attributed to continental rifting heralding the opening of the Iapetus Ocean. We report new data for the Kebnekaise Intrusive Complex (KIC) exposed in the Seve Nappes i...

  6. The Manamedu Complex: Geochemical constraints on Neoproterozoic suprasubduction zone ophiolite formation within the Gondwana suture in southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellappa, T.; Chetty, T. R. K.; Tsunogae, T.; Santosh, M.

    2010-09-01

    Ophiolites provide important clues on the role of subduction and have been widely investigated to reconstruct the history of development and closure of ocean basins in the geological past. The Manamedu Complex within the Palghat-Cauvery Suture Zone in southern India comprises metamorphosed equivalents of the following lithological units: (1) an ultramafic group comprising dominantly of pyroxenite and highly altered dunite, locally preserving cumulate textures; (2) a gabbroic suite consisting of gabbro, gabbro norite, and anorthosite; (3) sheeted mafic dykes of amphibolite to meta-andesite categories, (4) plagiogranite veins and pools; and (5) a thin layer of ferruginous cherts. Cr vs. Y, V vs. Cr, Ti vs. Zr, TiO 2-MnO-P 2O 5 and Fe 2O 3-Na 2O + K 2O-MgO plots of the gabbros and mafic dyke assemblages show that these are related to island arc tholeiite (IAT) group with tholeiitic to calcalkaline signatures. Chondrite normalized REE patterns of mafic dykes do not show any pronounced fractionation and display slight positive Eu anomalies. The normalized MORB plots of the mafic dykes show depletion of HFSE (negative Nb, Ti, Ta, Hf anomalies) and enrichment of LFSE (positive K, Ba, Rb, Th). The petrological and geochemical characteristics of the major lithological units in Manamedu Complex suggest that these rocks represent the remnants of an oceanic crust, developed from mantle-derived arc magmas probably within a suprasubduction zone tectonic setting. From the geological set up and our field observations, we infer that these rocks were obducted on to the continental margin with the closure of an ocean basin during the Neoproterozoic. The Manamedu Complex may represent the remnants of the Mozambique Ocean crust developed during Rodinia breakup and which was destroyed during the amalgamation of the Gondwana supercontinent in the Latest Neoproterozoic-Cambrian.

  7. Topography of Io (color)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The images used to create this color composite of Io were acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter and are part of a sequence of images designed to map the topography or relief on Io and to monitor changes in the surface color due to volcanic activity. Obtaining images at low illumination angles is like taking a picture from a high altitude around sunrise or sunset. Such lighting conditions emphasize the topography of the volcanic satellite. Several mountains up to a few miles high can be seen in this view, especially near the upper right. Some of these mountains appear to be tilted crustal blocks. Most of the dark spots correspond to active volcanic centers.North is to the top of the picture which merges images obtained with the clear, red, green, and violet filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. . The resolution is 8.3 kilometers per picture element. The image was taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 817,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  8. Présence du complexe tectonique Malaguide à l'est de Carthagène (zone interne Bétique, Espagne)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Tortosa, Francisco Juan; López-Garrido, Angel Carlos; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    Triassic materials belonging to the Malaguide Complex east of Cartagena are described for the first time. This is the easternmost Malaguide outcrop known and it overlies the Portmán Alpujarride unit. Knowledge of this outcrop contributes to the palaeogeographic reconstruction of the Betic Internal Zone in an area where the Alpujarride Complex is considerably thinned due to stratigraphic and tectonic reasons.

  9. Liriomyza Leafminer (Diptera: Agromyzidae) Parasitoid Complex in Different Agroecological Zones, Seasons, and Host Plants in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foba, C N; Salifu, D; Lagat, Z O; Gitonga, L M; Akutse, K S; Fiaboe, K K M

    2016-04-01

    Liriomyza leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are severe pests of vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Previous studies revealed low leafminer parasitism across different agroecological zones in Kenya. The present paper reports on the composition of leafminer parasitoids at different elevations, in different seasons, and on different host crops. Surveys were conducted monthly from January to November 2012, and nine parasitoid species were recovered. Total mean parasitism in the study sites was 31.23 ± 1.03% from a total of 20 different vegetable Liriomyza-infested crops belonging to seven families. Diglyphus isaea (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), Phaedrotoma scabriventris, a newly released parasitoid, and Opius dissitus Muesebeck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were the most abundant at all elevations, accounting for 67.3, 18.6, and 9.2% of total parasitoids, respectively. Elevation, season, and host crop significantly affected the parasitoid species present and their abundance. Diglyphus isaea was more abundant at the high- and mid-elevations at all seasons compared with the low-elevation, whereas the lower-elevation favored higher abundance of P. scabriventris and O. dissitus during the long rainy season compared with the high- and mid-elevations at all seasons. Of all the host crops surveyed, parasitoids were more abundant on tomato, local kidney bean, snow pea and French bean than other crops. The total parasitism rate observed in this study suggests a considerable improvement in leafminer parasitism compared with previous surveys in Kenya. The implications of these findings for leafminer management in vegetable and ornamental production in Kenya are discussed.

  10. On geometric complexity of earthquake focal zone and fault system: A statistical study

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Yan Y

    2008-01-01

    We discuss various methods used to investigate the geometric complexity of earthquakes and earthquake faults, based both on a point-source representation and the study of interrelations between earthquake focal mechanisms. We briefly review the seismic moment tensor formalism and discuss in some detail the representation of double-couple (DC) earthquake sources by normalized quaternions. Non-DC earthquake sources like the CLVD focal mechanism are also considered. We obtain the characterization of the earthquake complex source caused by summation of disoriented DC sources. We show that commonly defined geometrical fault barriers correspond to the sources without any CLVD component. We analyze the CMT global earthquake catalog to examine whether the focal mechanism distribution suggests that the CLVD component is likely to be zero in tectonic earthquakes. Although some indications support this conjecture, we need more extensive and significantly more accurate data to answer this question fully.

  11. Dynamic rupture simulations on complex fault zone structures with off-fault plasticity using the ADER-DG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollherr, Stephanie; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Igel, Heiner

    2015-04-01

    In dynamic rupture models, high stress concentrations at rupture fronts have to to be accommodated by off-fault inelastic processes such as plastic deformation. As presented in (Roten et al., 2014), incorporating plastic yielding can significantly reduce earlier predictions of ground motions in the Los Angeles Basin. Further, an inelastic response of materials surrounding a fault potentially has a strong impact on surface displacement and is therefore a key aspect in understanding the triggering of tsunamis through floor uplifting. We present an implementation of off-fault-plasticity and its verification for the software package SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method. The software recently reached multi-petaflop/s performance on some of the largest supercomputers worldwide and was a Gordon Bell prize finalist application in 2014 (Heinecke et al., 2014). For the nonelastic calculations we impose a Drucker-Prager yield criterion in shear stress with a viscous regularization following (Andrews, 2005). It permits the smooth relaxation of high stress concentrations induced in the dynamic rupture process. We verify the implementation by comparison to the SCEC/USGS Spontaneous Rupture Code Verification Benchmarks. The results of test problem TPV13 with a 60-degree dipping normal fault show that SeisSol is in good accordance with other codes. Additionally we aim to explore the numerical characteristics of the off-fault plasticity implementation by performing convergence tests for the 2D code. The ADER-DG method is especially suited for complex geometries by using unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Local adaptation of the mesh resolution enables a fine sampling of the cohesive zone on the fault while simultaneously satisfying the dispersion requirements of wave propagation away from the fault. In this context we will investigate the influence of off-fault-plasticity on geometrically complex fault zone structures like subduction

  12. Systematics of the hypervariable Moraea tripetala complex (Iridaceae: Iridoideae of the southern African winter rainfall zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Goldblatt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Field and laboratory research has shown that the Moraea tripetala complex of western South Africa, traditionally treated as a single species, sometimes with two additional varieties, has a pattern of morphological and cytological variation too complex to be accommodated in a single species. Variation in floral structure, especially the shape of the inner tepals, degree of union of the filaments, anther length and pollen colour form coherent patterns closely correlated with morphology of the corm tunics, mode of vegetative reproduction, and in some instances capsule and seed shape and size. The morphological patterns also correlate with geography, flowering time and sometimes habitat. It is especially significant that different variants of the complex may co-occur, each with overlapping or separate flowering times, a situation that conflicts with a single species taxonomy. We propose recognizing nine species and three additional subspecies for plants currently assigned to M. tripetala. M. grandis, from the western Karoo, has virtually free filaments and leaves often ± plane distally; closely allied M. amabilis, also with ± free filaments and often hairy leaves, is centred in the western Karoo and Olifants River Valley. Its range overlaps that of M. cuspidata, which has narrowly channelled, smooth leaves, linear inner tepals spreading distally and filaments united for up to 1.5 mm. M. decipiens from the Piketberg, M. hainebachiana, a local endemic of coastal limestone fynbos in the Saldanha District, M. ogamana from seasonally wet lowlands, and early flowering M. mutila constitute the remaining species of the complex in the southwestern Western Cape. M. helmei, a local endemic of middle elevations in the Kamiesberg, Namaqualand, has small flowers with short, tricuspidate inner tepals. All but M. amabilis and M. mutila are new species. We divide M. tripetala sensu stricto into three subspecies: widespread subsp. tripetala, subsp. violacea from

  13. Metals complexation with humic acids in surface water of different natural–climatic zones

    OpenAIRE

    Dinu M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Humic acids extracted from different soils. The stability constants of metal humates and acid dissociation constant humic acids were calculated. Forms of metals in natural waters was determined with use account their chemical composition and content and properties of organic matter. We assessed metals speciation in water objects with account for competitive reactions resulting in formation of hydroxide, hydrocarbonate, sulfate, and chloride metal complexes and obtained a competitive series of...

  14. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism.

  15. The Impact of Organo-Mineral Complexation on Mineral Weathering in the Soil Zone: Column Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, F.; Dever, S.; Yoo, K.; Imhoff, P. T.; Michael, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    While it is well known that organo-mineral complexes can protect organic matter (OM) from degradation, its impact on soil mineral weathering is not clear. Strong evidence has shown that the adsorption of OM to mineral surface accelerates the dissolution of some minerals, but these observations are limited to bench-scale experiments that focus on specific OM and minerals. In this study, soil samples prepared from an undisturbed forest site were used to determine mineral weathering rates under differing OM sorption on minerals. Soil samples from two depths, 0-6cm and 84-100cm, were chosen to represent different soil OM content and soil mineralogy. Soil OM was removed stepwise by heating samples to 350℃ for different durations (0-6cm: 100% removed, ~50% removed, and no removal; 84-100cm: 100% removed and no removal). Pretreated soil samples were subjected to flow-through, saturated column experiments using 0.01M LiCl and 5%CO2/95%air gas saturated (pH = 4.5) influent solution. Each column treatment was run in duplicate under a constant flow rate (Darcy velocity ≈ 8cm/hr). All columns reached a steady state after 600~700 pore volumes at which effluent pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and element concentrations were constant. At the 95% significance level, the DOC from OM-present columns was significantly higher, as expected. Correspondingly, effluent pH was lower in higher OM content columns. The chemical denudation rates were calculated from the effluent concentrations of the elements of interest. For the soil columns from both depths, silicon (Si) leaching rate showed that dissolution of silicate minerals was 2-3 times higher in OM-removed columns, suggesting that organo-mineral complexes suppress mineral dissolution. The N2-BET specific surface area (SSA) measurement also showed that the removal of OM increased SSA, which supported the idea that OM adsorption had decreased mineral exposure and thus decreased mineral dissolution. The leaching rates of some

  16. Capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of phytochelatins and other thiol peptides in complex biological samples derivatized with monobromobimane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rama, Mónica; Torres Vaamonde, Enrique; Abalde Alonso, Julio

    2005-02-01

    A new method to improve the analysis of phytochelatins and their precursors (cysteine, gamma-Glu-Cys, and glutathione) derivatized with monobromobimane (mBrB) in complex biological samples by capillary zone electrophoresis is described. The effects of the background electrolyte pH, concentration, and different organic additives (acetonitrile, methanol, and trifluoroethanol) on the separation were studied to achieve optimum resolution and number of theoretical plates of the analyzed compounds in the electropherograms. Optimum separation of the thiol peptides was obtained with 150 mM phosphate buffer at pH 1.60. Separation efficiency was improved when 2.5% v/v methanol was added to the background electrolyte. The electrophoretic conditions were 13 kV and capillary dimensions with 30 cm length from the inlet to the detector (38 cm total length) and 50 microm inner diameter. The injection was by pressure at 50 mbar for 17 s. Under these conditions, the separation between desglycyl-peptides and phytochelatins was also achieved. We also describe the optimum conditions for the derivatization of biological samples with mBrB to increase electrophoretic sensitivity and number of theoretical plates. The improved method was shown to be simple, reproducible, selective, and accurate in measuring thiol peptides in complex biological samples, the detection limit being 2.5 microM glutathione at a wavelength of 390 nm.

  17. Identification of Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes in a hybrid zone of West Nile virus transmission in Fresno County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAbee, Rory D; Green, Emily N; Holeman, Jodie; Christiansen, Julie; Frye, Niki; Dealey, Katherine; Mulligan, F Steve; Brault, Aaron C; Cornel, Anthony J

    2008-02-01

    Culex pipiens sensu lato mosquitoes were collected from 24 gravid traps (mid-June to mid-October, 2005) in Fresno County, CA. Captured gravid females were allowed to oviposit before sibling species identification by Ace.2 PCR and detection of West Nile virus (WNV) RNA by RT-PCR were performed on the mother and her offspring. Of the 442 Cx. pipiens s.l. female mosquitoes collected, 88 were positive for WNV viral RNA (peaked in August) with no significant differences among complex members or habitat. Vertical transmission was detected in 4 out of 20 families originating from WNV-positive mothers, however, in only a small number of offspring from each family. Out of 101 families that had PCR-based maternal and offspring identifications, the offspring from 15 families produced inexplicable amplicon patterns, suggesting ambiguities in the PCR assay identifications. Male genitalia (DV/D ratio) and Ace.2 PCR identifications revealed numerous discrepancies in our ability to accurately determine the identity of Cx. pipiens complex members in the hybrid zone of Fresno County.

  18. Medium effect (transfer activity coefficient) of methanol and acetonitrile on beta-cyclodextrin/benzoate complexation in capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Simo P; Sarmini, Karim; Fanali, Salvatore; Kenndler, Ernst

    2003-04-01

    Association constants, Kc, were derived from the electrophoretic mobilities of the anionic solutes (seven benzoates with hydroxy or chloro substituents) by capillary zone electrophoresis in different solvent systems, consisting of binary mixtures of water with up to 20% (v/v) methanol or acetonitrile, respectively. The association constants expectedly are found to decrease with increasing organic solvent concentration. The effect of organic solvents on the Kc of the benzoates with beta-cyclodextrin was analyzed applying the concept of the transfer activity coefficient (or the medium effect). This concept enables the evaluation of the significance of the contributions of the individual species involved in the complexation equilibrium in the different solvents: the benzoate ion, beta-cyclodextrin, and the anionic benzoate-beta-cyclodextrin complex. The medium effect on benzoate was calculated from the change in acidity constant of benzoic acid in the different mixed solvents and the corresponding transfer activity coefficients of the proton and the molecular acid. The transfer activity coefficients for beta-cyclodextrin results from its solubility at saturation in the different solvents. In this way, an estimation of the standard free energy of transfer, deltaG(t)0, of each species involved in the complexation equilibrium was possible for the transfer from water into the respective mixed solvent. It was found that the organic solvents do not significantly affect deltaG(t)0 for the benzoate anion. However, the organic solvents play a different role concerning the stabilization of beta-cyclodextrin and the complex anion: whereas the addition of acetonitrile has nearly no influence on deltaG(t)0 of the anionic complex, the reduction in Kc is caused by the enhanced stabilization of beta-cyclodextrin (reflected by its better solubility). Addition of methanol, on the other hand, lowers the solubility of beta-cyclodextrin, thus giving positive values for deltaG(t)0. Thus

  19. Flat-slab subduction, topography, and mantle dynamics in southwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérault, Mélanie; Husson, Laurent; Miller, Meghan S.; Humphreys, Eugene D.

    2015-09-01

    Topography above subduction zones arises from the isostatic contribution of crustal and lithospheric buoyancy, as well as the dynamic contribution from slab-driven mantle flow. We evaluate those effects in southwestern Mexico, where a segment of the Cocos slab subducts horizontally. The eastern part of the volcanic arc—the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt—stands at an average elevation of 2.3 km, nearly 1.3 km above the fore-arc. Lateral changes in bulk crustal density are relatively small, and seismic imaging shows that there is little variation in crustal thickness between these two regions. Thus, the elevation difference between the arc and the fore-arc should arise from differences in mantle properties. We present finite element models of flat-slab subduction that provide a simultaneous match to topography, plate velocities, and stress state in the overriding plate. We find that the dynamic effects are primarily controlled by the amount of coupling at the subduction interface and in the mantle wedge, the lack of slab anchoring into the lower mantle, and the absence of continental mantle lithosphere. With a mantle wedge and a subduction interface that are, respectively, 2 and 4 orders of magnitude weaker than the asthenosphere, the flat slab exerts a downward pull that can explain most of the elevation difference between the fore-arc and the arc. We infer that lateral viscosity variations play a significant role in shaping dynamic topography in complex tectonic settings and that sublithospheric dynamics can influence the topography at wavelengths that are significantly shorter than previously recognized.

  20. Complete structural analysis of the Upper plate of Attica metamorphic core complex (Sub-Pelagonian Zone, Internal Hellenides, Central Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulos, A.

    2009-04-01

    Two structural plates compose the Miocene Cordillera-type core complex of Attica, separated by a km-scale detachment fault (Diamantopoulos 2005, Diamantopoulos 2006). The Upper Plate contains rocks of the Sub-Pelagonian Zone and the Neogene basin of Athens. The Lower Plate includes Neogene basins developed onto Late Cenozoic a-type metamorphic domes. This work analyzes the geometry and the kinematic path of flow of rock masses of the Sub-Pelagonian rocks from the northern parts of Penteli mountain up to the Gulf of Alkyonides. The UP comprises Permo-Triassic rocks, Triassic-Jurassic carbonates and Late Jurassic melange, Mesozoic serpentinites containing Fe-Ni rocks, occurrences of carbonates and radiolarites, Cretaceous limestones as well as Paleocene flysch. A 3D structural analysis in all the scales concludes that: a) Multiple steep- and low-angle cataclastic shear zones define the boundaries among distinctive Permo-Triassic rocks, among Triassic-Jurassic rocks and Permo-Triassic rocks, among Permo-Triassic rocks and Triassic-Jurassic rocks, among Triassic-Jurassic rocks and serpentinites, among serpentinites and Triassic-Jurassic rocks, among Triassic-Jurassic rocks and Jurassic mélange, among Jurassic mélange and Triassic-Jurassic rocks, among Triassic-Jurassic rocks and Jurassic radiolarites, among Cretaceous and Triassic-Jurassic rocks, among Triassic-Jurassic rocks and Fe-Ni rocks, among Cretaceous and Fe-Ni rocks, among Paleocene and Triassic-Jurassic rocks, among Paleocene and Permo-Triassic rocks as well as among Cretaceous and Paleocene rocks, b) Apparent omissions of intermediate lithologies throughout the entire nappe stack observed in multiple locations suggest intense non-coaxial thinning, c) A remarkable contrast in the distributed strain between the distinctive lithologies is well-recognized, dependent by the rheological and mechanical character of the rocks, d) Thrust-like geometries and macroscopic repetitions between competent and incompetent

  1. Molybdenum isotope fractionation during complexation with organic matter in the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E. K.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a micronutrient and a redox sensitive trace metal that also forms strong complexes with organic matter (OM). The fractionation of Mo in sediments associated with adsorption onto both iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) (oxyhydr)oxides under oxic conditions and sulfide phases under euxinic conditions has been used to constrain redox conditions in the ocean. Additionally, Mo isotope dynamics in terrestrial systems can shed light on the pedogenic mechanisms driving the riverine Mo isotopic composition and how atmospheric inputs alter the trace metal budget and isotopic composition of soils. As a result of these studies, it has been hypothesized that multiple mechanisms are responsible for fractionating Mo isotopes. In particular, Mo fractionation during adsorption onto OM is unknown, despite the fact this mechanism is 3x to more than 20x greater than adsorption onto Fe- and Mn- (oxyhydr)oxides across a range of soil types from Oregon, Iceland, and Hawaii1-3 (Marks et al., 2015; Siebert et al., 2015; King et al., 2016). In this study, we measured Mo adsorption and isotopic fractionation onto insolubilized humic acid (IHA), a proxy for OM, as a function of both adsorption time (2-170 h) and pH (2-7). Preliminary results suggest that for the time series experiment, Mo adsorption onto IHA increased from 35% to 64% and a plateau was reached after 24 hours. The average Mo isotope fractionation between the solution and the IHA was Δ98Mosolution-IHA = 1.8 ± 0.3‰. For the pH series experiment, the average Mo isotope fractionation was Δ98Mosolution-IHA = 2.0 ± 0.2‰. Next, we compared the Mo isotopic composition of foliage, O-horizon, and surface soil from 12 sites in the Oregon Coast Range to better understand the impact of OM on Mo isotope dynamics in natural samples. The potential isotopic offset between dissolved and adsorbed Mo onto OM is of the same order of magnitude and direction as fractionation onto Fe- and Mn- (oxyhydr)oxides such as ferrihydrite

  2. Ins and outs of a complex subduction zone: C cycling along the Sunda margin, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, B. M.; Bebout, G. E.; Hilton, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction of C in marine sediments and altered oceanic crust is the main mechanism for reintroducing C into the deep earth and removing it from communication with the ocean and atmosphere. However, detailed studies of individual margins - which are necessary to understanding global C cycling - are sparse. The thick, C-rich sediment column along the Sunda margin, Indonesia makes understanding this margin crucial for constructing global C cycling budgets. Furthermore it is an ideal location to compare cycling of organic and carbonate C due to the abrupt transition from carbonate-dominated sediments in the SE to sediments rich in organic C from the Nicobar Fan in the NW. To quantify and characterize C available for subduction, we analyzed samples from DSDP 211, 260, 261, and ODP 765, all outboard of the trench, as well as piston and gravity cores of locally-sourced terrigenous trench fill. We created a 3-D model of overall sediment thickness and the thicknesses of geochemically distinct sedimentary units using archived and published seismic profiles to infer unit thicknesses at and along the 2500 km trench. This model vastly improves estimates of the C available for subduction and also reveals that the Christmas Island Seamount Province serves as a barrier to turbidite flow, dividing the regions of the trench dominated by organic and inorganic C input. Incorporating best estimates for the depth of the decollement indicates that the terrigenous trench fill, with up to 1.5 wt % organic C, is entirely accreted as is the thick section of carbonate-rich turbidites that dominate the southeastern portion of the margin (DSDP 261/ODP 765). Organic C accounts for most of the C bypassing the accretionary complex NW of the Christmas Island Seamount Province, and C inputs to the trench are lower there than to the SE where carbonate units near the base of the sediment column are the dominant C source. Release of C from altered oceanic crust - a C reservoir up to 10 times greater

  3. Shallow seismic reflection profiling over a Mylonitic Shear Zone, Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range Metamorphic Core Complex, NE Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawman, Robert B.; Ahmed, Hishameldin O.

    Seismic reflection profiling carried out with a sledgehammer source has imaged Tertiary extensional structures over a depth range of 45-500 m within lower plate rocks of the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range metamorphic core complex. The 400-m CMP profile straddles an exposed contact between tectonic slices of dolomitic marble and metaquartzite emplaced by low-angle ductile-brittle normal faulting. Subhorizontal reflections from layering within the tectonic slices give way at 160 ms (160-220 m depth) to reflections that dip 15-45° to the east, in contrast with dips indicated in a poorly imaged segment of a coincident regional seismic line but in agreement with dips of foliation mapped for nearby up-plunge exposures of a late Proterozoic - early Cambrian sequence of metaquartzites, marbles, schists, and granitic rocks that forms the bulk of the underlying shear zone. Differences with the regional profile are attributed to the higher frequencies (30-100 Hz) generated by the smaller hammer source and the enhanced lateral resolution provided by the straighter profile and much smaller shot-receiver offsets (46-157 m) contributing to the stack for each CMP. The results suggest that the near-surface, east-dipping component of the anastomozing shear zone extends at least 2 km farther east than previously interpreted. Rough estimates of interval velocities (1500-4500 m/s) inferred from stacking velocities are consistent with velocities of mylonitic rocks measured perpendicular to foliation at low confining pressures when the effects of macroscopic fractures and joints are taken into account. Peaks in amplitude spectra of stacked traces suggest long-wavelength components of layering resolved at scales from 5-8 m (depth: 50 m) to 15-25 m (depth: 500 m).

  4. Topography mediates plant water stress: coupling groundwater flow and rhizosphere-xylem hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. S.; Tai, X.

    2016-12-01

    Explicit representation of groundwater movement and its subsidy to the unsaturated zone have long been recognized to affect land surface fluxes. But its impact on mediating plant safety during drought has not yet been evaluated, due to the oversimplified representation of the soil-plant-atmospheric continuum in current mainstream land surface models. Here we evaluated the interaction between groundwater processes and plant hydraulics by integrating a three-dimensional groundwater model - ParFlow with a physiologically sophisticated plant model - TREES. A series of simulation experiments using representative hillslope shapes during a general dry down period were carried out to explore the impacts of topography, soil properties, and plant traits - maximum hydraulic conductance (Kmax), root area (Ar), and vulnerability to cavitation on plant hydraulic stress and the potential feedbacks to soil water spatial dynamics. From an initial condition of uniform pressure, lateral redistribution dominated the first stage when soils were wet, resulting in various water table depths. As drought progressed, the tension wetted zone provided a water subsidy to the root zone, causing various rates of soil dry down at different locations. In the end, the root zone soil water remains stable and dry, with diurnal fluctuations induced by the hydraulic redistribution of plant roots. Plants, in general, had higher transpiration and lower hydraulic stress on concave hillslopes. The same plant growing on fine-textured soils had higher transpiration rate, and therefore stronger feedbacks to the water table depths, compared to coarse-textured soil. But these responses could further vary by plant traits. For locations with shallow water table, Kmax is the most important factor determining plant function. When soil is dry, plants with higher Ar and more resistant xylem sustained higher transpiration rates. Those promising performance suggests that the coupled model could be a powerful tool for

  5. Magma ascent and emplacement in a continental rift setting: lessons from alkaline complexes in active and ancient rift zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, William; Lloyd, Ryan; Birhanu, Yelebe; Biggs, Juliet; Mather, Tamsin; Pyle, David; Lewi, Elias; Yirgu, Gezahgen; Finch, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    A key feature of continental rift evolution is the development of large chemically-evolved alkaline magmatic systems in the shallow crust. At active alkaline systems, for example in the East African Rift, the volcanic complexes pose significant hazards to local populations but can also sustain major geothermal resources. In ancient rifts, for example the Gardar province in Southern Greenland, these alkaline magma bodies can host some of the world's largest rare element deposits in resources such as rare earths, niobium and tantalum. Despite their significance, there are major uncertainties about how such magmas are emplaced, the mechanisms that trigger eruptions and the magmatic and hydrothermal processes that generate geothermal and mineral resources. Here we compare observations from active caldera volcanoes in the Ethiopian Rift with compositionally equivalent ancient (1300-1100 Ma) plutonic systems in the Gardar Rift province (Greenland). In the Ethiopian Rift Valley we use InSAR and GPS data to evaluate the temporal and spatial evolution of ground deformation at Aluto and Corbetti calderas. We show that unrest at Aluto is characterized by short (3-6 month) accelerating uplift pulses likely caused by magmatic fluid intrusion at 5 km. At Corbetti, uplift is steady ( 6.6 cm/yr) and sustained over many years with analytical source models suggesting deformation is linked to sill intrusion at depths of 7 km. To evaluate the validity of these contrasting deformation mechanisms (i.e. magmatic fluid intrusion and sill emplacement) we carried out extensive field, structural and geochemical analysis in the roof zones of two alkaline plutons (Ilímaussaq and Motzfeldt) in Greenland. Our results show that the volatile contents (F, Cl, OH and S) of these magmas were exceptionally high and that there is evidence for ponding of magmatic fluids in the roof zone of the magma reservoir. We also identified extensive sill networks at the contact between the magma reservoir and the

  6. Deformation processes at the down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone: The example of Shimanto accretionary complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzin, G.; Raimbourg, H.; Famin, V.; Jolivet, L.; Kusaba, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2016-09-01

    In order to constrain deformation processes close to the brittle-ductile transition in seismogenic zone, we have carried out a microstructural study in the Shimanto accretionary complex (Japan), the fossil equivalent of modern Nankai accretionary prisms. The Hyuga Tectonic Mélange was sheared along the plate interface at mean temperatures of 245 °C ± 30 °C, as estimated by Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material (RSCM). It contains strongly elongated quartz ribbons, characterized by very high fluid inclusions density, as well as micro-veins of quartz. Both fluid inclusion planes and micro-veins are preferentially developed orthogonal to the stretching direction. Furthermore, crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of quartz c-axes in the ribbons has maxima parallel to the stretching direction. Recrystallization to a small grain size is restricted to rare deformation bands cutting across the ribbons. In such recrystallized quartz domains, CPO of quartz c-axes are orthogonal to foliation plane. The evolution of deformation micro-processes with increasing temperature can be further analyzed using the Foliated Morotsuka, a slightly higher-grade metamorphic unit (342 ± 30 °C by RSCM) from the Shimanto accretionary complex. In this unit, in contrast to Hyuga Tectonic Mélange, recrystallization of quartz veins is penetrative. CPO of quartz c-axes is concentrated perpendicularly to foliation plane. These variations in microstructures and quartz crystallographic fabric reflect a change in the dominant deformation mechanism with increasing temperatures: above ~ 300 °C, dislocation creep is dominant and results in intense quartz dynamic recrystallization. In contrast, below ~ 300 °C, quartz plasticity is not totally activated and pressure solution is the major deformation process responsible for quartz ribbons growth. In addition, the geometry of the quartz ribbons with respect to the phyllosilicate-rich shear zones shows that bulk rheology is controlled by

  7. Reconstruction of Topography and Lithosphere Dynamics Within the Basin and Range of Western North America Since 36 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, W. E.; Bahadori, A.; Liu, L.; Flesch, L. M.; Piccione, G.; Rasbury, T.; Badgley, C.; Smiley, T.; Smith, R.

    2016-12-01

    The complex deformation history of the western U.S. since 36 Ma involved a dramatic transition from a subduction-dominated to a transform-dominated margin, with widespread extension within the interior Basin and Range region. This deformation history altered the topography and drainage patterns and basins throughout the southwest. We perform a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of the plate boundary zone in the western U.S. since 36 Ma, focusing on the U.S. Basin and Range region, with the goal of understanding the link between mantle dynamics, crustal deformation history, and topography evolution. Using position estimates from McQuarrie and Wernicke [2005], we determine lithospheric strain rates through time and integrate these to determine estimates of crustal thickness evolution. We generate dynamic models to test a number of paleotopographic models (which produce effective body forces) that, together with the mantle contribution, produce compatible directions and magnitudes of extension and shear strain rate through time in the lithosphere. The mantle coupling input is determined using adjoint solutions to move tomography-constrained convection simulations backward. We simultaneously calculate the dynamics of subducting oceanic lithosphere and tomography-driven mantle buoyancy anomalies. These convection simulations provide the lower boundary conditions in the dynamic models. Topography estimates not only incorporate crustal thickness estimates over time, they also include time-dependent dynamic topography estimates from the convection simulations. Our effort on the dynamics will be combined with other independent geochemical constraints provided by the dating of fluorite deposits within fault-associated veins. These fluorite deposits are proposed to be used as a timing constraint for mantle fluid input. Furthermore, our topography, stress, and strain rate models are being used to test the hypothesis that topographic roughness has provided a major control

  8. Geophysical, petrological and mineral physics constraints on Earth's surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2015-04-01

    modeled topography. We also test several viscosity models, either radially symmetric, the V1 profile from Mitrovica and Forte [2004], or more complex laterally varying structures. All the property fields are expanded in spherical harmonics, until degree 24, and implemented in the code StagYY [Tackley, 2008] to perform mantle instantaneous flow modeling and compute surface topography and gravitational field. Our results show the importance of constraining the crustal and mantle density structure relying on a multidisciplinary approach that involves experimentally robust thermodynamic datasets. Crustal density field has a strong effect on the isostatic component of topography. The models that we test, CRUST 1.0 and those in Guerri and Cammarano [2015], produce strong differences in the computed isostatic topography, in the range ±600 m. For the lithospheric mantle, relying on experimentally robust material properties constraints is necessary to infer a reliable density model that takes into account chemical heterogeneities. This approach is also fundamental to correctly interpret seismic models in temperature, a crucial parameter, necessary to determine the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, where static effects on topography leave place to dynamic ones. The comparison between results obtained with different viscosity fields, either radially symmetric or vertically and laterally varying, shows how lateral viscosity variations affect the results, in particular the modeled geoid, at different wavelengths. References: Brocher, T. M. (2005), Empirical Relations between Elastic Wavespeeds and Density in the Earth's Crust, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 95(6), 2081-2092. Cammarano, F., P. J. Tackley, and L. Boschi (2011), Seismic, petrological and geodynamical constraints on thermal and compositional structure of the upper mantle: global thermochemical models, Geophys. J. Int. Connolly, J. A. D. (2005), Computation of phase equilibria by linear programming: A

  9. Progressive coaxial Variscan deformation in the Centro-Iberian Zone (Portugal): Serra do Moradal-Fajao complex syncline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metodiev, Daniel; Romao, Jose; Dias, Rui; Ribeiro, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    The Serra do Moradal-Fajão syncline is a major NNW-SSE Variscan structure developed in the SW sector of the Centro-Iberian Zone, one of the main geodynamical structures of the Iberian Variscides. This tight syncline with a 1.5 km wavelength, could be followed for more than 80 km and represents one of the most important regional structures. Its complex structure has been possible to characterize, not only due to excellent outcrop condition (mostly induced by the competent behaviour of the Lower Ordovician Armorican Quartzite Formation), but also to the detailed lithostratigraphic control of the Ordovician-Silurian lithologies. These units are present in a homogeneous regional distribution, unconformably overlain the Cambrian Beiras Group. Concerning the Variscan structures, their geometry and kinematics show that they could be ascribed to progressive deformation induced by the first and main D1 tectonic event. During this event, a complex NNW-SSE aggregation of fold and thrust arrays have been developed. At the macroscale, this pattern is mainly characterized by the Serra de Moradal-Fajão syncline. Both limbs of this major D1 Variscan fold, which present a slightly ENE facing, have been disrupted by convergent thrust systems, leading to the superposition of the Cambrian Beiras metasediments on top of the Ordovician-Silurian succession. Concerning its SW limb, a major single overthrust has been developed, the Vilar Barroco-Fajão one, although in some very localized sectors, some minor thrusts could be emphasized; as they present a ENE facing, they are interpreted as duplex style forethrusts in relation to the main overthrust. Regarding the NE limb, a different behaviour is found. Indeed, in this sector, an imbricated thrust system has been mapped; due to their WSW facing it should be considered as backthrusts. Concerning the temporal relations between the previously described structures, although in some rare cases backthrusts cut forethrusts, the scarcity of

  10. Mulitple Origins of Sand Dune-Topography Interactions on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, H.; Ewing, R. C.; Hayes, A.; Cisneros, J.; Epps, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between sand dune patterns and topographic obstacles is a primary signal of sand transport direction in the equatorial region of Saturn's moon, Titan. The streamlined, tear drop appearance of the sand-dune patterns as they wrap around obstacles and a dune-free zone on the east side of many obstacles gives the impression that sand transport is from the west to east at equatorial latitudes. However, the physical mechanism behind the dune-obstacle interaction is not well explained, leaving a gap in our understanding of the equatorial sand transport and implied wind directions and magnitudes on Titan. In order to better understand this interaction and evaluate wind and sand transport direction, we use morphometric analysis of optical images on Earth and Cassini SAR images on Titan combined with analog wind tunnel experiments to study dune-topography interactions. Image analysis is performed in a GIS environment to map spatial variations in dune crestline orientations proximal to obstacles. We also use digital elevation models to and analyze the three-dimensional geometry - height, length, width and slope of the dune-topography relationships on Earth. Preliminary results show that dune patterns are deflected similarly around positive, neutral, or negative topography, where positive topography is greater than the surrounding dune height, neutral topography is at dune height and negative topography is lower than dune heights. In the latter case these are typically intra-dune field playas. The obstacle height, width, slope and wind variability appear to play a primary role in determining if a lee-dune, rather than a dune-free lee-zone, develops. In many cases a dune-free playa with evaporite and mud desiccation polygons forms lee-ward of the obstacle. To support and elaborate on the mapping and spatial characterization of dune-topography interactions, a series of experiments using a wind tunnel were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments examine the formation

  11. Parameterizing turbulence over abrupt topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymak, Jody

    2016-11-01

    Stratified flow over abrupt topography generates a spectrum of propagating internal waves at large scales, and non-linear overturning breaking waves at small scales. For oscillating flows, the large scale waves propagate away as internal tides, for steady flows the large-scale waves propagate away as standing "columnar modes". At small-scales, the breaking waves appear to be similar for either oscillating or steady flows, so long as in the oscillating case the topography is significantly steeper than the internal tide angle of propagation. The size and energy lost to the breaking waves can be predicted relatively well from assuming that internal modes that propagate horizontally more slowly than the barotropic internal tide speed are arrested and their energy goes to turbulence. This leads to a recipe for dissipation of internal tides at abrupt topography that is quite robust for both the local internal tide generation problem (barotropic forcing) and for the scattering problem (internal tides incident on abrupt topography). Limitations arise when linear generation models break down, an example of which is interference between two ridges. A single "super-critical" ridge is well-modeled by a single knife-edge topography, regardless of its actual shape, but two supercritical ridges in close proximity demonstrate interference of the high modes that makes knife-edfe approximations invalid. Future direction of this research will be to use more complicated linear models to estimate the local dissipation. Of course, despite the large local dissipation, many ridges radiate most of their energy into the deep ocean, so tracking this low-mode radiated energy is very important, particularly as it means dissipation parameterizations in the open ocean due to these sinks from the surface tide cannot be parameterized locally to where they are lost from the surface tide, but instead lead to non-local parameterizations. US Office of Naval Research; Canadian National Science and

  12. Impacts of topography and land degradation on the sea breeze over eastern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, J.F.; Kroon, L.J.M.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional non-hydrostatic atmospheric model RAMS, version3b, is used to examine the impact of complex topography on the sea breeze under heterogeneous and degradation land use characteristics. In the study, it is shown that topography plays an important role in the sea-breeze circulation b

  13. Mapping Bedrock Topography using Electromagnetic Profiling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mapping Bedrock Topography using Electromagnetic Profiling. ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... within the Abakaliki Urban, to map the bedrock topography which also aids us to determine the position of the ...

  14. Surface Micro Topography Replication in Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2005-01-01

    carried out with rough EDM (electrical discharge machining) mould surfaces, a PS grade, and by applying established three-dimensional topography parameters. Significant quantitative relationships between process parameters and topography parameters were established. It further appeared that replication...

  15. Complexity of the food web structure of the Ascophyllum nodosum zone evidenced by a δ13C and δ15N study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golléty, Claire; Riera, Pascal; Davoult, Dominique

    2010-10-01

    Rocky shores dominated by canopy-forming macroalgae are characterized by complex communities making it difficult to assess whether the most abundant primary producers are at the base of the food web. This difficulty is exacerbated by the seasonal- and regional-scale variations of environmental and biotic factors that can affect the main trophic pathways. The food web structure of the Ascophyllum nodosum zone was studied during three seasons and at two sites separated by several 100s of kilometers by measuring the δ13C and δ15N of the major food sources and the dominant consumers of the zone. Despite the variability in isotopic compositions, both sites underwent similar significant seasonal variations. The main primary producers of the zone, A.nodosum, Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus, were not at the base of the main trophic pathway but part of the diverse number of basal resources supporting the food web. The use of community-wide metric indices allowed further defining the food web structure of the A. nodosum zone as one characterized by trophic redundancy and numerous major trophic pathways. Indeed, grazers were dominated by generalists, filter-feeders utilized both planktonic and benthic organic matter, and predators displayed a high degree of omnivory. The range of values in δ15N showed a high spatiotemporal variability within and an important overlap between trophic groups. This prevented establishing distinctive trophic levels and further emphasized the complexity of the food web structure. The spatiotemporal stability of the relative isotopic composition of the dominant consumers within trophic groups and the low variability of the community-wide indices suggested a stability of the food web structure of the A.nodosum zone at a regional scale.

  16. ATM Coastal Topography--Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface elevation map was produced cooperatively from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  17. ATM Coastal Topography--Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface elevation map was produced cooperatively from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  18. ATM Coastal Topography--Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface elevation map was produced cooperatively from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  19. ATM Coastal Topography--Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface elevation map was produced cooperatively from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  20. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and exhumation of mylonitized metamorphic complex in Changle-Nanao ductile shear zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志洪; 卢华复

    1997-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages from rocks of Changle-Nanao ductile shear zone are 107.9 Ma(Mus), 108.2 Ma(Bi), 107. 1 Ma(Bi), 109. 2 Ma(Hb) and 117. 9 Ma(Bi) respectively, which are concordant with their isochron ages and record the formation age of the ductile shear zone. The similarity and apparent overlap of the cooling ages with respective closure temperatures of 5 minerals document initial rapid uplift during 107-118 Ma following the collision between the Min-Tai microcontinent and the Min-Zhe Mesozoic volcanic arc. The 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, K-Ar date of K-feldspar and other geochronologic information suggest that the exhumation rate of the ductile shear zone is about 0.18-1.12 mm/a in the range of 107-70 Ma, which is mainly influenced by tectonic extension.

  1. Surface micro topography replication in injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf

    of the mechanisms controlling topography replication. Surface micro topography replication in injection moulding depends on the main elements of  Process conditions  Plastic material  Mould topography In this work, the process conditions is the main factor considered, but the impact of plastic material...

  2. The Effects of Micro- and Nano-Topography on Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Cells continuously make decisions on what proteins to express, and when to divide, differentiate and commit suicide, through a complex network of intracellular processes. The signals that determine the cellular processes reside within the extracellular matrix. They involve soluble signaling...... the effect of topography on cells has received much attention understanding how important this is for the rational design of bio-interfaces. Nevertheless, there is still a limited understanding of the effect of topography on cells making it impossible to tailor a biomaterial with specific cellular activity...... at the substrate surface. The major aim of this PhD thesis has been to understand the effect of micro- and nano-topography on focal adhesion assembly and cell spreading, as well as its effect on proliferation and differentiation of cells. Such knowledge will provide a more rational approach to optimize...

  3. Mapping of sea bottom topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkoen, C. J.; Wensink, G. J.; Hesselmans, G. H. F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Under suitable conditions the bottom topography of shallow seas is visible in remote sensing radar imagery. Two experiments were performed to establish which remote sensing technique or combination yields optimal imaging of bottom topography and which hydro-meteorological conditions are favorable. A further goal is to gain experience with these techniques. Two experiments were performed over an area in the North Sea near the measuring platform Meetpost Noordwijk (MPN). The bottom topography in the test area is dominated by sand waves. The crests of the sand waves are perpendicular to the coast line and the dominating (tidal-)current direction. A 4x4 sq km wide section of the test area was studied in more detail. The first experiment was undertaken on 16 Aug. 1989. During the experiment the following remote sensing instruments were used: Landsat-Thematic Mapper, and NASA/JPL Airborne Imaging Radar (AIR). The hydro-meteorological conditions; current, wind, wave, and air and water temperature were monitored by MPN, a ship of Rijkswaterstaat (the OCTANS), and a pitch-and-roll WAVEC-buoy. The second experiment took place on 12 July 1992. During this experiment data were collected with the NASA/JPL polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR), and a five-band helicopter-borne scatterometer. Again the hydro-meteorological conditions were monitored at MPN and the OCTANS. Furthermore, interferometric radar data were collected.

  4. Earth rotation and core topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Clayton, Robert W.; Spieth, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Geodynamics program has as one of its missions highly accurate monitoring of polar motion, including changes in length of day (LOD). These observations place fundamental constraints on processes occurring in the atmosphere, in the mantle, and in the core of the planet. Short-timescale (t less than or approx 1 yr) variations in LOD are mainly the result of interaction between the atmosphere and the solid earth, while variations in LOD on decade timescales result from the exchange of angular momentum between the mantle and the fluid core. One mechanism for this exchange of angular momentum is through topographic coupling between pressure variations associated with flow in the core interacting with topography at the core-mantel boundary (CMB). Work done under another NASA grant addressing the origin of long-wavelength geoid anomalies as well as evidence from seismology, resulted in several models of CMB topography. The purpose of work supported by NAG5-819 was to study further the problem of CMB topography, using geodesy, fluid mechanics, geomagnetics, and seismology. This is a final report.

  5. Effect of topography on sulfate redistribution in Cumulonimbus cloud development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujović, Dragana; Vučković, Vladan; Curić, Mlađen

    2014-03-01

    An aqueous chemical module is created and included into a complex three-dimensional atmospheric cloud-resolving mesoscale model. In the chemical module, oxidation of S(IV) by ozone and hydrogen peroxide in cloud-water and rainwater, as important process of the sulfate production is included. To examine the impact of topography on the sulfate redistribution in a clean and a polluted environment, the complex topography of Serbia is included in the model. Numerical simulations of an isolated summer Cumulonimbus cloud shows that thunderstorms generate very strong vertical sulfate redistribution from the planetary boundary layer to the upper troposphere. This redistribution is sensitive to cloud dynamics, while cloud microphysics and precipitation determine wet removal of the chemical species. In simulations with realistic topography, the chemical species are transported over larger distances close to the surface, while in the upper atmosphere, there is no difference compared to the simulations without topography. The sensitivity tests of cloud chemistry to the physical processes are made. Omission of nucleation and impact scavenging of aerosols in the model simulations shows that 75.8 and 62.5 % of total sulfur mass deposited in the base experiment for the clean and the polluted environment, respectively, is the result of other processes. Exclusion of oxidation accounted for 19.2 and 37.7 % of total sulfur deposited for clean and polluted environment. Ignoring the ice phase almost not change mass of deposited sulfur: there is an increase of 2.9 and 1.5 % for clean and polluted atmosphere, respectively. Real topography conditions affect the sulfate redistribution in the sense of greater possibilities of transport. Numerical simulations without real topography give an artificial increase of deposited sulfur mass of about 25-30 %.

  6. Vulnerability of topography-limited and recharge-limited groundwater systems to sea-level rise-induced salinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, H. A.; Byron, L. A.; Feinson, L. S.; Voss, C. I.; Russoniello, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of rising sea level on the hydraulic balance between aquifers and the ocean threaten freshwater resources and aquatic ecosystems along many world coastlines. Understanding both the vulnerability of groundwater systems to these changes and the primary factors that determine the magnitude of system response is critical to developing effective management plans in coastal zones. The rate and magnitude of salinization of fresh groundwater due to lateral seawater intrusion and changes in groundwater flow to the sea were assessed over a range of hydrogeologic settings. A primary factor affecting vulnerability is whether the system is recharge-limited or topography-limited. Results of two-dimensional variable-density groundwater-flow and salt-transport simulations indicate that the response of recharge-limited systems is largely minimal, whereas topography-limited systems are vulnerable for various combinations of permeability, vertical anisotropy in permeability, and recharge. World coastlines were classified according to system type as a vulnerability indicator. Results indicate that more than 50 percent of world coastlines are topography-limited over the range of cases tested. Central coastal Bangladesh is an example of a primarily topography-limited system that is highly vulnerable to impacts of sea-level rise as a result of its low elevation, dense population, and extensive groundwater use. Complexities of geologic heterogeneity and salinization processes, including storm-surge overtopping and accelerated salinization rates due to pumping, were considered. Results indicate that geologic heterogeneity has a strong control on the current and evolving pattern of salinity. The process of lateral intrusion can be slow, such that the current salinity distribution may still be changing in response to past sea-level rise. Vertical intrusion from above, where it occurs, is faster, and pumping can accelerate both mechanisms. Bangladesh vulnerability analyses are

  7. A species delimitation approach in the Trochulus sericeus/hispidus complex reveals two cryptic species within a sharp contact zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfenninger Markus

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA sequencing increasingly results in the recognition of genetically divergent, but morphologically cryptic lineages. Species delimitation approaches that rely on multiple lines of evidence in areas of co-occurrence are particularly powerful to infer their specific status. We investigated the species boundaries of two cryptic lineages of the land snail genus Trochulus in a contact zone, using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA marker as well as shell morphometrics. Results Both mitochondrial lineages have a distinct geographical distribution with a small zone of co-occurrence. In the same area, we detected two nuclear genotype clusters, each being highly significantly associated to one mitochondrial lineage. This association however had exceptions: a small number of individuals in the contact zone showed intermediate genotypes (4% or cytonuclear disequilibrium (12%. Both mitochondrial lineage and nuclear cluster were statistically significant predictors for the shell shape indicating morphological divergence. Nevertheless, the lineage morphospaces largely overlapped (low posterior classification success rate of 69% and 78%, respectively: the two lineages are truly cryptic. Conclusion The integrative approach using multiple lines of evidence supported the hypothesis that the investigated Trochulus lineages are reproductively isolated species. In the small contact area, however, the lineages hybridise to a limited extent. This detection of a hybrid zone adds an instance to the rare reported cases of hybridisation in land snails.

  8. The copper-nickel concentration log: A tool for stratigraphic interpretation within the ultramafic and basal zones of the stillwater complex, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Bawiec, W.J.; Page, N.J.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    An analogue to the electric well log was devised for copper-nickel concentration drill-hole data from the Basal and lower part of the Ultramafic zones of the Stillwater Complex using automated data processing. The copper-nickel concentration logs graphically represent intensity (concentration) values that reflect the distribution of the elements in sulfide and silicate minerals. Four major patterns are recognized by their characteristic variations in copper and nickel intensity: (1) relatively flat, low-level copper-intensity signatures associated with arcuate nickel-intensity patterns that correlate with rocks in the Peridotite member of the Ultramafic zone; (2) arcuate or bulb-like patterns of copper and nickel intensity that correlate closely with the Basal bronzite cumulate member of the Basal zone; (3) complex patterns consisting of intervals of low-intensity copper and moderate-intensity nickel, spikes of high nickel and copper intensity, and high copper intensity associated with low nickel intensity that correlate respectively with cordierite-pyroxene hornfels, massive sulfide, norites and mineralized diabase dikes in the Basal norite member; and (4) large intervals of extremely low copper and nickel intensity that correlate with quartz-orthopyroxene hornfels. The recognition and interpretation of these patterns allow two- and three-dimensional stratigraphic and lithologic reconstructions to be done by means of concentration-log correlations instead of variable quality lithologic logging. ?? 1985.

  9. Geometry and thermal structure of the Menderes Massif Core Complex (Western Turkey), implications for thermal evolution of Hellenic subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Vincent; Jolivet, Laurent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Tuduri, Johann; Bouchot, Vincent; Beccaletto, Laurent; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2016-04-01

    The eastern Mediterranean region is one of the most promising geothermal areas, with more than 250 geothermal fields discovered in Turkey (Parlaktuna, 2013), in a region of active tectonics and volcanism. Although the potential of these deep geothermal resources has not been systematically investigated yet, the geothermal activity of the western Turkey area is the most recent signature of the high heat flow (120-140 mW/m²; Aydin, 2005, from Teczan, 1995). Based on Turkish data, 2084 MWt are being utilized for direct applications and most of the energy originates from the Menderes Massif (Baba et al., 2015). This large-scale thermal anomaly at the surface is correlated to a long wavelength east-west increase of surface heat flow that could reflect the thermal state of Aegean subduction zone at depth. In order to better understand and characterize the possible connections between large-scale mantle dynamics and surface processes in space and time, we study the structure and thermal evolution of the Menderes Massif. Both the acceleration of the Aegean extension in the Middle Miocene and the recent escape of Anatolia have been proposed to result from several slab tearing events, the first one being located below western Turkey and the Eastern Aegean Sea. These events have triggered the formation of metamorphic complexes with contrasted exhumation P-T paths. While the extension in the Aegean domain is well-characterized with high-temperature domes in the center and east, the succession of several metamorphic events in the Menderes Massif and their significance in terms of geodynamics is still debated. Hence, the exhumation history is key to understanding the temporal and spatial distribution of the thermal signature of the Hellenic slab and its tearing/detachment. The Menderes Massif displays a large variety of metamorphic facies, from the Barrovian type metamorphism in the Eocene (the Main Menderes Metamorphism) to the coeval (?) HP-LT metamorphism on the southernmost

  10. Geoid, topography, and convection-driven crustal deformation on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mark; Hager, Bradford H.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution Magellan images and altimetry of Venus reveal a wide range of styles and scales of surface deformation that cannot readily be explained within the classical terrestrial plate tectonic paradigm. The high correlation of long-wavelength topography and gravity and the large apparent depths of compensation suggest that Venus lacks an upper-mantle low-viscosity zone. A key difference between Earth and Venus may be the degree of coupling between the convecting mantle and the overlying lithosphere. Mantle flow should then have recognizable signatures in the relationships between the observed surface topography, crustal deformation, and the gravity field. Therefore, comparison of model results with observational data can help to constrain such parameters as crustal and thermal boundary layer thicknesses as well as the character of mantle flow below different Venusian features. We explore in this paper the effects of this coupling by means of a finite element modelling technique.

  11. Conceptual Models for Migration of Key Groundwater Contaminants Through the Vadose Zone and Into the Upper Unconfined Aquifer Below the B-Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Keller, Jason M.; Thorne, Paul D.; Lanigan, David C.; Christensen, J. N.; Thomas, Gregory S.

    2010-07-01

    The B-Complex contains 3 major crib and trench disposal sites and 3 SST farms that have released nearly 346 mega-liters of waste liquids containing the following high groundwater risk drivers: ~14,000 kg of CN, 29,000 kg of Cr, 12,000 kg of U and 145 Ci of Tc-99. After a thorough review of available vadose zone sediment and pore water, groundwater plume, field gamma logging, field electrical resistivity studies, we developed conceptual models for which facilities have been the significant sources of the contaminants in the groundwater and estimated the masses of these contaminants remaining in the vadose zone and currently present in the groundwater in comparison to the totals released. This allowed us to make mass balance calculations on how consistent our knowledge is on the current deep vadose zone and groundwater distribution of contaminants. Strengths and weaknesses of the conceptual models are discussed as well as implications on future groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation alternatives. Our hypothesized conceptual models attribute the source of all of the cyanide and most of the Tc-99 currently in the groundwater to the BY cribs. The source of the uranium is the BX-102 tank overfill event and the source of most of the chromium is the B-7-A&B and B-8 cribs. Our mass balance estimates suggest that there are much larger masses of U, CN, and Tc remaining in the deep vadose zone within ~20 ft of the water table than is currently in the groundwater plumes below the B-Complex. This hypothesis needs to be carefully considered before future remediation efforts are chosen. The masses of these groundwater risk drivers in the the groundwater plumes have been increasing over the last decade and the groundwater plumes are migrating to the northwest towards the Gable Gap. The groundwater flow rate appears to flucuate in response to seasonal changes in hydraulic gradient. The flux of contaminants out of the deep vadose zone from the three proposed sources also

  12. Topography of cerebellar deficits in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2012-06-01

    The cerebellum is a key-piece for information processing and is involved in numerous motor and nonmotor activities, thanks to the anatomical characteristics of the circuitry, the enormous computational capabilities and the high connectivity to other brain areas. Despite its uniform cytoarchitecture, cerebellar circuitry is segregated into functional zones. This functional parcellation is driven by the connectivity and the anatomo-functional heterogeneity of the numerous extra-cerebellar structures linked to the cerebellum, principally brain cortices, precerebellar nuclei and spinal cord. Major insights into cerebellar functions have been gained with a detailed analysis of the cerebellar outputs, with the evidence that fundamental aspects of cerebrocerebellar operations are the closed-loop circuit and the predictions of future states. Cerebellar diseases result in disturbances of accuracy of movements and lack of coordination. The cerebellar syndrome includes combinations of oculomotor disturbances, dysarthria and other speech deficits, ataxia of limbs, ataxia of stance and gait, as well as often more subtle cognitive/behavioral impairments. Our understanding of the corresponding anatomo-functional maps for the human cerebellum is continuously improving. We summarize the topography of the clinical deficits observed in cerebellar patients and the growing evidence of a regional subdivision into motor, sensory, sensorimotor, cognitive and affective domains. The recently described topographic dichotomy motor versus nonmotor cerebellum based upon anatomical, functional and neuropsychological studies is also discussed.

  13. Tectono-geochemistry analyses of fault rocks in shear zone of metamorphic core complex in north Jiangxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Through a systematic sampling test and mass equilibrium analysis of the three sorts of complex assemblages (intrusive complex, tectonic complex and metamorphic complex) penetrating the metamorphic core complex (MCC) in the Xingzi area of north Jiangxi, the authors find that, like major elements, the trace elements of small ion radius, big specific gravity and high potential form the accumulative series in fault rocks, instead of divergence series. In rare earth elements, ΣREE and HREE are relatively centralized, characteristic of rising and Eu loss in the distribution pattern. Only on the upside of the ductile fault, there exist some phenomena contrary to the general rules, most of which are restricted by the rock rheologic differentiation, coupling of mechanics and chemistry, and inversion of tectonic regime.

  14. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening: Insights from laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models that have been conducted to improve our understanding of the influence of slab window opening on subduction dynamics, mantle flow and associated dynamic topography over geological time scales. The adopted setup consists of a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the subduction of a fixed plate of silicone (lithosphere) under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We found that the opening of a slab window does not produce consistent changes of the geometry and the kinematics of the slab. On the contrary, slab-induced mantle circulation, quantified both in the vertical and horizontal sections using the Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified. In particular, rollback subduction and the opening of the slab window generate a complex mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of poloidal and toroidal components, with the importance of each evolving according to kinematic stages. Mantle coming from the oceanic domain floods through the slab window, indenting the supra-slab mantle zone and producing its deformation without any mixing between mantle portions. The opening of the slab window and the upwelling of sub-slab mantle produce a regional-scale non-isostatic topographic uplift of the overriding plate that would correspond to values ranging between ca. 1 and 5 km in nature. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compared them to the tectonics and volcanism of the Patagonian subduction zone. We found that the anomalous backarc volcanism that has been developing since the middle Miocene could result from the lateral flow of sub

  15. An Estimation of Groundwater Fuxes Induced by Topography Structure at Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, A.; Boano, F.; Ridolfi, L.

    2016-12-01

    Water exchange between surface water bodies and aquifers influences biogeochemical processes, playing a crucial role for nutrient cycling and contaminant transport. In this picture, hyporheic exchange has been recognized as a key process for the biochemical and ecological conditions of the stream ecosystem. It has widely recognized that hyporheic exchange is strongly affected by the local morphology of the streambed and the flow conditions. The objective of this work is to investigate the role of basin topography complexity on river-aquifer interactions to analyze how gaining flow conditions affect the hyporheic fluxes and the spatial distribution of the flow paths which feed the river. By using a mathematical model, we determine the spatial structure of the ambient groundwater upwelling along the stream network and investigate the effect of large-scale groundwater flow on hyporheic flow velocity. The evaluation of the groundwater velocity field allows us to identify down- and upwelling areas and to assess the origin and the transit times of groundwater fluxes, which have important implications for water quality. Indeed, determining where groundwater is discharging into the river and where attenuation of groundwater pollutants at the groundwater-surface water interface occurs is very useful to cope with water quality problems. We consider a benchmark case study and show how the complex topographic conformation determines a substantial spatial variability of the aquifer-river exchange. The fragmentation of the hyporeic zone induced by groundwater discharge at the basin scale is evidenced. Our results highlight that the topographic structure of a basin contributes to determine the spatial complexity of the groundwater flow field together with the geomorphological river configuration. This complexity reflects on the depth and the intensity of the hyporheic exchange since the hyporheic zone is confined by groundwater upwelling.

  16. The internal structure of eclogite-facies ophiolite complexes: Implications from the Austroalpine outliers within the Zermatt-Saas Zone, Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sebastian; Martinez, Raul

    2016-04-01

    The Western Alpine Penninic domain is a classical accretionary prism that formed after the closure of the Penninic oceans in the Paleogene. Continental and oceanic nappes were telescoped into the Western Alpine stack associated with continent-continent collision. Within the Western Alpine geologic framework, the ophiolite nappes of the Zermatt-Saas Zone and the Tsate Unit are the remnants of the southern branch of the Piemonte-Liguria ocean basin. In addition, a series of continental basement slices reported as lower Austroalpine outliers have preserved an eclogitic high-pressure imprint, and are tectonically sandwiched between these oceanic nappes. Since the outliers occur at an unusual intra-ophiolitic setting and show a polymetamorphic character, this group of continental slices is of special importance for understanding the tectono-metamorphic evolution of Western Alps. Recently, more geochronological data from the Austroalpine outliers have become available that make it possible to establish a more complete picture of their complex geological history. The Lu-Hf garnet-whole rock ages for prograde growth of garnet fall into the time interval of 52 to 62 Ma (Weber et al., 2015, Fassmer et al. 2015), but are consistently higher than the Lu-Hf garnet-whole rock ages from several other locations throughout the Zermatt-Saas zone that range from 52 to 38 Ma (Skora et al., 2015). This discrepancy suggests that the Austroalpine outliers may have been subducted earlier than the ophiolites of the Zermatt-Saas Zone and therefore have been tectonically emplaced into their present intra-ophiolite position. This points to the possibility that the Zermatt-Saas Zone consists of tectonic subunits, which reached their respective pressure peaks over a prolonged time period, approximately 10-20 Ma. The pressure-temperature estimates from several members of the Austroalpine outliers indicate a complex distribution of metamorphic peak conditions, without ultrahigh

  17. Complex fragmentation and silicification structures in fault zones: quartz mineralization and repeated fragmentation along the Fountain Range Fault (Mt. Isa Inlier, Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Lina; Blenkinsop, Tom; Heuss, Soraya; Ord, Alison; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2015-04-01

    In large-scale fault zones fracture networks are commonly generated by high volumes of pressurized fluids, followed by quartz precipitation. In this way large amounts of quartz are formed as microcrystalline masses and as complex vein systems, with partly highly different textures, as a result of different formation processes. Based on field and microstructural data and the quantification of vein patterns, the spatial and temporal connection between fragmentation, quartz crystallization and fluid and material flow along the Fountain Range Fault at Fountain Springs was investigated. Dextral strike-slip led to up to 25 km horizontal displacement along the fault. Due to various fragmentation and quartz formation processes, a ca. 100 m high, 80 - 100 m wide and km-long quartz ridge with numerous vein systems and variable microfabrics was formed. Locally, lenses of highly altered metamorphic wall-rocks occur in the quartz zone. Where exposed, the contact to wall rocks is sharp. Millimetre- to decimetre-thick quartz veins penetrate the wall-rocks only within metre distance from the contact. Several clearly distinguishable fine-grained reddish, brownish to dark and pigment-rich quartz masses form up to 50 m wide and up to several 100 m long steep lenses that build the major part of the silicified fault zone. A chronology can be established. Some of these lenses are oriented slightly oblique to the general trend of the quartz zone, in agreement with the supposed dextral strike slip along the fault. Numerous generations of typically µm-cm thick quartz veins transect the microcrystalline quartz masses and, locally, form anisotropic networks. In the quartz masses, angular fragments often composed of quartz with, again, internal fragmentation structures, indicate earlier fracturing and silicification events. Within the veins, quartz forms geodes, locally filled with fine-grained reddish quartz and palisade structures with feathery textures and fluid-inclusion zoning

  18. An Approach Using Gas Monitoring to Find the Residual TCE Location in the Unsaturated Zone of Woosan Industrial Complex (WIC), Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Y.; Lee, S.; Yang, J.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    An area accommodating various industrial facilities has fairly high probability of groundwater contamination with multiple chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), and chloroform (CF). Source tracing of chlorinated solvents in the unsaturated zone is an essential procedure for the management and remediation of contaminated area. From the previous study on seasonal variations in hydrological stresses and spatial variations in geologic conditions on a TCE plume, the existence of residual DNAPLs at or above the water table has proved. Since TCE is one of the frequently detected VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) in groundwater, residual TCE can be detected by gas monitoring. Therefore, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in the gas phase TCE contaminant at an industrial complex in Wonju, Korea, were used to find the residual TCE locations. As pilot tests, TCE gas samples collected in the unsaturated zone at 4 different wells were analyzed using SPME (Solid Phase MicroExtraction) fiber and Gas Chromatography (GC). The results indicated that detecting TCE in gas phase was successful from these wells and TCE analysis on gas samples, collected from the unsaturated zone, will be useful for source area characterization. However, some values were too high to doubt the accuracy of the current method, which needs a preliminary lab test with known concentrations. The modified experiment setups using packer at different depths are in process to find residual TCE locations in the unsaturated zone. Meanwhile, several PVD (polyethylene-membrane Passive Vapor Diffusion) samplers were placed under water table to detect VOCs by equilibrium between air in the vial and VOCs in pore water.

  19. The structure of mesofauna complexes in soils of the forest-park zone of Moscow and the Prioksko-Terrasnyi Biospheric Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyvolova, A. Yu.; Rakhleeva, A. A.; Buyvolov, Yu. A.; Bykova, E. P.

    2016-12-01

    A comparative analysis of quantitative parameters of the complexes of large soil invertebrates (mesofauna) in slightly disturbed biotopes of the Kuz'minki-Lyublino natural forest park of Moscow and in natural biotopes of the Prioksko-Terrasnyi Biospheric Reserve as a representative territory of the zone of mixed forests. It is shown that soil mesofauna in forest cenoses of the urban park preserves its natural features, though significant changes take place in the dominant complex. An increase in the biomass (up to 43 g/m2) of invertebrates has been observed in the forest-park soils at the expense of a greater population density of earthworms; the portion of saprophages in them increases, whereas the portion of predators is smaller than that in the native soils of the reserve.

  20. Evidence of Complex Ice-Volcano Interactions in the Transition Zone Between Elysium Rise and Utopia Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, G. B. M.; Head, J. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report on morphologic evidence of a complex succession of ice-volcano interactions in the Galaxias region, Mars, and reconsider the emplacement properties of volcanoclastic outflow deposit under martian conditions.

  1. Formation, Evolution and Geological Significance of the Heilongjiang Complex Zone%黑龙江杂岩带的形成演化及地质意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔凡梅; 李旭平; 李守军; 金爱文

    2011-01-01

    黑龙江杂岩带呈南北向带状展布于佳木斯地块西缘,出露于嘉荫—牡丹江缝合带以东.研究证明其主体形成时代为晚海西期到印支期,地球化学特征显示其极可能形成于佳木斯与松嫩地块(松花江—嫩江地块)间板块俯冲碰撞或陆间洋盆消失闭合的环境.综合佳木斯地块同位素研究成果,结合该区古生物的研究和地质特点,推演出依兰地区黑龙江杂岩的形成演化模式,绘制出晚石炭世—早二叠世东北地区的岩相古地理简图.认为从晚石炭世末期开始,佳木斯地块西缘的洋壳北东向俯冲,佳木斯地块与松嫩地块沿嘉荫—牡丹江缝合带碰撞拼合,可能是在古亚洲洋南支向西伯利亚板块俯冲的大地构造背景下发生的.%The Heilongjiang complex zone like a belt from south to north, which is on the western margin of the Jiamusi massif, exposed to the east of Jiayin-Mudanjiang suture zone. Studies indicate that the Heilongjiang complex zone is mainly formed from the Late Hercynian to Indosinian. Geochemical characteristics suggest a geological background of the oceanic crust subduction and collision of the Jiamusi Massif and the Songnen Block (Songhua River-Nenjiang River Block). Combined with isotope study, paleontological research and geological background of the Jiamusi Massif, this study sums up a formation and evolution model of the Heilongjiang complex, and develops a lithofacies palaeogeography diagram of Late Carboniferous to Early Permian in the Northeast China. This study also concludes that oceanic crust on western margin of the Jiamusi massif subducted NE direction from the Late Carboniferous, while the Jiamusi and Songnen blocks collided along the Jiayin-Mudanjiang suture zone, probably occurred during subduction of the south branch of the Paleo-Asian Ocean into the Siberian plate.

  2. Caltepec fault zone: An Early Permian dextral transpressional boundary between the Proterozoic Oaxacan and Paleozoic Acatlán complexes, southern Mexico, and regional tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías-Herrera, Mariano; Ortega-Gutiérrez, Fernando

    2002-06-01

    The tectonic boundary between the Grenville-age Oaxacan and Paleozoic Acatlán crystalline complexes in southern Mexico, named the Caltepec fault zone (CFZ), is characterized for the first time as a dextral transpressional, NNW trending and ENE dipping ductile fault zone of Early Permian age. The complexes are welded by a syntectonic magmatic epidote-bearing granite along the entire length of the CFZ. From east to west, the 2-6 km wide CFZ consists of disrupted and retrograded banded gneisses of the Oaxacan complex, quartz-feldspar mylonite, and the syntectonic magmatic epidote-bearing Cozahuico granite (CZG) with huge xenoliths (up to several kilometers long and up to 600 m wide) of the Proterozoic gneisses, thrust westward over metasedimentary tectonites of the Acatlán complex. The CZG shows magmatic fabrics that represent a transition to solid-state deformation characterized by subvertical foliation, subhorizontal NNE and SSE dipping mineral stretching lineation and dextral kinematics. The megaxenoliths underwent partial melting developing banded migmatites with layers of epidote-bearing granitic neosome. The parallelism of fabrics in these anatexitic rocks and in the enclosing deformed granite suggests that ductile deformation, migmatization of xenolithic gneisses, and granite emplacement along the CFZ were coeval. The neosome yielded a U-Pb zircon concordant age of 275.6 +/- 1 Ma probably dating the peak of the tectonothermal event. We interpret the CFZ as a major terrane boundary accommodating transpressional interaction between the Acatlán and Oaxaquia blocks, which were amalgamated in an oblique convergent setting by Early Permian time, as the leading edge of Gondwana impinged onto the southern margin of Laurentia along the Marathon-Ouachita suture to form Pangea.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of Current Source Inverter Fed Synchronous Motor in Complex Frequency Domain Taking the Transition Zone From Induction Motor to Synchronous Motor Mode into Account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Chattopadhyay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of synchronous motor plays a dominant role in designing complicated drive system for different applications, especially large blower fans etc for steel industries. As synchronous motor has no inherent starting torque generally it is started as an induction motor with the help of a damper winding and it pulls into synchronism under certain conditions. The present paper exactly concentrates on this particular zone of transition from induction motor to synchronous motor mode for a current source inverter fed synchronous motor drive system. Due to complexity of synchronous motor in terms of number of windings and finite amount of air gap saliency, direct modeling of such transition zone in time domain becomes cumbersome at the first instance of modeling. That is why the modeling in complex frequency domain (s-domain has been taken up using small perturbation model. Such a model clearly shows role of induction motor as noise function or disturbance function with respect to the open loop block diagram of synchronous motor. Such finding can be quantized in terms of important results and that is done in the present paper such that the results can help the designer for the successful design of a synchronous motor drive system.

  4. Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra Island - Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  5. Cobalt complexes as internal standards for capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometry studies in biological inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Hannah U; Morrow, Stuart J; Kubanik, Mario; Hartinger, Christian G

    2017-01-02

    Run-by-run variations are very common in capillary electrophoretic (CE) separations and cause imprecision in both the migration times and the peak areas. This makes peak and kinetic trend identification difficult and error prone. With the aim to identify suitable standards for CE separations which are compatible with the common detectors UV, ESI-MS, and ICP-MS, the Co(III) complexes [Co(en)3]Cl3, [Co(acac)3] and K[Co(EDTA)] were evaluated as internal standards in the reaction of the anticancer drug cisplatin and guanosine 5'-monophosphate as an example of a classical biological inorganic chemistry experiment. These Co(III) chelate complexes were considered for their stability, accessibility, and the low detection limit for Co in ICP-MS. Furthermore, the Co(III) complexes are positively and negatively charged as well as neutral, allowing the detection in different areas of the electropherograms. The background electrolytes were chosen to cover a wide pH range. The compatibility to the separation conditions was dependent on the ligands attached to the Co(III) centers, with only the acetylacetonato (acac) complex being applicable in the pH range 2.8-9.0. Furthermore, because of being charge neutral, this compound could be used as an electroosmotic flow (EOF) marker. In general, employing Co complexes resulted in improved data sets, particularly with regard to the migration times and peak areas, which resulted, for example, in higher linear ranges for the quantification of cisplatin.

  6. Changes of vessel-cells complex in zones of adaptive remodeling of the bone tissue under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, N.; Oganov, V.; Nosova, L.

    The development and differentiation of osteogenic cells in organism happen in closely topographical and functional connection with blood capillaries. We formerly proofed, that small-differentiated cells, which are in the population of perivascular cells are osteogenic cells -precursors . At the present time it is actually to clear up, how these biostructures react on conditions of less of biomechanical load on skeleton bones. We researched peculiarities of blood-bed structure and perivascular cells in metaphises of thighbones and tibial bones in rats, which were onboard the American space station SLS-2 and in experiments of modeling hypokinesia. There were used methods of cytochemistry, histology and electron microscopy. We established, that under the support and functional load decreasing in zones of bones adaptive remodeling, comparatively to control, on histosections the own volume of sinusoid capillaries reduces. The small vessels prevail here. The spaces of sinusoid capillaries are limited by 1 2 cells of the endothelia. Endotheliocytes in- general have the typical ultrastructure. Basal membranes are expressed not-distinctly. Perivascular cells don't create the unbroken layer. The population of these cells is not-homogeneous. It includes enclosed to endothelia small-differentiated forms and separating cells with sings of fibroblastic differentiation (the own volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm induces). The part of these cells reacts on the alkaline phosphatase (the marker of the osteogenic differentiation). Under the conditions of support load decreasing (especially under the microgravity) there is a tendency to reducing of separating osteogenic cells number. We noted the priority of differentiating fibroblasts. It leads to further development in zones of bone remodeling of hearths of fibrous tissue, that doesn't mineralize. The obtained data are seen as one of mechanisms of osteoporosis and osteopenia development under the deficite of support

  7. High-resolution land topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  8. The tectonic structure of the Song Ma fault zone, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Strong; Yeh, Yu-Lien; Tang, Chi-Cha; Phong, Lai Hop; Toan, Dinh Van; Chang, Wen-Yen; Chen, Chau-Huei

    2015-08-01

    Indochina area is a tectonic active region where creates complex topographies and tectonic structures. In particular, the Song Ma fault zone plays an important role in understanding the mechanism and revolution of the collision between the Indian plate and Eurasian plate. In order to have better understanding the seismotectonic structures of the Song Ma fault zone, a three-year project is proposed to study the seismotectonic structures of crust in this region. The main goal of this project is to deploy temporary broad-band seismic stations around/near the shear zone to record high quality microearthquakes. By using the data recorded by the temporary array and the local seismic network, we are able to conduct seismological studies which include using waveform inversion to obtain precise fault plane solutions of microearthquakes, one-dimensional (1-D) velocity structure of the crust in the region as well as the characteristics of seismogeneric zone. From the results of earthquake relocation and focal mechanisms, we find that the spatial distribution of events occurred in Song Ma fault zone forms in several distinct groups which are well correlated local geological structures and further use to gain insights on tectonic evolution.

  9. Topography Simulation for Nanometer Semiconductor Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun‑Gu; Yoon, Sukin; Won, Taeyoung

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel scheme for simulating the topography of nanometer semiconductor processes. Since the proposed scheme considers only the surface cells moving forward and backward during etching or deposition, the simulator does not suffer from an increased memory requirement due to the complexity of the high aspect-ratio structure built on the wafer. This method consists of steps for calculating the front surface moving forward and backward and converting the cell structure into a tetrahedral mesh structure for subsequent numerical simulation. This method mitigates the excessive memory requirement through a dynamic allocating scheme wherein only topographical data at the surface cell are taken into account. A spillover algorithm is also implemented in the simulator so that any excessive etching or deposition which is more than the rate acceptable at the exposed cell during a single time step is reconsidered in the adjacent cells. Our proposed scheme was verified for structures with complex geometry, such as a thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) structure, a read only memory (ROM) or a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cell.

  10. Quantifying high resolution transitional breaks in plant and mammal distributions at regional extent and their association with climate, topography and geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Giovanni; Laffan, Shawn W; Ebach, Malte C

    2013-01-01

    We quantify spatial turnover in communities of 1939 plant and 59 mammal species at 2.5 km resolution across a topographically heterogeneous region in south-eastern Australia to identify distributional breaks and low turnover zones where multiple species distributions overlap. Environmental turnover is measured to determine how climate, topography and geology influence biotic turnover differently across a variety of biogeographic breaks and overlaps. We identify the genera driving turnover and confirm the versatility of this approach across spatial scales and locations. Directional moving window analyses, rotated through 360°, were used to measure spatial turnover variation in different directions between gridded cells containing georeferenced plant and mammal occurrences and environmental variables. Generalised linear models were used to compare taxic turnover results with equivalent analyses for geology, regolith weathering, elevation, slope, solar radiation, annual precipitation and annual mean temperature, both uniformly across the entire study area and by stratifying it into zones of high and low turnover. Identified breaks and transitions were compared to a conservation bioregionalisation framework widely used in Australia. Detailed delineations of plant and mammal turnover zones with gradational boundaries denoted subtle variation in species assemblages. Turnover patterns often diverged from bioregion boundaries, though plant turnover adhered most closely. A prominent break zone contained either comparable or greater numbers of unique genera than adjacent overlaps, but these were concentrated in a small subsection relatively under-protected by conservation reserves. The environmental correlates of biotic turnover varied for different turnover zones in different subsections of the study area. Topography and temperature showed much stronger relationships with plant turnover in a topographically complex overlap, relative to a lowland overlap where weathering

  11. A convergence zone triggering deep convection over complex terrain: COSMO simulations of a case study from COPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, Ch.; Schipper, J. W.; Kalthoff, N.; Adler, B.; Kottmeier, Ch.

    2009-04-01

    A case study of an isolated deep convective cell from the Convective and Orographically induced Precipitation Study (COPS) is analysed with respect to its representation in the numerical weather prediction model of the Deutscher Wetterdienst COSMO-DE. The international field campaign COPS was performed in southwestern Germany and eastern France in summer 2007 as part of the Priority Programme SPP 1167 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG). The overall goal of COPS was to advance the quality of forecasts of orographically-induced convective precipitation by four-dimensional observations and modeling of its life cycle. On July 15, deep convection developed in an area east of the Black Forest crest although convective available potential energy (CAPE) was only moderate and convective inhibition (CIN) was high. Data analysis revealed that convection was triggered by the superposition of a synoptically generated eastward moving mesoscale convergence zone and a thermally induced convergence zone along the mountain crests in the northern Black Forest. More in the south, radar observations also showed a convergence line hours before a single cell was initiated. The question if these convergence lines are connected can not be answered by measurements only. In the standard configuration (2.8 km grid resolution), COSMO simulations reveal a near-surface convergence line and the evolution of a line of low clouds northeast of Freiburg in good agreement with radar and satellite observations. In addition, model-derived values of CAPE were high (> 2000 J/kg) accompanied by almost vanishing CIN. However, no deep convective cell developed out of this line of clouds. For an improved representation of orographic effects, simulations with 1 km grid resolution were performed and compared to the results of the standard configuration. Although both simulations did not initiate deep convection, the results suggest hat in a situation with air mass convection without mid

  12. Surface Micro Topography Replication in Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2005-01-01

    The surface micro topography of injection moulded plastic parts can be important for aesthetical and technical reasons. The quality of replication of mould surface topography onto the plastic surface depends among other factors on the process conditions. A study of this relationship has been...

  13. SECTION 6.2 SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seah, M. P.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilomet...

  14. Debris thickness and surface topography on Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael; Nicholson, Lindsey; Rieg, Lorenzo; Klug, Christoph; Wirbel, Anna; Del Gobbo, Costanza; Pritchard, Hamish; Willis, Ian; Mayer, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The ablation zones of many Himalayan glaciers are partially to completely covered with a layer of rock debris, the thickness of which is a key control on surface melt rates. Although it is commonly assumed that supraglacial debris is redistributed by gravitational processes due to variable surface topography, the nature of such a relationship has not been fully explored. Here we present locally extensive debris thickness data collected on Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal, using ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and investigate, by comparison with a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM), the relationship between debris thickness and surface topography. We compare debris thickness with slope, aspect, and hillslope curvature and look at how debris thickness relates to features of interest on the glacier surface. The existence of a relationship between debris thickness and surface topography has potentially important implications for remote sensing estimates of debris thickness made using thermal band satellite imagery because DTMs are commonly available at relatively high spatial resolution. For this reason, we assess whether or not debris thickness and surface topography covary. Further, due to the typically non-linear relationship between debris thickness and surface temperature, remote sensing estimates of debris thickness are affected by sub-pixel scale debris thickness variability. To see how debris thickness varies at sub-pixel scale, and the extent to which such variability should affect remote sensing-derived debris thickness estimates, we explore the effects of resampling our debris thickness data to the resolution of the thermal bands of ASTER and Landsat satellite images.

  15. Measurement of fine dynamic changes of corneal topography by use of interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Henryk T.; Jaronski, Jaroslaw W.

    2002-06-01

    Paper presents results of in vivo measurements of dynamic variations of the corneal topography by use of the Twyman Green interferometer. Sequence of interferograms were recorded by the CCD camera and stored in the computer memory. Then the fringe tracking method was used separately to each interferogram giving the phase surface of the wave reflected from the cornea in the numerical form. Results from neighboring interferograms were subtracted giving new sequence of changes of the corneal topography within 40 ms. Obtained results show the complex space distribution of the corneal topography variations.

  16. Coincidence of gabbro and granulite formation and their implication for Variscan HT metamorphism in the Moldanubian Zone (Bohemian Massif), example from the Kutná Hora Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryad, Shah Wali; Kachlík, Václav; Sláma, Jiří; Jedlicka, Radim

    2016-11-01

    Leucocratic metagabbro and amphibolite from a mafic-ultramafic body within migmatite and granulite in the Kutná Hora Complex were investigated. The mafic-ultramafic rocks show amphibolite facies metamorphism, but in the central part of the body some metagabbro preserves cumulus and intercumulus plagioclase, clinopyroxene and spinel. Spinel forms inclusions in both clinopyroxene and plagioclase and shows various degree of embayment structure, that was probably a result of reaction with melt during magmatic crystallization. In the metagabbro, garnet forms coronae around clinopyroxene at the contacts with plagioclase. Amphibolite contains garnet with prograde zoning and plagioclase. Phase relations of igneous and metamorphic minerals indicate that magmatic crystallization and subsequent metamorphism occurred as a result of isobaric cooling at a depth of 30-35 km. U-Pb dating on zircon from leucogabbro yielded a Variscan age (337.7 ± 2 Ma) that is similar or close to the age of granulite facies metamorphism (ca 340 Ma) in the Moldanubian Zone. Based on the calculated PT conditions and age data, both the mafic-ultramafic body and surrounding granulite shared the same exhumation path from their middle-lower crustal position at the end of Variscan orogeny. The coincidence of mafic-ultramafic intrusives and granulite-amphibolite facies metamorphism is explained by lithospheric upwelling beneath the Moldanubian Zone that occurred due to slab break-off during the final stages of subduction of the Moldanubian plate beneath the Teplá Barrandian Block. The model also addresses questions about the preservation of minerals and/or their compositions from the early metamorphic history of the rocks subjected to ultradeep subduction and subsequent granulite facies metamorphism.

  17. Negative cerium anomalies in the saprolite zone of serpentinite lateritic profiles in the Lomié ultramafic complex, South-East Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndjigui, Paul-Désiré; Bilong, Paul; Bitom, Dieudonné

    2009-01-01

    Strong negative cerium anomalies are developed in the saprolite zone of two serpentinite lateritic profiles in the Mada region of the Kongo-Nkamouma massif in the Lomié ultramafic complex (South-East Cameroon). The total lanthanide contents increase strongly from the parent rock (1.328 ppm) to the weathered materials (ranging from 74.32 to 742.18 ppm); the highest value is observed in the black nodules from the western weathering profile and the lowest one in the top of the clayey surface soil from the same profile. The lanthanide contents, except cerium, are highest in the saprolite and decrease along the profile. The light REE contents are very high compared to those of the heavy REE (LREE/HREE ranging from 3.21 to 44.37). The lanthanides normalized with respect to the parent rock reveal: (i) strong negative Ce anomalies with [Ce/Ce ∗] ranging from 0.006 to 0.680 in the saprolite zone; (ii) strong positive Ce anomalies with [Ce/Ce ∗] ranging from 1.23 to 23.96 from the top of the saprolite to the clayey surface horizon; (iii) positive Eu anomalies with [Eu/Eu ∗] ranging from 2.09 to 2.41 in all the weathered materials. Mass balance evaluation shows that, except cerium, lanthanides have been highly accumulated in the saprolite zone and moderately concentrated in the upper part of both profiles. Cerium has been highly accumulated in the nodules of the West Mada profile. The presence of negative Ce anomalies is confirmed by its low degree of accumulation whereas the positive ones are related to its high degree of accumulation.

  18. The Study of Corneal Topography in Myopic and Hyperopic Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Gao; Xuying Zhuo; Lusheng Ma; Ning Yu; Zhonghao Wang; Pengfei Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the differences of corneal topographies in myopic and hyperopic children and study the effect of Atropin on their changes.Methods: The refractive components of 136 eyes with different refractive conditions were measured with A-Scan and their corneal topographies with and without cycloplegia were obtained respectively.Results: The mean corneal power of zones 3mm (MD3, P=0.031 ) and minor keratometer K2 (P=0.003) of myopia are greater than those of hyperopia without cycloplegia. MD3 (P=0.009) and Keratometer K1 (P = 0.025) increased in hyperopic eyes, while MD3(P=0.033), K1 (P = 0.035) and K2 (P = 0.002) decreased in myopic eyes significantly after cycloplegia. Similarly, the mean corneal power of zones 5mm (MD5) and 7mm (MD7) in myopic eyes decreased dramatically (P ≤ 0.001 ).Conclusions: The corneal power was found to be greater in myopia than that in hyperopia. The effect of Atropin on corneal shape of myopia and hyperopia was in the opposite direction.

  19. 40Ar/39Ar hornblende and biotite geochronology of the Bulfat Igneous Complex, Zagros Suture Zone, NE Iraq: New insights on complexities of Paleogene arc magmatism during closure of the Neotethys Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswad, Khalid J.; Ali, Sarmad A.; Al. Sheraefy, Ruaa M.; Nutman, Allen P.; Buckman, Solomon; Jones, Brian G.; Jourdan, F.

    2016-12-01

    In NE Iraq, the eastern edge of the Arabian plate is overlain by arc rock allochthons whose genesis and tectonic emplacement were related to the consumption and closure of the Neotethys Ocean. This paper demonstrates the occurrence of unrelated Paleogene arc rocks in two adjacent allochthons. The Bulfat Igneous Complex at Wadi Rashid (NE Iraq) is an intrusion within the Upper Allochthon Albian-Cenomanian Gimo-Qandil sequence suprasubduction zone assemblage. A thrust separates this allochthon from the underlying Lower Allochthon of the Eocene-Oligocene Walash-Naopurdan volcanic-sedimentary arc rocks. The Bulfat Igneous Complex at Wadi Rashid consists of gabbro and granitic composite intrusions in which components mingle down to a small scale. Textural relationships in the Bulfat Igneous Complex rocks indicate emplacement at high crustal levels with rapid cooling, which is consistent with amphibole geobarometry indicating crystallisation pressures between 250 and 300 Mpa. Ti-rich igneous pargasite and Ti-rich igneous Fe-biotite from gabbroic and granitic components yielded 40Ar/39Ar ages of 39.23 ± 0.21 and 38.87 ± 0.24 Ma respectively. These ages agree within analytical error and suggest coeval emplacement and rapid cooling of mafic and felsic magmas in the Eocene, in an event that was distinct and much younger than the host Albian-Cenomanian rocks. This igneous event was unrelated to formation of Cenozoic rocks in the underlying, tectonically separate, lower allochthon. The trace element signatures of the Wadi Rashi volcanic rocks show volcanic-arc characteristics for the granites and the gabbroic rocks resemble E type MORB. The presence of Eocene arc-related rocks in two allochthons suggests complexity in Paleogene subduction systems, with possibly two subduction zones operating at that time.

  20. Development of a high resolution modeling tool for prediction of waterflows through complex mires: Example of the Mukhrino bog complex in West Siberian middle Taiga Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarov, Evgeny A.; Schmitz, Oliver; Bleuten, Wladimir

    2015-04-01

    Water flow through peat bogs differ substantially from mineral soil landscapes. Permeability of the peatlayers decrease dramatically with depth within the permanently watersaturated peat layers (Catotelm), whereas the 10-60 cm thick superficial layer (Acrotelm) has a very high conductivity. Water flows predominantly in this acrotelm layer where an open structure of stems of mosses and few plants hardly limit water flow. By omitting this superficial flow infrastructures in many places block the waterflow. Moreover, the different bog types within a complex bog have different hydrological conductivities. Without considering the typical water-flow of bogs the construction of roads and platforms for oil and gas production threatens downhill mire ecosystems by partly drainage. The objective of our study was to develop a modeling tool which can be used to predict quantitatively spatially distributed water-flow of a bog complex. A part of the extensive bog complex "Mukhrino bog complex" located at the left bank of Irtysh river near the West Siberian town Khanty-Mansiysk' was chosen as modeling area. Water discharge from this bog catchment occurs by "waterfalls" at the East margin where a scarp with ca. 8 m elevation difference has been developed by backward erosion into the bog by the Mukhrino river. From field observations it was proven that no discharge of groundwater occurred at the margin of the bog catchment area. We used PCRaster-MODFLOW as modeling environment. The model area size was 3.8 km2, cell size 5 m and the model included 3 Acrotelm layers and 3 Catotelm layers. Thickness of Acrotelm and Catotelm have been measured by coring in transects. Input data of rain, snow have been recorded in the study area. Evapotranspiration was measured with small lysimeters and crop factors for different land unit types (open water, raised bog, patterned bog, poor fens) were elaborated by water balance modeling (1-D). Land unit types have been mapped by supervised classification

  1. Hybrid zone origins, species boundaries, and the evolution of wing-pattern diversity in a polytypic species complex of North American admiral butterflies (Nymphalidae: Limenitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Sean P; Dopman, Erik B; Harrison, Richard G

    2008-06-01

    Hybrid zones present opportunities to study the effects of gene flow, selection, and recombination in natural populations and, thus, provide insights into the genetic and phenotypic changes that occur early in speciation. Here we investigate a hybrid zone between mimetic (Limenitis arthemis astyanax) and nonmimetic (Limenitis arthemis arthemis) populations of admiral butterflies using DNA sequence variation from mtDNA and seven nuclear gene loci. We find three distinct mitochondrial clades within this complex, and observe a strong overall concordance between wing-pattern phenotypes and mitochondrial variation. Nuclear gene genealogies, in contrast, revealed no evidence of exclusivity for either wing-pattern phenotype, suggesting incomplete barriers to gene exchange and/or insufficient time for lineage sorting. Coalescent simulations indicate that gene flow between these two subspecies is highly asymmetric, with the majority of migration occurring from mimetic into nonmimetic populations. Selective sweeps of alleles responsible for mimetic phenotypes may have occurred more than once when mimetic and nonmimetic Limenitis occurred together in the presence of the model (Battus philenor).

  2. A high-order multi-zone cut-stencil method for numerical simulations of high-speed flows over complex geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Patrick T.; Eldredge, Jeff D.; Zhong, Xiaolin; Kim, John

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a method for performing uniformly high-order direct numerical simulations of high-speed flows over arbitrary geometries. The method was developed with the goal of simulating and studying the effects of complex isolated roughness elements on the stability of hypersonic boundary layers. The simulations are carried out on Cartesian grids with the geometries imposed by a third-order cut-stencil method. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme was implemented to capture any steep gradients in the flow created by the geometries and a third-order Runge-Kutta method is used for time advancement. A multi-zone refinement method was also utilized to provide extra resolution at locations with expected complex physics. The combination results in a globally fourth-order scheme in space and third order in time. Results confirming the method's high order of convergence are shown. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional test cases are presented and show good agreement with previous results. A simulation of Mach 3 flow over the logo of the Ubuntu Linux distribution is shown to demonstrate the method's capabilities for handling complex geometries. Results for Mach 6 wall-bounded flow over a three-dimensional cylindrical roughness element are also presented. The results demonstrate that the method is a promising tool for the study of hypersonic roughness-induced transition.

  3. Crust rheology, slab detachment and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    The collision between continents following the closure of an ocean can lead to the subduction of continental crust. The introduction of buoyant crust within subduction zones triggers the development of extensional stresses in slabs which eventually result in their detachment. The dynamic consequences of slab detachment affects the development of topography, the exhumation of high-pressure rocks and the geodynamic evolution of collision zones. We employ two-dimensional thermo-mechanical modelling in order to study the importance of crustal rheology on the evolution of spontaneous subduction-collision systems and the occurrence of slab detachment. The modelling results indicate that varying the rheological structure of the crust can results in a broad range of collisional evolutions involving slab detachment, delamination (associated to slab rollback), or the combination of both mechanisms. By enhancing mechanical coupling at the Moho, a strong crust leads to the deep subduction of the crust (180 km). These collisions are subjected to slab detachment and subsequent coherent exhumation of the crust accommodated by eduction (inversion of subduction sense) and thrusting. In these conditions, slab detachment promotes the development of a high (> 4.5 km) and narrow (delamination of the lithosphere, preventing slab detachment to occur. Further shortening leads to buckling and thickening of the crust resulting in the development of topographic bulging on the lower plate. Collisions involving rheologically layered crust are characterised by a decoupling level at mid-crustal depths. These initial condition favours the delamination of the upper crust as well as the deep subduction of the lower crust. These collisions are thus successively affected by delamination and slab detachment and both processes contribute to the exhumation of the subducted crust. A wide (> 200 km) topographic plateau develops as the results of the buoyant extrusion of the upper crust onto the foreland

  4. Petrochemistry of Khunrang intrusive complex, southeast of Kerman, Iran: Implications for magmatic evolution of Sanandaj-Sirjan zone in the Mesozoic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighian, Soudeh; Dargahi, Sara; Arvin, Mohsen

    2017-10-01

    A noticeable characteristic of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) of Iran is the presence of extensive mafic to felsic intrusive igneous rocks in the host metamorphic rocks of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic eras. A similar composition is evident in batholithic size Khunrang Instrusive Complex (KIC) of southern SSZ. The rocks that make the KIC complex are mostly leucocratic microdiorite, quartz diorite, tonalite, granodiorite, granite and subordinate mesocratic to melanocratic pyroxene hornblende-gabbro and microgabbro. Field evidence and geochemical data suggest that the felsic rocks are not the products of fractional crystallization from a mafic phase. Using various discrimination and normalized multi-element diagrams suggest that mafic rocks, of tholeiitic to calc-alkaline affinities, were formed in an island arc or continental arc setting, from a metasomatized lithospheric mantle, above the stability field of garnet in a subduction zone environment. The felsic rocks, calc-alkaline and metaluminous in nature, have I-type granite characteristics. Their relative enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) such as Ba, Cs and K and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSEs) such as Nb, Ta and Ti, is a signature of their development in an arc related environment in an active continental margin, similar to KIC mafic rocks. Geochemical characteristics suggest that the KIC felsic rocks were formed by partial melting of metabasic rocks of lower crust in response to underplating of mantle-derived basaltic magmas in an active continental margin as a result of Neo-Tethys oceanic crust subduction beneath the Central Iranian microcontinent in Mesozoic time.

  5. Determination of alternative and conventional chelating agents as copper(II) complexes by capillary zone electrophoresis--the first use of didecyldimethylammonium bromide as a flow reversal reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laamanen, Pirkko-Leena; Matilainen, Rose

    2007-02-12

    A capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method for analyzing 11 chelating agents [beta-alaninediacetic acid (beta-ADA), trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid (HEDTA), N-(2-hydroxyethyl)iminodiacetic acid (HEIDA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA), methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), 1,3-diaminopropane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (PDTA) and triethylenetetraaminehexaacetic acid (TTHA)] as negatively charged copper(II) complexes has been established. Both conventional and alternative chelating agents were included in this study, because they are used side by side in industrial applications. In this study, didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMDDAB) was successfully used as a flow reversal reagent for the first time in an aqueous CZE method based on phosphate BGE with UV spectrophotometric detection. In addition this new flow modifier was compared to common TTAB. Method development was done using a fused silica capillary (61 cm x 50 microm i.d.). The optimized BGE was a 105 mmol L(-1) phosphate buffer with TTAB or DMDDAB in the concentration 0.5 mmol L(-1) at pH 7.1. The measurements were done with -20 kV voltage using direct UV detection at 254 nm. In both CZE methods all 11 analyte zones were properly separated (resolutions > or =2.4), and the calibrations gave excellent correlation coefficients (> or =0.998; linear range tested 0.5-2.0 mmol L(-1)). The limits of detection were < or =34 and < or =49 micromol L(-1) with the method of DMDDAB and TTAB, respectively. A clear benefit of both methods was the short analysis time; all 11 complexes were detected in less than 6 and 5.5 min with the methods of TTAB and DMDDAB, respectively. The two methods were tested with dishwashing detergents and paper mill wastewater samples and proved to be suitable for practical use.

  6. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  7. Retrograde T-t Histories From Pelitic Migmatites Reflect Structural Distance From the Gwillim Creek Shear Zone, Valhalla Complex, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, B. W.; Spear, F. S.

    2008-12-01

    Diffusion-zoned garnets from pelitic migmatites from the Valhalla metamorphic core complex, southeastern B.C. record relatively fast cooling rates that vary with distance above the Gwillim Creek shear zone (GCSZ). Fast cooling was caused by thrusting onto a cold footwall, where rocks closest to the fault began at the highest temperatures and conductively cooled at the fastest rate. Pelitic migmatites adjacent to and structurally above the GCSZ contain garnet with core to rim zoning of Fe/(Fe+Mg), controlled mainly by diffusion during progress of the retrograde net transfer reaction (ReNTR) Grt + Kfs + Melt = Bt + Sil + Plg. Where biotite is present in contact with garnet, retrograde Fe/Mg exchange has resulted in additional increased Fe/(Fe+Mg). A strongly foliated pelitic migmatite with pervasive 2-5mm-thick leucosomes from ~1.5 km structurally above the GCSZ contains garnet with Fe/(Fe+Mg) ranging from 0.72 to 0.93 and Xsps zoning with a uniform core (~0.02) and a near rim increase (to ~0.04). Interdiffusion of Fe+Mg was modeled with garnet radius varying linearly with temperature. This finite difference model calculates Fe-Mg interdiffusivity and generates a diffusion profile based on changing garnet rim boundary conditions governed by the ReNTR. Model fits to measured profiles require a 1-5 m.y. period of slow to moderate cooling (5-25°C/ m.y.) followed by a brief period (displacement on the Slocan Lake normal fault. 2-D thermal modeling of a low angle thrust ramp yields different T-t histories for hanging wall rocks based on their distance from the thrust. Model results show that transport on the order of cm/yr up a 10-20°-dipping thrust fault can produce cooling rates that are consistent with those calculated from garnet diffusion, and that the duration of initial slow cooling increases with distance from the fault.

  8. Cadomian magmatism and metamorphism at the Ossa Morena/Central Iberian zone boundary, Iberian Massif, Central Portugal: Geochemistry and P-T constraints of the Sardoal Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, S. B. A.; Neiva, A. M. R.; Tajčmanová, L.; Dunning, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    A well preserved Cadomian basement is exposed in the Iberian Massif, Central Portugal, at the Ossa Morena/Central Iberian zone boundary, which allows the determination of reliable geochemical data. A sequence of Cadomian and Variscan magmatic and tectonometamorphic events has been already described for this area and are documented in other areas of the Avalonian-Cadomian orogen. However, the geochemical information concerning the Cadomian basement for this area is still limited. We present whole rock geochemical and oxygen isotopic information to characterize the igneous protoliths of the Sardoal Complex, located within the Tomar-Badajoz-Córdoba Shear Zone, and identify their tectonic setting. We use detailed petrography, mineral chemistry and P-T data to characterize the final Cadomian tectonometamorphic event. The Sardoal Complex contains orthogneiss and amphibolite units. The protoliths of the orthogneiss are calc-alkaline magmas of acid composition and peraluminous character that were generated in an active continental margin in three different stages (ca. 692 Ma, ca. 569 Ma and ca. 548 Ma). The most significant processes in their petrogenesis are the partial melting of old metasedimentary and meta-igneous crust at different crustal levels and the crystal fractionation of plagioclase, alkali feldspars, apatite, zircon and Fe-Ti oxides. The protoliths of the amphibolite, older than ca. 540 Ma, are tholeiitic and calc-alkaline magmas of basic composition that display N-, T- and E-MORB affinities. They were generated in an active continental margin. Crustal contamination and fractional crystallization of hornblende and diopside were involved in their petrogenesis. However, the fractional crystallization was not significant. The magmatic activity recorded in the Sardoal Complex indicates the existence of a long-lived continental arc (ca. 692-540 Ma) with coeval felsic and mafic magmatism. The final stage of the Cadomian metamorphism is usually represented in other

  9. Parallel inversion of a massive ERT data set to characterize deep vadose zone contamination beneath former nuclear waste infiltration galleries at the Hanford Site B-Complex (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.; Rucker, D. F.; Wellman, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Hanford Site, located in south-central Washington, USA, originated in the early 1940's as part of the Manhattan Project and produced plutonium used to build the United States nuclear weapons stockpile. In accordance with accepted industrial practice of that time, a substantial portion of relatively low-activity liquid radioactive waste was disposed of by direct discharge to either surface soil or into near-surface infiltration galleries such as cribs and trenches. This practice was supported by early investigations beginning in the 1940s, including studies by Geological Survey (USGS) experts, whose investigations found vadose zone soils at the site suitable for retaining radionuclides to the extent necessary to protect workers and members of the general public based on the standards of that time. That general disposal practice has long since been discontinued, and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) is now investigating residual contamination at former infiltration galleries as part of its overall environmental management and remediation program. Most of the liquid wastes released into the subsurface were highly ionic and electrically conductive, and therefore present an excellent target for imaging by Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) within the low-conductivity sands and gravels comprising Hanford's vadose zone. In 2006, USDOE commissioned a large scale surface ERT survey to characterize vadose zone contamination beneath the Hanford Site B-Complex, which contained 8 infiltration trenches, 12 cribs, and one tile field. The ERT data were collected in a pole-pole configuration with 18 north-south trending lines, and 18 east-west trending lines ranging from 417m to 816m in length. The final data set consisted of 208,411 measurements collected on 4859 electrodes, covering an area of 600m x 600m. Given the computational demands of inverting this massive data set as a whole, the data were initially inverted in parts with a shared memory inversion code, which

  10. Platinum group elements in stream sediments of mining zones: The Hex River (Bushveld Igneous Complex, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almécija, Clara; Cobelo-García, Antonio; Wepener, Victor; Prego, Ricardo

    2017-05-01

    Assessment of the environmental impact of platinum group elements (PGE) and other trace elements from mining activities is essential to prevent potential environmental risks. This study evaluates the concentrations of PGE in stream sediments of the Hex River, which drains the mining area of the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa), at four sampling points. Major, minor and trace elements (Fe, Ca, Al, Mg, Mn, V, Cr, Zn, Cu, As, Co, Ni, Cd, and Pb) were analyzed by FAAS and ETAAS in suspended particulate matter and different sediment fractions (rocks. The highest concentrations were observed closer to the mining area, decreasing with distance and in the cycle, increasing the presence of PGE in the fine fraction of river sediments. We propose that indicators such as airborne particulate matter, and soil and river sediment quality, should be added to the protocols for evaluating the sustainability of mining activities.

  11. Morphology, topography, and optics of the orthokeratology cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Belsue, Rafael Navarro; López-Gil, Norberto; González-Méijome, José Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this work was to objectively characterize the external morphology, topography, and optics of the cornea after orthokeratology (ortho-k). A number of 24 patients between the ages of 17 and 30 years (median=24 years) were fitted with Corneal Refractive Therapy® contact lenses to correct myopia between -2.00 and -5.00 diopters (D) (median=-3.41 D). A classification algorithm was applied to conduct an automatic segmentation based on the mean local curvature. As a result, three zones (optical zone, transition zone, and peripheral zone) were delimited. Topographical analysis was provided through global and zonal fit to a general ellipsoid. Ray trace on partially customized eye models provided wave aberrations and retinal image quality. Monozone topographic description of the ortho-k cornea loses accuracy when compared with zonal description. Primary (C40) and secondary (C60) spherical aberration (SA) coefficients for a 5-mm pupil increased 3.68 and 19 times, respectively, after the treatments. The OZ area showed a strong correlation with C40 (r=-0.49, p<0.05) and a very strong correlation with C60 (r=0.78, p<0.01). The OZ, as well as the TZ, areas did not correlate with baseline refraction. The increase in the eye's positive SA after ortho-k is the major factor responsible for the decreased retinal optical quality of the unaccommodated eye.

  12. Comprehensive evaluation technology for shale gas sweet spots in the complex marine mountains, South China: A case study from Zhaotong national shale gas demonstration zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The exploration and development of marine shale gas reservoirs in South China is challenged by complex geological and geographical conditions, such as strong transformation, post maturity, complex mountains and humanity. In this paper, the evaluations on shale gas sweet spots conducted in Zhaotong demonstration zone in the past six years and the construction of 500 million m3 shale gas productivity in Huangjinba region were discussed, and the results of shale gas reservoir evaluations in China and abroad were investigated. Accordingly, it is proposed that another two key indicators be taken into consideration in the evaluation on shale gas sweet spots in marine mountains in South China, i.e. shale gas preservation conditions and pore pressure, and the research on ground stress and natural microfracture systems should be strengthened. Then, systematic analysis was conducted by integrating shale gas multidisciplinary data and geological and engineering integration study was carried out. Finally, a 3D model, which was composed of “geophysics, reservoir geology, fracture system and rock geomechanics”, was established for shale gas reservoirs. Application practice shows that the geological engineering integration and the 3D reservoir modeling are effective methods for evaluating the shale gas sweet spots in complex marine mountains in South China. Besides, based on shale gas sweet spot evaluation, 3D spatial congruency and superposition effects of multiple attributes and multiple evaluation parameters are presented. Moreover, the short-plate principle is the factor controlling the distribution patterns and evaluation results of shale gas sweet spots. It is concluded that this comprehensive evaluation method is innovative and effective in avoiding complex geological and engineering risks, so it is of guiding significance in exploration and development of marine shale gas in South China.

  13. Improving the estimation of solar radiation in areas with complex topography using DEM; Mejora en la estimacion de la irradiancia solar en zonas de topografia compleja mediante utilizacion de MDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovar-Pescador, J.; Pozo-Vazquez, D.; Molina, A.; Batlles, F. J.; Lopez, G.

    2004-07-01

    A feasible development of renewable energy in complex terrain areas needs for a reliable estimation of the available solar energy resources. Usually, estimation of the solar energy in areas where no direct measurements are available is carried out by interpolation techniques; but this kind of techniques can not be used in complex terrain areas. In order to analyze the behavior of solar radiation we have located 14 stations within the Sierra Nevada National Park, in a very complex terrain area. A Principal Component Analysis was carried out to obtain common spatio-temporal pattern of variability between stations and to try to analysis these common patterns on the light of the topographical characteristics. Results show the importance of using the topographical information and that orientation of the slopes is a key parameter in explaining the variability of the solar radiation in complex terrain areas. The use of DEM allows taking into account topographical information, such as the slope, in the physical models for solar radiation estimates, improving the estimations of solar radiation in this areas. (Author)

  14. Melatonin Stimulates Dendrite Formation and Complexity in the Hilar Zone of the Rat Hippocampus: Participation of the Ca++/Calmodulin Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Domínguez-Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (MEL, the main product synthesized by the pineal gland, stimulates early and late stages of neurodevelopment in the adult brain. MEL increases dendrite length, thickness and complexity in the hilar and mossy neurons of hippocampus. Dendrite formation involves activation of Ca2+/Calmodulin (CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII by CaM. Previous work showed that MEL increased the synthesis and translocation of CaM, suggesting that MEL activates CaM-dependent enzymes by this pathway. In this work we investigated whether MEL stimulates dendrite formation by CaMKII activation in organotypic cultures from adult rat hippocampus. We found that the CaMKII inhibitor, KN-62, abolished the MEL stimulatory effects on dendritogenesis and that MEL increased the relative amount of CaM in the soluble fraction of hippocampal slices. Also, PKC inhibition abolished dendritogenesis, while luzindole, an antagonist of MEL receptors (MT1/2, partially blocked the effects of MEL. Moreover, autophosphorylation of CaMKII and PKC was increased in presence of MEL, as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Our results indicate that MEL stimulates dendrite formation through CaMKII and the translocation of CaM to the soluble fraction. Dendritogenesis elicited by MEL also required PKC activation, and signaling through MT1/2 receptors was partially involved. Data strongly suggest that MEL could repair the loss of hippocampal dendrites that occur in neuropsychiatric disorders by increasing CaM levels and activation of CaMKII.

  15. Linking mantle dynamics, plate tectonics and surface processes in the active plate boundary zones of eastern New Guinea (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, S.; Moucha, R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Hoke, G. D.; Bermudez, M. A.; Webb, L. E.; Braun, J.; Rowley, D. B.; Insel, N.; Abers, G. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Eastern New Guinea lies within the rapidly obliquely converging Australian (AUS)- Pacific (PAC) plate boundary zone and is characterized by transient plate boundaries, rapidly rotating microplates and a globally significant geoid high. As the AUS plate moved northward in the Cenozoic, its leading edge has been a zone of subduction and arc accretion. The variety of tectonic settings in this region permits assessment of the complex interplay among mantle dynamics, plate tectonics, and surface processes. Importantly, the timescale of tectonic events (e.g., subduction, (U)HP exhumation, seafloor spreading) are within the valid bounds of mantle convection models. A record of changes in bathymetry and topography are preserved in high standing mountain belts, exhumed extensional gneiss domes and core complexes, uplifted coral terraces, and marine sedimentary basins. Global seismic tomography models indicate accumulation of subducted slabs beneath eastern New Guinea at the bottom of the upper mantle (i.e., 250-300 km). Preliminary global-scale backward advected mantle convection models, driven by density inferred from joint seismic-geodynamic tomography models, exhibit large-scale flow associated with these subducted slab remnants and predict the timing and magnitude (up to 1500 m) of dynamic topography change (both subsidence and uplift) since the Oligocene. In this talk we will explore the effects of large-scale background mantle flow and plate tectonics on the evolution of topography and bathymetry in eastern New Guinea, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain basin subsidence and surface uplift in the region.

  16. Multiple magmatism in an evolving suprasubduction zone mantle wedge: The case of the composite mafic-ultramafic complex of Gaositai, North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, T.; Tang, Li; Teng, Xueming

    2017-07-01

    The suprasubduction zone mantle wedge of active convergent margins is impregnated by melts and fluids leading to the formation of a variety of magmatic and metasomatic rock suites. Here we investigate a composite mafic-ultramafic intrusion at Gaositai, in the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC). The hornblende gabbro-serpentinite-dunite-pyroxenite-gabbro-diorite suite surrounded by hornblendites of this complex has long been considered to represent an ;Alaskan-type; zoned pluton. We present petrologic, mineral chemical, geochemical and zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf data from the various rock types from Gaositai including hornblende gabbro, serpentinite, dunite, pyroxenite, diorite and the basement hornblendite which reveal the case of multiple melt generation and melt-peridotite interaction. Our new mineral chemical data from the mafic-ultramafic suite exclude an ;Alaskan-type; affinity, and the bulk geochemical features are consistent with subduction-related magmatism with enrichment of LILE (K, Rb, and Ba) and LREE (La and Ce), and depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta, Zr, and Hf) and HREE. Zircon U-Pb geochronology reveals that the hornblendites surrounding the Gaositai complex are nearly 2 billion years older than the intrusive complex and yield early Paleoproterozoic emplacement ages (2433-2460 Ma), followed by late Paleoproterozoic metamorphism (1897 Ma). The serpentinites trace the history of a long-lived and replenished ancient sub-continental lithospheric mantle with the oldest zircon population dated as 2479 Ma and 1896 Ma, closely corresponding with the ages obtained from the basement rock, followed by Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic zircon growth. The oldest member in the Gaositai composite intrusion is the dunite that yields emplacement age of 755 Ma, followed by pyroxenite formed through the interaction of slab melt and wedge mantle peridotite at 401 Ma. All the rock suites also carry multiple population of younger zircons ranging in age from Paleozoic to

  17. Sensory properties of menthol and smoking topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman Allison C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although there is a great deal known about menthol as a flavoring agent in foods and confections, less is known about the particular sensory properties of menthol cigarette smoke. Similarly, although smoking topography (the unique way an individual smokes a cigarette has been well studied using non-menthol cigarettes, there is relatively less known about how menthol affects smoking behavior. The objective of this review is to assess the sensory properties of menthol tobacco smoke, and smoking topography associated with menthol cigarettes. The cooling, analgesic, taste, and respiratory effects of menthol are well established, and studies have indicated that menthol’s sensory attributes can have an influence on the positive, or rewarding, properties associated smoking, including ratings of satisfaction, taste, perceived smoothness, and perceived irritation. Despite these sensory properties, the data regarding menthol’s effect on smoking topography are inconsistent. Many of the topography studies have limitations due to various methodological issues.

  18. Enhanced Characterization of Niobium Surface Topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xu, Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley

    2011-12-01

    Surface topography characterization is a continuing issue for the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) particle accelerator community. Efforts are underway to both to improve surface topography, and its characterization and analysis using various techniques. In measurement of topography, Power Spectral Density (PSD) is a promising method to quantify typical surface parameters and develop scale-specific interpretations. PSD can also be used to indicate how chemical processes modifiesy the roughnesstopography at different scales. However, generating an accurate and meaningful topographic PSD of an SRF surface requires careful analysis and optimization. In this report, polycrystalline surfaces with different process histories are sampled with AFM and stylus/white light interferometer profilometryers and analyzed to indicate trace topography evolution at different scales. evolving during etching or polishing. Moreover, Aan optimized PSD analysis protocol will be offered to serve the SRF surface characterization needs is presented.

  19. SECTION 6.2 SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seah, M. P.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilometry...... representing some average property of the surface under examination. Measurement methods, as well as their application and limitations, are briefly reviewed, including standardisation and traceability issues....

  20. Dynamic Topography of the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Bering Sea. Comparisons also indicate that MDT estimates derived from the latest Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment geoid model have more in common...with the presented sea surface topography than with the MDTs based on earlier versions of the geoid . The presented MDT will increase the accuracy of...estimating the geoid in the Bering Sea. 15. SUBJECT TERMS dynamic topography, sea surface height, Bering Sea, 4DVar 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a

  1. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  2. Corneal topography measurements for biometric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan D.

    The term biometrics is used to describe the process of analyzing biological and behavioral traits that are unique to an individual in order to confirm or determine his or her identity. Many biometric modalities are currently being researched and implemented including, fingerprints, hand and facial geometry, iris recognition, vein structure recognition, gait, voice recognition, etc... This project explores the possibility of using corneal topography measurements as a trait for biometric identification. Two new corneal topographers were developed for this study. The first was designed to function as an operator-free device that will allow a user to approach the device and have his or her corneal topography measured. Human subject topography data were collected with this device and compared to measurements made with the commercially available Keratron Piccolo topographer (Optikon, Rome, Italy). A third topographer that departs from the standard Placido disk technology allows for arbitrary pattern illumination through the use of LCD monitors. This topographer was built and tested to be used in future research studies. Topography data was collected from 59 subjects and modeled using Zernike polynomials, which provide for a simple method of compressing topography data and comparing one topographical measurement with a database for biometric identification. The data were analyzed to determine the biometric error rates associated with corneal topography measurements. Reasonably accurate results, between three to eight percent simultaneous false match and false non-match rates, were achieved.

  3. Strategicheskie vozmozhnosti jekonomicheskogo razvitija rossijskih pribrezhnyh zon i morskih portovo-promyshlennyh kompleksov Baltijskogo morja [Strategic opportunities for economic development of the Baltic Sea coastal zones and sea industrial and port complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogoberidze George

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the principal dimensions in attraction of the world economy structures is coastal territories as spaces where marine potential of a state is most pronounced. In this respect, it is vital to set the priorities of development of coastal zones taking into account the changes in the strategic situation in order to maintain the components of marine potential of the Russian Federation at the level of its national interests. The article aims to develop an indicator system of assessment of coastal zone potential, and sea industrial and port facilities in order to identify the characteristic and strategic capacities of the economic development of these territories in the complex approach. The research methodology is based on the assessment of marine potential of coastal territories as an indicator of the efficacy of its marine economic complex development with using the indicator methods as a multi-factor and multi-level spatial system. The proposed system is applied to a complex analysis of coastal territories of the Russian Baltic, the estimation of a socio-economic factor of coastal zone marine potential, as well as recommendations for long-term planning of the economic development of Russia’s coastal zones of the Baltic Sea and the organization of marine activities. This methodology can help to identify a role of coastal territories in the economy and reflect perspectives and directions of strategic development of coastal zones, and sea industrial and port facilities of the Russian Federation.

  4. Elastic Reverse Time Migration (RTM) From Surface Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Naveed; Chen, Xiaofei

    2017-04-01

    Seismic Migration is a promising data processing technique to construct subsurface images by projecting the recorded seismic data at surface back to their origins. There are numerous Migration methods. Among them, Reverse Time Migration (RTM) is considered a robust and standard imaging technology in present day exploration industry as well as in academic research field because of its superior performance compared to traditional migration methods. Although RTM is extensive computing and time consuming but it can efficiently handle the complex geology, highly dipping reflectors and strong lateral velocity variation all together. RTM takes data recorded at the surface as a boundary condition and propagates the data backwards in time until the imaging condition is met. It can use the same modeling algorithm that we use for forward modeling. The classical seismic exploration theory assumes flat surface which is almost impossible in practice for land data. So irregular surface topography has to be considered in simulation of seismic wave propagation, which is not always a straightforward undertaking. In this study, Curved grid finite difference method (CG-FDM) is adapted to model elastic seismic wave propagation to investigate the effect of surface topography on RTM results and explore its advantages and limitations with synthetic data experiments by using Foothill model with topography as the true model. We focus on elastic wave propagation rather than acoustic wave because earth actually behaves as an elastic body. Our results strongly emphasize on the fact that irregular surface topography must be considered for modeling of seismic wave propagation to get better subsurface images specially in mountainous scenario and suggest practitioners to properly handled the geometry of data acquired on irregular topographic surface in their imaging algorithms.

  5. Deciphering igneous and metamorphic events in high-grade rocks of the Wilmington complex, Delaware: Morphology, cathodoluminescence and backscattered electron zoning, and SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of zircon and monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Schenck, W.S.; Plank, M.O.; Srogi, L.A.; Fanning, C.M.; Kamo, S.L.; Bosbyshell, H.

    2006-01-01

    High-grade rocks of the Wilmington Complex, northern Delaware and adjacent Maryland and Pennsylvania, contain morphologically complex zircons that formed through both igneous and metamorphic processes during the development of an island-arc complex and suturing of the arc to Laurentia. The arc complex has been divided into several members, the protoliths of which include both intrusive and extrusive rocks. Metasedimentary rocks are interlayered with the complex and are believed to be the infrastructure upon which the arc was built. In the Wilmingto n Complex rocks, both igneous and metamorphic zircons occur as elongate and equant forms. Chemical zoning, shown by cathodoluminescence (CL), includes both concentric, oscillatory patterns, indicative of igneous origin, and patchwork and sector patterns, suggestive of metamorphic growth. Metamorphic monazites are chemically homogeneous, or show oscillatory or spotted chemical zoning in backscattered electron images. U-Pb geochronology by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) was used to date complexly zoned zircon and monazite. All but one member of the Wilmington Complex crystallized in the Ordovician between ca. 475 and 485 Ma; these rocks were intruded by a suite of gabbro-to-granite plutonic rocks at 434 ?? Ma. Detrital zircons in metavolcanic and metasedimentary units were derived predominantly from 0.9 to 1.4 Ga (Grenvillian) basement, presumably of Laurentian origin. Amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism of the Wilmington Complex, recorded by ages of metamorphic zircon (428 ?? 4 and 432 ?? 6 Ma) and monazite (429 ?? 2 and 426 ?? 3 Ma), occurred contemporaneously with emplacement of the younger plutonic rocks. On the basis of varying CL zoning patterns and external morphologies, metamorphic zircons formed by different processes (presumably controlled by rock chemistry) at slightly different times and temperatures during prograde metamorphism. In addition, at least three other thermal episodes are

  6. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  7. The Dras arc Complex: lithofacies and reconstruction of a Late Cretaceous oceanic volcanic arc in the Indus Suture Zone, Ladakh Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alastair; Degnan, Paul

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an integrated description and interpretation of mainly volcaniclastic sediments related to excellently exposed oceanic volcanic arc successions in the Ladakh Himalayas. The mainly Late Cretaceous (Aptian—Paleocene?) Dras arc Complex in the Indus Suture Zone (N. India) is reconstructed as an oceanic arc, passing southwards into a proximal to distal forearc apron. The arc complex comprises three structural units. From west to east these are the Suru unit, the Naktul unit and the Nindam Formation. The Suru unit and the Naktul unit are unconformably underlain by dissected Late Jurassic? oceanic crust and mantle. The Suru unit preserves the interior of the arc and is divided into Dras 1 and Dras 2 sub-units. The Dras 1 Sub-unit, of mid-Late Cretaceous age, was intruded by arc plutonics, deformed, then unconformably overlain by the poorly dated Dras 2 Sub-unit (Lower Tertiary). The Dras 1 Sub-unit comprises arc extrusives, volcaniclastic and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, and mainly redeposited shallow-water limestones. The Dras 2 Sub-unit is dominated by coarse volcaniclastics and lava flows, passing up into rhythmically layered acidic extrusives, with interbedded turbiditic siltstones and siliceous pelagic limestones. Further east, the Naktul unit is mainly clastic, with large volumes of massive volcaniclastic talus, thick-bedded debris flows, volcaniclastic turbidites and reworked shallow-water carbonates. Pillowed extrusives and ribbon radiolarites are present, mainly low in the succession in some areas, while pelagic carbonates are abundant near the top. The Naktul unit is interpreted as a proximal forearc apron. The Nindam Formation in the east is dominated by deep-water volcaniclastic turbidites, tuffaceous sediments and pelagic carbonates, with subordinate debris flows and is interpreted as a distal deep-water forearc succession. Cyclical alternations of mainly volcaniclastics and pelagic carbonates in the Nindam Formation

  8. Topography Image Segmentation Based on Improved Chan-Vese Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Min-rong; ZHANG Xi-wen; JIANG Juan-na

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to solve the inefficient segmentation in traditional C-V model for complex topography image and time-consuming process caused by the level set function solving with partial differential, an improved Chan-Vese model is presented in this paper. With the good performances of maintaining topological properties of the traditional level set method and avoiding the numerical so-lution of partial differential, the same segmentation results could be easily obtained. Thus, a stable foundation for rapid segmenta-tion-based on image reconstruction identification is established.

  9. Geoid Anomalies and Dynamic Topography from Time Dependent, Spherical Axisymmetric Mantle Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Kellogg, Louise H.

    1998-01-01

    Geoid anomalies and dynamic topography are two important diagnostics of mantle convection. We present geoid and topography results for several time-dependent convection models in spherical axisymmetric geometry for Rayleigh numbers between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) with depth-dependent viscosity and mixtures of bottom and internal heating. The models are strongly chaotic, with boundary layer instabilities erupting out of both thermal boundary layers. In some instances, instabilities from one boundary layer influence the development of instabilities in the other boundary layer. Such coupling between events at the top and bottom of the mantle has been suggested to play a role in a mid-Cretaceous episode of enhanced volcanism in the Pacific. These boundary layer instabilities produce large temporal variations in the geoid anomalies and dynamic nd to the topography associated with the convection. The amplitudes of these fluctuations depend on the detailed model parameter,.% it of this but fluctuations of 30-50% relative to the time-averaged geoid and topography are common. The convective planform is strongly sensitive to the specific initial conditions. Convection cells with larger aspect ratio tend to have larger fractional fluctuations in their geoid and topography amplitudes, because boundary layer instabilities have more time to develop in long cells. In some instances, we observe low-amplitude topographic highs adjacent to the topographic lows produced by cold downwellings. We discuss applications of these results to several situations, including the temporal variability of m basis. hotspots such as Hawaii, the topography of subduction zone outer rises, and the topography of coronae on Venus.

  10. Crust and subduction zone structure of Southwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhardja, Sandy Kurniawan; Grand, Stephen P.; Wilson, David; Guzman-Speziale, Marco; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan Martin; Dominguez-Reyes, Tonatiuh; Ni, James

    2015-02-01

    Southwestern Mexico is a region of complex active tectonics with subduction of the young Rivera and Cocos plates to the south and widespread magmatism and rifting in the continental interior. Here we use receiver function analysis on data recorded by a 50 station temporary deployment of seismometers known as the MARS (MApping the Rivera Subduction zone) array to investigate crustal structure as well as the nature of the subduction interface near the coast. The array was deployed in the Mexican states of Jalisco, Colima, and Michoacan. Crustal thickness varies from 20 km near the coast to 42 km in the continental interior. The Rivera plate has steeper dip than the Cocos plate and is also deeper along the coast than previous estimates have shown. Inland, there is not a correlation between the thickness of the crust and topography indicating that the high topography in northern Jalisco and Michoacan is likely supported by buoyant mantle. High crustal Vp/Vs ratios (greater than 1.82) are found beneath the trenchward edge of magmatism including below the Central Jalisco Volcanic Lineament and the Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field implying a new arc is forming closer to the trench than the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Elsewhere in the region, crustal Vp/Vs ratios are normal. The subducting Rivera and Cocos plates are marked by a dipping shear wave low-velocity layer. We estimate the thickness of the low-velocity layer to be 3 to 4 km with an unusually high Vp/Vs ratio of 2.0 to 2.1 and a drop in S velocity of 25%. We postulate that the low-velocity zone is the upper oceanic crust with high pore pressures. The low-velocity zone ends from 45 to 50 km depth and likely marks the basalt to eclogite transition.

  11. Hume-Rothery stabilisation mechanism and d-states-mediated Fermi surface-Brillouin zone interactions in structurally complex metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, U.; Inukai, M.; Sato, H.

    2011-07-01

    The stability of Co2Zn11 and Al8V5 gamma-brasses, both of which are composed of a transition metal element and polyvalent elements Zn or Al, can be discussed in terms of d-states-mediated Fermi surface-Brillouin zone (FsBz) interactions in the context of first-principles full-potential linearised augmented plane wave (FLAPW) band calculations. A FsBz-induced pseudogap is revealed in the FLAPW-Fourier spectrum, though it is hidden behind a much larger d-band in the total density of states. The stability range of three families of complex metallic alloys (CMAs) that include gamma-brasses, RT-, MI- and Tsai-type 1/1-1/1-1/1 approximants and 2/1-2/1-2/1 approximant, each of which is characterised by ? = 18, 50 and 125, respectively, can be well scaled in terms of the number of electrons per unit cell (e/uc) given by the product of the number of atoms per unit cell and the e/a value determined by the Hume-Rothery plot on the basis of the FLAPW-Fourier method. This is taken as the evidence for the justification of the Hume-Rothery stabilisation mechanism for all these CMAs having a pseudogap at the Fermi level.

  12. Electronic Cigarette Topography in the Natural Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R J Robinson

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a clinical, observational, descriptive study to quantify the use patterns of electronic cigarette users in their natural environment. Previously published work regarding puff topography has been widely indirect in nature, and qualitative rather than quantitative, with the exception of three studies conducted in a laboratory environment for limited amounts of time. The current study quantifies the variation in puffing behaviors among users as well as the variation for a given user throughout the course of a day. Puff topography characteristics computed for each puffing session by each subject include the number of subject puffs per puffing session, the mean puff duration per session, the mean puff flow rate per session, the mean puff volume per session, and the cumulative puff volume per session. The same puff topography characteristics are computed across all puffing sessions by each single subject and across all subjects in the study cohort. Results indicate significant inter-subject variability with regard to puffing topography, suggesting that a range of representative puffing topography patterns should be used to drive machine-puffed electronic cigarette aerosol evaluation systems.

  13. On the nature of the transition between the mantle and crustal units in the Finero Complex (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Alberto; Langone, Antonio; Tommasi, Andréa; Vauchez, Alain; Padrón-Navarta, Josè Alberto; Giovanardi, Tommaso; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    A well-exposed contact between mantle and crustal rocks is present in the Finero Complex (northern Ivrea-Verbano Zone; Southern Alps). The core of the Complex is composed by the Finero Phlogopite Peridotite mantle unit (FPP), which is wrapped out by an intercalation of mafic-ultramafic rocks interpreted as intrusive crustal bodies. The first crustal unit, placed in contact with the FPP, is the Layered Internal Zone (LIZ), which is overlaid by the Amphibole Peridotite and the External Gabbro units. With the aim of characterising the nature of such transition, a detailed investigation has been done on the outcrop at the confluence between Rio Cannobino and Rio Creves. In the transition area, no apparent melt injection (i.e. veins or dykes) from the LIZ is observed into the FPP. A few meters far from the contact, the mantle rocks are similar to those forming the typical FPP sequence. They are coarse-granular phlogopite-amphibole-bearing harzburgite showing a foliation parallel to the contact. The amphibole chemistry is characterised by large Mg# and Cr, Th and U contents, large and linearly-fractionated LREE/PM values, and low Nb, Ta and HREE. Towards the LIZ, the olivine grain-size decreases and the peridotite becomes richer in orthopyroxene, phlogopite and amphibole. At the contact with the LIZ, the harzburgite is replaced by a layer, up to 1-m-thick, of weakly-deformed coarse-granular amphibole-biotite-bearing orthopyroxenite. Besides, approaching the contact, the minerals have larger Fe and Al, and lower Cr. Amphiboles are still enriched in Th, U, and LREE, and depleted in HREE, but with greater absolute values than in the harzburgite farther from the contact. The LIZ starts with dm-thick hornblendites, followed by amphibole gabbro layers containing garnet and clinopyroxene. Both hornblendites and gabbros preserve magmatic textures, with modest deformation and subsolidus recrystallisation. Hornblendites are made by titanian pargasites, definitely richer in Fe, Al

  14. Surface topography during neural stem cell differentiation regulates cell migration and cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, Catherine; Short, Aaron; Nelson, Tyler; Gygli, Patrick; Ortiz, Cristina; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Stocker, Ben; Cronin, James; Lannutti, John; Winter, Jessica; Otero, José Javier

    2016-12-01

    We sought to determine the contribution of scaffold topography to the migration and morphology of neural stem cells by mimicking anatomical features of scaffolds found in vivo. We mimicked two types of central nervous system scaffolds encountered by neural stem cells during development in vitro by constructing different diameter electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber mats, a substrate that we have shown to be topographically similar to brain scaffolds. We compared the effects of large fibers (made to mimic blood vessel topography) with those of small-diameter fibers (made to mimic radial glial process topography) on the migration and differentiation of neural stem cells. Neural stem cells showed differential migratory and morphological reactions with laminin in different topographical contexts. We demonstrate, for the first time, that neural stem cell biological responses to laminin are dependent on topographical context. Large-fiber topography without laminin prevented cell migration, which was partially reversed by treatment with rock inhibitor. Cell morphology complexity assayed by fractal dimension was inhibited in nocodazole- and cytochalasin-D-treated neural precursor cells in large-fiber topography, but was not changed in small-fiber topography with these inhibitors. These data indicate that cell morphology has different requirements on cytoskeletal proteins dependent on the topographical environment encountered by the cell. We propose that the physical structure of distinct scaffolds induces unique signaling cascades that regulate migration and morphology in embryonic neural precursor cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3485-3502, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Moiré topography in odontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Yeras, A.

    2003-07-01

    For several decades, measurement of optical techniques has been used in different branches of science and technology. One of these techniques is the so-called moiré topography (MT) that enables the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moiré and the phase shift method in an original way. The fringe patterns used to compute the shape and the shape matrix itself are presented in the article. The phase shift method ensures precisions up to the order of microns. Advantages and disadvantages of using the MT are included. Besides, some positive and negative aspects concerned with the implementation of this technique in odontology are shown in the article.

  16. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  17. Dynamics and Preservation Potential of Subduction Complexes in Continental Sutures: A Case Study from the Sedimentary-Marix Mélange of the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone in Southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, K.; Kapp, P. A.; Orme, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Intra-continental sutures are the geologic record of ancient subduction zones. Subduction complexes are a useful record of ancient continental collisions because they preserve sediments and/or blocks from units which have since eroded and are the first point of contact during collision. The India-Asia collision is one of the most-studied collisional orogens, but how much of the original subduction complex is preserved and what we can determine about the dynamics of the ancient subduction zone along the southern margin of Asia is poorly understood. Compared to other subduction complexes around the world, the complex preserved in the Indus Yarlung Suture Zone (IYSZ) of southern Tibet is anomalous. Blueschist facies metamorphism, a prominent mineral assemblage along intra-continental suture zones, is common in the northwest Himalaya, but not found along the central segment of the IYSZ. Most of the subduction complex is greenschist facies, inconsistent with the geotherm for a subduction zone. We present a metamorphic history for the greenschist facies rocks to reconcile this contradiction. A deep forearc basin (~5-8 km) developed during the Cretaceous, requiring an accretionary subduction zone, a topographic or structural outer forearc high behind which to trap sediment, and/or basal subduction erosion. The preserved subduction complex is almost entirely tectonic sedimentary-matrix mélange with minor outcrops of overlying turbidites. We present evidence from detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of sandstones that indicate along-strike variability in the provenance of the sedimentary-matrix mélange. For example, both lower and upper plate material are present near the town of Ngamring, while regions along-strike to the west contain little to no upper plate material. The blocks in the sedimentary-matrix mélange are well-mixed throughout kilometers of exposed width. Sandstone blocks of Tethyan affinity, which could have entered the trench only at the onset of collision

  18. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    A slab window is defined as an 'hole' in the subducting lithosphere. In the classical view, slab windows develop where a spreading ridge intersects a subduction zone. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. In this work, we perform dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models, to evaluate how the opening of a window in the subducting panel influences the geometry and the kinematics of the slab, the mantle circulation pattern and, finally, the overriding plate dynamic topography. The adopted setup consists in a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the roll-back of a fixed subducting plate (simulated using silicone putty) into the upper mantle (simulated using glucose syrup). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We find that the geometry and the kinematics of the slab are only minorly affected by the opening of a slab window. On the contrary, slab induced mantle circulation, quantified using Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified and produces a peculiar non-isostatic topographic signal on the overriding plate. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compare them to the Patagonian subduction zone finding that anomalous backarc volcanism that developed since middle Miocene could result from the lateral flowage of subslab mantle, and that part of the Patagonian uplift could be dynamically supported.

  19. Systematic revision of the marbled velvet geckos (Oedura marmorata species complex, Diplodactylidae) from the Australian arid and semi-arid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Paul M; Doughty, Paul

    2016-03-08

    Lizards restricted to rocky habitats often comprise numerous deeply divergent lineages, reflecting the disjunct nature of their preferred habitat and the capacity of rocky habitats to function as evolutionary refugia. Here we review the systematics and diversity of the predominantly saxicoline Australian marbled velvet geckos (genus Oedura) in the Australian arid and semi-arid zones using newly-gathered morphological data and previously published genetic data. Earlier work showed that four largely allopatric and genetically divergent lineages are present: Western (Pilbara and Gascoyne regions), Gulf (west and south of the Gulf of Carpentaria), Central (central ranges) and Eastern (Cooper and Darling Basins). None of these four populations are conspecific with true O. marmorata, a seperate species complex that is restricted to the Top End region of the Northern Territory. Top End forms share a short, bulbous tail whereas the other four lineages treated here possess a long, tapering tail. Morphological differences among the arid and semi-arid lineages include smaller body size, tapering lamellae and a shorter tail for the Gulf population, and a partially divided rostral scale in the Western population compared to the Central and Eastern populations. Accordingly, we resurrect O. cincta de Vis from synonymy for the Central and Eastern lineages, and regard this species as being comprised of two evolutionary significant units. We also describe the Gulf and Western lineages as new species: Oedura bella sp. nov. and O. fimbria sp. nov., respectively. We note that a predominantly arboreal lineage (the Eastern lineage of O. cincta) is more widely distributed than the other lineages and is phylogenetically nested within a saxicoline clade, but tends to have a deeper head and shorter limbs, consistent with morphological variation observed in other lizard radiations including both saxicoline and arboreal taxa.

  20. Open questions in surface topography measurement: a roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard; Evans, Christopher; He, Liangyu; Davies, Angela; Duparré, Angela; Henning, Andrew; Jones, Christopher W.; O'Connor, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    principles for statistically stationary, random surfaces. For rougher surfaces, correlations can be found experimentally for specific manufacturing processes. Improvements in computational methods encourage us to revisit light scattering as a powerful and versatile tool to investigate surface and thin film topographies, potentially providing information on both topography and defects over large areas at high speed. Future scattering techniques will be applied for complex film systems and for sub-surface damage measurement, but more research is required to quantify and standardise such measurements. A fundamental limitation of all topography measurement systems is their finite spatial bandwidth, which limits the slopes that they can detect. The third section ‘Optical measurements of surfaces containing high slope angles’ discusses this limitation and potential methods to overcome it. In some cases, a rough surface can allow measurement of slopes outside the classical optics limit, but more research is needed to fully understand this process. The last section ‘What are the challenges for high dynamic range surface measurement?’ presents the challenge facing metrologists by the use of surfaces that need measurement systems with very high spatial and temporal bandwidths, for example, those found in roll-to-roll manufacturing. High resolution, large areas and fast measurement times are needed, and these needs are unlikely to be fulfilled by developing a single all-purpose instrument. A toolbox of techniques needs to be developed which can be applied for any specific manufacturing scenario. The functional significance of surface topography has been known for centuries. Mirrors are smooth. Sliding behaviour depends on roughness. We have been measuring surfaces for centuries, but we still face many challenges. New manufacturing paradigms suggest that we need to make rapid measurements online that relate to the functional performance of the surface. This first

  1. Controlled surface topography regulates collective 3D migration by epithelial-mesenchymal composite embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiho; Shawky, Joseph H; Kim, YongTae; Hazar, Melis; LeDuc, Philip R; Sitti, Metin; Davidson, Lance A

    2015-07-01

    Cells in tissues encounter a range of physical cues as they migrate. Probing single cell and collective migratory responses to physically defined three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments and the factors that modulate those responses are critical to understanding how tissue migration is regulated during development, regeneration, and cancer. One key physical factor that regulates cell migration is topography. Most studies on surface topography and cell mechanics have been carried out with single migratory cells, yet little is known about the spreading and motility response of 3D complex multi-cellular tissues to topographical cues. Here, we examine the response to complex topographical cues of microsurgically isolated tissue explants composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers from naturally 3D organized embryos of the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. We control topography using fabricated micropost arrays (MPAs) and investigate the collective 3D migration of these multi-cellular systems in these MPAs. We find that the topography regulates both collective and individual cell migration and that dense MPAs reduce but do not eliminate tissue spreading. By modulating cell size through the cell cycle inhibitor Mitomycin C or the spacing of the MPAs we uncover how 3D topographical cues disrupt collective cell migration. We find surface topography can direct both single cell motility and tissue spreading, altering tissue-scale processes that enable efficient conversion of single cell motility into collective movement.

  2. Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Martin F. Price

    2016-01-01

    Reviewed: Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns. Edited by António José, Bento Gonçalves, and António Avelino Batista Vieria. New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, 2014. ix + 371 pp. US$ 175.00. ISBN 978-1-63117-288-5.

  3. Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    Reviewed: Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns. Edited by António José, Bento Gonçalves, and António Avelino Batista Vieria. New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, 2014. ix + 371 pp. US$ 175.00. ISBN 978-1-63117-288-5.

  4. Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F. Price

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns. Edited by António José, Bento Gonçalves, and António Avelino Batista Vieria. New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, 2014. ix + 371 pp. US$ 175.00. ISBN 978-1-63117-288-5.

  5. Geostatistical modeling of topography using auxiliary maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengl, T.; Bajat, B.; Blagojević, D.; Reuter, H.I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper recommends computational procedures for employing auxiliary maps, such as maps of drainage patterns, land cover and remote-sensing-based indices, directly in the geostatistical modeling of topography. The methodology is based on the regression-kriging technique, as implemented in the R pa

  6. Influence of mesoscale topography on vortex intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of mesoscale topography on multi-vortex self-organization is investigated numerically in this paper using a barotropic primitive equation model with topographic term. In the initial field there are one DeMaria major vortex with the maximum wind radius rm of 80 km at the center of the computational domain, and four meso-β vortices in the vicinity of rm to the east of the major vortex center.When there is no topography present, the initial vortices self-organize into a quasi-final state flow pattern, I.e. A quasi-axisymmetric vortex whose intensity is close to that of the initial major vortex. However, when a mesoscale topography is incorporated, the spatial scale of the quasi-final state vortex reduces, and the relative vorticity at the center of the vortex and the local maximum wind speed remarkably increase. The possible mechanism for the enhancement of the quasi-final state vortex might be that the negative relative vorticity lump,generated above the mesoscale topography because of the constraint of absolute vorticity conservation, squeezes the center of positive vorticity towards the mountain slope area, and thus reduces the spatial range of the major vortex. Meanwhile, because the total kinetic energy is basically conservative, the squeezing directly leads to the concentration of the energy in a smaller area, I.e. The strengthening of the vortex.

  7. EEG based topography analysis in string recognition task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaofei; Huang, Xiaolin; Shen, Yuxiaotong; Qin, Zike; Ge, Yun; Chen, Ying; Ning, Xinbao

    2017-03-01

    Vision perception and recognition is a complex process, during which different parts of brain are involved depending on the specific modality of the vision target, e.g. face, character, or word. In this study, brain activities in string recognition task compared with idle control state are analyzed through topographies based on multiple measurements, i.e. sample entropy, symbolic sample entropy and normalized rhythm power, extracted from simultaneously collected scalp EEG. Our analyses show that, for most subjects, both symbolic sample entropy and normalized gamma power in string recognition task are significantly higher than those in idle state, especially at locations of P4, O2, T6 and C4. It implies that these regions are highly involved in string recognition task. Since symbolic sample entropy measures complexity, from the perspective of new information generation, and normalized rhythm power reveals the power distributions in frequency domain, complementary information about the underlying dynamics can be provided through the two types of indices.

  8. Exploring scaling laws in surface topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedini, M.J. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: abedini@shirazu.ac.ir; Shaghaghian, M.R. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-30

    Surface topography affects many soil properties and processes, particularly surface water storage and runoff. Application of fractal analysis helps understand the scaling laws inherent in surface topography at a wide range of spatial scales and climatic regimes. In this research, a high resolution digital elevation model with a 3 mm resolution on one side of the spectrum and large scale DEMs, with a 500 m spatial resolution on the other side were used to explore scaling laws in surface topography. With appropriate exploratory spatial data analysis of both types of data sets, two conventional computational procedures - variogram and Box Counting Methods (BCM) - address scaling laws in surface topography. The results respect scaling laws in surface topography to some extent as neither the plot treatment nor the direction treatment has a significant impact on fractal dimension variability. While in the variogram method, the change in slope in Richardson's plots appears to be the norm rather than the exception; Richardson's plots resulting from box counting implementation lack such mathematical behavior. These breaks in slope might have useful implications for delineating homogeneous hydrologic units and detecting change in trend in hydrologic time series. Furthermore, it is shown that fractal dimension cannot be used to capture anisotropic variabilities both within and among micro-plots. In addition, its numerical value remains insignificant at the 5% level in moving from one direction to another and also from one spatial scale to another while the ordinate intercept could discriminate the surface roughness variability from one spatial scale to another.

  9. Local atmospheric decoupling in complex topography alters climate change impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Daly; David R. Conklin; Michael H. Unsworth

    2009-01-01

    Cold air drainage and pooling occur in many mountain valleys, especially at night and during winter. Local climate regimes associated with frequent cold air pooling have substantial impacts on species phenology, distribution, and diversity. However, little is known about how the degree and frequency of cold air drainage and pooling will respond to a changing climate....

  10. Photoluminescence topography of fluorescent SiC and its corresponding source crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelm, M.; Kaiser, M.; Jokubavicus, V.

    2013-01-01

    The preparation and application of co-doped polycrystalline SiC as source in sublimation growth of fluorescent layers is a complex topic. Photoluminescence topographies of luminescent 6H-SiC layers and their corresponding source crystals have been studied in order to investigate the dependence...

  11. Insights into the role of material surface topography and wettability on cell-material interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papenburg, Bernke J.; Rodrigues, Emillie Dooms; Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of surface topography and biomaterial wettability on protein absorption, cell attachment, proliferation and morphology and reveals important insights in the complexity of cell-material interactions. We use various materials, i.e. poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS), poly

  12. AMS and IRM studies in the late-variscan Santa Eulália Plutonic Complex (Ossa-Morena Zone, Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Ovaia, Helena; Gomes, Celeste; Carrilho Lopes, José; Nogueira, Pedro; Cruz, Claudia; Rocha, Armando

    2013-04-01

    The Santa Eulália Plutonic Complex (SEPC) is a calc-alkaline granitic body, with an area of 400 km2, and is located in the north of the Ossa Morena Zone of the Variscan Iberian sector, near the limit with the Central Iberian Zone. SEPC is considered late-Variscan because it cross-cuts the regional variscan structures. The host rocks are metamorphic formations from Upper Proterozoic to Lower Paleozoic. The SEPC has two main granitic facies with different compositions and textures. From the rim to the core, there is a medium-to coarse-grained pink granite (G0), which involves large elongated masses of mafic to intermediate rocks (M); and a central grey monzonitic granite (G1) which presents a dominant medium granular facies, and also a slight porphyritic texture close to G0. AMS and IRM studies were conducted to characterise these rocks, from 61 sampling sites: 29 in G0, 27 in G1 and 5 in M. The Km values range between 41.6 and 7343.7 x 10-6 SI in granitic rocks: G0, with Km > 10-3 SI (mean: 1357.4 x 10-6 SI) which supports the presence of magnetite, and G1 with Km< 10-4 SI (mean: 97.0 x 10-6 SI). In M, Km values are homogeneous with a mean of 620.9 x 10-6 SI. The magnetic anisotropy (P%) and the ellipsoid shape (T) were only determined in granites. The mean values of P% are 6.2% and 3.1% in G0 and G1, respectively. T shows the strongest oblate ellipsoids in central G1 (mean: 0.365) and slightly oblate in G0 (mean: 0.099). The magnetic foliations are subvertical ENE-WSW-striking in G0 and G1. Magnetic lineations are subvertical in G0 and moderately plunge to the SE in G1.The saturation IRM (SIRM) mean values are 9.345 A/m in G0, 0.027 A/m in G1 and 2.634 A/m in M. In G0 and M, the IRM acquisition curves show saturation between 0.3 and 0.4 T, followed by a small increase in increasing fields, suggesting that the main carrier of remanence is low magnetite or Ti-magnetite. In G1, the acquisition curves demonstrate paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic fractions, but a

  13. Complex ridge-transform evolution and mantle exhumation at the St. Paul fracture zone system, Equatorial Alantic. Preliminary results from the COLMEIA cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, M.; Sichel, S. E.; Santos, R.; Birot, D.; Brachet, C.; Brehme, I.; Briais, A.; Brunelli, D.; Campos, T.; Colosio, A.; de Moraes, E.; Donval, J.; Fontes, F.; Gaspar, F.; Guyader, V.; Hemond, C.; Konn, C.; Marcondes, M.; Motoki, A.; berengere, M.; Moura, D.; Pessanha, I.; Scalabrin, C.; Vale, E.

    2013-12-01

    peridotitic ridges as attested by sampling. The southern segment shows few short, symmetric ridges made of peridotite and gabbros. Both the central and the southern segments display asymmetric core complexes nucleating at segments ends. This variety of off-axis morphologies suggest that accretionary processes along the intra-transform segments are unstable and highly variable in space and time. Thus, significant variations in the spreading style were recognized, with a more magmatic northern segment and comparatively less magmatic central and southern segments. However, the existence of long-lived, gabbro cored, core complexes at the western flanks of these later segments suggests that lacking of magma extrusion and presence of mantle-derived rocks at ridge axis, is possibly generated by a reduced efficiency of melt extraction, instead of a reduced magma primary production. We postulate this regime to be controlled by a cold, thick lithosphere where magma is preferentially retained in the crust to create large gabbro bodies. Another striking result is the evidence for compressive stresses across the area, which can be linked to the uplift of the Saint Paul massif. An intense tectonic deformation is attested by the large presence of ultramafic and mafic-derived mylonites associated to km-large shear and thrust zones.

  14. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, September 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in September 2014. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  15. Fractal characteristics of resource quantity of cobalt crusts and seamount topography, the West Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Weiyan; ZHANG Fuyuan; YANG Kehong; HU Guangdao; YANG Shengxiong; CHENG Yongshou; ZHAO Guojun

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the fractal distribution of topography of seamounts from the West Pacific and the resource quantity of cobalt crust therein. The cobalt resource quantity has three to four variable fractal dimensions, corre- sponding to the distinct slopes and water depths of the sea- mount. The multiple fractal property of resource quantity may have resulted from various factors, such as types and components of cobalt crusts and ages of oceanic crusts host- ing the seamounts. Individual seamounts display complex topography and quantity of cobalt crust, both in the same and different regions.

  16. Determining relative contributions of vegetation and topography to burn severity from LANDSAT imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiwei; He, Hong S; Liang, Yu; Cai, Longyan; Lewis, Bernard J

    2013-10-01

    Fire is a dominant process in boreal forest landscapes and creates a spatial patch mosaic with different burn severities and age classes. Quantifying effects of vegetation and topography on burn severity provides a scientific basis on which forest fire management plans are developed to reduce catastrophic fires. However, the relative contribution of vegetation and topography to burn severity is highly debated especially under extreme weather conditions. In this study, we hypothesized that relationships of vegetation and topography to burn severity vary with fire size. We examined this hypothesis in a boreal forest landscape of northeastern China by computing the burn severity of 24 fire patches as the difference between the pre- and post-fire Normalized Difference Vegetation Index obtained from two Landsat TM images. The vegetation and topography to burn severity relationships were evaluated at three fire-size levels of small (1,000 ha, n = 3). Our results showed that vegetation and topography to burn severity relationships were fire-size-dependent. The burn severity of small fires was primary controlled by vegetation conditions (e.g., understory cover), and the burn severity of large fires was strongly influenced by topographic conditions (e.g., elevation). For moderate fires, the relationships were complex and indistinguishable. Our results also indicated that the pattern trends of relative importance for both vegetation and topography factors were not dependent on fire size. Our study can help managers to design fire management plans according to vegetation characteristics that are found important in controlling burn severity and prioritize management locations based on the relative importance of vegetation and topography.

  17. INTRA-ARTERIAL INFUSIONS AND DOPLEROGRAPIC CONTROL FOR COMPLEX TREATMENT OF UPPER AND MIDDLE FACIAL ZONES, CONCOMITANT WITH TRAUMATIC CRANIOCEREBRAL INJURIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagvilava, G; Gvenetadze, Z; Gibradze, E; Danelia, T; Gvenetadze, G

    2016-02-01

    Maxillofacial traumatic injuries concomitant with craniocerebral trauma are still considered as an actual problem in emergency medicine. For this category of patients one of the dangerous and severe complications is development of inflammatory process in the injured areas. Fracture lines of upper and middle facial zones pass through the accessory sinuses of the nose, maxillary/upper dental arch area and are considered to be open and infected fractures. Combination of these fractures with craniocerebral injuries and especially, with open traumas creates predisposition for development of inflammatory processes in CNS that can result in heavy outcome. 29 patients (among them 5-females and 24 -males) with severe and open craniofacial fractures were observed by the authors. For prevention of inflammatory complications in complex treatment of the patients, intra-arterial infusions of therapeutic agents (wide spectrum of antibiotics, Heparin) were used for stimulation of reparative regeneration in fractured fragments of facial bones. After the main surgical interventions (neurosurgery, surgery of facial bones) sanitation of infected centers (accessory sinuses of the nose, oral cavity) and catheterization of external carotid arteries through the temporal arteries were performed. According to the severity of the trauma and its preferential localization, catheterization of carotid arteries was conducted unilaterally (12 cases) or bilaterally (17 cases). Insertion depth through femoral artery was 6-8 cm. Catheter was stayed in the artery for 7-8 days. Intra-arterial infusions were carried out in the morning and evening. Therapeutic agents for arterial infusion included: antibiotic (Rocephin and its analogues), Heparin. To determine the effectiveness of vascular therapy dopplerography of external carotid artery, its branches and supratrochlear artery was performed. Dopplerography of supratrochlear artery, which is the branch of internal carotid artery, was conducted to detect

  18. Abyssal hills: Influence of topography on benthic foraminiferal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoudis, Paris V.; Bett, Brian J.; Gooday, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Abyssal plains, often thought of as vast flat areas, encompass a variety of terrains including abyssal hills, features that constitute the single largest landscape type on Earth. The potential influence on deep-sea benthic faunas of mesoscale habitat complexity arising from the presence of abyssal hills is still poorly understood. To address this issue we focus on benthic foraminifera (testate protists) in the >150-μm fraction of Megacorer samples (0-1 cm layer) collected at five different sites in the area of the Porcupine Abyssal Plain Sustained Observatory (NE Atlantic, 4850 m water depth). Three sites are located on the tops of small abyssal hills (200-500 m elevation) and two on the adjacent abyssal plain. We examined benthic foraminiferal assemblage characteristics (standing stock, diversity, composition) in relation to seafloor topography (hills vs. plain). Density and rarefied diversity were not significantly different between the hills and the plain. Nevertheless, hills do support a higher species density (i.e. species per unit area), a distinct fauna, and act to increase the regional species pool. Topographically enhanced bottom-water flows that influence food availability and sediment type are suggested as the most likely mechanisms responsible for these differences. Our findings highlight the potential importance of mesoscale heterogeneity introduced by relatively modest topography in regulating abyssal foraminiferal diversity. Given the predominance of abyssal hill terrain in the global ocean, we suggest the need to include faunal data from abyssal hills in assessments of abyssal ecology.

  19. A new approach to assess isostatic compensation of topography in continental domain from GOCE gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadio, Cécilia; Saraswati, Anita; Cattin, Rodolphe; Mazzotti, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    Estimating how topography is maintained provides insights into the different factors responsible for surface deformations and their relative roles. Here, we develop a new and simple approach to assess the degree of isostatic compensation of continental topography at regional scale from GOCE gravity gradients. We calculate the ratio between the radial gradient observed by GOCE and that calculated from topography only. From analytical and statistical formulations, simple relationships between this ratio and the degree of compensation are obtained under the Airy-Heiskanen isostasy hypothesis. Then, a value of degree of compensation at each point of study area can be easily deduced. We apply our method to the Alaska-Canada Cordillera and validate our results by comparison with a standard isostatic gravity anomaly model and additional geophysical information for this area. Both our GOCE-based results and the isostatic anomaly show that Airy-Heiskanen isostasy prevails for the Yukon Plateau whereas additional mechanisms are required to support topography below the Northwest Territories Craton and the Yakutat collision zone.

  20. Gravity and topography of Venusian highlands: Implications for formation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Suzanne Elizabeth

    Gravity and topography data are used to determine the apparent compensation depths (ADC's) of thirteen venusian regions. The depths are interpreted in terms of the likely tectonic origins of each area. First, three geologically distinct regions are studied in detail by inverting Pioneer Venus line of sight gravity data to obtain a model of vertical gravity over Bell Regio (possible hot spot), Tellus Regio (tessera terrain), and Leda Planitia (plains). The admittance spectra, the geoid to topography ratio (GTR), and the ADC for each region are found. Each area has a distinct gravity signature. The shallow ADC at Tellus Regio (approximately 25 km) indicates that crustal compensation, possibly with some thermal compensation, is most likely. The large ADC (approximately 175 km) and GTR (20 m/km) along with an unusual admittance spectra at Bell Regio indicate that some dynamic compensation is necessary; crustal or thermal compensation may also be present. Leda Planitia has an intermediate ADC (approximately 65 km), which indicates either thermal or crustal compensation. Second, ADC's and GTR's for 12 venusian highland regions are estimated directly from the topography and line of sight gravity data. These features are: Asteria, Atla, Bell, Beta, Ovda, Phoebe, Tellus, Thetis, and Ulfrun Regiones; Nokomis, Gula, and Sappho Montes. The ADC's range is 50-270 km; the GTR's range is 7-31 m/km. Two distinct GTR groups are apparent. The lower GTR group is best modeled by compensation due to thermal thinning of the lithosphere; some minor component of dynamic or crustal compensation may also be present. A fit to the upper GTR group requires dynamic compensation; a lesser contribution from thermal or crustal compensation may also be present. Upper mantle convection without a low viscosity zone can fit the data. Although the convection parameters are not well constrained, the best fit occurs for a conductive lid thickness of 105 km and a Rayleigh number of 105. These results

  1. Simultaneous measurement of refractive index distribution and topography by integrated transmission and reflection digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaojie; Di, Jianglei; Zhang, Jiwei; Li, Ying; Xi, Teli; Li, Enpu; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-11-20

    We propose a method for simultaneously measuring dynamic changes of the refractive index distribution and surface topography, which integrates the transmission and reflection digital holographic microscopy based on polarization and angular multiplexing techniques. The complex amplitudes of the transmitted and reflected object waves can be simultaneously retrieved. The phase information of the reflected object wave is directly used to determine the topography of the specimen which corresponds to its physical thickness. Assuming that the refractive index distribution is uniform in the direction of the specimen thickness, the refractive index distribution can be deduced from the phase distributions of the transmitted and reflected object waves without any approximation. The refractive index distribution and dynamic changes of the topography of a tiny deionized water droplet have been measured for the availability of the proposed method.

  2. Surface micro topography replication in injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf

    , the topography itself, and other factors were also investigated. The experimental work is based on a multi-purpose experimental injection mould with a collection of test surface inserts manufactured by EDM (electrical discharge machining). Experimental production took place with an injection moulding machine......Thermoplastic injection moulding is a widely used industrial process that involves surface generation by replication. The surface topography of injection moulded plastic parts can be important for aesthetical or technical reasons. With the emergence of microengineering and nanotechnology additional...... in a clean room environment. The mould and the injection moulding machine were fitted with transducers for subsequent process analysis. A total of 13 different plastic material grades were applied. Topographical characterisation was performed with an optical laser focus detection instrument. Replication...

  3. New null screen design for corneal topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Estrada-Molina, Amilcar; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2011-09-01

    In this work we report the design of a null screen for corneal topography. Here we assume that the corneal surface is an ellipsoid with a diameter of 12 mm and a curvature radius of 7.8 mm. To avoid the difficulties in the alignment of the test system due to the face contour (eyebrows, nose, or eyelids), we design a conical null-screen with spots (similar to ellipses) drawn on it in such a way that its image, which is formed by reflection on the test surface, becomes an exact radial array of circular spots if the surface is perfect. Additionally, we performed a numerical simulation introducing Gaussian random errors in the coordinates of the centroids of the spots on the image plane, and in the coordinates of the sources (spots on the null-screen) in order to obtain the conical null-screen that reduces the error in the evaluation of the topography.

  4. Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yingcai; Liu, Jing; Fehler, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear wave velocity structure that is important information for multi-component P-S seismic imaging. Three different approaches are taken to understand excitation of Scholte waves and numerical aspects of modeling Scholte waves, including analytical Cagniard-de Hoop analysis, the boundary integral method and a staggered grid finite difference method. For simple media for which the Green's function can be easily computed, the boundary element method produces accurate results. The finite difference method shows strong numerical artifacts and stagnant artificial waves can be seen in the vicinity of topography at the fluid-solid interface even when using fine computational grids. However, the amplitude of these artificial waves decays away from the seafloor. It is sensible to place receivers away fr...

  5. Biodiversity of Jinggangshan Mountain: The Importance of Topography and Geographical Location in Supporting Higher Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Huang, Fang-Fang; Liu, Jin-Gang; Liao, Wen-Bo; Wang, Ying-Yong; Ren, Si-Jie; Chen, Chun-Quan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Diversity is mainly determined by climate and environment. In addition, topography is a complex factor, and the relationship between topography and biodiversity is still poorly understood. To understand the role of topography, i.e., altitude and slope, in biodiversity, we selected Jinggangshan Mountain (JGM), an area with unique topography, as the study area. We surveyed plant and animal species richness of JGM and compared the biodiversity and the main geographic characteristics of JGM with the adjacent 4 mountains. Gleason’s richness index was calculated to assess the diversity of species. In total, 2958 spermatophyte species, 418 bryophyte species, 355 pteridophyte species and 493 species of vertebrate animals were recorded in this survey. In general, the JGM biodiversity was higher than that of the adjacent mountains. Regarding topographic characteristics, 77% of JGM’s area was in the mid-altitude region and approximately 40% of JGM’s area was in the 10°–20° slope range, which may support more vegetation types in JGM area and make it a biodiversity hotspot. It should be noted that although the impact of topography on biodiversity was substantial, climate is still a more general factor driving the formation and maintenance of higher biodiversity. Topographic conditions can create microclimates, and both climatic and topographic conditions contribute to the formation of high biodiversity in JGM. PMID:25763820

  6. Calculating gravitationally self-consistent sea level changes driven by dynamic topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, J.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2015-12-01

    We present a generalized formalism for computing gravitationally self-consistent sea level changes driven by the combined effects of dynamic topography, geoid perturbations due to mantle convection, ice mass fluctuations and sediment redistribution on a deforming Earth. Our mathematical treatment conserves mass of the surface (ice plus ocean) load and the solid Earth. Moreover, it takes precise account of shoreline migration and the associated ocean loading. The new formalism avoids a variety of approximations adopted in previous models of sea level change driven by dynamic topography, including the assumption that a spatially fixed isostatic amplification of `air-loaded' dynamic topography accurately accounts for ocean loading effects. While our approach is valid for Earth models of arbitrary complexity, we present numerical results for a set of simple cases in which a pattern of dynamic topography is imposed, the response to surface mass loading assumes that Earth structure varies only with depth and that isostatic equilibrium is maintained at all times. These calculations, involving fluid Love number theory, indicate that the largest errors in previous predictions of sea level change driven by dynamic topography occur in regions of shoreline migration, and thus in the vicinity of most geological markers of ancient sea level. We conclude that a gravitationally self-consistent treatment of long-term sea level change is necessary in any effort to use such geological markers to estimate ancient ice volumes.

  7. Biodiversity of Jinggangshan Mountain: the importance of topography and geographical location in supporting higher biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Chen, Bao-Ming; Liu, Gang; Huang, Fang-Fang; Liu, Jin-Gang; Liao, Wen-Bo; Wang, Ying-Yong; Ren, Si-Jie; Chen, Chun-Quan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Diversity is mainly determined by climate and environment. In addition, topography is a complex factor, and the relationship between topography and biodiversity is still poorly understood. To understand the role of topography, i.e., altitude and slope, in biodiversity, we selected Jinggangshan Mountain (JGM), an area with unique topography, as the study area. We surveyed plant and animal species richness of JGM and compared the biodiversity and the main geographic characteristics of JGM with the adjacent 4 mountains. Gleason's richness index was calculated to assess the diversity of species. In total, 2958 spermatophyte species, 418 bryophyte species, 355 pteridophyte species and 493 species of vertebrate animals were recorded in this survey. In general, the JGM biodiversity was higher than that of the adjacent mountains. Regarding topographic characteristics, 77% of JGM's area was in the mid-altitude region and approximately 40% of JGM's area was in the 10°-20° slope range, which may support more vegetation types in JGM area and make it a biodiversity hotspot. It should be noted that although the impact of topography on biodiversity was substantial, climate is still a more general factor driving the formation and maintenance of higher biodiversity. Topographic conditions can create microclimates, and both climatic and topographic conditions contribute to the formation of high biodiversity in JGM.

  8. Biodiversity of Jinggangshan Mountain: the importance of topography and geographical location in supporting higher biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhou

    Full Text Available Diversity is mainly determined by climate and environment. In addition, topography is a complex factor, and the relationship between topography and biodiversity is still poorly understood. To understand the role of topography, i.e., altitude and slope, in biodiversity, we selected Jinggangshan Mountain (JGM, an area with unique topography, as the study area. We surveyed plant and animal species richness of JGM and compared the biodiversity and the main geographic characteristics of JGM with the adjacent 4 mountains. Gleason's richness index was calculated to assess the diversity of species. In total, 2958 spermatophyte species, 418 bryophyte species, 355 pteridophyte species and 493 species of vertebrate animals were recorded in this survey. In general, the JGM biodiversity was higher than that of the adjacent mountains. Regarding topographic characteristics, 77% of JGM's area was in the mid-altitude region and approximately 40% of JGM's area was in the 10°-20° slope range, which may support more vegetation types in JGM area and make it a biodiversity hotspot. It should be noted that although the impact of topography on biodiversity was substantial, climate is still a more general factor driving the formation and maintenance of higher biodiversity. Topographic conditions can create microclimates, and both climatic and topographic conditions contribute to the formation of high biodiversity in JGM.

  9. Spatial interpolation of river channel topography using the shortest temporal distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Xian, Cuiling; Chen, Huajin; Grieneisen, Michael L.; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-11-01

    It is difficult to interpolate river channel topography due to complex anisotropy. As the anisotropy is often caused by river flow, especially the hydrodynamic and transport mechanisms, it is reasonable to incorporate flow velocity into topography interpolator for decreasing the effect of anisotropy. In this study, two new distance metrics defined as the time taken by water flow to travel between two locations are developed, and replace the spatial distance metric or Euclidean distance that is currently used to interpolate topography. One is a shortest temporal distance (STD) metric. The temporal distance (TD) of a path between two nodes is calculated by spatial distance divided by the tangent component of flow velocity along the path, and the STD is searched using the Dijkstra algorithm in all possible paths between two nodes. The other is a modified shortest temporal distance (MSTD) metric in which both the tangent and normal components of flow velocity were combined. They are used to construct the methods for the interpolation of river channel topography. The proposed methods are used to generate the topography of Wuhan Section of Changjiang River and compared with Universal Kriging (UK) and Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW). The results clearly showed that the STD and MSTD based on flow velocity were reliable spatial interpolators. The MSTD, followed by the STD, presents improvement in prediction accuracy relative to both UK and IDW.

  10. Topography over South America from ERS altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Anita; Frey, Herb; DiMarzio, John; Tsaoussi, Lucia

    1997-01-01

    The results of the surface topography mapping of South America during the ERS-1 geodetic mission are presented. The altimeter waveforms, the range measurement, and the internal and Doppler range corrections were obtained. The atmospheric corrections and solid tides were calculated. Comparisons between Shuttle laser altimetry and ERS-1 altimetry grid showed good agreement. Satellite radar altimetry data can be used to improve the topographic knowledge of regions for which only poor elevation data currently exist.

  11. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  12. ATM Coastal Topography-Mississippi, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Mississippi coastline, from Lakeshore to Petit Bois Island, acquired September 9-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS

  13. Curvature sensor for the measurement of the static corneal topography and the dynamic tear film topography in the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppetta, Steve; Koechlin, Laurent; Lacombe, François; Puget, Pascal

    2005-10-01

    A system to measure the topography of the first optical surface of the human eye noninvasively by using a curvature sensor is described. The static corneal topography and the dynamic topography of the tear film can both be measured, and the topographies obtained are presented. The system makes possible the study of the dynamic aberrations introduced by the tear film to determine their contribution to the overall ocular aberrations in healthy eyes, eyes with corneal pathologies, and eyes wearing contact lenses.

  14. Three-zone pupil filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Campos, Juan; Escalera, Juan C.; Ledesma, Silvia

    2008-07-01

    The performance of pupil filters consisting of three zones each of constant complex amplitude transmittance is investigated. For filters where the transmittance is real, different classes of potentially useful filter are identified. These include leaky filters with an inner zone of low amplitude transmittance, pure phase filters with phase change of π, and equal area filters.

  15. Interaction of mantle dynamics, crustal tectonics, and surface processes in the topography of the Romanian Carpathians: A geomorphological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, P.; Fubelli, G.; Nocentini, M.; Sperini, S.; Ignat, P.; Grecu, F.; Dramis, F.

    2012-06-01

    Tectonic processes and dynamic mantle flow impart a unique imprint on topography and geomorphic responses over time scales of 104 to 106 yr. First-order topographic features in a tectonically active landscape represent ways to quantitatively characterise the interaction between crustal tectonics, mantle dynamics, and geomorphology, providing a basis for modelling landscape evolution. We analysed the topographic features of the Romanian Carpathians, a mountain range characterised by two straight segments connected by a narrow curvature zone. The deformation started in the Late Jurassic and includes two collisional phases during the Cretaceous and Miocene. We examined the tectonic geomorphology of the Romanian Carpathians focusing on regional and local topographic setting, drainage pattern, and river long profiles. Our main database is composed of DEM-based topographic analysis, supplemented with field investigations in the Slănic River basin, located in the Carpathian curvature zone. The longitudinal profiles of rivers draining the southern Carpathians are close to the equilibrium shape, in agreement with the older emersion of the chain. The longitudinal profiles of the rivers draining the eastern and southeastern Carpathians are in a transient state of disequilibrium as a consequence of a more recent emersion of the chain and of the Pliocene-Pleistocene tectonic activity in the Bend Zone. Filtering the topography at different wavelengths, we observe a relative depression in correspondence with the Carpathian Bend, where mantle seismicity and a high-velocity zone in tomography data are located and commonly interpreted as related to an almost inactive and dying subduction zone. Contrastingly, the filtered topography presents a high in the Transylvanian basin, where tomography data show a low-velocity area, interpreted as upwelling of hot asthenospheric materials. We hypothesise that local mantle convection generates positive and negative dynamic topographies. In the

  16. OpenTopography: Enabling Online Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography Data and Processing Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Baru, Chaitan; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the Earth's surface and overlying vegetation. These data, collected from airborne, tripod, or mobile-mounted scanners have emerged as a fundamental tool for research on topics ranging from earthquake hazards to hillslope processes. Lidar data provide a digital representation of the earth's surface at a resolution sufficient to appropriately capture the processes that contribute to landscape evolution. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is a web-based system designed to democratize access to earth science-oriented lidar topography data. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including the raw point cloud and associated geospatial-processing tools for customized analysis. The point cloud data are co-located with on-demand processing tools to generate digital elevation models, and derived products and visualizations which allow users to quickly access data in a format appropriate for their scientific application. The OpenTopography system is built using a service-oriented architecture (SOA) that leverages cyberinfrastructure resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego to allow users, regardless of expertise level, to access these massive lidar datasets and derived products for use in research and teaching. OpenTopography hosts over 500 billion lidar returns covering 85,000 km2. These data are all in the public domain and are provided by a variety of partners under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding with OpenTopography. Partners include national facilities such as the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM), as well as non-governmental organizations and local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography has become a hub for high-resolution topography

  17. Interferometer for measuring dynamic corneal topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Jason Daniel

    The cornea is the anterior most surface of the eye and plays a critical role in vision. A thin fluid layer, the tear film, coats the outer surface of the cornea and serves to protect, nourish, and lubricate the cornea. At the same time, the tear film is responsible for creating a smooth continuous surface where the majority of refraction takes place in the eye. A significant component of vision quality is determined by the shape of the cornea and stability of the tear film. It is desirable to possess an instrument that can measure the corneal shape and tear film surface with the same accuracy and resolution that is currently performed on common optical elements. A dual interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography is designed, built, and verified. The completed system is validated by testing on human subjects. The system consists of two co-aligned polarization splitting Twyman-Green interferometers designed to measure phase instantaneously. The primary interferometer measures the surface of the tear film while the secondary interferometer simultaneously tracks the absolute position of the cornea. Eye motion, ocular variation, and a dynamic tear film surface will result in a non-null configuration of the surface with respect to the interferometer system. A non-null test results in significant interferometer induced errors that add to the measured phase. New algorithms are developed to recover the absolute surface topography of the tear film and corneal surface from the simultaneous interferometer measurements. The results are high-resolution and high-accuracy surface topography measurements of the in vivo cornea that are captured at standard camera frame rates. This dissertation will cover the development and construction of an interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography of the human eye. The discussion starts with the completion of an interferometer for measuring the tear film. The tear film interferometer is part of an

  18. Generation of Solitary Rossby Waves by Unstable Topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-Wei; YIN Bao-Shu; DONG Huan-He

    2012-01-01

    The effect of topography on generation of the solitary Rossby waves is researched. Here, the topography, as a forcing for waves generation, is taken as a function of longitude variable x and time variable t, which is called unstable topography. With the help of a perturbation expansion method, a forced mKdv equation governing the evolution of amplitude of the solitary Rossby waves is derived from quasi-geostrophic vortieity equation and is solved by the pseudo-spectral method. Basing on the waterfall plots, the generational features of the solitary Rossby waves under the influence of unstable topography and stable topography are compared and some conclusions are obtained.

  19. The Study on Provincial-level Land Consolidation Zoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoping; CHEN; Xiaowei; WU

    2013-01-01

    The principles and methods of regional land consolidation in Yunnan Province are expounded. On the basis of differences in topography, climate, soil, hydrology and other natural conditions and the characteristics of spatial layout of land use, agricultural zoning, cropping system and land consolidation measures, the land consolidation zoning indicator system composed of five indicators covering ecological environment, socio-economy, land use, land consolidation and land quality is established by using the GIS spatial analysis and mathematical analysis. Against this backdrop, the Yunnan Province is divided into five first-level land consolidation zones, including the middle-mountain lake basin plateau consolidation zone in central Yunnan, the middle and low mountain wide valley basin consolidation zone in southwest Yunnan, the karst middle and low mountains consolidation zone in southeast Yunnan, the high-mountain and highlands consolidation zone in northeast Yunnan, the middle -mountain and mountain plateau consolidation zone in northeast Yunnan.

  20. Topography and functional information of plasma membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    By using atomic force microscope (AFM), the topography and function of the plasmalemma surface of the isolated protoplasts from winter wheat mesophyll cells were observed, and compared with dead protoplasts induced by dehydrating stress. The observational results revealed that the plasma membrane of living protoplasts was in a state of polarization. Lipid layers of different cells and membrane areas exhibited distinct active states. The surfaces of plasma membranes were unequal, and were characterized of regionalisation. In addition, lattice structures were visualized in some regions of the membrane surface. These typical structures were assumed to be lipid molecular complexes, which were measured to be 15.8±0.09 nm in diameter and 1.9±0.3 nm in height. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging showed that the plasmalemma surfaces of winter wheat protoplasts were covered with numerous protruding particles. In order to determine the chemical nature of the protruding particles, living protoplasts were treated by proteolytic enzyme. Under the effect of enzyme, large particles became relatively looser, resulting that their width was increased and their height decreased. The results demonstrated that these particles were likely to be of protein nature. These protein particles at plasmalemma surface were different in size and unequal in distribution. The diameter of large protein particles ranged from 200 to 440 nm, with a central micropore, and the apparent height of them was found to vary from 12 to 40 nm. The diameter of mid-sized protein particles was between 40―60 nm, and a range of 1.8―5 nm was given for the apparent height of them. As for small protein particles, obtained values were 12―40 nm for their diameter and 0.7―2.2 nm for height. Some invaginated pits were also observed at the plasma membrane. They were formed by the endocytosis of protoplast. Distribution density of them at plasmalemma was about 16 pits per 15 μm2. According to their

  1. Topography and functional information of plasma membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN DeLan; CHEN JianMin; SONG YanMei; ZHU ChuanFeng; PAN GeBo; WAN LiJun

    2008-01-01

    By using atomic force microscope (AFM), the topography and function of the plasmalemma surface of the isolated protoplasta from winter wheat mesophyll cells were observed, and compared with dead protoplssts induced by dehydrating stress. The observational results revealed that the plasma membrane of living protoplasta was in a state of polarization. Lipid layers of different cells and membrane areas exhibited distinct active states. The surfaces of plasma membranes were unequal, and were characterized of regionalisation. In addition, lattice structures were visualized in some regions of the membrane surface. These typical structures were assumed to be lipid molecular complexes, which were measured to be 15.8±0.09 nm in diameter and 1.9±0.3 nm in height. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging showed that the plasmalemma surfaces of winter wheat protoplasta were covered with numerous protruding particles. In order to determine the chemical nature of the protruding particles, living protoplasts were treated by proteolytic enzyme. Under the effect of enzyme, large particles became relatively looser, resulting that their width was increased and their height decreased.The results demonstrated that these particles were likely to be of protein nature. These protein particles at plasmalemma surface were different in size and unequal in distribution. The diameter of large protein particles ranged from 200 to 440 nm, with a central micropore, and the apparent height of them was found to vary from 12 to 40 nm. The diameter of mid-sized protein particles was between 40-60 nm,and a range of 1.8-5 nm was given for the apparent height of them. As for small protein particles, obtained values were 12-40 nm for their diameter and 0.7-2.2 nm for height. Some invaginated pits were also observed at the plasma membrane. They were formed by the endocytosis of protoplsst. Distributlon density of them at plasmalemma was about 16 pits per 15 μm2. According to their size, we

  2. Hydrodynamic Characterization of a Surface Storage Zone in a Natural Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Ulloa, J. C.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Mignot, E.; Mao, L.

    2015-12-01

    Flow developed in surface storage zones in rivers is very important for many physical and biogeochemical processes. These regions are characterized by low velocities compared to the flow in the main channel and long residence times that favor the deposition of contaminants, nutrient uptake and interactions with reactive sediments. The dynamics of the turbulent flows in these zones is very complex, typically characterized by a shear layer that induces a recirculating area, with multiple large-scale coherent structures of different temporal and spatial scales. In this work we present the methodology and analysis of measurements in a natural surface storage zone. We report detailed information of a field campaign carried out in the Lluta River, located in northern Chile in the high altitude Andean environment known as the Altiplano (~4,000 masl). The area of study has great interest for the river ecosystem, since the water has high concentration levels of arsenic and other metals. The Lluta River is also a water source for many agricultural communities and urban centers located in the lower parts of the watershed. Field information obtained was: detailed topography, 3D velocity components in several points, and sediment arsenic concentration in the main channel and in the recirculating region of the natural surface storage zone. Topography was obtained through DGPS and digital image processing. The 3D velocity field was measured with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and surface velocity data was obtained through the LSPIV technique. Arsenic concentration was obtained by sediment sampling analysis. With this data we analyze the flow topology and characteristics features of the velocity, which constitute the controlling mechanisms of contaminant transport in the field. In addition, we contrast with preliminary results of a three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation, to determine the influence of different parameters on the transport and mixing processes in natural

  3. Structural topography-mediated high temperature wetting symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jing; Liu, Yahua; Hao, Chonglei; Li, Minfei; Chaudhury, Manoj K; Yao, Shuhuai

    2015-01-01

    Directed motion of liquid droplets is of considerable importance in various industrial processes. Despite extensive advances in this field of research, our understanding and the ability to control droplet dynamics at high temperature remain limited, in part due to the emergence of complex wetting states intertwined by the phase change process at the triple-phase interfaces. Here we show that two concurrent wetting states (Leidenfrost and contact boiling) can be manifested in a single droplet above its boiling point rectified by the presence of asymmetric textures. The breaking of the wetting symmetry at high temperature subsequently leads to the preferential motion towards the region with higher heat transfer coefficient. We demonstrate experimentally and analytically that the droplet vectoring is intricately dependent on the interplay between the structural topography and its imposed thermal state. Our fundamental understanding and the ability to control the droplet dynamics at high temperature represent an ...

  4. Combined High-Resolution LIDAR Topography and Multibeam Bathymetry for Northern Resurrection Bay, Seward, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, Keith A.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    A new Digital Elevation Model was created using the best available high-resolution topography and multibeam bathymetry surrounding the area of Seward, Alaska. Datasets of (1) LIDAR topography collected for the Kenai Watershed Forum, (2) Seward harbor soundings from the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, and (3) multibeam bathymetry from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration contributed to the final combined product. These datasets were placed into a common coordinate system, horizontal datum, vertical datum, and data format prior to being combined. The projected coordinate system of Universal Transverse Mercator Zone 6 North American Datum of 1927 was used for the horizontal coordinates. Z-values in meters were referenced to the tidal datum of Mean High Water. Gaps between the datasets were interpolated to create the final seamless 5-meter grid covering the area of interest around Seward, Alaska.

  5. Zones of emotional labour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2011-01-01

    is put forth among 25 Danish public family law caseworkers. The study points to personal, professional, and social zones of emotional labour through which the caseworkers carry out their work. Emotional labour zones mark emotion structures that may be challenging due to complex emotional intersections......The paper suggests that due to the difficult nature of their work public family law caseworkers are to be included in the definition of emotional labour even though they are omitted by Hochschild. Based upon a review of the structures involved in emotional labour an explorative qualitative study...

  6. Low-amplitude topographic features and textures on the Moon: Initial results from detrended Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.

    2017-02-01

    Global lunar topographic data derived from ranging measurements by the Lunar Oribter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard LRO mission to the Moon have extremely high vertical precision. We use detrended topography as a means for utilization of this precision in geomorphological analysis. The detrended topography was calculated as a difference between actual topography and a trend surface defined as a median topography in a circular sliding window. We found that despite complicated distortions caused by the non-linear nature of the detrending procedure, visual inspection of these data facilitates identification of low-amplitude gently-sloping geomorphic features. We present specific examples of patterns of lava flows forming the lunar maria and revealing compound flow fields, a new class of lava flow complex on the Moon. We also highlight the identification of linear tectonic features that otherwise are obscured in the images and topographic data processed in a more traditional manner.

  7. Brittle-ductile deformation effects on zircon crystal-chemistry and U-Pb ages: an example from the Finero Mafic Complex (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, western Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Antonio; José Alberto, Padrón-Navarta; Zanetti, Alberto; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio; Tiepolo, Massimo; Giovanardi, Tommaso; Bonazzi, Mattia

    2016-04-01

    A detailed structural, geochemical and geochronological survey was performed on zircon grains from a leucocratic dioritic dyke discordantly intruded within meta-diorites/gabbros forming the External Gabbro unit of the Finero Mafic Complex. This latter is nowadays exposed as part of a near complete crustal section spanning from mantle rocks to upper crustal metasediments (Val Cannobina, Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italy). The leucocratic dyke consists mainly of plagioclase (An18-24Ab79-82Or0.3-0.7) with subordinate amounts of biotite, spinel, zircon and corundum. Both the leucocratic dyke and the surrounding meta-diorites show evidence of ductile deformation occurred under amphibolite-facies conditions. Zircon grains (up to 2 mm in length) occur mainly as euhedral grains surrounded by fine grained plagioclase-dominated matrix and pressure shadows, typically filled by oxides. Fractures and cracks within zircon are common and can be associated with grain displacement or they can be filled by secondary minerals (oxides and chlorite). Cathodoluminescence (CL) images show that zircon grains have internal features typical of magmatic growth, but with local disturbances. However EBSD maps on two selected zircon grains revealed a profuse mosaic texture resulting in an internal misorientation of ca. 10o. The majority of the domains of the mosaic texture are related to parting and fractures, but some domains show no clear relation with brittle features. Rotation angles related to the mosaic texture are not crystallographically controlled. In addition, one of the analysed zircons shows clear evidence of plastic deformation at one of its corners due to indentation. Plastic deformation results in gradual misorientations of up to 12o, which are crystallographically controlled. Trace elements and U-Pb analyses were carried out by LA-ICP-MS directly on petrographic thin sections and designed to cover the entire exposed surface of selected grains. Such investigations revealed a strong

  8. Support of long-wavelength topography on Mercury inferred from MESSENGER measurements of gravity and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter B.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-02-01

    To explore the mechanisms of support of surface topography on Mercury, we have determined the admittances and correlations of topography and gravity in Mercury's northern hemisphere from measurements obtained by NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. These admittances and correlations can be interpreted in the context of a number of theoretical scenarios, including flexural loading and dynamic flow. We find that long-wavelength (spherical harmonic degree l shallow crustal compensation and are weakly correlated with positive mass anomalies in the mantle. The center of the Caloris basin features some of the thinnest crust on the planet, and the basin is underlain by a large negative mass anomaly. We also explore models of dynamic flow in the presence of compositional stratification above the liquid core. If there is substantial compositional stratification in Mercury's solid outer shell, relaxation of perturbed compositional interfaces may be capable of creating and sustaining long-wavelength topography.

  9. Mercury's Thermal Evolution, Dynamical Topography and Geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziethe, Ruth; Benkhoff, Johannes

    stagnant lid comprises roughly half the mantle after only 0.5Ga. Since the rigid lithosphere does not take part in the convection anymore, the heat coming from the interior (due to the cooling of the large core) can only be transported through the lithosphere by thermal conduction. This is a significantly less effective mechanism of heat transport than convection and hence the lithosphere forms an insulating layer. As a result, the interior is kept relatively warm.Because the mantle is relatively shallow compared to the planet's radius, and additionally the thick stagnant lid is formed relatively rapid, the convection is confined to a layer of only about 200km to 300km. Convection structures are therefore relatively small structured. The flow patterns in the early evolution show that mantle convection is characterized by numerous upwelling plumes, which are fed by the heat flow from the cooling core. These upwellings are relatively stable regarding their spatial position. As the core cools down the temperature anomalies become colder and less pronounced but not less numerous. In our calculations, a region of partial melt in the mantle forms immediately after the start of the model at a depths of roughly 220km. While in the entire lower mantle the temperature exceeds the solidus, the highest melt degrees can be found in the upwelling plumes. The partial molten region persists a significant time (up to 2.5Ga). How long the partial molten zone actually survives depends strongly on the initial conditions of the model. For instance, an outer layer with a reduced thermal conductivity would keep the lower mantle significantly warmer and a molten layer survives longer. The hot upwellings cause a surface deformation (dynamical topography) which itself causes a gravity anomaly. Due to the weak constraints of important parameters (e.g. sulfur content of the core, mantle rheology, amount and distribution of radiogenic heat sources, planetary contraction, thermal conductivity, etc

  10. Global patterns in Earth's dynamic topography since the Jurassic: the role of subducted slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rubey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the spatial and temporal evolution of Earth's long-wavelength surface dynamic topography since the Jurassic using a series of high-resolution global mantle convection models. These models are Earth-like in terms of convective vigour, thermal structure, surface heat-flux and the geographic distribution of heterogeneity. The models generate a degree-2-dominated spectrum of dynamic topography with negative amplitudes above subducted slabs (i.e. circum-Pacific regions and southern Eurasia and positive amplitudes elsewhere (i.e. Africa, north-western Eurasia and the central Pacific. Model predictions are compared with published observations and subsidence patterns from well data, both globally and for the Australian and southern African regions. We find that our models reproduce the long-wavelength component of these observations, although observed smaller-scale variations are not reproduced. We subsequently define geodynamic rules for how different surface tectonic settings are affected by mantle processes: (i locations in the vicinity of a subduction zone show large negative dynamic topography amplitudes; (ii regions far away from convergent margins feature long-term positive dynamic topography; and (iii rapid variations in dynamic support occur along the margins of overriding plates (e.g. the western US and at points located on a plate that rapidly approaches a subduction zone (e.g. India and the Arabia Peninsula. Our models provide a predictive quantitative framework linking mantle convection with plate tectonics and sedimentary basin evolution, thus improving our understanding of how subduction and mantle convection affect the spatio-temporal evolution of basin architecture.

  11. Global patterns in Earth's dynamic topography since the Jurassic: the role of subducted slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubey, Michael; Brune, Sascha; Heine, Christian; Rhodri Davies, D.; Williams, Simon E.; Dietmar Müller, R.

    2017-09-01

    We evaluate the spatial and temporal evolution of Earth's long-wavelength surface dynamic topography since the Jurassic using a series of high-resolution global mantle convection models. These models are Earth-like in terms of convective vigour, thermal structure, surface heat-flux and the geographic distribution of heterogeneity. The models generate a degree-2-dominated spectrum of dynamic topography with negative amplitudes above subducted slabs (i.e. circum-Pacific regions and southern Eurasia) and positive amplitudes elsewhere (i.e. Africa, north-western Eurasia and the central Pacific). Model predictions are compared with published observations and subsidence patterns from well data, both globally and for the Australian and southern African regions. We find that our models reproduce the long-wavelength component of these observations, although observed smaller-scale variations are not reproduced. We subsequently define geodynamic rules for how different surface tectonic settings are affected by mantle processes: (i) locations in the vicinity of a subduction zone show large negative dynamic topography amplitudes; (ii) regions far away from convergent margins feature long-term positive dynamic topography; and (iii) rapid variations in dynamic support occur along the margins of overriding plates (e.g. the western US) and at points located on a plate that rapidly approaches a subduction zone (e.g. India and the Arabia Peninsula). Our models provide a predictive quantitative framework linking mantle convection with plate tectonics and sedimentary basin evolution, thus improving our understanding of how subduction and mantle convection affect the spatio-temporal evolution of basin architecture.

  12. Corneal topography and soft contact lens fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Graeme; Schnider, Cristina; Hunt, Chris; Efron, Suzanne

    2010-05-01

    To determine which ocular topography variables affect soft contact lens fit. Fifty subjects each wore three pairs of soft lenses in random succession (Vistakon Acuvue 2, Vistakon Acuvue Advance, Ciba Vision Night & Day), and various aspects of lens fit were evaluated. The steeper base curves of each type were worn in one eye and the flatter base curves in the other eye. Corneal topography data were collected using a Medmont E300 corneal topographer (Camberwell, Australia). Corneal curvature, shape factor (SF), and corneal height were measured over a 10 mm chord and also over the maximum measurable diameter. These were measured in the horizontal, vertical, steepest, and flattest meridians. With each lens type, the steeper base curve provided the best fit on the greatest proportion of eyes and the significant differences in various aspects of fit were noted between base curves. For each lens type, there was no significant difference in mean K-reading between those eyes best fit with the steeper base curve and those eyes best fit with the flatter base curve. Two of the lenses showed a positive correlation between centration and horizontal corneal height (maximum), whereas one lens showed a negative correlation between centration and horizontal SF (SF = e). Several lenses showed a positive correlation between post-blink movement and horizontal or vertical corneal SF. The measurement of corneal topography using current Placido disc instrumentation allows a better prediction of soft lens fit than by keratometry, but it is not reliable enough to enable accurate selection of the best fitting base curve. Some correlations are evident between corneal measurements; however, trial fitting remains the method of choice for selection of soft lens base curve.

  13. Macromolecular Topography Leaps into the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    A low-cost, real-time digital topography system is under development which will replace x-ray film and nuclear emulsion plates. The imaging system is based on an inexpensive surveillance camera that offers a 1000x1000 array of 8 im square pixels, anti-blooming circuitry, and very quick read out. Currently, the system directly converts x-rays to an image with no phosphor. The system is small and light and can be easily adapted to work with other crystallographic equipment. Preliminary images have been acquired of cubic insulin at the NSLS x26c beam line. NSLS x26c was configured for unfocused monochromatic radiation. Six reflections were collected with stills spaced from 0.002 to 0.001 degrees apart across the entire oscillation range that the reflections were in diffracting condition. All of the reflections were rotated to the vertical to reduce Lorentz and beam related effects. This particular CCD is designed for short exposure applications (much less than 1 sec) and so has a relatively high dark current leading to noisy raw images. The images are processed to remove background and other system noise with a multi-step approach including the use of wavelets, histogram, and mean window filtering. After processing, animations were constructed with the corresponding reflection profile to show the diffraction of the crystal volume vs. the oscillation angle as well as composite images showing the parts of the crystal with the strongest diffraction for each reflection. The final goal is to correlate features seen in reflection profiles captured with fine phi slicing to those seen in the topography images. With this development macromolecular topography finally comes into the digital age.

  14. Welcome to Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard

    2013-11-01

    I am delighted to welcome readers to this inaugural issue of Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties (STMP). In these days of citation indexes and academic reviews, it is a tough, and maybe a brave, job to start a new journal. But the subject area has never been more active and we are seeing genuine breakthroughs in the use of surfaces to control functional performance. Most manufactured parts rely on some form of control of their surface characteristics. The surface is usually defined as that feature on a component or device, which interacts with either the environment in which it is housed (or in which the device operates), or with another surface. The surface topography and material characteristics of a part can affect how fluids interact with it, how the part looks and feels and how two bearing parts will slide together. The need to control, and hence measure, surface features is becoming increasingly important as we move into a miniaturized world. Surface features can become the dominant functional features of a part and may become large in comparison to the overall size of an object. Research into surface texture measurement and characterization has been carried out for over a century and is now more active than ever, especially as new areal surface texture specification standards begin to be introduced. The range of disciplines for which the function of a surface relates to its topography is very diverse; from metal sheet manufacturing to art restoration, from plastic electronics to forensics. Until now, there has been no obvious publishing venue to bring together all these applications with the underlying research and theory, or to unite those working in academia with engineering and industry. Hence the creation of Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties . STMP will publish the best work being done across this broad discipline in one journal, helping researchers to share common themes and highlighting and promoting the extraordinary benefits this

  15. EAARL Coastal Topography - Sandy Hook 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey, acquired on May 16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  16. Bessel Function Model for Corneal Topography

    CERN Document Server

    Okrasiński, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a new nonlinear mathematical model for corneal topography formulated as two-point boudary value problem. We derive it from first physical principles and provide some mathematical analysis. The existence and uniqeness theorems are proved as well as various estimates on exact solution. At the end we fit the simplified model based on Modified Bessel Function of the First Kind with the real corneal data consisting of matrix of 123x123 points and obtain an error of order of 1%.

  17. Topography-Dependent Eikonal Traveltime Tomography for Upper Crustal Structure Beneath an Irregular Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting; Zhang, Zhongjie

    2015-06-01

    Seismic modeling of the crust with nonflat topography can be made by first-arrival traveltime tomography, which faces the challenge of an irregular free surface. A feasible way to deal with this problem consists of expanding the physical space by overlapping a low velocity layer above the irregular surface in order to have a flat topography, besides using the classical eikonal equation solver for traveltime computation. However, the undesirable consequences of this method include seismic ray deviations due to the transition from an irregular surface that is the free boundary to an inner discontinuity lying in the expanded computational space. An alternative solution, called irregular surface flattening, which involves the transformation between curvilinear and Cartesian coordinate systems, has been recently proposed through the formulation of the topography-dependent eikonal equation (TDEE) and a new solver for forward modeling of traveltimes. Based on the solution of this equation, we present topography-dependent eikonal traveltime tomography (hereafter TDETT) for seismic modeling of the upper crust. First-arrival traveltimes are calculated using the TDEE solver and the raypaths with the minimum traveltime that can be found by following the steepest traveltime gradient from the receiver to the source. By solving an algebraic equation system that connects the slowness perturbations with the already determined traveltimes, these variables can be obtained making use of the back-projection algorithm. This working scheme is evaluated through three numerical examples with different topographic complexities that are conducted from synthetic data and a fourth example with somewhat more complicated topography and real data acquired in northeastern Tibet. The comparison of the results obtained by both methods, i.e., physical space expansion above the irregular surface and irregular surface flattening, fully validates the tomography scheme that is proposed to construct

  18. Oceanic residual depth measurements, the plate cooling model, and global dynamic topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark J.; Winterbourne, Jeff; Czarnota, Karol; White, Nicky

    2017-03-01

    Convective circulation of the mantle causes deflections of the Earth's surface that vary as a function of space and time. Accurate measurements of this dynamic topography are complicated by the need to isolate and remove other sources of elevation, arising from flexure and lithospheric isostasy. The complex architecture of continental lithosphere means that measurement of present-day dynamic topography is more straightforward in the oceanic realm. Here we present an updated methodology for calculating oceanic residual bathymetry, which is a proxy for dynamic topography. Corrections are applied that account for the effects of sedimentary loading and compaction, for anomalous crustal thickness variations, for subsidence of oceanic lithosphere as a function of age and for non-hydrostatic geoid height variations. Errors are formally propagated to estimate measurement uncertainties. We apply this methodology to a global database of 1936 seismic surveys located on oceanic crust and generate 2297 spot measurements of residual topography, including 1161 with crustal corrections. The resultant anomalies have amplitudes of ±1 km and wavelengths of ˜1000 km. Spectral analysis of our database using cross-validation demonstrates that spherical harmonics up to and including degree 30 (i.e., wavelengths down to 1300 km) are required to accurately represent these observations. Truncation of the expansion at a lower maximum degree erroneously increases the amplitude of inferred long-wavelength dynamic topography. There is a strong correlation between our observations and free-air gravity anomalies, magmatism, ridge seismicity, vertical motions of adjacent rifted margins, and global tomographic models. We infer that shorter wavelength components of the observed pattern of dynamic topography may be attributable to the presence of thermal anomalies within the shallow asthenospheric mantle.

  19. Effect of Streambed Roughness and Topography on the Solute Transport and Hyporheic Exchanges: Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobing; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Li

    2013-04-01

    Hyporheic zones are critical for maintaining river ecosystem as they provide hyporheic and riparian organisms critical solutes, including nutrients and dissolved gases from bedforms to watershed scales. Among the hyporheic driving factors, the streambed topogaraphy is considered as a significant driving factor for hydraulic process in hyporheic zone that has been well documented in the past few decades. Previous research has implied that the rough streambed impact the flow resistance and continuously affect the hydraulic gradient between the river and the streambed. Recent research works focused more on the realistic pressure distribution along the bedform interface (eg. triangular-shaped sand dunes) on a macro level scale, while only few works related to the hyporheic exchanges induced by pore size scaled topography. How and to what extent that pore size scaled bedform would contribute to the total hyporheic discharge is still unclear. Indeed, the mesoscopic uneven topography can disturb the flow regime that near the water-sand interface, for example, it brings turbulent eddies and fluctuating pressure distribution along a rough gravel bed. In our study, a set of flume experiments were setup to examine the pore size roughness impacts on the solute transport and hyporheic exchanges in surface-subsurface system. Six kinds of riverbed sediments with median diameter range from 1.1 mm to 50.2 mm were chosen for comparative analyses. Also, three kinds of triangular shaped bedforms represented by the ratio α (=δ/?, δ is the amplitude and ? is the wavelength) with value of 0.125, 0.17 and 0.25 were considered as the macro-topography driver variation in our experiments. Our tests revealed that under a flat riverbed condition, the vertical diffusion is the main factor for the solute transport in hyporheic zone, however, the hyporheic exchange rate (represented by the decrease rate in concentration of surface water) is significantly enhanced as the growth of gravel grain

  20. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, Silvina; Petrinovic, Ivan [CONICET -IBIGEO. Museo de Cs. Naturales, Universidad de Salta, Mendoza 2 (4400), Salta (Argentina)], E-mail: guzmansilvina@gmail.com

    2008-10-01

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  1. Modeling and Simulation of Current Source Inverter Fed Synchronous Motor in Complex Frequency Domain Taking the Transition Zone From Induction Motor to Synchronous Motor Mode into Account

    OpenAIRE

    A.B. Chattopadhyay; Sunil Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of synchronous motor plays a dominant role in designing complicated drive system for different applications, especially large blower fans etc for steel industries. As synchronous motor has no inherent starting torque generally it is started as an induction motor with the help of a damper winding and it pulls into synchronism under certain conditions. The present paper exactly concentrates on this particular zone of transition from induction motor to synchronous motor mode for a curre...

  2. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter and denudation zones

    OpenAIRE

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Rubenchik, Alexander; King, Wayne E.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the significant effect of the recoil pressure and Marangoni convection in laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of 316L stainless steel. A three-dimensional high fidelity powder-scale model reveals how the strong dynamical melt flow generates pore defects, material spattering (sparking), and denudation zones. The melt track is divided into three sections: a topological depression, a transition and a tail region, each being the location of specific physical effects. The inclu...

  3. Accuracy of the PAR corneal topography system with spatial misalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belin, M W; Zloty, P

    1993-01-01

    The PAR Corneal Topography System is a computerized corneal imaging system which uses close-range raster photogrammetry to measure and produce a topographic map of the corneal surface. Raster photogrammetry is a standard method of extracting object information by projecting a known pattern onto an object and recording the distortion when viewed from an oblique angle. Unlike placido disc based videokeratoscopes, the PAR system requires neither a smooth reflective surface nor precise spatial alignment for accurate imaging. We studied both the accuracy of the system with purposeful misalignment (defocusing) of the test object and determined the ability to image freshly deepithelialized, keratectomized, and photoablated corneas. The PAR system was both accurate and reproducible in imaging calibrated spheres within a defined zone in space. Whole cadaver eyes were imaged both before and immediately after removal of the epithelium, lamellar keratectomy, and laser photoablation. The system demonstrated the ability to image irregular, deepithelialized, and keratectomized corneas. The ability to maintain accuracy without precise alignment and the facility to image freshly deepithelialized and keratectomized corneas may make the system suitable for intraoperative refractive monitoring.

  4. Contrast in manganese nodule distribution on either side of 79~'E fracture zone in central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.

    Seabed topography is one of the prime factors in controlling the distribution of manganese nodules. Study of the nodule abundance on either side of the 79~'E fracture zone in the Central Indian Basin (idenfitied from multibeam bathymetric data...

  5. Measurement of the topography of human cadaver lenses using the PAR corneal topography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Viviana; Manns, Fabrice; Zipper, Stanley; Sandadi, Samith; Hamaoui, Marie; Tahi, Hassan; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    2001-06-01

    To measure the radius of curvature and asphericity of the anterior and posterior surfaces of crystalline lenses of human Eye-Bank eyes using the PAR Corneal Topography System. The measured values will be used in an optical model of the eye for lens refilling procedures.

  6. Analysis Of Scoliosis By Back Shape Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Smith, Alan R.; Harris, John D.

    1983-07-01

    The use of surface topography for the assessment of scoliotic deformity in the clinic depends firstly on the quality of measures which reliably characterise deformity of the back, and secondly on the ease and speed with which these measures can be applied. A method of analysis of back shape measurements is presented which can be applied to any topographic measurement system. Measures presented are substantially independent of minor changes in the patient's posture in rotation and flexion from one clinic to the next, and yet sensitive enough to indicate significant improvement or degeneration of the disease. The presentation shows (1) horizontal cross-sections at ten levels up the back from sacrum to vertebra prominens, (2) angles of rotation of the surface over a small region about the spine, (3) three vertical profiles following the line of the spine, and (4) measures of maximum kyphosis and lordosis. Dependence on the operator has been reduced to a minimum. Extreme care in positioning the patient is unnecessary and those spinous processes which are easily palpable, the vertebra prominens and the two dimples over the posterior superior iliac spines are marked. Analysis proceeds entirely automatically once the basic shape data have been supplied. Applications of the technique to indirect moire topography and a television topographic measurement system are described.

  7. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  8. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, Abby; Wright, C. Wayne; Travers, Laurinda J.; Lebonitte, James

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived coastal topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey areas for the purposes of geomorphic change studies following major storm events. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program's National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project is a multi-year undertaking to identify and quantify the vulnerability of U.S. shorelines to coastal change hazards such as effects of severe storms, sea-level rise, and shoreline erosion and retreat. Airborne Lidar surveys conducted during periods of calm weather are compared to surveys collected following extreme storms in order to quantify the resulting coastal change. Other applications of high-resolution topography include habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, volumetric change detection, and event assessment. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northern Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, acquired on September 19, 2004, immediately following Hurricane Ivan. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532 nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking RGB (red-green-blue) digital camera, a high-resolution multi

  9. Corneal Topography Analysis of Stromal Corneal Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Kocluk, Yusuf; Yalniz-Akkaya, Zuleyha; Burcu, Ayse; Ornek, Firdevs

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to compare the corneal topography and tomography parameters of macular corneal dystrophy (MCD), granular corneal dystrophy (GCD) and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) patients obtained by Scheimpflug imaging system. Methods: The charts, photographs and topography images of patients were reviewed retrospectively. This study included 73 eyes of 73 patients (28 MCD, 20 GCG and 25 LCD patients). Topography images were obtained by Pentacam (Oculus Optikgerate, Wetzlar, Germany...

  10. Dynamic Topography at Earth's Surface: Fact or Fiction? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Silver, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Contributions to Earth’s surface topography range from short-wavelength uncompensated features due to tectonic activity, to variations in crustal structure and long-wavelength deflections of the lithosphere caused by mantle dynamics. The latter we call dynamic topography. Dynamic topography elevates or depresses the surface even if the density anomaly giving rise to flow is deep in the mantle. Dynamic topography is also a major contributor to Earth’s gravitational potential and to surface deformation. However, direct observations of dynamic topography are elusive, because signals are obscured by the isostatic contribution due to crustal and lithospheric structure. The only seemingly unequivocal signals of dynamically supported topography have been found over mantle upwellings on both continents (Africa [Lithgow-Bertelloni and Silver, 1998] and Arabia [Daradich et al., 2004]) and oceanic basins (North-Atlantic [Conrad et al., 2004]). Recent work on Africa’s geomorphic history [Moore et al., 2009] and North Atlantic gravity and topography have called even these results into questions. In downwelling regions (near slabs) no clear signals have been found. I will explore why this dichotomy may exist and relate it to the need for dynamic topography in mantle flow models, with an eye towards the effects of phase transitions, lateral variations in viscosity and layered convection. I will also present recent results on dynamic topography over flat slab segments that overturn the conventional wisdom and explain basin topography in the Andean foreland. Along with the new models I will discuss a recent global lithospheric structure model with which to compute the residual topography, i.e. the “observed” dynamic topography.

  11. Gravity Terrain Effect of the Seafloor Topography in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-Tao Tong Tai-Rong Guo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity terrain correction is used to compensate for the gravitational effects of the topography residual to the Bouguer plate. The seafloor topography off the eastern offshore of Taiwan is extremely rugged, and the depth of the sea bottom could be greater than 5000 m. In order to evaluate the terrain effect caused by the seafloor topography, a modern computer algorithm is used to calculate the terrain correction based on the digital elevation model (DEM.

  12. Origin of bending in uncoated microcantilever - Surface topography?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmoji, K.; Prabakar, K.; Tripura Sundari, S., E-mail: sundari@igcar.gov.in; Jayapandian, J.; Tyagi, A. K.; Sundar, C. S. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2014-01-27

    We provide direct experimental evidence to show that difference in surface topography on opposite sides of an uncoated microcantilever induces bending, upon exposure to water molecules. Examination on opposite sides of the microcantilever by atomic force microscopy reveals the presence of localized surface features on one side, which renders the induced stress non-uniform. Further, the root mean square inclination angle characterizing the surface topography shows a difference of 73° between the opposite sides. The absence of deflection in another uncoated microcantilever having similar surface topography confirms that in former microcantilever bending is indeed induced by differences in surface topography.

  13. Coupling between apical tension and basal adhesion allow epithelia to collectively sense and respond to substrate topography over long distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broaders, Kyle E; Cerchiari, Alec E; Gartner, Zev J

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial sheets fold into complex topographies that contribute to their function in vivo. Cells can sense and respond to substrate topography in their immediate vicinity by modulating their interfacial mechanics, but the extent to which these mechanical properties contribute to their ability to sense substrate topography across length scales larger than a single cell has not been explored in detail. To study the relationship between the interfacial mechanics of single cells and their collective behavior as tissues, we grew cell-sheets on substrates engraved with surface features spanning macroscopic length-scales. We found that many epithelial cell-types sense and respond to substrate topography, even when it is locally nearly planar. Cells clear or detach from regions of local negative curvature, but not from regions with positive or no curvature. We investigated this phenomenon using a finite element model where substrate topography is coupled to epithelial response through a balance of tissue contractility and adhesive forces. The model correctly predicts the focal sites of cell-clearing and epithelial detachment. Furthermore, the model predicts that local tissue response to substrate curvature is a function of the surrounding topography of the substrate across long distances. Analysis of cell-cell and cell-substrate contact angles suggests a relationship between these single-cell interfacial properties, epithelial interfacial properties, and collective epithelial response to substrate topography. Finally, we show that contact angles change upon activation of oncogenes or inhibition of cell-contractility, and that these changes correlate with collective epithelial response. Our results demonstrate that in mechanically integrated epithelial sheets, cell contractility can be transmitted through multiple cells and focused by substrate topography to affect a behavioral response at distant sites.

  14. Sequential assimilation of multi-mission dynamical topography into a global finite-element ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Skachko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on an accurate estimation of ocean circulation via assimilation of satellite measurements of ocean dynamical topography into the global finite-element ocean model (FEOM. The dynamical topography data are derived from a complex analysis of multi-mission altimetry data combined with a referenced earth geoid. The assimilation is split into two parts. First, the mean dynamic topography is adjusted. To this end an adiabatic pressure correction method is used which reduces model divergence from the real evolution. Second, a sequential assimilation technique is applied to improve the representation of thermodynamical processes by assimilating the time varying dynamic topography. A method is used according to which the temperature and salinity are updated following the vertical structure of the first baroclinic mode. It is shown that the method leads to a partially successful assimilation approach reducing the rms difference between the model and data from 16 cm to 2 cm. This improvement of the mean state is accompanied by significant improvement of temporal variability in our analysis. However, it remains suboptimal, showing a tendency in the forecast phase of returning toward a free run without data assimilation. Both the mean difference and standard deviation of the difference between the forecast and observation data are reduced as the result of assimilation.

  15. Kumbakonam: the ritual topography of a sacred and royal city of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Nanda

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available South India is renowned worldwide for the architectural splendour of its temples and the elaborate sculpture that adorns them, but their symbolism, still ritually enacted today, is less well understood outside India. Complex interrelationships of art, architecture and ritual are expressed in the evolution, through the past thousand years, of the topography of one of th most important of the temple cities.

  16. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    In this study, the GOCE (Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gradiometry data were used to study geologic structures and mass variations within the lithosphere in areas of known subduction zones. The advantage of gravity gradiometry over other gravity methods is that gradie......In this study, the GOCE (Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gradiometry data were used to study geologic structures and mass variations within the lithosphere in areas of known subduction zones. The advantage of gravity gradiometry over other gravity methods...... is that gradients are extremely sensitive to localized density contrasts within regional geological settings, which makes it ideally suited for detecting subduction zones. Second order gravity gradients of disturbing potential were extracted from global geopotential model, the fifth release GOCE model ‘EGM_TIM_RL05......’. In order to remove the signal which mainly corresponds to the gravity signal of the lower mantle, long wavelength part of the gravity signal was removed up to degree and order 60. Because the areas with notable topography differences coincide with subduction zones, topography correction was also performed...

  17. Australian topography from Seasat overland altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Herbert; Brenner, Anita C.

    1990-01-01

    Retracking of overland returns from the Seasat altimeter using algorithms originally developed for recovering elevations over ice has led to the successful recovery of high quality continental topography over Australia and other continents. Cross-over analysis both before and after orbit adjustment shows the altimetric data over land to have a 2-3 m quality. Direct comparison of gridded Seasat data with surface data re-averaged in the same way shows excellent agreement except where Seasat data are sparse, due either to poor track spacing or to dropouts caused by loss of tracker lock over steeply sloping ground. These results suggest that useful topographic data can be derived from Seasat and the more recent Geosat altimeters for parts of the world where surface data are few or of poor quality.

  18. EAARL topography: Dry Tortugas National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2008-01-01

    This lidar-derived submarine topography map was produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs for the purposes of habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, ad event assessment (for example: bleaching, hurricanes, disease outbreaks). As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring water depth and conducting cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to managers of coastal tropical habitats.

  19. Mean Dynamic Topography of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Sinead Louise; Mcadoo, David C.; Laxon, Seymour W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Yi, Donghui; Ridout, Andy; Giles, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    ICESat and Envisat altimetry data provide measurements of the instantaneous sea surface height (SSH) across the Arctic Ocean, using lead and open water elevation within the sea ice pack. First, these data were used to derive two independent mean sea surface (MSS) models by stacking and averaging along-track SSH profiles gathered between 2003 and 2009. The ICESat and Envisat MSS data were combined to construct the high-resolution ICEn MSS. Second, we estimate the 5.5-year mean dynamic topography (MDT) of the Arctic Ocean by differencing the ICEn MSS with the new GOCO02S geoid model, derived from GRACE and GOCE gravity. Using these satellite-only data we map the major features of Arctic Ocean dynamical height that are consistent with in situ observations, including the topographical highs and lows of the Beaufort and Greenland Gyres, respectively. Smaller-scale MDT structures remain largely unresolved due to uncertainties in the geoid at short wavelengths.

  20. Gravity and topography. [of planet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P. B.; Banerdt, W. B.; Lindal, G. F.; Sjogren, W. L.; Slade, M. A.; Bills, B. G.; Smith, D. E.; Balmino, G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper summarizes the fundamental gravity field constants for Mars and a brief historical review of early determinations and current-day accurate estimates. These include the planetary gravitational constant, global figure, dynamical oblateness, mean density, and rotational period. Topographic results from data acquired from the 1967 opposition to the most recent, 1988, opposition are presented. Both global and selected local topographic variations and features are discussed. The inertia tensor and the nonhydrostatic component of Mars are examined in detail. The dimensionless moment of inertia about the rotational axis is 0.4 for a body of uniform density and 0.37621 if Mars were in hydrostatic equilibrium. By comparing models of both gravity and topography, inferences are made about the degree and depth of compensation in the interior and stresses in the lithosphere.

  1. Critical zone architecture and processes: a geophysical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, W. S.

    2016-12-01

    The "critical zone (CZ)," Earth's near-surface layer that reaches from treetop to bedrock, sustains terrestrial life by storing water and producing nutrients. Despite is central importance, however, the CZ remains poorly understood, due in part to the complexity of interacting biogeochemical and physical processes that take place there, and in part due to the difficulty of measuring CZ properties and processes at depth. Major outstanding questions include: What is the architecture of the CZ? How does that architecture vary across scales and across gradients in climate, lithology, topography, biology and regional states of stress? What processes control the architecture of the CZ? At what depth does weathering initiate, and what controls the rates at which it proceeds? Based on recent geophysical campaigns at seven Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) sites and several other locations, a geophysical perspective on CZ architecture and processes is emerging. CZ architecture can be usefully divided into four layers, each of which has distinct geophysical properties: soil, saprolite, weathered bedrock and protolith. The distribution of those layers across landscapes varies depending on protolith composition and internal structure, topography, climate (P/T) and the regional state of stress. Combined observations from deep CZ drilling, geophysics and geochemistry demonstrate that chemical weathering initiates deep in the CZ, in concert with mechanical weathering (fracturing), as chemical weathering appears concentrated along fractures in borehole walls. At the Calhoun CZO, the plagioclase weathering front occurs at nearly 40 m depth, at the base of a 25-m-thick layer of weathered bedrock. The principal boundary in porosity, however, occurs at the saprolite/weathered bedrock boundary: porosity decreases over an order of magnitude, from 50% to 5% over an 8-m-thick zone at the base of saprolite. Porosity in weathered bedrock is between 2-5%. Future progress will depend on (1

  2. Corneal topography matching by iterative registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Davey, Pinakin G; Wang, Weizhuo; Bao, Fangjun; Mottershead, John E

    2014-11-01

    Videokeratography is used for the measurement of corneal topography in overlapping portions (or maps) which must later be joined together to form the overall topography of the cornea. The separate portions are measured from different viewpoints and therefore must be brought together by registration of measurement points in the regions of overlap. The central map is generally the most accurate, but all maps are measured with uncertainty that increases towards the periphery. It becomes the reference (or static) map, and the peripheral (or dynamic) maps must then be transformed by rotation and translation so that the overlapping portions are matched. The process known as registration, of determining the necessary transformation, is a well-understood procedure in image analysis and has been applied in several areas of science and engineering. In this article, direct search optimisation using the Nelder-Mead algorithm and several variants of the iterative closest/corresponding point routine are explained and applied to simulated and real clinical data. The measurement points on the static and dynamic maps are generally different so that it becomes necessary to interpolate, which is done using a truncated series of Zernike polynomials. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point variant has the advantage of releasing certain optimisation constraints that lead to persistent registration and alignment errors when other approaches are used. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point routine is found to be robust to measurement noise, insensitive to starting values of the transformation parameters and produces high-quality results when using real clinical data.

  3. Characterization of slow slip rate faults in humid areas: Cimandiri fault zone, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marliyani, G. I.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Whipple, K. X.

    2016-12-01

    In areas where regional tectonic strain is accommodated by broad zones of short and low slip rate faults, geomorphic and paleoseismic characterization of faults is difficult because of poor surface expression and long earthquake recurrence intervals. In humid areas, faults can be buried by thick sediments or soils; their geomorphic expression subdued and sometimes undetectable until the next earthquake. In Java, active faults are diffused, and their characterization is challenging. Among them is the ENE striking Cimandiri fault zone. Cumulative displacement produces prominent ENE oriented ranges with the southeast side moving relatively upward and to the northeast. The fault zone is expressed in the bedrock by numerous NE, west, and NW trending thrust- and strike-slip faults and folds. However, it is unclear which of these structures are active. We performed a morphometric analysis of the fault zone using 30 m resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. We constructed longitudinal profiles of 601 bedrock rivers along the upthrown ranges along the fault zone, calculated the normalized channel steepness index, identified knickpoints and use their distribution to infer relative magnitudes of rock uplift and locate boundaries that may indicate active fault traces. We compare the rock uplift distribution to surface displacement predicted by elastic dislocation model to determine the plausible fault kinematics. The active Cimandiri fault zone consists of six segments with predominant sense of reverse motion. Our analysis reveals considerable geometric complexity, strongly suggesting segmentation of the fault, and thus smaller maximum earthquakes, consistent with the limited historical record of upper plate earthquakes in Java.

  4. HESS Opinions "Topography driven conceptual modelling (FLEX-Topo"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. G. Savenije

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity and complexity of hydrological processes offer substantial challenges to the hydrological modeller. Some hydrologists try to tackle this problem by introducing more and more detail in their models, or by setting-up more and more complicated models starting from basic principles at the smallest possible level. As we know, this reductionist approach leads to ever higher levels of equifinality and predictive uncertainty. On the other hand, simple, lumped and parsimonious models may be too simple to be realistic or representative of the dominant hydrological processes. In this commentary, a new model approach is proposed that tries to find the middle way between complex distributed and simple lumped modelling approaches. Here we try to find the right level of simplification while avoiding over-simplification. Paraphrasing Einstein, the maxim is: make a model as simple as possible, but not simpler than that. The approach presented is process based, but not physically based in the traditional sense. Instead, it is based on a conceptual representation of the dominant physical processes in certain key elements of the landscape. The essence of the approach is that the model structure is made dependent on a limited number of landscape classes in which the topography is the main driver, but which can include geological, geomorphological or land-use classification. These classes are then represented by lumped conceptual models that act in parallel. The advantage of this approach over a fully distributed conceptualisation is that it retains maximum simplicity while taking into account observable landscape characteristics.

  5. HESS Opinions "Topography driven conceptual modelling (FLEX-Topo"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. G. Savenije

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity and complexity of hydrological processes offer substantial challenges to the hydrological modeller. Some hydrologists try to tackle this problem by introducing more and more detail in their models, or by setting-up more and more complicated models starting from basic principles at the smallest possible level. As we know, this reductionist approach leads to ever higher levels of equifinality and predictive uncertainty. On the other hand, simple, lumped and parsimonious models may be too simple to be realistic or representative of the dominant hydrological processes. In this commentary, a new approach is proposed that tries to find the middle way between complex distributed and simple lumped modelling approaches. Here we try to find the right level of simplification while avoiding over-simplification. Paraphrasing Einstein, the maxim is: make a model as simple as possible, but not simpler than that. The approach presented is process based, but not physically based in the traditional sense. Instead, it is based on a conceptual representation of the dominant physical processes in certain key elements of the landscape. The essence of the approach is that the model structure is made dependent on a limited number of landscape classes in which the topography is the main driver, but which can include geological, geomorphological or land-use classification. These classes are then represented by lumped conceptual models that act in parallel. The advantage of this approach over a fully distributed conceptualisation is that it retains maximum simplicity while taking into account observable landscape characteristics.

  6. Effect of the Earth's surface topography on the quasi-dynamic earthquake cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, M.; Hirahara, K.

    2014-12-01

    the entire seismogenic zone as negative A - B to produce coseismic slip, the slip behavior showed almost no change. This is because the rupture starts from the deep portion, and the deep area has less affected by the Earth's surface topography. We also examined the realistic case assuming the Nankai Trough, the subduction zone located in southeast, Japan.

  7. Geophysical survey of Neovolcanic complexes in the first protection zone of the Sliač Spa and the Baková jama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašiaková, Mariana; Gajdoš, Vojtech; Bučová, Jana; Dérerová, Jana; Straka, Adam; Hlavˇnová, Petra; Brixová, Bibiana

    2014-03-01

    The main purpose of the survey in the 1st protection zone area of the Sliač Spa and the Baková jama was to clarify the geological-tectonical structure. The vertical electric sounding (VES) technique was selected as the main geophysical survey method. Additionally, the soil radon emanometry was carried out to verify tectonic lines' presence. The outcrop of Pre-Tertiary basement was discovered in the form of small isolated island. No tectonic line was identified based on the evaluation of profile radon concentration. The results of geoelectrical measurements are presented in 8 geological-geophysical crosssections. The results and the tectonic lines' courses interpreted by the VES method are drawn in the map of new indications. The isoline maps and 3D model of Pre-Tertiary basement were constructed.

  8. Hybridization in the Ensatina Ring Species, Strong selection against hybrids at a hybrid zone in the ensatina ring species complex and its evolutionary implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrino, Joao; Baird, Stuart J.E.; Lawson, Lucinda; Macey, J. Robert; Moritz, Craig; Wake, David B.

    2005-04-22

    The analysis of interactions between lineages at varying levels of genetic divergence can provide insights into the process of speciation through the accumulation of incompatible mutations. Ring species, and especially the Ensatina eschscholtzii system exemplify this approach. The plethodontid salamanders Ensatina eschscholtzii xanthoptica and Ensatina eschscholtzii platensis hybridize in the Central Sierran foothills of California. We compared the genetic structure across two transects (southern and northern Calaveras Co.), one of which was re-sampled over 20 years, and examined diagnostic molecular markers (eight allozyme loci and mitochondrial DNA) and a diagnostic quantitative trait (color pattern). Key results across all studies were: (i) cline centers for all markers were coincident and the zones were narrow, with width estimates of 730m to 2000m; (ii) cline centers at the northern Calaveras transect were coincident between 1981 and 2001, demonstrating repeatability over 5 generations; (iii) there are very few if any putative F1's, but a relatively high number of backcrossed individuals (57-86 percent) in the central portion of transects; (iv) we found substantial linkage disequilibrium in all three studies and strong heterozygote deficit both in northern Calaveras, in 2001, and southern Calaveras. Both linkage disequilibrium and heterozygote deficit show maximum values near the center of the zones (R and Fis, approx. equal to 0.5). Using estimates of cline width and dispersal, we infer strong selection against hybrids (s* approx. equal to 46-75 percent). This is sufficient to promote accumulation of differences at loci that are neutral or under divergent selection, but would still allow for introgression of adaptive alleles. The evidence for strong, but incomplete isolation across this centrally located contact is consistent with theory suggesting a gradual increase in postzygotic incompatibility between allopatric populations subject to divergent

  9. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W; Reis, R L; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Mano, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavi

  10. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W; Reis, R.L.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Apeldoorn, van A.A.; Mano, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavi

  11. Effect of Surface Topography on Stress Concentration Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhengkun; LIAO Ridong

    2015-01-01

    Neuber rule and Arola-Ramulu model are widely used to predict the stress concentration factor of rough specimens. However, the height parameters and effective valley radius used in these two models depend strongly on the resolution of the roughness-measuring instruments and are easily introduce measuring errors. Besides, it is difficult to find a suitable parameter to characterize surface topography to quantitatively describe its effect on stress concentration factor. In order to overcome these disadvantages, profile moments are carried out to characterize surface topography, surface topography is simulated by superposing series of cosine components, the stress concentration factors of different micro cosine-shaped surface topographies are investigated by finite element analysis. In terms of micro cosine-shaped surface topography, an equation using the second profile moment to estimate the stress concentration factor is proposed, predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% error compared with the results of finite element analysis, which are more accurate than other models. Moreover, the proposed equation is applied to the real surface topography machined by turning. Predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% of the maximum stress concentration factors and about 5% of the effective stress concentration factors estimated from the finite element analysis for three levels of turning surface topographies under different simulated scales. The proposed model is feasible in predicting the stress concentration factors of real machined surface topographies.

  12. Topography-induced focusing of random waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, P.B.; Janssen, T.T.; Herbers, T.H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Refraction of narrow-band surface waves in coastal areas can result in wave-focal zones where due to interference, wave statistics vary rapidly and on similar length scales as those of individual waves. However such interference patterns, or wave coherence, are not accounted for in conventional stoc

  13. Comparison of platinum, palladium, and rhodium distributions in some layered intrusions with special reference to the late differentiates (upper zone) of the Bushveld complex, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, N.J.; Von Gruenewaldt, G.; Haffty, J.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Stillwater, Fiskenaesset and Bushveld complexes have many similarities. The trends of the Pt/(Pt + Pd) and its correlation with Mg/(Mg + Fe2+) are presented. Presumably the Pt/(Pt + Pd) variations are related to changes in major mineral compositions. -K.A.R.

  14. Analyzing topography effects for l-band radiometry using an improved model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Weihermüller, L.; Zhang, L. X.; Jiang, L. M.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-04-01

    Global measurements of soil moisture, the key variables in the water cycle, are provided by spaceborne radiometer based on the long wavelength detection. As one potentially critical factor, topography will induce soil moisture retrieval error over mountain areas from space. Therefore, it is imperative to develop microwave radiative transfer models for L-band over mountain areas characterized by low complexity, and therefore, practical use. To address this issue, we pay close attention to the interactive mechanism between topography and microwave radiation by describing microwave radiation characteristics of terrain scenes. To explore the mechanism of relief effects on L-band, landscape scenes are generated based on Gaussian surfaces ranging from flat terrain to multiple hills within a 35 x 35 km scene. The scattering radiation, one of contributions to the L-band microwave signal, had undergone the fairly reasonable modification that we recalculated the mutual diffuse reflection of adjacent hills instead of the maximal unidirectional diffuse reflection. Therefore, an improved microwave radiative transfer model to simulate relief effects was proposed. Based on the model, the significance of soil moisture and land surface temperature to relief effects in these terrain scenes are analyzed respectively. When the soil becomes wetter the deviation of TB between flat and mountainous terrain is enhanced. In contrast to water content, land surface temperature has a negligible effect with less than 1 K for both polarizations. Besides, the impact of topography on brightness temperature and soil moisture retrieval is predicted. It is shown that the soil moisture retrieval error at L band arisen by topography is more than 4%, the maximum permissible error, and the maximum fractional error of soil moisture retrieval compared to soil moisture in the flat terrain is 77.6%. The results presented indicate the necessity of eliminating relief effects at L-band and our approach provides

  15. Silk film topography directs collective epithelial cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Lawrence

    Full Text Available The following study provides new insight into how surface topography dictates directed collective epithelial cell sheet growth through the guidance of individual cell movement. Collective cell behavior of migrating human corneal limbal-epithelial cell sheets were studied on highly biocompatible flat and micro-patterned silk film surfaces. The silk film edge topography guided the migratory direction of individual cells making up the collective epithelial sheet, which resulted in a 75% increase in total culture elongation. This was due to a 3-fold decrease in cell sheet migration rate efficiency for movement perpendicular to the topography edge. Individual cell migration direction is preferred in the parallel approach to the edge topography where localization of cytoskeletal proteins to the topography's edge region is reduced, which results in the directed growth of the collective epithelial sheet. Findings indicate customized biomaterial surfaces may be created to direct both the migration rate and direction of tissue epithelialization.

  16. Mapping Indigenous Settlement Topography in the Caribbean Using Drones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till F. Sonnemann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The archaeology of Amerindian settlements in the Caribbean has mostly been identified through scatters of artefacts; predominantly conglomerations of shells, ceramics and lithics. While archaeological material may not always be visible on the surface, particular settlement patterns may be identifiable by a topography created through cultural action: earthen mounds interchanging with mostly circular flattened areas. In northern Hispaniola, recent foot surveys have identified more than 200 pre-colonial sites of which several have been mapped in high resolution. In addition, three settlements with topographical characteristics have been extensively excavated, confirming that the mounds and flattened areas may have had a cultural connotation in this region. Without the availability of high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging data, a photogrammetric approach using UAS (unmanned aircraft system, commonly known as drones can fill the knowledge gap on a local scale, providing fast and reliable data collection and precise results. After photogrammetric processing, digital clearance of vegetation, and extraction of the georeferenced DEM (digital elevation model and orthophoto, filters and enhancements provide an opportunity to visualize the results in GIS. The outcome provides an overview of site size, and distribution of mounds and flattened areas. Measurement of the topographic changes in a variety of past settlements defines likely zones of habitat, and provides clues on the actual dimensions and density of living space. Understanding the relation of the mounds and adjacent flat areas within their environment allows a discussion on how, and for what purpose, the settlement was founded at a particular location, and provides clues about its spatial organization.

  17. A magmatic probe of dynamic topography beneath western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöcking, M.; White, N. J.; Maclennan, J.

    2014-12-01

    A region centered on the Yellowstone hotspot and encompassing the Colorado Plateau sits at an elevation 2 km higher than the cratonic North America. This difference broadly coincides with tomographically observed variations in lithospheric thickness: ~120 km beneath western North America, ~240 km beneath the craton. Thermochronology of the Grand Canyon area, sedimentary flux to the Gulf of Mexico, and river profile inversion all suggest that regional uplift occurred in at least two separate stages. High resolution seismic tomographic models, using USArray data, have identified a ring of low velocity material beneath the edges of the Colorado Plateau. Magmatism coincides with these low velocity zones and shows distinct phases: an overall increase in volume around 40 Ma and a change from lithospheric to asthenospheric signatures around 5 Ma. Volcanism is also observed to migrate north-east with time. Here, we attempt to integrate these different observations with lithospheric thickness. A dynamic topography model of progressive lithospheric erosion over a hot mantle plume might account for uplift as well as the temporal and spatial distribution of magmatism across western North America. Thinning of the lithosphere around the edges of the Colorado Plateau in combination with the hotter mantle potential temperature of a plume could create isostatic and dynamic uplift as well as allowing for melt production. To test this model, we have analysed around 100 samples from volcanic centers across western North America by ICP-MS for rare earth elements (REE). Most of the samples are younger than 5 Ma, and all of them have previously been analysed by XRF. Using trace element ratios such as La/Yb and Nb/Y we assess depth of melting and melt fraction, respectively. In addition, we use REE inversion modelling to estimate melt fractions as a function of depth and temperature of melting. The results are compared to existing constraints on lithospheric thickness and mantle potential

  18. New Global Bathymetry and Topography Model Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. H.; Sandwell, D. T.; Marks, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    A new version of the "Smith and Sandwell" global marine topography model is available in two formats. A one-arc-minute Mercator projected grid covering latitudes to +/- 80.738 degrees is available in the "img" file format. Also available is a 30-arc-second version in latitude and longitude coordinates from pole to pole, supplied as tiles covering the same areas as the SRTM30 land topography data set. The new effort follows the Smith and Sandwell recipe, using publicly available and quality controlled single- and multi-beam echo soundings where possible and filling the gaps in the oceans with estimates derived from marine gravity anomalies observed by satellite altimetry. The altimeter data have been reprocessed to reduce the noise level and improve the spatial resolution [see Sandwell and Smith, this meeting]. The echo soundings database has grown enormously with new infusions of data from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVO), the National Geospatial-intelligence Agency (NGA), hydrographic offices around the world volunteering through the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO), and many other agencies and academic sources worldwide. These new data contributions have filled many holes: 50% of ocean grid points are within 8 km of a sounding point, 75% are within 24 km, and 90% are within 57 km. However, in the remote ocean basins some gaps still remain: 5% of the ocean grid points are more than 85 km from the nearest sounding control, and 1% are more than 173 km away. Both versions of the grid include a companion grid of source file numbers, so that control points may be mapped and traced to sources. We have compared the new model to multi-beam data not used in the compilation and find that 50% of differences are less than 25 m, 95% of differences are less than 130 m, but a few large differences remain in areas of poor sounding control and large-amplitude gravity anomalies. Land values in the solution are taken from SRTM30v2, GTOPO30 and ICESAT data

  19. Coral community change on a turbid-zone reef complex: developing baseline records for the central Great Barrier Reef's nearshore coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie; Perry, Chris; Smithers, Scott; Morgan, Kyle; Johnson, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Understanding past coral community development and reef growth is crucial for placing contemporary ecological and environmental change within appropriate reef-building timescales. Coral reefs located within coastal inner-shelf zones are widely perceived to be most susceptible to declining water quality due to their proximity to modified river catchments. On the inner-shelf of Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) the impacts and magnitude of declining water quality since European settlement (c. 1850 A.D.) still remain unclear. This relates to ongoing debates concerning the significance of increased sediment yields against the naturally high background sedimentary regimes and the paucity of long-term (>decadal) ecological datasets. To provide baseline records for interpreting coral community change within the turbid inner-shelf waters of the GBR, 21 cores were recovered from five nearshore reefs spanning an evolutionary spectrum of reef development. Discrete intervals pre- and post-dating European settlement, but deposited at equivalent water depths, were identified by radiocarbon dating, enabling the discrimination of extrinsic and intrinsic driven shifts within the coral palaeo-record. We report no discernible evidence of anthropogenically-driven disturbance on the coral community records at these sites. Instead, significant transitions in coral community assemblages relating to water depth and vertical reef accretion were observed. We suggest that these records may be used to contextualise observed contemporary ecological change within similar environments on the GBR.

  20. Classification of regimes of internal solitary waves transformation over a shelf-slope topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terletska, Kateryna; Maderich, Vladimir; Talipova, Tatiana; Brovchenko, Igor; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2015-04-01

    depression may be converted to wave of elevation at the 'turning point' (h2 = h1) as they propagate from deep water onto a shallow shelf. Thus intersecting surfaces f1 and f2 divide three-dimensional diagram into four zones. Zone I located above two surfaces and corresponds to the non breaking regime. Zone II lies above 'breaking' surfaces but below the surface of changing polarity and corresponds to regime of changing polarity without breaking. Zone III lies above surface of changing polarity but below 'breaking' surfaces and corresponds to regime of wave breaking without changing polarity. Zone IV that located below two surfaces and corresponds to the regime of wave breaking with changing polarity. Regimes predicted by diagram agree with results of numerical modelling, laboratory and observation data. Based on the proposed diagram the regions in α, β, γ space with a high energy dissipation of ISW passed over the shelf-slope topography are distinguished. References Talipova T., Terletska K., Maderich V, Brovchenko I., Jung K.T., Pelinovsky E. and Grimshaw R. 2013. Internal solitary wave transformation over the bottom step: loss of energy. Phys. Fluids, 25, 032110 Vlasenko V., Hutter K. 2002. Numerical Experiments on the Breaking of Solitary Internal Waves over a Slope-Shelf Topography. J. Phys. Oceanogr., 32 (6), 1779-1793

  1. Distribution of soil testate amoeba assemblages along catenas in the northern taiga zone (Karelia, Russia)

    OpenAIRE

    Tsyganov, Andrey; Embulaeva, Elena; Mazei, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    Topography is one of the main factors, which regulate composition and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the relationships between topography and soil protozoa remain poorly understood. We studied the distribution of testate amoeba assemblages in soil biotopes located at various topographic positions along two topographical gradients (catenas) in a forest site in the north taiga zone (Karelia, Russia). The variation in testate amoeba assemblages was estimated using univariate ass...

  2. Tholeitic basalts and ophiolitic complexes of the Mesorif Zone (External Rif, Morocco) at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary and the importance of the Ouerrha Accident in the palaeogeographic and geodynamic evolution of the Rif Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzaggagh, M.

    2016-10-01

    The stratigraphical series around the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary of the External Rif Mountains, in particular those in the Mesorif Zone, exhibits many outcrops with volcanic materials spread westwards over 200 km. These materials show diverse aspects: basalt lithoclasts reworked into calcareous breccia beds or in marly matrix breccia, interstratified lava flows and volcanoclastic complexes incorporated within the Berriasian marls. In the Central Rif, several magmatic blocks outcrop, usually regarded as granite scales from the Paleozoic basement or as intrusive gabbros of Barremian age. Actually these magmatic massifs display typical ophiolitic sequences and they are overlaid by mega-olistoliths of Jurassic materials and locally by radiolarite layers. Geochemical analysis of several basalt and gabbro samples belonging to the Mesorif Zone evidenced that both display a typical E-MORB magma indicating at least partial oceanization of the Mesorif basement. Concerning geodynamics, the Mesorif Zone had undergone, at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary interval, two successive palaeogeographic phases: an uplift, close to emersion during the Kimmeridgian-Early Tithonian interval, stressed by important submarine volcanic activities and intense brecciation of the carbonate formations, followed by a general collapse at the Late Tithonian, underlined by lava flows, slumping as mega-olistoliths and the formation of an oceanic crust, at least in the Central Rif. These magmatic materials, distributed on both sides of the Ouerrha Valley, evidence that this westwards extending valley (the Nekor Accident), may correspond in the Central Rif, to two palaeo-subduction planes which become two major overlapping thrusts in the western part of the Rif Mountains. (Author)

  3. Individual IOL Surface Topography Analysis by the WaveMaster Reflex UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Kannengießer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In order to establish inspection routines for individual intraocular lenses (IOLs, their surfaces have to be measured separately. Currently available measurement devices lack this functionality. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new topography measurement device based on wavefront analysis for measuring individual regular and freeform IOL surfaces, the “WaveMaster Reflex UV” (Trioptics, Wedel, Germany. Methods. Measurements were performed on IOLs with increasingly complex surface geometries: spherical surfaces, surfaces modelled by higher-order Zernike terms, and freeform surfaces from biometrical patient data. Two independent parameters were measured: the sample’s radius of curvature (ROC and its residual (difference of sample topography and its best-fit sphere. We used a quantitative analysis method by calculating the residuals’ root-mean-square (RMS and peak-to-Valley (P2V values. Results. The sample’s best-fit ROC differences increased with the sample’s complexity. The sample’s differences of RMS values were 80 nm for spherical surfaces, 97 nm for higher-order samples, and 21 nm for freeform surfaces. Graphical representations of both measurement and design topographies were recorded and compared. Conclusion. The measurements of spherical surfaces expectedly resulted in better values than those of freeform surfaces. Overall, the wavefront analysing method proves to be an effective method for evaluating individual IOL surfaces.

  4. Quantum Loop Topography for Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2017-05-01

    Despite rapidly growing interest in harnessing machine learning in the study of quantum many-body systems, training neural networks to identify quantum phases is a nontrivial challenge. The key challenge is in efficiently extracting essential information from the many-body Hamiltonian or wave function and turning the information into an image that can be fed into a neural network. When targeting topological phases, this task becomes particularly challenging as topological phases are defined in terms of nonlocal properties. Here, we introduce quantum loop topography (QLT): a procedure of constructing a multidimensional image from the "sample" Hamiltonian or wave function by evaluating two-point operators that form loops at independent Monte Carlo steps. The loop configuration is guided by the characteristic response for defining the phase, which is Hall conductivity for the cases at hand. Feeding QLT to a fully connected neural network with a single hidden layer, we demonstrate that the architecture can be effectively trained to distinguish the Chern insulator and the fractional Chern insulator from trivial insulators with high fidelity. In addition to establishing the first case of obtaining a phase diagram with a topological quantum phase transition with machine learning, the perspective of bridging traditional condensed matter theory with machine learning will be broadly valuable.

  5. Scattering of high-frequency seismic waves caused by irregular surface topography and small-scale velocity inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi; Maeda, Takuto

    2015-04-01

    Based on 3-D finite difference method simulations of seismic wave propagation, we examined the processes by which the complex, scattered high-frequency (f > 1 Hz) seismic wavefield during crustal earthquakes is developed due to heterogeneous structure, which includes small-scale velocity inhomogeneity in subsurface structure and irregular surface topography on the surface, and compared with observations from dense seismic networks in southwestern Japan. The simulations showed the process by which seismic wave scattering in the heterogeneous structure develops long-duration coda waves and distorts the P-wave polarization and apparent S-wave radiation pattern. The simulations revealed that scattering due to irregular topography is significant only near the station and thus the topographic scattering effects do not accumulate as seismic waves propagate over long distances. On the other hand, scattering due to velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure distorts the seismic wavefield gradually as seismic waves propagate. The composite model, including both irregular topography and velocity inhomogeneity, showed the combined effects. Furthermore, by introducing irregular topography, the effects of seismic wave scattering on both body and coda waves were stronger than in the model with velocity inhomogeneity alone. Therefore, to model the high-frequency seismic wavefield, both topography and velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure should be taken into account in the simulation model. By comparing observations with the simulations including topography, we determined that the most preferable small-scale velocity heterogeneity model for southwestern Japan is characterized by the von Kármán power spectral density function with correlation distance a = 5 km, rms value of fluctuation ɛ = 0.07 and decay order κ = 0.5. We also demonstrated that the relative contribution of scattering due to the topography of southwestern Japan is approximately 12 per cent.

  6. The low-grade Canal de las Montañas Shear Zone and its role in the tectonic emplacement of the Sarmiento Ophiolitic Complex and Late Cretaceous Patagonian Andes orogeny, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, M.; Fosdick, J. C.; Warren, C.; Massonne, H.-J.; Fanning, C. M.; Cury, L. Fadel; Schwanethal, J.; Fonseca, P. E.; Galaz, G.; Gaytán, D.; Hervé, F.

    2012-02-01

    The Canal de las Montañas Shear Zone (CMSZ), southern Patagonian Andes (51-52°S), is a low-grade mylonite belt generated from felsic ignimbritic, pelitic and basaltic protoliths of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Rocas Verdes basin. The different types of rock fabrics across the CMSZ are thought to be associated with relatively intermediate and high strain conditions, characterized by the development of a narrow western belt of S-Ć-type mylonites and phyllonites interpreted as the metamorphic sole thrust of the Sarmiento Ophiolitic Complex. Highly strained rocks of the CMSZ display a reverse, continent-ward tectonic transport, with a minor dextral component of shearing. Transitional pumpellyite-actinolite and upper greenschist facies metamorphic conditions at ca. 5-6 kbar and 230-260 °C indicate that the primary shearing event occurred in a subduction zone setting. In-situ 40Ar/39Ar laserprobe chronology yielded ages of ca. 85 Ma on syntectonic phengite which are interpreted as representing cooling synchronous with mica crystallization during the main compressive deformational event. The 78-81 Ma U-Pb zircon crystallization ages of cross-cutting plutonic and hypabyssal rocks and 40Ar/39Ar amphibole age of ca.79 Ma from lamprophyric dikes within the fold-thrust belt constrain an upper age limit of the ophiolite tectonic emplacement deformation.

  7. The RP105/MD-1 complex is indispensable for TLR4/MD-2-dependent proliferation and IgM-secreting plasma cell differentiation of marginal zone B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoshinori; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Kariyone, Ai; Ohta, Shoichiro; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Kimoto, Masao; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells mount rapid T-cell-independent (T-I) immune responses against microbial components such as LPS. While Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is essential for LPS responses, MZ B cells uniquely express high levels of another LPS sensor Radioprotective 105 (RP105). However, little is known about how RP105 is used by MZ B cells. In this study, we investigated TLR4- or RP105-dependent MZ B cell responses by utilizing agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to each receptor. Cross-linking TLR4 and RP105 at the same time with the mAbs induced robust IgM-secreting plasma cell generation as lipid A moiety of LPS. In contrast, stimulation with either mAb alone did not elicit such responses. RP105-deficient MZ B cells failed to produce IgM-secreting plasma cells in response to lipid A. TLR4 or lipid A stimulation of MZ B cells up-regulated their B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) and X-box-binding protein 1 (Xbp-1) mRNA expression. RP105 stimulation alone did not give these responses and in fact decreased TLR4-mediated their expression. Compared with wild-type (WT) MZ B cells, RP105-deficient MZ B cells exhibited increased levels of Blimp-1 and Xbp-1 mRNA expression in response to lipid A. Lipid A or TLR4 plus RP105 stimulation induced massive proliferation and expression of Bcl-xL and c-Myc in WT but not RP105-deficient MZ B cells. These responses contributed to TLR4-mediated anti-apoptotic responses in MZ B cells. Thus, RP105 contributes in a unique way to the TLR4-dependent survival, proliferation and plasma cell generation of MZ B cells.

  8. Condition of forest ecosystems in the zone of aerial emissions’ impact of the Norilsk mining and metallurgical industrial complex. First communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ziganshin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the study, based on the analysis of literary sources and the own research materials, the characteristic of the environmental situation in Taimyr is done, in connection with aerial technogenic impact of the Norilsk mining and metallurgical industrial complex. The dynamics of forest condition over the past decade in the area close to 200 km or more from the plant were evaluated. The analysis was performed taking into account the landscape structure of the territory. The progressive drying of the large areas of the northern forests since the early 80 is registered. In the article, according to the literature reviewed, the structure, dynamics and distribution of air industrial emissions of the Norilsk mining and metallurgical industrial complex «Norilsk Nickel» is analyzed and presented. Further, the authors considered the impact of air industrial emissions of Norilsk industrial region on the forest ecosystems of Taimyr. The focus is on the main forest-forming tree – Siberian larch Larix sibirica Ledeb. It is noted the complete absence of the larch undergrowth in the area of industrial pollution. Investigation of the technogenically damaged forests was carried out on the basis of dendrochronological research at six different points on different distances from the city of Norilsk, mainly to the south and east of the metallurgical plant. One study point (sparse larch community is located 5 km north-west of Norilsk. We investigated stands of varying degrees of damage, including completely dead. It is shown, that outside the area of Norilsk mining and metallurgical industrial complex impact there were no signs of damage to the foliage of the trees and on the contrary, in the area of air pollution (Khantaiskoe Lake, forest stands are largely affected. The main damaging agent is sulfur dioxide.

  9. How Surface Ice and Topography Affects the Atmospheric Circulation on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Michaels, T. I.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a new general circulation model (GCM) for Pluto in order to investigate how the heterogeneous distribution of nitrogen surface ice and large-scale topography affects Pluto's atmospheric circulation. Our Pluto GCM is built on the GFDL Flexible Modeling System finite volume dynamical core. The GCM physics routines include a gray model radiative-conductive scheme, a subsurface conduction scheme, and a nitrogen volatile cycle. The radiative-conductive scheme accounts for the CH4 and CO absorption bands at 2.3, 3.3, and 7.8 microns, including non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. The nitrogen volatile cycle assumes vapor pressure equilibrium between the atmosphere and the surface. Images from the New Horizon mission to Pluto showed an extremely complex, heterogeneous distribution of surface ice, some of which was draped over substantial and variable topography. To produce such a complicated ice distribution, the atmospheric dynamics and the volatile transport must be more complex than expected prior to the New Horizons fly-by of Pluto. We use simulations where topography and surface ice distributions were added individually and in various combinations to individually quantify the contribution of topography, volatile cycle, and surface ice distributions to Pluto's atmospheric circulation. We show that even regional patches of ice or large craters can have global impacts on the atmospheric circulation, the volatile cycle, and the distribution of surface ice. As well, we demonstrate that explaining the expression of Pluto's volatile cycle on the surface ice distribution requires the consideration of atmospheric processes beyond the simple vapor pressure equilibrium arguments.

  10. Holocene surface-faulting earthquakes at the Spring Lake and North Creek Sites on the Wasatch Fault Zone: Evidence for complex rupture of the Nephi Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duross, Christopher; Hylland, Michael D; Hiscock, Adam; Personius, Stephen; Briggs, Richard; Gold, Ryan D.; Beukelman, Gregg; McDonald, Geg N; Erickson, Ben; McKean, Adam; Angster, Steve; King, Roselyn; Crone, Anthony J.; Mahan, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    The Nephi segment of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) comprises two fault strands, the northern and southern strands, which have evidence of recurrent late Holocene surface-faulting earthquakes. We excavated paleoseismic trenches across these strands to refine and expand their Holocene earthquake chronologies; improve estimates of earthquake recurrence, displacement, and fault slip rate; and assess whether the strands rupture separately or synchronously in large earthquakes. Paleoseismic data from the Spring Lake site expand the Holocene record of earthquakes on the northern strand: at least five to seven earthquakes ruptured the Spring Lake site at 0.9 ± 0.2 ka (2σ), 2.9 ± 0.7 ka, 4.0 ± 0.5 ka, 4.8 ± 0.8 ka, 5.7 ± 0.8 ka, 6.6 ± 0.7 ka, and 13.1 ± 4.0 ka, yielding a Holocene mean recurrence of ~1.2–1.5 kyr and vertical slip rate of ~0.5–0.8 mm/yr. Paleoseismic data from the North Creek site help refine the Holocene earthquake chronology for the southern strand: at least five earthquakes ruptured the North Creek site at 0.2 ± 0.1 ka (2σ), 1.2 ± 0.1 ka, 2.6 ± 0.9 ka, 4.0 ± 0.1 ka, and 4.7 ± 0.7 ka, yielding a mean recurrence of 1.1–1.3 kyr and vertical slip rate of ~1.9–2.0 mm/yr. We compare these Spring Lake and North Creek data with previous paleoseismic data for the Nephi segment and report late Holocene mean recurrence intervals of ~1.0–1.2 kyr for the northern strand and ~1.1–1.3 kyr for the southern strand. The northern and southern strands have similar late Holocene earthquake histories, which allow for models of both independent and synchronous rupture. However, considering the earthquake timing probabilities and per-event vertical displacements, we have the greatest confidence in the simultaneous rupture of the strands, including rupture of one strand with spillover rupture to the other. Ultimately, our results improve the surface-faulting earthquake history of the Nephi segment and enhance our understanding of how structural barriers

  11. Topography and vegetation alter soil nitrogen availability and loss in tropical and temperate ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    A dominant paradigm in ecosystem ecology holds that nitrogen (N) cycles as an excess nutrient in old tropical landscapes but is a scarce, limiting resource in young, temperate ecosystems. However, recent work suggests that both biotic and abiotic state factors can promote unexpected patterns of N cycling across complex landscapes. Here, I present two case studies demonstrating how topography and vegetation shape patterns of N cycling and loss in heterogeneous terrain. In a geomorphically dynamic, high-diversity tropical rainforest, flat ridge tops display open N cycling, yet eroding hillslopes are surprisingly N-poor with multiple indicators implying conservative N cycling. Soil mineralogy indicates slope soils are less developed than adjacent flat ridge counterparts, and the accumulation of cosmogenic 10Be in surface soil suggests residence times are only half as long. Together, these observations suggest erosion resets soil development, with constant N-removal promoting tight N-cycling. Further, soil δ15N is negatively correlated with slope angle across the landscape, and mass balance modeling supports an increasing role for erosive N loss in steep regions. In a temperate montane landscape with lower physical erosion rates, vegetation interacts with hydro-topographic position to mediate local N dynamics. Upslope, forests display conservative N-cycling, yet in adjacent herbaceous areas, multiple indicators point toward an open N cycle. Downslope, both vegetation types show an increase in N-richness. In downslope forests, this is confined to the near-surface, stemming from higher foliar N content due to lateral N transport and uptake. In herbaceous sites, deeper vadose-zone N transport occurs but with no change in foliar N, implying differences in the degree of N limitation between vegetation types. In this landscape, soil nitrate leaching rates track N availability, though δ15N-NO3- does not suggest a similar pattern for gaseous losses, instead reflecting

  12. High-resolution topography using SfM-photogrammetry from UAV for coastal mudflat geomorphic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Jules; Brunier, Guillaume; Michaud, Emma; Anthony, Edward; Morvan, Sylvain; Dussouillez, Philippe; Gardel, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    The coast between the Amazon and the Orinoco river mouths comprises mud banks formed from the large muddy discharge of the Amazon and migrating westward under the influence of waves and currents. These banks are highly dynamic and strongly affected by complex hydro-bio-geochemical interactions that are also important in mangrove colonization of bare mudflats in the upper intertidal zone of these banks. The surface topography of these mud banks is further affected by physical and biological processes such as tidal channel incision and bioturbation. Surveying the morphology of these mudflats over large areas and at a high-resolution without perturbing their surface is a real challenge that cannot be accomplished using classical survey methods such as RTK-GPS or Total Stations. To overcome this hurdle, we conducted a SfM(Surface from Motion)-photogrammetry experiment over 1 ha of a large intertidal mudflat colonized by pioneer mangroves at the mouth of the Sinnamary estuary in French Guiana. We developed a topographic data acquisition system based on sub-vertical aerial photography from a UAV flying at low altitude (15 m), in order to produce images at 3 mm resolution. A light DJI F550 drone was used, with an automatic flight programming using GPS navigation and a flight plan designed on photogrammetric criteria. The payload was a lightweight (250 grams) Ricoh GR camera with an APS-C sensor of 16.2 Megapixel and including an intervalometer triggering function. The drone had a flight autonomy of 12 minutes thus covering entirely the surrounding mudflat platform. The landing procedure was conducted manually in order for the drone to land safely on a very narrow artificial ground base set up for our experiment. 3D-models and derived products were generated using Agisoft Photoscan Professionnal software. We produced a gridded Digital Surface Model (DSM) and an orthophoto in visible bands at 1 cm and 5mm pixel resolution respectively. The vertical accuracy of the DSM based

  13. Relationship between high-frequency sediment-level oscillations in the swash zone and inner surf zone wave characteristics under calm wave conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Swash zone topography rapidly responds to the surf zone waves. Understanding how sandy beaches respond to wave action is critical for beach erosion research, and plays a critical role in the design and maintenance of shore protection structures. The main objectives of this study were to detect the relationship between high-frequency beachface oscillations and surf zone wave characteristics under plunging breakers by using Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA. The study site is located in Houjiangwan Bay, eastern Guangdong. Topography data were sampled at 6 min intervals. The wave characteristic parameters were calculated by spectrum method. During the field work, the beach showed a reflective state and plunging breakers controlled the surf zone. The beach cusp topography was destructed gradually. The analysis provides 4 canonical correlation processes between the beachface variations and surf zone waves, which explained 95.28% of the overall variation in the data. The result shows wave steepness, the irregularity factor and spectral broadness factor had strong impacts on the topography. The wave steepness was the most important factor for beach profile variations. The results of the present study indicate that data-driven statistical analysis, such as CCA, is useful for analyzing profile response to waves if there is strong correlation between the two variables (beach profiles and wave.

  14. Development of a 3D Coupled Physical-Biogeochemical Model for the Marseille Coastal Area (NW Mediterranean Sea): What Complexity Is Required in the Coastal Zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraysse, Marion; Pinazo, Christel; Faure, Vincent Martin; Fuchs, Rosalie; Lazzari, Paolo; Raimbault, Patrick; Pairaud, Ivane

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic) from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P) cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007–2011). The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model. PMID:24324589

  15. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Gaete

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells.

  16. Global dynamic topography: geoscience communities requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewez, T.; Costeraste, J.

    2012-04-01

    The advent of free-of-charge global topographic data sets SRTM and Aster GDEM have enabled testing a host of geoscience hypotheses. This is because they first revealed the relief of previously unavailable earth landscapes, enabled quantitative geomorphometric analyses across entire landscapes and improved the resolution of measurements. Availability of such data is now considered standard, and though resolved at 30-m to 90-m pixel, which is amazing seeing where we come from, they are now regarded as mostly obsolete given the sub-meter imagery coming through web services like Google Earth. Geoscientists now appear to desire two additional features: field-scale-compatible elevation datasets (i.e. meter-scale digital models and sub-meter elevation precision) and dispose of regularly updated topography to retrieve earth surface changes, while retaining the key for success: data availability at no charge. A new satellite instrument is currently under phase 0 study at CNES, the French space agency, to fulfil these aims. The scientific community backing this demand is that of natural hazards, glaciology and to a lesser extent the biomass community. The system under study combines a native stereo imager and a lidar profiler. This combination provides spatially resolved elevation swaths together with absolute along-track elevation control point profiles. Data generated through this system, designed for revisit time better than a year, is intended to produce not only single acquisition digital surface models, colour orthoimages and small footprint full-wave-form lidar profiles to update existing topographic coverages, but also time series of them. This enables 3D change detection with centimetre-scale planimetric precision and metric vertical precision, in complement of classical spectral change appoaches. The purpose of this contribution, on behalf of the science team, is to present the mission concepts and philosophy and the scientific needs for such instrument including

  17. Rossby waves with linear topography in barotropic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Rossby waves are the most important waves in the atmosphere and ocean, and are parts of a large-scale system in fluid. The theory and observation show that, they satisfy quasi-geostrophic and quasi-static equilibrium approximations. In this paper, solitary Rossby waves induced by linear topography in barotropic fluids with a shear flow are studied. In order to simplify the problem, the topography is taken as a linear function of latitude variable y, then employing a weakly nonlinear method and a perturbation method, a KdV (Korteweg-de Vries) equation describing evolution of the amplitude of solitary Rossby waves induced by linear topography is derived. The results show that the variation of linear topography can induce the solitary Rossby waves in barotropic fluids with a shear flow, and extend the classical geophysical theory of fluid dynamics.

  18. Coastal Topography—Anegada, British Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A seamless (bare earth and submerged) topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Anegada, British Virgin Islands, was...

  19. Surface topography evolvement of galvanized steels in sheet metal forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Ying-ke; YU Zhong-qi; ZHANG Wei-gang; JIANG Hao-min; LIN Zhong-qin

    2009-01-01

    U-channel forming tests were performed to investigate the surface topography evolvement of hot-dip galvanized(GI) and galvannealed(GA) steels and the effects of die hardness on sheet metal forming(SMF). Experimental results indicate that the surface roughness values of the two galvanized steels increase with the number of forming, i.e., the surface topographies of galvanized steels are roughened in SMF. Moreover, GI steel has a better ability of damage-resistance than GA steel. The mechanisms of topography evolvement are different in the forming of GI and GA steels. Scratch is the main form of surface damage in the forming of GI steels. The severity of scratch can be decreased by increasing die hardness. GA steel results in exfoliating of the coating firstly and then severe scratching. The surface topography of galvannealed steels can be improved by increasing die hardness. However, the hardness should not be too high.

  20. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J; Montgomery, David R

    2015-08-14

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 10(4) years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain.

  1. Engineering microscale topographies to control the cell–substrate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhah, Mehdi; Edalat, Faramarz; Manoucheri, Sam; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Cells in their in vivo microenvironment constantly encounter and respond to a multitude of signals. While the role of biochemical signals has long been appreciated, the importance of biophysical signals has only recently been investigated. Biophysical cues are presented in different forms including topography and mechanical stiffness imparted by the extracellular matrix and adjoining cells. Microfabrication technologies have allowed for the generation of biomaterials with microscale topographies to study the effect of biophysical cues on cellular function at the cell–substrate interface. Topographies of different geometries and with varying microscale dimensions have been used to better understand cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation at the cellular and sub-cellular scales. Furthermore, quantification of cell-generated forces has been illustrated with micropillar topographies to shed light on the process of mechanotransduction. In this review, we highlight recent advances made in these areas and how they have been utilized for neural, cardiac, and musculoskeletal tissue engineering application. PMID:22521491

  2. EAARL Submerged Topography-U.S. Virgin Islands 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of the U.S. Virgin Islands was produced from remotely sensed,...

  3. EAARL Submerged Topography-U.S. Virgin Islands 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of the U.S. Virgin Islands was produced from remotely sensed,...

  4. Application of SAR Imagery in Submarine Topography Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁川; 梁开龙; 桂力民

    2004-01-01

    An important research area in oceanographic surveying and mapping is to obtain submarine topography by remote sensing technique, especially by SAR imagery. In this article, problems related to SAR imagery are analyzed to provide references for the further research.

  5. Influence of Parent Material and Topography on some Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of Parent Material and Topography on some Soil Properties in Southwestern Nigeria. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... on soils formed on banded gneiss and quartzite schist parent materials.

  6. Coastal Topography—Anegada, British Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A seamless (bare earth and submerged) topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Anegada, British Virgin Islands, was...

  7. Geoid height versus topography for oceanic plateaus and swells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.; Mackenzie, Kevin R.

    1989-01-01

    Gridded geoid height data (Marsh et al.l, 1986) and gridded bathymetry data (Van Wykhouse, 1973) are used to estimate the average compensation depths of 53 oceanic swells and plateaus. The relationship between geoid height and topography is examined using Airy and thermal compensation models. It is shown that geoid height is linearly related to topography between wavelengths of 400 and 4000 m as predicted by isostatic compensation models. The geoid/topography ratio is dependent on the average depth of compensation. The intermediate geoid/topography ratios of most thermal swells are interpreted as a linear combination of the decaying thermal swell signature and that of the persisting Airy-compensated volcanic edifice.

  8. Mapping Indigenous Settlement Topography in the Caribbean Using Drones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sonnemann, Till; Ulloa Hung, Jorge; Hofman, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    ...; predominantly conglomerations of shells, ceramics and lithics. While archaeological material may not always be visible on the surface, particular settlement patterns may be identifiable by a topography created through cultural action...

  9. Contrast Reversal of Topography Artifacts in a Transmission SNOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi; WANG Shu-Feng; ZHANG Jia-Sen; GONG Qi-Huang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate the contrast reversal behaviour of topography artifacts by changing the diameter of the collection diaphragm in a transmission scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). This originates from the change of the approach curves. Such contrast reversal phenomenon is used to distinguish the artifact signal from the true optical signal of the SNOM image. We also show that continuously changing the diaphragm to a proper diameter can greatly reduce topography artifacts.

  10. 3D surface topography formation in ultra-precision turning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽伟; 董申; 程凯

    2004-01-01

    The generation process of 3 D surface topography in ultra-precision turning is analyzed, as the result of superimposing between actual roughness surface, waviness surface and geometrical form texture surface. From the viewpoints of machine technical system and manufacturing process, factors influencing on roughness surface,waviness surface and geometrical form texture surface in ultra-precision turning are discussed further. The 3D topography of ideal roughness surface and actual surface affected by cutting vibration are simulated respectively.

  11. Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, B. H.; Clayton, R. W.; Richards, M. A.; Comer, R. P.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Density contrasts in the lower mantle, recently imaged using seismic tomography, drive convective flow which results in kilometers of dynamically maintained topography at the core-mantle boundary and at the earth's surface. The total gravity field due to interior density constrasts and boundary topography predicts the largest wavelength components of the geoid remarkably well. Neglecting dynamic surface deformation leads to geoid anomalies of opposite sign than are observed.

  12. Topography-modified refraction (TMR): adjustment of treated cylinder amount and axis to the topography versus standard clinical refraction in myopic topography-guided LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and contralateral eye comparison of topography-guided myopic LASIK with two different refraction treatment strategies. Private clinical ophthalmology practice. A total of 100 eyes (50 patients) in consecutive cases of myopic topography-guided LASIK procedures with the same refractive platform (FS200 femtosecond and EX500 excimer lasers) were randomized for treatment as follows: one eye with the standard clinical refraction (group A) and the contralateral eye with the topographic astigmatic power and axis (topography-modified treatment refraction; group B). All cases were evaluated pre- and post-operatively for the following parameters: refractive error, best corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), topography (Placido-disk based) and tomography (Scheimpflug-image based), wavefront analysis, pupillometry, and contrast sensitivity. Follow-up visits were conducted for at least 12 months. Mean refractive error was -5.5 D of myopia and -1.75 D of astigmatism. In group A versus group B, respectively, the average UDVA improved from 20/200 to 20/20 versus 20/16; post-operative CDVA was 20/20 and 20/13.5; 1 line of vision gained was 27.8% and 55.6%; and 2 lines of vision gained was 5.6% and 11.1%. In group A, 27.8% of eyes had over -0.50 diopters of residual refractive astigmatism, in comparison to 11.7% in group B (Prefractive astigmatism of more than -0.5 diopters. Topography-modified refraction (TMR): topographic adjustment of the amount and axis of astigmatism treated, when different from the clinical refraction, may offer superior outcomes in topography-guided myopic LASIK. These findings may change the current clinical paradigm of the optimal subjective refraction utilized in laser vision correction.

  13. ATM Coastal Topography--Louisiana, 2001: UTM Zone 16 (Part 2 of 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface elevation map was produced cooperatively from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  14. ATM Coastal Topography--Louisiana, 2001: UTM Zone 15 (Part 1 of 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface elevation map was produced cooperatively from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  15. ATM Coastal Topography--Louisiana, 2001: UTM Zone 16 (Part 2 of 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface elevation map was produced cooperatively from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  16. ATM Coastal Topography--Louisiana, 2001: UTM Zone 15 (Part 1 of 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface elevation map was produced cooperatively from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  17. Cognitive “Boy stories”: urban folklore and urban topographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The culturally cognitive perception of Belgrade’s topographies is considered through its deployment, symbolic use and narrative foundation. As the explanatory material-one football-media incident, the use of certain areas of the city in a spectacleceremonial manner, knowledge and lore of certain elements of the Belgrade topographies and the organization of «the football Belgrade»-were considered. The attitude is taken that the topography of a city is a multifaceted cultural constituent, whose structure of particular meaning, as a part of cultural communication, is determined by the very fact it is an urban space. Physical aspects of spatial-ness are reduced to relationism, i.e. it has a meaning for the cultural communication only when the elements of urban topographies are brought into correlation. Other characteristics of physical spatial-ness are irrelevant for such communication. Meaning relations in which elements of urban topographies exist are formed on the very fact of them being urban, that is, the afore mentioned denotation that is ascribed to space, stems from those cultural features and artifacts that are associated in a given milieu with certain concrete elements of urban topographies.

  18. Analyses de la dégradation du lac Kinkony pour la conservation du Complexe des Zones Humides Mahavavy-Kinkony, Région Boeny, Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rado Andriamasimanana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mahavavy-Kinkony wetland complex is an ecologically diverse and economically critical habitat assemblage. Despite recently receiving national protection, the ecological integrity of Lake Kinkony is threatened by the conversion of adjacent, unprotected lands into rice paddies. Conversion to aqua-cultural lands eliminates reed beds which provide favoured habitat for numerous endemic and endangered avian, fish and reptilian species, including Amaurornis olivieri, Paretroplus dambabe, P. kieneri and Erymnochelys madagascariensis. This research identified the physio-chemical sources and extent of degradation and evaluated the associated impacts on endangered wildlife. Employing digital environmental data within a Geographic Information System, the historical extent of reed habitat (circa 1949 was compared to distribution identified through fieldwork in 2008, indicating an areal loss of 80%. Results indicate the primary contributor to reed loss was increased turbidity associated with erosion. The continuing decrease in marsh habitat facilitated by an increase in erosion poses significant threats to already endangered wildlife. However, while the reduction in marsh area was shown to reduce habitat availability for Amaurornis olivieri, observations imply this species does not occupy all potential reed habitats and that territorial preferences and tolerance towards turbidity need to be understood to accurately determine the magnitude of threat. Despite the need for continued research, information representing agents of change and their associated ramifications on fauna is essential for developing regional conservation and natural resource management strategies. In particular, anti-erosion management of the most vulnerable water catchment areas and restoration activities within the most severely degraded marshes are prescribed.

  19. 3D DC Resistivity Inversion with Topography Based on Regularized Conjugate Gradient Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-ke Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, we observed a strong interest in 3D DC resistivity inversion and imaging with complex topography. In this paper, we implemented 3D DC resistivity inversion based on regularized conjugate gradient method with FEM. The Fréchet derivative is assembled with the electric potential in order to speed up the inversion process based on the reciprocity theorem. In this study, we also analyzed the sensitivity of the electric potential on the earth’s surface to the conductivity in each cell underground and introduced an optimized weighting function to produce new sensitivity matrix. The synthetic model study shows that this optimized weighting function is helpful to improve the resolution of deep anomaly. By incorporating topography into inversion, the artificial anomaly which is actually caused by topography can be eliminated. As a result, this algorithm potentially can be applied to process the DC resistivity data collected in mountain area. Our synthetic model study also shows that the convergence and computation speed are very stable and fast.

  20. Datum Level and NMO Corrections to Shallow Seismic Reflection Data on Rugged Topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jiangping; Xia Jianghai; Chen Chao; Zhang Suxin

    2003-01-01

    The application of the seismic reflection method is often limited in complex terrain areas.The problem is the incorrect correction of time-shift caused by topography. To apply normal moveout (NMO) correction to reflection data correctly, static corrections are necessary to be applied in advance for the compensation of the time distortions of topography and the time-delays from near-surface weathered layers. For environment and engineering investigation, weathered layers are our targets so that the static correction mainly serves the adjustment of time-shift due to an undulating surface. In practice,seismic reflected raypaths are assumed to be almost vertical through the near-surface layers because they have much lower velocities than layers below. This assumption is typically acceptable in most cases since it results in little residual error for small elevation changes and small offsets in reflection events. Although static algorithms based on choosing a floating datum related to common midpoint gathers or residual surface-consistent functions are available and effective, errors caused by the assumption of vertical raypaths often generate pseudo indications of structures. This paper presents the comparison of applying corrections based on the vertical raypaths and bias (non-vertical) raypaths. It also provides an approach of combining elevation and NMO corrections. The advantages of the approach are demonstrated by a synthetic example of multi-coverage seismic reflection surveys on rough topography.

  1. Effects of topography on simulated net primary productivity at landscape scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X F; Chen, J M; An, S Q; Ju, W M

    2007-11-01

    Local topography significantly affects spatial variations of climatic variables and soil water movement in complex terrain. Therefore, the distribution and productivity of ecosystems are closely linked to topography. Using a coupled terrestrial carbon and hydrological model (BEPS-TerrainLab model), the topographic effects on the net primary productivity (NPP) are analyzed through four modelling experiments for a 5700 km(2) area in Baohe River basin, Shaanxi Province, northwest of China. The model was able to capture 81% of the variability in NPP estimated from tree rings, with a mean relative error of 3.1%. The average NPP in 2003 for the study area was 741 gCm(-2)yr(-1) from a model run including topographic effects on the distributions of climate variables and lateral flow of ground water. Topography has considerable effect on NPP, which peaks near 1350 m above the sea level. An elevation increase of 100 m above this level reduces the average annual NPP by about 25 gCm(-2). The terrain aspect gives rise to a NPP change of 5% for forests located below 1900 m as a result of its influence on incident solar radiation. For the whole study area, a simulation totally excluding topographic effects on the distributions of climatic variables and ground water movement overestimated the average NPP by 5%.

  2. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK Signalling Influence Osteoblast Adhesion, Differentiation and Mineralization on Titanium Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, Paul D. H.; Elliott, Christopher G.; Hutter, Jeff; Hamilton, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK)). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated) and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched) topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23505566

  3. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK signalling influence osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on titanium topographies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D H Prowse

    Full Text Available Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications.

  4. 3D time-domain airborne EM forward modeling with topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe; Cai, Jing

    2016-11-01

    The time-domain finite-difference method has been widely used in simulation of the electromagnetic field diffusion. However, this method is severely restricted by the mesh size and time step. To overcome the defect, we adopted edge finite-element method for unstructured grid with Backward Euler method to conduct 3D airborne electromagnetic forward modeling directly in time-domain. The tetrahedral meshes provide the flexibility required for representing the rugged topography and complex-shape anomalous bodies. We simulated the practical shape, size and attitude of transmitting source by directly setting the loop into the well-generated grids. The characteristic properties of vector basic functions guarantee automatic satisfaction of divergence-free property of electric fields. The Galerkin's method is used to discretize the governing equations and a direct solver is adopted to solve the large sparse linear system. We adopted an algorithm with constant step in each time segment to speed up the forward modeling. Further we introduced the local mesh strategy to reduce the calculations, in which an optimized grid is designed for each sounding station. We check the accuracy of our 3D modeling results against the solution for a homogenous half-space and those for a buried vertical plate model using integral equation. The numerical experiments for a hill, a valley or undulating topography model with buried anomalous bodies were further studied that show that the topography has a serious effect on airborne EM data.

  5. Retinal ganglion cell topography in elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzano, A; Collin, S P

    2000-04-01

    Retinal wholemounts are used to examine the topographic distribution of retinal cells within the ganglion cell layer in a range of elasmobranchs from different depths. The retina is examined for regional specializations for acute vision in six species of selachians, Galeocerdo cuvieri, Hemiscyllium ocellatum, Scyliorhinus canicula, Galeus melastomus, Etmopterus spinax, Isistius brasiliensis, one species of batoid, Raja bigelowi and one species of chimaera, Hydrolagus mirabilis. These species represent a range of lifestyles including pelagic, mesopelagic and benthic habitats, living from shallow water to the sea bottom at a depth of more than 3000 m. The topography of cells within the ganglion cell layer is non-uniform and changes markedly across the retina. Most species possess an increased density of cells across the horizontal (dorsal) meridian or visual streak, with a density range of 500 to 2,500 cells per mm(2) with one or more regional increases in density lying within this specialized horizontal area. It is proposed that the higher spatial resolving power provided by the horizontal streak in these species mediates panoramic vision in the lower frontal visual field. Only I. brasiliensis possesses a concentric arrangement of retinal iso-density contours in temporal retina or an area centralis, thereby increasing spatial resolving power in a more specialized part of the visual field, an adaptation for its unusual feeding behavior. In Nissl-stained material, amacrine and ganglion cell populations could be distinguished on the criteria of soma size, soma shape and nuclear staining. Quantitative analyses show that the proportion of amacrine cells lying within the ganglion cell layer is non-uniform and ranges between 0.4 and 12.3% in specialized retinal areas and between 8.2 and 48.1% in the peripheral non-specialized regions. Analyses of soma area of the total population of cells in the ganglion cell layer also show that the pelagic species possess significantly

  6. Strong topographic sheltering effects lead to spatially complex treeline advance and increased forest density in a subtropical mountain region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Sarah; Chen, Jan-Chang; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Jump, Alistair S

    2014-12-01

    Altitudinal treelines are typically temperature limited such that increasing temperatures linked to global climate change are causing upslope shifts of treelines worldwide. While such elevational increases are readily predicted based on shifting isotherms, at the regional level the realized response is often much more complex, with topography and local environmental conditions playing an important modifying role. Here, we used repeated aerial photographs in combination with forest inventory data to investigate changes in treeline position in the Central Mountain Range of Taiwan over the last 60 years. A highly spatially variable upslope advance of treeline was identified in which topography is a major driver of both treeline form and advance. The changes in treeline position that we observed occurred alongside substantial increases in forest density, and lead to a large increase in overall forest area. These changes will have a significant impact on carbon stocking in the high altitude zone, while the concomitant decrease in alpine grassland area is likely to have negative implications for alpine species. The complex and spatially variable changes that we report highlight the necessity for considering local factors such as topography when attempting to predict species distributional responses to warming climate.

  7. Zoning Districts, Zoning, Published in 2002, Freelance.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2002. It is described as 'Zoning'. Data by this publisher are often...

  8. Integrated geophysical study to understand the architecture of the deep critical zone in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; Hynek, S. A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Terry, N.; Whiting, F.; Job, M. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Fletcher, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) in Puerto Rico is characterized by a complex system of heterogeneous fractures that participate in the formation of corestones, and influence the development of a regolith by the alteration of the bedrock at very rapid weathering rates. The spatial distribution of fractures, and its influence on regolith thickness is, however, currently not well understood. In this study, we used an array of near-surface geophysical methods, including ground penetrating radar, terrain conductivity, electrical resistivity imaging and induced polarization, OhmMapper, and shallow seismic, constrained with direct methods from previous studies. These methods were combined with stress modeling to better understand: 1) changes in regolith thickness; and 2) variation of the spatial distribution and density of fractures with topography and proximity to the knickpoint. Our observations show the potential of geophysical methods for imaging variability in regolith thickness, and agree with the result of a stress model showing increased dilation of fractures with proximity to the knickpoint.

  9. Synaptic vesicle proteins and active zone plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Kittel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone. The complex molecular architecture of active zones mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of active zones vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct active zone states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the active zone.The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1 and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and active zone states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  10. The role of topography and lateral velocity heterogeneities on near-source scattering and ground-motion variability

    KAUST Repository

    Imperatori, W.

    2015-07-28

    The scattering of seismic waves travelling in the Earth is not only caused by random velocity heterogeneity but also by surface topography. Both factors are known to strongly affect ground-motion complexity even at relatively short distance from the source. In this study, we simulate ground motion with a 3-D finite-difference wave propagation solver in the 0–5 Hz frequency band using three topography models representative of the Swiss alpine region and realistic heterogeneous media characterized by the Von Karman correlation functions. Subsequently, we analyse and quantify the characteristics of the scattered wavefield in the near-source region. Our study shows that both topography and velocity heterogeneity scattering may excite large coda waves of comparable relative amplitude, especially at around 1 Hz, although large variability in space may occur. Using the single scattering model, we estimate average QC values in the range 20–30 at 1 Hz, 36–54 at 1.5 Hz and 62–109 at 3 Hz for constant background velocity models with no intrinsic attenuation. In principle, envelopes of topography-scattered seismic waves can be qualitatively predicted by theoretical back-scattering models, while forward- or hybrid-scattering models better reproduce the effects of random velocity heterogeneity on the wavefield. This is because continuous multiple scattering caused by small-scale velocity perturbations leads to more gentle coda decay and envelope broadening, while topography abruptly scatters the wavefield once it impinges the free surface. The large impedance contrast also results in more efficient mode mixing. However, the introduction of realistic low-velocity layers near the free surface increases the complexity of ground motion dramatically and indicates that the role of topography in elastic waves scattering can be relevant especially in proximity of the source. Long-period surface waves can form most of the late coda, especially when intrinsic attenuation is taken

  11. The topography of the Iberian Peninsula from coupled geophysical-petrological inversion of multiple data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullea, Javier; Negredo, Ana; Charco, María; Palomeras, Imma; Villaseñor, Antonio; Afonso, Juan Carlos

    2017-04-01

    In this study we have performed a1D nonlinear Bayesian (probabilistic) inversion of a wide variety of data sets, extensively exploring the parameter space by means of a coupled geophysical-petrological inversion algorithm. The goal is to obtain a robust estimation of the thermal, compositional and density structure of the lithospheric/sublithospheric upper mantle system beneath the Iberian Peninsula, a crucial constraint to understand the complex geodynamic evolution in the study area. The most prominent feature in the modeled lithospheric structure is the progressive northward and northeastward steepening of the lithospheric-asthenospheric boundary (LAB) below the Ebro basin, reaching > 120 km under the central and western Pyrenees. Similarly, absolute maximum values of crustal thickness are obtained in the central Pyrenees, locally exceeding 45 km. Further to the west the Moho discontinuity shallows to about 35 km beneath the Cantabrian Cordillera. A dramatic decrease in both crustal and lithospheric thickness is observed from the central towards the easternmost Pyrenees, reaching depths of about 25 km and 90 km for the Moho and LAB respectively. Average Moho depth values of about 30 km are estimated in the central Iberian Peninsula. A slightly thicker crust is predicted under the Gibraltar arc than under the Betics, consistently with the deeper LAB beneath the former, most likely reflecting the presence of a sinking lithospheric slab. For the rest of the Iberian Peninsula a rather flat topography of LAB and Moho is observed, with moderate lithospheric thinning below the central western and SE Iberian margins. Isostatic topography related to variations in predicted crustal thickness shows local significant discrepancies form observed topography, thus indicating important regional contributions from dynamic and mantle source. The thermal and compositional fields in the lithospheric reveal the imprints of past and ongoing tectonic processes that have their

  12. A Review of Topography in Fish Culture in Nigeria Part Two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A. Bariweni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A review of topography in culture in Nigeria was reviewed to enable the fish culturists know the basic principles to design and build fishponds, reservoirs and small dams and use existing topographical maps. All physical features of fish farms depend directly on the site topography. The exact plan of the fish farm need be followed. Do this by ensuring the position to build each structure. Soil quality varies and depends on the topography of the area. Topographical method can be used for maps showing the different kinds of soil present in an area of land. In this part, integrated farming, using pumps, how to plan your fish farm considering its size and complexity, laying out ponds according to their use, laying out the access roads on your farm, laying out the canals on your farm , Level differences on your fish farm, If you are building a barrage pond, A pump might be necessary and living on your fish farm are considered. The topography measurements reviewed are height measurement, measurement of differences in height, methods for measurement of height differences, calculating differences in height, the line level, the flexible tube water level, the T bone level, the improved T - bone, the bamboo sighting level, the hand level, Contouring Mason’s level, The A - frame level, The a frame and plumb line level, contouring with non-sighting levels, contouring with sighting level and graded lines of slope to enable the fish culturists know these basic principles to design and build fishponds, reservoirs and small dams and use existing topographical maps.

  13. Relationship between crystallographic structure of the Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS complex inclusion and microstructure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in steel processed by oxide metallurgy route and impact toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Zhihui; Liu, Shilong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China); Wang, Xuemin, E-mail: wxm@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China); Shang, Chengjia [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials Research and Innovation, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A new method based on electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) is proposed to determine the structure of titanium oxide/MnS complex inclusion which induced the formation of intragranular acicular ferrite (IAF) in heat-affected zone (HAZ) in steel processed by oxide metallurgy route. It was found that the complex inclusion was Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS, the orientation relationship between Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MnS was also examined, and the crystallographic orientation relationship among IAF, Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS complex inclusion, austenite, bainite formed at lower temperature is researched systematically. It was observed that MnS precipitated on Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} at specific habit plane and direction and MnS had a specific orientation relationship ((0001) Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}//(111) MnS), <10–10> Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}//<110> MnS) with respect to Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Intragranular acicular ferrite (IAF) nucleated on MnS part of the Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS complex inclusion had no specific orientation relationship with MnS. IAF and the surrounding bainite had different Bain groups, so that there was an increase in high angle boundaries, which was beneficial for the toughness of HAZ. - Highlights: • The inclusion of TiO{sub x}/MnS that induced IAF formation is identified to be Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS. • The inclusion is identified based on electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). • MnS and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} had specific orientation relationship of Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS complex inclusion. • The IAFs formed on the same inclusion tend to be in one Bain group. • IAF and the surrounding bainite tend to be in different Bain groups.

  14. Crustal-scale recycling in caldera complexes and rift zones along the Yellowstone hotspot track: O and Hf isotopic evidence in diverse zircons from voluminous rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Dana L.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Fu, Bin; McCurry, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field (10.4–6.6 Ma) in eastern Idaho are preserved as thick ignimbrites and lavas along the margins of the Snake River Plain (SRP), and within a deep (>3 km) borehole near the central axis of the Yellowstone hotspot track. In this study we present new O and Hf isotope data and U–Pb geochronology for individual zircons, O isotope data for major phenocrysts (quartz, plagioclase, and pyroxene), whole rock Sr and Nd isotope ratios, and whole rock geochemistry for a suite of Picabo rhyolites. We synthesize our new datasets with published Ar–Ar geochronology to establish the eruptive framework of the Picabo volcanic field, and interpret its petrogenetic history in the context of other well-studied caldera complexes in the SRP. Caldera complex evolution at Picabo began with eruption of the 10.44±0.27 Ma (U–Pb) Tuff of Arbon Valley (TAV), a chemically zoned and normal-δ18O (δ18O magma=7.9‰) unit with high, zoned 87Sr/86Sri (0.71488–0.72520), and low-εNd(0) (−18) and εHf(0) (−28). The TAV and an associated post caldera lava flow possess the lowest εNd(0) (−23), indicating ∼40–60% derivation from the Archean upper crust. Normal-δ18O rhyolites were followed by a series of lower-δ18O eruptions with more typical (lower crustal) Sr–Nd–Hf isotope ratios and whole rock chemistry. The voluminous 8.25±0.26 Ma West Pocatello rhyolite has the lowest δ18O value (δ18Omelt=3.3‰), and we correlate it to a 1,000 m thick intracaldera tuff present in the INEL-1 borehole (with published zircon ages 8.04–8.35 Ma, and similarly low-δ18O zircon values). The significant (4–5‰) decrease in magmatic-δ18O values in Picabo rhyolites is accompanied by an increase in zircon δ18O heterogeneity from ∼1‰ variation in the TAV to >5‰ variation in the late-stage low-δ18O rhyolites, a trend similar to what is characteristic of Heise and Yellowstone, and which indicates remelting of variably hydrothermally altered tuffs

  15. Influence of climatic conditions, topography and soil attributes on the spatial distribution of site productivity index of the species rich forests of Jalisco, Mexico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adel Mohamed; Robin M. Reich; Raj Khosla; C. Aguirre-Bravo; Martin Mendoza Briseño

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach based on field data to model the spatial distribution of the site productivity index (SPI) of the diverse forest types in Jalisco, Mexico and the response in SPI to site and cli-matic conditions. A linear regression model was constructed to test the hypothesis that site and climate variables can be used to predict the SPI of the major forest types in Jalisco. SPI varied significantly with topog-raphy (elevation, aspect and slope), soil attributes (pH, sand and silt), climate (temperature and precipitation zones) and forest type. The most important variable in the model was forest type, which accounted for 35% of the variability in SPI. Temperature and precipitation accounted for 8 to 9% of the variability in SPI while the soil attributes accounted for less than 4% of the variability observed in SPI. No significant differences were detected between the observed and predicted SPI for the individual forest types. The linear regression model was used to develop maps of the spatial variability in predicted SPI for the individual forest types in the state. The spatial site productivity models developed in this study provides a basis for understanding the complex relationship that exists between forest productivity and site and climatic conditions in the state. Findings of this study will assist resource managers in making cost-effective decisions about the management of individual forest types in the state of Jalisco, Mexico.

  16. Meter-scale characterization of surface processes and fault-related deformation using LiDAR topography (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrowsmith, R.; Crosby, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake slip, fault zone geometric evolution, and geomorphic response to surface displacements from faulting are phenomena well manifest in topography at the meter scale. With laser ground return densities of multiple per square meter, LiDAR-derived topography provide a powerful tool to characterize features related to these processes at the appropriate scale. Many of the active faults in the western US, in particular the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system, have been scanned using LiDAR by community-oriented projects such as B4 and EarthScope. These data and many others (along with processed derivatives, dataset citation information, and educational and training materials) are available from the OpenTopography Facility (http://opentopography.org/). New meter-scale offsets along the SAF and other faults have been discovered and measured and known ones remeasured to provide a rich description of slip in the last few earthquakes. However, this method requires direct association of earthquake timing with measured (often cumulative) slip. Surface ruptures of recent earthquakes (Hector Mine, Denali, Sierra El Mayor) have been spectacularly documented by various research teams using LiDAR and other methods, and prepare us for future opportunities to directly measure post-event near field deformation with multi-temporal LiDAR surveys (the original motivator of the B4 project for the southern SAF and San Jacinto Fault). Cumulative ground deformation associated with repeated late Quaternary earthquakes produces the discontinuous fault zones well manifest in few km-wide swaths of LiDAR topography. Mapping these traces and associated landforms provides important ground rupture hazard information, locations of possible paleoseismic sites, and improved understanding of the structural geometry, mechanical behavior, and evolution of the shallow, velocity-strengthening portion of active fault zones. Fault-related deformation, in particular localized by geometric discontinuities

  17. Impact of wear and diet on molar row geometry and topography in the house mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Sabrina; Ledevin, Ronan

    2017-09-01

    Dental evolution affects the geometry of the tooth, but the adaptive relevance of these changes is related to tooth sharpness, complexity, and relief (topography). On a set of laboratory mice, we assessed how wear related to age and food consistency affected molar geometry and topography. Three groups of laboratory inbred mice (C57BL/6J strain) were considered: Four week old mice close to weaning, six month old mice fed on regular rodent pellets, and six month old mice fed on rodent pellets that were powdered and served as jelly. Their upper and lower molar rows were imaged in 3D. The geometry of the surfaces was quantified using a template describing the whole surface of the rows. Topographic indices were estimated on the same surfaces. The geometry of the molar rows was heavily affected by age-related wear. Food consistency affected mostly the upper molar row, which was more worn and less helical in soft food eaters. Tooth sharpness and relief decreased with age-related wear. Tooth relief was lower in soft food eaters, but only on the upper molar row. Tooth complexity was insensitive to wear. The primary factor affecting tooth geometry and topography is age-related wear, as wear erodes the molar surfaces. Tooth complexity, however, appears to be insensitive to wear, making this index relevant for comparison of tooth morphology among wild mice of unknown age. Soft food eaters displayed more worn teeth, with less helical molar row occlusal surface, possibly because behavior and jaw morphology were disturbed due to this unusual food resource. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Topography-modified refraction (TMR: adjustment of treated cylinder amount and axis to the topography versus standard clinical refraction in myopic topography-guided LASIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John Kanellopoulos1,2 1LaserVision Clinical and Research Institute, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Medical School, New York, NY, USA Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and contralateral eye comparison of topography-guided myopic LASIK with two different refraction treatment strategies. Setting: Private clinical ophthalmology practice. Patients and methods: A total of 100 eyes (50 patients in consecutive cases of myopic topography-guided LASIK procedures with the same refractive platform (FS200 femtosecond and EX500 excimer lasers were randomized for treatment as follows: one eye with the standard clinical refraction (group A and the contralateral eye with the topographic astigmatic power and axis (topography-modified treatment refraction; group B. All cases were evaluated pre- and post-operatively for the following parameters: refractive error, best corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, topography (Placido-disk based and tomography (Scheimpflug-image based, wavefront analysis, pupillometry, and contrast sensitivity. Follow-up visits were conducted for at least 12 months. Results: Mean refractive error was -5.5 D of myopia and -1.75 D of astigmatism. In group A versus group B, respectively, the average UDVA improved from 20/200 to 20/20 versus 20/16; post-operative CDVA was 20/20 and 20/13.5; 1 line of vision gained was 27.8% and 55.6%; and 2 lines of vision gained was 5.6% and 11.1%. In group A, 27.8% of eyes had over -0.50 diopters of residual refractive astigmatism, in comparison to 11.7% in group B (P<0.01. The residual percentages in both groups were measured with refractive astigmatism of more than –0.5 diopters. Conclusion: Topography-modified refraction (TMR: topographic adjustment of the amount and axis of astigmatism treated, when different from the clinical refraction, may offer superior outcomes in topography-guided myopic LASIK. These findings

  19. Avoiding errors attributable to topography in GPS-IR snow depth retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangcheng; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) interferometric reflectometry represents a potential source of new snow data for climate scientists and water managers with spatial and temporal sensitivity. Generally, the snow layer fluctuation is considered to be correlated with the ground surface fluctuation. The reflector heights in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are quite close to the vertical distance between the antenna and the ground or snow level at the corresponding Fresnel zone. The reflector heights at different zones were represented by a grid model in this work, which can reflect and overcome some of the problems caused by the topography. The proposed method for snow depth retrievals looks for good quality reflector height values of the horizontal reflecting zone in the grid model, and with this method improvements in snow depth retrieval accuracy were achieved (RMSE: 7.40 cm, Corr.: 0.99) compared to the PBO H2O group calculation results (RMSE: 16.58 cm, Corr.: 0.99).

  20. Refractive improvements and safety with topography-guided corneal crosslinking for keratoconus: 1-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Maria; Schiller, Maria; Fredriksson, Anneli; Behndig, Anders

    2017-07-01

    To assess the refractive improvements and the corneal endothelial safety of an individualised topography-guided regimen for corneal crosslinking in progressive keratoconus. An open-label prospective randomised clinical trial was performed at the Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. Thirty-seven patients (50 eyes) with progressive keratoconus planned for corneal crosslinking were included. The patients were randomised to topography-guided crosslinking (photorefractive intrastromal crosslinking (PiXL); n=25) or uniform 9 mm crosslinking (corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL); n=25). Visual acuity, refraction, keratometry (K1, K2 and Kmax) and corneal endothelial morphometry were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The PiXL treatment involved an asymmetrical treatment zone centred on the area of maximum corneal steepness with treatment energies ranging from 7.2 to 15.0 J/cm(2); the CXL treatment was a uniform 9 mm 5.4 J/cm(2) pulsed crosslinking. The main outcome measures were changes in refractive errors and corneal endothelial cell density. The spherical refractive errors decreased (pkeratoconus with decreased spherical refractive errors and improved visual acuity, without damage to the corneal endothelium. NCT02514200, Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Refraction traveltime tomography with irregular topography using the unwrapped phase inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-01-01

    Traveltime tomography has long served as a stable and efficient tool for velocity estimation, especially for the near surface. It, however, suffers from some of limitations associated with ray tracing and high-frequency traveltime in velocity inversion zones and ray shadow regions. We develop a tomographic approach based on traveltime solutions obtained by tracking the phase (instantaneous traveltime) of the wavefield solution of the Helmholtz wave equation. Since the instantaneous-traveltime does not suffer from phase wrapping, the inversion algorithm using the instantaneous-traveltime has the potential to generate robust inversion results. With a high damping factor, the instantaneous-traveltime inversion provides refraction tomography similar results, but from a single frequency. Despite the Helmholtz-based solver implementation, the tomographic inversion handles irrgular topography. The numerical examples show that our inversion algorithm generates a convergent smooth velocity model, which looks very much like a tomographic result. Next, we plan to apply the instantaneous-traveltime inversion algorithm to real seismic data acquired from the near surface with irregular topography.

  2. Geology, Bedrock - BEDROCK_TOPOGRAPHY_MM36_IN: Bedrock Topography Contours, Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:500,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Bedrock topography was converted from the original published map, Indiana Geological Survey Miscellaneous Map 36. The contours define the elevation/topography of the...

  3. Geology, Bedrock - BEDROCK_TOPOGRAPHY_MM36_IN: Bedrock Topography Contours, Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:500,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Bedrock topography was converted from the original published map, Indiana Geological Survey Miscellaneous Map 36. The contours define the elevation/topography of the...

  4. Effects of a hyperbaric environment on subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-top).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Reinhard; Horejsi, Renate; Tafeit, Erwin; Fraidl, Michaela; Dietmaier, Gabriele; Anegg, Udo; Klemen, Huberta; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    The physiological reactions of the body in scuba diving situation can be simulated in a pressure chamber by increasing the ambient pressure. In this study the influence of a hyperbaric environment of 6 bar on the changes of the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) thicknesses on different body sites in 68 voluntary men with undersea diving experience was investigated. Measurements of SAT-topography (SAT-Top) were performed with the optical device Lipometer before and after hyperbaric exposure. We observed a significant increase of the SAT-layers of the upper body zones, upper abdomen (+24.5%), lower abdomen (+21%) and front chest (+19%) after hyperbaric exposure. This increase of volume can be assumed to the nitrogen accumulation in fat cells at increased ambient pressures. In conclusion we describe for the first time in detail the influence of a hyperbaric environment on quantitative and topographic changes of SAT.

  5. Ductile-brittle deformation effects on crystal-chemistry and U-Pb ages of magmatic and metasomatic zircons from a dyke of the Finero Mafic Complex (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Antonio; Padrón-Navarta José, Alberto; Ji, Wei-Qiang; Zanetti, Alberto; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio; Tiepolo, Massimo; Giovanardi, Tommaso; Bonazzi, Mattia

    2017-07-01

    A detailed microstructural, geochemical and geochronological study was performed on zircon grains from plagioclase-rich dioritic dykes discordantly intruded within meta-diorites/gabbros forming the External Gabbro unit of the Finero Mafic Complex (Italian Alps). This unit is exposed as part of a near complete crustal section spanning from mantle rocks to upper crustal metasediments (Val Cannobina, Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italy). The leucocratic dykes consist mainly of plagioclase (An18-24Ab79-82Or0.3-0.7) with subordinate amounts of biotite and spinel defining melanocratic layers. Zircon and corundum are common accessory phases. Both the dykes and the surrounding meta-diorites/gabbros show evidence of ductile deformation under amphibolite-facies conditions. Zircon grains/fragments (up to 2 mm in length) occur as porphyroclasts surrounded by fine-grained plagioclase within the leucocratic domains and may occur within the melanocratic layers completely or partially surrounded by biotite and spinels. Fractures are common within zircon, define networks and have associated displacements occasionally and/or they can be filled by secondary minerals. Cathodoluminescence (CL) images reveal that zircon grains from the leucocratic layers show relicts of primary magmatic (i.e. oscillatory and or sector) zoning generally related with the crystal shapes or crystallographic orientation, whereas those from the melanocratic domains do not. In both cases, zircon shows secondary CL features, i.e. mosaic-like textures, due to deformation. EBSD maps confirmed a profuse mosaic texture, resulting in an internal misorientation of ca. 10°, generally associated with fractures. Locally, zircon shows clear evidence of crystal-plastic deformation at the edges, with a gradual misorientations of up to 12°, suggesting an origin prior fragmentation. Trace elements and U-Pb analyses were carried out by LA-ICP-MS directly on petrographic thin sections. Such in situ investigations revealed a strong

  6. Present-day dynamic and residual topography in Central Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengül Uluocak, Ebru; Pysklywec, Russell; Göǧüş, Oǧuz H.

    2016-09-01

    The Central Anatolian orogenic plateau is represented by young volcanism, rapid plateau uplift and distinctive (past and active) tectonic deformation. In this study, we consider observational data in terms of regional present-day geodynamics in the region. The residual topography of Central Anatolia was derived to define the regional isostatic conditions according to Airy isostasy and infer the potential role of `dynamic topography'. 2-D thermomechanical forward models for coupled mantle-lithosphere flow/deformation were conducted along an N-S directional profile through the region (e.g. northern/Pontides, interior and southern/Taurides). These models were based on seismic tomography data that provide estimates about the present-day mantle thermal structure beneath the Anatolian plate. We compare the modelling results with calculated residual topography and independent data sets of geological deformation, gravity and high surface heat flow/widespread geothermal activity. Model results suggest that there is ˜1 km of mantle flow induced dynamic topography associated with the sublithospheric flow driven by the seismically inferred mantle structure. The uprising mantle may have also driven the asthenospheric source of volcanism in the north (e.g. Galatia volcanic province) and the Cappadocia volcanic province in the south while elevating the surface in the last 10 Myr. Our dynamic topography calculations emphasize the role of vertical forcing under other orogenic plateaux underlain by relatively thin crust and low-density asthenospheric mantle.

  7. Smoking topography and abstinence in adult female smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Erin A; Saladin, Michael E; Baker, Nathaniel L; Carpenter, Matthew J; Gray, Kevin M

    2013-12-01

    Preliminary evidence, within both adults and adolescents, suggests that the intensity with which cigarettes are smoked (i.e., smoking topography) is predictive of success during a cessation attempt. These reports have also shown topography to be superior compared to other variables, such as cigarettes per day, in the prediction of abstinence. The possibility that gender may influence this predictive relationship has not been evaluated but may be clinically useful in tailoring gender-specific interventions. Within the context of a clinical trial for smoking cessation among women, adult daily smokers completed a laboratory session that included a 1-hour ad libitum smoking period in which measures of topography were collected (N=135). Participants were then randomized to active medication (nicotine patch vs. varenicline) and abstinence was monitored for 4weeks. Among all smoking topography measures and all abstinence outcomes, a moderate association was found between longer puff duration and greater puff volume and continued smoking during the active 4-week treatment phase, but only within the nicotine patch group. Based on the weak topography-abstinence relationship among female smokers found in the current study, future studies should focus on explicit gender comparisons to examine if these associations are specific to or more robust in male smokers. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Present-day dynamic and residual topography in Central Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengül Uluocak, Ebru; Pysklywec, Russell; Göǧüş, Oǧuz H.

    2016-09-01

    The Central Anatolian orogenic plateau is represented by young volcanism, rapid plateau uplift and distinctive (past and active) tectonic deformation. In this study, we consider observational data in terms of regional present-day geodynamics in the region. The residual topography of Central Anatolia was derived to define the regional isostatic conditions according to Airy isostasy and infer the potential role of `dynamic topography'. 2-D thermomechanical forward models for coupled mantle-lithosphere flow/deformation were conducted along an N-S directional profile through the region (e.g. northern/Pontides, interior and southern/Taurides). These models were based on seismic tomography data that provide estimates about the present-day mantle thermal structure beneath the Anatolian plate. We compare the modelling results with calculated residual topography and independent data sets of geological deformation, gravity and high surface heat flow/widespread geothermal activity. Model results suggest that there is ˜1 km of mantle flow induced dynamic topography associated with the sublithospheric flow driven by the seismically inferred mantle structure. The uprising mantle may have also driven the asthenospheric source of volcanism in the north (e.g. Galatia volcanic province) and the Cappadocia volcanic province in the south while elevating the surface in the last 10 Myr. Our dynamic topography calculations emphasize the role of vertical forcing under other orogenic plateaux underlain by relatively thin crust and low-density asthenospheric mantle.

  9. Smoking topography and abstinence in adult female smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Erin A.; Saladin, Michael E.; Baker, Nathaniel L.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Gray, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary evidence, within both adults and adolescents, suggests that the intensity with which cigarettes are smoked (i.e. smoking topography) is predictive of success during a cessation attempt. These reports have also shown topography to be superior compared to other variables, such as cigarettes per day, in the prediction of abstinence. The possibility that gender may influence this predictive relationship has not been evaluated, but may be clinically useful in tailoring gender-specific interventions. Within the context of a clinical trial for smoking cessation among women, adult daily smokers completed a laboratory session that included a 1-hour ad-libitum smoking period in which measures of topography were collected (N=135). Participants were then randomized to active medication (nicotine patch vs. varenicline) and abstinence was monitored for 4 weeks. Among all smoking topography measures and all abstinence outcomes, a moderate association was found between longer puff duration and greater puff volume and continued smoking during the active 4-week treatment phase, but only within the nicotine patch group. Based on the weak topography-abstinence relationship among female smokers found in the current study, future studies should focus on explicit gender comparisons to examine if these associations are specific to or more robust in male smokers. PMID:24018226

  10. U-Pb-Hf zircon study of two mylonitic granite complexes in the Talas-Fergana fault zone, Kyrgyzstan, and Ar-Ar age of deformations along the fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopelko, D.; Seltmann, R.; Apayarov, F.; Belousova, E.; Izokh, A.; Lepekhina, E.

    2013-09-01

    A 2000 km long dextral Talas-Fergana strike-slip fault separates eastern terranes in the Kyrgyz Tien Shan from western terranes. The aim of this study was to constrain an age of dextral shearing in the central part of the fault utilizing Ar-Ar dating of micas. We also carried out a U-Pb-Hf zircon study of two different deformed granitoid complexes in the fault zone from which the micas for Ar dating were separated. Two samples of the oldest deformed Neoproterozoic granitoids in the area of study yielded U-Pb zircon SHRIMP ages 728 ± 11 Ma and 778 ± 11 Ma, characteristic for the Cryogenian Bolshoi Naryn Formation, and zircon grains analyzed for their Lu-Hf isotopic compositions yielded εHf(t) values from -11.43 to -16.73, and their calculated tHfc ages varied from 2.42 to 2.71 Ga. Thus varying Cryogenian ages and noticeable heterogeneity of Meso- to Paleoproterozoic crustal sources was established for mylonitic granites of the Bolshoi Naryn Formation. Two samples of mylonitized pegmatoidal granites of the Kyrgysh Complex yielded identical 206Pb/238U ages of 279 ± 5 Ma corresponding to the main peak of Late-Paleozoic post-collisional magmatism in the Tien Shan (Seltmann et al., 2011), and zircon grains analyzed for their Lu-Hf isotopic compositions yielded εHf(t) values from -11.43 to -16.73, and calculated tHfc ages from 2.42 to 2.71 Ga indicating derivation from a Paleoproterozoic crustal source. Microstructural studies showed that ductile/brittle deformation of pegmatoidal granites of the Kyrgysh Complex occurred at temperatures of 300-400 °C and caused resetting of the K-Ar isotope system of primary muscovite. Deformation of mylonitized granites of the Bolshoi Naryn Formation occurred under high temperature conditions and resulted in protracted growth and recrystallization of micas. The oldest Ar-Ar muscovite age of 241 Ma with a well defined plateau from a pegmatoidal granite of the Kyrgysh Complex is considered as a “minimum” age of dextral motions

  11. Paralarvae of the complex Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis-Dosidicus gigas (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) in the northern limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone of the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean (April 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Velasco, Laura; Ruvalcaba-Aroche, Erick D.; Beier, Emilio; Godínez, Victor M.; Barton, Eric D.; Díaz-Viloria, Noe; Pacheco, María. R.

    2016-03-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of the paralarvae of the complex Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis-Dosidicus gigas (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) was analyzed at the northern limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone in the Eastern Tropical Pacific in April 2012. The upper limit of the oxygen minimum water (˜44 µmol/kg or 1 mL/L) rises from ˜100 m depth in the entrance of the Gulf of California to ˜20 m depth off Cabo Corrientes. Most of the paralarvae of this complex, dominated by D. gigas, were concentrated in the Gulf entrance, between the thermocline (˜20 to ˜50 m depth) and the sea surface, in the warmest (>19°C) oxygenated (>176 µmol/kg) layer. The highest abundance of paralarvae was detected in an anticyclonic eddy (˜120 km diameter and >500 m deep), which contained lower-salinity water (<35 g/kg), consistent with formation in the California Current. Lower paralarvae abundance was recorded further south off Cabo Corrientes, where hypoxic layers were elevated as water shoaled nearshore. Almost no paralarvae were found in the north of the study area beyond the strong salinity front (˜34.8-35.4 g/kg) that bounded the anticyclone. These results showed an affinity of the paralarvae for lower-salinity, oxygenated water, illustrated by the influence of the mesoscale anticyclonic eddy and the salinity front in their distribution. Based on this study, it can be concluded that the expansion of the depth range of hypoxic water observed in the Eastern Tropical Pacific may be increasing environmental stress on the paralarvae by vertically restricting their habitat, and so affecting their survival.

  12. Metallogeny of subduction zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokhtin N. O.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the multistage mechanism of the Earth's crust enrichment in ore elements in underthrust zones. The processes of metamorphism and the formation of hydrothermal solutions at pulling of the watered oceanic lithospheric plate into the subduction zone have been described. Some physical and chemical transformation regularities of structural-material complexes in these areas and mechanisms of the formation of ore deposits have been discussed. Spatio-temporal patterns of the localization of a number of endogenetic and exogenetic deposits have been described using metallogeny of the Ural and the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma Fold Belts as an example. It has been shown that in nature there are several effective mechanisms of the enrichment of the crust in ore minerals. One of them is the process of pulling into subduction zone of metalliferous sediments and ferromanganese crusts as well as seabed nodules, their metamorphic transformation, partial melting and transition of ore components into magmatic melts and mineralized fluids. In the future this leads to the release of ore material by magmas and hydrothermal solutions into the folded formations of island-arc and Andean types and the formation of igneous, metasomatic and hydrothermal deposits. Another, yet no less powerful natural mechanism of a conveyor enrichment of the crust in ore elements is the process of destruction and sedimentation of mineral deposits formed in the folded areas as well as the formation of placers and their transfer to the marginal parts of the continent. Later, during the collision of active and passive margins of two lithospheric plates, such as the collision of the Kolyma Massif with the eastern part of the Siberian craton in the middle of the Mesozoic there was a thrusting of a younger lithospheric plate over a more ancient one. As a result, the sedimentary sequences of the passive margin of the Siberian plate were submerged and partially melted by the basic magmas

  13. Topography of Photochemical Initiation in Molecular Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward D. Aluker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fluctuation model of the photochemical initiation of an explosive chain reaction in energetic materials. In accordance with the developed model, density fluctuations of photo-excited molecules serve as reaction nucleation sites due to the stochastic character of interactions between photons and energetic molecules. A further development of the reaction is determined by a competition of two processes. The first process is growth in size of the isolated reaction cell, leading to a micro-explosion and release of the material from the cell towards the sample surface. The second process is the overlap of reaction cells due to an increase in their size, leading to the formation of a continuous reaction zone and culminating in a macro-explosion, i.e., explosion of the entire area, covering a large part of the volume of the sample. Within the proposed analytical model, we derived expressions of the explosion probability and the duration of the induction period as a function of the initiation energy (exposure. An experimental verification of the model was performed by exploring the initiation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN with the first harmonic of YAG: Nd laser excitation (1,064 nm, 10 ns, which has confirmed the adequacy of the model. This validation allowed us to make a few quantitative assessments and predictions. For example, there must be a few dozen optically excited molecules produced by the initial fluctuations for the explosive decomposition reaction to occur and the life-time of an isolated cell before the micro-explosion must be of the order of microseconds.

  14. Crystal quality analysis and improvement using x-ray topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, J. A.; Goetze, K.; Macrander, A. T.; Zhong, Y. C.; Huang, X. R.; Maj, L.

    2008-08-01

    The Topography X-ray Laboratory of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory operates as a collaborative effort with APS users to produce high performance crystals for APS X-ray beamline experiments. For many years the topography laboratory has worked closely with an on-site optics shop to help ensure the production of crystals with the highest quality, most stress-free surface finish possible. It has been instrumental in evaluating and refining methods used to produce high quality crystals. Topographical analysis has shown to be an effective method to quantify and determine the distribution of stresses, to help identify methods that would mitigate the stresses and improve the Rocking curve, and to create CCD images of the crystal. This paper describes the topography process and offers methods for reducing crystal stresses in order to substantially improve the crystal optics.

  15. Sintered silver joints via controlled topography of electronic packaging subcomponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A.

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are sintered silver bonded electronic package subcomponents and methods for making the same. Embodiments of the sintered silver bonded EPSs include topography modification of one or more metal surfaces of semiconductor devices bonded together by the sintered silver joint. The sintered silver bonded EPSs include a first semiconductor device having a first metal surface, the first metal surface having a modified topography that has been chemically etched, grit blasted, uniaxial ground and/or grid sliced connected to a second semiconductor device which may also include a first metal surface with a modified topography, a silver plating layer on the first metal surface of the first semiconductor device and a silver plating layer on the first metal surface of the second semiconductor device and a sintered silver joint between the silver plating layers of the first and second semiconductor devices which bonds the first semiconductor device to the second semiconductor device.

  16. Crystal quality analysis and improvement using x-ray topography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, J.; Goetze, K.; Macrander, A.; Zhong, Y.; Huang, X.; Maj, L.; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-01-01

    The Topography X-ray Laboratory of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory operates as a collaborative effort with APS users to produce high performance crystals for APS X-ray beamline experiments. For many years the topography laboratory has worked closely with an on-site optics shop to help ensure the production of crystals with the highest quality, most stress-free surface finish possible. It has been instrumental in evaluating and refining methods used to produce high quality crystals. Topographical analysis has shown to be an effective method to quantify and determine the distribution of stresses, to help identify methods that would mitigate the stresses and improve the Rocking curve, and to create CCD images of the crystal. This paper describes the topography process and offers methods for reducing crystal stresses in order to substantially improve the crystal optics.

  17. The Urban Topography of the Contemporary City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Álvarez Berrones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban reason, defined under psychoanalytic concepts transcended through the use of complex topologies in the generation of urban problems, develops our understanding of the paradoxes of the anti-city within the city, identity and non-identity, and marginalization and inclusion. The city is understood from the rapport of the urban environment, as its urban topology is discovered and its essential configuration subordinated to urbanism, in relation to collective consciousness. This understanding leads to an explanation and comprehension of the phenomena that help to understand identity, marginalization, and violence as urban phenomena.

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of low cost UAV generated topography for geomorphic change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    With the recent explosion in the use and availability of unmanned aerial vehicle platforms and development of easy to use structure from motion software, UAV based photogrammetry is increasingly being adopted to produce high resolution topography for the study of surface processes. UAV systems can vary substantially in price and complexity, but the tradeoffs between these and the quality of the resulting data are not well constrained. We look at one end of this spectrum and evaluate the effectiveness of a simple low cost UAV setup for obtaining high resolution topography in a challenging field setting. Our study site is the Daan River gorge in western Taiwan, a rapidly eroding bedrock gorge that we have monitored with terrestrial Lidar since 2009. The site presents challenges for the generation and analysis of high resolution topography, including vertical gorge walls, vegetation, wide variation in surface roughness, and a complicated 3D morphology. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the UAV-derived topography, we compare it with terrestrial Lidar data collected during the same survey period. Our UAV setup combines a DJI Phantom 2 quadcopter with a 16 megapixel Canon Powershot camera for a total platform cost of less than $850. The quadcopter is flown manually, and the camera is programmed to take a photograph every 5 seconds, yielding 200-250 pictures per flight. We measured ground control points and targets for both the Lidar scans and the aerial surveys using a Leica RTK GPS with 1-2 cm accuracy. UAV derived point clouds were obtained using Agisoft Photoscan software. We conducted both Lidar and UAV surveys before and after a summer typhoon season, allowing us to evaluate the reliability of the UAV survey to detect geomorphic changes in the range of one to several meters. We find that this simple UAV setup can yield point clouds with an average accuracy on the order of 10 cm compared to the Lidar point clouds. Well-distributed and accurately located ground

  19. Spray-coatable negative photoresist for high topography MEMS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Markus; Voigt, Anja; Haas, Sven; Schwenzer, Falk; Schwenzer, Gunther; Reuter, Danny; Gruetzner, Gabi; Geßner, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    In microsystem technology, the lithographical processing of substrates with a topography is very important. Interconnecting lines, which are routed over sloped topography sidewalls from the top of the protecting wafer to the contact pads of the device wafer, are one example of patterning over a topography. For structuring such circuit paths, a photolithography process, and therefore a process for homogeneous photoresist coating, is required. The most flexible and advantageous way of depositing a homogeneous photoresist film over structures with high topography steps is spray-coating. As a pattern transfer process for circuit paths in cavities, the lift-off process is widely used. A negative resist, like ma-N (MRT) or AZnLOF (AZ) is favoured for lift-off processes due to the existing negative angle of the sidewalls. Only a few sprayable negative photoresists are commercially available. In this paper, the development of a novel negative resist spray-coating based on a commercially available single-layer lift-off resist for spin-coating, especially for the patterning of structures inside the cavity and on the cavity wall, is presented. A variety of parameters influences the spray-coating process, and therefore the patterning results. Besides the spray-coating tool and the parameters, the composition of the resist solution itself also influences the coating results. For homogeneous resist coverage over the topography of the substrate, different solvent combinations for diluting the resist solution, different chuck temperatures during the coating process, and also the softbake conditions, are all investigated. The solvent formulations and the process conditions are optimized with respect to the homogeneity of the resist coverage on the top edge of the cavities. Finally, the developed spray-coating process, the resist material and the process stability are demonstrated by the following applications: (i) lift-off, (ii) electroplating, (iii) the wet and (iv) the dry

  20. Signatures of molecular recognition from the topography of electrostatic potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhimoy K Roy; P Balanarayan; Shridhar R Gadre

    2009-09-01

    The recognition of interaction between two molecules is analysed via the topography of their molecular electrostatic potentials (MESP). The point of recognition between two species is proposed to be the geometry at which there is a change in the nature of the set of MESP critical points of one of the molecules vis-a-vis with its MESP topography at infinite separation. These results are presented for certain model systems such as pyridine and benzene dimers, cytosine-guanine and adenine-thymine base pairs in various orientations of approach of the two species.

  1. A model for Faraday pilot-waves over variable topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    In 2005 Yves Couder and co-workers discovered that droplets walking on a vibrating bath posses certain features previously thought to be exclusive to quantum systems. These millimetric droplets synchronize with their Faraday wavefield, creating a macroscopic pilot-wave system. In this talk we exploit the fact that the waves generated are nearly monochromatic and propose a hydrodynamic model capable of capturing the interaction between bouncing drops and a variable topography. We show that our model is able to reproduce some important experiments involving the drop-topography interaction, such as non-specular reflection and single-slit diffraction.

  2. A model for Faraday pilot waves over variable topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Luiz M.

    2017-01-01

    Couder and Fort discovered that droplets walking on a vibrating bath possess certain features previously thought to be exclusive to quantum systems. These millimetric droplets synchronize with their Faraday wavefield, creating a macroscopic pilot-wave system. In this paper we exploit the fact that the waves generated are nearly monochromatic and propose a hydrodynamic model capable of quantitatively capturing the interaction between bouncing drops and a variable topography. We show that our reduced model is able to reproduce some important experiments involving the drop-topography interaction, such as non-specular reflection and single-slit diffraction.

  3. A subdued topography among the high relief, tectonic-active island ---registered middle to late Pleistocene climatic changes in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, P.; Chen, B.

    2003-12-01

    The island of Taiwan is geographically in the frontal zone of the Asian monsoon region, and is geologically located in the collision boundary between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate. A Holocene uplifting rate of up to 10mm/yr in the eastern coast has been documented in this high relief mountainous island, and active folds and thrusts are common. When tracing the rivers backward to the mountain, one often encounters a subdued topography, covered by primary lateritic soil, above the higher river terrace and below the rugged mountains, and is referred to as lateritic highland (LH) by a previous author. Studies in paleoclimatology and geomorphology enable us to refine the possible age and origin of this remarkable topography. The penultimate glacial-interglacial cycle and the last interglacial period should be the major interval for the development of lateritic highland. LH may be looked upon as a reference surface for studying the dynamic evolution of the tectonic landscape of Taiwan. It shows that the lower uplifting rate is the most important factor for the preservation of the LH topography in this island. Based on the morphology of LH, different deformation styles are recognized in north and south Chiayi (near tropic of cancer), in western Taiwan. To the north, platforms originating from piedmont LH are well developed, whereas to the south, platforms and piedmont LH are hardly visible. This contrast is probably due to a lithological variance between them.

  4. Global assessment of vulnerability to sea-level rise in topography-limited and recharge-limited coastal groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Holly A.; Russoniello, Christopher J.; Byron, Lindsay A.

    2013-04-01

    Impacts of rising sea level on the hydraulic balance between aquifers and the ocean threaten fresh water resources and aquatic ecosystems along many world coastlines. Understanding the vulnerability of groundwater systems to these changes and the primary factors that determine the magnitude of system response is critical to developing effective management and adaptation plans in coastal zones. We assessed the vulnerability of two types of groundwater systems, recharge-limited and topography-limited, to changes caused by sea-level rise over a range of hydrogeologic settings. Vulnerability in this context is defined by the rate and magnitude of salinization of coastal aquifers and changes in groundwater flow to the sea. Two-dimensional variable-density groundwater flow and salt transport simulations indicate that the response of recharge-limited systems is largely minimal, whereas topography-limited systems are vulnerable for various combinations of permeability, vertical anisotropy in permeability, and recharge. World coastlines were classified according to system type as a vulnerability indicator. Results indicate that approximately 70% of world coastlines may be topography-limited, though variability in hydrogeologic conditions strongly affects classification. Future recharge and sea-level rise scenarios have much less influence on the proportion of vulnerable coastlines than differences in permeability, distance to a hydraulic divide, and recharge, indicating that hydrogeologic properties and setting are more important factors to consider in determining system type than uncertainties in the magnitude of sea-level rise and hydrologic shifts associated with future climate change.

  5. Extensional and compressional regime driven left-lateral shear in southwestern Anatolia (eastern Mediterranean): The Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk; Aktuğ, Bahadır

    2016-10-01

    The tectonic framework of the eastern Mediterranean presented in this paper is based on an active subduction and small underwater hills/mountains on the oceanic crust moving toward the north. The Hellenic Arc, the Anaximander Mountains, the Rhodes and Finike basins, the compressional southern regions of the Western Taurides, and the extensional western Anatolian graben are the main interrelated tectonic structures that are shaped by the complex tectonic regimes. There are still heated debates regarding the structural properties and tectonic evolution of the southwestern Anatolia. GPS velocities and focal mechanisms of earthquakes demonstrate the absence of a single transform fault across the Burdur-Fethiye region; however, hundreds of small faults showing normal and left-lateral oblique slip indicate the presence of a regionally extensive shear zone in southwestern Turkey, which plays an important role in the eastern Mediterranean tectonics. The 300-km-long, 75-90-km-wide NE-SW-trending Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone developed during the formation of Aegean back-arc extensional system and the thrusting of Western Taurides. Today, the left-lateral differential motion across the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone varies from 3 to 4 mm/yr in the north to 8-10 mm/yr in the south. This finding could be attributed to the fact that while the subduction of the African Plate is relatively fast beneath the western Anatolia at the Hellenic Trench, it is slow or locked beneath the Western Taurides. Therefore, the GPS vectors and their distributions on land indicate remarkable velocity differences and enable us to determine the left-lateral shear zone located between the extensional and compressional blocks. Furthermore, this active tectonic regime creates differences in topography. This study also demonstrates how deep structures, such as the continuation of the subduction transform edge propagator (STEP) fault between the Hellenic and Cyprus arcs in the continental area, can come into play

  6. Formulating a coastal zone health metric for landuse impact management in urban coastal zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, P P; Varghese, Koshy; Ganesh, L S

    2010-11-01

    The need for ICZM arises often due to inadequate or inappropriate landuse planning practices and policies, especially in urban coastal zones which are more complex due to the larger number of components, their critical dimensions, attributes and interactions. A survey of literature shows that there is no holistic metric for assessing the impacts of landuse planning on the health of a coastal zone. Thus there is a need to define such a metric. The proposed metric, CHI (Coastal zone Health Indicator), developed on the basis of coastal system sustainability, attempts to gauge the health status of any coastal zone. It is formulated and modeled through an expert survey and pertains to the characteristic components of coastal zones, their critical dimensions, and relevant attributes. The proposed metric is applied to two urban coastal zones and validated. It can be used for more coast friendly and sustainable landuse planning/masterplan preparation and thereby for the better management of landuse impacts on coastal zones.

  7. SEMIAUTOMATIC DETECTION OF TUMORAL ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzeddine Zagrouba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a robust method based on the cooperation of fuzzy classification and regions segmentation algorithms, in order to detect the tumoral zone in the brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. On one hand, the classification in fuzzy sets is done by the Fuzzy C-Means algorithm (FCM, where a study of its different parameters and its complexity has been previously realised, which led us to improve it. On the other hand, the segmentation in regions is obtained by an hierarchical method through adaptive thresholding. Then, an operator expert selects a germ in the tumoral zone, and the class containing the sick zone is localised in return for the FCM algorithm. Finally, the superposition of the two partitions of the image will determine the sick zone. The originality of our approach is the parallel exploitation of different types of information in the image by the cooperation of two complementary approaches. This allows us to carry out a pertinent approach for the detection of sick zone in MRI images.

  8. High resolution reflection seismic profiling over the Tjellefonna fault in the Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lundberg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex (MTFC is one of the most prominent fault zones of Norway, both onshore and offshore. In spite of its importance, very little is known of the deeper structure of the individual fault segments comprising the fault complex. Most seismic lines have been recorded offshore or focused on deeper structures. This paper presents results from two reflection seismic profiles, located on each side of the Tingvollfjord, acquired over the Tjellefonna fault in the south-eastern part of the MTFC. Possible kilometer scale vertical offsets reflecting, large scale north-west dipping normal faulting separating the high topography to the south-east from lower topography to the north-west have been proposed for the Tjellefonna fault. In this study, however, the Tjellefonna fault is interpreted to dip approximately 50–60° towards the south-east to depths of at least 1.4 km. Travel-time modeling of reflections associated with the fault was used to establish the geometry of the fault structure at depth and detailed analysis of first P-wave arrivals in shot-gathers together with resistivity profiles were used to define the near surface geometry of the fault zone. A continuation of the structure on the north-eastern side of the Tingvollfjord is suggested by correlation of an in strike direction P-S converted reflection (generated by a fracture zone seen on the reflection data from that side of the Tingvollfjord. The reflection seismic data correlate well with resistivity profiles and recently published near surface geophysical data. A highly reflective package forming a gentle antiform structure was also identified on both seismic profiles. The structure may be an important boundary within the gneissic basement rocks of the Western Gneiss Region. The Fold Hinge Line is parallel with the Tjellefonna fault trace while the topographic lineament diverges, following secondary fracture zones towards north-east.

  9. The Evaluation of Complex Borehole Geophysics and Corescanning: for Detailed Characterization of Oriented Fracture Sets, Zones, and Hydraulic Flow on Different Scales. A Case Study: Moragy Granite, Mecsek Mts., Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maros, G.; Zilahi-Sebess, L.; Dudko, A.; Koroknai, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Our presentation outlines the methodology to determine the relationship between fractures and flow systems, and it tries to homogenize the results deriving from methods of different resolutions in a geological model. The granite suffered multi-phase brittle deformation during the Alpine orogene, the fractures renewed several times and were filled with multi-generation infillings. The cores were scanned with the ImaGeo system, the fractures were oriented, characterized in detail from geological and geophysical point of views, and structurally evaluated. A structural model was sketched (Maros et al 2004). The results were refined by the information received from geophysical data, primarily from well-logging (Zilahi-Sebess et al 2003), but radar measurements, crosshole velocity tomography were also used (Toros et al 2004). Transmissivity in granite: 10-6-10-12, main fractures: 10-6-10-5 m2/s. Porous and fracture flow models were set up (Benedek et al 2003, Balla et al 2004). Correlations were found between the core-logging and the well-logging: acoustic openness, density, acoustic velocity, resistivity versus fracture frequency, fracture zones versus HPF influx places. The complex evaluation made the determination of the size and dip of fracture zones more precise. The flow characteristics of individual fractures and fracture zones, however, are influenced by their unique features; no parameter-group can be selected that definitely produces permeable or impermeable fractures. The interpretation of the observations carried out on different scales can be done in several ways. One method is to use methods of different resolutions densely enough to be representative. We examined the relation of information deriving from high resolution methods and the well-logging. On the basis of the depth-trends it is possible to extrapolate the information around the borehole. The relationship with the geophysical surveys is possible through the resistivity and acoustic measurements

  10. A Scalable Infrastructure for Lidar Topography Data Distribution, Processing, and Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, C. J.; Nandigam, V.; Krishnan, S.; Phan, M.; Cowart, C. A.; Arrowsmith, R.; Baru, C.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology have emerged as a fundamental tool in the Earth sciences, and are also being widely utilized for ecological, planning, engineering, and environmental applications. Collected from airborne, terrestrial, and space-based platforms, these data are revolutionary because they permit analysis of geologic and biologic processes at resolutions essential for their appropriate representation. Public domain lidar data collection by federal, state, and local agencies are a valuable resource to the scientific community, however the data pose significant distribution challenges because of the volume and complexity of data that must be stored, managed, and processed. Lidar data acquisition may generate terabytes of data in the form of point clouds, digital elevation models (DEMs), and derivative products. This massive volume of data is often challenging to host for resource-limited agencies. Furthermore, these data can be technically challenging for users who lack appropriate software, computing resources, and expertise. The National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography Facility (www.opentopography.org) has developed a cyberinfrastructure-based solution to enable online access to Earth science-oriented high-resolution lidar topography data, online processing tools, and derivative products. OpenTopography provides access to terabytes of point cloud data, standard DEMs, and Google Earth image data, all co-located with computational resources for on-demand data processing. The OpenTopography portal is built upon a cyberinfrastructure platform that utilizes a Services Oriented Architecture (SOA) to provide a modular system that is highly scalable and flexible enough to support the growing needs of the Earth science lidar community. OpenTopography strives to host and provide access to datasets as soon as they become available, and also to expose greater application level functionalities to

  11. Two-zone pupil filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Campos, Juan; Escalera, Juan C.; Ledesma, Silvia

    2008-03-01

    The performance of pupil filters consisting of two zones each of constant complex amplitude transmittance is investigated. For filters where the transmittance is real, different classes of potentially useful filter are identified and optimized. These include leaky filters with an inner zone of low amplitude transmittance, pure phase filters with phase change of π, and equal area filters. The first of these minimizes the relative power in the outer rings for a given axial resolution, the second maximizes the Strehl ratio for a given transverse resolution, and the third minimizes the relative power in the outer rings for a given transverse resolution. Complex filters can give an axially shifted maximum in intensity: the performance parameters calculated relative to the true focus are investigated for some different classes of filter, but filters with phase change not equal to π are found to give inferior performance to the real value filters.

  12. A HYBRID THINNING ALGORITHM FOR BINARY TOPOGRAPHY MAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid thinning algorithm for binary topography maps is proposed on the basis of parallel thinning templates in this paper.The algorithm has a high processing speed and the strong ability of noise immunity and preservation of connectivity and skeleton symmetry. Experimental results show that the algorithm can solve t he thinning problem of binary maps effectively.

  13. The Effect of Substrate Topography on Coating Cathodic Delamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinell, Claus E.; Sørensen, Per A.; Kiil, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the effect of steel substrate topography on coating cathodic delamination. The study showed that the surface preparation can be used to control and minimize the rate of cathodic delamination. The coating should have maximum wetting properties so that substrates with high...

  14. The effect of asteroid topography on surface ablation deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Jay W.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Ablation techniques for deflecting hazardous asteroids deposit energy into the asteroid's surface, causing an effective thrust on the asteroid as the ablating material leaves normal to the surface. Although it has long been recognized that surface topography plays an important role in determining the deflection capabilities, most studies to date have ignored this aspect of the model. This paper focuses on understanding the topography for real asteroid shapes, and how this topography can change the deflection performance of an ablation technique. The near Earth asteroids Golevka, Bennu, and Itokawa are used as the basis for this study, as all three have high-resolution shape models available. This paper shows that naive targeting of an ablation method without accounting for the surface topography can lower the deflection performance by up to 20% in the cases studied in terms of the amount of acceleration applied in the desired direction. If the ablation thrust level is assumed to be 100 N, as used elsewhere in the literature, this misapplication of thrust translates to tens of kilometers per year in decreased semimajor axis change. However, if the ablation method can freely target any visible point on the surface of the asteroid, almost all of this performance can be recovered.

  15. Short wavelength topography on the inner-core boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Aimin; Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2007-01-02

    Constraining the topography of the inner-core boundary is important for studies of core-mantle coupling and the generation of the geodynamo. We present evidence for significant temporal variability in the amplitude of the inner core reflected phase PKiKP for an exceptionally high-quality earthquake doublet, observed postcritically at the short-period Yellowknife seismic array (YK), which occurred in the South Sandwich Islands within a 10-year interval (1993/2003). This observation, complemented by data from several other doublets, indicates the presence of topography at the inner-core boundary, with a horizontal wavelength on the order of 10 km. Such topography could be sustained by small-scale convection at the top of the inner core and is compatible with a rate of super rotation of the inner core of approximately 0.1-0.15 degrees per year. In the absence of inner-core rotation, decadal scale temporal changes in the inner-core boundary topography would provide an upper bound on the viscosity at the top of the inner core.

  16. Topographie en tomographie en coherence optique (OCT) des ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ceci permettrait de reconsidérer le glaucome comme un problème de santé publique afin de ... English Title: OCT topography of large cup-disc ratio in Lome ... The reference for the disc topogramm for comparison in this study is data from 19th ...

  17. Water balance and topography predict fire and forest structure patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van R. Kane; James A. Lutz; C. Alina Cansler; Nicholas A. Povak; Derek J. Churchill; Douglas F. Smith; Jonathan T. Kane; Malcolm P. North

    2015-01-01

    Mountainous topography creates fine-scale environmental mosaics that vary in precipitation, temperature, insolation, and slope position. This mosaic in turn influences fuel accumulation and moisture and forest structure. We studied these the effects of varying environmental conditions across a 27,104 ha landscape within Yosemite National Park, California, USA, on the...

  18. Ocean and laboratory observations on waves over topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, F.P. A.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the observation, analysis and dynamics of waves as being trapped, generated and focused by sloping topography. ---Shelf waves with diurnal tidal frequency off Greenland--- Tidal analysis has been carried out on current measurements at a “cross-shelf” transect off Greenland at 7

  19. An anatomical and functional topography of human auditory cortical areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle eMoerel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI throughout the last decades have enabled the detailed anatomical and functional inspection of the human brain non-invasively, to date there is no consensus regarding the precise subdivision and topography of the areas forming the human auditory cortex. Here, we propose a topography of the human auditory areas based on insights on the anatomical and functional properties of human auditory areas as revealed by studies of cyto- and myelo-architecture and fMRI investigations at ultra-high magnetic field (7 Tesla. Importantly, we illustrate that - whereas a group-based approach to analyze functional (tonotopic maps is appropriate to highlight the main tonotopic axis - the examination of tonotopic maps at single subject level is required to detail the topography of primary and non-primary areas that may be more variable across subjects. Furthermore, we show that considering multiple maps indicative of anatomical (i.e. myelination as well as of functional properties (e.g. broadness of frequency tuning is helpful in identifying auditory cortical areas in individual human brains. We propose and discuss a topography of areas that is consistent with old and recent anatomical post mortem characterizations of the human auditory cortex and that may serve as a working model for neuroscience studies of auditory functions.

  20. EAARL topography-Potato Creek watershed, Georgia, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Fredericks, Xan; Jones, J.W.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin, Georgia. These datasets were acquired on February 27, 2010.

  1. An anatomical and functional topography of human auditory cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Formisano, Elia

    2014-01-01

    While advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) throughout the last decades have enabled the detailed anatomical and functional inspection of the human brain non-invasively, to date there is no consensus regarding the precise subdivision and topography of the areas forming the human auditory cortex. Here, we propose a topography of the human auditory areas based on insights on the anatomical and functional properties of human auditory areas as revealed by studies of cyto- and myelo-architecture and fMRI investigations at ultra-high magnetic field (7 Tesla). Importantly, we illustrate that-whereas a group-based approach to analyze functional (tonotopic) maps is appropriate to highlight the main tonotopic axis-the examination of tonotopic maps at single subject level is required to detail the topography of primary and non-primary areas that may be more variable across subjects. Furthermore, we show that considering multiple maps indicative of anatomical (i.e., myelination) as well as of functional properties (e.g., broadness of frequency tuning) is helpful in identifying auditory cortical areas in individual human brains. We propose and discuss a topography of areas that is consistent with old and recent anatomical post-mortem characterizations of the human auditory cortex and that may serve as a working model for neuroscience studies of auditory functions.

  2. A Mathematical Approach for Evaluation of Surface Topography Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Haghi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The probability characteristics of surface topography parameters described by the composition of the deterministic component and the homogeneous random normal field were analysed. Formulae for the calculation of the mathematical expectation of the Ras parameter and the evaluation of its variance are given.

  3. Oral Streptococci Biofilm Formation on Different Implant Surface Topographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Cardoso Pita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the subgingival microbiota is dependent on successive colonization of the implant surface by bacterial species. Different implant surface topographies could influence the bacterial adsorption and therefore jeopardize the implant survival. This study evaluated the biofilm formation capacity of five oral streptococci species on two titanium surface topographies. In vitro biofilm formation was induced on 30 titanium discs divided in two groups: sandblasted acid-etched (SAE- n=15 and as-machined (M- n=15 surface. The specimens were immersed in sterilized whole human unstimulated saliva and then in fresh bacterial culture with five oral streptococci species: Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, and Streptococcus cricetus. The specimens were fixed and stained and the adsorbed dye was measured. Surface characterization was performed by atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. Surface and microbiologic data were analyzed by Student’s t-test and two-way ANOVA, respectively (P0.05. S. sanguinis exhibited similar behavior to form biofilm on both implant surface topographies, while S. salivarius showed the lowest ability to form biofilm. It was concluded that biofilm formation on titanium surfaces depends on surface topography and species involved.

  4. The subthalamic nucleus : Part I: Development, cytology, topography and connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology concerns the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types p

  5. Linking topography to tonotopy in the mouse auditory thalamocortical circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hackett, Troy A; Rinaldi Barkat, Tania; O'Brien, Barbara M J;

    2011-01-01

    The mouse sensory neocortex is reported to lack several hallmark features of topographic organization such as ocular dominance and orientation columns in primary visual cortex or fine-scale tonotopy in primary auditory cortex (AI). Here, we re-examined the question of auditory functional topography...

  6. Geoid-to-topography ratios on Venus: A global perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mark; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    Recently available spherical harmonic solutions for the geoid and topography of Venus are sufficiently high resolution that they can be used to address questions concerning the relationship between geoid and topography on a regional scale. We have approached this question by mapping the geoid-to-topography ratio (GTR) on a systematic global basis. For a given point on the surface, we consider the geoid and elevation values at all points on a gridded representation of those fields located within a specified distance of the reference point. From the set of paired values, we determine the correlation coefficient and the best-fitting straight line. The latter is the GTR at that position, and the former is a measure of the significance of the derived ratio. This procedure is then repeated for all points on the global grid, yielding maps of the GTR and the correlation coefficient. Unlike previous studies of the GRT on Venus, this apprach permits us to make an objective and systematic search for regions with anomalous GTR's as well as areas that do not demonstrate any strong correlation between geoid and topography. These maps can be updated regularly as new harmonic models of the Venus geoid are produced from new Magellan tracking data. This procedure permits the development of a global perspective on the relationship between GTR and venusian surface tectonics.

  7. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-09-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

  8. Fabrication of cell container arrays with overlaid surface topographies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truckenmuller, R.; Giselbrecht, S.; Escalante-Marun, M.; Groenendijk, M.; Papenburg, B.; Rivron, N.; Unadkat, H.; Saile, V.; Subramaniam, V.; Berg, A. van den; Blitterswijk, C. Van; Wessling, M.; Boer, J. den; Stamatialis, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents cell culture substrates in the form of microcontainer arrays with overlaid surface topographies, and a technology for their fabrication. The new fabrication technology is based on microscale thermoforming of thin polymer films whose surfaces are topographically prepatterned on a

  9. Fabrication of cell container arrays with overlaid surface topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truckenmüller, R.K.; Giselbrecht, S.; Escalante, M.; Groenendijk, M.N.W.; Papenburg, B.J.; Rivron, N.C.; Unadkat, H.V.; Saile, V.; Subramaniam, V.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Wessling, M.; Boer, de J.; Stamatialis, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents cell culture substrates in the form of microcontainer arrays with overlaid surface topographies, and a technology for their fabrication. The new fabrication technology is based on microscale thermoforming of thin polymer films whose surfaces are topographically prepatterned on a

  10. Mantle transition zone thickness in the Central South-American Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunmiller, Jochen; van der Lee, Suzan; Doermann, Lindsey

    We used receiver functions to determine lateral variations in mantle transition zone thickness and sharpness of the 410- and 660-km discontinuities in the presence of subducting lithosphere. The mantle beneath the central Andes of South America provides an ideal study site owing to its long-lived subduction history and the availability of broadband seismic data from the dense BANJO/SEDA temporary networks and the permanent station LPAZ. For LPAZ, we analyzed 26 earthquakes between 1993-2003 and stacked the depth-migrated receiver functions. For temporary stations operating for only about one year (1994-1995), station stacks were not robust. We thus stacked receiver functions for close-by stations forming five groups that span the subduction zone from west to east, each containing 12 to 25 events. We found signal significant at the 2σ level for several station groups from P to S conversions that originate near 520- and 850-900 km depth, but most prominently from the 410- and 660-km discontinuities. For the latter, the P to S converted signal is clear in stacks for western groups and LPAZ, lack of coherent signal for two eastern groups is possibly due to incoherent stacking and does not necessitate the absence of converted energy. The thickness of the mantle transition zone increases progressively from a near-normal 255 km at the Pacific coast to about 295 km beneath station LPAZ in the Eastern Cordillera. Beneath LPAZ, the 410-km discontinuity appears elevated by nearly 40 km, thus thickening the transition zone. We compared signal amplitudes from receiver function stacks calculated at different low-pass frequencies to study frequency dependence and possibly associated discontinuity sharpness of the P to S converted signals. We found that both the 410- and 660-km discontinuities exhibit amplitude increase with decreasing frequency. Synthetic receiver function calculations for discontinuity topography mimicking observed topography show that the observed steep

  11. Effect of Upper Mantle Heterogeneities on Lithosphere Stresses and Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei Tutu, A.; Steinberger, B.; Rogozhina, I.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    The orientation and magnitude of lithosphere stresses give us knowledge about most of the processes within the Earth that are not easy to observe. It has been established (Steinberger, Schmeling, and Marquart 2001) that large contribution of the forces producing lithosphere stresses have their source origination from the buoyancies of both the upper and lower mantle acting beneath the lithosphere. The contribution of the crustal thickness to the stresses has been estimated to be less than 10% (Steinberger et al. 2001) in most region and increases in areas with high gravitational potential energy like the Himalayas. In most of these studies, the effect of the crust was determined separately by computing the gravitational potential energy from the crust (Ghosh et al. 2013) and applied as correction. (Artyushkov 1973) showed that the inhomogeneous nature of the crust contribute to the stresses observed as against using constant lithosphere thickness in most studies, due to the complexities for implementing a variable lithosphere. We seek extend the approach of Ghosh et al. (2013) by coupling the Crust 1.0 (Laske et al. 2013) to a varaible lithosphere thickness in our numerical method. Using a 3D global lithosphere-asthenosphere model (Popov and Sobolev 2008) with visco-elasto-plastic rheology, coupled at 300 km depth to a mantle modeled with a spectral technique (Hager and O'Connell, 1981), we compute lithosphere stresses and topography. we compare our model with observations; the World Stress Map, Global Strain Rate Map and the observed topgraphy. We use S40RTS seismic tomography below 300 km depth, with radial viscosity distribution (Steinberger et al 2006). To account for all the heterogeneities in the upper mantle (300 km) we used different 3D temperatures models setups. The first model is the thermal lithosphere model (Artemieva and Mooney, 2001) in continental regions and assumes half-space cooling of sea floor with age (Müller et al. 2008) for oceans. For the

  12. Gravity, Topography, and Magnetic Field of Mercury from Messenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Barnouin, Olivier; Ernst, Carolyn; Goosens, Sander; Hauck, Steven A., II; Head, James W., III; Johnson, Catherine L.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Margot, Jean-Luc; McNutt, Ralph; Mazarico, Erwan M.; Oberst, Jurgen; Peale, Stanley J.; Perry, Mark; Purucker, Michael E.; Rowlands, David D.; Torrence, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a 12-hour, near-polar orbit around Mercury, with an initial periapsis altitude of 200 km, initial periapse latitude of 60 deg N, and apoapsis at approximately 15,200 km altitude in the southern hemisphere. This orbit has permitted the mapping of regional gravitational structure in the northern hemisphere, and laser altimetry from the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a geodetically controlled elevation model for the same hemisphere. The shape of a planet combined with gravity provides fundamental information regarding its internal structure and geologic and thermal evolution. Elevations in the northern hemisphere exhibit a unimodal distribution with a dynamic range of 9.63 km, less than that of the Moon (19.9 km), but consistent with Mercury's higher surface gravitational acceleration. After one Earth-year in orbit, refined models of gravity and topography have revealed several large positive gravity anomalies that coincide with major impact basins. These candidate mascons have anomalies that exceed 100 mGal and indicate substantial crustal thinning and superisostatic uplift of underlying mantle. An additional uncompensated 1000-km-diameter gravity and topographic high at 68 deg N, 33 deg E lies within Mercury's northern volcanic plains. Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is generally thicker at low latitudes than in the polar region. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR2 = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M=3.30 x 10(exp 23) kg and R=2440 km are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of Cm/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. One proposed model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes silicate crust and mantle layers overlying a dense solid (possibly Fe-S) layer, a liquid Fe

  13. Geodiversity of landforms within morphoclimatic zones of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwoliński, Zbigniew; Gudowicz, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the paper is trying to calculate and classify geomorphometric parameters and on the basis of their values describe geodiversity of landforms within morphoclimatic zones. Morphoclimatic zone classifications by Büdel (1963), Tricart, Cailleux (1965) and Hagedorn, Poser (1974) were evaluated. Zonal morphological and climatic variation of the Earth reflects the spatial distribution of the nature and intensity of the ancient and modern processes of erosion, denudation and accumulation. Therefore, can be observing variation of landforms within particular zones. Morphoclimatic zones we digitized to get polygon vector layers with consistent coverage for the whole world. Elevation data we obtained from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM Version 4). The coverage of elevation data are between 56° S and 60° N. In order to look at maps of morphoclimatic zones multiple parameters were calculated. Primary parameters consisted of relative heights, slope, plan and profile curvature. We used in the analysis also the secondary parameters i.e. Topographic Wetness Index and Convergence Index. Within the analyzed zones we also compared automatic landform classification methods based on Topographic Position Index, Hammond's classification, unsupervised nested-means algorithm and a three part geometric signature: slope gradient, local convexity, and surface texture. For the primary and secondary parameters descriptive statistics such as minimum, maximum, range, mean, standard deviation within each morphoclimatic zone were calculated. Then the parameter maps have been classified on the basis of the natural distribution of Jenks method (1967). Within each morphoclimatic zone, area percentage was calculated for the derived classes of parameters, as well as the percentage of surface forms generated on the basis of automatic classification methods. Iwahashi, Pike (2007) obtained terrain class values, as well as terrain series values for the entire world (see the first row

  14. Detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-04-21

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with online pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 h analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the online pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary.

  15. Braking effect of climate and topography on global change-induced upslope forest expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatalo, Juha M; Ferrarini, Alessandro

    2017-03-01

    Forests are expected to expand into alpine areas due to global climate change. It has recently been shown that temperature alone cannot realistically explain this process and that upslope tree advance in a warmer scenario may depend on the availability of sites with adequate geomorphic/topographic characteristics. Here, we show that, besides topography (slope and aspect), climate itself can produce a braking effect on the upslope advance of subalpine forests and that tree limit is influenced by non-linear and non-monotonic contributions of the climate variables which act upon treeline upslope advance with varying relative strengths. Our results suggest that global climate change impact on the upslope advance of subalpine forests should be interpreted in a more complex way where climate can both speed up and slow down the process depending on complex patterns of contribution from each climate and non-climate variable.

  16. Braking effect of climate and topography on global change-induced upslope forest expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatalo, Juha M.; Ferrarini, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Forests are expected to expand into alpine areas due to global climate change. It has recently been shown that temperature alone cannot realistically explain this process and that upslope tree advance in a warmer scenario may depend on the availability of sites with adequate geomorphic/topographic characteristics. Here, we show that, besides topography (slope and aspect), climate itself can produce a braking effect on the upslope advance of subalpine forests and that tree limit is influenced by non-linear and non-monotonic contributions of the climate variables which act upon treeline upslope advance with varying relative strengths. Our results suggest that global climate change impact on the upslope advance of subalpine forests should be interpreted in a more complex way where climate can both speed up and slow down the process depending on complex patterns of contribution from each climate and non-climate variable.

  17. Prediction models in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marti, I.; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the work is to investigatethe performance of HIRLAM in complex terrain when used as input to energy production forecasting models, and to develop a statistical model to adapt HIRLAM prediction to the wind farm. The features of the terrain, specially the topography, influence...

  18. Climate dominated topography in a tectonically active mountain range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, B. A.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tests of the interactions between tectonic and climate forcing on Earth's topography often focus on the concept of steady-state whereby processes of rock deformation and erosion are opposing and equal. However, when conditions change such as the climate or tectonic rock uplift, then surface processes act to restore the balance between rock deformation and erosion by adjusting topography. Most examples of canonical steady-state mountain ranges lie within the northern hemisphere, which underwent a radical change in the Quaternary due to the onset of widespread glaciation. The activity of glaciers changed erosion rates and topography in many of these mountain ranges, which likely violates steady-state assumptions. With new topographic analysis, and existing patterns of climate and rock uplift, we explore a mountain range previously considered to be in steady-state, the Olympic Mountains, USA. The broad spatial trend in channel steepness values suggests that the locus of high rock uplift rates is coincident with the rugged range core, in a similar position as high temperature and pressure lithologies, but not in the low lying foothills as has been previously suggested by low-temperature thermochronometry. The details of our analysis suggest the dominant topographic signal in the Olympic Mountains is a spatial, and likely temporal, variation in erosional efficiency dictated by orographic precipitation, and Pleistocene glacier ELA patterns. We demonstrate the same topographic effects are recorded in the basin hypsometries of other Cenozoic mountain ranges around the world. The significant glacial overprint on topography makes the argument of mountain range steadiness untenable in significantly glaciated settings. Furthermore, our results suggest that most glaciated Cenozoic ranges are likely still in a mode of readjustment as fluvial systems change topography and erosion rates to equilibrate with rock uplift rates.

  19. Upper-Mantle Flow Driven Dynamic Topography in Eastern Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul Uluocak, Ebru; Pysklywec, Russell; Eken, Tuna; Hakan Gogus, Oguz

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Anatolia is characterized by 2 km plateau uplift -in the last 10 Myrs-, high surface heat flow distribution, shallow Curie-point depth, anomalous gravity field. Seismological observations indicate relatively high Pn and Sn attenuation and significant low seismic velocity anomalies in the region. Moreover, the surface geology is associated predominantly with volcanic rocks in which melt production through mantle upwelling (following lithospheric delamination) has been suggested. It has been long known that the topographic loading in the region cannot be supported by crustal thickness (~45 km) based on the principle of Airy isostasy. Recent global geodynamic studies carried out for evaluating the post-collisional processes imply that there is an explicit dynamic uplift in Eastern Anatolia and its adjacent regions. In this study we investigate the instantaneous dynamic topography driven by 3-D upper-mantle flow in Eastern Anatolia. For this purpose we conducted numerous thermo-mechanical models using a 2-D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method. The available P-wave tomography data extracted along 10 profiles were used to obtain depth-dependent density anomalies in the region. We present resulting dynamic topography maps and estimated 3D mantle flow velocity vectors along these 2-D cross sections for each profile. The residual topography based on crustal thickness and observed topography was calculated and compared with other independent datasets concerning geological deformation and dynamic topography predictions. The results indicate an upper mantle driven dynamic uplift correlated with the under-compensated characteristic in Eastern Anatolia. We discuss our results combined with 3D mantle flow by considering seismic anisotropy studies in the region. Initial results indicate that high dynamic uplift and the localized low Pn velocities in concurrence with Pn anisotropy structures show nearly spatial coherence in Eastern Anatolia.

  20. Shape and topography corrections for planetary nuclear spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Hendricks, John S.

    2015-11-01

    The elemental composition of planetary surfaces can be determined using gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. Most planetary bodies for which nuclear spectroscopy data have been acquired are round, and simple, analytic corrections for measurement geometry can be applied; however, recent measurements of the irregular asteroid 4 Vesta by Dawn required more detailed corrections using a shape model (Prettyman et al., Science 2012). In addition, subtle artifacts of topography have been observed in low altitude measurements of lunar craters, with potential implications for polar hydrogen content (Eke et al., JGR 2015). To explore shape and topography effects, we have updated the general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX to include a polygonal shape model (Prettyman and Hendricks, LPSC 2015). The shape model is fully integrated with the code’s 3D combinatorial geometry modules. A voxel-based acceleration algorithm enables fast ray-intersection calculations needed for Monte Carlo. As modified, MCNPX can model neutron and gamma ray transport within natural surfaces using global and/or regional shape/topography data (e.g. from photogrammetry and laser altimetry). We are using MCNPX to explore the effect of small-scale roughness, regional-, and global-topography for asteroids, comets and close-up measurements of high-relief features on larger bodies, such as the lunar surface. MCNPX can characterize basic effects on measurements by an orbiting spectrometer such as 1) the angular distribution of emitted particles, 2) shielding of galactic cosmic rays by surrounding terrain and 3) re-entrant scattering. In some cases, re-entrant scattering can be ignored, leading to a fast ray-tracing model that treats effects 1 and 2. The algorithm is applied to forward modeling and spatial deconvolution of epithermal neutron data acquired at Vesta. Analyses of shape/topography effects and correction strategies are presented for Vesta, selected small bodies and cratered

  1. Disentangling the Role of Climate, Topography and Vegetation in Species Richness Gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario R Moura

    Full Text Available Environmental gradients (EG related to climate, topography and vegetation are among the most important drivers of broad scale patterns of species richness. However, these different EG do not necessarily drive species richness in similar ways, potentially presenting synergistic associations when driving species richness. Understanding the synergism among EG allows us to address key questions arising from the effects of global climate and land use changes on biodiversity. Herein, we use variation partitioning (also know as commonality analysis to disentangle unique and shared contributions of different EG in explaining species richness of Neotropical vertebrates. We use three broad sets of predictors to represent the environmental variability in (i climate (annual mean temperature, temperature annual range, annual precipitation and precipitation range, (ii topography (mean elevation, range and coefficient of variation of elevation, and (iii vegetation (land cover diversity, standard deviation and range of forest canopy height. The shared contribution between two types of EG is used to quantify synergistic processes operating among EG, offering new perspectives on the causal relationships driving species richness. To account for spatially structured processes, we use Spatial EigenVector Mapping models. We perform analyses across groups with distinct dispersal abilities (amphibians, non-volant mammals, bats and birds and discuss the influence of vagility on the partitioning results. Our findings indicate that broad scale patterns of vertebrate richness are mainly affected by the synergism between climate and vegetation, followed by the unique contribution of climate. Climatic factors were relatively more important in explaining species richness of good dispersers. Most of the variation in vegetation that explains vertebrate richness is climatically structured, supporting the productivity hypothesis. Further, the weak synergism between topography and

  2. Disentangling the Role of Climate, Topography and Vegetation in Species Richness Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Mario R.; Villalobos, Fabricio; Costa, Gabriel C.; Garcia, Paulo C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental gradients (EG) related to climate, topography and vegetation are among the most important drivers of broad scale patterns of species richness. However, these different EG do not necessarily drive species richness in similar ways, potentially presenting synergistic associations when driving species richness. Understanding the synergism among EG allows us to address key questions arising from the effects of global climate and land use changes on biodiversity. Herein, we use variation partitioning (also know as commonality analysis) to disentangle unique and shared contributions of different EG in explaining species richness of Neotropical vertebrates. We use three broad sets of predictors to represent the environmental variability in (i) climate (annual mean temperature, temperature annual range, annual precipitation and precipitation range), (ii) topography (mean elevation, range and coefficient of variation of elevation), and (iii) vegetation (land cover diversity, standard deviation and range of forest canopy height). The shared contribution between two types of EG is used to quantify synergistic processes operating among EG, offering new perspectives on the causal relationships driving species richness. To account for spatially structured processes, we use Spatial EigenVector Mapping models. We perform analyses across groups with distinct dispersal abilities (amphibians, non-volant mammals, bats and birds) and discuss the influence of vagility on the partitioning results. Our findings indicate that broad scale patterns of vertebrate richness are mainly affected by the synergism between climate and vegetation, followed by the unique contribution of climate. Climatic factors were relatively more important in explaining species richness of good dispersers. Most of the variation in vegetation that explains vertebrate richness is climatically structured, supporting the productivity hypothesis. Further, the weak synergism between topography and vegetation

  3. Rivers as borders, uniting or dividing? The effect of topography and implications for catchment management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, D A; Rowntree, K M

    2012-01-01

    South Africa's water resources are unequally distributed over space and time and an already stressed water resource situation will only be exacerbated by climate change if current predictions are correct. The potential for conflict over increasingly strained water resources in South Africa is thus very real. In order to deal with these complex problems, national legislation is demanding that water resource management be decentralized to the local level where active participation can take place in an integrated manner in accordance with the principles of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM). However, administrative and political boundaries rarely match those of catchments as, throughout South Africa, rivers have been employed extensively to delineate administrative and political boundaries at a number of spatial scales. The aim of this research is to determine if rivers act as dividing or uniting features in a socio-political landscape and whether topography will influence their role in this context. The Orange-Senqu River is used as a case study. This paper goes on to consider the implications of this for catchment management in South Africa. No study known to the authors has explored the effect of the river itself, and its topographic setting, on the drivers that foster either conflict or cooperation, and allow for participatory management. This study presents evidence that the topography of a catchment has the ability to aggravate or reduce the impact of the variables considered by water managers and thereby influence the role of a river as a dividing or uniting feature. South Africa's proposed form of decentralized water management will have to contend with the effects of different topographies on the way in which rivers are perceived and utilized.

  4. Exchange pattern in the hyporheic zone of boreal rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babak Mojarrad, Brian; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2017-04-01

    Rivers and groundwater are two essential components of hydrological systems which due to their contrasting hydrochemical characteristics plays significantly different roles in transporting water and solutes across the landscape. The interaction between these two components takes place in the hyporheic zone, where the stream water and groundwater mix in permeable sediments below the stream channel. This interaction is driven by processes that occur on different temporal and spatial scales reflecting a spectrum of landscape morphologies ranging from small stream features to large geological structures. The water movement within the catchment is governed by morphology due to its control on the groundwater head. Small scale and large scale topographies cause dynamic and static head variation, respectively. Dynamic head is controlled by the flow velocity whereas static head is regulated by variation in the water surface elevation. Thus, hyporheic exchange models that include both small and large scale topographies provide improved understanding of hyporheic exchange properties. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, the discharge patterns for both local hyporheic and regional catchment-scale groundwater flow were derived for the Krycklan Catchment (Sweden) with respect to the interacting circulation from a wide range of spatial scales in the watershed including those of the stream-bed. The general methodology was to divide the topography into three successive spatial scales: first the whole catchment was modeled in order to obtain the large-scale groundwater flow field. Secondly, the groundwater flow from the whole catchment was used as the boundary condition for a 1×1 km2 subdomain of the catchment. Finally, a 5×5 m2 region was used to represent the flow along the stream and its adjacent hyporheic zone. Due to lack of observation of the small scale topography of the stream bed a spectral approach was used to re-scale the topography from the 100×100 m2 scale to the 5×5 m2 scale

  5. Multi-source least-squares reverse time migration with topography

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dongliang

    2013-09-22

    We demonstrate an accurate method for calculating LSM images from data recorded on irregular topography. Our results with both the Marmousi and Foothill models with steep topography suggest the effectiveness of this method.

  6. Zoning Districts - Volusia County HUB Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) Zones in Volusia County. Go to http://www.sba.gov/hubzone or contact the Department of Economic Development (386) 248-8048...

  7. Fractality in the neuron axonal topography of the human brain based on 3-D diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaloulis, P.; Ghosh, A.; Philippe, A. C.; Provata, A.; Deriche, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this work the fractal architecture of the neuron axonal topography of the human brain is evaluated, as derived from 3-D diffusion MRI (dMRI) acquisitions. This is a 3D extension of work performed previously in 2D regions of interest (ROIs), where the fractal dimension of the neuron axonal topography was computed from dMRI data. A group study with 18 subjects is here conducted and the fractal dimensions D f of the entire 3-D volume of the brains is estimated via the box counting, the correlation dimension and the fractal mass dimension methods. The neuron axon data is obtained using tractography algorithms on diffusion tensor imaging of the brain. We find that all three calculations of D f give consistent results across subjects, namely, they demonstrate fractal characteristics in the short and medium length scales: different fractal exponents prevail at different length scales, an indication of multifractality. We surmise that this complexity stems as a collective property emerging when many local brain units, performing different functional tasks and having different local topologies, are recorded together.

  8. SIMULATION OF EDDIES AFFECTED BY TOPOGRAPHY IN A BAROTROPICAL QUASI-GEOSTROPHIC FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based upon the quasi-geostrophic barotropic equation, taking into account the effect of seabed topography, analytical solutions and simulated eddies associated with different topographies are obtained. Through exhibiting the shape of various eddies we have found some interesting phenomena and had a better understanding of the importance of seabed topography to the eddy shape.

  9. Freeboard, sea level and dynamic topography during aggregation of a supercontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B.; Husson, L.; Choblet, G.

    2012-04-01

    The long-term evolution of sea level is a combination of eustatic mechanisms (tectono-eustatism, distribution of continental masses through orogenesis and sedimentation) and non-uniform processes (dynamic topography, geoid, wander of the Earth rotation pole). Given the potentially similar amplitude of both factors, there is a bias in the observation of absolute sea level. Moreover, over large time-scales, and more specifically over the Wilson cycle time-scale, plate aggregation and separation are associated both with (i) variations of the flow pattern and (ii) thermal state in the mantle, which in turn may induce specific vertical motions of the surface. By changing the size of the oceanic and continental water reservoirs, large-scale dynamic topography associated with subduction or the presence of mantle plumes controls rises or drops of sea level, which in turn controls part of the stratigraphic record. The Earth has known periods of continental aggregation and fragmentation that redistribute the location of plate boundaries, especially the location and the length of subduction zones, that could potentially affect sea level. The distribution of mass anomalies in the mantle with respect to continents may therefore have a significant impact. To test the possible correlation between sea level changes and the Wilson cycle, we decide to first focus on the Pangea, which is known to be a period during which most subductions took place beneath continents. We run a set of Earth-like instantaneous flow model using the OEDIPUS (Origin, Evolution and Dynamics of the Interiors of Planets Using Simulation) tool, which allows spherical geometries with lateral viscosity variations. In these models, Pangea is modeled by a spherical continental cap, covering 29% of the planet surface, and floating above a two-layered viscous mantle. We vary parameters such as the dip of the subducting panel, the depth reached by the slab, the viscosity structure and the plate thickness within

  10. New data on the bottom topography, recent sedimentation and water balance of Cerro Prieto dam, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutsis, Vsevolod; Levchenko, Oleg; Lowag, Jens; Krivosheya, Konstantin; de León Gómez, Héctor; Kotsarenko, Anatolyi

    2010-05-01

    Cerro Prieto Dam, a small water reservoir in the NE Mexico, is characterized by very high velocity of recent sedimentation, high sub-bottom seepage and erosion, and as a result, nonlinear water balance. These phenomenons never were studied since construction of the dam in the beginning of 1980th. So the goal of our work was to investigate the bottom topography and also sub-bottom near surface structure using the parametric acoustical effect. High-resolution sub-bottom profiling, using the Innomar SES-2000 compact echosounder, was carried out in Cerro Prieto Dam during February-April of 2008. The survey was conducted onboard of a small motor boat. The SES transducer was mounted on the front side of the boat using light metal pipe, and all electronic equipment was installed on the deck. Accurate positioning of the boat was reached by GPS. Average speed was 8-10 km/h. Innomar's software tool ISE was provides near real-time post-processing of the collected SES data and operation procedure could be corrected on-line. Acoustic signal ensured vertical resolution of 10-15 cm at acceptable penetration up to 15 m. Bathymetry map was compiled assuming average sound velocity of 1450 m/s. The irregular bottom topography of Cerro Prieto dam was discovered. The present elevation of the water surface is about 181 m above see level, and the lake depth varies from 1-2 to 28 m. The SES records show a distinct bottom layer of recent sediments by 0.5 - 4 m thickness which follows reservoir floor topography. Very specific acoustic anomalies, which seem to be related with gas sediments, are observed. The integrated SES, gravity, magnetic and geoelectrical data interpretation allows assuming a series of the superficial fractures focused in a NW direction, perpendicular (NE-SW) to the general deep fault zone. Hydrological balance for the Cerro Prieto water reservoir has been analyzed for last two decades. There are three types of water level fluctuations on the Cerro Prieto dam: long

  11. Three-dimensional measurement and characterization of grinding tool topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Changcai; Blunt, Liam; Jiang, Xiangqian; Xu, Xipeng; Huang, Hui; Ye, Ruifang

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive 3-dimensional measurement and characterization method for grinding tool topography was developed. A stylus instrument (SOMICRONIC, France) was used to measure the surface of a metal-bonded diamond grinding tool. The sampled data was input the software SurfStand developed by Centre for Precision Technology (CPT) for reconstruction and further characterization of the surface. Roughness parameters pertaining to the general surface and specific feature parameters relating to the grinding grits, such as height and angle peak curvature have been calculated. The methodology of measurement has been compared with that using an optical microscope. The comparison shows that the three-dimensional characterization has distinct advantages for grinding tool topography assessment. It is precise, convenient and comprehensive so it is suitable for precision measurement and analysis where an understanding of the grinding tool and its cutting ability are required.

  12. Topography and refractometry of nanostructures using spatial light interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Chun, Ik Su; Li, Xiuling; Ong, Zhun-Yong; Pop, Eric; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-01-15

    Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a novel method developed in our laboratory that provides quantitative phase images of transparent structures with a 0.3 nm spatial and 0.03 nm temporal accuracy owing to the white light illumination and its common path interferometric geometry. We exploit these features and demonstrate SLIM's ability to perform topography at a single atomic layer in graphene. Further, using a decoupling procedure that we developed for cylindrical structures, we extract the axially averaged refractive index of semiconductor nanotubes and a neurite of a live hippocampal neuron in culture. We believe that this study will set the basis for novel high-throughput topography and refractometry of man-made and biological nanostructures.

  13. Ice sheet topography from retracked ERS-1 altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Dimarzio, John; Seiss, Timothy

    1994-01-01

    An objective of the ERS-1 radar altimeter is to measure the surface topography of the polar ice sheets to a precision on the order of a meter. ERS-1 Waveform Altimeter Product (WAP) data was corrected for several processing errors. A range correction from the WAP waveforms, using the multiparameter retracking algorithm to account for range tracking limitations inherent to radar altimetry, was derived. From crossover analysis, the resulting precision is shown to be about 2.1 m in ocean mode and 2.2 m in ice mode. A topography map, produced with 23 days of corrected data, shows details of the western part of west Antarctic ice sheet and part of the Ross ice shelf including ice divides, ice stream boundaries, and ice shelf grounding lines.

  14. Keratometry and corneal topography using multiple delay element OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-02-01

    We have presented previously a novel method for the evaluation of the surface shape of an object, with immediate application to measurement of cornea shape. This method uses single shot C-scans obtained by using a multiple delay element (MDE) in the reference path of an OCT system. A calibrated MDE-OCT system can be used to measure the elevation of points on the cornea, in contrast to existing methods which are based on measurement of the cornea slope. The associated algorithm for extracting corneal topography data points from the MDE-OCT C-Scan image will be presented, data points which can then be used to calculate the Zernike coefficients for the cornea shape. The differences between the existing systems and the MDE-OCT method for keratometry and corneal topography are discussed.

  15. Advances in corneal topography measurements with conical null-screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Cossio-Guerrero, Cesar; Huerta-Carranza, Oliver; Moreno-Oliva, Víctor I.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we report the design of a null-screen for corneal topography. To avoid the difficulties in the alignment of the test system due to the face contour (eyebrows, nose, or eyelids), we design a conical null-screen with a novel radial points distribution drawn on it in such a way that its image, which is formed by reflection on the test surface, becomes an exact array of circular spots if the surface is perfect. Additionally, an algorithm to compute the sagittal and meridional radii of curvature for the corneal surface is presented. The sagittal radius is obtained from the surface normal, and the meridional radius is calculated from a function fitted to the derivative of the sagittal curvature by using the surfacenormals raw data. Experimental results for the testing a calibration spherical surface are shown. Also, we perform some corneal topography measurements.

  16. Synchronous interferometric demodulation of Placido mires applied to corneal topography

    CERN Document Server

    Servin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel digital interferometric method to demodulate Placido fringe patterns. This is a synchronous method which uses a computer-stored conic-wavefront as demodulating reference. Here we focuses on the experimental aspects to phase-demodulate Placido mires applied to corneal topography. This synchronous method is applied to two topographic Placido images and their de-modulated corneal-slope deformation is estimated. This conic-interferometric method is highly robust against typical "noisy" signals in Placido topography such as: reflected eyelashes and iris structures. That is because the eyelashes and the iris structure are high frequency "noisy" signals corrupting the reflected Placido mire, so they are filtered-out by this method. Digital synchronous interferometry is here applied for the first time to demodulate corneal topographic concentric-rings images (Patent pending at the USPTO).

  17. Topography measurement of micro structure by modulation-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Tang, Yan; Liu, Junbo; Deng, Qinyuan; Cheng, Yiguang; Hu, Song

    2016-10-01

    Dimensional metrology for micro structure plays an important role in addressing quality issues and observing the performance of micro-fabricated products. Different from the traditional white-light interferometry approach, the modulation-based method is expected to measure topography of micro structure by the obtained modulation of each interferometry image. Through seeking the maximum modulation of every pixel respectively in Z direction, the method could obtain the corresponding height of individual pixel and finally get topography of the structure. Owing to the characteristic of modulation, the proposed method which is not influenced by the change of background light intensity caused by instable light source and different reflection index of the structure could be widely applied with high stability. The paper both illustrates the principle of this novel method and conducts the experiment to verify the feasibility.

  18. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, and obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular, the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented.

  19. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, to obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented. 10 references, 11 figures.

  20. Venusian highlands - Geoid to topography ratios and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Phillips, Roger J.

    1991-01-01

    Geoid-to-topography ratios (GTRs) are estimated for 12 Venusian highland features to allow comparison with convection calculations and with terrestrial data of oceanic hot spots, swells, and plateaus. The geoid is estimated in the wavenumber domain from the isostatic formula, using the topography and the apparent depths isostatic compensation (ADC) for each region. In the space domain, the GTR is equal to the least squares slope of the linear fit of the geoid to the topograpy. The resulting GTR range is 7-31 m/km, which is much higher than terrestrial oceanic values (-1 to 5 m/km). The features fall into two distinct groups, one with a GTR range of 7-13 m/km, and one with a range of 19-25 m/km. A model for thermal thinning of a 100-km-thick lithosphere fits all values in the lower GTR group to within one standard deviation.

  1. The long wavelength topography of Beethoven and Tolstoj basins, Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Sarah L.; Watters, Thomas R.; Robinson, Mark S.

    2005-11-01

    Topography derived from Mariner 10 stereo images is used to characterize the interior structure of two mercurian basins, Beethoven and Tolstoj. Beethoven and Tolstoj basins are shallow (~2.5 km and ~2 km deep, respectively) and relatively flat-floored. Beethoven basin has an interior topographic rise near the northwest margin. The topography of Beethoven and Tolstoj basins is similar to that of lunar mare-filled basins. Well-developed basin-concentric wrinkle ridges and arcuate graben associated with lunar mascons are absent in both Beethoven and Tolstoj basins. The lack of mascon tectonic features suggests that either 1) the mercurian basins have a relatively thin veneer of fill material, 2) Mercury's elastic lithosphere was too strong for significant lithospheric flexure and subsidence to occur, or 3) the basin fill material has little or no density contrast with the surrounding crust and thus exerts little net load on the mercurian lithosphere.

  2. Towards Mapping the Ocean Surface Topography at 1 km Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Rodriquez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01