WorldWideScience

Sample records for complex subtypes iab

  1. Seroprevalence of antibodies to Venezuelan equine encephalitis complex (subtypes IAB and VI in humans from General Belgrano Island, Formosa, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cámara Alicia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of the detection of antibodies (immunoglobulin G for subtypes I and VI of VEE viruses complex (Togaviridae family in people from the General Belgrano island, Formosa province (Argentina. The prevalence of neutralizing (NT antibodies for subtype VI was from 30% to 70% and the prevalence of antibodies inhibitory of hemagglutination (HI was of 0% in the first and second inquiry respectively. For the subtype IAB the prevalence of NT antibodies was from 13% to 3.6%, similar to the prevalence total for both subtypes. HI antibodies were not detected in any inquiries for any subtype. It was observed that both subtypes circulate simultaneously, while subtype VI remains constant with some peaks, subtype I was found in low level.

  2. Characterizing cosmochemical materials with genetic affinities to the Earth: Genetic and chronological diversity within the IAB iron meteorite complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsham, Emily A.; Bermingham, Katherine R.; Walker, Richard J.

    2017-06-01

    The IAB iron meteorite complex consists of a main group (MG) and five chemical subgroups (sLL, sLM, sLH, sHL, and sHH). Here, mass-independent Mo and radiogenic 182W isotope compositions are reported for IAB complex meteorites to evaluate the genetics and chronology, respectively, of the MG and subgroups. Osmium isotopes are used to correct for cosmic ray exposure effects on isotopes of Mo and W. The MG and three subgroups (i.e., sLL, sLM, and sLH), characterized by low Au abundances, have the same Mo isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainty, consistent with a common genetic origin. These meteorites, together with winonaites, are the only cosmochemical materials yet identified with Mo isotopic compositions that are identical to Earth. The Mo isotopic compositions of two subgroups characterized by higher Au abundances (sHL and sHH) are identical to one another within uncertainty, but differ from the low Au subgroups, indicating derivation from genetically distinct materials. The MG has a 182W, post calcium-aluminum inclusion (CAI) formation model age of 3.4 ± 0.7 Ma. One of the low Au subgroups (sLM) is ∼1.7 Ma younger, whereas the high Au subgroups are ∼1.5-3 Ma older. The new Mo-W data, coupled with chemical data, indicate that the MG and the low Au subgroups formed in different impact-generated melts, some of which evidently formed on a chemically disparate, but genetically identical parent body. The high Au subgroups likely formed via core-formation processes on separate, internally-heated parent bodies from other IAB subgroups. The IAB complex meteorites fall on a linear trend defined by 94Mo/96Mo vs. 95Mo/96Mo, along with most other iron meteorite groups. Variation along this line was caused by mixing between at least two nebular components. One component was likely a pure s-process enriched nucleosynthetic carrier, and the other a homogenized nebular component. Sombrerete, currently classified as an sHL iron, has a Mo isotopic composition that

  3. The Drosophila microRNA iab-4 causes a dominant homeotic transformation of halteres to wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronshaugen, Matthew; Biemar, Frédéric; Piel, Jessica; Levine, Mike; Lai, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    The Drosophila Bithorax Complex encodes three well-characterized homeodomain proteins that direct segment identity, as well as several noncoding RNAs of unknown function. Here, we analyze the iab-4 locus, which produces the microRNAs iab-4-5p and iab-4-3p. iab-4 is analogous to miR-196 in vertebrate Hox clusters. Previous studies demonstrate that miR-196 interacts with the Hoxb8 3′ untranslated region. Evidence is presented that miR-iab-4-5p directly inhibits Ubx activity in vivo. Ectopic expression of mir-iab-4-5p attenuates endogenous Ubx protein accumulation and induces a classical homeotic mutant phenotype: the transformation of halteres into wings. These findings provide the first evidence for a noncoding homeotic gene and raise the possibility that other such genes occur within the Bithorax complex. We also discuss the regulation of mir-iab-4 expression during development. PMID:16357215

  4. A IAB-Complex Iron Meteorite Containing Low-Ca Clinopyroxene: Northwest Africa 468 and its Relationship to Iodranites and Formation by Impact Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Kallemeyn, Gregory W.; Wasson, John T.

    2002-01-01

    Northwest Africa 468 (NWA 468) is a new ungrouped, silicate-rich member of the IAB complex of nonmagmatic iron meteorites. The silicates contain relatively coarse (approximately 300 micron-size) grains of low-Ca clinopyroxene with polysynthetic twinning and inclined extinction. Low-Ca clinopyroxene is indicative of quenching from high temperatures (either from protoenstatite in a few seconds or high-temperature clinoenstatite in a few hours). It seems likely that NWA 468 formed by impact melting followed by rapid cooling to less than or equal to 660 C. After the loss of a metal-sulfide melt from the silicates, sulfide was reintroduced, either from impact-mobilized FeS or as an S2 vapor that combined with metallic Fe to produce FeS. The O-isotopic composition (delta O-17 = -1.39 %) indicates that the precursor material of NWA 468 was a metal-rich (e.g., CR) carbonaceous chondrite. Lodranites are similar in bulk chemical and O-isotopic composition to the silicates in NWA 468; the MAC 88177 lodranite (which also contains low-Ca clinopyroxene) is close in bulk chemical composition. Both NWA 468 and MAC 88177 have relatively low abundances of REE (rare earth elements) and plagiophile elements. Siderophiles in the metal-rich areas of NWA 468 are similar to those in the MAC 88177 whole rock; both samples contain low Ir and relatively high Fe, Cu and Se. Most unweathered lodranites contain approximately 20 - 38 wt. % metallic Fe-Ni. These rocks may have formed in an analogous manner to NWA 468 (i.e., by impact melting of metal-rich carbonaceous-chondrite precursors) but with less separation of metal-rich melts from silicates.

  5. Homicide-Complex Suicide: A Rare Subtype of Dyadic Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Akçan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Homicide-suicide, a subtype of dyadic death, is described as murderer’s suicide following committing a homicide. Here, we present a case of homicide-suicide which is relatively rare because of involving complex suicide as suicide method of perpetrator. A 30 year-old male and 38 year-old female were found dead in an apartment. Post­mortem investigation of man revealed that wrist cutting and hanging were used as suicide methods compatibly with complex suicide. Postmortem investigation of wom­an showed extensive traumatic lesions compatible with manual strangulation on neck structures and the mode of death was homicide. In the light of all findings case was concluded to be a dyadic death involving homicide-com­plex. The presented case is rare in terms of combination of rare methods of dyadic death, and committed complex suicide by perpetrator. While determining mode of death, detailed case history and witness statements should be taken into account along with forensic autopsy findings.

  6. 40Ar- 39Ar dating of plagioclase grain size separates from silicate inclusions in IAB iron meteorites and implications for the thermochronological evolution of the IAB parent body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Nadia; Renne, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    In order to better constrain the thermochronological evolution of the IAB parent body we performed a 40Ar/ 39Ar age study on individual silicate inclusions of the IAB irons Caddo County, Campo del Cielo, Landes, and Ocotillo. In contrast to earlier studies, several plagioclase separates of different grain sizes and quality grades were extracted from each inclusion to reduce the complexity of the age spectra and study the influence of these parameters on the Ar-Ar ages. In nearly all inclusions we found significantly different Ar-Ar ages among the separates (Caddo County: 4.472 ± 0.02-4.562 ± 0.02 Ga; Campo del Cielo 2: 4.362 ± 0.04-4.442 ± 0.03 Ga; Landes 2: 4.412 ± 0.05-4.522 ± 0.04 Ga; Ocotillo: 4.382 ± 0.04-4.462 ± 0.03 Ga). These ages were calculated using the new 40K decay constant published by [Mundil R., Renne P. R., Min K. and Ludwig K. R. (2006) Resolvable miscalibration of the 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronometer. Eos Trans. AGU 87, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract V21A-0543]. The ages did not systematically correlate with the respective grain size of the separate as expected, i.e., smaller grains did not necessarily show younger ages due to later closure to Ar diffusion or easier re-opening of the system in the course of a reheating event compared to larger grains. Based on the large range of Ar-Ar ages we suggest that the individual inclusions are composed of silicate grains from different locations within the IAB parent body. While some grains remained in a hot (deep) environment that allowed Ar diffusion over an extended time period—in some cases combined with grain coarsening—, others cooled significantly earlier (near surface) through the K/Ar blocking temperature. These different grains where brought together during an impact followed by mixing and reassembly of the debris as proposed by Benedix et al. [Benedix G. K., McCoy T. J., Keil K. and Love S. G. (2000) A petrologic study of the IAB iron meteorites: constraints on the formation of the IAB

  7. Complex regional pain syndrome: are there distinct subtypes and sequential stages of the syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehl, Stephen; Harden, R Norman; Galer, Bradley S; Saltz, Samuel; Backonja, Miroslav; Stanton-Hicks, Michael

    2002-01-01

    This study tested for evidence supporting the clinical lore of three sequential stages of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and examined the characteristics of possible CRPS subtypes. A series of 113 patients meeting IASP criteria for CRPS underwent standardized history and physical examinations to assess CRPS signs and symptoms in four domains identified in previous research: pain/sensory abnormalities, vasomotor dysfunction, edema/sudomotor dysfunction, and motor/trophic changes. K-Means cluster analysis was used to derive three relatively homogeneous CRPS patient subgroups based on similarity of sign/symptom patterns in these domains. The resulting CRPS subgroups did not differ significantly regarding pain duration as might be expected in a sequential staging model. However, the derived subgroups were statistically-distinct, and suggested three possible CRPS subtypes: (1) a relatively limited syndrome with vasomotor signs predominating, (2) a relatively limited syndrome with neuropathic pain/sensory abnormalities predominating, and (3) a florid CRPS syndrome similar to "classic RSD" descriptions. Subtype 3 showed the highest levels of motor/trophic signs and possible disuse-related changes (osteopenia) on bone scan, despite having directionally the briefest pain duration of the three groups. EMG/NCV testing suggests that Subtype 2 may reflect CRPS-Type 2 (causalgia). Overall, these results are consistent with limited previous work that argues against three sequential stages of CRPS. However, several distinct CRPS subtypes are suggested, and these could ultimately have utility in targeting treatment more effectively.

  8. In vivo protein interactions and complex formation in the Pectobacterium atrosepticum subtype I-F CRISPR/Cas System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Richter

    Full Text Available Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR and their associated proteins (Cas; CRISPR associated are a bacterial defense mechanism against extra-chromosomal elements. CRISPR/Cas systems are distinct from other known defense mechanisms insofar as they provide acquired and heritable immunity. Resistance is accomplished in multiple stages in which the Cas proteins provide the enzymatic machinery. Importantly, subtype-specific proteins have been shown to form complexes in combination with small RNAs, which enable sequence-specific targeting of foreign nucleic acids. We used Pectobacterium atrosepticum, a plant pathogen that causes soft-rot and blackleg disease in potato, to investigate protein-protein interactions and complex formation in the subtype I-F CRISPR/Cas system. The P. atrosepticum CRISPR/Cas system encodes six proteins: Cas1, Cas3, and the four subtype specific proteins Csy1, Csy2, Csy3 and Cas6f (Csy4. Using co-purification followed by mass spectrometry as well as directed co-immunoprecipitation we have demonstrated complex formation by the Csy1-3 and Cas6f proteins, and determined details about the architecture of that complex. Cas3 was also shown to co-purify all four subtype-specific proteins, consistent with its role in targeting. Furthermore, our results show that the subtype I-F Cas1 and Cas3 (a Cas2-Cas3 hybrid proteins interact, suggesting a protein complex for adaptation and a role for subtype I-F Cas3 proteins in both the adaptation and interference steps of the CRISPR/Cas mechanism.

  9. Deciphering the complex distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes among different cohorts in Northern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harr F Njai

    Full Text Available Increased understanding of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 is challenging but important in the development of an effective vaccine. We aimed to describe the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes in northern Tanzania among women enrolled in studies preparing for HIV-1 prevention trials (hospitality facility-worker cohorts, and among men and women in an open cohort demographic surveillance system (Kisesa cohort.The polymerase encompassing partial reverse transcriptase was sequenced and phylogenetic analysis performed and subtype determined. Questionnaires documented demographic data. We examined factors associated with subtype using multinomial logistic regression, adjusted for study, age, and sex.Among 140 individuals (125 women and 15 men, subtype A1 predominated (54, 39%, followed by C (46, 33%, D (25, 18% and unique recombinant forms (URFs (15, 11%. There was weak evidence to suggest different subtype frequencies by study (for example, 18% URFs in the Kisesa cohort versus 5-9% in the hospitality facility-worker cohorts; adjusted relative-risk ratio (aRR = 2.35 [95% CI 0.59,9.32]; global p = 0.09. Compared to men, women were less likely to have subtype D versus A (aRR = 0.12 [95% CI 0.02,0.76]; global p = 0.05. There was a trend to suggest lower relative risk of subtype D compared to A with older age (aRR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23,0.85] per 10 years; global p = 0.05.We observed multiple subtypes, confirming the complex genetic diversity of HIV-1 strains circulating in northern Tanzania, and found some differences between cohorts and by age and sex. This has important implications for vaccine design and development, providing opportunity to determine vaccine efficacy in diverse HIV-1 strains.

  10. Deciphering the Complex Distribution of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtypes among Different Cohorts in Northern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njai, Harr F.; Ewings, Fiona M.; Lyimo, Eric; Foulongne, Vincent; Ngerageza, Dhamira; Mongi, Aika; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Andreasen, Aura; Nyombi, Balthazar; Ao, Tony; Michael, Denna; Urassa, Mark; Todd, Jim; Zaba, Basia; Changalucha, John; Hayes, Richard; Kapiga, Saidi H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased understanding of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 is challenging but important in the development of an effective vaccine. We aimed to describe the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes in northern Tanzania among women enrolled in studies preparing for HIV-1 prevention trials (hospitality facility-worker cohorts), and among men and women in an open cohort demographic surveillance system (Kisesa cohort). Methods The polymerase encompassing partial reverse transcriptase was sequenced and phylogenetic analysis performed and subtype determined. Questionnaires documented demographic data. We examined factors associated with subtype using multinomial logistic regression, adjusted for study, age, and sex. Results Among 140 individuals (125 women and 15 men), subtype A1 predominated (54, 39%), followed by C (46, 33%), D (25, 18%) and unique recombinant forms (URFs) (15, 11%). There was weak evidence to suggest different subtype frequencies by study (for example, 18% URFs in the Kisesa cohort versus 5–9% in the hospitality facility-worker cohorts; adjusted relative-risk ratio (aRR) = 2.35 [95% CI 0.59,9.32]; global p = 0.09). Compared to men, women were less likely to have subtype D versus A (aRR = 0.12 [95% CI 0.02,0.76]; global p = 0.05). There was a trend to suggest lower relative risk of subtype D compared to A with older age (aRR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23,0.85] per 10 years; global p = 0.05). Conclusions We observed multiple subtypes, confirming the complex genetic diversity of HIV-1 strains circulating in northern Tanzania, and found some differences between cohorts and by age and sex. This has important implications for vaccine design and development, providing opportunity to determine vaccine efficacy in diverse HIV-1 strains. PMID:24349139

  11. Complex trait subtypes identification using transcriptome profiling reveals an interaction between two QTL affecting adiposity in chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blum Yuna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrative genomics approaches that combine genotyping and transcriptome profiling in segregating populations have been developed to dissect complex traits. The most common approach is to identify genes whose eQTL colocalize with QTL of interest, providing new functional hypothesis about the causative mutation. Another approach includes defining subtypes for a complex trait using transcriptome profiles and then performing QTL mapping using some of these subtypes. This approach can refine some QTL and reveal new ones. In this paper we introduce Factor Analysis for Multiple Testing (FAMT to define subtypes more accurately and reveal interaction between QTL affecting the same trait. The data used concern hepatic transcriptome profiles for 45 half sib male chicken of a sire known to be heterozygous for a QTL affecting abdominal fatness (AF on chromosome 5 distal region around 168 cM. Results Using this methodology which accounts for hidden dependence structure among phenotypes, we identified 688 genes that are significantly correlated to the AF trait and we distinguished 5 subtypes for AF trait, which are not observed with gene lists obtained by classical approaches. After exclusion of one of the two lean bird subtypes, linkage analysis revealed a previously undetected QTL on chromosome 5 around 100 cM. Interestingly, the animals of this subtype presented the same q paternal haplotype at the 168 cM QTL. This result strongly suggests that the two QTL are in interaction. In other words, the "q configuration" at the 168 cM QTL could hide the QTL existence in the proximal region at 100 cM. We further show that the proximal QTL interacts with the previous one detected on the chromosome 5 distal region. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that stratifying genetic population by molecular phenotypes followed by QTL analysis on various subtypes can lead to identification of novel and interacting QTL.

  12. Smooth pursuit eye movement (SPEM) in patients with multiple complex developmental disorder (MCDD), a subtype of the pervasive developmental disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahuis, Bertine E.; Van Engeland, Herman; Cahn, Wiepke; Caspers, Esther; Van der Geest, Jos N.; Van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Kemner, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Multiple complex developmental disorder (MCDD) is a well-defined and validated behavioural subtype of pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and is thought to be associated with a higher risk of developing a schizophrenic spectrum disorder. The question was

  13. Internalizing and Externalizing Subtypes in Female Sexual Assault Survivors: Implications for the Understanding of Complex PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark W.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    This study replicated and extended findings of internalizing and externalizing subtypes of posttraumatic psychopathology (Miller, M. W., Greif, J. L., & Smith, A. A. (2003). Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire profiles of veterans with traumatic combat exposure: Internalizing and externalizing subtypes. "Psychological Assessment, 15",…

  14. Fine mapping major histocompatibility complex associations in psoriasis and its clinical subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukinori; Han, Buhm; Tsoi, Lam C; Stuart, Philip E; Ellinghaus, Eva; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Chandran, Vinod; Pellett, Fawnda; Pollock, Remy; Bowcock, Anne M; Krueger, Gerald G; Weichenthal, Michael; Voorhees, John J; Rahman, Proton; Gregersen, Peter K; Franke, Andre; Nair, Rajan P; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Gladman, Dafna D; Elder, James T; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-08-07

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) risk is strongly associated with variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, but its genetic architecture has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we conducted a large-scale fine-mapping study of PsV risk in the MHC region in 9,247 PsV-affected individuals and 13,589 controls of European descent by imputing class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes from SNP genotype data. In addition, we imputed sequence variants for MICA, an MHC HLA-like gene that has been associated with PsV, to evaluate association at that locus as well. We observed that HLA-C(∗)06:02 demonstrated the lowest p value for overall PsV risk (p = 1.7 × 10(-364)). Stepwise analysis revealed multiple HLA-C(∗)06:02-independent risk variants in both class I and class II HLA genes for PsV susceptibility (HLA-C(∗)12:03, HLA-B amino acid positions 67 and 9, HLA-A amino acid position 95, and HLA-DQα1 amino acid position 53; p PsV, psoriatic arthritis (PsA; n = 3,038) and cutaneous psoriasis (PsC; n = 3,098). We found that risk heterogeneity between PsA and PsC might be driven by HLA-B amino acid position 45 (Pomnibus = 2.2 × 10(-11)), indicating that different genetic factors underlie the overall risk of PsV and the risk of specific PsV subphenotypes. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution HLA and MICA imputation for fine mapping causal variants in the MHC. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The IAB Congress 2016: Is there justice in the bioethics world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopichandran, Vijayaprasad

    2017-01-01

    This comment contains the reflections of a first-time participant in the 13th International Association of Bioethics Congress (IAB 2016), held from June 14 to 17, 2016, in Edinburgh. At the outset, I would like to make a couple of clarifications. First, the opinions expressed here are my personal reflections and second, I am a physician and public health practitioner by profession and my interest is bioethics. I reflect on the justice implications of the IAB 2016 from the perspective of the challenge of maintaining inclusivity in a multidisciplinary bioethics world.

  16. Biclustered Independent Component Analysis for Complex Biomarker and Subtype Identification from Structural Magnetic Resonance Images in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Castro, Eduardo; Rachkonda, Srinivas; van Erp, Theo G M; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith M; Mathalon, Daniel; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A; Greve, Douglas N; Andreassen, Ole A; Agartz, Ingrid; Mayer, Andrew R; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E; Bustillo, Juan; Calhoun, Vince D; Turner, Jessica A

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and cognitive symptoms domain-based subtyping in schizophrenia (Sz) has been critiqued due to the lack of neurobiological correlates and heterogeneity in symptom scores. We, therefore, present a novel data-driven framework using biclustered independent component analysis to detect subtypes from the reliable and stable gray matter concentration (GMC) of patients with Sz. The developed methodology consists of the following steps: source-based morphometry (SBM) decomposition, selection and sorting of two component loadings, subtype component reconstruction using group information-guided ICA (GIG-ICA). This framework was applied to the top two group discriminative components namely the insula/superior temporal gyrus/inferior frontal gyrus (I-STG-IFG component) and the superior frontal gyrus/middle frontal gyrus/medial frontal gyrus (SFG-MiFG-MFG component) from our previous SBM study, which showed diagnostic group difference and had the highest effect sizes. The aggregated multisite dataset consisted of 382 patients with Sz regressed of age, gender, and site voxelwise. We observed two subtypes (i.e., two different subsets of subjects) each heavily weighted on these two components, respectively. These subsets of subjects were characterized by significant differences in positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) positive clinical symptoms (p = 0.005). We also observed an overlapping subtype weighing heavily on both of these components. The PANSS general clinical symptom of this subtype was trend level correlated with the loading coefficients of the SFG-MiFG-MFG component (r = 0.25; p = 0.07). The reconstructed subtype-specific component using GIG-ICA showed variations in voxel regions, when compared to the group component. We observed deviations from mean GMC along with conjunction of features from two components characterizing each deciphered subtype. These inherent variations in GMC among patients with Sz could possibly indicate the need for

  17. Biclustered Independent Component Analysis for Complex Biomarker and Subtype Identification from Structural Magnetic Resonance Images in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cota Navin Gupta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and cognitive symptoms domain-based subtyping in schizophrenia (Sz has been critiqued due to the lack of neurobiological correlates and heterogeneity in symptom scores. We, therefore, present a novel data-driven framework using biclustered independent component analysis to detect subtypes from the reliable and stable gray matter concentration (GMC of patients with Sz. The developed methodology consists of the following steps: source-based morphometry (SBM decomposition, selection and sorting of two component loadings, subtype component reconstruction using group information-guided ICA (GIG-ICA. This framework was applied to the top two group discriminative components namely the insula/superior temporal gyrus/inferior frontal gyrus (I-STG-IFG component and the superior frontal gyrus/middle frontal gyrus/medial frontal gyrus (SFG-MiFG-MFG component from our previous SBM study, which showed diagnostic group difference and had the highest effect sizes. The aggregated multisite dataset consisted of 382 patients with Sz regressed of age, gender, and site voxelwise. We observed two subtypes (i.e., two different subsets of subjects each heavily weighted on these two components, respectively. These subsets of subjects were characterized by significant differences in positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS positive clinical symptoms (p = 0.005. We also observed an overlapping subtype weighing heavily on both of these components. The PANSS general clinical symptom of this subtype was trend level correlated with the loading coefficients of the SFG-MiFG-MFG component (r = 0.25; p = 0.07. The reconstructed subtype-specific component using GIG-ICA showed variations in voxel regions, when compared to the group component. We observed deviations from mean GMC along with conjunction of features from two components characterizing each deciphered subtype. These inherent variations in GMC among patients with Sz could possibly indicate the

  18. Cas5d Protein Processes Pre-crRNA and Assembles into a Cascade-like Interference Complex in Subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR-Cas System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Haitjema, Charles; Liu, Xueqi; Ding, Fran; Wang, Hongwei; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Ke, Ailong (Yale); (Cornell); (Tsinghua)

    2012-10-10

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), together with an operon of CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, form an RNA-based prokaryotic immune system against exogenous genetic elements. Cas5 family proteins are found in several type I CRISPR-Cas systems. Here, we report the molecular function of subtype I-C/Dvulg Cas5d from Bacillus halodurans. We show that Cas5d cleaves pre-crRNA into unit length by recognizing both the hairpin structure and the 3 single stranded sequence in the CRISPR repeat region. Cas5d structure reveals a ferredoxin domain-based architecture and a catalytic triad formed by Y46, K116, and H117 residues. We further show that after pre-crRNA processing, Cas5d assembles with crRNA, Csd1, and Csd2 proteins to form a multi-sub-unit interference complex similar to Escherichia coli Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense) in architecture. Our results suggest that formation of a crRNA-presenting Cascade-like complex is likely a common theme among type I CRISPR subtypes.

  19. Clinical significance of psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder: subtyping a complex disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, A E; Morer, A; Moreno, E; Plana, M T; Cordovilla, C; Lázaro, L

    2016-04-01

    A promising approach in relation to reducing phenotypic heterogeneity involves the identification of homogeneous subtypes of OCD based on age of onset, gender, clinical course and comorbidity. This study aims to assess the sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features of OCD patients in relation to gender and the presence or absence of another comorbid disorder. The sample comprised 112 children and adolescents of both sexes and aged 8-18 years, all of whom had a diagnosis of OCD. Overall, 67 % of OCD patients had one comorbid diagnosis, 20.5 % had two such diagnoses and 2.6 % had three comorbid diagnoses. The group of OCD patients with a comorbid neurodevelopmental disorder had significantly more family history of OCD in parents (p = .049), as compared with the no comorbidity group and the group with a comorbid internalizing disorder, and they also showed a greater predominance of males (p = .013) than did the group with a comorbid internalizing disorder. The group of OCD patients with internalizing comorbidity had a later age of onset of OCD (p = .001) compared with both the other groups. Although the initial severity was similar in all three groups, the need for pharmacological treatment and for hospitalization due to OCD symptomatology was greater in the groups with a comorbid neurodevelopmental disorder (p = .038 and p = .009, respectively) and a comorbid internalizing disorder (p = .008 and p = .004, respectively) than in the group without comorbidity. Our findings suggest that two subtypes of OCD can be defined on the basis of the comorbid pathology presented. The identification of different subtypes according to comorbidity is potentially useful in terms of understanding clinical variations, as well as in relation to treatment management and the use of therapeutic resources.

  20. Interpreting the I-Xe system in individual silicate grains from Toluca IAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdivtseva, O. V.; Meshik, A. P.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Petaev, M.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed isotopic and mineralogical studies of silicate inclusions separated from a troilite nodule of the Toluca IAB iron meteorite reveal the presence of radiogenic 129Xe in chlorapatite, plagioclase, perryite, and pyroxene grains. Subsequent I-Xe studies of 32 neutron-irradiated pyroxene grains indicate that high-Mg and low-Mg pyroxenes have distinctive I-Xe signatures. The I-Xe system in high-Mg pyroxenes closed at 4560.5 ± 2.4 Ma, probably reflecting exsolution of silicates from the melt, while the low-Mg pyroxenes closed at 4552.0 ± 3.7 Ma, 8.5 Ma later, providing a means for determining the cooling rate at the time of exsolution. If the host Toluca graphite-troiliterich inclusion formed after the breakup and reassembly of the IAB parent body as has been suggested, the I-Xe ages of the high-Mg pyroxenes separated from this inclusions indicate that this catastrophic impact occurred not later than 4560.5 Ma, 6.7 Ma after formation of CAIs. The cooling rate at the time of silicates exsolution in Toluca is 14.5 ± 10.0 °C/Ma.

  1. Late metal-silicate separation on the IAB parent asteroid: Constraints from combined W and Pt isotopes and thermal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alison C.; Cook, David L.; Lichtenberg, Tim; Reger, Philip M.; Ek, Mattias; Golabek, Gregor J.; Schönbächler, Maria

    2018-01-01

    The short-lived 182Hf-182W decay system is a powerful chronometer for constraining the timing of metal-silicate separation and core formation in planetesimals and planets. Neutron capture effects on W isotopes, however, significantly hamper the application of this tool. In order to correct for neutron capture effects, Pt isotopes have emerged as a reliable in-situ neutron dosimeter. This study applies this method to IAB iron meteorites, in order to constrain the timing of metal segregation on the IAB parent body. The ε182W values obtained for the IAB iron meteorites range from -3.61 ± 0.10 to -2.73 ± 0.09. Correlating εiPt with ε182W data yields a pre-neutron capture ε182W of -2.90 ± 0.06. This corresponds to a metal-silicate separation age of 6.0 ± 0.8 Ma after CAI for the IAB parent body, and is interpreted to represent a body-wide melting event. Later, between 10 and 14 Ma after CAI, an impact led to a catastrophic break-up and subsequent reassembly of the parent body. Thermal models of the interior evolution that are consistent with these estimates suggest that the IAB parent body underwent metal-silicate separation as a result of internal heating by short-lived radionuclides and accreted at around 1.4 ± 0.1 Ma after CAIs with a radius of greater than 60 km.

  2. Evolution and spread of Venezuelan equine encephalitis complex alphavirus in the Americas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi L Forrester

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE complex alphaviruses are important re-emerging arboviruses that cause life-threatening disease in equids during epizootics as well as spillover human infections. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of VEE complex alphaviruses by sequencing the genomes of 94 strains and performing phylogenetic analyses of 130 isolates using complete open reading frames for the nonstructural and structural polyproteins. Our analyses confirmed purifying selection as a major mechanism influencing the evolution of these viruses as well as a confounding factor in molecular clock dating of ancestors. Times to most recent common ancestors (tMRCAs could be robustly estimated only for the more recently diverged subtypes; the tMRCA of the ID/IAB/IC/II and IE clades of VEE virus (VEEV were estimated at ca. 149-973 years ago. Evolution of the IE subtype has been characterized by a significant evolutionary shift from the rest of the VEEV complex, with an increase in structural protein substitutions that are unique to this group, possibly reflecting adaptation to its unique enzootic mosquito vector Culex (Melanoconion taeniopus. Our inferred tree topologies suggest that VEEV is maintained primarily in situ, with only occasional spread to neighboring countries, probably reflecting the limited mobility of rodent hosts and mosquito vectors.

  3. The Chuckwalla, CA, IAB iron contains preterrestrial impact-produced diamonds with sphalerite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R. S., Jr.; Jarosewich, E.; Ross, D. R.; Wasson, J. T.; English, M.

    1994-07-01

    A 1.8-kg, roughly hemispherical shaped, iron meteorite was found by Melvin English on a slope of the Chuckwalla Mountains, Kern County, California. Neutron activation analysis yields 68 mg/g Ni, 4.6 mg/g Co, 104 micro-g/g Ga, 22 micro-g/g As, 2.9 micro-g/g Ir, and 1.6 micro-g/g Au. These values match well those for the average of IAB irons of this Ni content, with the exception that As is high by a factor of 2. Metallographic examination revealed that Chuckwalla is a cohenite-rich, coarse octahedrite that has been severely shock-altered. Superimposed on this preterrestrial shock-altered internal structure is a about 2-mm-thick heat-altered zone along the entire exterior edge of the about 14 sq cm surface. Schreibersite and taenite are melted close to the exterior edge of the heat-altered zone, but not in its interior or further into the slice. While cutting Chuckwalla to obtain material for study, the saw blade penetrated with unusual difficulty and was finally stopped. A black, 0.75-mm-diameter inclusion was found at the most forward point of this first cut. It was isolated from metal and subjected to X-ray examination. Powder diffraction data indicate both cubic diamond (diamond) and hexagonal diamond (lonsdaleite). All reflections are broad, indicating very small crystallines. A second carbonado (290 x 200 microns) was found in situ when over half of the large slice was prepared for metallographic examination. It is in association with two types of material. One appears to be a single-phase, gray mineral. The second type of area appears to be two-phase on a scale of a few micrometers or less and contains numerous small black inclusions and a small area of kamacite. It appears to have formed by shock melting. A second inclusion containing the two types of material is present in the same section, as are two smaller inclusions of the single-phase material. Of the three Fe meteorites that are now known to contain shock-produced diamonds, the shock event in two cases

  4. Impulsive and rigid temperament subtypes and executive functioning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicate that the rigid temperament subtype reacted slower to both complex (executive functioning) and less complex tasks (attention and working memory) than the impulsive temperament subtype. ... Significant differences were maintained with analyses of intelligence and parental education as covariates.

  5. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes-MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72-have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel...... from 2154 patients with FTD and 4308 controls), we did separate association analyses for each FTD subtype (behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, and FTD overlapping with motor neuron disease [FTD-MND]), followed by a meta-analysis of the entire dataset. We carried...

  6. Detection of the B"-GWGR variant in the southernmost region of Brazil: unveiling the complexity of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Maletich Junqueira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Typical human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B (HIV-1B sequences present a GPGR signature at the tip of the variable region 3 (V3 loop; however, unusual motifs harbouring a GWGR signature have also been isolated. Although epidemiological studies have detected this variant in approximately 17-50% of the total infections in Brazil, the prevalence of B"-GWGR in the southernmost region of Brazil is not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate the C2-V3 molecular diversity of the HIV-1B epidemic in southernmost Brazil. HIV-1 seropositive patients were ana-lysed at two distinct time points in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS98 and RS08 and at one time point in the state of Santa Catarina (SC08. Phylogenetic analysis classified 46 individuals in the RS98 group as HIV-1B and their molecular signatures were as follows: 26% B"-GWGR, 54% B-GPGR and 20% other motifs. In the RS08 group, HIV-1B was present in 32 samples: 22% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 19% other motifs. In the SC08 group, 32 HIV-1B samples were found: 28% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 13% other motifs. No association could be established between the HIV-1B V3 signatures and exposure categories in the HIV-1B epidemic in RS. However, B-GPGR seemed to be related to heterosexual individuals in the SC08 group. Our results suggest that the established B"-GWGR epidemics in both cities have similar patterns, which is likely due to their geographical proximity and cultural relationship.

  7. Detection of the B"-GWGR variant in the southernmost region of Brazil: unveiling the complexity of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; Medeiros, Rúbia Marília de; Leite, Thaysse Cristina Neiva Ferreira; Guimarães, Monick Lindenmeyer; Gräf, Tiago; Pinto, Aguinaldo Roberto; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2013-09-01

    Typical human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) sequences present a GPGR signature at the tip of the variable region 3 (V3) loop; however, unusual motifs harbouring a GWGR signature have also been isolated. Although epidemiological studies have detected this variant in approximately 17-50% of the total infections in Brazil, the prevalence of B"-GWGR in the southernmost region of Brazil is not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate the C2-V3 molecular diversity of the HIV-1B epidemic in southernmost Brazil. HIV-1 seropositive patients were ana-lysed at two distinct time points in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS98 and RS08) and at one time point in the state of Santa Catarina (SC08). Phylogenetic analysis classified 46 individuals in the RS98 group as HIV-1B and their molecular signatures were as follows: 26% B"-GWGR, 54% B-GPGR and 20% other motifs. In the RS08 group, HIV-1B was present in 32 samples: 22% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 19% other motifs. In the SC08 group, 32 HIV-1B samples were found: 28% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 13% other motifs. No association could be established between the HIV-1B V3 signatures and exposure categories in the HIV-1B epidemic in RS. However, B-GPGR seemed to be related to heterosexual individuals in the SC08 group. Our results suggest that the established B"-GWGR epidemics in both cities have similar patterns, which is likely due to their geographical proximity and cultural relationship.

  8. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... drive the late repolarization of the ventricle with some redundancy, and in atria this repolarization reserve is supplemented by the fairly atrial-specific KV1.5, Kir3, KCa, and K2P channels. The role of the latter two subtypes in atria is currently being clarified, and several findings indicate...... that they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure...

  9. Subtypes of cocaine abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R D; Mirin, S M

    1986-09-01

    We have characterized five subtypes of cocaine abusers on the basis of clinical presentation, family history data, and response to specific treatment interventions. These include depressed patients who value the euphorigenic effects of the drug, patients with bipolar or cyclothymic disorder who use cocaine to augment manic or hypomanic symptoms or to alleviate depression, adults with ADD, residual type, who find that cocaine has a paradoxical effect of increasing attention span and decreasing motor restlessness, patients with narcissistic and borderline personality disorders who use cocaine for its social prestige and because it bolsters self-esteem, and patients with antisocial personality disorder who use cocaine as part of an overall pattern of antisocial behavior. Although not all cocaine abusers fit neatly into these categories, careful psychiatric evaluation and subtyping is essential in designing a specific treatment program for these patients. As the prevalence rate of cocaine abuse increases, studies that examine the efficacy of various treatment approaches for specific subtypes of cocaine abusers will be essential. It is hoped that our work will be a step in that direction.

  10. Psychopathy subtypes and psychopathic violence

    OpenAIRE

    Koshkina Ekaterina Nikolaevna

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses two main subtypes of psychopathy and its characteristic traits that allow to differ them from each other. Following that, the existence of more specific subtypes of psychopathy and sociopathy is argued on the basis of the recent researches. Also, the inclination of psychopaths and sociopaths to various kinds of violence is examined.

  11. Global DNA methylation of ischemic stroke subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Soriano-Tárraga

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS, a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder, is among the leading causes of mortality and long-term disability in the western world. Epidemiological data provides evidence for a genetic component to the disease, but its epigenetic involvement is still largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, change over time and may be associated with aging processes and with modulation of the risk of various pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. We analyzed 2 independent cohorts of IS patients. Global DNA methylation was measured by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA of DNA blood samples. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the methylation differences between the 3 most common IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA, small-artery disease (SAD, and cardio-aortic embolism (CE. A total of 485 IS patients from 2 independent hospital cohorts (n = 281 and n = 204 were included, distributed across 3 IS subtypes: LAA (78/281, 59/204, SAD (97/281, 53/204, and CE (106/281, 89/204. In univariate analyses, no statistical differences in LUMA levels were observed between the 3 etiologies in either cohort. Multivariate analysis, adjusted by age, sex, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, confirmed the lack of differences in methylation levels between the analyzed IS subtypes in both cohorts. Despite differences in pathogenesis, our results showed no global methylation differences between LAA, SAD, and CE subtypes of IS. Further work is required to establish whether the epigenetic mechanism of methylation might play a role in this complex disease.

  12. Lung Adenocarcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma Gene Expression Subtypes Demonstrate Significant Differences in Tumor Immune Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruki, Hawazin; Mayhew, Gregory M; Serody, Jonathan S; Hayes, D Neil; Perou, Charles M; Lai-Goldman, Myla

    2017-06-01

    Molecular subtyping of lung adenocarcinoma (AD) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) reveal biologically diverse tumors that vary in their genomic and clinical attributes. Published immune cell signatures and several lung AD and SCC gene expression data sets, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, were used to examine immune response in relation to AD and SCC expression subtypes. Expression of immune cell populations and other immune related genes, including CD274 molecule gene (CD274) (programmed death ligand 1), was investigated in the tumor microenvironment relative to the expression subtypes of the AD (terminal respiratory unit, proximal proliferative, and proximal inflammatory) and SCC (primitive, classical, secretory, and basal) subtypes. Lung AD and SCC expression subtypes demonstrated significant differences in tumor immune landscape. The proximal proliferative subtype of AD demonstrated low immune cell expression among ADs whereas the secretory subtype showed elevated immune cell expression among SCCs. Tumor expression subtype was a better predictor of immune cell expression than CD274 (programmed death ligand 1) in SCC tumors but was a comparable predictor in AD tumors. Nonsilent mutation burden was not correlated with immune cell expression across subtypes; however, major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression was highly correlated with immune cell expression. Increased immune and major histocompatibility complex II gene expression was associated with improved survival in the terminal respiratory unit and proximal inflammatory subtypes of AD and in the primitive subtype of SCC. Molecular expression subtypes of lung AD and SCC demonstrate key and reproducible differences in immune host response. Evaluation of tumor expression subtypes as potential biomarkers for immunotherapy should be investigated. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Subtypes of Patients Experiencing Exacerbations of COPD and Associations with Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arostegui, Inmaculada; Esteban, Cristobal; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Bare, Marisa; Fernández-de-Larrea, Nerea; Briones, Eduardo; Quintana, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous condition characterized by occasional exacerbations. Identifying clinical subtypes among patients experiencing COPD exacerbations (ECOPD) could help better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in exacerbations, establish different strategies of treatment, and improve the process of care and patient prognosis. The objective of this study was to identify subtypes of ECOPD patients attending emergency departments using clinical variables and to validate the results using several outcomes. We evaluated data collected as part of the IRYSS-COPD prospective cohort study conducted in 16 hospitals in Spain. Variables collected from ECOPD patients attending one of the emergency departments included arterial blood gases, presence of comorbidities, previous COPD treatment, baseline severity of COPD, and previous hospitalizations for ECOPD. Patient subtypes were identified by combining results from multiple correspondence analysis and cluster analysis. Results were validated using key outcomes of ECOPD evolution. Four ECOPD subtypes were identified based on the severity of the current exacerbation and general health status (largely a function of comorbidities): subtype A (n = 934), neither high comorbidity nor severe exacerbation; subtype B (n = 682), moderate comorbidities; subtype C (n = 562), severe comorbidities related to mortality; and subtype D (n = 309), very severe process of exacerbation, significantly related to mortality and admission to an intensive care unit. Subtype D experienced the highest rate of mortality, admission to an intensive care unit and need for noninvasive mechanical ventilation, followed by subtype C. Subtypes A and B were primarily related to other serious complications. Hospitalization rate was more than 50% for all the subtypes, although significantly higher for subtypes C and D than for subtypes A and B. These results could help identify

  14. Chemical classification of iron meteorites. IX - A new group /IIF/, revision of IAB and IIICD, and data on 57 additional irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracher, A.; Willis, J.; Wasson, J. T.

    1980-06-01

    The paper discusses the chemical classification of independent iron meteorites which include 57 meteorites based on structural observations and concentrations of Ni, Ga, Ge, and Ir. Instrumental neutron activation analysis indicates that five previously studied irons with very high Ge/Ga ratios are compositionally closely related and can be gathered together as group IIF; a previously unstudied iron, Dehesa, has the highest Ge/Ga ratios known in an iron meteorite, a ratio 18 times higher than that in CI chondrites. In terms of Ge/Ga ratios and other properties, group IIF shows genetic links to the Eagle station pallasites and CO/CV chondrites. The iron with the highest Ni concentration, Oktibbeha County, is a member of group IAB, and it extends the concentration ranges of all elements in this nonmagnetic group.

  15. Subtle conformational changes induced in major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervonsky, A V; Medzhitov, R M; Denzin, L K; Barlow, A K; Rudensky, A Y; Janeway, C A

    1998-08-18

    Intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is characterized by passage through specialized endocytic compartment(s) where antigenic peptides replace invariant chain fragments in the presence of the DM protein. These changes are accompanied by structural transitions of the MHC molecules that can be visualized by formation of compact SDS-resistant dimers, by changes in binding of mAbs, and by changes in T cell responses. We have observed that a mAb (25-9-17) that is capable of staining I-Ab on the surface of normal B cells failed to interact with I-Ab complexes with a peptide derived from the Ealpha chain of the I-E molecule but bound a similar covalent complex of I-Ab with the class II binding fragment (class II-associated invariant chain peptides) of the invariant chain. Moreover, 25-9-17 blocked activation of several I-Ab-reactive T cell hybridomas but failed to block others, suggesting that numerous I-Ab-peptide complexes acquire the 25-9-17(+) or 25-9-17(-) conformation. Alloreactive T cells were also able to discriminate peptide-dependent variants of MHC class II molecules. Thus, peptides impose subtle structural transitions upon MHC class II molecules that affect T cell recognition and may thus be critical for T cell selection and autiommunity.

  16. Dyscalculia and Attention Deficit Subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1999-01-01

    The association of specific academic deficits with attention deficit disorder (ADD) subtypes was determined in 20 students (ages 8-12) with ADD with hyperactivity (ADD/H) compared to 20 with ADD without hyperactivity (ADD/noH), at the Department of Educational Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, TX.

  17. Sleep quality subtypes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Christopher A; Reddy, Prasuna; Robinson, Laura; McGregor, Alisha

    2016-12-01

    Poor sleep quality could be a risk factor for obesity. This article utilized a person-centered approach to investigate whether distinct sleep quality subtypes were associated with obesity directly, and indirectly via physical activity. The sample included 8,932 Australian employees who participated in the Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey. Structured interviews and self-report questionnaires collected information on sleep quality, obesity, and relevant demographic, health, and work-related variables. Latent class analysis identified distinct subtypes of sleep quality. General linear modeling examined the associations of sleep quality subtypes with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Multicategorical mediation models examined indirect paths linking sleep quality classes with obesity via physical activity. Five distinct sleep quality subtypes were identified: Poor Sleepers (20.0%), Frequent Sleep Disturbances (19.2%), Minor Sleep Disturbances (24.5%), Long Sleepers (9.6%), and Good Sleepers (26.7%). BMI, waist circumference, and physical activity differed among the sleep quality subtypes, with similar results observed for males and females. For example, Poor Sleepers had the highest BMIs, followed by Frequent Sleep Disturbances and Minor Sleep Disturbances; Long Sleepers and Good Sleepers had the lowest BMIs. Mediation analyses indicated that low levels of physical activity linked the Poor Sleep, Frequent Sleep Disturbance, and Long Sleep classes with higher BMI. These results provide new insights into the nature of sleep quality in employees. In particular, distinct sleep quality patterns had differing associations with measures of obesity, suggesting the need for tailored workplace interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  19. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bagaglio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4% in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2% in 1a isolates, p = 0.040. Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1% G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5% harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001. Finally, 28 (2.3% G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001. In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs.

  20. Subtypes of paranoia in a nonclinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Dennis R; Penn, David L; Chadwick, Paul; Trower, Peter; Michael, Christopher O; Basso, Michael R

    2007-11-01

    Previous research has proposed that there may be subtypes of paranoia with different patterns of performance on symptom and clinical measures. However, there has been little empirical examination of whether distinct subtypes actually exist. Recent research has suggested that paranoia can be found in normal individuals and exists on a continuum. Thus, it is possible that evidence for subtypes of paranoia can be derived from nonclinical samples. From a total of 723 participants, we identified 114 college students who showed elevated levels of paranoia as determined by two measures of paranoid ideation. The remaining sample of 609 persons served as the nonparanoid control group. All participants completed measures of depression, self-esteem, and social anxiety. Scores from the high subclinical group was subjected to cluster analysis to derive homogeneous subtypes. Participants also completed a measure of attributional style, the IPSAQ, which was used to validate the subtypes and was not used in the cluster analysis. Based on the cluster analysis, three subtypes were derived. Each subtype showed a different pattern of scores on measures of depression, self-esteem, and anxiety. There were also additional differences on the externalising and personalising bias scores from the IPSAQ between the subtypes. We conclude that there is preliminary evidence for the presence of subtypes among nonclinical samples and discuss the patterns of performance in relation to previous research on subtypes of paranoia. The implications of these subtypes for the study of paranoia are discussed.

  1. MALDI profiling of human lung cancer subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Gámez-Pozo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proteomics is expected to play a key role in cancer biomarker discovery. Although it has become feasible to rapidly analyze proteins from crude cell extracts using mass spectrometry, complex sample composition hampers this type of measurement. Therefore, for effective proteome analysis, it becomes critical to enrich samples for the analytes of interest. Despite that one-third of the proteins in eukaryotic cells are thought to be phosphorylated at some point in their life cycle, only a low percentage of intracellular proteins is phosphorylated at a given time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we have applied chromatographic phosphopeptide enrichment techniques to reduce the complexity of human clinical samples. A novel method for high-throughput peptide profiling of human tumor samples, using Parallel IMAC and MALDI-TOF MS, is described. We have applied this methodology to analyze human normal and cancer lung samples in the search for new biomarkers. Using a highly reproducible spectral processing algorithm to produce peptide mass profiles with minimal variability across the samples, lineal discriminant-based and decision tree-based classification models were generated. These models can distinguish normal from tumor samples, as well as differentiate the various non-small cell lung cancer histological subtypes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A novel, optimized sample preparation method and a careful data acquisition strategy is described for high-throughput peptide profiling of small amounts of human normal lung and lung cancer samples. We show that the appropriate combination of peptide expression values is able to discriminate normal lung from non-small cell lung cancer samples and among different histological subtypes. Our study does emphasize the great potential of proteomics in the molecular characterization of cancer.

  2. Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and <i>ab initio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Oberg, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Beye, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Dell' Angela, M. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Turner, J. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gladh, J. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ng, M. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sellberg, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kaya, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mercurio, G. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Hieke, F. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Nordlund, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dakovski, G. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Minitti, M. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fohlisch, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Univ. Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Wolf, M. [Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, Berlin (Germany); Wurth, W. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY Photon Science, Hamburg (Germany); Ogasawara, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Norskov, J. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Ostrom, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, L. G. M. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ablid-Pedersen, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    We show that coadsorbed oxygen atoms have a dramatic influence on the CO desorption dynamics from Ru(0001). In contrast to the precursor-mediated desorption mechanism on Ru(0001), the presence of surface oxygen modifies the electronic structure of Ru atoms such that CO desorption occurs predominantly via the direct pathway. This phenomenon is directly observed in an ultrafast pump-probe experiment using a soft x-ray free-electron laser to monitor the dynamic evolution of the valence electronic structure of the surface species. This is supported with the potential of mean force along the CO desorption path obtained from density-functional theory calculations. Charge density distribution and frozen-orbital analysis suggest that the oxygen-induced reduction of the Pauli repulsion, and consequent increase of the dative interaction between the CO 5σ and the charged Ru atom, is the electronic origin of the distinct desorption dynamics. <i>Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO desorption from Ru(0001) and oxygen-coadsorbed Ru(0001) provide further insights into the surface bond-breaking process.

  3. Botulinum toxin therapy for treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis: review and recommendations of the IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Dirk; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Bohlega, Saeed; Chahidi, Abderrahmane; Chung, Tae Mo; Ebke, Markus; Jacinto, L Jorge; Kaji, Ryuji; Koçer, Serdar; Kanovsky, Petr; Micheli, Federico; Orlova, Olga; Paus, Sebastian; Pirtosek, Zvezdan; Relja, Maja; Rosales, Raymond L; Sagástegui-Rodríguez, José Alberto; Schoenle, Paul W; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Timerbaeva, Sofia; Walter, Uwe; Saberi, Fereshte Adib

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) therapy is an established treatment of spasticity due to stroke. For multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity this is not the case. IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders formed a task force to explore the use of BT therapy for treatment of MS spasticity. A formalised PubMed literature search produced 55 publications (3 randomised controlled trials, 3 interventional studies, 11 observational studies, 2 case studies, 35 reviews, 1 guideline) all unanimously favouring the use of BT therapy for MS spasticity. There is no reason to believe that BT should be less effective and safe in MS spasticity than it is in stroke spasticity. Recommendations include an update of the current prevalence of MS spasticity and its clinical features according to classifications used in movement disorders. Immunological data on MS patients already treated should be analysed with respect to frequencies of MS relapses and BT antibody formation. Registration authorities should expand registration of BT therapy for spasticity regardless of its aetiology. MS specialists should consider BT therapy for symptomatic treatment of spasticity.

  4. A Meta-Regression Method for Studying Etiological Heterogeneity Across Disease Subtypes Classified by Multiple Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Molin; Kuchiba, Aya; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    In interdisciplinary biomedical, epidemiologic, and population research, it is increasingly necessary to consider pathogenesis and inherent heterogeneity of any given health condition and outcome. As the unique disease principle implies, no single biomarker can perfectly define disease subtypes. The complex nature of molecular pathology and biology necessitates biostatistical methodologies to simultaneously analyze multiple biomarkers and subtypes. To analyze and test for heterogeneity hypotheses across subtypes defined by multiple categorical and/or ordinal markers, we developed a meta-regression method that can utilize existing statistical software for mixed-model analysis. This method can be used to assess whether the exposure-subtype associations are different across subtypes defined by 1 marker while controlling for other markers and to evaluate whether the difference in exposure-subtype association across subtypes defined by 1 marker depends on any other markers. To illustrate this method in molecular pathological epidemiology research, we examined the associations between smoking status and colorectal cancer subtypes defined by 3 correlated tumor molecular characteristics (CpG island methylator phenotype, microsatellite instability, and the B-Raf protooncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF), mutation) in the Nurses' Health Study (1980–2010) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986–2010). This method can be widely useful as molecular diagnostics and genomic technologies become routine in clinical medicine and public health. PMID:26116215

  5. Insight into highly conserved H1 subtype-specific epitopes in influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Joon Cho

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses continuously undergo antigenic changes with gradual accumulation of mutations in hemagglutinin (HA that is a major determinant in subtype specificity. The identification of conserved epitopes within specific HA subtypes gives an important clue for developing new vaccines and diagnostics. We produced and characterized nine monoclonal antibodies that showed significant neutralizing activities against H1 subtype influenza viruses, and determined the complex structure of HA derived from a 2009 pandemic virus A/Korea/01/2009 (KR01 and the Fab fragment from H1-specific monoclonal antibody GC0587. The overall structure of the complex was essentially identical to the previously determined KR01 HA-Fab0757 complex structure. Both Fab0587 and Fab0757 recognize readily accessible head regions of HA, revealing broadly shared and conserved antigenic determinants among H1 subtypes. The β-strands constituted by Ser110-Glu115 and Lys169-Lys170 form H1 epitopes with distinct conformations from those of H1 and H3 HA sites. In particular, Glu112, Glu115, Lys169, and Lys171 that are highly conserved among H1 subtype HAs have close contacts with HCDR3 and LCDR3. The differences between Fab0587 and Fab0757 complexes reside mainly in HCDR3 and LCDR3, providing distinct antigenic determinants specific for 1918 pdm influenza strain. Our results demonstrate a potential key neutralizing epitope important for H1 subtype specificity in influenza virus.

  6. Identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of retinoid X and retinoic acid receptors via quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Motonori; Shudo, Koichi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Understanding and identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of a ligand is an important issue in the field of drug discovery. Using a combination of classical molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical calculations, this report assesses the receptor subtype selectivity for the human retinoid X receptor (hRXR) and retinoic acid receptor (hRAR) ligand-binding domains (LBDs) complexed with retinoid ligands. The calculated energies show good correlation with the experimentally reported binding affinities. The technique proposed here is a promising method as it reveals the origin of the receptor subtype selectivity of selective ligands.

  7. SUBTYPES OF JUVENILE SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M N Slarovoitova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to allot clinical forms of juvenile systemic scleroderma (JSSD. Material and methods: investigation and dynamic observation of 60 patients aged 14-54 (mean age 25.1 ±7.2 with onset of disease in child's and adolescent’s ages from 1 to 16 years old ( in average 11. 4±3.8 year old and disease duration from 1 to 39 years (in average 13.1 ±7.9. Results: 55% of patients demonstrated JSSD subtype with focal cutaneous lesion of different localization. The possibility of overlap-syndrome development in JSSD patients with onset in adolescent age typical for SSD-rheumatoid arthritis, SSD-polymvositis should be underlined. Conclusion: knowledge of different clinical forms and courses of the disease, modern diagnostics and early beginning of differential JSSD treatment will enable us to improve the prognosis and disease outcome.

  8. Transsexual subtypes : Clinical and theoretical significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, YLS; van Goozen, SHM; Kuiper, AJ; Cohen-Kettenis, PT

    2005-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether transsexuals can be validly subdivided into subtypes on the basis of sexual orientation, and whether differences between subtypes of transsexuals are similar for male-to-female (ME) and female-to-male transsexuals (FMs). Within a large

  9. Molecular Subtyping in Cholera Outbreak, Laos, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithivong, Noikaseumsy; Morita-Ishihara, Tomoko; Vongdouangchanh, Arounnapha; Phouthavane, Traykhouane; Chomlasak, Khampheng; Sisavath, Lay; Khamphaphongphane, Bouaphanh; Sengkeopraseuth, Bounthanom; Vongprachanh, Phengta; Keosavanh, Onechanh; Southalack, Kongmany; Jiyoung, Lee; Tsuyuoka, Reiko; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    A cholera outbreak in Laos in July 2010 involved 237 cases, including 4 deaths. Molecular subtyping indicated relatedness between the Vibrio cholerae isolates in this and in a 2007 outbreak, uncovering a clonal group of V. cholerae circulating in the Mekong basin. Our finding suggests the subtyping methods will affect this relatedness. PMID:22099098

  10. Serum proteomic profiles of depressive subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, F; Bot, M; Jansen, R; Chan, M K; Cooper, J D; Bahn, S; Penninx, B W J H

    2016-07-12

    Depression is a highly heterogeneous disorder. Accumulating evidence suggests biological and genetic differences between subtypes of depression that are homogeneous in symptom presentation. We aimed to evaluate differences in serum protein profiles between persons with atypical and melancholic depressive subtypes, and compare these profiles with serum protein levels of healthy controls. We used the baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety on 414 controls, 231 persons with a melancholic depressive subtype and 128 persons with an atypical depressive subtype for whom the proteomic data were available. Depressive subtypes were previously established using a data-driven analysis, and 171 serum proteins were measured on a multi-analyte profiling platform. Linear regression models were adjusted for several covariates and corrected for multiple testing using false discovery rate q-values. We observed differences in analytes between the atypical and melancholic subtypes (9 analytes, q<0.05) and between atypical depression and controls (23 analytes, q<0.05). Eight of the nine markers differing between the atypical and melancholic subtype overlapped with markers from the comparison between atypical subtype and controls (mesothelin, leptin, IGFBP1, IGFBP2, FABPa, insulin, C3 and B2M), and were mainly involved in cellular communication and signal transduction, and immune response. No markers differed significantly between the melancholic subtype and controls. To conclude, although some uncertainties exist in our results as a result of missing data imputation and lack of proteomic replication samples, many of the identified analytes are inflammatory or metabolic markers, which supports the notion of atypical depression as a syndrome characterized by metabolic disturbances and inflammation, and underline the importance and relevance of subtypes of depression in biological and genetic research, and potentially in the treatment of depression.

  11. Ultrasound as predictor of histologic subtypes linked to recurrence in basal cell carcinoma of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortsman, X; Vergara, P; Castro, A; Saavedra, D; Bobadilla, F; Sazunic, I; Zemelman, V; Wortsman, J

    2015-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) recurrences, especially in the facial region, represent a complex cosmetic problem. To date the possibility of predicting recurrence is supported solely by the histologic subtype. To evaluate the relationship between BCC histologic subtypes linked to high and low risk of recurrence and the presence of hyperechoic spots on sonography. Retrospective analysis of the pre-surgical ultrasound examinations of primary BCC tumours with visualization and counting of intra-tumoural hyperechoic spots. The data were then correlated with the corresponding histologic subtype. Thirty one patients with histologically proven BCC were included in the study. Hyperechoic spots were detected in all cases and there was a positive, statistically significant association between hyperechoic spots count and high recurrence risk histologic subtypes. Higher hyperechoic spots count was found in the recurrence-prone micronodular, sclerosing variant and morpheiform BCC subtypes. Low risk and high risk of recurrence showed a significant difference on the mean hyperechoic spots count of 5.5 (range: 3-25) and 8 (4-81). A cut-off point ≥7 hyperechoic spots presented a sensitivity of 79% and specificity of 53% for predicting the high risk of recurrence subtypes. The presence and count of hyperechoic spots within BCC lesions may help predicting the high risk of recurrence histologic subtypes. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Molecular subtypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Tonoli, Elisa; Giaccone, Giorgio; Moda, Fabio; Paterlini, Anna; Campagnani, Ilaria; Sorrentino, Stefano; Colombo, Laura; Kubis, Adriana; Bistaffa, Edoardo; Ghetti, Bernardino; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2018-02-19

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a central feature of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), in which assemblies of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides accumulate in the brain in the form of parenchymal and/or vascular amyloid. A widely accepted concept is that AD is characterized by distinct clinical and neuropathological phenotypes. Recent studies revealed that Aβ assemblies might have structural differences among AD brains and that such pleomorphic assemblies can correlate with distinct disease phenotypes. We found that in both sporadic and inherited forms of AD, amyloid aggregates differ in the biochemical composition of Aβ species. These differences affect the physicochemical properties of Aβ assemblies including aggregation kinetics, resistance to degradation by proteases and seeding ability. Aβ-amyloidosis can be induced and propagated in animal models by inoculation of brain extracts containing aggregated Aβ. We found that brain homogenates from AD patients with different molecular profiles of Aβ are able to induce distinct patterns of Aβ-amyloidosis when injected into mice. Overall these data suggest that the assembly of mixtures of Aβ peptides into different Aβ seeds leads to the formation of distinct subtypes of amyloid having distinctive physicochemical and biological properties which result in the generation of distinct AD molecular subgroups.

  13. Verified Subtyping with Traits and Mixins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asankhaya Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Traits allow decomposing programs into smaller parts and mixins are a form of composition that resemble multiple inheritance. Unfortunately, in the presence of traits, programming languages like Scala give up on subtyping relation between objects. In this paper, we present a method to check subtyping between objects based on entailment in separation logic. We implement our method as a domain specific language in Scala and apply it on the Scala standard library. We have verified that 67% of mixins used in the Scala standard library do indeed conform to subtyping between the traits that are used to build them.

  14. Kepler sheds new and unprecedented light on the variability of a blue supergiant: Gravity waves in the O9.5Iab star HD 188209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, C.; Símon-Díaz, S.; Bloemen, S.; Debosscher, J.; Pápics, P. I.; Bryson, S.; Still, M.; Moravveji, E.; Williamson, M. H.; Grundahl, F.; Fredslund Andersen, M.; Antoci, V.; Pallé, P. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Rogers, T. M.

    2017-06-01

    Stellar evolution models are most uncertain for evolved massive stars. Asteroseismology based on high-precision uninterrupted space photometry has become a new way to test the outcome of stellar evolution theory and was recently applied to a multitude of stars, but not yet to massive evolved supergiants.Our aim is to detect, analyse and interpret the photospheric and wind variability of the O9.5 Iab star HD 188209 from Kepler space photometry and long-term high-resolution spectroscopy. We used Kepler scattered-light photometry obtained by the nominal mission during 1460 d to deduce the photometric variability of this O-type supergiant. In addition, we assembled and analysed high-resolution high signal-to-noise spectroscopy taken with four spectrographs during some 1800 d to interpret the temporal spectroscopic variability of the star. The variability of this blue supergiant derived from the scattered-light space photometry is in full in agreement with the one found in the ground-based spectroscopy. We find significant low-frequency variability that is consistently detected in all spectral lines of HD 188209. The photospheric variability propagates into the wind, where it has similar frequencies but slightly higher amplitudes. The morphology of the frequency spectra derived from the long-term photometry and spectroscopy points towards a spectrum of travelling waves with frequency values in the range expected for an evolved O-type star. Convectively-driven internal gravity waves excited in the stellar interior offer the most plausible explanation of the detected variability. Based on photometric observations made with the NASA Kepler satellite and on spectroscopic observations made with four telescopes: the Nordic Optical Telescope operated by NOTSA and the Mercator Telescope operated by the Flemish Community, both at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Spain) of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, the T13 2.0 m Automatic Spectroscopic

  15. Symptom-based subtypes of depression and their psychosocial correlates: a person-centered approach focusing on the influence of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Stephanie; Grosse Holtforth, Martin; Müller, Mario; Hengartner, Michael P; Rössler, Wulf; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta

    2014-03-01

    Reducing the complexity of major depressive disorder by symptom-based subtypes constitutes the basis of more specific treatments. To date, few studies have empirically derived symptom subtypes separated by sex, although the impact of sex has been widely accepted in depression research. The community-based sample included 373 males and 443 females from the Zurich Program for Sustainable Development of Mental Health Services (ZInEP) manifesting depressive symptoms in the past 12 months. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was performed separately by sex to extract sex-related depression subtypes. The subtypes were characterized by psychosocial characteristics. Three similar subtypes were found in both sexes: a severe typical subtype (males: 22.8%; females: 35.7%), a severe atypical subtype (males: 17.4%; females: 22.6%), and a moderate subtype (males: 25.2%; females: 41.8%). In males, two additional subgroups were identified: a severe irritable/angry-rejection sensitive (IARS) subtype (30%) comprising the largest group, and a small psychomotor retarded subtype (4%). Males belonging to the severe typical subtype exhibited the lowest masculine gender role orientation, while females of the typical subtype showed more anxiety disorders. The severe atypical subtype was associated with eating disorders in both sexes and with alcohol/drug abuse/dependence in females. In contrast, alcohol/drug abuse/dependence was associated with the severe IARS subtype in males. The study had a cross-sectional design, allowing for no causal inferences. This study contributes to a better understanding of sex-related depression subtypes, which can be well distinguished on the basis of symptom profiles. This provides the base for future research investigating the etiopathogenesis and effective treatment of the heterogeneous depression disorder. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Identifying Cancer Subtypes from miRNA-TF-mRNA Regulatory Networks and Expression Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taosheng Xu

    Full Text Available Identifying cancer subtypes is an important component of the personalised medicine framework. An increasing number of computational methods have been developed to identify cancer subtypes. However, existing methods rarely use information from gene regulatory networks to facilitate the subtype identification. It is widely accepted that gene regulatory networks play crucial roles in understanding the mechanisms of diseases. Different cancer subtypes are likely caused by different regulatory mechanisms. Therefore, there are great opportunities for developing methods that can utilise network information in identifying cancer subtypes.In this paper, we propose a method, weighted similarity network fusion (WSNF, to utilise the information in the complex miRNA-TF-mRNA regulatory network in identifying cancer subtypes. We firstly build the regulatory network where the nodes represent the features, i.e. the microRNAs (miRNAs, transcription factors (TFs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs and the edges indicate the interactions between the features. The interactions are retrieved from various interatomic databases. We then use the network information and the expression data of the miRNAs, TFs and mRNAs to calculate the weight of the features, representing the level of importance of the features. The feature weight is then integrated into a network fusion approach to cluster the samples (patients and thus to identify cancer subtypes. We applied our method to the TCGA breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM datasets. The experimental results show that WSNF performs better than the other commonly used computational methods, and the information from miRNA-TF-mRNA regulatory network contributes to the performance improvement. The WSNF method successfully identified five breast cancer subtypes and three GBM subtypes which show significantly different survival patterns. We observed that the expression patterns of the features in some mi

  17. CaMKIIdelta Subtypes: Localization and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Burdis Burns Gray

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review we will discuss the localization and function of the known subtypes of calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ and their role in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. The CaMKII holoenzyme is comprised of multiple subunits that are encoded by four different genes called CaMKIIα, β, γ, and δ. While these four genes have a high degree of sequence homology, they are expressed in different tissues. CaMKIIα and β are expressed in neuronal tissue while γ and δ are present throughout the body, including in the heart. Both CaMKIIγ and δ are alternatively spliced in the heart to generate multiple subtypes. CaMKIIδ is the predominant cardiac isoform and is alternatively spliced in the heart to generate the CaMKIIδB subtype or the slightly less abundant δC subtype. The CaMKIIδB mRNA sequence contains a 33bp insert not present in δC that codes for an 11-amino acid nuclear localization sequence (NLS. This review will focus on the localization and function of the CaMKIIδ subtypes δB and δC and the role of these subtypes in arrhythmias, contractile dysfunction, gene transcription, and the regulation of Ca2+ handling.

  18. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiodun M. Adeoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH, isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH, and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH. Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5% and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7% were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2% was higher among males (P=0.048. Female subjects were more obese (P<0.0001 and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations.

  19. Multiple introductions and onward transmission of HIV-1 subtype B strains in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Kexin; Xue, Yile; Wei, Feiran; Gao, Rong; Duerr, Ralf; Fang, Kun; Li, Wei; Song, Yue; Du, Guoping; Yan, Wenjuan; Musa, Taha Hussein; Ge, You; Ji, Yu; Zhong, Ping; Wei, Pingmin

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the viral genetic evolution, spatial origins and patterns of transmission of HIV-1 subtype B in Shanghai, China. A total of 242 Shanghai subtype B and 1519 reference pol sequences were subjected to phylogenetic inference and genetic transmission network analyses. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that subtype B strains circulating in Shanghai were genetically diverse and closely associated with viral sequence lineages in Beijing (76 of 242 [31.4%]), Central China (Henan/Hebei/Hunan/Hubei) (43 of 242 [17.8%]), Chinese Taiwan (20 of 242 [8.3%]), Japan (6 of 242 [2.5%]), and Korea (7 of 242 [2.9%]), suggesting multiple introductions into Shanghai from mainland China and Taiwan, Japan, and Korea. Interestingly, a monophyletic Shanghai lineage (SH-L) (36 of 242 [14.9%]) of HIV-1 subtype B most likely originated from an Argentine strain, transferred through Liaoning infected individuals. In-depth analyses of 195 Shanghai subtype B sequences revealed that a total of 37.9% (n = 74) sequences contributed to 35 transmission networks, whereof 33.8% (n = 25) of the sequences associated with infected individuals from other provinces. Our new findings reflect the evolution complexity and transmission dynamics of HIV-1 subtype B in Shanghai, which would provide critical information for the design of effective prevention measures against HIV transmission. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characteristics of a PHD Finger Subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Daniel; Lin, Tao; Poppinga, Franchesca A; Basu, Shraddha; Rahman, Shahariar; Essel, Francisca; Chakravarty, Suvobrata

    2018-01-05

    Although the plant homeodomain (PHD) finger superfamily is known for its site-specific readouts of histone tails, the origins of the mechanistic differences in histone H3 readout by different PHD subtypes remain less clear. We show that sequences containing the xCDxCDx motif in the PHD treble clef (xCDxCDx-PHD) constitute a distinct subtype, based on the following observations: (i) the amino acid composition of the binding site is strikingly different from other subtypes due to position-specific enrichment of negatively charged and bulky nonpolar residues, (ii) the binding site positions are mutually and positively correlated, and this correlation is absent in other subtypes, and (iii) there are only small structural deviations, despite low sequence similarity. The xCDxCDx-PHD constitutes ∼20% of the PHD family, and the double PHD fingers (DPFs) are 10% of the total number of xCDxCDx-PHDs. This subtype originated early in the evolution of eukaryotes but has diversified within the metazoan lineage. Despite sequence diversification, the positions of the enriched nonpolar residues, in particular, show very small structural deviations, suggesting critical contributions of nonpolar residues in the binding mechanism of this subtype. Using mutagenesis, we probed the contributions of the binding-site positions enriched in nonpolar residues in four xCDxCDx-PHD proteins and found that they contribute to the tight packing of the H3 residues. This effect may potentially be exploited, as we observed affinity enhancement upon substituting a bulky nonpolar residue at the same binding site in another histone reader. Overall, we present a detailed characterization of PHD subtypes.

  1. Structure of the Unbound Form of HIV-1 Subtype A Protease: Comparison with Unbound Forms of Proteases from other HIV Subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Arthur H.; Coman, Roxana M.; Bracho-Sanchez, Edith; Fernandez, Marty A.; Gilliland, C.Taylor; Li, Mi; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dunn, Ben M.; McKenna, Robert (NCI); (Florida)

    2010-03-12

    The crystal structure of the unbound form of HIV-1 subtype A protease (PR) has been determined to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution and refined as a homodimer in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} to an R{sub cryst} of 20.5%. The structure is similar in overall shape and fold to the previously determined subtype B, C and F PRs. The major differences lie in the conformation of the flap region. The flaps in the crystal structures of the unbound subtype B and C PRs, which were crystallized in tetragonal space groups, are either semi-open or wide open. In the present structure of subtype A PR the flaps are found in the closed position, a conformation that would be more anticipated in the structure of HIV protease complexed with an inhibitor. The amino-acid differences between the subtypes and their respective crystal space groups are discussed in terms of the differences in the flap conformations.

  2. Pharmacological characterisation and autoradiographic localisation of dopamine receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system and in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, F; Ferrante, F; Ricci, A

    1995-06-01

    Combined radioligand binding and light microscope autoradiography techniques were used for investigating the pharmacological profile and the microanatomical localisation of dopamine receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system and in the kidney. In superior mesenteric and renal arteries the predominant dopamine D1-like receptor belongs to the D5 (or D1b) subtype. This site is located within smooth muscle of the tunica media. The same receptor subtype predominates in the kidney, where it has a vascular and tubular localisation. The dopamine D2-like receptor subtype expressed by systemic arteries belongs to the D2 receptor subtype. It has a prejunctional and endothelial localisation. In the kidney the predominating dopamine D2-like receptor belongs to the dopamine D3 subtype. Atria but not ventricles express dopamine D2-like receptors belonging to the D4 receptor subtype. The above results suggest that in spite of the emerging complexity of the dopamine receptor profile demonstrated by molecular biology techniques, radioligand binding and autoradiographic techniques, if performed with appropriate radioligands and/or in the presence of compounds active on specific receptor subtypes, may represent a useful tool for better understanding the biological significance of peripheral dopamine receptors.

  3. Subtype distribution of Blastocystis isolates from synanthropic and zoo animals and identification of a new subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensvold, C. R.; Alfellani, M. A.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, S.

    2009-01-01

    Blastocystis isolates from 56 Danish synanthropic and zoo animals, 62 primates primarily from United Kingdom (UK) collections and 16 UK primate handlers were subtyped by PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. A new subtype (ST) from primates and artiodactyls was identified and designated...

  4. Precise subtyping for synchronous multiparty sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangiola Dezani-Ciancaglini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The notion of subtyping has gained an important role both in theoretical and applicative domains: in lambda and concurrent calculi as well as in programming languages. The soundness and the completeness, together referred to as the preciseness of subtyping, can be considered from two different points of view: operational and denotational. The former preciseness has been recently developed with respect to type safety, i.e. the safe replacement of a term of a smaller type when a term of a bigger type is expected. The latter preciseness is based on the denotation of a type which is a mathematical object that describes the meaning of the type in accordance with the denotations of other expressions from the language. The result of this paper is the operational and denotational preciseness of the subtyping for a synchronous multiparty session calculus. The novelty of this paper is the introduction of characteristic global types to prove the operational completeness.

  5. Transcortical sensory aphasia: evidence for subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslett, H B; Roeltgen, D P; Gonzalez Rothi, L; Heilman, K M

    1987-11-01

    Impaired auditory comprehension and fluent but semantically empty speech in conjunction with preserved repetition characterize the syndrome of transcortical sensory aphasia (TSA). Repetition, however, may be mediated by at least two distinct processes--a lexical process that may involve the recognition and subsequent activation of discrete stored word representations and a nonlexical process that involves phonologic decoding and immediate phonologic encoding from immediate memory. We investigated the spontaneous speech, reading, and tendency to recognize and spontaneously correct syntactic errors in four patients with TSA: this analysis suggests there are two subtypes of TSA. We contend that in one subtype both the lexical and direct repetition (or speech production) mechanisms are preserved, but in the second subtype the lexical mechanism is disrupted and repetition is mediated by the nonlexical mechanism.

  6. Subtypes of anorgasmia via mathematical taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derogatis, L R; Schmidt, C W; Fagan, P J; Wise, T N

    1989-01-01

    Seventy-six women who presented with a principal complaint of anorgasmia were partitioned into four distinct subtypes on the basis of psychosexual and psychological symptoms using hierarchical cluster analysis, a mathematical taxonomic method. The classification was accomplished with data from the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory (DSFI) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Comparisons involving age, race, marital status, and social class demonstrated no significant differences between the four subtypes; however, statistical analyses of psychosexual, psychological symptom, and chart-review variables (including psychiatric diagnosis) revealed very significant distinctions between the four groups. From the resulting typology, anorgasmic subtypes were presumptively identified as "low desire" (n = 21), "histrionic/marital conflict" (n = 20) "psychiatric disorder" (n = 12) and "constitutional" (n = 16). Implications of the typology for etiologic and optimal treatment decisions concerning anorgasmia are discussed.

  7. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it is important to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA modules. In this study, we integrated the Ping-Pong algorithm and multiobjective genetic algorithm to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA functional regulatory modules (MFRMs through integrative analysis of three biological data sets: GO biological processes, miRNA target information, and matched miRNA and mRNA expression data. We applied our method on a heterogeneous disease, multiple myeloma (MM, to identify MM subtype specific MFRMs. The constructed miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks provide modular outlook at subtype specific miRNA-mRNA interactions. Furthermore, clustering analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous MFRMs were able to separate corresponding MM subtypes. These subtype specific MFRMs may aid in the further elucidation of the pathogenesis of each subtype and may serve to guide MM subtype diagnosis and treatment.

  8. The oncocytic subtype is genetically distinct from other pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Olca; Tan, Marcus; Bhanot, Umesh; Allen, Peter; Adsay, Volkan; Scott, Sasinya N; Shah, Ronak; Berger, Michael F; Askan, Gokce; Dikoglu, Esra; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O; Sigel, Carlie; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Klimstra, David S

    2016-09-01

    In 2010, the World Health Organization reclassified the entity originally described as intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm as the 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Although several key molecular alterations of other intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes have been discovered, including common mutations in KRAS, GNAS, and RNF3, those of oncocytic subtype have not been well characterized. We analyzed 11 pancreatic 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Nine pancreatic 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms uniformly exhibited typical entity-defining morphology of arborizing papillae lined by layers of cells with oncocytic cytoplasm, prominent, nucleoli, and intraepithelial lumina. The remaining two were atypical. One lacked the arborizing papilla and had flat oncocytic epithelium only; the other one had focal oncocytic epithelium in a background of predominantly intestinal subtype intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Different components of this case were analyzed separately. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens of all cases were microdissected and subjected to high-depth-targeted next-generation sequencing for a panel of 300 key cancer-associated genes in a platform that enabled the identification of sequence mutations, copy number alterations, and select structural rearrangements involving all targeted genes. Fresh frozen specimens of two cases were also subjected to whole-genome sequencing. For the nine typical pancreatic 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, the number of mutations per case, identified by next-generation sequencing, ranged from 1 to 10 (median=4). None of these cases had KRAS or GNAS mutations and only one had both RNF43 and PIK3R1 mutations. ARHGAP26, ASXL1, EPHA8, and ERBB4 genes were somatically altered in more than one of these typical 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms but not in

  9. Subtypes of social phobia in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, S G; Albano, A M; Heimberg, R G; Tracey, S; Chorpita, B F; Barlow, D H

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three social phobic adolescents were asked to name their ten most feared social situations. Two independent judges classified each situation reported by the participants into one of four situational domains: formal speaking/interactions, informal speaking/interactions, observation by others, and assertion. Fifteen participants (45.5%) were assigned a generalized subtype of social phobia because they endorsed at least moderate anxiety in all four situational domains. This subgroup scored higher on self-report measures of anxiety and depression than the rest of the sample. These results provide empirical support for the existence of subtypes of social phobia in adolescents.

  10. Systems biology guided by Chinese medicine reveals new markers for sub-typing rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wietmarschen, H. van; Yuan, K.; Lu, C.; Gao, P.; Wang, J.; Xiao, C.; Yan, X.; Wang, M.; Schroën, J.; Lu, A.; Xu, G.; Greef, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complex chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis have become a major challenge in medicine and for the pharmaceutical industry. New impulses for drug development are needed. OBJECTIVE: A systems biology approach is explored to find subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis patients enabling

  11. HCV subtype characterization among injection drug users: implication for a crucial role of Zhenjiang in HCV transmission in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiyu Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HCV transmission is closely associated with drug-trafficking routes in China. However, the transmission route of HCV in Eastern China remains unclear. Here, we investigate the role of Zhenjiang city of Jiangsu province, an important transportation hub linking Shanghai with other regions of China, in HCV transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 141 whole blood samples were collected from injection drug users (IDUs in Zhenjiang and then tested for HCV infection. Of them, 115 HCV positive plasmas were subjected to RNA extraction, RT-PCR amplification, and sequencing. The subtype characterization and the evolutionary origin of HCV strains circulating in Zhenjiang were determined using polygenetic or phylogeographic analyses. Seven HCV subtypes 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6e and 6n were detected among Zhenjiang IDUs, showing a complex HCV epidemic. The most predominant subtypes were 3a (38% and 1b (26.8%. Among these subtypes, subtypes 3b, 6n and 6e originated from Southwestern China (i.e., Yunnan and/or Guangxi, subtypes 2a and 6a from Southern China (i.e., Guangdong, subtype 1b from Central (i.e., Henan and Northwestern (i.e., Xinjiang China, and subtype 3a from Southwestern (i.e., Yunnan and Northwestern (i.e., Xinjiang China. From Zhenjiang, subtypes 1b and 2a were further spread to Eastern (i.e., Shanghai and Northern (i.e., Beijing China, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The mixing of seven HCV subtypes in Zhenjiang from all quarters of China indicates that as an important middle station, Zhenjiang plays a crucial role in HCV transmission, just as it is important in population migration between other regions of China and Eastern China.

  12. Nominal and Structural Subtyping in Component-Based Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    In nominal type systems, the subtype relation is between names of types, and subtype links are explicitly declared. In structural type systems, names are irrelevant; in determining type compatibility, only the structure of types is considered, and a type name is just an abbreviation for the full ...... and delineates the frontiers of the subtyping design space. In addition, we propose a new subtyping definition in one particularly interesting corner of the design space which combines the safety of nominal subtyping with the flexibility of structural subtyping....

  13. MicroRNA Signatures and Molecular Subtypes of Glioblastoma: The Role of Extracellular Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Godlewski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of molecular subtype classification of glioblastoma (GBM, the extent of extracellular vesicle (EV-driven molecular and phenotypic reprogramming remains poorly understood. To reveal complex subpopulation dynamics within the heterogeneous intratumoral ecosystem, we characterized microRNA expression and secretion in phenotypically diverse subpopulations of patient-derived GBM stem-like cells (GSCs. As EVs and microRNAs convey information that rearranges the molecular landscape in a cell type-specific manner, we argue that intratumoral exchange of microRNA augments the heterogeneity of GSC that is reflected in highly heterogeneous profile of microRNA expression in GBM subtypes.

  14. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…

  15. Polymorphisms in human muscarinic receptor subtype genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; Teitsma, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of polymorphisms have been reported in muscarinic receptor subtype genes, mostly in M₁ and M₂ and, to a lesser extent, M₃ receptors. Most studies linking such genetic variability to phenotype have been performed for brain functions, but a more limited amount of information is also

  16. Multidimensional Neuroanatomical Subtyping of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok-Jun; Valk, Sofie L; Di Martino, Adriana; Milham, Michael P; Bernhardt, Boris C

    2017-09-14

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with multiple biological etiologies and highly variable symptoms. Using a novel analytical framework that integrates cortex-wide MRI markers of vertical (i.e., thickness, tissue contrast) and horizontal (i.e., surface area, geodesic distance) cortical organization, we could show that a large multi-centric cohort of individuals with ASD falls into 3 distinctive anatomical subtypes (ASD-I: cortical thickening, increased surface area, tissue blurring; ASD-II: cortical thinning, decreased distance; ASD-III: increased distance). Bootstrap analysis indicated a high consistency of these biotypes across thousands of simulations, while analysis of behavioral phenotypes and resting-state fMRI showed differential symptom load (i.e., Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule; ADOS) and instrinsic connectivity anomalies in communication and social-cognition networks. Notably, subtyping improved supervised learning approaches predicting ADOS score in single subjects, with significantly increased performance compared to a subtype-blind approach. The existence of different subtypes may reconcile previous results so far not converging on a consistent pattern of anatomical anomalies in autism, and possibly relate the presence of diverging corticogenic and maturational anomalies. The high accuracy for symptom severity prediction indicates benefits of MRI biotyping for personalized diagnostics and may guide the development of targeted therapeutic strategies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. High-resolution molecular epidemiology and evolutionary history of HIV-1 subtypes in Albania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salemi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 epidemic in Western Europe is largely due to subtype B. Little is known about the HIV-1 in Eastern Europe, but a few studies have shown that non-B subtypes are quite common. In Albania, where a recent study estimated a ten-fold increase of AIDS incidence during the last six years, subtype A and B account for 90% of the know infections.We investigated the demographic history of HIV-1 subtype A and B in Albania by using a statistical framework based on coalescent theory and phylogeography. High-resolution phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis showed a limited introduction to the Balkan country of subtype A during the late 1980s followed by an epidemic outburst in the early 1990 s. In contrast, subtype B was apparently introduced multiple times between the mid-1970s and mid-1980s. Both subtypes are growing exponentially, although the HIV-1A epidemic displays a faster growth rate, and a significantly higher basic reproductive number R(0. HIV-1A gene flow occurs primarily from the capital Tirane, in the center of the country, to the periphery, while HIV-1B flow is characterized by a balanced exchange between center and periphery. Finally, we calculated that the actual number of infections in Albania is at least two orders of magnitude higher than previously thought.Our analysis demonstrates the power of recently developed computational tools to investigate molecular epidemiology of pathogens, and emphasize the complex factors involved in the establishment of HIV-1 epidemics. We suggest that a significant correlation exists between HIV-1 exponential spread and the socio-political changes occurred during the Balkan wars. The fast growth of a relatively new non-B epidemic in the Balkans may have significant consequences for the evolution of HIV-1 epidemiology in neighboring countries in Eastern and Western Europe.

  18. HIV-1 subtype influences susceptibility and response to monotherapy with the protease inhibitor lopinavir/ritonavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, K A; Ghosn, J; Gregson, J; Mbisa, J L; Chaix, M L; Cohen Codar, I; Delfraissy, J F; Delaugerre, C; Gupta, R K

    2015-01-01

    PI susceptibility results from a complex interplay between protease and Gag proteins, with Gag showing wide variation across HIV-1 subtypes. We explored the impact of pre-treatment susceptibility on the outcome of lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy. Treatment-naive individuals who experienced lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy failure from the MONARK study were matched (by subtype, viral load and baseline CD4 count) with those who achieved virological response ('successes'). Successes were defined by viral load protease was amplified from patient samples for in vitro phenotypic susceptibility testing, with susceptibility expressed as fold change (FC) relative to a subtype B reference strain. Baseline lopinavir susceptibility was lower in viral failures compared with viral successes, but the differences were not statistically significant (median lopinavir susceptibility: 4.4 versus 8.5, respectively, P = 0.17). Among CRF02_AG/G patients, there was a significant difference in lopinavir susceptibility between the two groups (7.1 versus 10.4, P = 0.047), while in subtype B the difference was not significant (2.7 versus 3.4, P = 0.13). Subtype CRF02_AG/G viruses had a median lopinavir FC of 8.7 compared with 3.1 for subtype B (P = 0.001). We report an association between reduced PI susceptibility (using full-length Gag-protease sequences) at baseline and subsequent virological failure on lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy in antiretroviral-naive patients harbouring subtype CRF02_AG/G viruses. We speculate that this may be important in the context of suboptimal adherence in determining viral failure. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  19. Personality subtypes in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzillo, Francesco; Lingiardi, Vittorio; Peloso, Anna; Giordani, Silvia; Vesco, Serena; Zanna, Valeria; Filippucci, Ludovica; Vicari, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this study are to (1) empirically identify the personality subtypes of adolescents with anorexic disorders and (2) investigate the personality disorders, identity disturbances, and affective features associated with the different subtypes. We assessed 102 adolescent patients with Eating Disorders (anorexia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified) using three clinical instruments: the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure for Adolescents (SWAP-200-A) (Westen D, Shedler J, Durrett C, Glass S, Martens A. Personality diagnoses in adolescence: DSM-IV Axis II diagnoses and an empirically derived alternative. Am J Psychiatry 2003;160:952-966), the Affective Regulation and Experience Questionnaire (AREQ) (Zittel Conklin C, Bradley R, Westen D. Affect regulation in borderline personality disorder. J Nerv Ment Dis 2006;194:69-77), and the Identity Disorder Questionnaire (IDQ) (Wilkinson-Ryan T, Westen D. Identity disturbance in borderline personality disorder: An empirical investigation. Am J Psychiatry 2000;157:528-541). We performed a Q factor analysis of the SWAP-200-A descriptions of our sample to identify personality subtypes. We correlated these personality styles with AREQ and IDQ factors and explored the personality differences among individuals with the different types of ED. The Q factor analysis identified three personality subtypes: high-functioning/perfectionist, emotionally dysregulated, and overcontrolled/constricted. Each subtype showed specific identity and affective features, comorbidities with different personality disorders, and clinical implications. These results contribute to the understanding of adolescents with ED and seem to be relevant for treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome: a comparison of subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey de Castro, Nicolas G; Miller, Vivien; Carruthers, Helen R; Whorwell, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is traditionally divided into subtypes depending on the bowel habit abnormality, but there is little clarity in the literature about whether these subtypes differ symptomatically or psychologically. Furthermore, there are conflicting reports on the relationship between symptom severity and psychological status. The aim of this study was to address these issues in a large cohort of patients defined by bowel habit. One thousand IBS patients were divided into diarrhea (IBS-D), constipation (IBS-C), and mixed (IBS-M) bowel habit subtypes and completed a series of validated questionnaires capturing symptom severity, non-colonic symptomatology (somatization), quality of life, and anxiety or depression levels. Comparisons were made using SPSS version 20. There were no significant differences between the three subtypes with respect to symptom severity, abdominal pain intensity, non-colonic symptomatology, quality of life, and anxiety or depression scores (all Ps > 0.05). In addition, there was only a small but statistically significant correlation between IBS symptom severity and both anxiety or depression, as well as quality of life (highest r = 0.34), while the relationship between somatization and disease severity was moderate (r = 0.42). This study suggests that there are no differences in the symptom profiles and anxiety or depression scores between different subtypes of IBS. In addition, anxiety and depression do not appear to be strongly associated with symptom severity, although this does not exclude the possible interplay between these and other psychological drivers of severity, such as poor coping skills. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. The identification of family subtype based on the assessment of subclinical levels of psychosis in relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derks Eske M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a complex psychiatric disorder characterized by high phenotypic heterogeneity. Previous studies have distinguished between familial and sporadic forms of schizophrenia and have suggested clinical differentiation between patients and relatives from sporadic and multiplex families. We will introduce a more refined method to distinguish between family subtypes based on psychosis dimension profiles in the relatives of schizophrenia patients. Methods Positive, negative, disorganization, mania, and depression scores were assessed in 1,392 relatives. Mixed Model Latent Class Analysis was used to identify family subtypes. A family subtype is a relatively homogeneous group of families with similar symptom profiles in the relatives in these families. Next, we investigated in 616 schizophrenia patients whether family subtype was associated with symptom profiles, IQ, cannabis dependence/abuse, or age of onset of psychosis. Results Based on the data of relatives, we identified two different family types: “healthy” and “at risk for psychiatric disorder”. Patients from at risk families obtained higher positive scores compared to patients from healthy families (Wald(1 = 6.6293, p = 0.010. No significant differences were found in any of the remaining variables. Conclusions Our findings confirm the existence of high-risk families and although we did not establish an etiological basis for the distinction between family types, genetic studies might reveal whether family subtype is associated with genetic heterogeneity.

  2. Executive functions and language in children with different subtypes of specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta Rodríguez, V; Ramírez Santana, G M; Hernández Expósito, S

    The marked heterogeneity among children diagnosed with specific language impairment (SLI) highlights the importance of studying and describing cases based on the distinction between the expressive and receptive-expressive SLI subtypes. The main objective of this study was to examine neuropsychological, linguistic, and narrative behaviours in children with different SLI subtypes. A comprehensive battery of language and neuropsychological tests was administered to a total of 58 children (29 with SLI and 29 normal controls) between 5.60 and 11.20 years old. Both SLI subtypes performed more poorly than the control group in language skills, narrative, and executive function. Furthermore, the expressive SLI group demonstrated substantial ungrammaticality, as well as problems with verbal fluency and both verbal and spatial working memory, while the receptive-expressive SLI subtype displayed poorer neuropsychological performance in general. Our findings showed that children with either SLI subtype displayed executive dysfunctions that were not limited to verbal tasks but rather extended to nonverbal measures. This could reflect a global cognitive difficulty which, along with declining linguistic and narrative skills, illustrates the complex profile of this impairment. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Interpersonal subtypes in social phobia: Diagnostic and treatment implications

    OpenAIRE

    Cain, N M; Pincus, A L; Grosse Holtforth, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Interpersonal assessment may provide a clinically useful way to identify subtypes of social phobia. In this study, we examined evidence for interpersonal subtypes in a sample of 77 socially phobic outpatients. A cluster analysis based on the dimensions of dominance and love on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Circumplex Scales (Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 1990) found 2 interpersonal subtypes of socially phobic patients. These subtypes did not differ on pretreatment global symptom severit...

  4. Colorectal Cancer Subtypes: Developmental Origin and Microenvironmental Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fessler, Evelyn; Medema, Jan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease and many cancer types do not represent a single entity, but are composed of biologically and clinically diverse subtypes. The subtype affiliation can influence prognosis and response to therapy. Recently, a multicenter colorectal cancer (CRC) subtyping consortium

  5. hisBreast cancer Molecular subtypes and their clinicopathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with varying clinical outcomes in histologically similar tumors. Micro arrays gene profiling has identified several breast cancer subtypes which include luminal A, Luminal B, Basal, and Her2 subtype. These subtypes show variable prognosis and response to therapy.

  6. Subtypes of depression in cancer patients : An empirically driven approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Ranchor, Adelita V; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Sanderman, Robbert; Schroevers, Maya J

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct subtypes of depression before the start of psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic and medical characteristics distinguished these subtypes, and (3) examine whether people with distinct subtypes

  7. Subtypes of depression in cancer patients: an empirically driven approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Ranchor, A.V.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Sanderman, Robbert; Schroevers, Maya J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct subtypes of depression before the start of psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic and medical characteristics distinguished these subtypes, and (3) examine whether people with distinct subtypes

  8. THE SUBTYPES OF PANCREATIC DUCTAL ADENOCARCINOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apeksha Kakkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Being the 4th leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and with a global increase in incidence, above 80% of pancreatic cancers are locally advanced or metastatic at the time of diagnosis. As surgical resection is the only hope for a cure, the answer is probably in early screening, proper classification and right therapy. The advancing research will likely lead to a better understanding of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC as well as enhance the techniques for screening, diagnosis, accurate subtyping and enable the use of targeted therapy. Thus, instead of clubbing together various subtypes of PDAC for trials, improving the subcategorization will ensure statistical significance for the academicians, and the clinicians would avoid administration of placebo drug to a vast number of patients.

  9. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina

    2016-01-01

    Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40...... oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell......-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were...

  10. A taxometric investigation of developmental dyslexia subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Beth A; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W

    2012-02-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with severe reading disorders. Latent characteristics of the sample are assessed in regard to posited subtypes with phonological deficits and naming speed deficits, thus extending prior work by addressing whether these deficits embody separate classes of individuals. Findings support separate taxa of dyslexia with and without phonological deficits. Different latent structure for naming speed deficits was found depending on the definitional criterion used to define dyslexia. Non-phonologically based forms of dyslexia showed particular difficulty with naming speed and reading fluency. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Obesity and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Whiteman, David C

    2013-01-01

    (13 548 cases and 17 913 controls). We combined study-specific adjusted odds ratios (ORs) using a random-effects model. We further examined the associations by histological subtype, menopausal status and post-menopausal hormone use. High BMI (all time-points) was associated with increased risk......Whilst previous studies have reported that higher BMI increases a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer, associations for the different histological subtypes have not been well defined. As the prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically, and classification of ovarian histology has improved...... in the last decade, we sought to examine the association in a pooled analysis of recent studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We evaluated the association between BMI (recent, maximum and in young adulthood) and ovarian cancer risk using original data from 15 case–control studies...

  12. Subtyping Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Neuropsychological Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L. Harris

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We administered neuropsychological measures considered sensitive to prefrontal dysfunction (both orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal neocortex to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD patients and control subjects. OCD subjects exhibited performance deficits, in comparison to community controls, on three measures sensitive to orbitofrontal neocortex dysfunction. Contrary to expectation, OCD patients also exhibited performance deficits on measures sensitive to dorsolateral prefrontal neocortex dysfunction. However, distinct neurocognitive profiles emerged when we examined the impact of comorbid schizotypal personality features on neuropsychological test performance. Primary OCD patients displayed impaired performance on measures sensitive to orbitofrontal dysfunction; however, they did not differ from control subjects on tests of dorsolateral function. OCD subjects presenting with schizotypal personality features performed poorly not only on tests sensitive to orbitofrontal dysfunction, but also on tests sensitive to dorsolateral dysfunction. Findings suggest that OCD can be subdivided into clinical subtypes, and distinct prefrontal subsystems may be differentially involved in these subtypes.

  13. Epidemiology of subtypes of hypothyroidism in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Laurberg, Peter; Pedersen, Inge B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Studies of hypothyroidism are often based on referred patients. and limited information is available on the incidence rates of subtypes of hypothyroidism in the general population. We therefore studied incidences of subtypes of primary. overt hypothyroidism in a Danish population cohort...... and compared incidences in two subcohorts with different levels of iodine intake. Design: A prospective population-based study, monitoring a well-defined cohort representative of the Danish population. Methods: The Danish Investigation of Iodine Intake and Thyroid Diseases registry of hyper- and hypothyroidism...... was established as part of the monitoring of the iodine fortification of salt in Denmark. A computer-based system linked to laboratory databases identified all patients diagnosed with new. biochemically overt hypothyroidism in populations living in Aalborg (moderate iodine deficiency, n = 311 102) and Copenhagen...

  14. Type- and Subtype-Specific Influenza Forecast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Sasikiran; Yang, Wan; Shaman, Jeffrey

    2017-03-01

    Prediction of the growth and decline of infectious disease incidence has advanced considerably in recent years. As these forecasts improve, their public health utility should increase, particularly as interventions are developed that make explicit use of forecast information. It is the task of the research community to increase the content and improve the accuracy of these infectious disease predictions. Presently, operational real-time forecasts of total influenza incidence are produced at the municipal and state level in the United States. These forecasts are generated using ensemble simulations depicting local influenza transmission dynamics, which have been optimized prior to forecast with observations of influenza incidence and data assimilation methods. Here, we explore whether forecasts targeted to predict influenza by type and subtype during 2003-2015 in the United States were more or less accurate than forecasts targeted to predict total influenza incidence. We found that forecasts separated by type/subtype generally produced more accurate predictions and, when summed, produced more accurate predictions of total influenza incidence. These findings indicate that monitoring influenza by type and subtype not only provides more detailed observational content but supports more accurate forecasting. More accurate forecasting can help officials better respond to and plan for current and future influenza activity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Assessment of Breast Cancer Risk Factors Reveals Subtype Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Johanna; Eriksson, Louise; Ploner, Alexander; Eriksson, Mikael; Rantalainen, Mattias; Li, Jingmei; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2017-07-01

    Subtype heterogeneity for breast cancer risk factors has been suspected, potentially reflecting etiologic differences and implicating risk prediction. However, reports are conflicting regarding the presence of heterogeneity for many exposures. To examine subtype heterogeneity across known breast cancer risk factors, we conducted a case-control analysis of 2,632 breast cancers and 15,945 controls in Sweden. Molecular subtype was predicted from pathology record-derived IHC markers by a classifier trained on PAM50 subtyping. Multinomial logistic regression estimated separate ORs for each subtype by the exposures parity, age at first birth, breastfeeding, menarche, hormone replacement therapy use, somatotype at age 18, benign breast disease, mammographic density, polygenic risk score, family history of breast cancer, and BRCA mutations. We found clear subtype heterogeneity for genetic factors and breastfeeding. Polygenic risk score was associated with all subtypes except for the basal-like (Pheterogeneity risk of basal-like subtype [OR 4.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.89-9.21] compared with both nulliparity (reference) and breastfeeding. Breastfeeding was not associated with risk of HER2-overexpressing type, but protective for all other subtypes. The observed heterogeneity in risk of distinct breast cancer subtypes for germline variants supports heterogeneity in etiology and has implications for their use in risk prediction. The association between basal-like subtype and breastfeeding merits more research into potential causal mechanisms and confounders. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3708-17. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Comparative biochemical analysis of recombinant reverse transcriptase enzymes of HIV-1 subtype B and subtype C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisi Daniella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 subtype C infections account for over half of global HIV infections, yet the vast focus of HIV-1 research has been on subtype B viruses which represent less than 12% of the global pandemic. Since HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT is a major target of antiviral therapy, and since differential drug resistance pathways have been observed among different HIV subtypes, it is important to study and compare the enzymatic activities of HIV-1 RT derived from each of subtypes B and C as well as to determine the susceptibilities of these enzymes to various RT inhibitors in biochemical assays. Methods Recombinant subtype B and C HIV-1 RTs in heterodimeric form were purified from Escherichia coli and enzyme activities were compared in cell-free assays. The efficiency of (- ssDNA synthesis was measured using gel-based assays with HIV-1 PBS RNA template and tRNA3Lys as primer. Processivity was assayed under single-cycle conditions using both homopolymeric and heteropolymeric RNA templates. Intrinsic RNase H activity was compared using 5'-end labeled RNA template annealed to 3'-end recessed DNA primer in a time course study in the presence and absence of a heparin trap. A mis-incorporation assay was used to assess the fidelity of the two RT enzymes. Drug susceptibility assays were performed both in cell-free assays using recombinant enzymes and in cell culture phenotyping assays. Results The comparative biochemical analyses of recombinant subtype B and subtype C HIV-1 reverse transcriptase indicate that the two enzymes are very similar biochemically in efficiency of tRNA-primed (- ssDNA synthesis, processivity, fidelity and RNase H activity, and that both enzymes show similar susceptibilities to commonly used NRTIs and NNRTIs. Cell culture phenotyping assays confirmed these results. Conclusions Overall enzyme activity and drug susceptibility of HIV-1 subtype C RT are comparable to those of subtype B RT. The use of RT inhibitors (RTIs

  17. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  18. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariya Cho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  19. Metabolomic Identification of Subtypes of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina; Fernández-Ramos, David; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Arranz, Ibon; Navasa, Nicolás; Van Liempd, Sebastiaan M; Lavín Trueba, José L; Mayo, Rebeca; Ilisso, Concetta P; de Juan, Virginia G; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; delaCruz-Villar, Laura; Mincholé, Itziar; Robinson, Aaron; Crespo, Javier; Martín-Duce, Antonio; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Sann, Holger; Platon, Julian; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Aspichueta, Patricia; Noureddin, Mazen; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Anguita, Juan; Aransay, Ana M; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M

    2017-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a consequence of defects in diverse metabolic pathways that involve hepatic accumulation of triglycerides. Features of these aberrations might determine whether NAFLD progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We investigated whether the diverse defects observed in patients with NAFLD are caused by different NAFLD subtypes with specific serum metabolomic profiles, and whether these can distinguish patients with NASH from patients with simple steatosis. We collected liver and serum from methionine adenosyltransferase 1a knockout (MAT1A-KO) mice, which have chronically low levels of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) and spontaneously develop steatohepatitis, as well as C57Bl/6 mice (controls); the metabolomes of all samples were determined. We also analyzed serum metabolomes of 535 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD (353 with simple steatosis and 182 with NASH) and compared them with serum metabolomes of mice. MAT1A-KO mice were also given SAMe (30 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks); liver samples were collected and analyzed histologically for steatohepatitis. Livers of MAT1A-KO mice were characterized by high levels of triglycerides, diglycerides, fatty acids, ceramides, and oxidized fatty acids, as well as low levels of SAMe and downstream metabolites. There was a correlation between liver and serum metabolomes. We identified a serum metabolomic signature associated with MAT1A-KO mice that also was present in 49% of the patients; based on this signature, we identified 2 NAFLD subtypes. We identified specific panels of markers that could distinguish patients with NASH from patients with simple steatosis for each subtype of NAFLD. Administration of SAMe reduced features of steatohepatitis in MAT1A-KO mice. In an analysis of serum metabolomes of patients with NAFLD and MAT1A-KO mice with steatohepatitis, we identified 2 major subtypes of NAFLD and markers that differentiate steatosis from NASH in each subtype. These might be

  20. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Tumors Reveals Multiple Connections to Intrinsic Breast Cancer Subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2014-01-01

    with the well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. METHODS: Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published...... gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. RESULTS: 5,944 genes were significantly differentially......OBJECTIVE: Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities...

  1. Intraperitoneal disease dissemination patterns are associated with residual disease, extent of surgery, and molecular subtypes in advanced ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Diogo; Kumar, Amanika; Wallace, Sumer K; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N; Konecny, Gottfried E; Weaver, Amy L; McGree, Michaela E; Goode, Ellen L; Cliby, William A; Wang, Chen

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the association between intraperitoneal (IP) disease dissemination patterns, residual disease (RD), surgical complexity, and molecular subtypes in advanced high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). 741 patients with operable stage III-IV HGSOC undergoing primary debulking surgery at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2011 were categorized into four mutually exclusive IP disease dissemination patterns: upper abdominal (60%), miliary (16%), lower abdominal (15%), and pelvic (9%). Surgical complexity was classified as high, intermediate, or low; RD status was defined as 0, 0.1-0.5, 0.6-1.0, or >1cm; molecular subtype assignments were derived from expression profiling of tumors from 334 patients. Patients with either miliary or upper abdominal dissemination patterns were less likely to achieve RD0 compared to patients with pelvic and lower abdominal dissemination patterns (25% vs. 9% and 62%, each Pdissemination patterns compared to patients with differentiated, proliferative, or immunoreactive subtypes (90% vs. 77%, 70%, 69%, respectively, Pdissemination patterns are associated with RD, surgical complexity, and tumor molecular subtypes. Patients with upper abdominal or miliary dissemination patterns are more likely to have mesenchymal HGSOC and in turn achieve lower rates of complete resection. This provides a plausible model for how the biologic behavior of molecular subtypes is manifest in disease and oncologic outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Michael S.; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Bradley S.; McCarter, Martin D.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  3. Bovine Staphylococcus aureus: Subtyping, evolution, and zoonotic transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, R; Cosandey, A; Luini, M; Artursson, K; Bardiau, M; Breitenwieser, F; Hehenberger, E; Lam, Th; Mansfeld, M; Michel, A; Mösslacher, G; Naskova, J; Nelson, S; Podpečan, O; Raemy, A; Ryan, E; Salat, O; Zangerl, P; Steiner, A; Graber, H U

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is globally one of the most important pathogens causing contagious mastitis in cattle. Previous studies using ribosomal spacer (RS)-PCR, however, demonstrated in Swiss cows that Staph. aureus isolated from bovine intramammary infections are genetically heterogeneous, with Staph. aureus genotype B (GTB) and GTC being the most prominent genotypes. Furthermore, Staph. aureus GTB was found to be contagious, whereas Staph. aureus GTC and all the remaining genotypes were involved in individual cow disease. In addition to RS-PCR, other methods for subtyping Staph. aureus are known, including spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). They are based on sequencing the spa and various housekeeping genes, respectively. The aim of the present study was to compare the 3 analytic methods using 456 strains of Staph. aureus isolated from milk of bovine intramammary infections and bulk tanks obtained from 12 European countries. Furthermore, the phylogeny of animal Staph. aureus was inferred and the zoonotic transfer of Staph. aureus between cattle and humans was studied. The analyzed strains could be grouped into 6 genotypic clusters, with CLB, CLC, and CLR being the most prominent ones. Comparing the 3 subtyping methods, RS-PCR showed the highest resolution, followed by spa typing and MLST. We found associations among the methods but in many cases they were unsatisfactory except for CLB and CLC. Cluster CLB was positive for clonal complex (CC)8 in 99% of the cases and typically positive for t2953; it is the cattle-adapted form of CC8. Cluster CLC was always positive for tbl 2645 and typically positive for CC705. For CLR and the remaining subtypes, links among the 3 methods were generally poor. Bovine Staph. aureus is highly clonal and a few clones predominate. Animal Staph. aureus always evolve from human strains, such that every human strain may be the ancestor of a novel animal-adapted strain. The zoonotic transfer of IMI- and milk-associated strains

  4. Biopsy variability of lymphocytic infiltration in breast cancer subtypes and the ImmunoSkew score

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Adnan Mujahid; Yuan, Yinyin

    2016-01-01

    The number of tumour biopsies required for a good representation of tumours has been controversial. An important factor to consider is intra-tumour heterogeneity, which can vary among cancer types and subtypes. Immune cells in particular often display complex infiltrative patterns, however, there is a lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of immune cells and how this fundamental biological nature of human tumours influences biopsy variability and treatment resistance...

  5. A Gabor Filter Texture Analysis Approach for Histopathological Brain Tumor Subtype Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Kadi, Omar S.

    2017-01-01

    Meningioma brain tumour discrimination is challenging as many histological patterns are mixed between the different subtypes. In clinical practice, dominant patterns are investigated for signs of specific meningioma pathology; however the simple observation could result in inter- and intra-observer variation due to the complexity of the histopathological patterns. Also employing a computerised feature extraction approach applied at a single resolution scale might not suffice in accurately del...

  6. Biopsy variability of lymphocytic infiltration in breast cancer subtypes and the ImmunoSkew score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adnan Mujahid; Yuan, Yinyin

    2016-11-01

    The number of tumour biopsies required for a good representation of tumours has been controversial. An important factor to consider is intra-tumour heterogeneity, which can vary among cancer types and subtypes. Immune cells in particular often display complex infiltrative patterns, however, there is a lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of immune cells and how this fundamental biological nature of human tumours influences biopsy variability and treatment resistance. We systematically investigate biopsy variability for the lymphocytic infiltrate in 998 breast tumours using a novel virtual biopsy method. Across all breast cancers, we observe a nonlinear increase in concordance between the biopsy and whole-tumour score of lymphocytic infiltrate with increasing number of biopsies, yet little improvement is gained with more than four biopsies. Interestingly, biopsy variability of lymphocytic infiltrate differs considerably among breast cancer subtypes, with the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) subtype having the highest variability. We subsequently identify a quantitative measure of spatial variability that predicts disease-specific survival in HER2+ subtype independent of standard clinical variables (node status, tumour size and grade). Our study demonstrates how systematic methods provide new insights that can influence future study design based on a quantitative knowledge of tumour heterogeneity.

  7. Identification of different subtypes of breast cancer using tissue microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirah, M A; Siti-Aishah, M A; Reena, M Z; Sharifah, N A; Rohaizak, M; Norlia, A; Rafie, M K M; Asmiati, A; Hisham, A; Fuad, I; Shahrun, N S; Das, S

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer may be classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling or immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. The main aim of the present study was to classify breast cancer into molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry findings and correlate the subtypes with clinicopathological factors. Two hundred and seventeen primary breast carcinomas tumor tissues were immunostained for ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR, CK8/18, p53 and Ki67 using tissue microarray technique. All subtypes were significantly associated with Malay ethnic background (p=0.035) compared to other racial origins. The most common subtypes of breast cancers were luminal A and was significantly associated with low histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 negativity (p=0.003) compared to HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes with high histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 positivity (p=0.003). Luminal B subtype had the smallest mean tumor size (p=0.009) and also the highest mean number of lymph nodes positive (p=0.032) compared to other subtypes. All markers except EGFR and Ki67 were significantly associated with the subtypes. The most common histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma, NOS. Majority of basal-like subtype showed comedo-type necrosis (68.8%) and infiltrative margin (81.3%). Our studies suggest that IHC can be used to identify the different subtypes of breast cancer and all subtypes were significantly associated with race, mean tumor size, mean number of lymph node positive, histological grade and all immunohistochemical markers except EGFR and Ki67.

  8. Common Molecular Subtypes Among Asian Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaisaingmongkol, Jittiporn; Budhu, Anuradha; Dang, Hien

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are clinically disparate primary liver cancers with etiological and biological heterogeneity. We identified common molecular subtypes linked to similar prognosis among 199 Thai ICC and HCC patients through systems integratio...... metabolism. These molecular subtypes are found in 582 Asian, but less so in 265 Caucasian patients. Thus, Asian ICC and HCC, while clinically treated as separate entities, share common molecular subtypes with similar actionable drivers to improve precision therapy....

  9. Attention dysfunction subtypes of developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Monika; Milner, Rafał; Ganc, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2014-11-12

    Previous studies indicate that many different aspects of attention are impaired in children diagnosed with developmental dyslexia (DD). The objective of the present study was to identify cognitive profiles of DD on the basis of attentional test performance. 78 children with DD (30 girls, 48 boys, mean age of 12 years ±8 months) and 32 age- and sex-matched non-dyslexic children (14 girls, 18 boys) were examined using a battery of standardized tests of reading, phonological and attentional processes (alertness, covert shift of attention, divided attention, inhibition, flexibility, vigilance, and visual search). Cluster analysis was used to identify subtypes of DD. Dyslexic children showed deficits in alertness, covert shift of attention, divided attention, flexibility, and visual search. Three different subtypes of DD were identified, each characterized by poorer performance on the reading, phonological awareness, and visual search tasks. Additionally, children in cluster no. 1 displayed deficits in flexibility and divided attention. In contrast to non-dyslexic children, cluster no. 2 performed poorer in tasks involving alertness, covert shift of attention, divided attention, and vigilance. Cluster no. 3 showed impaired covert shift of attention. These results indicate different patterns of attentional impairments in dyslexic children. Remediation programs should address the individual child's deficit profile.

  10. Cigarette smoking and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma and its subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Rostgaard, K; Glaser, S L

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) remains incompletely characterized. Studies of the association between smoking and HL have yielded ambiguous results, possibly due to differences between HL subtypes....

  11. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues....... The distributions of these subtypes and their potential physiological roles are discussed. By use of molecular genetic manipulation of cloned muscarinic receptor cDNAs, the regions of muscarinic receptors that specify G-protein coupling and ligand binding have been defined in several recent studies. Overall...

  12. Molecular subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, R; Prieto, E; Aguas, M J; Manata, M J; Botas, J; Pereira, F Martins

    2009-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken.

  13. MICRORNA-AUGMENTED PATHWAYS (mirAP) AND THEIR APPLICATIONS TO PATHWAY ANALYSIS AND DISEASE SUBTYPING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Diana; Donato, Michele; Nguyen, Tin; Draghici, Sorin

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in the development of many complex diseases. Because of their importance, the analysis of signaling pathways including miRNA interactions holds the potential for unveiling the mechanisms underlying such diseases. However, current signaling pathway databases are limited to interactions between genes and ignore miRNAs. Here, we use the information on miRNA targets to build a database of miRNA-augmented pathways (mirAP), and we show its application in the contexts of integrative pathway analysis and disease subtyping. Our miRNA-mRNA integrative pathway analysis pipeline incorporates a topology-aware approach that we previously implemented. Our integrative disease subtyping pipeline takes into account survival data, gene and miRNA expression, and knowledge of the interactions among genes. We demonstrate the advantages of our approach by analyzing nine sample-matched datasets that provide both miRNA and mRNA expression. We show that integrating miRNAs into pathway analysis results in greater statistical power, and provides a more comprehensive view of the underlying phenomena. We also compare our disease subtyping method with the state-of-the-art integrative analysis by analyzing a colorectal cancer database from TCGA. The colorectal cancer subtypes identified by our approach are significantly different in terms of their survival expectation. These miRNA-augmented pathways offer a more comprehensive view and a deeper understanding of biological pathways. A better understanding of the molecular processes associated with patients' survival can help to a better prognosis and an appropriate treatment for each subtype.

  14. Subtype selective kainic acid receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl

    2009-01-01

    (S)-Glutamic acid (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, activating the plethora of glutamate receptors (GluRs). In broad lines, the GluRs are divided into two major classes: the ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) and the metabotropic Glu receptors (m......GluRs). Within the iGluRs, five subtypes (KA1, KA2, iGluR5-7) show high affinity and express full agonist activity upon binding of the naturally occurring amino acid kainic acid (KA). Thus these receptors have been named the KA receptors. This review describes all-to our knowledge-published KA receptor agonists...

  15. Prevalence of Plasmodium vivax VK210 and VK247 subtype in Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Yoon-Joong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium vivax is divided into two subtypes, a dominant form, VK210 and a variant form, VK247. This division is dependent on the amino acid composition of the circumsporozoite (CS protein. In this study, the prevalence of the VK247 variant form of P. vivax was investigated in Myanmar. Methods The existence of malaria parasites in blood samples was determined by microscopic examination, polymerase chain reaction (PCR and DNA hybridization assays. To test for antibodies against P. vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in blood samples, an indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT was performed using asexual blood antigens. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic VK210 and VK247 antigens was carried out to discriminate between the P. vivax subtypes. Results By thick smear examination, 73 (n = 100 patients were single infected with P. vivax, one with P. falciparum and 13 with both species. By thin smear, 53 patients were single infected with P. vivax, eight with only P. falciparum and 16 with both. Most of the collected blood samples were shown to be P. vivax positive (n = 95 by PCR. All cases that were positive for P. falciparum by PCR (n = 43 were also positive for P. vivax. However, 52 cases were single infected with P. vivax. IFAT showed antibody titres from 1:32 to 1:4,096. Additionally, using specific antibodies for VK210 and VK247, ELISA showed that 12 patients had antibodies for only the VK210 subtype, 4 patients had only VK247 subtype antibodies and 21 patients had antibodies for both subtypes. Using a DNA hybridization test, 47 patients were infected with the VK210 type, one patient was infected with VK247 and 23 patients were infected with both subtypes. Conclusions The proportion of the VK247 subtype in Myanmar was 43.1% (n = 25 among 58 positive cases by serodiagnosis and 25.6% (n = 24 among 94 positive cases by genetic diagnosis. In both diagnostic methods, the infection status of malaria patients is

  16. Ischemic stroke subtype is associated with outcome in thrombolyzed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, C Z; Svendsen, M L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of ischemic stroke subtype on clinical outcome in patients treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) is sparsely examined. We studied the association between stroke subtype and clinical outcome in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-evaluated patients...

  17. The validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Sinke, Sjoukje; Mitchell, James E.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To review the evidence for the validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa (BN) into a purging (BN-P) and a nonpurging subtype (BN-NP), and of distinguishing BN-NP from binge eating disorder (BED), by comparing course, complications, and treatment. Method: A literature search of

  18. ADHD subtype differences in reinforcement sensitivity and visuospatial working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dovis, S.; van der Oord, S.; Wiers, R.W.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Both cognitive and motivational deficits are thought to give rise to the problems in the combined (ADHD-C) and inattentive subtype (ADHD-I) of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In both subtypes one of the most prominent cognitive weaknesses appears to be in visuospatial working memory

  19. Tubal ligation and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Salvador, Shannon; McGuire, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Tubal ligation is a protective factor for ovarian cancer, but it is unknown whether this protection extends to all invasive histological subtypes or borderline tumors. We undertook an international collaborative study to examine the association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer subtypes....

  20. Ethnic variation of the histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The commonest histological variant in each of the ethnic groups, irrespective of sex, was clear cell carcinoma which accounted for 79.7% of all the histological subtypes found in Chinese, for 70.5% in Malaysian and 77.4% in Indian patients. The sarcomatoid histological subtype was found in 4.3% of the studied population ...

  1. Major depressive disorder subtypes to predict long-term course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loo, Hanna M.; Cai, Tianxi; Gruber, Michael J.; Li, Junlong; de Jonge, Peter; Petukhova, Maria; Rose, Sherri; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoevers, Robert A.; Wardenaar, Klaas J.; Wilcox, Marsha A.; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Bunting, Brendan; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia E.; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Levinson, Daphna; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Posada-Villa, Jose; Scott, Kate M.; Xavier, Miguel; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    BACKGROUND: Variation in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is not strongly predicted by existing subtype distinctions. A new subtyping approach is considered here. METHODS: Two data mining techniques, ensemble recursive partitioning and Lasso generalized linear models (GLMs), followed by

  2. Is Rett Syndrome a Subtype of Pervasive Developmental Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Luke Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews whether Rett syndrome is a subtype of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). The paper analyzes internal and external diagnostic validity and discusses whether Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder or a mental disorder. The paper concludes that data support the idea of classifying Rett syndrome as a subtype of PDD.…

  3. The association between physical morbidity and subtypes of severe depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Petrides, Georgios; Dinesen, Peter Thisted

    2013-01-01

    Physical illness and depression are related, but the association between specific physical diseases and diagnostic subtypes of depression remains poorly understood. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between a number of physical diseases and the nonpsychotic and psychotic subtype of sev...

  4. Osteoclastic finger arthrosis - a subtype of polyarthrosis of the hand; Osteoklastische Fingerarthrose - Subtyp der Handpolyarthrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W. [Radiologische Praxis, Hamburg-Barmbek (Germany); Dihlmann, A. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Unfallkrankenhaus Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-02-01

    Aim: Description of a subtype of arthrosis deformans of the hand which is characterised as osteoclastic arthrosis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of radiographs of the hands of 150 women and 100 men with radiological findings of arthrosis deformans. Results: 5% of women and 2% of men showed at least one digital joint with subchondral osteolysis of one or both articulating bones involving at least a third of the phalanx. This subchondral osteolysis far exceeds the cysts which are situated in the epiphyseal part of the articular region. It may develop within a year. Conclusion: Osteoclastic arthrosis of the finger is a subtype of polyarthrosis of the hand. Serial observations suggest that an osteoclast stimulating substance is produced by the cysts or arises directly from the synovial fluid; this enters the subchondral part of the bone through clefts which may or may not be visible radiologically and that this produces osteoclastic activity. The most important differential diagnoses are chronic tophacious gout and a benign tumor. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Beschreibung eines Subtyps der Arthrosis deformans an der Hand, der als osteoklastische Arthrose bezeichnet wird. Patienten und Methode: Retrospektive Analyse der Handroentgenaufnahmen von 150 Frauen und 100 Maennern mit Roentgenbefunden der Arthrosis deformans. Ergebnisse: 5% der Frauen und 2% der maennlichen Patienten des durchgesehenen Krankenguts zeigten an mindestens einem Fingergelenk eine Arthrose mit subchondralen Osteolysen an einem oder beiden artikulierenden Knochen, die mindestens ein Drittel der Phalanxlaenge erfasst hatten. Diese subchondralen Osteolysen gehen ueber die Groesse und Form der arthrotischen Geroellzysten, die lediglich im knoechernen (epiphysaeren) Gelenksockel sitzen, weit hinaus. Sie koennen innerhalb eines Jahres entstehen. Schlussfolgerung: Die osteoklastische Arthrose der Finger ist ein Subtyp der Handpolyarthrose. Nach Verlaufsbeobachtungen wird vermutet, dass eine

  5. Development of a new PCR protocol to detect and subtype Blastocystis spp. from humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín, Mónica; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria; Fayer, Ronald

    2011-07-01

    Blastocystis spp. is commonly found in the feces of humans worldwide. Infection has been reported as asymptomatic, acute symptomatic, and chronic symptomatic. This wide range of responses to infection could be related to the genetic diversity of morphologically indistinguishable specimens obtained from infected hosts. The former name Blastocystis hominis is now reported as Blastocystis spp. because of its genetic diversity. Blastocystis is recognized as a complex of subtypes that have not been fully characterized as independent species. The finding of Blastocystis spp. in feces from several animal species suggests a zoonotic potential. Based on conserved regions of published nucleotide SSU rDNA sequences from all Blastocystis subtypes found in GenBank, a PCR and sequencing protocol was developed. The ~500 bp SSU rDNA gene fragment amplified by this PCR is highly sensitive compared with published primers and contains highly variable regions that allow phylogenetic analysis of Blastocystis. These primers were used to detect and subtype Blastocystis spp. specimens from naturally infected humans, primates, cattle, pigs, and chickens. Based on these findings, application of this method can elucidate the complexity of this heterogeneous genus and its role in human and animal disease, as well as its zoonotic potential.

  6. A Newly Identified T Cell Subtype: Th22 and Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Pelin Cengiz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Th22 cells are recently identified subtype of CD4 T lymphocytes. Naive CD4 T lymphocytes convert to Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17 and Th22 cells according to the cytokines they product. IL-22, a member of IL-10 family, is produced by natural killer (NK, Th17 and Th22 cells. IL-22 receptor complex is composed of IL-22 receptor 1 (IL-22R1 and IL-10 receptor 2 (IL-10R2 units and IL-22 receptor complex is usually expressed on the surfaces of nonhematopoietic cells. IL-22 induces keratinocyte proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia in the skin. IL-22 promotes the production of antimicrobial peptides and chemokines essential for tissue remodeling. IL-22 was initially thought to be released from Th17 cells however it was recently understood that the major part of IL-22 is released from newly identified subtype of T cell as Th22 cells. Th22 cells don’t secrete IL-17 and interferon-γ (İFN-γ, unlike Th17. Th22 cells are located to the skin by chemokine receptors CCR4 and CCR10 and their amount is increased in many skin diseases. In this review, we aim to discuss the role of newly identified subtype of T cells, Th22 cells in skin diseases.

  7. Subtyping children's reading disabilities using a comprehensive neuropsychological measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Kimberly J; D'Amato, Rik Carl

    2009-01-01

    This study examined subtypes of children with reading disabilities using the NEPSY (series of Neuropsychological tests authored by Marit Korkman, Ursula Kirk and Sally Kemp). Multiple methods of cluster analysis were performed with 80 elementary school-age children identified as reading disabled. Students completed the NEPSY Language Domain and the NEPSY Memory and Learning Domain. Three clusters emerged which were interpreted as: (1) a No Language or Memory Deficit Subtype, (2) a Global Language and Memory Deficit Subtype, and (3) a Global Memory Deficit Subtype. This study suggested that memory-related processes, not exclusively phonologically related processes, might contribute to reading difficulties. This investigation supported the utility of a neuropsychological approach to subtyping children's reading disabilities.

  8. Sensory Subtypes in Preschool Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomchek, Scott D; Little, Lauren M; Myers, John; Dunn, Winnie

    2018-02-07

    Given the heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research has investigated how sensory features elucidate subtypes that enhance our understanding of etiology and tailored treatment approaches. Previous studies, however, have not integrated core developmental behaviors with sensory features in investigations of subtypes in ASD. Therefore, we used latent profile analysis to examine subtypes in a preschool aged sample considering sensory processing patterns in combination with social-communication skill, motor performance, and adaptive behavior. Results showed four subtypes that differed by degree and quality of sensory features, age and differential presentation of developmental skills. Findings partially align with previous literature on sensory subtypes and extends our understanding of how sensory processing aligns with other developmental domains in young children with ASD.

  9. Molecular Subtyping of Tumors from Patients with Familial Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Vanessa Y; Praska, Corinne E; Armstrong, Georgina; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Yamada, Seiji; Decker, Paul A; Kosel, Matthew L; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Consortium, The Gliogene; Lachance, Daniel H; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2017-10-10

    Single-gene mutation syndromes account for some familial glioma (FG); however, they make up only a small fraction of glioma families. Gliomas can be classified into 3 major molecular subtypes based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. We hypothesized that the prevalence of molecular subtypes might differ in familial versus sporadic gliomas, and that tumors in the same family should have the same molecular subtype. Participants in the FG study (Gliogene) provided samples for germline DNA analysis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor was obtained for a subset of FG cases, and DNA was extracted. We analyzed tissue from 75 families, including 10 families containing a second affected family member. Copy number variation (CNV) data was obtained using a first-generation Affymetrix molecular inversion probe (MIP) array. Samples from 62 of 75 (83%) FG cases could be classified into the 3 subtypes. The prevalence of the molecular subtypes was: 30 (48%) IDH-wild type, 21 (34%) IDH-mutant non-codeleted, and 11 (19%) IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted. This distribution of molecular subtypes was not statistically different from that of sporadic gliomas (p=0.54). Of 10 paired FG samples, molecular subtypes were concordant for 7 (κ=0.59): 3 IDH-mutant non-codeleted, 2 IDH-wild type, and 2 IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted gliomas. Our data suggest that within individual families, patients develop gliomas of the same molecular subtype. However, we did not observe differences in the prevalence of the molecular subtypes in FG compared with sporadic gliomas. These observations provide further insight about the distribution of molecular subtypes in FG.

  10. Neuronal subtypes and diversity revealed by single-nucleus RNA sequencing of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Blue B; Ai, Rizi; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Salathia, Neeraj S; Yung, Yun C; Liu, Rui; Wildberg, Andre; Gao, Derek; Fung, Ho-Lim; Chen, Song; Vijayaraghavan, Raakhee; Wong, Julian; Chen, Allison; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Kaper, Fiona; Shen, Richard; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Wei; Chun, Jerold; Zhang, Kun

    2016-06-24

    The human brain has enormously complex cellular diversity and connectivities fundamental to our neural functions, yet difficulties in interrogating individual neurons has impeded understanding of the underlying transcriptional landscape. We developed a scalable approach to sequence and quantify RNA molecules in isolated neuronal nuclei from a postmortem brain, generating 3227 sets of single-neuron data from six distinct regions of the cerebral cortex. Using an iterative clustering and classification approach, we identified 16 neuronal subtypes that were further annotated on the basis of known markers and cortical cytoarchitecture. These data demonstrate a robust and scalable method for identifying and categorizing single nuclear transcriptomes, revealing shared genes sufficient to distinguish previously unknown and orthologous neuronal subtypes as well as regional identity and transcriptomic heterogeneity within the human brain. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M

    2016-01-01

    are decreased in a transgenic mouse model with concomitant β-amyloid and tau pathology. Our data suggest that Lynx1 binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the brain and that this interaction might have functional and pathophysiological implications in relation to Alzheimer's disease....... to demonstrate that a water-soluble variant of human Lynx1 (Ws-Lynx1) isolates α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits from human and rat cortical extracts, and rat midbrain and olfactory bulb extracts, suggesting that Lynx1 forms complexes with multiple nAChR subtypes in the human and rodent brain...

  12. Identification of neural transcription factors required for the differentiation of three neuronal subtypes in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, Leslie A; McClay, David R

    2018-01-10

    Correct patterning of the nervous system is essential for an organism's survival and complex behavior. Embryologists have used the sea urchin as a model for decades, but our understanding of sea urchin nervous system patterning is incomplete. Previous histochemical studies identified multiple neurotransmitters in the pluteus larvae of several sea urchin species. However, little is known about how, where and when neural subtypes are differentially specified during development. Here, we examine the molecular mechanisms of neuronal subtype specification in 3 distinct neural subtypes in the Lytechinus variegatus larva. We show that these subtypes are specified through Delta/Notch signaling and identify a different transcription factor required for the development of each neural subtype. Our results show achaete-scute and neurogenin are proneural for the serotonergic neurons of the apical organ and cholinergic neurons of the ciliary band, respectively. We also show that orthopedia is not proneural but is necessary for the differentiation of the cholinergic/catecholaminergic postoral neurons. Interestingly, these transcription factors are used similarly during vertebrate neurogenesis. We believe this study is a starting point for building a neural gene regulatory network in the sea urchin and for finding conserved deuterostome neurogenic mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Appreciating HIV-1 diversity: subtypic differences in ENV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shen, Tongye [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lynch, Rebecca M [NON LANL; Derdeyn, Cynthia A [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M is responsible for the current AIDS pandemic and exhibits exceedingly high levels of viral genetic diversity around the world, necessitating categorization of viruses into distinct lineages, or subtypes. These subtypes can differ by around 35% in the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of the virus, which are displayed on the surface of the virion and are targets for both neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. This diversity reflects the remarkable ability of the virus to adapt to selective pressures, the bulk of which is applied by the host immune response, and represents a serious obstacle for developing an effective vaccine with broad coverage. Thus, it is important to understand the underlying biological consequences of inter-subtype diversity. Recent studies have revealed that the HIV-1 subtypes exhibit phenotypic differences that result from subtle differences in Env structure, particularly within the highly immunogenic V3 domain, which participates directly in viral entry. This review will therefore explore current research that describes subtypic differences in Env at the genetic and phenotypic level, focusing in particular on V3, and highlighting recent discoveries about the unique features of subtype C Env, which is the most prevalent subtype globally.

  14. Molecular characterization of Blastocystis species in Oregon identifies multiple subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipps, Christopher M; Boorom, Ken; Bermudez, Luiz E; Kent, Michael L

    2010-03-01

    The association of Blastocystis species infections with gastrointestinal symptoms in humans is clouded by the variable presentation of disease and multiple lineages of the parasite that can infect humans and other animals. It has long been suspected that certain subtypes of Blastocystis may be more or less pathogenic, be restricted to certain hosts, or have limits to their geographic distribution. In the state of Oregon, USA, Blastocystis spp. are the most commonly encountered parasites in fecal specimens submitted for diagnostic evaluation, yet the diversity of subtypes is unknown. In this study, fecal samples were collected from individuals experiencing symptoms associated with blastocystosis and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for presence of the parasite and DNA sequenced for subtyping. Five of 19 individuals tested positive for the parasite, all of which were also positive by previous ova and parasitology examination. DNA sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal DNA and elongation factor 1 alpha gene followed by phylogenetic subtyping identified five unique subtypes, representing Blastocystis subtypes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8. No symptoms were consistently associated with presence or absence of infection, although abdominal pain and fatigue were reported by all infected individuals. Multiple subtypes are indicative of multiple sources of infection, suggesting more extensive surveys are required to understand the transmission of this parasite.

  15. Clinical Subtypes of Premenstrual Syndrome and Responses to Sertraline Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Sammel, Mary D.; Lin, Hui; Rickels, Karl; Sondheimer, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate response of diagnosis and symptom-based subtypes to sertraline treatment. METHODS This was a secondary data analysis for women who were diagnosed with premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or premenstrual dysphoric disorder and treated in three National Institutes of Health-supported clinical trials (N=447). Three PMS subtypes were identified based on predominance of psychological, physical, or both symptom types. Scores for each symptom and a total premenstrual score at baseline and endpoint were calculated from daily symptom diaries. Change from baseline after three treated menstrual cycles (or endpoint if sooner) was estimated using linear regression models adjusted for baseline severity. RESULTS The PMS and premenstrual dysphoric disorder diagnoses improved similarly with sertraline relative to placebo, while symptom-based subtypes had differential responses to treatment. The mixed symptom subtype had the strongest response to sertraline relative to placebo (Daily Symptom Rating [DSR] difference 33.80, 95% CI: 17.16, 50.44, Ppremenstrual dysphoric disorder diagnoses have similar response to sertraline treatment, but symptom-based subtypes have significantly different responses to this treatment. Mixed and psychological symptom subtypes improved while the physical symptom subtype did not improve significantly. Identifying the patient’s predominant symptoms, and their severity is important for individualized treatment and possible response to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. PMID:22105258

  16. Oncotargets in different renal cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Mischo, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell cancer is a heterogeneous group of cancers with different histologic subtypes. The majority of renal tumors in adults are clear cell renal cell carcinomas, which are characterized by von Hippel- Lindau (VHL) gene alterations. Recent advances in defining the genetic landscape of renal cancer has shown the genetic heterogeneity of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) and the presence of at least 3 additional ccRCC tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 3p. Due to inactivation of VHL, renal cancer cells produce the HIF-responsive growth factor VEGF. The PI3K--mTORC1 signaling axis also represents a target for therapy. The new systemic therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, and mTOR inhibitors, aim to suppress angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor as a target. Various VEGF-inhibitors are approved for the treatment of ccRCC and we discuss recent advancements in the treatment of metastatic ccRCC. Other gene alterations have been identified in hereditary cancer syndromes, e.g. FLCN, TSC1, TSC2, TFE3, TFEB, MITF, FH, SDHB, SDHD, MET, and PTEN and we review their role in renal tumor carcinogenesis, prognosis, and targeted therapy. By reviewing the associations between morphologic features and molecular genetics of renal cancer we provide insight into the basis for targeted renal cancer therapy.

  17. Molecular Subtyping of PrPres in Human Sporadic CJD Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, G M; Lewis, V; Collins, S J

    2017-01-01

    Across the spectrum of sporadic human prion diseases (also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: TSE), there is considerable phenotypic diversity. Cumulative scientific evidence supports that prions, the infectious agents of prion diseases, are constituted predominantly, if not exclusively, by misfolded, typically protease-resistant, disease-associated isoforms of the prion protein (PrPres). Consequently, tissue deposition of PrPres is considered a hallmark of prion disease pathology, and this can be visualized by Western blotting after tissue homogenization and treatment with proteinases, particularly proteinase K (PK). Indeed, Western blot profiles of PrPres are utilized as one marker of different prion strains, with such strains thought to contribute to at least part of the phenotypic variation observed in sporadic human prion disease. Typically, Western blotting of PrPres demonstrates three bands of different electrophoretic mobility, depicting the di-glycosylated, mono-glycosylated and unglycosylated species although further subclassification and the delineation of novel sporadic disease subtypes, such as variably protease-sensitive prionopathy, has contributed greater complexity. Nevertheless, it is the mobility of the unglycosylated PrPres band, the relative abundance of the two glycosylated bands or overall profile of the banding post-PK, in combination with the prion protein gene (PRNP) codon 129 genotype that allows the categorisation of molecular subtypes of sporadic human prion disease. These subtypes appear to correlate with distinct clinico-pathological profiles of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  18. Genetic heterogeneity and subtyping of human Hepatitis E virus isolates from Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazo, Santiago; Ramos, Natalia; Russi, José Carlos; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is an important public health concern in many developing countries causing waterborne outbreaks, as well as sporadic autochthonous hepatitis. It is transmitted primarily by the fecal-oral route. However, zoonotic transmission from animal reservoirs to human has also been suggested. Genotype 3 is the most frequent genotype found in South America and the HEV epidemiology in this region seems to be very complex. However, data about the molecular characterization of HEV isolates of the region is still lacking and further investigation is needed. Our study characterized human HEV strains detected in a 1-year period in Uruguay, by extensive sequence analysis of three regions of the HEV genome. Uruguayan strains were closely related to a set of European strains and in turn, were dissimilar to Brazilian, Argentinean and Bolivian isolates. Additionally, the co-circulation of viral subtypes 3i and 3h was observed. Circulation of subtype 3i had been reported in Argentina and Bolivia whereas sequences of subtype 3h are rare and had never been reported in Latin America. In order to contribute to shedding light over the molecular epidemiology of this emergent infection in the region, we thoroughly analyzed the genetic variability of HEV strains detected in Uruguay, providing the largest dataset of sequences of HEV ever reported in a country in South America. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. New paradigms for Salmonella source attribution based on microbial subtyping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Franz, Eelco; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    Microbial subtyping is the most common approach for Salmonella source attribution. Typically, attributions are computed using frequency-matching models like the Dutch and Danish models based on phenotyping data (serotyping, phage-typing, and antimicrobial resistance profiling). Herewith, we

  20. Brief report: Further evidence of sensory subtypes in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E; Dennis, Simon J; Geraghty, Maureen E

    2011-06-01

    Distinct sensory processing (SP) subtypes in autism have been reported previously. This study sought to replicate the previous findings in an independent sample of thirty children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Model-based cluster analysis of parent-reported sensory functioning (measured using the Short Sensory Profile) confirmed the triad of sensory subtypes reported earlier. Subtypes were differentiated from each other based on degree of SP dysfunction, taste/smell sensitivity and vestibular/proprioceptive processing. Further elucidation of two of the subtypes was also achieved in this study. Children with a primary pattern of sensory-based inattention could be further described as sensory seekers or non-seekers. Children with a primary pattern of vestibular/proprioceptive dysfunction were also differentiated on movement and tactile sensitivity.

  1. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum in Paris, France

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grange, Philippe Alain; Allix-Beguec, Caroline; Chanal, Johan; Benhaddou, Nadjet; Gerhardt, Philippe; Morini, Jean-Pierre; Deleuze, Jean; Lassau, François; Janier, Michel; Dupin, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTTwo major Treponema pallidum subtypes, 14 d/g and 14 d/f, were identified in a population of 119 patients with syphilis in Paris, France, characterized by a high proportion of men who have sex with men...

  2. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  3. Risk Factors for Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer by Histologic Subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirk JT

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether the different histologic subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma have different risk factors. We investigated the relationships between selected epidemiologic variables (i.e., parity, family history of ovarian cancer, oral contraceptive use, a history of tubal ligation and noncontraceptive estrogen use and the major histologic subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer in a hospital-based case-control study of adult women at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, USA. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. We observed a pattern of increased risk associated with family history and a pattern of risk reduction associated with parity, noncontraceptive estrogen use and tubal ligation across all histologic subtype groups. However, we did not observe a consistent pattern of risk associated with oral contraceptive use. These results provide some additional support for the hypothesis that the effects of various ovarian cancer risk factors may differ according to the histologic subtype.

  4. Salmonella Source Attribution in Japan by a Microbiological Subtyping Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyofuku, Hajime; Pires, Sara Monteiro; Hald, Tine

    2011-01-01

    to specific sources and allows for the estimation of the differences in the ability of Salmonella subtypes and food types to result in reported salmonellosis. The number of human cases caused by different Salmonella subtypes is estimated as a function of the prevalence of these subtypes in the animal......-food sources, subtype-related factors, and source-related factors. National-surveillance serotyping data from 1998 to 2007 were applied to the model. Results suggested that the relative contribution of the sources to salmonellosis varied during the 10 year period, and that eggs are the most important source....... The proportion of cases attributed to an unknown source varied substantially between years. We conclude that this is valid approach to attribute salmonellosis in Japan, and that and improved dataset would substantially improve results. This is the first indication of the relative contribution of different foods...

  5. Interpersonal subtypes in social phobia: diagnostic and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicole M; Pincus, Aaron L; Grosse Holtforth, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Interpersonal assessment may provide a clinically useful way to identify subtypes of social phobia. In this study, we examined evidence for interpersonal subtypes in a sample of 77 socially phobic outpatients. A cluster analysis based on the dimensions of dominance and love on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Circumplex Scales (Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 1990) found 2 interpersonal subtypes of socially phobic patients. These subtypes did not differ on pretreatment global symptom severity as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993) or diagnostic comorbidity but did exhibit differential responses to outpatient psychotherapy. Overall, friendly-submissive social phobia patients had significantly lower scores on measures of social anxiety and significantly higher scores on measures of well-being and satisfaction at posttreatment than cold-submissive social phobia patients. We discuss the results in terms of interpersonal theory and the clinical relevance of assessment of interpersonal functioning prior to beginning psychotherapy with socially phobic patients.

  6. Subtyping aggression and predicting cognitive behavioral treatment response in adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, K.C.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation describes the clinical relevance of the distinction between proactive and reactive aggression in adolescents with aggression problems. These subtypes of aggression can be clinical distinguished on the level of severity rather than typology; proactive aggression is always

  7. A differentiation-based phylogeny of cancer subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Riester

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Histopathological classification of human tumors relies in part on the degree of differentiation of the tumor sample. To date, there is no objective systematic method to categorize tumor subtypes by maturation. In this paper, we introduce a novel computational algorithm to rank tumor subtypes according to the dissimilarity of their gene expression from that of stem cells and fully differentiated tissue, and thereby construct a phylogenetic tree of cancer. We validate our methodology with expression data of leukemia, breast cancer and liposarcoma subtypes and then apply it to a broader group of sarcomas. This ranking of tumor subtypes resulting from the application of our methodology allows the identification of genes correlated with differentiation and may help to identify novel therapeutic targets. Our algorithm represents the first phylogeny-based tool to analyze the differentiation status of human tumors.

  8. Light microscope autoradiography of peripheral dopamine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, F

    1997-01-01

    Radioligand binding assay techniques associated with light microscope autoradiography were used for investigating the pharmacological profile and the micro anatomical localization of peripheral dopamine receptor subtypes. In systemic arteries, the predominant dopamine D1-like receptor belongs to the D5 (or D1B) subtype. It is located within smooth muscle of the tunica media. In pulmonary arteries, dopamine D1-like receptors have primarily an endothelial localization and belong to the dopamine D1 (or D1A) receptor subtype. Both systemic and pulmonary arteries express a dopamine D2-like receptor belonging to the D2 receptor subtype. It has a prejunctional localization in the majority of vascular beds investigated. In cerebral, coronary and mesenteric arteries, it has also an endothelial localization. In the heart, a dopamine D4 receptor was identified. It is expressed by atrial tissue and has a widespread distribution overall atrial musculature. The kidney expresses both dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptors. Renal dopamine D1-like receptors have a vascular and tubular localization. The majority of these sites belongs to the D5 receptor subtype. A smaller D1 receptor population has primarily a tubular localization. Renal dopamine D2-like receptors belong to the dopamine D3 subtype and in lesser amounts to the D2 and D4 receptor subtypes. Renal dopamine D3 receptor has to a greater extent a tubular localization, whereas the D4 receptor is located within glomerular arterioles. The above results suggest that radioligand binding assay and autoradiographic techniques, if performed in the presence of compounds displaying specific receptor subtype selectivity, may contribute to characterize, mainly from a quantitative point of view, peripheral dopamine receptors.

  9. Risk Factors for Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer by Histologic Subtype

    OpenAIRE

    Quirk JT; Natarajan N; Mettlin CJ; Moysich KB; Swede H

    2004-01-01

    It is unclear whether the different histologic subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma have different risk factors. We investigated the relationships between selected epidemiologic variables (i.e., parity, family history of ovarian cancer, oral contraceptive use, a history of tubal ligation and noncontraceptive estrogen use) and the major histologic subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer in a hospital-based case-control study of adult women at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, USA...

  10. Molecular subtypes of glioblastoma are relevant to lower grade glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Guan

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with great heterogeneity in histopathology and clinical course. The intent was to evaluate the relevance of known glioblastoma (GBM expression and methylation based subtypes to grade II and III gliomas (ie. lower grade gliomas.Gene expression array, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array and clinical data were obtained for 228 GBMs and 176 grade II/II gliomas (GII/III from the publically available Rembrandt dataset. Two additional datasets with IDH1 mutation status were utilized as validation datasets (one publicly available dataset and one newly generated dataset from MD Anderson. Unsupervised clustering was performed and compared to gene expression subtypes assigned using the Verhaak et al 840-gene classifier. The glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (G-CIMP was assigned using prediction models by Fine et al.Unsupervised clustering by gene expression aligned with the Verhaak 840-gene subtype group assignments. GII/IIIs were preferentially assigned to the proneural subtype with IDH1 mutation and G-CIMP. GBMs were evenly distributed among the four subtypes. Proneural, IDH1 mutant, G-CIMP GII/III s had significantly better survival than other molecular subtypes. Only 6% of GBMs were proneural and had either IDH1 mutation or G-CIMP but these tumors had significantly better survival than other GBMs. Copy number changes in chromosomes 1p and 19q were associated with GII/IIIs, while these changes in CDKN2A, PTEN and EGFR were more commonly associated with GBMs.GBM gene-expression and methylation based subtypes are relevant for GII/III s and associate with overall survival differences. A better understanding of the association between these subtypes and GII/IIIs could further knowledge regarding prognosis and mechanisms of glioma progression.

  11. Epigenetic Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    CRISPR screen to investigate mechanisms of resistance to epigenetic therapies. POC: Program Administrator Sylvia C. Lin Email: Sylvia_Lin...1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0213 TITLE: Epigenetic Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Epigenetic Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0213 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  12. Obesity and Breast Cancer: Do Age, Race and Subtype Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly M. Arnold; Flynn, Nicole J.; Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Obesity rates within the United States are on the rise. Obesity is a known risk factor for various diseases, including cancer. Numerous studies have linked obesity to the incidence and treatment outcomes of breast cancer. However, the risk of obesity may vary between breast cancer subtypes and different racial or age groups. In this article, we review the literature regarding the impact of obesity on incidence and response for different subtypes of breast cancer within different population gr...

  13. Regulation of retinal interneuron subtype identity by the Iroquois homeobox gene Irx6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Erin N; Zhu, Minyan; Shi, Zhiwei; Liu, Haiquan; Pashmforoush, Mohammad; Sauve, Yves; Bruneau, Benoit G; Chow, Robert L

    2012-12-01

    Interneuronal subtype diversity lies at the heart of the distinct molecular properties and synaptic connections that shape the formation of the neuronal circuits that are necessary for the complex spatial and temporal processing of sensory information. Here, we investigate the role of Irx6, a member of the Iroquois homeodomain transcription factor family, in regulating the development of retinal bipolar interneurons. Using a knock-in reporter approach, we show that, in the mouse retina, Irx6 is expressed in type 2 and 3a OFF bipolar interneurons and is required for the expression of cell type-specific markers in these cells, likely through direct transcriptional regulation. In Irx6 mutant mice, presumptive type 3a bipolar cells exhibit an expansion of their axonal projection domain to the entire OFF region of the inner plexiform layer, and adopt molecular features of both type 2 and 3a bipolar cells, highlighted by the ectopic upregulation of neurokinin 3 receptor (Nk3r) and Vsx1. These findings reveal Irx6 as a key regulator of type 3a bipolar cell identity that prevents these cells from adopting characteristic features of type 2 bipolar cells. Analysis of the Irx6;Vsx1 double null retina suggests that the terminal differentiation of type 2 bipolar cells is dependent on the combined expression of the transcription factors Irx6 and Vsx1, but also points to the existence of Irx6;Vsx1-independent mechanisms in regulating OFF bipolar subtype-specific gene expression. This work provides insight into the generation of neuronal subtypes by revealing a mechanism in which opposing, yet interdependent, transcription factors regulate subtype identity.

  14. Imaging patterns predict patient survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma via machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macyszyn, Luke; Akbari, Hamed; Pisapia, Jared M; Da, Xiao; Attiah, Mark; Pigrish, Vadim; Bi, Yingtao; Pal, Sharmistha; Davuluri, Ramana V; Roccograndi, Laura; Dahmane, Nadia; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Biros, George; Wolf, Ronald L; Bilello, Michel; O'Rourke, Donald M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-03-01

    MRI characteristics of brain gliomas have been used to predict clinical outcome and molecular tumor characteristics. However, previously reported imaging biomarkers have not been sufficiently accurate or reproducible to enter routine clinical practice and often rely on relatively simple MRI measures. The current study leverages advanced image analysis and machine learning algorithms to identify complex and reproducible imaging patterns predictive of overall survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma (GB). One hundred five patients with GB were first used to extract approximately 60 diverse features from preoperative multiparametric MRIs. These imaging features were used by a machine learning algorithm to derive imaging predictors of patient survival and molecular subtype. Cross-validation ensured generalizability of these predictors to new patients. Subsequently, the predictors were evaluated in a prospective cohort of 29 new patients. Survival curves yielded a hazard ratio of 10.64 for predicted long versus short survivors. The overall, 3-way (long/medium/short survival) accuracy in the prospective cohort approached 80%. Classification of patients into the 4 molecular subtypes of GB achieved 76% accuracy. By employing machine learning techniques, we were able to demonstrate that imaging patterns are highly predictive of patient survival. Additionally, we found that GB subtypes have distinctive imaging phenotypes. These results reveal that when imaging markers related to infiltration, cell density, microvascularity, and blood-brain barrier compromise are integrated via advanced pattern analysis methods, they form very accurate predictive biomarkers. These predictive markers used solely preoperative images, hence they can significantly augment diagnosis and treatment of GB patients. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Subclass mapping: identifying common subtypes in independent disease data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Hoshida

    Full Text Available Whole genome expression profiles are widely used to discover molecular subtypes of diseases. A remaining challenge is to identify the correspondence or commonality of subtypes found in multiple, independent data sets generated on various platforms. While model-based supervised learning is often used to make these connections, the models can be biased to the training data set and thus miss inherent, relevant substructure in the test data. Here we describe an unsupervised subclass mapping method (SubMap, which reveals common subtypes between independent data sets. The subtypes within a data set can be determined by unsupervised clustering or given by predetermined phenotypes before applying SubMap. We define a measure of correspondence for subtypes and evaluate its significance building on our previous work on gene set enrichment analysis. The strength of the SubMap method is that it does not impose the structure of one data set upon another, but rather uses a bi-directional approach to highlight the common substructures in both. We show how this method can reveal the correspondence between several cancer-related data sets. Notably, it identifies common subtypes of breast cancer associated with estrogen receptor status, and a subgroup of lymphoma patients who share similar survival patterns, thus improving the accuracy of a clinical outcome predictor.

  16. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. (Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine (USA))

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  17. Baseline motor findings and Parkinson disease prognostic subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Ali H; Rajput, Michele L; Ferguson, Leslie W; Rajput, Alex

    2017-07-11

    To identify the significance of baseline motor features to the lifelong prognostic motor subtypes in a Parkinson disease (PD) cohort. In a previous study of 166 PD cases, we observed different prognosis in tremor-dominant, akinetic-rigid, and mixed subtypes. This study includes the same cases, but we excluded 10 cases with symptoms of ≥15 years duration at baseline. Relative severity of tremor, bradykinesia/akinesia, and rigidity at baseline were evaluated as predictors of the motor subtypes, which are known to have different prognosis. The most common motor subtype was mixed, followed by akinetic-rigid and then the tremor-dominant. Seventy cases were not receiving antiparkinsonian drugs at baseline. The prognostic subtypes could be predicted at baseline in 85% of all and in 91% of the treatment-naive cases. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were strong for the mixed and the akinetic-rigid but weak for the tremor-dominant subtype. Our data show that motor profile at baseline can predict prognosis in most PD cases. These findings can be incorporated into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Subtype distribution of Blastocystis isolates in Sebha, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Ithoi, Init; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Blastocystis is a genetically diverse and a common intestinal parasite of humans with a controversial pathogenic potential. This study was carried out to identify the Blastocystis subtypes and their association with demographic and socioeconomic factors among outpatients living in Sebha city, Libya. Blastocystis in stool samples were cultured followed by isolation, PCR amplification of a partial SSU rDNA gene, cloning, and sequencing. The DNA sequences of isolated clones showed 98.3% to 100% identity with the reference Blastocystis isolates from the Genbank. Multiple sequence alignment showed polymorphism from one to seven base substitution and/or insertion/deletion in several groups of non-identical nucleotides clones. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three assemblage subtypes (ST) with ST1 as the most prevalent (51.1%) followed by ST2 (24.4%), ST3 (17.8%) and mixed infections of two concurrent subtypes (6.7%). ST1 infection was significantly associated with female (P = 0.009) and low educational level (P = 0.034). ST2 was also significantly associated with low educational level (P= 0.008) and ST3 with diarrhoea (P = 0.008). Phylogenetic analysis of Libyan Blastocystis isolates identified three different subtypes; with ST1 being the predominant subtype and its infection was significantly associated with female gender and low educational level. More extensive studies are needed in order to relate each Blastocystis subtype with clinical symptoms and potential transmission sources in this community.

  19. Subtype Distribution of Blastocystis Isolates in Sebha, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, Awatif M.; Ithoi, Init; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M.; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Background Blastocystis is a genetically diverse and a common intestinal parasite of humans with a controversial pathogenic potential. This study was carried out to identify the Blastocystis subtypes and their association with demographic and socioeconomic factors among outpatients living in Sebha city, Libya. Methods/Findings Blastocystis in stool samples were cultured followed by isolation, PCR amplification of a partial SSU rDNA gene, cloning, and sequencing. The DNA sequences of isolated clones showed 98.3% to 100% identity with the reference Blastocystis isolates from the Genbank. Multiple sequence alignment showed polymorphism from one to seven base substitution and/or insertion/deletion in several groups of non-identical nucleotides clones. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three assemblage subtypes (ST) with ST1 as the most prevalent (51.1%) followed by ST2 (24.4%), ST3 (17.8%) and mixed infections of two concurrent subtypes (6.7%). Blastocystis ST1 infection was significantly associated with female (P = 0.009) and low educational level (P = 0.034). ST2 was also significantly associated with low educational level (P= 0.008) and ST3 with diarrhoea (P = 0.008). Conclusion Phylogenetic analysis of Libyan Blastocystis isolates identified three different subtypes; with ST1 being the predominant subtype and its infection was significantly associated with female gender and low educational level. More extensive studies are needed in order to relate each Blastocystis subtype with clinical symptoms and potential transmission sources in this community. PMID:24376805

  20. Variability of Delirium Motor Subtype Scale-Defined Delirium Motor Subtypes in Elderly Adults with Hip Fracture : A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Rikie M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Adamis, Dimitrios; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; Meagher, David J.; de Rooij, Sophia E. J. A.

    OBJECTIVES: To examine changes in motor subtype profile in individuals with delirium. DESIGN: Observational, longitudinal study; substudy of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Departments of surgery and orthopedics, Academic Medical Center and Tergooi Hospital, the Netherlands.

  1. Towards a brief definition of burnout syndrome by subtypes: development of the "Burnout Clinical Subtypes Questionnaire" (BCSQ-12)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montero-Marín, Jesús; Skapinakis, Petros; Araya, Ricardo; Gili, Margarita; García-Campayo, Javier

    2011-01-01

    ...). The "Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire" (BCSQ-12), comprising the dimensions of overload, lack of development and neglect, is proposed as a brief means of identifying the different ways this disorder is manifested...

  2. Short-term stability of subtypes in the irritable bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsbro, A L; Simren, M; Bytzer, P

    2012-01-01

    In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtyping is used in research and clinical practice. Knowledge of subtype stability is needed for proper design of trials and treatment strategies.......In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtyping is used in research and clinical practice. Knowledge of subtype stability is needed for proper design of trials and treatment strategies....

  3. Pathway-based classification of cancer subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Shinuk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular markers based on gene expression profiles have been used in experimental and clinical settings to distinguish cancerous tumors in stage, grade, survival time, metastasis, and drug sensitivity. However, most significant gene markers are unstable (not reproducible among data sets. We introduce a standardized method for representing cancer markers as 2-level hierarchical feature vectors, with a basic gene level as well as a second level of (more stable pathway markers, for the purpose of discriminating cancer subtypes. This extends standard gene expression arrays with new pathway-level activation features obtained directly from off-the-shelf gene set enrichment algorithms such as GSEA. Such so-called pathway-based expression arrays are significantly more reproducible across datasets. Such reproducibility will be important for clinical usefulness of genomic markers, and augment currently accepted cancer classification protocols. Results The present method produced more stable (reproducible pathway-based markers for discriminating breast cancer metastasis and ovarian cancer survival time. Between two datasets for breast cancer metastasis, the intersection of standard significant gene biomarkers totaled 7.47% of selected genes, compared to 17.65% using pathway-based markers; the corresponding percentages for ovarian cancer datasets were 20.65% and 33.33% respectively. Three pathways, consisting of Type_1_diabetes mellitus, Cytokine-cytokine_receptor_interaction and Hedgehog_signaling (all previously implicated in cancer, are enriched in both the ovarian long survival and breast non-metastasis groups. In addition, integrating pathway and gene information, we identified five (ID4, ANXA4, CXCL9, MYLK, FBXL7 and six (SQLE, E2F1, PTTG1, TSTA3, BUB1B, MAD2L1 known cancer genes significant for ovarian and breast cancer respectively. Conclusions Standardizing the analysis of genomic data in the process of cancer staging

  4. Pulmonary Emphysema Subtypes on Computed Tomography in Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin M.; Austin, John H.M.; Newell, John D.; D’Souza, Belinda M.; Rozenshtein, Anna; Hoffman, Eric A.; Ahmed, Firas; Barr, R. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary emphysema is divided into three major subtypes at autopsy: centrilobular, paraseptal and panlobular emphysema. These subtypes can be defined by visual assessment on computed tomography (CT); however, clinical characteristics of emphysema subtypes on CT are not well-defined. We developed a reliable approach to visual assessment of emphysema subtypes on CT and examined if emphysema subtypes have distinct characteristics. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50–79 years with ≥10 pack-years. Participants underwent CT following a standardized protocol. Definitions of centrilobular, paraseptal and panlobular emphysema were obtained by literature review. Six-minute walk distance and pulmonary function were performed following guidelines. Results Twenty-seven percent of 318 smokers had emphysema on CT. Inter-rater reliability of emphysema subtype was substantial (K:0.70). Compared to participants without emphysema, individuals with centrilobular or panlobular emphysema had greater dyspnea, reduced walk distance, greater hyperinflation, and lower diffusing capacity. In contrast, individuals with PSE were similar to controls, except for male predominance. Centrilobular but not panlobular or paraseptal emphysema was associated with greater smoking history (+21 pack-years Pemphysema was associated with reduced body mass index (−5 kg/m2;P=0.01). Other than for dyspnea, these findings were independent of the forced expiratory volume in one second. Seventeen percent of smokers without COPD on spirometry had emphysema, which was independently associated with reduced walk distance. Conclusions Emphysema subtypes on CT are common in smokers with and without COPD. Centrilobular and panlobular emphysema but not paraseptal emphysema have considerable symptomatic and physiological consequences. PMID:24384106

  5. Clinical Characteristics of the Respiratory Subtype in Panic Disorder Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hye-Min; Kim, Ji-Hae; Heo, Jung-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Panic disorder has been suggested to be divided into the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes in terms of its clinical presentations. The present study aimed to investigate whether there are any differences in treatment response and clinical characteristics between the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes of panic disorder patients. Methods Among the 48 patients those who completed the study, 25 panic disorder patients were classified as the respiratory subtype, whereas 23 panic disorder patients were classified as the non-respiratory subtype. All patients were treated with escitalopram or paroxetine for 12 weeks. We measured clinical and psychological characteristics before and after pharmacotherapy using the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS), Albany Panic and Phobic Questionnaire (APPQ), Anxiety Sensitivity Index-Revised (ASI-R), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T, STAI-S), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). Results The prevalence of the agoraphobia was significantly higher in the respiratory group than the non-respiratory group although there were no differences in gender and medication between the two groups. The respiratory group showed higher scores on the fear of respiratory symptoms of the ASI-R. In addition, after pharmacotherapy, the respiratory group showed more improvement in panic symptoms than the non-respiratory group. Conclusion Panic disorder patients with the respiratory subtype showed more severe clinical presentations, but a greater treatment response to SSRIs than those with non-respiratory subtype. Thus, classification of panic disorder patients as respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes may be useful to predict clinical course and treatment response to SSRIs. PMID:25395972

  6. Pulmonary emphysema subtypes on computed tomography: the MESA COPD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin M; Austin, John H M; Newell, John D; D'Souza, Belinda M; Rozenshtein, Anna; Hoffman, Eric A; Ahmed, Firas; Barr, R Graham

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is divided into 3 major subtypes at autopsy: centrilobular, paraseptal, and panlobular emphysema. These subtypes can be defined by visual assessment on computed tomography (CT); however, clinical characteristics of emphysema subtypes on CT are not well defined. We developed a reliable approach to visual assessment of emphysema subtypes on CT and examined if emphysema subtypes have distinct characteristics. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and controls ages 50-79 years with ≥ 10 pack-years. Participants underwent CT following a standardized protocol. Definitions of centrilobular, paraseptal, and panlobular emphysema were obtained by literature review. Six-minute walk distance and pulmonary function were performed following guidelines. Twenty-seven percent of 318 smokers had emphysema on CT. Interrater reliability of emphysema subtype was substantial (K: 0.70). Compared with participants without emphysema, individuals with centrilobular or panlobular emphysema had greater dyspnea, reduced walk distance, greater hyperinflation, and lower diffusing capacity. In contrast, individuals with paraseptal emphysema were similar to controls, except for male predominance. Centrilobular, but not panlobular or paraseptal, emphysema was associated with greater smoking history (+21 pack-years P emphysema, was associated with reduced body mass index (-5 kg/m(2); P = .01). Other than for dyspnea, these findings were independent of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Seventeen percent of smokers without COPD on spirometry had emphysema, which was independently associated with reduced walk distance. Emphysema subtypes on CT are common in smokers with and without COPD. Centrilobular and panlobular emphysema, but not paraseptal emphysema, have considerable symptomatic and physiological consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Francisella tularensis Subtype A.II Genomic Plasticity in Comparison with Subtype A.I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilynn A Larson

    Full Text Available Although Francisella tularensis is considered a monomorphic intracellular pathogen, molecular genotyping and virulence studies have demonstrated important differences within the tularensis subspecies (type A. To evaluate genetic variation within type A strains, sequencing and assembly of a new subtype A.II genome was achieved for comparison to other completed F. tularensis type A genomes. In contrast with the F. tularensis A.I strains (SCHU S4, FSC198, NE061598, and TI0902, substantial genomic variation was observed between the newly sequenced F. tularensis A.II strain (WY-00W4114 and the only other publically available A.II strain (WY96-3418. Genome differences between WY-00W4114 and WY96-3418 included three major chromosomal translocations, 1580 indels, and 286 nucleotide substitutions of which 159 were observed in predicted open reading frames and 127 were located in intergenic regions. The majority of WY-00W4114 nucleotide deletions occurred in intergenic regions, whereas most of the insertions and substitutions occurred in predicted genes. Of the nucleotide substitutions, 48 (30% were synonymous and 111 (70% were nonsynonymous. WY-00W4114 and WY96-3418 nucleotide polymorphisms were predominantly G/C to A/T allelic mutations, with WY-00W4114 having more A+T enrichment. In addition, the A.II genomes contained a considerably higher number of intact genes and longer repetitive sequences, including transposon remnants than the A.I genomes. Together these findings support the premise that F. tularensis A.II may have a fitness advantage compared to the A.I subtype due to the higher abundance of functional genes and repeated chromosomal sequences. A better understanding of the selective forces driving F. tularensis genetic diversity and plasticity is needed.

  8. HIV subtype D is associated with dementia, compared with subtype A, in immunosuppressed individuals at risk of cognitive impairment in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacktor, Ned; Nakasujja, Noeline; Skolasky, Richard L; Rezapour, Mona; Robertson, Kevin; Musisi, Seggane; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Clifford, David B; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Quinn, Thomas C

    2009-09-01

    In the United States, clade B is the predominant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) subtype, whereas in sub-Saharan Africa, clades A, C, and D are the predominant subtypes. HIV subtype may have an impact on HIV disease progression. The effect of HIV subtype on the risk of dementia has, to our knowledge, not been examined. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between HIV subtype and the severity of HIV-associated cognitive impairment among individuals initiating antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Sixty antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected individuals with advanced immunosuppression who were at risk of HIV-associated cognitive impairment underwent neurological, neuropsychological, and functional assessments, and gag and gp41 regions were subtyped. Subtype assignments were generated by sequence analysis using a portion of the gag and gp41 regions. Thirty-three HIV-infected individuals were infected with subtype A, 2 with subtype C, 9 with subtype D, and 16 with A/D recombinants. Eight (89%) of 9 HIV-infected individuals with subtype D had dementia, compared with 7 (24%) of 33 HIV-infected individuals with subtype A (P = .004). These results suggest that, in untreated HIV-infected individuals with advanced immunosuppression who are at risk of developing HIV-associated cognitive impairment, HIV dementia may be more common among patients infected with subtype D virus than among those infected with subtype A virus. These findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that HIV subtypes may have a pathogenetic factor with respect to their capacity to cause cognitive impairment. Additional studies are needed to confirm this observation and to define the mechanism by which subtype D leads to an increased risk of neuropathogenesis.

  9. Molecular subtypes of osteosarcoma identified by reducing tumor heterogeneity through an interspecies comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Milcah C; Sarver, Aaron L; Gavin, Katherine J; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Getzy, David M; Newman, Robert A; Cutter, Gary R; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Kisseberth, William C; Hunter, Lawrence E; Subramanian, Subbaya; Breen, Matthew; Modiano, Jaime F

    2011-09-01

    The heterogeneous and chaotic nature of osteosarcoma has confounded accurate molecular classification, prognosis, and prediction for this tumor. The occurrence of spontaneous osteosarcoma is largely confined to humans and dogs. While the clinical features are remarkably similar in both species, the organization of dogs into defined breeds provides a more homogeneous genetic background that may increase the likelihood to uncover molecular subtypes for this complex disease. We thus hypothesized that molecular profiles derived from canine osteosarcoma would aid in molecular subclassification of this disease when applied to humans. To test the hypothesis, we performed genome wide gene expression profiling in a cohort of dogs with osteosarcoma, primarily from high-risk breeds. To further reduce inter-sample heterogeneity, we assessed tumor-intrinsic properties through use of an extensive panel of osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. We observed strong differential gene expression that segregated samples into two groups with differential survival probabilities. Groupings were characterized by the inversely correlated expression of genes associated with 'G2/M transition and DNA damage checkpoint' and 'microenvironment-interaction' categories. This signature was preserved in data from whole tumor samples of three independent dog osteosarcoma cohorts, with stratification into the two expected groups. Significantly, this restricted signature partially overlapped a previously defined, predictive signature for soft tissue sarcomas, and it unmasked orthologous molecular subtypes and their corresponding natural histories in five independent data sets from human patients with osteosarcoma. Our results indicate that the narrower genetic diversity of dogs can be utilized to group complex human osteosarcoma into biologically and clinically relevant molecular subtypes. This in turn may enhance prognosis and prediction, and identify relevant therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier

  10. Diagnosis and subtypes of adolescent antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredith; Westen, Drew

    2010-04-01

    The present study examined the application of the Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) diagnosis to adolescents and investigated the possibility of subtypes of APD adolescents. As part of a broader study of adolescent personality in clinically-referred patients, experienced clinicians provided personality data on a randomly selected patient in their care using the SWAP-II-A personality pathology instrument. Three hundred thirteen adolescents met adult DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for APD. To characterize adolescents with the disorder, we aggregated the data to identify the items most descriptive and distinctive of APD adolescents relative to other teenagers in the sample (N = 950). Q-factor analysis identified five personality subtypes: psychopathic-like, socially withdrawn, impulsive-histrionic, emotionally dysregulated, and attentionally dysregulated. The five subtypes differed in predictable ways on a set of external criteria related to global adaptive functioning, childhood family environment, and family history of psychiatric illness. Both the APD diagnosis and the empirically derived APD subtypes provided incremental validity over and above the DSM-IV disruptive behavior disorders in predicting global adaptive functioning, number of arrests, early-onset severe externalizing pathology, and quality of peer relationships. Although preliminary, these results provide support for the use of both APD and personality-based subtyping systems in adolescents.

  11. Clinically-inspired automatic classification of ovarian carcinoma subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aicha BenTaieb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It has been shown that ovarian carcinoma subtypes are distinct pathologic entities with differing prognostic and therapeutic implications. Histotyping by pathologists has good reproducibility, but occasional cases are challenging and require immunohistochemistry and subspecialty consultation. Motivated by the need for more accurate and reproducible diagnoses and to facilitate pathologists′ workflow, we propose an automatic framework for ovarian carcinoma classification. Materials and Methods: Our method is inspired by pathologists′ workflow. We analyse imaged tissues at two magnification levels and extract clinically-inspired color, texture, and segmentation-based shape descriptors using image-processing methods. We propose a carefully designed machine learning technique composed of four modules: A dissimilarity matrix, dimensionality reduction, feature selection and a support vector machine classifier to separate the five ovarian carcinoma subtypes using the extracted features. Results: This paper presents the details of our implementation and its validation on a clinically derived dataset of eighty high-resolution histopathology images. The proposed system achieved a multiclass classification accuracy of 95.0% when classifying unseen tissues. Assessment of the classifier′s confusion (confusion matrix between the five different ovarian carcinoma subtypes agrees with clinician′s confusion and reflects the difficulty in diagnosing endometrioid and serous carcinomas. Conclusions: Our results from this first study highlight the difficulty of ovarian carcinoma diagnosis which originate from the intrinsic class-imbalance observed among subtypes and suggest that the automatic analysis of ovarian carcinoma subtypes could be valuable to clinician′s diagnostic procedure by providing a second opinion.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 subtypes in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemal, Kimdar S; Anastos, Kathryn; Weiser, Barbara; Ramirez, Christina M; Shi, Qiuhu; Burger, Harold

    2013-06-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by genetic diversity, with multiple subtypes and recombinant variants circulating, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. During the Rwandan genocide, many women experienced multiple rapes and some became HIV-1 infected. We studied plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 30 infected women comprising two exposure groups: those with numerous contacts, raped multiple times, and women with one lifetime sexual partner and no history of rape. Population-based sequences from gag, pol, and env genes were analyzed to determine HIV-1 subtypes and intersubtype recombination. Individual plasma-derived variants from 12 women were also analyzed. Subtype A was found in 24/30 (80%), intersubtype recombination (AC and AD) in 4/30 (13%), and subtypes C and D in 1/30 each. In two subjects, the pattern of HIV-1 recombination differed between plasma and PBMC-derived sequences. Intersubtype recombination was common, although there were no significant differences in subtype or recombination rates between exposure groups.

  13. Tailoring cognitive behavioural therapy to subtypes of voice-hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eSmailes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT for voice-hearing (i.e., auditory verbal hallucinations; AVH has, at best, small-to-moderate effects. One possible reason for this limited efficacy is that current CBT approaches tend to conceptualise voice-hearing as a homogenous experience in terms of the cognitive processes involved in AVH. However, the highly heterogeneous nature of voice-hearing suggests that many different cognitive processes may be involved in the etiology of AVH. These heterogeneous voice-hearing experiences do, however, appear to cluster into a set of subtypes, opening up the possibility of tailoring treatment to the subtype of AVH that a voice-hearer reports. In this paper, we (a outline our rationale for tailoring CBT to subtypes of voice-hearing, (b describe CBT for three putative subtypes of AVH (inner speech-based AVH, memory-based AVH, and hypervigilance AVH, and (c discuss potential limitations and problems with such an approach. We conclude by arguing that tailoring CBT to subtypes of voice-hearing could prove to be a valuable therapeutic development, which may be especially effective when used in early intervention in psychosis services.

  14. Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Subtypes of Voice-Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailes, David; Alderson-Day, Ben; Fernyhough, Charles; McCarthy-Jones, Simon; Dodgson, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for voice-hearing (i.e., auditory verbal hallucinations; AVH) has, at best, small to moderate effects. One possible reason for this limited efficacy is that current CBT approaches tend to conceptualize voice-hearing as a homogenous experience in terms of the cognitive processes involved in AVH. However, the highly heterogeneous nature of voice-hearing suggests that many different cognitive processes may be involved in the etiology of AVH. These heterogeneous voice-hearing experiences do, however, appear to cluster into a set of subtypes, opening up the possibility of tailoring treatment to the subtype of AVH that a voice-hearer reports. In this paper, we (a) outline our rationale for tailoring CBT to subtypes of voice-hearing, (b) describe CBT for three putative subtypes of AVH (inner speech-based AVH, memory-based AVH, and hypervigilance AVH), and (c) discuss potential limitations and problems with such an approach. We conclude by arguing that tailoring CBT to subtypes of voice-hearing could prove to be a valuable therapeutic development, which may be especially effective when used in early intervention in psychosis services.

  15. Parkinson's disease severity and motor subtype influence physical capacity components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pinto Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The severity of Parkinson's disease (PD and PD's motor subtypes influence the components of physical capacity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of both PD severity and motor subtype in the performance of these components. Thirty-six PD patients were assigned into four groups: Tremor (TD initial and TD mild, akinetic-rigid (AR initial, and AR mild. Patients' strength, balance, coordination, mobility and aerobic capacity were evaluated and groups were compared using a two-way ANOVA (severity and subtype as factors. AR presents a poorer performance than TD in almost all tests. Also this performance was worsened with the advance of the disease in AR, contrary to TD. We conclude that AR and TD subgroups are different about their performance on physical capacity components, moreover, this performance worsens with the advance of the disease of the AR group, but not for TD.

  16. Sensory processing subtypes in autism: association with adaptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E; Young, Robyn L; Baker, Amy E Z; Angley, Manya T

    2010-01-01

    Children with autism are frequently observed to experience difficulties in sensory processing. This study examined specific patterns of sensory processing in 54 children with autistic disorder and their association with adaptive behavior. Model-based cluster analysis revealed three distinct sensory processing subtypes in autism. These subtypes were differentiated by taste and smell sensitivity and movement-related sensory behavior. Further, sensory processing subtypes predicted communication competence and maladaptive behavior. The findings of this study lay the foundation for the generation of more specific hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of sensory processing dysfunction in autism, and support the continued use of sensory-based interventions in the remediation of communication and behavioral difficulties in autism.

  17. Psychological subtypes of anorgasmia: a marker variable approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derogatis, L R; Fagan, P J; Schmidt, C W; Wise, T N; Gilden, K S

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-six women who presented with a principal complaint of anorgasmia were compared with a matched cohort of sexually functional controls on the domains of the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory (DSFI). Patients were case matched with controls on age, race, marital status, and social class. Initial comparisons revealed significant differences between patient and control groups on a number of psychosexual characteristics, consistent with prior research. Based on evidence of heterogeneity within the patient sample and earlier research by our group, the anorgasmic cohort was partitioned by a "marker variable" approach into two anorgasmic subtypes. The marker variable used to create the subtypes was the presence of homosexual fantasies. Subsequent contrasts, both between the two anorgasmic subgroups, and with functional controls, revealed highly significant differences, and provided strong evidence for at least two psychologically distinct subtypes of anorgasmia.

  18. Crystal Structures of Human Orexin 2 Receptor Bound to the Subtype-Selective Antagonist EMPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suno, Ryoji; Kimura, Kanako Terakado; Nakane, Takanori; Yamashita, Keitaro; Wang, Junmei; Fujiwara, Takaaki; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Im, Dohyun; Horita, Shoichiro; Tsujimoto, Hirokazu; Tawaramoto, Maki S; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Joti, Yasumasa; Yabashi, Makina; Shimamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masaki; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Iwata, So; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2018-01-02

    Orexin peptides in the brain regulate physiological functions such as the sleep-wake cycle, and are thus drug targets for the treatment of insomnia. Using serial femtosecond crystallography and multi-crystal data collection with a synchrotron light source, we determined structures of human orexin 2 receptor in complex with the subtype-selective antagonist EMPA (N-ethyl-2-[(6-methoxy-pyridin-3-yl)-(toluene-2-sulfonyl)-amino]-N-pyridin-3-ylmethyl-acetamide) at 2.30-Å and 1.96-Å resolution. In comparison with the non-subtype-selective antagonist suvorexant, EMPA contacted fewer residues through hydrogen bonds at the orthosteric site, explaining the faster dissociation rate. Comparisons among these OX 2 R structures in complex with selective antagonists and previously determined OX 1 R/OX 2 R structures bound to non-selective antagonists revealed that the residue at positions 2.61 and 3.33 were critical for the antagonist selectivity in OX 2 R. The importance of these residues for binding selectivity to OX 2 R was also revealed by molecular dynamics simulation. These results should facilitate the development of antagonists for orexin receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Variation in Campylobacter Multilocus Sequence Typing Subtypes from Chickens as Detected on Three Plating Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, M E; Ladely, S R; Meinersmann, R J; Line, J E; Oakley, B B; Cox, N A

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare subtypes of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli detected on three selective Campylobacter plating media to determine whether each medium selected for different subtypes. Fifty ceca and 50 carcasses (representing 50 flocks) were collected from the evisceration line in a commercial broiler processing plant. Campylobacter was cultured and isolated from cecal contents and carcass rinses on Campy-Cefex, Campy Line, and RF Campylobacter jejuni/coli agars. When a positive result was obtained with all three media, one colony of the most prevalent morphology on each medium was selected for further analysis by full genome sequencing and multilocus sequence typing. Sequence types were assigned according to PubMLST. A total of 49 samples were positive for Campylobacter on all three media. Forty samples contained only C. jejuni , three had only C. coli , and both species were detected in six samples. From 71% of samples, Campylobacter isolates of the same sequence type were recovered on all three media. From 81.6% of samples, isolates were all from the same clonal complex. From significantly fewer samples (26%, P Campylobacter jejuni/coli . From one sample, three sequence types were detected. In most cases, all three plating media allowed detection of the same type of Campylobacter from complex naturally contaminated chicken samples.

  20. Epidemiological risk factors associated with inflammatory breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Rachel L; El-Zein, Randa; Valero, Vicente; Lucci, Anthony; Bevers, Therese B; Fouad, Tamer; Liao, Weiqin; Ueno, Naoto T; Woodward, Wendy A; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2016-03-01

    In this single-institution case-control study, we identified risk factors associated with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) subtypes based on staining of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and expression of human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2neu) to determine distinct etiologic pathways. We identified 224 women with IBC and 396 cancer-free women seen at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between breast cancer risk factors and the IBC tumor subtypes: luminal (ER+ and/or PR+/HER2neu-), HER2neu+ (any ER and PR, HER2neu+), and triple-negative (ER-/PR-/HER2neu-). In multivariable analysis, compared with women age ≥26 at first pregnancy, women age risk of triple-negative IBC (OR 3.32, 95% CI 1.37-8.05). Women with a history of breast-feeding had a lower risk of triple-negative (OR 0.30; 95% CI 0.15-0.62) and luminal IBC (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.18-0.68). A history of smoking was associated with an increased risk of luminal IBC (OR 2.37; 95% CI 1.24-4.52). Compared with normal-weight women, those who were overweight or obese (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) had a higher risk of all three tumor subtypes (p risk factor for IBC of any subtype. Modifiable risk factors, age at first pregnancy (≥26), breast-feeding, and smoking may be associated with specific IBC subtypes. These results highlight the importance of evaluating epidemiologic risk factors for IBC for the identification of subtype-specific prevention strategies.

  1. Therapeutic response to benzodiazepine in panic disorder subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martins Valença

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: This study makes a comparison between two subtypes of panic disorder regarding the clinical efficacy of clonazepam, a benzodiazepine. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of clonazepam in a fixed dosage (2 mg/day, compared to placebo, in the treatment of panic disorder patients and to verify whether there are any differences in the responses to clonazepam between panic disorder patients with the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes. TYPE OF STUDY: Randomized study with clonazepam and placebo. SETTING: Outpatient Anxiety and Depression Unit of the Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 34 patients with a diagnosis of panic disorder with agoraphobia, between 18 and 55 years old. PROCEDURES: Administration of clonazepam or placebo for 6 weeks, in panic disorder patients, after they were classified within two subtypes of panic disorder: respiratory and non-respiratory. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Changes in the number of panic attacks in comparison with the period before the beginning of the study; Hamilton Anxiety Scale; Global Clinical Impression Scale; and Patient's Global Impression scale. RESULTS: In the group that received clonazepam, by the end of the 6th week there was a statistically significant clinical improvement, shown by the remission of panic attacks (p < 0.001 and decrease in anxiety (p = 0.024. In the group that received clonazepam there was no significant difference between the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes of panic disorder, regarding the therapeutic response to clonazepam. CONCLUSION: Clonazepam was equally effective in the treatment of the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes of panic disorder, suggesting there is no difference in the therapeutic response between the two subtypes.

  2. P2 receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunapuli, S P; Daniel, J L

    1998-12-15

    Extracellular nucleotides have been implicated in a number of physiological functions. Nucleotides act on cell-surface receptors known as P2 receptors, of which several subtypes have been cloned. Both ATP and ADP are stored in platelets and are released upon platelet activation. Furthermore, nucleotides are also released from damaged or broken cells. Thus during vascular injury nucleotides play an important role in haemostasis through activation of platelets, modulation of vascular tone, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of injury, and facilitation of adhesion of leucocytes to the endothelium. Nucleotides also moderate these functions by generating nitric oxide and prostaglandin I2 through activation of endothelial cells, and by activating different receptor subtypes on vascular smooth muscle cells. In the heart, P2 receptors regulate contractility through modulation of L-type Ca2+ channels, although the molecular mechanisms involved are still under investigation. Classical pharmacological studies have identified several P2 receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system. Molecular pharmacological studies have clarified the nature of some of these receptors, but have complicated the picture with others. In platelets, the classical P2T receptor has now been resolved into three P2 receptor subtypes: the P2Y1, P2X1 and P2TAC receptors (the last of these, which is coupled to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, is yet to be cloned). In peripheral blood leucocytes, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes, the effects of classical P2X, P2Y and P2U receptors have been found to be mediated by more than one P2 receptor subtype. However, the exact functions of these multiple receptor subtypes remain to be understood, as P2-receptor-selective agonists and antagonists are still under development.

  3. Identification of Blastocystis Subtype 1 Variants in the Home for Girls, Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thathaisong, Umaporn; Siripattanapipong, Suradej; Mungthin, Mathirut; Pipatsatitpong, Duangnate; Tan-ariya, Peerapan; Naaglor, Tawee; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2013-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of Blastocystis infection was conducted to evaluate the prevalence, risk factors, and subtypes of Blastocystis at the Home for Girls, Bangkok, Thailand in November 2008. Of 370 stool samples, 118 (31.9%) were infected with Blastocystis. Genotypic characterization of Blastocystis was performed by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the partial small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. Subtype 1 was the most predominant (94.8%), followed by subtype 6 (3.5%) and subtype 2 (1.7%). Sequence analyses revealed nucleotide polymorphisms for Blastocystis subtype 1, which were described as subtype 1/variant 1, subtype 1/variant 2. Blastocystis subtype 1/variant 1 was the most predominant infection occurring in almost every house. The results showed that subtype analysis of Blastocystis was useful for molecular epidemiological study. PMID:23166199

  4. Parent stress across molecular subtypes of children with Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodrag, N; Peters, S

    2015-09-01

    Parenting stress has been consistently reported among parents of children with developmental disabilities. However, to date, no studies have investigated the impact of a molecular subtype of Angelman syndrome (AS) on parent stress, despite distinct phenotypic differences among subtypes. Data for 124 families of children with three subtypes of AS: class I and II deletions (n = 99), imprinting centre defects (IC defects; n = 11) and paternal uniparental disomy (UPD; n = 14) were drawn from the AS Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) database and collected from five research sites across the Unites States. The AS study at the RDCRN gathered health information to understand how the syndrome develops and how to treat it. Parents completed questionnaires on their perceived psychological stress, the severity of children's aberrant behaviour and children's sleep patterns. Children's adaptive functioning and developmental levels were clinically evaluated. Child-related stress reached clinical levels for 40% of parents of children with deletions, 100% for IC defects and 64.3% for UPD. Sleep difficulties were similar and elevated across subtypes. There were no differences between molecular subtypes for overall child and parent-related stress. However, results showed greater isolation and lack of perceived parenting skills for parents of children with UPD compared with deletions. Better overall cognition for children with deletions was significantly related to more child-related stress while their poorer adaptive functioning was associated with more child-related stress. For all three groups, the severity of children's inappropriate behaviour was positively related to different aspects of stress. How parents react to stress depends, in part, on children's AS molecular subtype. Despite falling under the larger umbrella term of AS, it is important to acknowledge the unique aspects associated with children's molecular subtype. Identifying these factors can

  5. Reproductive profiles and risk of breast cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouckaert, Olivier; Rudolph, Anja; Laenen, Annouschka

    2017-01-01

    pooled data on tumor markers (estrogen and progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)) and reproductive risk factors (parity, age at first full-time pregnancy (FFTP) and age at menarche) from 28,095 patients with invasive BC from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer......BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that reproductive factors are differentially associated with breast cancer (BC) risk by subtypes. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between reproductive factors and BC subtypes, and whether these vary by age at diagnosis. METHODS: We used...

  6. Salmonella source attribution based on microbial subtyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barco, Lisa; Barrucci, Federica; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2013-01-01

    source attribution models have been implemented by using serotyping and phage-typing data. Molecular-based methods may prove to be similarly valuable in the future, as already demonstrated for other food-borne pathogens like Campylobacter. This review assesses the state of the art concerning Salmonella...... source attribution through microbial subtyping approach. It summarizes the available microbial subtyping attribution models and discusses the use of conventional phenotypic typing methods, as well as of the most commonly applied molecular typing methods in the European Union (EU) laboratories...

  7. Assessing the Differences in Public Health Impact of Salmonella Subtypes Using a Bayesian Microbial Subtyping Approach for Source Attribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pires, Sara Monteiro; Hald, Tine

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. To prioritize interventions and assess the effectiveness of efforts to reduce illness, it is important to attribute salmonellosis to the responsible sources. Studies have suggested that some Salmonella subtypes have a higher health...... impact than others. Likewise, some food sources appear to have a higher impact than others. Knowledge of variability in the impact of subtypes and sources may provide valuable added information for research, risk management, and public health strategies. We developed a Bayesian model that attributes...... revealed that the model can be applied to data with less discriminatory power, which is the only data available in many countries. In conclusion, the model allows for the estimation of relative differences between Salmonella subtypes and sources, providing results that will benefit future risk assessment...

  8. The HIV epidemic in the Amazon Basin is driven by prototypic and recombinant HIV-1 subtypes B and F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, A C; Otsuki, K; Silva, N B; Castilho, M C; Barros, F S; Pieniazek, D; Hu, D; Rayfield, M A; Bretas, G; Tanuri, A

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes genetic subtypes of HIV-1 found in blood samples from 31 HIV-1-infected people who visited the Counseling and Testing AIDS Center of Instituto de Medicina Tropical in Manaus, Brazil. Manaus, the main city in Brazil's Amazon Basin, is also the closest urban connection for more than 100,000 Indians living in the rain forests of this region. Although to date there is no evidence of increased incidence of HIV-1 infection among the indigenous population, our understanding of both the prevalence and nature of the epidemic in the region as a whole is limited. From the 31 samples analyzed by C2V3 sequencing, we found almost equal proportions of HIV-1 strains belonging to subtype B (n = 16; 51.6%) and subtype F (n = 15; 48.4%), a finding that differs from results from previous studies conducted in urban areas of southeastern Brazil. We also observed the presence of the GWGR amino-acid sequence in the critical tetra-peptide crown of the env V3 loop in the HIV-1 subtype B samples analyzed. Among these samples, we also found 14 mosaic genomes (45.16%) in which different combinations of subtypes B, C, and F were identified between the p24 gag, pro, and env regions. Our data support the hypothesis that the Amazonian HIV-1 infections linked to the urban epidemic in southeastern Brazil. The genetic diversity and the prevalence of mosaic genomes among the isolates in our study confirm an integral role of recombination in the complex Brazilian epidemic.

  9. Bulimia nervosa-nonpurging subtype: closer to the bulimia nervosa-purging subtype or to binge eating disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jennifer; McIntosh, Virginia V W; Carter, Janet D; Rowe, Sarah; Taylor, Kathryn; Frampton, Christopher M A; McKenzie, Janice M; Latner, Janet; Joyce, Peter R

    2014-04-01

    DSM-5 has dropped subtyping of bulimia nervosa (BN), opting to continue inclusion of the somewhat contentious diagnosis of BN-nonpurging subtype (BN-NP) within a broad BN category. Some contend however that BN-NP is more like binge eating disorder (BED) than BN-P. This study examines clinical characteristics, eating disorder symptomatology, and Axis I comorbidity in BN-NP, BN-P, and BED groups to establish whether BN-NP more closely resembles BN-P or BED. Women with BN-P (n = 29), BN-NP (n = 29), and BED (n = 54) were assessed at baseline in an outpatient psychotherapy trial for those with binge eating. Measures included the Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV, Eating Disorder Examination, and Eating Disorder Inventory-2. The BN-NP subtype had BMIs between those with BN-P and BED. Both BN subtypes had higher Restraint and Drive for Thinness scores than BED. Body Dissatisfaction was highest in BN-NP and predicted BN-NP compared to BN-P. Higher Restraint and lower BMI predicted BN-NP relative to BED. BN-NP resembled BED with higher lifetime BMIs; and weight-loss clinic than eating disorder clinic attendances relative to the BN-P subtype. Psychiatric comorbidity was comparable except for higher lifetime cannabis use disorder in the BN-NP than BN-P subtype These results suggest that BN-NP sits between BN-P and BED however the high distress driving inappropriate compensatory behaviors in BN-P requires specialist eating disorder treatment. These results support retaining the BN-NP group within the BN category. Further research is needed to determine whether there are meaningful differences in outcome over follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pilot studies for development of an HIV subtype panel for surveillance of global diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manak, Mark; Sina, Silvana; Anekella, Bharathi; Hewlett, Indira; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Kim, Jerome; Vermeulen, Marion; Stramer, Susan L; Sabino, Ester; Grabarczyk, Piotr; Michael, Nelson; Peel, Sheila; Garrett, Patricia; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Busch, Michael P; Schito, Marco

    2012-06-01

    The continued global spread and evolution of HIV diversity pose significant challenges to diagnostics and vaccine strategies. NIAID partnered with the FDA, WRAIR, academia, and industry to form a Viral Panel Working Group to design and prepare a panel of well-characterized current and diverse HIV isolates. Plasma samples that had screened positive for HIV infection and had evidence of recently acquired infection were donated by blood centers in North and South America, Europe, and Africa. A total of 80 plasma samples were tested by quantitative nucleic acid tests, p24 antigen, EIA, and Western blot to assign a Fiebig stage indicative of approximate time from initial infection. Evaluation of viral load using FDA-cleared assays showed excellent concordance when subtype B virus was tested, but lower correlations for subtype C. Plasma samples were cocultivated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from normal donors to generate 30 viral isolates (50-80% success rate for samples with viral load >10,000 copies/ml), which were then expanded to 10(7)-10(9) virus copies per ml. Analysis of env sequences showed that sequences derived from cultured PBMCs were not distinguishable from those obtained from the original plasma. The pilot collection includes 30 isolates representing subtypes B, C, B/F, CRF04_cpx, and CRF02_AG. These studies will serve as a basis for the development of a comprehensive panel of highly characterized viral isolates that reflects the current dynamic and complex HIV epidemic, and will be made available through the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL).

  11. Methods used for the detection and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Snehal; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A

    2012-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for non-invasive and invasive diseases in the elderly, pregnant women, neonates and immunocompromised populations. This bacterium has many similarities with other non-pathogenic Listeria species which makes its detection from food and environmental samples challenging. Subtyping of L. monocytogenes strains can prove to be crucial in epidemiological investigations, source tracking contamination from food processing plants and determining evolutionary relationships between different strains. In recent years there has been a shift towards the use of molecular subtyping. This has led to the development of new subtyping techniques such as multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and multi-locus sequence based typing (MLST). This review focuses on the available methods for Listeria detection including immuno-based techniques and the more recently developed molecular methods and analytical techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight based mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). It also includes a comparison and critical analysis of the available phenotypic and genotypic subtyping techniques that have been investigated for L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Racial Differences by Ischemic Stroke Subtype: A Comprehensive Diagnostic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies have suggested that black populations have more small-vessel and fewer cardioembolic strokes. We sought to analyze racial differences in ischemic stroke subtype employing a comprehensive diagnostic workup with magnetic resonance-imaging-(MRI- based evaluation including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI. Methods. 350 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to an urban hospital with standardized comprehensive diagnostic evaluations were retrospectively analyzed. Ischemic stroke subtype was determined by three Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST classification systems. Results. We found similar proportions of cardioembolic and lacunar strokes in the black and white cohort. The only subtype category with a significant difference by race was “stroke of other etiology,” more common in whites. Black stroke patients were more likely to have an incomplete evaluation, but this did not reach significance. Conclusions. We found similar proportions by race of cardioembolic and lacunar strokes when employing a full diagnostic evaluation including DWI MRI. The relatively high rate of cardioembolism may have been underappreciated in black stroke patients when employing a CT approach to stroke subtype diagnosis. Further research is required to better understand the racial differences in frequency of “stroke of other etiology” and explore disparities in the extent of diagnostic evaluations.

  13. Incidence of dementia and major subtypes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratiglioni, L; Launer, L J; Andersen, K

    2000-01-01

    The authors examined the association of incident dementia and subtypes with age, sex, and geographic area in Europe. Incidence data from eight population-based studies carried out in seven European countries were compared and pooled. The pooled data included 835 mild to severe dementia cases and ...

  14. Breast cancer molecular subtype classifier that incorporates MRI features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Elizabeth J; Dashevsky, Brittany Z; Oh, Jung Hun; Veeraraghavan, Harini; Apte, Aditya P; Thakur, Sunitha B; Morris, Elizabeth A; Deasy, Joseph O

    2016-07-01

    To use features extracted from magnetic resonance (MR) images and a machine-learning method to assist in differentiating breast cancer molecular subtypes. This retrospective Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant study received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. We identified 178 breast cancer patients between 2006-2011 with: 1) ERPR + (n = 95, 53.4%), ERPR-/HER2 + (n = 35, 19.6%), or triple negative (TN, n = 48, 27.0%) invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and 2) preoperative breast MRI at 1.5T or 3.0T. Shape, texture, and histogram-based features were extracted from each tumor contoured on pre- and three postcontrast MR images using in-house software. Clinical and pathologic features were also collected. Machine-learning-based (support vector machines) models were used to identify significant imaging features and to build models that predict IDC subtype. Leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) was used to avoid model overfitting. Statistical significance was determined using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Each support vector machine fit in the LOOCV process generated a model with varying features. Eleven out of the top 20 ranked features were significantly different between IDC subtypes with P machine-learning-based predictive model using features extracted from MRI that can distinguish IDC subtypes with significant predictive power. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:122-129. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Longitudinal Stability of Phonological and Surface Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Olson, Richard K.; Wadsworth, Sally J.

    2014-01-01

    Limited evidence supports the external validity of the distinction between developmental phonological and surface dyslexia. We previously identified children ages 8 to 13 meeting criteria for these subtypes (Peterson, Pennington, & Olson, 2013) and now report on their reading and related skills approximately 5 years later. Longitudinal…

  16. Phonological and Surface Subtypes among University Students with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of phonological and surface dyslexia subtypes among Swedish university students with dyslexia (n = 40) was examined using both the regression method, developed by Castles and Coltheart, and latent profile analysis. When an academic-level control group was used as a reference group in a regression, eight students with phonological…

  17. Brief Report: Further Evidence of Sensory Subtypes in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E.; Dennis, Simon J.; Geraghty, Maureen E.

    2011-01-01

    Distinct sensory processing (SP) subtypes in autism have been reported previously. This study sought to replicate the previous findings in an independent sample of thirty children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Model-based cluster analysis of parent-reported sensory functioning (measured using the Short Sensory Profile) confirmed the…

  18. Sensory Processing Subtypes in Autism: Association with Adaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E.; Young, Robyn L.; Baker, Amy E. Z.; Angley, Manya T.

    2010-01-01

    Children with autism are frequently observed to experience difficulties in sensory processing. This study examined specific patterns of sensory processing in 54 children with autistic disorder and their association with adaptive behavior. Model-based cluster analysis revealed three distinct sensory processing subtypes in autism. These subtypes…

  19. Psychosocial and Adaptive Deficits Associated with Learning Disability Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backenson, Erica M.; Holland, Sara C.; Kubas, Hanna A.; Fitzer, Kim R.; Wilcox, Gabrielle; Carmichael, Jessica A.; Fraccaro, Rebecca L.; Smith, Amanda D.; Macoun, Sarah J.; Harrison, Gina L.; Hale, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Children with specific learning disabilities (SLD) have deficits in the basic psychological processes that interfere with learning and academic achievement, and for some SLD subtypes, these deficits can also lead to emotional and/or behavior problems. This study examined psychosocial functioning in 123 students, aged 6 to 11, who underwent…

  20. Relationship between thrombus attenuation and different stroke subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, J.M.; Schaaf, I.C. van der; Biessels, G.J.; Otterloo, A.E. van; Seeters, T. van; Horsch, A.D.; Luitse, M.J.; Graaf, Y. van der; Kappelle, L.J.; Mali, W.P.Th.; Velthuis, B.K.; Meijer, A.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More insights in the etiopathogenesis of thrombi could be helpful in the treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between presence of a hyperdense vessel sign and thrombus density with different stroke subtypes. METHODS:

  1. Family history of stroke in stroke types and subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronopoulos, P; Gioldasis, G; Ellul, J; Metallinos, I C; Lekka, N P; Paschalis, C; Papapetropoulos, Th

    2002-03-30

    Many studies have provided data showing that family history of stroke (FHS) is associated with an increased risk of stroke. The association of the FHS with the various stroke subtypes has not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of the FHS with the two major stroke types (cerebral haematomas and ischaemic strokes) and the four stroke subtypes (cardioembolic, large artery disease, small artery disease, and undetermined) in a Greek population. The FHS was obtained from 421 consecutive acute stroke patients and from 239 matched control subjects. Positive FHS was observed in 49% of all stroke patients compared with 28% of the control subjects [adjusted OR=2.06 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.42-3.00)]. Haematomas, ischaemic strokes, and from the ischaemic strokes, both large and small artery disease strokes were strongly associated with positive FHS compared with the control subjects [adjusted OR=2.06 (95% CI 9-3.04), 2.07 (95% CI 1.09-3.91), 2.05 (95% CI 1.24-3.38), and 2.76 (95% CI 1.55-4.91), respectively]. There was no difference between maternal and paternal heritable contribution.In conclusion, FHS was found in this study to be an independent risk factor for all strokes combined, for each stroke type, and for the large and small-artery disease stroke subtypes, but not for the cardioembolic and undetermined stroke subtypes.

  2. Notch as master regulator of breast cancer subtype and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Notch as master regulator of breast cancer subtype and intratumoural heterogeneity. Tumour heterogeneity is a driving force for disease progression and one of the major obstacles to effective treatment. Heterogeneity is driven by mutations and other processes that generate diverse cancer cell phenotypes and functions.

  3. Cancer of the esophagus; histopathological sub-types in northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cause of cancer death worldwide with squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma carcinoma as the main histopathological subtypes. Esophageal cancer is known for its marked variation by geographic region, ethnicity, and gender. The histopathological ...

  4. Neurophysiological mechanisms of emotion regulation for subtypes of externalizing children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieben, J.; Lewis, M.D.; Granic, I.; Zelazo, P.D.; Segalowitz, S.; Pepler, D.

    2007-01-01

    Children referred for externalizing behavior problems may not represent a homogeneous population. Our objective was to assess neural mechanisms of emotion regulation that might distinguish subtypes of externalizing children from each other and from their normal age mates. Children with pure

  5. Assessing the genetic architecture of epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Lu, Yi; Dixon, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the deadliest common cancers. The five most common types of disease are high-grade and low-grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell carcinoma. Each of these subtypes present distinct molecular pathogeneses and sensitivities to treatments. Recen...

  6. Cognitive subtypes of mathematics learning difficulties in primary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelet, Dimona; Ansari, Daniel; Vaessen, Anniek; Blomert, Leo

    2014-03-01

    It has been asserted that children with mathematics learning difficulties (MLD) constitute a heterogeneous group. To date, most researchers have investigated differences between predefined MLD subtypes. Specifically MLD children are frequently categorized a priori into groups based on the presence or absence of an additional disorder, such as a reading disorder, to examine cognitive differences between MLD subtypes. In the current study 226 third to six grade children (M age=131 months) with MLD completed a selection of number specific and general cognitive measures. The data driven approach was used to identify the extent to which performance of the MLD children on these measures could be clustered into distinct groups. In particular, after conducting a factor analysis, a 200 times repeated K-means clustering approach was used to classify the children's performance. Results revealed six distinguishable clusters of MLD children, specifically (a) a weak mental number line group, (b) weak ANS group, (c) spatial difficulties group, (d) access deficit group, (e) no numerical cognitive deficit group and (f) a garden-variety group. These findings imply that different cognitive subtypes of MLD exist and that these can be derived from data-driven approaches to classification. These findings strengthen the notion that MLD is a heterogeneous disorder, which has implications for the way in which intervention may be tailored for individuals within the different subtypes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Social Withdrawal Subtypes during Early Adolescence in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Julie C.; Raja, Radhi

    2011-01-01

    The overarching goal of this study was to examine the associations between three social withdrawal subtypes (shyness, unsociability, avoidance), peer isolation, peer difficulties (victimization, rejection, exclusion, low acceptance), and loneliness in India during early adolescence. Participants were 194 adolescents in Surat, India (M age=13.35…

  8. Preoperative subtyping of meningiomas by perfusion MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Shanghai Jiaotong University affiliated First People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiology, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Roediger, Lars A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Shen, Tianzhen [Fudan University Huashan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Miao, Jingtao [Shanghai Jiaotong University affiliated First People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2008-10-15

    This paper aims to evaluate the value of perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the preoperative subtyping of meningiomas by analyzing the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) of three benign subtypes and anaplastic meningiomas separately. Thirty-seven meningiomas with peritumoral edema (15 meningothelial, ten fibrous, four angiomatous, and eight anaplastic) underwent perfusion MR imaging by using a gradient echo echo-planar sequence. The maximal rCBV (compared with contralateral normal white matter) in both tumoral parenchyma and peritumoral edema of each tumor was measured. The mean rCBVs of each two histological subtypes were compared using one-way analysis of variance and least significant difference tests. A p value less than 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The mean rCBV of meningothelial, fibrous, angiomatous, and anaplastic meningiomas in tumoral parenchyma were 6.93{+-}3.75, 5.61{+-}4.03, 11.86{+-}1.93, and 5.89{+-}3.85, respectively, and in the peritumoral edema 0.87{+-}0.62, 1.38{+-}1.44, 0.87{+-}0.30, and 3.28{+-}1.39, respectively. The mean rCBV in tumoral parenchyma of angiomatous meningiomas and in the peritumoral edema of anaplastic meningiomas were statistically different (p<0.05) from the other types of meningiomas. Perfusion MR imaging can provide useful functional information on meningiomas and help in the preoperative diagnosis of some subtypes of meningiomas. (orig.)

  9. Neuropsychological Subtyping of Learning-Disabled Children: History, Methods, Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, John L.; Rourke, Byron P.

    1983-01-01

    The neuropsychological approach to studying learning disabilities (LD) has produced two extreme positions: the view of LD as (1) homogeneous and unitary and (2) as a pattern of unique and idiosyncratic characteristics. Resulting classification approaches for determining subtypes of the population have important implications for assessment and…

  10. Subtype identification of Blastocystis spp. isolated from patients in a major hospital in northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantermtor, Sarinee; Pinlaor, Porntip; Sawadpanich, Kookwan; Pinlaor, Somchai; Sangka, Arunnee; Wilailuckana, Chotechana; Wongsena, Wachanan; Yoshikawa, Hisao

    2013-04-01

    The present study is aimed to identify the prevalence of Blastocystis subtypes isolated from patients in a major hospital in northeastern Thailand. A total of 562 stool samples were examined by culture technique, and 56 Blastocystis-positive samples were analyzed further by the combination of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) followed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-tagged site primers (PCR-STS). By RFLP profiles, Blastocystis genotypes were categorized into four groups: group A (12, 21.4%), group B (32, 57.1%), group C (10, 17.9%), and group D (2, 3.6%). By PCR-STS, only four subtypes were identified. All 12 (21.4%) isolates in group A were identified as subtype 1. Similarly, all 32 (57.1%) isolates in group B were subtype 3. In group C, 10 (17.9%) samples were all subtype 7, and two samples (3.6%) in group D were both subtype 6. Of 56 Blastocystis-positive patients, 31 (55.4%) were asymptomatic and 22 (39.4%) have gastrointestinal symptoms. No significant association was observed between the Blastocystis subtypes and the clinical features. Among the Blastocystis-positive patients, the most characteristic stool samples were loose (78.6%) and soft (17.9%). In conclusion, the most common Blastocystis spp. in northeastern Thailand was subtype 3 followed by subtype 1. Relatively minor subtypes, subtype 6 and subtype 7 which are considered as avian subtypes, were found for the first time in humans in Thailand.

  11. Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Associations with Common Genetic Variants in FGFR2 according to the Intrinsic Subtypes in Southern Han Chinese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GWAS have identified variation in the FGFR2 locus as risk factors for breast cancer. Validation studies, however, have shown inconsistent results by ethnics and pathological characteristics. To further explore this inconsistency and investigate the associations of FGFR2 variants with breast cancer according to intrinsic subtype (Luminal-A, Luminal-B, ER−&PR−&HER2+, and triple negative among Southern Han Chinese women, we genotyped rs1078806, rs1219648, rs2420946, rs2981579, and rs2981582 polymorphisms in 609 patients and 882 controls. Significant associations with breast cancer risk were observed for rs2420946, rs2981579, and rs2981582 with OR (95% CI per risk allele of 1.19 (1.03–1.39, 1.24 (1.07–1.43, and 1.17 (1.01–1.36, respectively. In subtype specific analysis, above three SNPs were significantly associated with increased Luminal-A risk in a dose-dependent manner Ptrend<0.01; however, only rs2981579 was associated with Luminal-B, and none were linked to ER−&PR− subtypes (ER−&PR−&HER2+ and triple negative. Haplotype analyses also identified common haplotypes significantly associated with luminal-like subtypes (Luminal-A and Luminal-B, but not with ER−&PR− subtypes. Our results suggest that associations of FGFR2 SNPs with breast cancer were heterogeneous according to intrinsic subtype. Future studies stratifying patients by their intrinsic subtypes will provide new insights into the complex genetic mechanisms underlying breast cancer.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of salmonid alphavirus (SAV subtype 3 in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Mona D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreas disease (PD is a viral fish disease which in recent years has significantly affected Norwegian salmonid aquaculture. In Norway, the aetiological agent salmonid alphavirus (SAV has been found to be represented by the subtype 3 only. SAV subtype 3 has in previous analyses been found to show a lower genetic divergence than the subtypes found to cause PD in Ireland and Scotland. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nucleotide (nt and amino acid divergence and the phylogenetic relationship of 33 recent SAV subtype 3 sequences. The samples from which the sequences were obtained originated from both PD endemic and non-endemic regions in an attempt to investigate agent origin/spread. Multiple samples throughout the seawater production phase from several salmonid populations were included to investigate genetic variation during an outbreak. The analyses were mainly based on partial sequences from the E2 gene. For some samples, additional partial 6 K and nsP3 gene sequences were available. Results The nucleotide divergence for all gene fragments ranged from total identity (0.0% divergence to 0.45% (1103 nt fragment of E2, 1.11% (451 nt fragment of E2, 0.94% (6 K and 0.28% (nsP3. This low nucleotide divergence corresponded well to previous reports on SAV 3 sequences; however the observed divergence for the short E2 fragment was higher than that previously reported. When compared to SAVH20/03 (AY604235, amino acid substitutions were detected in all assessed gene fragments however the in vivo significance of these on for example disease outbreak mortality could not be concluded on. The phylogenetic tree based on the 451 nt E2 fragment showed that the sequences divided into two clusters with low genetic divergence, representing only a single SAV subtype. Conclusions The analysed sequences represented two clusters of a single SAV subtype; however some of the observed sequence divergence was higher than that previously reported

  13. Clinical criteria for subtyping Parkinson's disease: biomarkers and longitudinal progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Zeighami, Yashar; Dagher, Alain; Postuma, Ronald B

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease varies widely in clinical manifestations, course of progression and biomarker profiles from person to person. Identification of distinct Parkinson's disease subtypes is of great priority to illuminate underlying pathophysiology, predict progression and develop more efficient personalized care approaches. There is currently no clear way to define and divide subtypes in Parkinson's disease. Using data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative, we aimed to identify distinct subgroups via cluster analysis of a comprehensive dataset at baseline (i.e. cross-sectionally) consisting of clinical characteristics, neuroimaging, biospecimen and genetic information, then to develop criteria to assign patients to a Parkinson's disease subtype. Four hundred and twenty-one individuals with de novo early Parkinson's disease were included from this prospective longitudinal multicentre cohort. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using data on demographic and genetic information, motor symptoms and signs, neuropsychological testing and other non-motor manifestations. The key classifiers in cluster analysis were a motor summary score and three non-motor features (cognitive impairment, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and dysautonomia). We then defined three distinct subtypes of Parkinson's disease patients: 223 patients were classified as 'mild motor-predominant' (defined as composite motor and all three non-motor scores below the 75th percentile), 52 as 'diffuse malignant' (composite motor score plus either ≥1/3 non-motor score >75th percentile, or all three non-motor scores >75th percentile) and 146 as 'intermediate'. On biomarkers, people with diffuse malignant Parkinson's disease had the lowest level of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β (329.0 ± 96.7 pg/ml, P = 0.006) and amyloid-β/total-tau ratio (8.2 ± 3.0, P = 0.032). Data from deformation-based magnetic resonance imaging morphometry demonstrated a Parkinson's disease

  14. Gene specific actions of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Z Lin

    Full Text Available There are two homologous thyroid hormone (TH receptors (TRs α and β, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR family. While TRs regulate different processes in vivo and other highly related NRs regulate distinct gene sets, initial studies of TR action revealed near complete overlaps in their actions at the level of individual genes. Here, we assessed the extent that TRα and TRβ differ in target gene regulation by comparing effects of equal levels of stably expressed exogenous TRs +/- T(3 in two cell backgrounds (HepG2 and HeLa. We find that hundreds of genes respond to T(3 or to unliganded TRs in both cell types, but were not able to detect verifiable examples of completely TR subtype-specific gene regulation. TR actions are, however, far from identical and we detect TR subtype-specific effects on global T(3 response kinetics in HepG2 cells and many examples of TR subtype specificity at the level of individual genes, including effects on magnitude of response to TR +/- T(3, TR regulation patterns and T(3 dose response. Cycloheximide (CHX treatment confirms that at least some differential effects involve verifiable direct TR target genes. TR subtype/gene-specific effects emerge in the context of widespread variation in target gene response and we suggest that gene-selective effects on mechanism of TR action highlight differences in TR subtype function that emerge in the environment of specific genes. We propose that differential TR actions could influence physiologic and pharmacologic responses to THs and selective TR modulators (STRMs.

  15. Patient-specific data fusion defines prognostic cancer subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinyin Yuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Different data types can offer complementary perspectives on the same biological phenomenon. In cancer studies, for example, data on copy number alterations indicate losses and amplifications of genomic regions in tumours, while transcriptomic data point to the impact of genomic and environmental events on the internal wiring of the cell. Fusing different data provides a more comprehensive model of the cancer cell than that offered by any single type. However, biological signals in different patients exhibit diverse degrees of concordance due to cancer heterogeneity and inherent noise in the measurements. This is a particularly important issue in cancer subtype discovery, where personalised strategies to guide therapy are of vital importance. We present a nonparametric Bayesian model for discovering prognostic cancer subtypes by integrating gene expression and copy number variation data. Our model is constructed from a hierarchy of Dirichlet Processes and addresses three key challenges in data fusion: (i To separate concordant from discordant signals, (ii to select informative features, (iii to estimate the number of disease subtypes. Concordance of signals is assessed individually for each patient, giving us an additional level of insight into the underlying disease structure. We exemplify the power of our model in prostate cancer and breast cancer and show that it outperforms competing methods. In the prostate cancer data, we identify an entirely new subtype with extremely poor survival outcome and show how other analyses fail to detect it. In the breast cancer data, we find subtypes with superior prognostic value by using the concordant results. These discoveries were crucially dependent on our model's ability to distinguish concordant and discordant signals within each patient sample, and would otherwise have been missed. We therefore demonstrate the importance of taking a patient-specific approach, using highly-flexible nonparametric

  16. Comparing two basic subtypes in OCD across three large community samples: a pure compulsive versus a mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Stephanie; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Kawohl, Wolfram; Müller, Mario; Rössler, Wulf; Hengartner, Michael P; Castelao, Enrique; Vandeleur, Caroline; Angst, Jules; Preisig, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Due to its heterogeneous phenomenology, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been subtyped. However, these subtypes are not mutually exclusive. This study presents an alternative subtyping approach by deriving non-overlapping OCD subtypes. A pure compulsive and a mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype (including subjects manifesting obsessions with/without compulsions) were analyzed with respect to a broad pattern of psychosocial risk factors and comorbid syndromes/diagnoses in three representative Swiss community samples: the Zurich Study (n = 591), the ZInEP sample (n = 1500), and the PsyCoLaus sample (n = 3720). A selection of comorbidities was examined in a pooled database. Odds ratios were derived from logistic regressions and, in the analysis of pooled data, multilevel models. The pure compulsive subtype showed a lower age of onset and was characterized by few associations with psychosocial risk factors. The higher social popularity of the pure compulsive subjects and their families was remarkable. Comorbidities within the pure compulsive subtype were mainly restricted to phobias. In contrast, the mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype had a higher prevalence and was associated with various childhood adversities, more familial burden, and numerous comorbid disorders, including disorders characterized by high impulsivity. The current comparison study across three representative community surveys presented two basic, distinct OCD subtypes associated with differing psychosocial impairment. Such highly specific subtypes offer the opportunity to learn about pathophysiological mechanisms specifically involved in OCD.

  17. Prognosis of metastatic breast cancer subtypes: the hormone receptor/HER2-positive subtype is associated with the most favorable outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; van Kampen, Roel J W; Voogd, Adri C; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; Smilde, Tineke J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Peters, Frank P J; van Riel, Johanna M G H; Peters, Natascha A J B; de Boer, Maaike; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to the situation in early breast cancer, little is known about the prognostic relevance of the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in metastatic breast cancer. The objectives of this study were to present survival estimates and to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtypes based on HR and HER2 status in a recent cohort of metastatic breast cancer patients, which is representative of current clinical practice. Patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2009 were included. Information regarding patient and tumor characteristics and treatment was collected. Patients were categorized in four subtypes based on the HR and HER2 status of the primary tumor: HR positive (+)/HER2 negative (-), HR+/HER2+, HR-/HER2+ and triple negative (TN). Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtype, adjusted for possible confounders. Median follow-up was 21.8 months for the 815 metastatic breast cancer patients included; 66 % of patients had the HR+/HER2- subtype, 8 % the HR-/HER2+ subtype, 15 % the TN subtype and 11 % the HR+/HER2+ subtype. The longest survival was observed for the HR+/HER2+ subtype (median 34.4 months), compared to 24.8 months for the HR+/HER2- subtype, 19.8 months for the HR-/HER2+ subtype and 8.8 months for the TN subtype (P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, subtype was an independent prognostic factor, as were initial site of metastases and metastatic-free interval. The HR+/HER2+ subtype was associated with the longest survival after diagnosis of distant metastases.

  18. Established breast cancer risk factors and risk of intrinsic tumor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Mollie E; Boeke, Caroline E; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple intrinsic tumor subtypes. These subtypes vary in tumor gene expression and phenotype, and are most commonly grouped into four major subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, HER2-overexpressing and triple negative (or basal-like). A growing number of studies have evaluated the relationship between established breast cancer risk factors and risk of one or more intrinsic tumor subtypes. We conducted a systematic review of 38 studies to synthesize their results and identify areas requiring more research. Taken together, published studies suggest that most established breast cancer risk factors reflect risk factors for the luminal A subtype of breast cancer, and some breast cancer risk factors may be differentially associated with other intrinsic tumor subtypes. Future breast cancer research will need to consider etiologic differences across subtypes and design studies focused on understanding the etiology and prevention of less common tumor subtypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Robust Identification of Alzheimer’s Disease subtypes based on cortical atrophy patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yun; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L.; Han, Cheol E.; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Decarli, Charles; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Shen, Li; Kelley, Faber; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino, Daniel, II; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; de Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, Maryann; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc Adams Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin Cook, Kristen; Devous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; Macavoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Marsel Mesulam, Marek; Lipowski, Kristine; Kuo Wu, Chuang; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Lynn Johnson, Patricia; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T. Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok

    2017-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is heterogenous and can be classified into several subtypes. Here, we propose a robust subtyping method for AD based on cortical atrophy patterns and graph theory. We calculated similarities between subjects in their atrophy patterns throughout the whole brain, and clustered subjects with similar atrophy patterns using the Louvain method for modular organization extraction. We applied our method to AD patients recruited at Samsung Medical Center and externally validated our method by using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Our method categorized very mild AD into three clinically distinct subtypes with high reproducibility (>90%) the parietal-predominant (P), medial temporal-predominant (MT), and diffuse (D) atrophy subtype. The P subtype showed the worst clinical presentation throughout the cognitive domains, while the MT and D subtypes exhibited relatively mild presentation. The MT subtype revealed more impaired language and executive function compared to the D subtype.

  20. Construction of a High Titer Infectious HIV-1 Subtype C Proviral Clone from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Bodem

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 subtype C is currently the predominant subtype worldwide. Cell culture studies of Sub-Saharan African subtype C proviral plasmids are hampered by the low replication capacity of the resulting viruses, although viral loads in subtype C infected patients are as high as those from patients with subtype B. Here, we describe the sequencing and construction of a new HIV-1 subtype C proviral clone (pZAC, replicating more than one order of magnitude better than the previous subtype C plasmids. We identify the env-region for being the determinant for the higher viral titers and the pZAC Env to be M-tropic. This higher replication capacity does not lead to a higher cytotoxicity compared to previously described subtype C viruses. In addition, the pZAC Vpu is also shown to be able to down-regulate CD4, but fails to fully counteract CD317.

  1. Epidemiology of breast cancer subtypes in two prospective cohort studies of breast cancer survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwan, Marilyn L; Kushi, Lawrence H; Weltzien, Erin; Maring, Benjamin; Kutner, Susan E; Fulton, Regan S; Lee, Marion M; Ambrosone, Christine B; Caan, Bette J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe breast tumor subtypes by common breast cancer risk factors and to determine correlates of subtypes using baseline data from two pooled prospective breast cancer...

  2. Cognitive subtypes in non-affected siblings of schizophrenia patients: characteristics and profile congruency with affected family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, P. J.; Alizadeh, B. Z.; Aleman, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Kahn, R. S.; Linszen, D. H.; van Os, J.; Wiersma, D.; Cahn, W.; de Haan, L.; Krabbendam, L.; Myin-Germeys, I.; Bruggeman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Although cognitive subtypes have been suggested in schizophrenia patients, similar analyses have not been carried out in their non-affected siblings. Subtype classification may provide more insight into genetically driven variation in cognitive function. We investigated cognitive subtypes in

  3. Cognitive subtypes in non-affected siblings of schizophrenia patients : characteristics and profile congruency with affected family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, P. J.; Alizadeh, B. Z.; Aleman, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.

    Background Although cognitive subtypes have been suggested in schizophrenia patients, similar analyses have not been carried out in their non-affected siblings. Subtype classification may provide more insight into genetically driven variation in cognitive function. We investigated cognitive subtypes

  4. Contribution of constitutively proliferating precursor cell subtypes to dentate neurogenesis after cortical infarcts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberland Julia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that focal ischemia increases neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation but the cellular mechanisms underlying this proliferative response are only poorly understood. We here investigated whether precursor cells which constitutively proliferate before the ischemic infarct contribute to post-ischemic neurogenesis. To this purpose, transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the nestin promoter received repetitive injections of the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU prior to induction of cortical infarcts. We then immunocytochemically analyzed the fate of these BrdU-positive precursor cell subtypes from day 4 to day 28 after the lesion. Results Quantification of BrdU-expressing precursor cell populations revealed no alteration in number of radial glia-like type 1 cells but a sequential increase of later precursor cell subtypes in lesioned animals (type 2a cells at day 7, type 3 cells/immature neurons at day 14. These alterations result in an enhanced survival of mature neurons 4 weeks postinfarct. Conclusions Focal cortical infarcts recruit dentate precursor cells generated already before the infarct and significantly contribute to an enhanced neurogenesis. Our findings thereby increase our understanding of the complex cellular mechanisms of postlesional neurogenesis.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Subtypes Identified from Cluster Analysis of Motor and Non-motor Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Mu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is now considered a complex, multi-peptide, central, and peripheral nervous system disorder with considerable clinical heterogeneity. Non-motor symptoms play a key role in the trajectory of Parkinson's disease, from prodromal premotor to end stages. To understand the clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease, this study used cluster analysis to search for subtypes from a large, multi-center, international, and well-characterized cohort of Parkinson's disease patients across all motor stages, using a combination of cardinal motor features (bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, axial signs and, for the first time, specific validated rater-based non-motor symptom scales. Two independent international cohort studies were used: (a the validation study of the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (n = 411 and (b baseline data from the global Non-Motor International Longitudinal Study (n = 540. k-means cluster analyses were performed on the non-motor and motor domains (domains clustering and the 30 individual non-motor symptoms alone (symptoms clustering, and hierarchical agglomerative clustering was performed to group symptoms together. Four clusters are identified from the domains clustering supporting previous studies: mild, non-motor dominant, motor-dominant, and severe. In addition, six new smaller clusters are identified from the symptoms clustering, each characterized by clinically-relevant non-motor symptoms. The clusters identified in this study present statistical confirmation of the increasingly important role of non-motor symptoms (NMS in Parkinson's disease heterogeneity and take steps toward subtype-specific treatment packages.

  6. How Subtyping Shapes Perception : Predictable Exceptions to the Rule Reduce Attention to Stereotype-Associated Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Deutsch, Roland; Fazio, Russell H.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relation between stereotype disconfirmation and attentional processes. Using an instrumental learning-paradigm, we successfully simulated stereotype acquisition and the subsequent subtyping of disconfirming exemplars. While replicating established markers of subtyping, the present research demonstrates a hitherto neglected cognitive consequence of subtyping: Predictable stereotype disconfirmation increased attention to features that facilitated discriminating betw...

  7. Genome characterisation of the newly discovered avian influenza A H5N7 virus subtype combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, K.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    In Denmark, in 2003, a previously unknown subtype combination of avian influenza A virus, H5N7 (A/Mallard/Denmark/64650/03), was isolated from a flock of 12,000 mallards. The H5N7 subtype combination might be a reassortant between recent European avian influenza A H5, H7, and a third subtype, pos...

  8. Empirically Derived Learning Disability Subtypes: A Replication Attempt and Longitudinal Patterns over 15 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreen, Otfried; Haaf, Robert G.

    1986-01-01

    Test scores of two groups of learning disabled children (N=63 and N=96) were submitted to cluster analysis in an attempt to replicate previously described subtypes. All three subtypes (visuo-perceptual, linguistic, and articulo-graphomotor types) were identified along with minimally and severely impaired subtypes. Similar clusters in the same…

  9. Histopathological Analysis of 226 Patients With Rosacea According to Rosacea Subtype and Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Jung, Joon Min; Lee, Ye Jin; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan; Lee, Mi Woo

    2016-05-01

    The histopathological features of rosacea have not been described in detail. To evaluate the histopathological features of rosacea according to clinical characteristics such as subtype and severity. We retrospectively analyzed histopathological findings in 226 patients with rosacea, which included 52 patients with the erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR) and 174 patients with the papulopustular rosacea (PPR) subtype. The frequency of each histopathological finding was compared between subtypes. Histopathological features were also compared according to the severity, through subgroup analysis within each subtype group. Perivascular and perifollicular lymphohistiocytic infiltration were common dermal findings in both subtype groups, but the intensity of dermal inflammatory infiltration was higher in PPR than in ETR. Follicular spongiosis and exocytosis of inflammatory cells into hair follicles were noted in both subtypes; but these findings were significantly more common in the PPR subtype. Vascular changes (telangiectasia and proliferation) and solar elastosis were common histopathological findings in both subtypes, with no difference in frequency between subtype groups. Demodex mites were identified in about 40% of patients, and the frequency of demodex mites did not differ between subtype groups. The intensity of perifollicular inflammation and the presence of follicular inflammatory reactions were dependent on the severity of rosacea in both subtype groups. The intensity of inflammatory reactions, especially perifollicular infiltration, was higher in PPR patients than in ETR patients. Rosacea has a spectrum of histopathological features that are related to clinical progression between rosacea subtypes.

  10. Deciphering genomic alterations in colorectal cancer through transcriptional subtype-based network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhu

    Full Text Available Both transcriptional subtype and signaling network analyses have proved useful in cancer genomics research. However, these two approaches are usually applied in isolation in existing studies. We reason that deciphering genomic alterations based on cancer transcriptional subtypes may help reveal subtype-specific driver networks and provide insights for the development of personalized therapeutic strategies. In this study, we defined transcriptional subtypes for colorectal cancer (CRC and identified driver networks/pathways for each subtype. Applying consensus clustering to a patient cohort with 1173 samples identified three transcriptional subtypes, which were validated in an independent cohort with 485 samples. The three subtypes were characterized by different transcriptional programs related to normal adult colon, early colon embryonic development, and epithelial mesenchymal transition, respectively. They also showed statistically different clinical outcomes. For each subtype, we mapped somatic mutation and copy number variation data onto an integrated signaling network and identified subtype-specific driver networks using a random walk-based strategy. We found that genomic alterations in the Wnt signaling pathway were common among all three subtypes; however, unique combinations of pathway alterations including Wnt, VEGF and Notch drove distinct molecular and clinical phenotypes in different CRC subtypes. Our results provide a coherent and integrated picture of human CRC that links genomic alterations to molecular and clinical consequences, and which provides insights for the development of personalized therapeutic strategies for different CRC subtypes.

  11. Difference of achalasia subtypes based on clinical symptoms, radiographic findings, and stasis scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meillier, A; Midani, D; Caroline, D; Saadi, M; Parkman, H; Schey, R

    Three subtypes of achalasia have been defined through high-resolution esophageal manometry: subtype i shows no pressurization with swallows, subtype ii has increased isobaric panesophageal pressure, and subtype iii has distal esophageal spastic non-isobaric contractions. Studies describing the subtypes based on radiographic findings, clinical symptoms, and stasis scores are limited. To determine the differences in clinical symptoms, radiographic findings, and stasis scores for the 3 achalasia subtypes. Patients undergoing high-resolution esophageal manometry received a questionnaire about current symptoms and previous treatments. The questions included the presence of symptoms and their severity. Barium swallow tests were performed before the high-resolution esophageal manometry study to evaluate the maximum esophageal diameter. Stasis scores were calculated using the transit patterns on high-resolution esophageal manometry. One hundred and eight patients with high-resolution esophageal manometry diagnosis of achalasia (n=8, subtype i; n=84, subtype ii; n=16, subtype iii) within the time frame of 1/2012-6/2015 were included in the study. Sex distribution was similar between the subtypes. Patient age was younger for subtype i (38±16 years), compared with subtypes ii (55±17 years) and iii (63±17 years) (P=.03). Esophageal symptoms did not differ between subtypes regarding the severity of nausea, chest pain, coughing, and heartburn, except for increased vomiting severity in subtype i (2.8±1.4 vs. 1.4±1.4 vs. 1.2±1.2, P<.01). A significant radiographic difference in esophageal dilation was seen between subtypes ii and iii (35.1±14.4 vs. 24.0±7.2mm, P=.023). Stasis scores did not significantly differ between the subtypes. Achalasia subtypes had similar clinical symptoms, except for increased vomiting severity in subtype i. The maximum esophageal diameter in subtype ii was significantly greater than in subtype iii. Esophageal stasis scores were similar. Thus

  12. Sequence Analysis of In Vivo-Expressed HIV-1 Spliced RNAs Reveals the Usage of New and Unusual Splice Sites by Viruses of Different Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; de la Barrera, Jorge; Carrera, Cristina; Zaballos, Ángel; Cuesta, Isabel; Mariño, Ana; Ocampo, Antonio; Miralles, Celia; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Álvarez, Hortensia; López-Miragaya, Isabel; García-Bodas, Elena; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; Thomson, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 RNAs are generated through a complex splicing mechanism, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts, which are classified in three major categories: unspliced, singly spliced (SS), and doubly spliced (DS). Knowledge on HIV-1 RNA splicing in vivo and by non-subtype B viruses is scarce. Here we analyze HIV-1 RNA splice site usage in CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals through pyrosequencing. HIV-1 DS and SS RNAs were amplified by RT-PCR in 19 and 12 samples, respectively. 13,108 sequences from HIV-1 spliced RNAs, derived from viruses of five subtypes (A, B, C, F, G), were identified. In four samples, three of non-B subtypes, five 3’ splice sites (3’ss) mapping to unreported positions in the HIV-1 genome were identified. Two, designated A4i and A4j, were used in 22% and 25% of rev RNAs in two viruses of subtypes B and A, respectively. Given their close proximity (one or two nucleotides) to A4c and A4d, respectively, they could be viewed as variants of these sites. Three 3’ss, designated A7g, A7h, and A7i, located 20, 32, and 18 nucleotides downstream of A7, respectively, were identified in a subtype C (A7g, A7h) and a subtype G (A7i) viruses, each in around 2% of nef RNAs. The new splice sites or variants of splice sites were associated with the usual sequence features of 3’ss. Usage of unusual 3’ss A4d, A4e, A5a, A7a, and A7b was also detected. A4f, previously identified in two subtype C viruses, was preferentially used by rev RNAs of a subtype C virus. These results highlight the great diversity of in vivo splice site usage by HIV-1 RNAs. The fact that four of five newly identified splice sites or variants of splice sites were detected in non-subtype B viruses allows anticipating an even greater diversity of HIV-1 splice site usage than currently known. PMID:27355361

  13. Sequence Analysis of In Vivo-Expressed HIV-1 Spliced RNAs Reveals the Usage of New and Unusual Splice Sites by Viruses of Different Subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Vega

    Full Text Available HIV-1 RNAs are generated through a complex splicing mechanism, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts, which are classified in three major categories: unspliced, singly spliced (SS, and doubly spliced (DS. Knowledge on HIV-1 RNA splicing in vivo and by non-subtype B viruses is scarce. Here we analyze HIV-1 RNA splice site usage in CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals through pyrosequencing. HIV-1 DS and SS RNAs were amplified by RT-PCR in 19 and 12 samples, respectively. 13,108 sequences from HIV-1 spliced RNAs, derived from viruses of five subtypes (A, B, C, F, G, were identified. In four samples, three of non-B subtypes, five 3' splice sites (3'ss mapping to unreported positions in the HIV-1 genome were identified. Two, designated A4i and A4j, were used in 22% and 25% of rev RNAs in two viruses of subtypes B and A, respectively. Given their close proximity (one or two nucleotides to A4c and A4d, respectively, they could be viewed as variants of these sites. Three 3'ss, designated A7g, A7h, and A7i, located 20, 32, and 18 nucleotides downstream of A7, respectively, were identified in a subtype C (A7g, A7h and a subtype G (A7i viruses, each in around 2% of nef RNAs. The new splice sites or variants of splice sites were associated with the usual sequence features of 3'ss. Usage of unusual 3'ss A4d, A4e, A5a, A7a, and A7b was also detected. A4f, previously identified in two subtype C viruses, was preferentially used by rev RNAs of a subtype C virus. These results highlight the great diversity of in vivo splice site usage by HIV-1 RNAs. The fact that four of five newly identified splice sites or variants of splice sites were detected in non-subtype B viruses allows anticipating an even greater diversity of HIV-1 splice site usage than currently known.

  14. Relating Church-Style and Curry-Style Subtyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Compagnoni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type theories with higher-order subtyping or singleton types are examples of systems where computation rules for variables are affected by type information in the context. A complication for these systems is that bounds declared in the context do not interact well with the logical relation proof of completeness or termination. This paper proposes a natural modification to the type syntax for F-Omega-Sub, adding variable's bound to the variable type constructor, thereby separating the computational behavior of the variable from the context. The algorithm for subtyping in F-Omega-Sub can then be given on types without context or kind information. As a consequence, the metatheory follows the general approach for type systems without computational information in the context, including a simple logical relation definition without Kripke-style indexing by context. This new presentation of the system is shown to be equivalent to the traditional presentation without bounds on the variable type constructor.

  15. Apoptosis in Blastocystis spp. is related to subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhurga, D B; Suresh, K G; Tan, T C; Chandramathi, S

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that apoptosis-like features are observed in Blastocystis spp., an intestinal protozoan parasite, when exposed to the cytotoxic drug metronidazole (MTZ). This study reports that among the four subtypes of Blastocystis spp. investigated for rate of apoptosis when treated with MTZ, subtype 3 showed the highest significant increase after 72h of in vitro culture when treated with MTZ at 0.1mg/ml (79%; pBlastocystis spp. that actually regulates the apoptotic process to produce higher number of viable cells when treated. Apoptosis may not just be programmed cell death but instead a mechanism to increase the number of viable cells to ensure survival during stressed conditions. The findings of the present study have an important contribution to influence chemotherapeutic approaches when developing drugs against the emerging Blastocystis spp. infections. Copyright © 2012 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Unique Migraine Subtypes, Rare Headache Disorders, and Other Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    The medical aphorism that common things happen commonly makes unique (and less common) migraine subtypes especially appropriate to review for the general neurologist. This article also identifies some rare headache disorders and other disturbances, and offers strategies to manage them. This article discusses migraine with brainstem aura, which is troublesome clinically and has had a change in terminology in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition, beta version (ICHD-3 beta), and hemiplegic migraine, which is also troublesome in practice. The rare headache disorder hypnic headache and the exploding head syndrome are also discussed. When hypnic headache is recognized, it is eminently treatable, while exploding head syndrome is a benign condition with no reported consequences. Unique migraine subtypes, rare headache disorders, and other disturbances present to neurologists. When recognized, they can often be managed very well, which offers significant benefits to patients and practice satisfaction to neurologists.

  17. Beyond classical benzodiazepines: Novel therapeutic potential of GABAA receptor subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Uwe; Knoflach, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    GABAA receptors are a family of ligand-gated ion channels which are essential for the regulation of central nervous system function. Benzodiazepines – which target GABAA receptors containing the α1, α2, α3, or α5 subunits non-selectively – have been in clinical use for decades and are still among the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of insomnia and anxiety disorders. However, their use is limited by side effects and the risk of drug dependence. In the past decade, the identification of separable key functions of GABAA receptor subtypes suggests that receptor subtype-selective compounds could overcome the limitations of classical benzodiazepines and, furthermore, might be valuable for novel indications, such as analgesia, depression, schizophrenia, cognitive enhancement and stroke. PMID:21799515

  18. Myeloperoxidase index and subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivazi-Ziaei, Jamal

    2009-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) should be classified into subtypes according to the French-American-British (FAB) or, preferably, the newer World Health Organization (WHO) classification schemes. FAB is purely a morphological classification. It does not determine treatment (except M3) or prognosis for the patient which requires cytogenetics. Haematological analyzer had been used for classification of leukaemia in several studies. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity (MPXI) can be performed by Technicon H1 (Bayer) automated cell counter. The aim of this study was the statement of myeloperoxidase index and subgroups of AML. In the study of medical records of 72 patients with AML from 2006-7, we found that MPXI was negative in M4 and M5 while 75% of M3 cases had high MPXI values. MPXI level may help to differentiate subtypes of AML.

  19. Groin hernia subtypes are associated in patients with bilateral hernias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the relation between groin hernia subtypes in patients operated for bilateral hernias. METHODS: With data from the Danish Hernia Database, we identified all patients operated for primary groin hernias from 1998 to 2012. Within this cohort all patients that were...... bilaterally operated were analyzed. Risk factors for bilateral groin hernia operation as well as the relationship between groin hernia subtypes bilaterally, were analyzed using multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and Kappa statistics. RESULTS: A total of 108, 775 persons with primary groin hernia...... repair (89.9% males) were registered, and of those were 12,041 persons operated bilaterally (94.9% males). Females and males operated for a unilaterally direct inguinal hernia (DIH) had increased Hazard Ratios (HR) of 3.85 (CI 95% 2.14-6.19) and 4.46 (CI 95% 2.57-7.88) of being contralaterally operated...

  20. Modularity-based credible prediction of disease genes and detection of disease subtypes on the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Hao, Han; Li, Yanda; Li, Shao

    2011-05-20

    Protein-protein interaction networks and phenotype similarity information have been synthesized together to discover novel disease-causing genes. Genetic or phenotypic similarities are manifested as certain modularity properties in a phenotype-gene heterogeneous network consisting of the phenotype-phenotype similarity network, protein-protein interaction network and gene-disease association network. However, the quantitative analysis of modularity in the heterogeneous network and its influence on disease-gene discovery are still unaddressed. Furthermore, the genetic correspondence of the disease subtypes can be identified by marking the genes and phenotypes in the phenotype-gene network. We present a novel network inference method to measure the network modularity, and in particular to suggest the subtypes of diseases based on the heterogeneous network. Based on a measure which is introduced to evaluate the closeness between two nodes in the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network, we developed a Hitting-Time-based method, CIPHER-HIT, for assessing the modularity of disease gene predictions and credibly prioritizing disease-causing genes, and then identifying the genetic modules corresponding to potential subtypes of the queried phenotype. The CIPHER-HIT is free to rely on any preset parameters. We found that when taking into account the modularity levels, the CIPHER-HIT method can significantly improve the performance of disease gene predictions, which demonstrates modularity is one of the key features for credible inference of disease genes on the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network. By applying the CIPHER-HIT to the subtype analysis of Breast cancer, we found that the prioritized genes can be divided into two sub-modules, one contains the members of the Fanconi anemia gene family, and the other contains a reported protein complex MRE11/RAD50/NBN. The phenotype-gene heterogeneous network contains abundant information for not only disease genes discovery but also

  1. Bilateral vestibular hypofunction: Insights in etiologies, clinical subtypes and diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    F. eLucieer; P. eVonk; N. eGuinand; R. eStokroos; H. eKingma; R. evan de Berg

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the different etiologies and clinical subtypes of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) and the value of diagnostic tools in the diagnostic process of BVH.Materials and methods: A retrospective case review was performed on 154 patients diagnosed with BVH in a tertiary referral center, between 2013 and 2015. Inclusion criteria comprised 1) imbalance and/or oscillopsia during locomotion, and 2) summated slow phase velocity of nystagmus of less than 20 degrees per second ...

  2. Bilateral Vestibular Hypofunction: Insights in Etiologies, Clinical Subtypes, and Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Lucieer, F.; Vonk, P.; Guinand, N; Stokroos, R.; Kingma, H.; van de Berg, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the different etiologies and clinical subtypes of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) and the value of diagnostic tools in the diagnostic process of BVH. Materials and methods A retrospective case review was performed on 154 patients diagnosed with BVH in a tertiary referral center, between 2013 and 2015. Inclusion criteria comprised (1) imbalance and/or oscillopsia during locomotion and (2) summated slow phase velocity of nystagmus of less than 20°/s duri...

  3. Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    whether Luminal type A breast cancer cell line MCF-7 implanted into nude mice with experimentally induced type I diabetes (no Insulin but hyperglycemia ...or type II diabetes (elevated serum Insulin and hyperglycemia ) progress to become Luminal type B or any other intrinsic subtype. Progress on in...GATA-3. As the expression of some of the above factors are controlled by insulin , the objective of this study was to investigate the ability of insulin

  4. Anatomic mapping of molecular subtypes in diffuse glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qisheng; Lian, Yuxi; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Liang

    2017-09-15

    Tumor location served as an important prognostic factor in glioma patients was considered to postulate molecular features according to cell origin theory. However, anatomic distribution of unique molecular subtypes was not widely investigated. The relationship between molecular phenotype and histological subgroup were also vague based on tumor location. Our group focuses on the study of glioma anatomic location of distinctive molecular subgroups and histology subtypes, and explores the possibility of their consistency based on clinical background. We retrospectively reviewed 143 cases with both molecular information (IDH1/TERT/1p19q) and MRI images diagnosed as cerebral diffuse gliomas. The anatomic distribution was analyzed between distinctive molecular subgroups and its relationship with histological subtypes. The influence of tumor location, molecular stratification and histology diagnosis on survival outcome was investigated as well. Anatomic locations of cerebral diffuse glioma indicate varied clinical outcome. Based on that, it can be stratified into five principal molecular subgroups according to IDH1/TERT/1p19q status. Triple-positive (IDH1 and TERT mutation with 1p19q codeletion) glioma tended to be oligodendroglioma present with much better clinical outcome compared to TERT mutation only group who is glioblastoma inclined (median overall survival 39 months VS 18 months). Five molecular subgroups were demonstrated with distinctive locational distribution. This kind of anatomic feature is consistent with its corresponding histological subtypes. Each molecular subgroup in glioma has unique anatomic location which indicates distinctive clinical outcome. Molecular diagnosis can be served as perfect complementary tool for the precise diagnosis. Integration of histomolecular diagnosis will be much more helpful in routine clinical practice in the future.

  5. Maltreatment and psychopathy subtypes in high-risk adolescent females

    OpenAIRE

    Coupland, Ruth Louise

    2011-01-01

    Psychopathy is often viewed as a unitary construct, however, research with adults and adolescent males has revealed two heterogeneous subtypes. Primary psychopathy is presumed to have biological underpinnings and is associated with low levels of anxiety and psychological distress. In contrast, secondary psychopathy is believed to result from exposure to adversity, including childhood maltreatment, and is associated with emotional reactivity, impulsivity, and comorbid psychological problems. T...

  6. Refining developmental coordination disorder subtyping with multivariate statistical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalanne Christophe

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a large number of potentially relevant clinical indicators penalization and ensemble learning methods are thought to provide better predictive performance than usual linear predictors. However, little is known about how they perform in clinical studies where few cases are available. We used Random Forests and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis to select the most salient impairments in Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD and assess patients similarity. Methods We considered a wide-range testing battery for various neuropsychological and visuo-motor impairments which aimed at characterizing subtypes of DCD in a sample of 63 children. Classifiers were optimized on a training sample, and they were used subsequently to rank the 49 items according to a permuted measure of variable importance. In addition, subtyping consistency was assessed with cluster analysis on the training sample. Clustering fitness and predictive accuracy were evaluated on the validation sample. Results Both classifiers yielded a relevant subset of items impairments that altogether accounted for a sharp discrimination between three DCD subtypes: ideomotor, visual-spatial and constructional, and mixt dyspraxia. The main impairments that were found to characterize the three subtypes were: digital perception, imitations of gestures, digital praxia, lego blocks, visual spatial structuration, visual motor integration, coordination between upper and lower limbs. Classification accuracy was above 90% for all classifiers, and clustering fitness was found to be satisfactory. Conclusions Random Forests and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis are useful tools to extract salient features from a large pool of correlated binary predictors, but also provide a way to assess individuals proximities in a reduced factor space. Less than 15 neuro-visual, neuro-psychomotor and neuro-psychological tests might be required to provide a sensitive and

  7. Major depressive disorder subtypes to predict long-term course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loo, Hanna M; Cai, Tianxi; Gruber, Michael J; Li, Junlong; de Jonge, Peter; Petukhova, Maria; Rose, Sherri; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoevers, Robert A; Wardenaar, Klaas J; Wilcox, Marsha A; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn J; Bunting, Brendan; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia E; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Levinson, Daphna; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Posada-Villa, Jose; Scott, Kate M; Xavier, Miguel; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C

    2014-09-01

    Variation in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is not strongly predicted by existing subtype distinctions. A new subtyping approach is considered here. Two data mining techniques, ensemble recursive partitioning and Lasso generalized linear models (GLMs), followed by k-means cluster analysis are used to search for subtypes based on index episode symptoms predicting subsequent MDD course in the World Mental Health (WMH) surveys. The WMH surveys are community surveys in 16 countries. Lifetime DSM-IV MDD was reported by 8,261 respondents. Retrospectively reported outcomes included measures of persistence (number of years with an episode, number of years with an episode lasting most of the year) and severity (hospitalization for MDD, disability due to MDD). Recursive partitioning found significant clusters defined by the conjunctions of early onset, suicidality, and anxiety (irritability, panic, nervousness-worry-anxiety) during the index episode. GLMs found additional associations involving a number of individual symptoms. Predicted values of the four outcomes were strongly correlated. Cluster analysis of these predicted values found three clusters having consistently high, intermediate, or low predicted scores across all outcomes. The high-risk cluster (30.0% of respondents) accounted for 52.9-69.7% of high persistence and severity, and it was most strongly predicted by index episode severe dysphoria, suicidality, anxiety, and early onset. A total symptom count, in comparison, was not a significant predictor. Despite being based on retrospective reports, results suggest that useful MDD subtyping distinctions can be made using data mining methods. Further studies are needed to test and expand these results with prospective data. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Association of Blastocystis subtypes with diarrhea in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfa, F.; Sari, I. P.; Kurniawan, A.

    2017-08-01

    Blastocystis hominis is an intestinal zoonotic protozoa that epidemiological surveys have shown, is highly prevalent among children and may cause chronic diarrhea. This study aimed to identify Blastocystis subtypes among children and associate those subtypes to pathology. The study’s population was children aged 6-12 years old divided into asymptomatic and symptomatic (diarrhea) groups. The asymptomatic samples were obtained from primary school students in the Bukit Duri area of South Jakarta, while the symptomatic samples were obtained from patients who visited nearby primary health centers (Puskesmas). Symptomatic stool samples were examined inParasitology Laboratory FKUI. Microscopic examination of the stool samples was performed to screen for single Blastocystic infection, followed by culture, PCR of 18S rRNA, and sequencing. In the study, 53.2% of children (n = 156) harbored intestinal parasites, Blastocysts sp. A single infection of Blastocystis sp. was present in 69 (44.23%) samples, comprised of 36 symptomatic and 33 asymptomatic participants. The Blastocystis subtypes (STs) identified in this study were STs 1-4 ST3 was the most dominant and was observed with statistically significant higher frequency in the symptomatic group. ST4 was only found in one sample in the symptomatic group. While ST1 and ST2 were found more frequently in the asymptomatic group, no statistical association was observed. ST3 is more likely to be associated with clinical symptoms than ST1 and ST2.

  9. The global spread of HIV-1 subtype B epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Angelis, Konstantinos; Mamais, Ioannis; Katzourakis, Aris; Hatzakis, Angelos; Albert, Jan; Lawyer, Glenn; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo J; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Anders; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Lepej, Snjezana J; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elizabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Stylianou, Dora C; Boucher, Charles A B; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Vasylyeva, Tetyana; Friedman, Samuel R; van de Vijver, David; Angarano, Gioacchino; Chaix, Marie-Laure; de Luca, Andrea; Korn, Klaus; Loveday, Clive; Soriano, Vincent; Yerly, Sabine; Zazzi, Mauricio; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was discovered in the early 1980s when the virus had already established a pandemic. For at least three decades the epidemic in the Western World has been dominated by subtype B infections, as part of a sub-epidemic that traveled from Africa through Haiti to United States. However, the pattern of the subsequent spread still remains poorly understood. Here we analyze a large dataset of globally representative HIV-1 subtype B strains to map their spread around the world over the last 50years and describe significant spread patterns. We show that subtype B travelled from North America to Western Europe in different occasions, while Central/Eastern Europe remained isolated for the most part of the early epidemic. Looking with more detail in European countries we see that the United Kingdom, France and Switzerland exchanged viral isolates with non-European countries than with European ones. The observed pattern is likely to mirror geopolitical landmarks in the post-World War II era, namely the rise and the fall of the Iron Curtain and the European colonialism. In conclusion, HIV-1 spread through specific migration routes which are consistent with geopolitical factors that affected human activities during the last 50years, such as migration, tourism and trade. Our findings support the argument that epidemic control policies should be global and incorporate political and socioeconomic factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Blood Cell Subtypes Lysis on Routine Biochemical Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ünlü Burcu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to establish the contribution of blood cells subtypes on hemolysis. Methods: Separated blood cell subtype suspensions prepared with blood from 10 volunteers were serially diluted to obtain different concentrations of cell suspensions. The cells were fully lysed and cell hemolysates were added (1:20 to aliquots of serum pool. Thus, seven serum pools with different concentrations of interferent were obtained for each blood cell subtype. Biochemical parameters and serum indices were measured by an autoanalyzer. As cell lysis markers, free hemoglobin was measured by spectrophotometry while myeloperoxidase and b-thromboglobulin were measured by enzyme immunoassay. The percent changes in analyte levels of the serum pools were evaulated by Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and compared with clinical thresholds defined for each test. Results: The clinical thresholds were exceeded in lactate dehydrogenase, potassium, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, magnesium, total protein, total cholesterol, inorganic phosphate, glucose for red blood cells (RBC; lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, total protein, inorganic phosphate and glucose for platelets (PLT. Free hemoglobin was significantly correlated with RBC (r=0.999; p=0.001, while myeloperoxidase and b thromboglobulin showed no significant correlation to white blood cells (WBC and PLT, respectively. Conclusion: The effect of RBC hemolysis in serum on the routine biochemical tests are clearly established, yet, additional studies are required in order to verify this kind of effects of PLT and WBC hemolysis.

  11. Cognitive style in bipolar disorder sub-types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kathryn; Parker, Gordon; Manicavasagar, Vijaya

    2013-04-30

    Clearer understanding of psychological processes and mechanisms such as cognitive style inform more targeted psychological treatments for mood disorders. Studies to date have focused on bipolar I disorder or combined bipolar sub-types, precluding identification of any distinctive cognitive style profiles. We examined cognitive style separately in the bipolar sub-types, contrasted with unipolar and non-clinical controls. A total of 417 participants (94 bipolar I, 114 bipolar II, 109 unipolar, 100 healthy controls) completed cognitive style measures including the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale, Inferential Styles Questionnaire, Stress Appraisal Measure and the Behavioural Inhibition System/Behavioural Activation System Scale. Overall, cognitive styles were similar in unipolar and bipolar participants, but with styles relevant to the Behavioral Activation System differentiating bipolar I disorder in particular. State anxiety influenced negative inferential style in unipolar participants and appraisal of stress in bipolar II participants. Analyses restricted to bipolar I vs. II comparisons revealed subtle differences in terms of dispositional stress appraisal, with higher scores on two stress appraisal sub-scales in the bipolar I group. Further exploration of cognitive style in bipolar sub-types is indicated in order to determine whether there are specific psychological vulnerabilities that would benefit from more targeted psychological interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Breast cancer subtypes predispose the site of distant metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Abha; Ren, Zhiyong; Hameed, Omar; Chanda, Diptiman; Morgan, Charity J; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2015-04-01

    The distant organs to which breast cancer preferentially metastasizes are of significant clinical importance. We explored the relationship between the clinicopathologic factors and the common sites of distant metastasis in 531 consecutive patients with advanced breast cancer. Breast cancer subtype as a variable was significantly associated with all five common sites of relapse by multivariate analysis. The luminal tumors were remarkable for their significant bone-seeking phenotype and were less frequently observed in lung, brain, and pleural metastases and less likely to be associated with multiorgan relapse. The HER2 subtype demonstrated a significant liver-homing characteristic. African Americans were significantly less likely to have brain-only metastasis in patients with brain relapse. These findings further articulate that breast cancer subtypes differ not only in tumor characteristics but also in their metastatic behavior, thus raising the possibility that this knowledge could potentially be used in determining the appropriate strategy for follow-up of patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  13. DNA methylation profiling distinguishes histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Amy A.; Alokail, Majed; Gentle, Dean; Yao, Masahiro; Kovacs, Gyula; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for around 3% of cancers in the UK, and both incidence and mortality are increasing with the aging population. RCC can be divided into several subtypes: conventional RCC (the most common, comprising 75% of all cases), papillary RCC (15%) and chromophobe RCC (5%). Renal oncocytoma is a benign tumor and accounts for 5% of RCC. Cancer and epigenetics are closely associated, with DNA hypermethylation being widely accepted as a feature of many cancers. In this study the DNA methylation profiles of chromophobe RCC and renal oncocytomas were investigated by utilizing the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. Cancer-specific hypermethylation was identified in 9.4% and 5.2% of loci in chromophobe RCC and renal oncocytoma samples, respectively, while the majority of the genome was hypomethylated. Thirty (hypermethylated) and 41 (hypomethylated) genes were identified as differentially methylated between chromophobe RCC and renal oncocytomas (p renal oncocytoma in relation to the other histological subtypes, providing insight into the pathology of RCC subtypes and classification of renal tumors. PMID:23428843

  14. The validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Sinke, Sjoukje; Mitchell, James E; Hoek, Hans W

    2009-11-01

    To review the evidence for the validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa (BN) into a purging (BN-P) and a nonpurging subtype (BN-NP), and of distinguishing BN-NP from binge eating disorder (BED), by comparing course, complications, and treatment. A literature search of psychiatry databases for studies published in peer-reviewed journals that used the DSM-definitions of BN and BED, and included both individuals with BN-NP and individuals with BN-P and/or BED. Twenty-three studies compared individuals with BN-NP (N = 671) to individuals with BN-P (N = 1795) and/or individuals with BED (N = 1921), two of which reported on course, 12 on comorbidity and none on treatment response-the indicators for validity and clinical utility. The differences found were mainly quantitative rather than qualitative, suggesting a gradual difference in severity from BN-P (most severe) through BN-NP to BED (least severe). None of the comparisons provided convincing evidence for the validity or utility of the BN-NP diagnosis. Three options for the position of BN-NP in DSM-V were suggested: (1) maintaining the BN-NP subtype, (2) dropping nonpurging compensatory behavior as a criterion for BN, so that individuals currently designated as having BN-NP would be designated as having BED, and (3) including BN-NP in a broad BN category.

  15. Metabolic Footprints and Molecular Subtypes in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Cappelletti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment options are increasing. However, even among the same tumor histotype, interpatient tumor heterogeneity should be considered for best therapeutic result. Metabolomics represents the last addition to promising “omic” sciences such as genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. Biochemical transformation processes underlying energy production and biosynthetic processes have been recognized as a hallmark of the cancer cell and hold a promise to build a bridge between genotype and phenotype. Since breast tumors represent a collection of different diseases, understanding metabolic differences between molecular subtypes offers a way to identify new subtype-specific treatment strategies, especially if metabolite changes are evaluated in the broader context of the network of enzymatic reactions and pathways. Here, after a brief overview of the literature, original metabolomics data in a series of 92 primary breast cancer patients undergoing surgery at the Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori of Milano are reported highlighting a series of metabolic differences across various molecular subtypes. In particular, the difficult-to-treat luminal B subgroup represents a tumor type which preferentially relies on fatty acids for energy, whereas HER2 and basal-like ones show prevalently alterations in glucose/glutamine metabolism.

  16. Somatoform disorders and the subtypes: do differences exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric diagnoses, especially somatoform disorders, are based on phenomenology, i.e. the subjective experience of the symptoms by the patient. The concept of “medically unexplained symptoms” (MUS is now getting away with much focus on the symptoms per se rather than its explanation by some medical illness. Aim of the study: To study the symptom profile of somatoform disorders and to see its variability in relation to different subtypes of the disorder. Materials and methods: Hundred consecutive patients of somatoform disorders, diagnosed clinically based on the tenth revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10 criteria, were chosen after applying various inclusion and exclusion criteria.The Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGI Health Questionnaire N-2 was used to evaluate symptoms of the patients. Data was analysed with chi-square test. Result: Patients of somatization disorder (SD have significantly higher prevalence of symptoms related to eyes (p=.0412 and higher complaints of hot sensation in the body (p=.0007as compared to undifferentiated somatoform (UD disorder and other somatoform disorders. Hypochondriacal ideas are significantly less in UD and SD. Conclusion: Although traditionally, subtypes of somatoform disorders are supposed to have differences in the phenomenology, there is considerable overlap between them in clinical practice. It may mean that all somatoform disorders are virtually same and there may be no need to have many subtypes.

  17. Stroke subtype classification by geometrical descriptors of lesion shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bastian; Knaack, Christian; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Schnabel, Renate; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2017-01-01

    Inference of etiology from lesion pattern in acute magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for management and prognosis of acute stroke patients. This study aims to assess the value of three-dimensional geometrical lesion-shape descriptors for stroke-subtype classification, specifically regarding stroke of cardioembolic origin. Stroke Etiology was classified according to ASCOD in retrospectively selected patients with acute stroke. Lesions were segmented on diffusion-weighed datasets, and descriptors of lesion shape quantified: surface area, sphericity, bounding box volume, and ratio between bounding box and lesion volume. Morphological measures were compared between stroke subtypes classified by ASCOD and between patients with embolic stroke of cardiac and non-cardiac source. 150 patients (mean age 77 years; 95% CI, 65-80 years; median NIHSS 6, range 0-22) were included. Group comparison of lesion shape measures demonstrated that lesions caused by small-vessel disease were smaller and more spherical compared to other stroke subtypes. No significant differences of morphological measures were detected between patients with cardioembolic and non-cardioembolic stroke. Stroke lesions caused by small vessel disease can be distinguished from other stroke lesions based on distinctive morphological properties. However, within the group of embolic strokes, etiology could not be inferred from the morphology measures studied in our analysis.

  18. Stroke subtype classification by geometrical descriptors of lesion shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Cheng

    Full Text Available Inference of etiology from lesion pattern in acute magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for management and prognosis of acute stroke patients. This study aims to assess the value of three-dimensional geometrical lesion-shape descriptors for stroke-subtype classification, specifically regarding stroke of cardioembolic origin.Stroke Etiology was classified according to ASCOD in retrospectively selected patients with acute stroke. Lesions were segmented on diffusion-weighed datasets, and descriptors of lesion shape quantified: surface area, sphericity, bounding box volume, and ratio between bounding box and lesion volume. Morphological measures were compared between stroke subtypes classified by ASCOD and between patients with embolic stroke of cardiac and non-cardiac source.150 patients (mean age 77 years; 95% CI, 65-80 years; median NIHSS 6, range 0-22 were included. Group comparison of lesion shape measures demonstrated that lesions caused by small-vessel disease were smaller and more spherical compared to other stroke subtypes. No significant differences of morphological measures were detected between patients with cardioembolic and non-cardioembolic stroke.Stroke lesions caused by small vessel disease can be distinguished from other stroke lesions based on distinctive morphological properties. However, within the group of embolic strokes, etiology could not be inferred from the morphology measures studied in our analysis.

  19. Psychosocial and Adaptive Deficits Associated With Learning Disability Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backenson, Erica M; Holland, Sara C; Kubas, Hanna A; Fitzer, Kim R; Wilcox, Gabrielle; Carmichael, Jessica A; Fraccaro, Rebecca L; Smith, Amanda D; Macoun, Sarah J; Harrison, Gina L; Hale, James B

    2015-01-01

    Children with specific learning disabilities (SLD) have deficits in the basic psychological processes that interfere with learning and academic achievement, and for some SLD subtypes, these deficits can also lead to emotional and/or behavior problems. This study examined psychosocial functioning in 123 students, aged 6 to 11, who underwent comprehensive evaluations for learning and/or behavior problems in two Pacific Northwest school districts. Using concordance-discordance model (C-DM) processing strengths and weaknesses SLD identification criteria, results revealed working memory SLD (n = 20), processing speed SLD (n = 30), executive SLD (n = 32), and no disability groups (n = 41). Of the SLD subtypes, repeated measures MANOVA results revealed the processing speed SLD subtype exhibited the greatest psychosocial and adaptive impairment according to teacher behavior ratings. Findings suggest processing speed deficits may be behind the cognitive and psychosocial disturbances found in what has been termed "nonverbal" SLD. Limitations, implications, and future research needs are addressed. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  20. HIV-1 subtype B: Traces of a pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2016-08-01

    Human migration is a major process that shaped the origin and dissemination of HIV. Within HIV-1, subtype B (HIV-1B) is the most disseminated variant and it is assumed to be the causative agent in approximately 11% of all cases of HIV worldwide. Phylogenetic studies have revealed that HIV-1B emerged in Kinshasa (Africa) and was introduced into the Caribbean region via Haiti in or around 1966 by human migration. After localized dispersion, the virus was brought to the United States of America via homosexual/bisexual contact around 1969. Inside USA, the incidence of HIV-1B infection increased exponentially and it became established in the population, affecting not only homosexual individuals but also heterosexual individuals and injecting drug users. Soon after, the virus was disseminated and became established in other regions, including Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Australia. Recent studies suggest that, in addition to this pandemic clade, several lineages have emerged from Haiti and reached other Caribbean and Latin American countries via short-distance dissemination. Different subtype B genetic variants have also been detected in these epidemics. Four genetic variants have been described to date: subtype B', which mainly circulates in Thailand and other Asian countries; a specific variant mainly found in Trinidad and Tobago; the GPGS variant, which is primarily detected in Korea; and the GWGR variant, which is mainly detected in Brazil. This paper reviews the evolution of HIV-1B and its impact on the human population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Receptor mimicry by antibody F045–092 facilitates universal binding to the H3 subtype of influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Peter S.; Ohshima, Nobuko; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Yu, Wenli; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-04-10

    Influenza viruses present a significant health challenge each year, as in the H3N2 epidemic of 2012–2013. Here we describe an antibody, F045–092, that possesses broadly neutralizing activity against the entire H3 subtype and accommodates the natural variation and additional glycosylation in all strains tested from 1963 to 2011. Crystal structures of F045–092 in complex with HAs from 1975 and 2011 H3N2 viruses reveal the structural basis for its neutralization breadth through insertion of its 23-residue HCDR3 into the receptor-binding site that involves striking receptor mimicry. F045–092 extends its recognition to divergent subtypes, including H1, H2 and H13, using the enhanced avidity of its IgG to overcome lower-affinity Fab binding, as observed with other antibodies that target the receptor-binding site. This unprecedented level of antibody cross-reactivity against the H3 subtype can potentially inform on development of a pan-H3 vaccine or small-molecule therapeutics.

  2. Biochemical characterization of membrane fractions in murine sperm: identification of three distinct sub-types of membrane rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Atsushi; Selvaraj, Vimal; Buttke, Danielle E; Nelson, Jacquelyn L; Green, Karin M; Evans, James E; Travis, Alexander J

    2009-03-01

    Despite enormous interest in membrane raft micro-domains, no studies in any cell type have defined the relative compositions of the raft fractions on the basis of their major components--sterols, phospholipids, and proteins--or additional raft-associating lipids such as the ganglioside, G(M1). Our previous localization data in live sperm showed that the plasma membrane overlying the acrosome represents a stabilized platform enriched in G(M1) and sterols. These findings, along with the physiological requirement for sterol efflux for sperm to function, prompted us to characterize sperm membrane fractions biochemically. After confirming limitations of commonly used detergent-based approaches, we utilized a non-detergent-based method, separating membrane fractions that were reproducibly distinct based on sterol, G(M1), phospholipid, and protein compositions (both mass amounts and molar ratios). Based on fraction buoyancy and biochemical composition, we identified at least three highly reproducible sub-types of membrane raft. Electron microscopy revealed that raft fractions were free of visible contaminants and were separated by buoyancy rather than morphology. Quantitative proteomic comparisons and fluorescence localization of lipids suggested that different organelles contributed differentially to individual raft sub-types, but that multiple membrane micro-domain sub-types could exist within individual domains. This has important implications for scaffolding functions broadly associated with rafts. Most importantly, we show that the common practice of characterizing membrane domains as either "raft" or "non-raft" oversimplifies the actual biochemical complexity of cellular membranes.

  3. Emergence of recombinant forms in geographic regions with co-circulating HIV subtypes in the dynamic HIV-1 epidemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letiner, Thomas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foley, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have reexamined the subtype designations of {approx}10,000 subtype A, B, C, G, and AG, BC, BF recombinant sequences, and compared the results of the new analysis with their published designations. Intersubtype recombinants dominate HIV epidemics in three different geographical regions. The circulating recombinant from (CRF) CRF02-AG, common in West Central Africa, appears to result from a recombination event that occurred early in the divergence between subtypes A and G, although additional more recent recombination events may have contributed to the breakpoint pattern in this recombinant lineage as well. The Chinese recombinant epidemic strains CRF07 and CRF08, in contrast, result from recent recombinations between more contemporary strains. Nevertheless, CRF07 and CRF08 contributed to many subsequent recombination events. The BF recombinant epidemics in two HIV-1 epicenters in South America are not independent and BF epidemics in South America have an unusually high fraction of unique recombinant forms (URFs) that have each been found only once and carry distinctive breakpoints. Taken together, these analyses reveal a complex and dynamic picture of the current HIV-1 epidemic, and suggest a means of grouping and tracking relationships between viruses through preservation of shared breakpints.

  4. Inter- and Intra-subtype genotypic differences that differentiate Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biet Franck

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map is the aetiological agent of Johne’s disease or paratuberculosis and is included within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC. Map strains are of two major types often referred to as ‘Sheep’ or ‘S-type’ and ‘Cattle’ or ‘C-type’. With the advent of more discriminatory typing techniques it has been possible to further classify the S-type strains into two groups referred to as Type I and Type III. This study was undertaken to genotype a large panel of S-type small ruminant isolates from different hosts and geographical origins and to compare them with a large panel of well documented C-type isolates to assess the genetic diversity of these strain types. Methods used included Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units - Variable-Number Tandem Repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR, analysis of Large Sequence Polymorphisms by PCR (LSP analysis, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP analysis of gyr genes, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis coupled with hybridization to IS900 (IS900-RFLP analysis. Results The presence of LSPA4 and absence of LSPA20 was confirmed in all 24 Map S-type strains analysed. SNPs within the gyr genes divided the S-type strains into types I and III. Twenty four PFGE multiplex profiles and eleven different IS900-RFLP profiles were identified among the S-type isolates, some of them not previously published. Both PFGE and IS900-RFLP segregated the S-type strains into types I and III and the results concurred with those of the gyr SNP analysis. Nine MIRU-VNTR genotypes were identified in these isolates. MIRU-VNTR analysis differentiated Map strains from other members of Mycobacterium avium Complex, and Map S-type from C-type but not type I from III. Pigmented Map isolates were found of type I or III. Conclusion This is the largest panel of S-type strains investigated to date. The S-type strains

  5. Molecular subtyping of feline immunodeficiency virus from domestic cats in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, R K C; Kyaw-Tanner, M T; Seddon, J M; Lehrbach, P R; Zwijnenberg, R J G; Meers, J

    2006-04-01

    To determine the prevalent subtypes of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) present in the domestic cat population of Australia. Blood samples were collected from 41 FIV antibody positive cats from four cities across Australia. Following DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to amplify the variable V3-V5 region of the envelope (env) gene. Genotypes were assessed by direct sequencing of PCR products and comparison with previously reported FIV sequences. Phylogenetic analysis allowed classification of the Australian sequences into the appropriate subtype. Of the 41 FIV samples, 40 were found to cluster with previously reported subtype A isolates, whilst the remaining sample grouped within subtype B. Subtype A was found to be the predominant FIV subtype present in Australia, although subtype B was also found. These results broaden our knowledge of the genetic diversity of FIV and the associated implications for preventative, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  6. Strategies for subtyping influenza viruses circulating in the Danish pig population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Trebbien, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses are endemic in the Danish pig population and the dominant circulating subtypes are H1N1, a Danish H1N2 reassortant, and H3N2. Here we present our current and future strategies for influenza virus subtyping. For diagnostic and surveillance of influenza subtypes circulating...... in the Danish pig population functional and rapid subtyping assays are required. The conventional RT-PCR influenza subtyping assays developed by Chiapponi et al. (2003) have been implemented and used for typing of influenza viruses found positive in a pan influenza A real time RT-PCR assay. The H1 and N1 assays...... assays based on RT-PCR and subsequent sequencing were implemented for the four subtypes H1, H3, N1, and N2. The assays were based on primer sets published by the WHO, but slightly modified for improved detection of Danish subtype variants. Sequencing of circulating influenza viruses is beneficial since...

  7. Distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes in the State of Amazonas, Brazil, and subtype C identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, L.K.H. [Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Kashima, S.; Amarante, M.F.C.; Haddad, R.; Rodrigues, E.S. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Hemocentro de Ribeirão Preto, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, K.L.T.; Lima, T.A.; Castro, D.B.; Brito, F.C.; Almeida, E.G. [Diretoria de Ensino e Pesquisa,Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Covas, D.T. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Hemocentro de Ribeirão Preto, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Malheiro, A. [Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Diretoria de Ensino e Pesquisa,Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2012-01-20

    Few studies have reported the molecular epidemiological characterization of HIV-1 in the Northern region of Brazil. The present study reports the molecular and epidemiological characterization of 31 HIV-1 isolates from blood donors from the State of Amazonas who donated blood between April 2006 and March 2007. Serum/plasma samples from all donors were screened for HIV antibodies by ELISA and the results confirmed by Western blot analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buffy coat using the Super Quik-Gene-DNA Isolation kit. Nested PCR was performed on the env, gag, and pol regions of HIV-1 using the Gene Amp PCR System 9700. Sequencing reactions were performed using the inner PCR primers and the DYEnamic™ ET Dye Terminator Kit, and phylogenetic analysis was performed using the gag, pol, and env gene sequences. We collected samples from 31 blood donors who tested positive for HIV-1 in confirmatory experiments. The male:female ratio of blood donors was 3.4:1, and the mean age was 32.4 years (range: 19 to 61 years). Phylogenetic analysis showed that subtype B is the most prevalent among Northern Brazilian HIV-1-seropositive blood donors. One HIV-1 subtype C and one circulating recombinant form (CRF-BF) of HIV-1 were identified in the State of Amazonas. This is the first study showing the occurrence of a possible “homogenous” subtype C in this region of Brazil. This finding could contribute to a better characterization of the HIV-1 strains that circulate in the country. Key words: HIV-1; Subtypes; Phylogenetic analysis; Blood donors; Molecular and epidemiological characterization.

  8. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder subtypes in adolescents with comorbid substance-use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Leanne; Adinoff, Bryon; Nakonezny, Paul A; Winhusen, Theresa; Riggs, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes and substance-use disorder (SUD). As there is literature suggesting different subtype phenotypes, there may be subtype differences in regard to the risk for developing SUD and substance treatment response. To characterize the sample in a Clinical Trials Network (CTN) study according to ADHD subtypes and baseline psychosocial and substance-use characteristics and to compare subtypes on response to treatment. Secondary analyses on data collected from adolescents (n = 276) diagnosed with ADHD and SUD (non-nicotine) and treated with stimulant medication or placebo and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use. Participants were characterized as inattentive or combined ADHD subtype and compared on baseline characteristics and treatment outcome. The combined subtype presented with more severe SUDs and higher rates of conduct disorder. There were a greater proportion of boys with inattentive subtype. The inattentive subtype appeared less ready for treatment (greater University of Rhode Island Change Assessment precontemplation scores) with poorer coping skills (poorer problem-solving and abstinence focused coping) at baseline. However, the two subtypes responded equally to treatment even after controlling for baseline differences. Findings from this large community sample indicate that there were no subtype differences in treatment response, although there were differences in terms of substance use, antisocial behavior, readiness for treatment, and gender prior to treatment. This study is the first to report on subtype differences for treatment response for non-nicotine SUD in a comorbid ADHD-SUD population. Despite some baseline differences, both subtypes responded equally to treatment, suggesting limited relevance for subtype designation on treatment planning.

  9. Immunity raised by recent European subtype 1 PRRSV strains allows better replication of East European subtype 3 PRRSV strain Lena than that raised by an older strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trus, Ivan; Frydas, Ilias S.; Reddy, Vishwanatha R. A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Stable spatial distribution of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRSV)-1 subtypes in Europe is accompanied by a strong population immunity induced by local PRRSV strains. In the present study, it was examined if the immunity induced by three West European subtype 1 PRRSV strains (20...

  10. The Region of Difference Four is a Robust Genetic Marker for Subtyping Mycobacterium caprae Isolates and is Linked to Spatial Distribution of Three Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettinger, A; Broeckl, S; Fink, M; Prodinger, W M; Blum, H; Krebs, S; Domogalla, J; Just, F; Gellert, S; Straubinger, R K; Büttner, M

    2017-06-01

    Alpine Mycobacterium caprae isolates found in cattle and red deer display at least three genetic variations in the region of difference four (RD4) that can be used for further differentiation of the isolates into the subtypes 'Allgäu', 'Karwendel' and 'Lechtal'. Each genomic subtype is thereby characterized by a specific nucleotide deletion pattern in the 12.7-kb RD4 region. Even though M. caprae infections are frequently documented in cattle and red deer, little is known about the transmission routes. Hence, robust markers for M. caprae subtyping are needed to gain insight into the molecular epidemiology. For this reason, a rapid and robust multiplex PCR was developed for the simultaneous detection of three M. caprae RD4 subtypes and was used to subtype a total number of 241 M. caprae isolates from animals (145 cattle, 95 red deer and one fox) from Bavaria and Austria. All three subtypes occur spatially distributed and are found in cattle and in red deer suggesting transmission between the two species. As subtypes are genetically stable in both species it is hypothesized that the described genetic variations developed within the host due to 'within-host replication'. The results of this study recommend the genomic RD4 region as a reliable diagnostic marker for M. caprae subtype differentiation. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. HIV-1 subtype C primary isolates exhibit high sensitivity to an anti-gp120 RNA aptamer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Globally, HIV-1 subtype C is the most prevalent subtype, yet most antiretroviral drugs are developed against subtype B. UCLA1 RNA aptamer, which we previously showed neutralizes HIV-1 subtype C Env-pseudotyped viruses was examined for neutralization...

  12. Plasma Viral Loads During Early HIV-1 Infection Are Similar in Subtype C– and Non-Subtype C–Infected African Seroconverters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Mary S.; Kahle, Erin M.; Celum, Connie; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Kapiga, Saidi; Mujugira, Andrew; Mugo, Nelly R.; Fife, Kenneth H.; Mullins, James I.; Baeten, Jared M.; Celum, Connie; Wald, Anna; Lingappa, Jairam; Baeten, Jared M.; Campbell, Mary S.; Corey, Lawrence; Coombs, Robert W.; Hughes, James P.; Magaret, Amalia; McElrath, M. Juliana; Morrow, Rhoda; Mullins, James I.; Coetzee, David; Fife, Kenneth; Were, Edwin; Essex, Max; Makhema, Joseph; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Allen, Susan; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig; Allen, Susan; Kanweka, William; Allen, Susan; Vwalika, Bellington; Kapiga, Saidi; Manongi, Rachel; Farquhar, Carey; John-Stewart, Grace; Kiarie, James; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Farm, Orange; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Rees, Helen; de Bruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda; McIntyre, James; Mugo, Nelly Rwamba

    2013-01-01

    Recent data suggest that infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C results in prolonged high-level viremia (>5 log10 copies/mL) during early infection. We examined the relationship between HIV-1 subtype and plasma viremia among 153 African seroconverters. Mean setpoint viral loads were similar for C and non-C subtypes: 4.36 vs 4.42 log10 copies/mL (P = .61). The proportion of subtype C–infected participants with viral loads >5 log10 copies/mL was not greater than the proportion for those with non-C infection. Our data do not support the hypothesis that higher early viral load accounts for the rapid spread of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa. PMID:23315322

  13. The Genetic Diversity and Evolution of HIV-1 Subtype B Epidemic in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Pablo; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa; Rodríguez, Nayra; Vargas, Freddie; Yamamura, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-23

    HIV-1 epidemics in Caribbean countries, including Puerto Rico, have been reported to be almost exclusively associated with the subtype B virus (HIV-1B). However, while HIV infections associated with other clades have been only sporadically reported, no organized data exist to accurately assess the prevalence of non-subtype B HIV-1 infection. We analyzed the nucleotide sequence data of the HIV pol gene associated with HIV isolates from Puerto Rican patients. The sequences (n = 945) were obtained from our "HIV Genotyping" test file, which has been generated over a period of 14 years (2001-2014). REGA subtyping tool found the following subtypes: B (90%), B-like (3%), B/D recombinant (6%), and D/B recombinant (0.6%). Though there were fewer cases, the following subtypes were also found (in the given proportions): A1B (0.3%), BF1 (0.2%), subtype A (01-AE) (0.1%), subtype A (A2) (0.1%), subtype F (12BF) (0.1%), CRF-39 BF-like (0.1%), and others (0.1%). Some of the recombinants were identified as early as 2001. Although the HIV epidemic in Puerto Rico is primarily associated with HIV-1B virus, our analysis uncovered the presence of other subtypes. There was no indication of subtype C, which has been predominantly associated with heterosexual transmission in other parts of the world.

  14. Robust stratification of breast cancer subtypes using differential patterns of transcript isoform expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Stricker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death of women worldwide, is a heterogenous disease with multiple different subtypes. These subtypes carry important implications for prognosis and therapy. Interestingly, it is known that these different subtypes not only have different biological behaviors, but also have distinct gene expression profiles. However, it has not been rigorously explored whether particular transcriptional isoforms are also differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes, or whether transcript isoforms from the same sets of genes can be used to differentiate subtypes. To address these questions, we analyzed the patterns of transcript isoform expression using a small set of RNA-sequencing data for eleven Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+ subtype and fourteen triple negative (TN subtype tumors. We identified specific sets of isoforms that distinguish these tumor subtypes with higher fidelity than standard mRNA expression profiles. We found that alternate promoter usage, alternative splicing, and alternate 3'UTR usage are differentially regulated in breast cancer subtypes. Profiling of isoform expression in a second, independent cohort of 68 tumors confirmed that expression of splice isoforms differentiates breast cancer subtypes. Furthermore, analysis of RNAseq data from 594 cases from the TCGA cohort confirmed the ability of isoform usage to distinguish breast cancer subtypes. Also using our expression data, we identified several RNA processing factors that were differentially expressed between tumor subtypes and/or regulated by estrogen receptor, including YBX1, YBX2, MAGOH, MAGOHB, and PCBP2. RNAi knock-down of these RNA processing factors in MCF7 cells altered isoform expression. These results indicate that global dysregulation of splicing in breast cancer occurs in a subtype-specific and reproducible manner and is driven by specific differentially expressed RNA processing factors.

  15. [Obsessive compulsive disorder with tics: a new subtype?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibbe, L A; Cath, D C; van Balkom, A J L M

    2011-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous disorder. With the help of phenomenological research, attempts are being made to create more homogeneous subtypes. To search the literature in order to compare the symptoms of OCD patients with tics and without tics, and thereby determine whether OCD with tics can be distinguished clinically from OCD without tics. Search terms were used in conjunction with PubMed and Psychinfo in order to locate studies in which OCD patients without tics were compared with OCD patients with tics. In the 26 studies found in our search 872 OCD patients out of a total of 2801 OCD patients (i.e. 31%) had a comorbid tic disorder. OCD patients with tics displayed similarities and differences at symptom level. OCD patients with tics were associated with male gender and early age of onset. Tic-like symptoms such as touching, twitching, repeating, symmetry behavior and rubbing were seen more frequently in OCD patients with tics. OCD patients without tics more often displayed contamination obsessions and engaged in compulsive washing. On the other hand, the obsessions of patients with tics and without tics were very similar. The goal-directedness of compulsions differed between OCD patients with tics and those without tics. By analogy with 'the premonitory urges' that often precede tics, OCD patients with tics more often reported 'just-right' perceptions prior to their compulsions. OCD patients without tics more often reported anxiety prior to their compulsions. Compulsions seemed to be aimed at reducing tension and feelings of anxiety. On the basis of the clinical symptoms OCD with tics does seem to be a subtype of OCD. However further research is needed into the aetiology, effective treatment and the course of the disorder before OCD with tics can be accepted conclusively as a subtype of OCD.

  16. Changes in insomnia subtypes in early Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholfsen, Lena K; Larsen, Jan P; Schulz, Jörn; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Gjerstad, Michaela D

    2017-01-24

    To examine the development of factors associated with insomnia in a cohort of originally drug-naive patients with incident Parkinson disease (PD) during the first 5 years after diagnosis. One hundred eighty-two drug-naive patients with PD derived from a population-based incident cohort and 202 control participants were assessed for insomnia before treatment initiation and were repeatedly examined after 1, 3, and 5 years. Insomnia was diagnosed according to the Stavanger Sleepiness Questionnaire. The Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale was used to differentiate sleep initiation problems from problems of sleep maintenance. Generalized estimating equation models were applied for statistical measures. The prevalence of insomnia in general was not higher in patients with PD compared to controls at the 5-year follow-up. There were changes in the prevalence of the different insomnia subtypes over the 5-year follow-up. The prevalence of solitary problems in sleep maintenance increased from 31% (n = 18) in the drug-naive patients at baseline to 49% (n = 29) after 1 year and were associated with the use of dopamine agonists and higher Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores. The prevalence of solitary sleep initiation problems decreased continuously from 21% (n = 12) at baseline to 7.4% (n = 4) after 5 years; these were associated with less daytime sleepiness. The prevalence rates of the different insomnia subtypes changed notably in patients with early PD. The frequency of sleep maintenance problems increased, and these problems were associated with dopamine agonist use and depressive symptoms, while the total number of patients with insomnia remained stable. Our findings reflect the need for early individual assessments of insomnia subtypes and raise the possibility of intervention to reduce these symptoms in patients with early PD. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Subtypes of depression in a nationally representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragher, Natacha; Adamson, Gary; Bunting, Brendan; McCann, Siobhan

    2009-02-01

    Continued research efforts aim to elucidate the heterogeneity in depression. The identification of meaningful and valid subtypes has implications for research and clinical practice. Based on patterns of depressive symptomatology, this study identified a typology of depressive syndromes using data from a large, nationally representative survey. Analyses were based on a subsample of 12,180 respondents from the 2001-2002 Wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Latent class analysis was applied to the DSM-IV 'A' criteria for major depression to identify homogenous subtypes or classes of depressive syndromes. Associations between the emergent latent classes and demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed. Three clinically relevant subtypes were identified, in addition to a class who reported few depressive symptoms: severely depressed (40.9%), psychosomatic (30.6%), cognitive-emotional (10.2%) and non-depressed (18.3%). The odds of experiencing negative life events, psychiatric disorders, and having a family background of major depression were significantly higher for the severely depressed, psychosomatic and cognitive-emotional classes, compared to the non-depressed class. Several unique differences between the latent classes also emerged. Methodological shortcomings included: reliance on lay interviewer-administered structured interviews to determine diagnoses; basing sample selection on the endorsement of screener items; and, using measures of 'any anxiety disorder', 'any mood disorder', and 'any personality disorder' to determine psychiatric disorder prevalence rates. Significant heterogeneity in depressive symptomatology exists in this U.S. sample. Profiling symptom patterns is potentially useful as a first step in developing tailored intervention and treatment programmes.

  18. Rare Breast Cancer Subtypes: Histological, Molecular, and Clinical Peculiarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieci, Maria Vittoria; Orvieto, Enrico; Dominici, Massimo; Conte, PierFranco

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer encompasses a collection of different diseases characterized by different biological and pathological features, clinical presentation, response to treatments, clinical behavior, and outcome. On the basis of cell morphology, growth, and architecture patterns, breast cancer can be classified in up to 21 distinct histological types. Breast cancer special types, including the classic lobular invasive carcinoma, represent 25% of all breast cancers. The histological diversity of breast carcinomas has relevant prognostic implications. Indeed, the rare breast cancer group includes subtypes with very different prognoses, ranging from the tubular carcinoma, associated with an indolent clinical course, to metaplastic cancer, whose outcome is generally unfavorable. New approaches based on gene expression profiling allow the identification of molecularly defined breast cancer classes, with distinct biological features and clinical behavior. In clinical practice, immunohistochemical classification based on the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and Ki67 is applied as a surrogate of the intrinsic molecular subtypes. However, the identification of intrinsic molecular subtypes were almost completely limited to the study of ductal invasive breast cancer. Moreover, some good-prognosis triple-negative histotypes, on the basis of gene expression profiling, can be classified among the poor-prognosis group. Therefore, histopathological classification remains a crucial component of breast cancer diagnosis. Special histologies can be very rare, and the majority of information on outcome and treatments derives from small series and case reports. As a consequence, clear recommendations about clinical management are still lacking. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about rare breast cancer histologies. PMID:24969162

  19. Glutamate-pyruvate transaminase subtypes in Singapore ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, N; Bhattacharyya, S P

    1989-01-01

    Autopsy liver samples from 244 Chinese, 119 Malays and 136 Indians were screened for glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) subtypes by starch-gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing at pH 5-7. Altogether, ten phenotypes controlled by four alleles (GPT1, GPT2A, GPT2B and GPT3) were identified. There was no significant difference in the frequency of GPT alleles between the ethnic groups. The distribution of GPT types was in agreement with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all the ethnic groups.

  20. Kidney Transplantation Rates Across Glomerulonephritis Subtypes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼShaughnessy, Michelle M; Liu, Sai; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Lafayette, Richard A; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2017-10-01

    Whether kidney transplantation rates differ by glomerulonephritis (GN) subtype remains largely unknown. Using the US Renal Data System, we identified all adult patients with end-stage renal disease attributed to 1 of 6 GN subtypes who initiated dialysis in the US (1996-2013). Patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) served as "external" non-GN comparators. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, with death considered a competing risk, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for first kidney transplantation, controlling for year, demographics, comorbidities, socioeconomic factors, and Organ Procurement Organization. Among 718 480 patients studied, unadjusted and multivariable-adjusted transplant rates differed considerably across GN subtypes. Adjusted transplant rates were highest for patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) (referent) and lower for all other groups: focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.77-0.82), membranous nephropathy (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.83-0.93), membranoproliferative GN (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76-0.92), lupus nephritis (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.66-0.71), vasculitis (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.61-0.70), DN (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.47-0.52), ADPKD (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.82-0.88). Reduced kidney transplantation rates among comparator groups were driven more so by lower rates of waitlisting (HRs vs IgAN, ranged from 0.49 for DN to 0.92 for membranous nephropathy or ADPKD) than by lower rates of deceased donor kidney transplantation after waitlisting (rates were only significantly lower, vs IgAN, for those with secondary GN subtypes: lupus nephritis [HR,0.91; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97], vasculitis [HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.94), DN [HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.69-0.77]). Identifying underlying reasons for apparent disease-specific barriers to kidney transplantation might inform center-specific transplant candidate selection procedures, along with national organ allocation policies, leading

  1. Distinct Epigenetic Effects of Tobacco Smoking in Whole Blood and among Leukocyte Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dan; Wang, Xuting; Campbell, Michelle R; Porter, Devin K; Pittman, Gary S; Bennett, Brian D; Wan, Ma; Englert, Neal A; Crowl, Christopher L; Gimple, Ryan N; Adamski, Kelly N; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K; Bell, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoke exposure dramatically alters DNA methylation in blood cells and may mediate smoking-associated complex diseases through effects on immune cell function. However, knowledge of smoking effects in specific leukocyte subtypes is limited. To better characterize smoking-associated methylation changes in whole blood and leukocyte subtypes, we used Illumina 450K arrays and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (RRBS) to assess genome-wide DNA methylation. Differential methylation analysis in whole blood DNA from 172 smokers and 81 nonsmokers revealed 738 CpGs, including 616 previously unreported CpGs, genome-wide significantly associated with current smoking (p smoking duration among heavy smokers (>22 cigarettes/day, n = 86) which might relate to long-term heavy-smoking pathology. In purified leukocyte subtypes from an independent group of 20 smokers and 14 nonsmokers we further examined methylation and gene expression for selected genes among CD14+ monocytes, CD15+ granulocytes, CD19+ B cells, and CD2+ T cells. In 10 smokers and 10 nonsmokers we used RRBS to fine map differential methylation in CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD14+, CD15+, CD19+, and CD56+ natural killer cells. Distinct cell-type differences in smoking-associated methylation and gene expression were identified. AHRR (cg05575921), ALPPL2 (cg21566642), GFI1 (cg09935388), IER3 (cg06126421) and F2RL3 (cg03636183) showed a distinct pattern of significant smoking-associated methylation differences across cell types: granulocytes> monocytes> B cells. In contrast GPR15 (cg19859270) was highly significant in T and B cells and ITGAL (cg09099830) significant only in T cells. Numerous other CpGs displayed distinctive cell-type responses to tobacco smoke exposure that were not apparent in whole blood DNA. Assessing the overlap between these CpG sites and differential methylated regions (DMRs) with RRBS in 6 cell types, we confirmed cell-type specificity in the context of DMRs. We identified new Cp

  2. Seven genomic subtypes of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: a detailed analysis of gene networks and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, J R; Burke, B; Petty, R; Gough, J; Fear, D; Mattey, D L; Axford, J S; Dalgleish, A G; Nutt, D J

    2008-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a multisystem disease, the pathogenesis of which remains undetermined. The authors have recently reported a study of gene expression that identified differential expression of 88 human genes in patients with CFS/ME. Clustering of quantitative PCR (qPCR) data from patients with CFS/ME revealed seven distinct subtypes with distinct differences in Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 scores, clinical phenotypes and severity. In this study, for each CFS/ME subtype, those genes whose expression differed significantly from that of normal blood donors were identified, and then gene interactions, disease associations and molecular and cellular functions of those gene sets were determined. Genomic analysis was then related to clinical data for each CFS/ME subtype. Genomic analysis revealed some common (neurological, haematological, cancer) and some distinct (metabolic, endocrine, cardiovascular, immunological, inflammatory) disease associations among the subtypes. Subtypes 1, 2 and 7 were the most severe, and subtype 3 was the mildest. Clinical features of each subtype were as follows: subtype 1 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression); subtype 2 (musculoskeletal, pain, anxiety/depression); subtype 3 (mild); subtype 4 (cognitive); subtype 5 (musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal); subtype 6 (postexertional); subtype 7 (pain, infectious, musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal, neurocognitive, anxiety/depression). It was particularly interesting that in the seven genomically derived subtypes there were distinct clinical syndromes, and that those which were most severe were also those with anxiety/depression, as would be expected in a disease with a biological basis.

  3. Integrating Decision Tree and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for Subtype Prediction of Human Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaluri, Pavan K.; Chen, Zhengxin; Weerakoon, Aruna M.; Lu, Guoqing

    Multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) has significant impact in bioinformatics. In the research reported here, we explore the integration of decision tree (DT) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for subtype prediction of human influenza A virus. Infection with influenza viruses continues to be an important public health problem. Viral strains of subtype H3N2 and H1N1 circulates in humans at least twice annually. The subtype detection depends mainly on the antigenic assay, which is time-consuming and not fully accurate. We have developed a Web system for accurate subtype detection of human influenza virus sequences. The preliminary experiment showed that this system is easy-to-use and powerful in identifying human influenza subtypes. Our next step is to examine the informative positions at the protein level and extend its current functionality to detect more subtypes. The web functions can be accessed at http://glee.ist.unomaha.edu/.

  4. Imaging features of automated breast volume scanner: Correlation with molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng-Yang; Lu, Qing; Huang, Bei-Jian; Xia, Han-Sheng; Yan, Li-Xia; Wang, Xi; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the imaging features obtained by an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. We examined 303 malignant breast tumours by ABVS for specific imaging features and by immunohistochemical analysis to determine the molecular subtype. ABVS imaging features, including retraction phenomenon, shape, margins, echogenicity, post-acoustic features, echogenic halo, and calcifications were analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine the significant predictive factors of the molecular subtypes. By univariate logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of the Luminal-A subtype (n=128) were retraction phenomenon (odds ratio [OR]=10.188), post-acoustic shadowing (OR=5.112), and echogenic halo (OR=3.263, Pimaging features, especially retraction phenomenon, have a strong correlation with the molecular subtypes, expanding the scope of ultrasound in identifying breast cancer subtypes with confidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. HIV-1 Subtype distribution in morocco based on national sentinel surveillance data 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrim Mohammed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about HIV-1 subtype distribution in Morocco. Some data suggest an emergence of new HIV subtypes. We conducted phylogenetic analysis on a nationally representative sample of 60 HIV-1 viral specimens collected during 2004-2005 through the Morocco national HIV sentinel surveillance survey. Results While subtype B is still the most prevalent, 23.3% of samples represented non-B subtypes, the majority of which were classified as CRF02_AG (15%. Molecular clock analysis confirmed that the initial introduction of HIV-1B in Morocco probably came from Europe in the early 1980s. In contrast, the CRF02_AG strain appeared to be introduced from sub-Saharan Africa in two separate events in the 1990s. Conclusions Subtype CRF02_AG has been emerging in Morocco since the 1990s. More information about the factors introducing HIV subtype-specific transmission will inform the prevention strategy in the region.

  6. Functional characteristics of HIV-1 subtype C compatible with increased heterosexual transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Brandon L; Armitage, Andrew E; Graham, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the existence of over 50 subtypes and circulating recombinant forms of HIV-1, subtype C dominates the heterosexual pandemic causing approximately 56% of all infections. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether viral genetic factors may contribute to the observed subtype-C predominance...... mononuclear cell and cell lines with low CCR5 expression. Structural modeling suggested the formation of an additional hydrogen bond between V3 and CCR5. Moreover, we found preferential selection of HIV with 316T and/or extremely short V1-V2 loops in cervices of three women infected with subtypes A/C, B or C....... CONCLUSION: As CD4-CCR5-T cells are key targets for genital HIV infection and cervical selection can favor compact V1-V2 loops and 316T, which increase viral infectivity, we propose that these conserved subtype-C motifs may contribute to transmission and spread of this subtype....

  7. Differences in regulation of tight junctions and cell morphology between VHL mutations from disease subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isanova Bella

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease, germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene cause clear cell renal carcinomas, hemangioblastomas, and pheochromocytomas. The VHL gene product is part of an ubiquitin E3 ligase complex and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-α is a key substrate, although additional VHL functions have been described. A genotype-phenotype relationship exists in VHL disease such that specific VHL mutations elicit certain subsets of these tumors. Here, we examine VHL genotype-phenotype correlations at the cellular level, focusing on the regulation of tight junctions and cell morphology. Methods Wild-type and various mutant VHL proteins representing VHL disease subtypes were stably expressed in 3 VHL-negative renal carcinoma cell lines. Using these cell lines, the roles of various VHL-associated cellular functions in regulation of cell morphology were investigated. Results As a whole, type 1 mutants varied greatly from type 2 mutants, demonstrating high levels of HIF-2α, cyclin D1 and α5 integrin, lower p27 levels, and a spindly, fibroblastic cellular appearance. Type 2 mutations demonstrated an epithelial morphology similar to wild-type VHL in the majority of the renal cell lines used. Knockdown of p27 in cells with wild-type VHL led to perturbations of both epithelial morphology and ZO-1 localization to tight junctions. ZO-1 localization correlated well with VHL disease subtypes, with greater mislocalization observed for genotypes associated with a higher risk of renal carcinoma. HIF-2α knockdown in 786-O partially restored ZO-1 localization, but did not restore an epithelial morphology. Conclusion VHL has both HIF-α dependent and HIF-α independent functions in regulating tight junctions and cell morphology that likely impact the clinical phenotypes seen in VHL disease.

  8. Prader-Willi Syndrome Genetic Subtypes and Clinical Neuropsychiatric Diagnoses in Residential Care Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzardo, Ann M; Weisensel, Nicolette; Ayala, Sheryl; Hossain, Waheeda; Butler, Merlin G

    2017-10-06

    The historical diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a complex genetic disorder, in adults by clinical presentation rather than genetic testing has limited genetic subtype-specific psychometric investigations and treatment. Genetic testing and clinical psychiatric evaluation using DSM-IV-TR criteria were undertaken on 72 adult residents (34M; 38F) from the Prader-Willi Homes of Oconomowoc (PWHO), a specialty PWS group home system. Methylation specific-multiplex ligation probe amplification and high-resolution microarrays were analyzed for methylation status, 15q11-q13 deletions and maternal uniparental disomy 15 (mUPD15). Seventy (33M; 37F) of 72 residents were genetically confirmed and 36 (51%) had Type I or Type II deletions; 29 (42%) with mUPD15 and 5 (7%) with imprinting defects from three separate families. Psychiatric comorbidities were classified as anxiety disorder (38%), excoriation (skin picking) (33%), intermittent explosive disorder [(30%-predominantly among males at 45% compared with females at 16% (OR=4.3, 95%CI 1.4-13.1, p < 0.008)] and psychotic features (23%). Psychiatric diagnoses did not differ between mUPD15 vs deletion, but a greater number of psychiatric diagnoses were observed for larger Type I (4.3) vs smaller Type II (3.6) deletions when age was controlled (F = 5.0, p < 0.04). Adults with PWS presented with uniformly higher rates of psychiatric comorbidities which differed by genetic subtype with gender-specific trends. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Age, dyslexia subtype and comorbidity modulate rapid auditory processing in developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa eLorusso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The nature of Rapid Auditory Processing (RAP deficits in dyslexia remains debated, together with the specificity of the problem to certain types of stimuli and/or restricted subgroups of individuals. Following the hypothesis that the heterogeneity of the dyslexic population may have led to contrasting results, the aim of the study was to define the effect of age, dyslexia subtype and comorbidity on the discrimination and reproduction of nonverbal tone sequences.Participants were 46 children aged 8 - 14 (26 with dyslexia, subdivided according to age, presence of a previous language delay, and type of dyslexia. Experimental tasks were a Temporal Order Judgment (TOJ (manipulating tone length, ISI and sequence length, and a Pattern Discrimination Task. Dyslexic children showed general RAP deficits. Tone length and ISI influenced dyslexic and control children’s performance in a similar way, but dyslexic children were more affected by an increase from 2 to 5 sounds. As to age, older dyslexic children’s difficulty in reproducing sequences of 4 and 5 tones was similar to that of normally reading younger (but not older children. In the analysis of subgroup profiles, the crucial variable appears to be the advantage, or lack thereof, in processing long vs short sounds. Dyslexic children with a previous language delay obtained the lowest scores in RAP measures, but they performed worse with shorter stimuli, similar to control children, while dyslexic-only children showed no advantage for longer stimuli. As to dyslexia subtype, only surface dyslexics improved their performance with longer stimuli, while phonological dyslexics did not. Differential scores for short vs long tones and for long vs short ISIs predict nonword and word reading, respectively, and the former correlate with phonemic awareness.In conclusion, the relationship between nonverbal RAP, phonemic skills and reading abilities appears to be characterized by complex interactions with

  10. Serum Proteomic Profiling of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Washing Subtype: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Nejadi, Naser; Arefi Oskouie, Afsaneh; Zayeri, Faird; Hamdieh, Mostafa; Safaei, Akram; Rezaei-Tavirani, Majid; Ahmadzadeh, Alireza; Amouzandeh-Nobaveh, Alireza; Okhovatian, Farshad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a disabling mental condition that its proteomic profiling is not yet investigated. Proteomics is a valuable tool to discover biomarker approaches. It can be helpful to detect protein expression changes in complex disorders such as OCD. Methods: Here, by the application of 2D gel electrophoresis (2DE), a pilot study of serum proteome profile of females with washing subtype of OCD was performed. Serum samples were obtained from females with washing subtype of OCD. Following the protein extraction from the serum with acetone perception, the samples were subjected to 2DE for separation based on pI and molecular weight (MW) with triple replications. Finally, the protein spots were visualized using Coomassie blue staining method and analyzed by Progenesis SameSpots software. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis was handled by the application of Cytoscape software. Results: The results suggested that 41 matched spots demonstrated significant expression alterations among which 5 proteins including immunoglobulin heavy constant alpha-1 (IGHA1), apolipoprotein A-4 (APOA4), haptoglobin (HP), protein α-1-antitrypsin (SERPINA1), and component 3 (C3) were identified by database query. Additionally, PPI network analysis indicated the central role of SERPINA1 and C3 in the network integrity. However, albumin (ALB), amyloid precursor protein (APP), and protein α-1-antitrypsin (APOA1) proteins were important in OCD PPI network as well. The identified proteins were related to 3 processes: acute-phase response, hydrogen peroxide catabolic process, and regulation of triglyceride metabolic process. Conclusion: It was concluded that these proteins may have a fundamental role in OCD pathogenesis. Moreover, the dysregulation of inflammatory and antioxidant systems in OCD risk was suggested by the current study. However, evaluation of bigger sample sizes and application of mass spectrometry are essential

  11. Dynamics of brain responses to phobic-related stimulation in specific phobia subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseras, Xavier; Mataix-Cols, David; Trasovares, Maria Victoria; López-Solà, Marina; Ortriz, Hector; Pujol, Jesus; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Torrubia, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Very few studies have investigated to what extent different subtypes of specific phobia share the same underlying functional neuroanatomy. This study aims to investigate the potential differences in the anatomy and dynamics of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses associated with spider and blood-injection-injury phobias. We used an event-related paradigm in 14 untreated spider phobics, 15 untreated blood-injection-injury phobics and 17 controls. Phobic images successfully induced distress only in phobic participants. Both phobic groups showed a similar pattern of heart rate increase following the presentation of phobic stimuli, this being different from controls. The presentation of phobic images induced activity within the same brain network in all participants, although the intensity of brain responses was significantly higher in phobics. Only blood-injection-injury phobics showed greater activity in the ventral prefrontal cortex compared with controls. This phobia group also presented a lower activity peak in the left amygdala compared with spider phobics. Importantly, looking at the dynamics of BOLD responses, both phobia groups showed a quicker time-to-peak in the right amygdala than controls, but only spider phobics also differed from controls in this parameter within the left amygdala. Considering these and previous findings, both phobia subtypes show very similar responses regarding their immediate reaction to phobia-related images, but critical differences in their sustained responses to these stimuli. These results highlight the importance of considering complex mental processes potentially associated with coping and emotion regulation processes, rather than exclusively focusing on primary neural responses to threat, when investigating fear and phobias. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Reviewing the history of HIV-1: spread of subtype B in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Matte, Maria Cristina Cotta; Araújo, Leonardo Augusto Luvison; Chies, Jose Artur Bogo; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2011-01-01

    The dispersal of HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) is a reflection of the movement of human populations in response to social, political, and geographical issues. The initial dissemination of HIV-1B outside Africa seems to have included the passive involvement of human populations from the Caribbean in spreading the virus to the United States. However, the exact pathways taken during the establishment of the pandemic in the Americas remain unclear. Here, we propose a geographical scenario for the dissemination of HIV-1B in the Americas, based on phylogenetic and genetic statistical analyses of 313 available sequences of the pol gene from 27 countries. Maximum likelihood and bayesian inference methods were used to explore the phylogenetic relationships between HIV-1B sequences, and molecular variance estimates were analyzed to infer the genetic structure of the viral population. We found that the initial dissemination and subsequent spread of subtype B in the Americas occurred via a single introduction event in the Caribbean around 1964 (1950-1967). Phylogenetic trees present evidence of several primary outbreaks in countries in South America, directly seeded by the Caribbean epidemic. Cuba is an exception insofar as its epidemic seems to have been introduced from South America. One clade comprising isolates from different countries emerged in the most-derived branches, reflecting the intense circulation of the virus throughout the American continents. Statistical analysis supports the genetic compartmentalization of the virus among the Americas, with a close relationship between the South American and Caribbean epidemics. These findings reflect the complex establishment of the HIV-1B pandemic and contribute to our understanding between the migration process of human populations and virus diffusion.

  13. Age, dyslexia subtype and comorbidity modulate rapid auditory processing in developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Cantiani, Chiara; Molteni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The nature of Rapid Auditory Processing (RAP) deficits in dyslexia remains debated, together with the specificity of the problem to certain types of stimuli and/or restricted subgroups of individuals. Following the hypothesis that the heterogeneity of the dyslexic population may have led to contrasting results, the aim of the study was to define the effect of age, dyslexia subtype and comorbidity on the discrimination and reproduction of non-verbal tone sequences. Participants were 46 children aged 8-14 (26 with dyslexia, subdivided according to age, presence of a previous language delay, and type of dyslexia). Experimental tasks were a Temporal Order Judgment (TOJ) (manipulating tone length, ISI and sequence length), and a Pattern Discrimination Task. Dyslexic children showed general RAP deficits. Tone length and ISI influenced dyslexic and control children's performance in a similar way, but dyslexic children were more affected by an increase from 2 to 5 sounds. As to age, older dyslexic children's difficulty in reproducing sequences of 4 and 5 tones was similar to that of normally reading younger (but not older) children. In the analysis of subgroup profiles, the crucial variable appears to be the advantage, or lack thereof, in processing long vs. short sounds. Dyslexic children with a previous language delay obtained the lowest scores in RAP measures, but they performed worse with shorter stimuli, similar to control children, while dyslexic-only children showed no advantage for longer stimuli. As to dyslexia subtype, only surface dyslexics improved their performance with longer stimuli, while phonological dyslexics did not. Differential scores for short vs. long tones and for long vs. short ISIs predict non-word and word reading, respectively, and the former correlate with phonemic awareness. In conclusion, the relationship between non-verbal RAP, phonemic skills and reading abilities appears to be characterized by complex interactions with subgroup

  14. Differential mTOR pathway profiles in bladder cancer cell line subtypes to predict sensitivity to mTOR inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Andrew M; Nakasaki, Manando; Nakashima, Kazufumi; Krish, Goutam; Hansel, Donna E

    2017-10-01

    Molecular classification of bladder cancer has been increasingly proposed as a potential tool to predict clinical outcomes and responses to chemotherapy. Here we focused on mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition as a chemotherapeutic strategy and characterized the expression profile of mTOR signaling targets in representative bladder cancer cell lines from basal, luminal, and either basal/luminal ("non-type") molecular subtypes. Protein and mRNA expression of mTOR signaling components from representative luminal (RT4 and RT112), basal (SCaBER and 5637), and nontype (T24 and J82) bladder cancer cell line subtypes were determined by Western blot and database mining analysis of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. Cell viability following treatment with either, Torin-2 or KU-0063794, 2 dual mTOR complex 1/2 inhibitors, was determined by MTT assay. Immunoblot analysis of cells treated with Torin-2 or KU-0063794 was performed to determine the effects of mTOR inhibition on expression and phosphorylation status of mTOR signaling components, Akt, 4E-BP1, and ribosomal protein S6. Molecular subtypes of bladder cancer cell lines each exhibited a distinct pattern of expression of mTOR-associated genes and baseline phosphorylation level of Akt and 4E-BP1. Cells with low levels of Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of mTOR inhibition with Torin-2, but not KU-0063794. Exposure to Torin-2 and KU-0063794 both potently and rapidly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt Ser-473 and Thr-308, and 4E-BP1 T37/46 in cell lines that included basal and nontype subtypes. Differential gene expression and protein activity associated with mTOR signaling is observed among bladder cancer cell lines stratified into basal, luminal, and nontype subtypes. Urothelial carcinomas characterized by high baseline Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation may be best suited for targeted mTOR therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes in the State of Amazonas, Brazil, and subtype C identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, L K H; Kashima, S; Amarante, M F C; Haddad, R; Rodrigues, E S; Silva, K L T; Lima, T A; Castro, D B; Brito, F C; Almeida, E G; Covas, D T; Malheiro, A

    2012-02-01

    Few studies have reported the molecular epidemiological characterization of HIV-1 in the Northern region of Brazil. The present study reports the molecular and epidemiological characterization of 31 HIV-1 isolates from blood donors from the State of Amazonas who donated blood between April 2006 and March 2007. Serum/plasma samples from all donors were screened for HIV antibodies by ELISA and the results confirmed by Western blot analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buffy coat using the Super Quik-Gene-DNA Isolation kit. Nested PCR was performed on the env, gag, and pol regions of HIV-1 using the Gene Amp PCR System 9700. Sequencing reactions were performed using the inner PCR primers and the DYEnamic™ ET Dye Terminator Kit, and phylogenetic analysis was performed using the gag, pol, and env gene sequences. We collected samples from 31 blood donors who tested positive for HIV-1 in confirmatory experiments. The male:female ratio of blood donors was 3.4:1, and the mean age was 32.4 years (range: 19 to 61 years). Phylogenetic analysis showed that subtype B is the most prevalent among Northern Brazilian HIV-1-seropositive blood donors. One HIV-1 subtype C and one circulating recombinant form (CRF_BF) of HIV-1 were identified in the State of Amazonas. This is the first study showing the occurrence of a possible "homogenous" subtype C in this region of Brazil. This finding could contribute to a better characterization of the HIV-1 strains that circulate in the country.

  16. Combining functional genomics strategies identifies modular heterogeneity of breast cancer intrinsic subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouladi, Nima; Cowper-Sallari, Richard; Moore, Jason H

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of breast cancer subtypes and subsequent development of treatments aimed at them has allowed for a great reduction in the mortality of breast cancer. But despite this progress, tumors with similar characteristics that belong to the same subtype continue to respond differently to the same treatment. Five subtypes of breast cancer, namely intrinsic subtypes, have been characterized to date based on their gene expression profiles. Among other characteristics, subtypes vary in their degree of intra-subtype heterogeneity. It is not clear, however, whether this heterogeneity is shared across all tumor traits. It is also unclear whether individual traits can be highly heterogeneous among a majority of homogeneous traits. We employ network theory to uncover gene modules and accordingly consider them as tumor traits, which capture shared biological processes among the subtypes. We then use the β-diversity metric from ecology to quantify the heterogeneity in these gene modules. In doing so, we show that breast cancer heterogeneity is contained in gene modules and that this modular heterogeneity increases monotonically across the subtypes. We identify a core of two modules that are shared among all subtypes which contain nucleosome assembly and mammary morphogenesis genes, and a number of modules that are specific to subtypes. This modular heterogeneity, which increases with global heterogeneity, relates to tumor aggressiveness. Indeed, we observe that Luminal A, the most treatable of subtypes, has the lowest modular heterogeneity whereas the Basal-like subtype, which is among the hardest to treat, has the highest. Furthermore, our analysis shows that a higher degree of global heterogeneity does not imply higher heterogeneity for all modules, as Luminal B shows the highest heterogeneity for core modules. Overall, modular heterogeneity provides a framework with which to dissect cancer heterogeneity and better understand its underpinnings, thereby ultimately

  17. Evidence of multiple introductions of HIV-1 subtype C in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Joana Morais; Morgado, Mariza G; Bello, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    HIV-1 subtype C is the most prevalent group M clade in southern Africa and some eastern African countries. Subtype C is also the most frequent subtype in Angola (southwestern Africa), with an estimated prevalence of 10-20%. In order to better understand the origin of the HIV-1 subtype C strains circulating in Angola, 31 subtype C pol sequences of Angolan origin were compared with 1950 subtype C pol sequences sampled in other African countries. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the Angolan subtype C sequences were distributed in 16 different lineages that were widely dispersed among other African strains. Ten subtype C Angolan lineages were composed by only one sequence, while the remaining six clades contain between two and seven sequences. Bayesian phylogeographic analysis indicates that most Angolan clades probably originated in different southern African countries with the exception of one lineage that most likely originated in Burundi. Evolutionary analysis suggests that those Angolan subtype C clades composed by ≥ 2 sequences were introduced into the country between the late 1970s and the mid 2000s. The median estimated time frame for the origin of those Angolan lineages coincides with periods of positive migration influx in Angola that were preceded by phases of negative migratory outflow. These results demonstrate that the Angolan subtype C epidemic resulted from multiple introductions of subtype C viruses mainly imported from southern African countries over the last 30years, some of which have been locally disseminated establishing several autochthonous transmission networks. This study also suggests that population mobility between Angola and southern African countries during civil war (1974-2002) may have played a key role in the emergence of the Angolan subtype C epidemic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Subtypes of Uterine Leiomyosarcoma and Correlation with Clinical Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce N. Barlin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular etiology of uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS is poorly understood, which accounts for the wide disparity in outcomes among women with this disease. We examined and compared the molecular profiles of ULMS and normal myometrium (NL to identify clinically relevant molecular subtypes. Discovery cases included 29 NL and 23 ULMS specimens. RNA was hybridized to Affymetrix U133A 2.0 transcription microarrays. Differentially expressed genes and pathways were identified using standard methods. Fourteen NL and 44 ULMS independent archival samples were used for external validation. Molecular subgroups were correlated with clinical outcome. Pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes between ULMS and NL samples identified overrepresentation of cell cycle regulation, DNA repair, and genomic integrity. External validation confirmed differential expression in 31 genes (P < 4.4 × 10−4, Bonferroni corrected, with 84% of the overexpressed genes, including CDC7, CDC20, GTSE1, CCNA2, CCNB1, and CCNB2, participating in cell cycle regulation. Unsupervised clustering of ULMS identified two clades that were reproducibly associated with progression-free (median, 4.0 vs 26.0 months; P = .02; HR, 0.33 and overall (median, 18.2 vs 77.2 months; P = .04; HR, 0.33 survival. Cell cycle genes play a key role in ULMS sarcomagenesis, providing opportunities for therapeutic targeting. Reproducible molecular subtypes associated with clinical outcome may permit individualized adjuvant treatment after clinical trial validation.

  19. Mostly Smokers: Identifying Subtypes of Emerging Adult Substance Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzilos, Golfo K; Reddy, Madhavi K; Caviness, Celeste M; Anderson, Bradley J; Stein, Michael D

    2016-10-14

    The concurrent use of marijuana and other substances among emerging adults (ages 18-25) is a major public health problem. This study examined if there are distinct subtypes of emerging adult marijuana users and if these are associated with demographic and substance use variables. The design was a cross-sectional interview with a community sample of 1,503 emerging adults in the northeastern U.S. who reported last month marijuana use. We used latent class analysis (LCA) to identify distinct subtypes of emerging adults who used additional substances and examined predictors of the latent classes. We identified three distinct classes of emerging adults who use substances: "mostly smokers" (those who primarily use marijuana and nicotine), "moderate users" (those who primarily use marijuana and/or heavy episodic alcohol), and "polysubstance users." Polysubstance users had higher probabilities of use of all assessed substances (e.g. cocaine, opiates, sleep medications, stimulants, synthetic marijuana, and inhalants) than the other two groups. Not being currently enrolled in school and male gender were associated with mostly smokers and polysubstance users group status. We identified a distinct group of emerging adult marijuana users who primarily smoke marijuana and cigarettes, suggesting that there could be a shared vulnerability for risk of co-occurrence.

  20. Seasonal BMI differences between restrictive and purging anorexia nervosa subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Angela; Caggianesse, Veronica; Carrera, Olaia; Graell, Montserrat; Morandé, Gonzalo; Gutiérrez, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal differences in anorexia nervosa is an area of research which has received scarce attention in the literature. The aim of this study was to explore patterns of seasonal variation in body weight in anorexia nervosa patients admitted to an eating disorders unit from January 2007 to December 2011. Anorexia nervosa restrictive (ANR) and binge eating/purging (ANBP) subtypes were compared with respect to BMI on admission during the Warm and Cold Semester, and in terms of lenght of hospital stay. The main result was that BMI differences between ANBP and ANR patients were due to bodyweight differences during the colder months of the year (p < 0.01) whereas no difference in bodyweight on admission was observed between both subtypes during the Warm Semester months. Furthermore, ANR patients' bodyweight was lower when admitted during the Cold compared to the Warm Semester (p < 0.05). Length of stay was significantly associated with reduced BMI in ANR patients (p < 0.01), but not so for ANBP patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the literature providing data on seasonal variations in the BMI on admission of anorexia nervosa patients, and in the length of hospitalization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Breast cancer subtypes and outcomes of central nervous system metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ulku Y; Oksuzoglu, Berna; Aksoy, Sercan; Harputluoglu, Hakan; Turker, Ibrahim; Ozisik, Yavuz; Dizdar, Omer; Altundag, Kadri; Alkis, Necati; Zengin, Nurullah

    2011-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are detected in up to one third of patients with advanced breast cancer, but their incidence and outcomes by breast cancer subtypes are not precisely documented. Herein, we retrospectively analyzed clinicopathologic data of 259 breast cancer patients with CNS metastases to evaluate the association between breast cancer subtypes and CNS metastasis. The patient groups were classified according to their hormone receptor status and HER-2 expression. Median follow-up time among the patients was 42 months and median survival after CNS metastasis detection was 7.8 months. In HER-2 overexpressing group, median time period between the diagnosis of breast cancer and the detection of CNS metastasis (15.9 months) was significantly shorter compared to the other groups (p = 0.01). The triple negative group had the shortest median survival time after CNS metastasis (6.6 months), although statistically not significant (p = 0.3). In multivariate Cox regression analyses, having solitary CNS metastasis (HR 0.4, 95% CI; 0.2-0.7, p = 0.004), and receiving chemotherapy after CNS metastasis (HR 0.4, 95% CI; 0.287-0.772, p = 0.003) were independent prognostic factors for increasing survival after CNS metastasis. In conclusion, new and effective treatment strategies are required for breast carcinoma patients with brain metastasis considering the positive effect of the treatment on survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Subtype-specific neuronal remodeling during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veverytsa, Lyubov; Allan, Douglas W

    2013-01-01

    During metamorphosis in holometabolous insects, the nervous system undergoes dramatic remodeling as it transitions from its larval to its adult form. Many neurons are generated through post-embryonic neurogenesis to have adult-specific roles, but perhaps more striking is the dramatic remodeling that occurs to transition neurons from functioning in the larval to the adult nervous system. These neurons exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity during this transition; many subsets undergo programmed cell death, others remodel their axonal and dendritic arbors extensively, whereas others undergo trans-differentiation to alter their terminal differentiation gene expression profiles. Yet other neurons appear to be developmentally frozen in an immature state throughout larval life, to be awakened at metamorphosis by a process we term temporally-tuned differentiation. These multiple forms of remodeling arise from subtype-specific responses to a single metamorphic trigger, ecdysone. Here, we discuss recent progress in Drosophila melanogaster that is shedding light on how subtype-specific programs of neuronal remodeling are generated during metamorphosis.

  3. Muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity of novel heterocyclic QNB analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgold, J.; Cohen, V.I.; Paek, R.; Reba, R.C. (George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-01-01

    In an effort at synthesizing centrally-active subtype-selective antimuscarinic agents, the authors derivatized QNB (quinuclidinyl benzilate), a potent muscarinic antagonist, by replacing one of the phenyl groups with less lipophilic heterocyclic moieties. The displacement of ({sup 3}H)-N-methyl scopolamine binding by these novel compounds to membranes from cells expressing ml - m4 receptor subtypes was determined. Most of the novel 4-bromo-QNB analogues were potent and slightly selective for ml receptors. The 2-thienyl derivative was the most potent, exhibiting a 2-fold greater potency than BrQNB at ml receptors, and a 4-fold greater potency than BrQNB at ml receptors, and a 4-fold greater potency at m2 receptors. This compound was also considerably less lipophilic than BrQNB as determined from its retention time on C18 reverse phase HPLC. This compound may therefore be useful both for pharmacological studies and as a candidate for a radioiodinated SPECT imaging agent for ml muscarinic receptors in human brain.

  4. Neglect subtypes, race, and poverty: individual, family, and service characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett; Zhou, Pan

    2013-02-01

    Recent child maltreatment research has highlighted the very different context of poverty for Black and White children. Neglect is the most common form of maltreatment and strongly associated with poverty. Neglect is, however, not a unitary construct. We lack an understanding of whether reporting of and responding to different types of neglect may vary by poverty, race, or the intersection of the two. Administrative census, child welfare, welfare, health, and education data were used to examine how family and community poverty factors associate with various subtypes of neglect and subsequent case dispositions for Black and White children. Black children reported to child welfare reside in far poorer communities than Whites, even after taking into account family income (Aid to Families with Dependent Children [AFDC]/Temporary Aid to Needy Families [TANF]). Black children were more commonly reported and substantiated for severe and basic needs neglect. Community poverty indicators had a different relationship to report disposition for Black as compared to White children after controlling for neglect subtypes, child and family characteristics. Implications for practice and policy are discussed.

  5. The whole-genome landscape of medulloblastoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Buchhalter, Ivo; Morrissy, A Sorana; Hovestadt, Volker; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Gröbner, Susanne; Segura-Wang, Maia; Zichner, Thomas; Rudneva, Vasilisa A; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Sidiropoulos, Nikos; Phillips, Aaron H; Schumacher, Steven; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Waszak, Sebastian M; Erkek, Serap; Jones, David T W; Worst, Barbara C; Kool, Marcel; Zapatka, Marc; Jäger, Natalie; Chavez, Lukas; Hutter, Barbara; Bieg, Matthias; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Heinold, Michael; Gu, Zuguang; Ishaque, Naveed; Jäger-Schmidt, Christina; Imbusch, Charles D; Jugold, Alke; Hübschmann, Daniel; Risch, Thomas; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Gonzalez, Francisco German Rodriguez; Weber, Ursula D; Wolf, Stephan; Robinson, Giles W; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Gang; Finkelstein, David; Liu, Yanling; Cavalli, Florence M G; Luu, Betty; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Wu, Xiaochong; Koster, Jan; Ryzhova, Marina; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pomeroy, Scott L; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schuhmann, Martin; Ebinger, Martin; Liau, Linda M; Mora, Jaume; McLendon, Roger E; Jabado, Nada; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Chuah, Eric; Ma, Yussanne; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Mungall, Karen L; Thiessen, Nina; Tse, Kane; Wong, Tina; Jones, Steven J M; Witt, Olaf; Milde, Till; Von Deimling, Andreas; Capper, David; Korshunov, Andrey; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Kriwacki, Richard; Gajjar, Amar; Zhang, Jinghui; Beroukhim, Rameen; Fraenkel, Ernest; Korbel, Jan O; Brors, Benedikt; Schlesner, Matthias; Eils, Roland; Marra, Marco A; Pfister, Stefan M; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter

    2017-07-19

    Current therapies for medulloblastoma, a highly malignant childhood brain tumour, impose debilitating effects on the developing child, and highlight the need for molecularly targeted treatments with reduced toxicity. Previous studies have been unable to identify the full spectrum of driver genes and molecular processes that operate in medulloblastoma subgroups. Here we analyse the somatic landscape across 491 sequenced medulloblastoma samples and the molecular heterogeneity among 1,256 epigenetically analysed cases, and identify subgroup-specific driver alterations that include previously undiscovered actionable targets. Driver mutations were confidently assigned to most patients belonging to Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma subgroups, greatly enhancing previous knowledge. New molecular subtypes were differentially enriched for specific driver events, including hotspot in-frame insertions that target KBTBD4 and 'enhancer hijacking' events that activate PRDM6. Thus, the application of integrative genomics to an extensive cohort of clinical samples derived from a single childhood cancer entity revealed a series of cancer genes and biologically relevant subtype diversity that represent attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of patients with medulloblastoma.

  6. Integrated Multiple "-omics" Data Reveal Subtypes of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most heterogeneous cancers, as reflected by its multiple grades and difficulty to subtype. In this study, we integrated copy number variation, DNA methylation, mRNA, and miRNA data with the developed "cluster of cluster" method and classified 256 HCC samples from TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas into five major subgroups (S1-S5. We observed that this classification was associated with specific mutations and protein expression, and we detected that each subgroup had distinct molecular signatures. The subclasses were associated not only with survival but also with clinical observations. S1 was characterized by bulk amplification on 8q24, TP53 mutation, low lipid metabolism, highly expressed onco-proteins, attenuated tumor suppressor proteins and a worse survival rate. S2 and S3 were characterized by telomere hypomethylation and a low expression of TERT and DNMT1/3B. Compared to S2, S3 was associated with less copy number variation and some good prognosis biomarkers, including CRP and CYP2E1. In contrast, the mutation rate of CTNNB1 was higher in S3. S4 was associated with bulk amplification and various molecular characteristics at different biological levels. In summary, we classified the HCC samples into five subgroups using multiple "-omics" data. Each subgroup had a distinct survival rate and molecular signature, which may provide information about the pathogenesis of subtypes in HCC.

  7. Association of Blastocystis hominis genetic subtypes with urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Dina M Abdel; Hassanin, Omayma M; Zuel-Fakkar, Nehal Mohamed

    2011-03-01

    Although intestinal parasites are a possible cause of skin disorders, there are few case reports concerning the role of Blastocystis hominis in urticaria. To clarify this association, we determined the frequency of B. hominis genetic subtype in urticarial patients by stool culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and evaluated the clinical and parasitological recovery of urticarial patients after treatment with metronidazole. Of 54 urticarial patients (group I), 18 (33.3%) were diagnosed as acute urticaria (group IA) and 36 (66.7%) were diagnosed as chronic (group IB). Thirty-three (61.1%) out of 54 urticarial (group I) patients were Blastocystis positive by stool culture and PCR. Out of these 33 patients, 21 were symptomatic and 12 were asymptomatic. The amoeboid form was found in 20 (95.2%) out of 21 symptomatic Blastocystis urticarial patients assuring their pathogenic potential. Of 50 normal control group (group II), four (8%) Blastocystis isolates were found with no amoeboid form. B. hominis subtype 3 was the only detected genotype in both groups. Of 20 symptomatic Blastocystis urticarial patients, 12 (60%) patients recovered symptomatically and parasitologically after one course of metronidazole. Recovery reached 100% on repeating the treatment for a second course with disappearance of the amoeboid form. It was concluded that acute urticaria of unknown etiology and chronic idiopathic urticaria patients who are resistant to the ordinary regimen of urticaria treatment might be examined for infection with B. hominis, in order to prescribe the proper specific anti-protozoan treatment.

  8. Specification of Transplantable Astroglial Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krencik, Robert; Weick, Jason P.; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Functionally diversified neuronal populations have now been efficiently generated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). However, directed differentiation of hPSCs to functional astroglial subtypes remains elusive. In this study, hPSCs were successfully directed to nearly uniform populations of immature astrocytes in large quantities (>90% S100β+ and GFAP+). The immature human astrocytes exhibit similar gene expression patterns as primary astrocytes, display functional properties such as glutamate uptake and promotion of synaptogenesis, and become mature astrocytes by forming connections with blood vessels following transplantation into the mouse brain. Furthermore, hPSC-derived neuroepithelia, patterned to rostral-caudal and dorsal-ventral identities with the same morphogens used for neuronal subtype specification, generate immature astrocytes that carry distinct homeodomain transcription factors and display phenotypic differences. These human astroglial progenitors and immature astrocytes will be instrumental for studying astrocytes in brain development and function, for revealing their roles in disease processes, and for developing novel treatments for neurological disorders. PMID:21602806

  9. Listeria monocytogenes: Strain Heterogeneity, Methods, and Challenges of Subtyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, Esmond B; Donnelly, Catherine W

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne bacterial pathogen that is associated with 20% to 30% case fatality rate. L. monocytogenes is a genetically heterogeneous species, with a small fraction of strains (serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 4b) implicated in human listeriosis. Monitoring and source tracking of L. monocytogenes involve the use of subtyping methods, with the performance of genetic-based methods found to be superior to phenotypic-based ones. Various methods have been used to subtype L. monocytogenes isolates, with the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) being the gold standard. Although PFGE has had a massive impact on food safety through the establishment of the PulseNet, there is no doubt that whole genome sequence (WGS) typing is accurate, has a discriminatory power superior to any known method, and allows genome-wide differences between strains to be quantified through the comparison of nucleotide sequences. This review focuses on the different techniques that have been used to type L. monocytogenes strains, their performance challenges, and the tremendous impact WGS typing could have on the food safety landscape. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Induction of IFN-α subtypes and their antiviral activity in mumps virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markušić, Maja; Šantak, Maja; Košutić-Gulija, Tanja; Jergović, Mladen; Jug, Renata; Forčić, Dubravko

    2014-12-01

    Human type I interferons (IFNs) comprise one IFN-β, -ω, -κ, and -ɛ and 12 different IFN-α subtypes, which play an important role in early host antiviral response. Despite their high structural homology and signaling through the same receptor, IFN-α subtypes exhibit different antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities. Differences in the production of IFN-α subtypes therefore determine the quality of an antiviral response. In this study, we investigated the pattern of IFN-α subtypes induced in infection with different mumps virus (MuV) strains and examined the MuV sensitivity to the action of IFN-α subtypes. We found that all IFN-α subtypes are being expressed in response to MuV infection with a highly similar IFN-α subtype pattern between the virus strains. We assessed an antiviral activity of several IFN-α subtypes: IFN-α1, IFN-α2, IFN-α4, IFN-α6, IFN-α8, IFN-α14, IFN-α17, and IFN-α21. Although they were all effective in suppressing MuV replication, the intensity and pattern of their action varied between MuV strains. Our results indicate that the overall IFN antiviral activity as well as the activity of specific IFN-α subtypes against MuV depend on a virus strain.

  11. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in human breast cancer. Correlation with histologic subtype and degree of differentiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed, R H; Lakatua, D J; Haus, E; Yasmineh, W J

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic review of 490 consecutive human breast biopsy and mastectomy specimens were correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptor content of the tissue, by subtype and degree of differentiation...

  12. Distinguishing subtypes of extrinsic motivation among people with mild to borderline intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frielink, N; Schuengel, C; Embregts, P

    2017-07-01

    According to self-determination theory, motivation is ordered in types, including amotivation, extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. Self-determination theory defines four subtypes of extrinsic motivation: external motivation, introjected motivation, identified motivation and integrated motivation. Although it has been argued theoretically that the different types of motivation are universally applicable, Reid et al. () proposed a dichotomy of broad subtypes of extrinsic motivation for people with intellectual disability (ID) due to their cognitive limitations. The current study challenges this proposal by testing whether the four subtypes of extrinsic motivation can be differentiated among people with ID as well. The subtypes of extrinsic motivation were measured using two adapted versions of the Self-Regulation Questionnaire, one regarding exercise and one regarding support. In total, 186 adults with mild to borderline ID participated in the study. Results supported the distinction between the four subtypes of extrinsic motivation regarding both exercise and support. In addition, the correlation coefficients supported a quasi-simplex pattern of correlations among the subtypes, indicating that adjacent subtypes were more closely related than non-adjacent subtypes. Moreover, the study showed sufficient Cronbach's alphas and test-retest reliabilities for early stage research. Overall, the results of the current study provide initial evidence for the universality of the four subtypes of extrinsic motivation across populations with and without ID. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research published by MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disibilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Molecular imaging using PET and SPECT for identification of breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Chen, Yao; Wu, Shuang; Song, Fahuan; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major disease with high morbidity and mortality in women. As a highly heterogeneous tumor, it contains different molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor 2-positive, and triple-negative subtypes. As each subtype has unique features, it may not be universal to the optimal treatment and expected response for individual patients. Therefore, it is critical to identify different breast cancer subtypes. Targeting subcellular levels, molecular imaging, especially PET and single photon emission computed tomography, has become a promising means to identify breast cancer subtypes and monitor treatment. Different biological processes between various subtypes, including changes correlated with receptor expression, cell proliferation, or glucose metabolism, have the potential for imaging with PET and single photon emission computed tomography radiopharmaceuticals. Receptor imaging, with radiopharmaceuticals targeting estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or human epidermal growth factor 2, is available to distinguish receptor-positive tumors from receptor-negative ones. Cell proliferation imaging with fluorine-18 fluorothymidine PET aids identification of luminal A and B subtypes on the basis of the correlation with the immunohistochemical biomarker Ki-67. Glucose metabolism imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET may have potential to discriminate triple-negative subtypes from others. With increasing numbers of novel radiopharmaceuticals, noninvasive molecular imaging will be applied widely for the identification of different subtypes and provide more in-vivo information on individualized management of breast cancer patients.

  14. Obesity and sleep disturbances: meaningful sub-typing of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Bixler, Edward O; Chrousos, George P; Pejovic, Slobodanka

    2008-10-01

    cycle, i.e. "eucortisolemia" or "hypocortisolemia" plus hypercytokinemia is associated with high sleep efficiency and objective sleepiness, whereas "hypercortisolemia" plus hypercytokinemia is associated with low sleep efficiency and fatigue. In conclusion, we propose that the above-reviewed data provide the basis for a meaningful phenotypic and pathophysiologic sub-typing of obesity. One subtype is associated with emotional distress, poor sleep, fatigue, HPA axis "hyperactivity," and hypercytokinemia while the other is associated with non-distress, better sleep but more sleepiness, HPA axis "normo or hypoactivity," and hypercytokinemia. This proposed sub-typing may lead to novel, preventive and therapeutic strategies for obesity and its associated sleep disturbances.

  15. Breast Conservation Therapy: The Influence of Molecular Subtype and Margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirci, Senem, E-mail: senem.demirci@ege.edu.tr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir (Turkey); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC (United States); Cancer and Leukemia Group B Statistical Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Clough, Robert; Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors, especially margin status and molecular subtype, in early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 1,058 Stage I or II breast cancer patients treated with BCT (surgical excision plus radiotherapy) at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, from 1985-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Conventional receptor analyses were used as surrogate markers for molecular subtype classification (luminal A, luminal B, Her2 positive, and basal like). Actuarial estimates of overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), failure-free survival, and locoregional control (LRC) were computed by use of Kaplan-Meier plots. We analyzed prognostic variables for significance using Cox proportional hazards univariate and multivariate analysis. The study was approved by the Duke University Medical Center Institutional Review Board. Results: The median age of the patients was 56 years (range, 18-89 years). Of the patients, 80% had T1 disease and 66% N0 disease pathologically. With a median follow-up of 9.8 years, an in-breast recurrence developed in 53 patients and 10 patients had nodal failure. For all patients, the 10-year CSS rate was 94%; LRC rate, 94%; and failure-free survival rate, 88%. Luminal A patients had a CSS rate of 95% and LRC rate of 99%. Basal-type patients appeared to do worse, with regard to both CSS rate (74%) and LRC rate (76%), but the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. LRC rates of patients with negative margins (widely negative, close, and extent of margin not known) were virtually identical (93%, 96%, and 94%, respectively). Those with positive margins appeared to fare slightly worse based on LRC rate (88%), but again, the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: BCT remains the treatment of choice for early-stage breast cancer

  16. Effect of HIV-1 subtypes on disease progression in rural Uganda: a prospective clinical cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deogratius Ssemwanga

    Full Text Available We examined the association of HIV-1 subtypes with disease progression based on three viral gene regions.A prospective HIV-1 clinical cohort study in rural Uganda.Partial gag, env and pol genes were sequenced. Cox proportional hazard regression modelling was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs of progression to: CD4≤250, AIDS onset and death, adjusted for sex, age and CD4 count at enrolment.Between 1990 and 2010, 292 incident cases were subtyped: 25% had subtype A, 45% had D, 26% had A/D recombinants, 1% had C and 4% were other recombinant forms. Of the 278 incident cases included in the disease progression analysis, 62% progressed to CD4≤250, 32% to AIDS, and 34% died with a higher proportion being among subtype D cases. The proportions of individuals progressing to the three endpoints were significantly higher among individuals infected with subtype D. Throughout the study period, individuals infected with subtype D progressed faster to CD4≤250, adjusted HR (aHR, (95% CI = 1.72 (1.16-2.54, but this was mainly due to events in the period before antiretroviral therapy (ART introduction, when individuals infected with subtype D significantly progressed faster to CD4≤250 than subtype A cases; aHR (95% CI = 1.78 (1.01-3.14.In this population, HIV-1 subtype D was the most prevalent and was associated with faster HIV-1 disease progression than subtype A. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of HIV-1 subtypes on disease progression in the ART period and their effect on the virological and immunological ART outcomes.

  17. Frequent intra-subtype recombination among HIV-1 circulating in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireen E Kiwelu

    Full Text Available The study estimated the prevalence of HIV-1 intra-subtype recombinant variants among female bar and hotel workers in Tanzania. While intra-subtype recombination occurs in HIV-1, it is generally underestimated. HIV-1 env gp120 V1-C5 quasispecies from 45 subjects were generated by single-genome amplification and sequencing (median (IQR of 38 (28-50 sequences per subject. Recombination analysis was performed using seven methods implemented within the recombination detection program version 3, RDP3. HIV-1 sequences were considered recombinant if recombination signals were detected by at least three methods with p-values of ≤0.05 after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. HIV-1 in 38 (84% subjects showed evidence for intra-subtype recombination including 22 with HIV-1 subtype A1, 13 with HIV-1 subtype C, and 3 with HIV-1 subtype D. The distribution of intra-patient recombination breakpoints suggested ongoing recombination and showed selective enrichment of recombinant variants in 23 (60% subjects. The number of subjects with evidence of intra-subtype recombination increased from 29 (69% to 36 (82% over one year of follow-up, although the increase did not reach statistical significance. Adjustment for intra-subtype recombination is important for the analysis of multiplicity of HIV infection. This is the first report of high prevalence of intra-subtype recombination in the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Tanzania, a region where multiple HIV-1 subtypes co-circulate. HIV-1 intra-subtype recombination increases viral diversity and presents additional challenges for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  18. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  19. Preparation of quadri-subtype influenza virus-like particles using bovine immunodeficiency virus gag protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Hidajat, Rachmat; Hamilton, Garrett; Horn, Noah; Nickols, Brian; Prather, Raphael O. [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD (United States); Tumpey, Terrence M. [Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road N.E., Atlanta, GA (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Influenza VLPs comprised of hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and matrix (M1) proteins have been previously used for immunological and virological studies. Here we demonstrated that influenza VLPs can be made in Sf9 cells by using the bovine immunodeficiency virus gag (Bgag) protein in place of M1. We showed that Bgag can be used to prepare VLPs for several influenza subtypes including H1N1 and H10N8. Furthermore, by using Bgag, we prepared quadri-subtype VLPs, which co-expressed within the VLP the four HA subtypes derived from avian-origin H5N1, H7N9, H9N2 and H10N8 viruses. VLPs showed hemagglutination and neuraminidase activities and reacted with specific antisera. The content and co-localization of each HA subtype within the quadri-subtype VLP were evaluated. Electron microscopy showed that Bgag-based VLPs resembled influenza virions with the diameter of 150–200 nm. This is the first report of quadri-subtype design for influenza VLP and the use of Bgag for influenza VLP preparation. - Highlights: • BIV gag protein was configured as influenza VLP core component. • Recombinant influenza VLPs were prepared in Sf9 cells using baculovirus expression system. • Single- and quadri-subtype VLPs were prepared by using BIV gag as a VLP core. • Co-localization of H5, H7, H9, and H10 HA was confirmed within quadri-subtype VLP. • Content of HA subtypes within quadri-subtype VLP was determined. • Potential advantages of quadri-subtype VLPs as influenza vaccine are discussed.

  20. Lowered performance in working memory and attentional sub-processes are most prominent in multi-domain amnestic mild cognitive impairment subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekociuk, Shannon Z; Summers, Mathew J

    2014-03-01

    Research suggests that working memory and attention deficits may be present in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the functional status of these domains within revised MCI subtypes remains unclear, particularly because previous studies have examined these cognitive domains with the same tests that were used to classify MCI subtypes. The aim of this study was to examine working memory and attention function in MCI subtypes on a battery of neuropsychological tests that were distinct from those used to classify MCI subtypes A total of 122 adults aged 60-90 years were classified at baseline as amnestic MCI, non-amnestic MCI, and multi-domain amnestic (a-MCI+). The attentional and working memory capacity of participants was examined using a battery of tests distinct from those used to classify MCI at screening. The a-MCI+ group demonstrated the poorest performance on all working memory tasks and specific sub-processes of attention. The non-amnestic MCI group had lowered performance on visual span and complex sustained attention only. There was no evidence of either attentional or working memory impairment in the amnestic MCI participants. When MCI cohorts are assessed on measures distinct from those used at classification, a-MCI+ subjects had the most compromised working memory and attention function. These results support previous findings that suggest a-MCI+ more closely resembles early stage Alzheimer's disease and those with a-MCI+ may be at increased rate of future cognitive decline compared to those with other MCI subtypes. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  1. Diversity of Blastocystis subtypes in dogs in different geographical settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wenqi; Cuttell, Leigh; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2013-01-01

    Background: Blastocystis is a ubiquitous, globally distributed intestinal protist infecting humans and a wide range of animals. Several studies have shown that Blastocystis is a potentially zoonotic parasite. A 1996 study reported a 70% Blastocystis prevalence in Brisbane pound dogs while another...... study found that pet dogs/cats of 11 symptomatic Blastocystis infected patients harboured at least one Blastocystis subtype (ST) in common with the patient. These results raised the possibility that dogs might be natural hosts of Blastocystis. In this study, we aimed to investigate this hypothesis...... by estimating the prevalence of Blastocystis carriage and characterising the diversity of STs in dogs from three different environmental settings and comparing these STs with the range that humans harbour. Methods: Two hundred and forty faecal samples from dogs from three different geographical regions...

  2. MORPHOMETRIC SUBTYPING FOR A PANEL OF BREAST CANCER CELL LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joe W.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-08

    A panel of cell lines of diverse molecular background offers an improved model system for high-content screening, comparative analysis, and cell systems biology. A computational pipeline has been developed to collect images from cell-based assays, segment individual cells and colonies, represent segmented objects in a multidimensional space, and cluster them for identifying distinct subpopulations. While each segmentation strategy can vary for different imaging assays, representation and subpopulation analysis share a common thread. Application of this pipeline to a library of 41 breast cancer cell lines is demonstrated. These cell lines are grown in 2D and imaged through immunofluorescence microscopy. Subpopulations in this panel are identified and shown to correlate with previous subtyping literature that was derived from transcript data.

  3. Memory processes in learning disability subtypes of children born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Thomasin E; Conrad, Amy L; Richman, Lynn C; Nopoulos, Peg C; Bell, Edward F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate immediate auditory and visual memory processes in learning disability subtypes of 40 children born preterm. Three subgroups of children were examined: (a) primary language disability group (n = 13), (b) perceptual-motor disability group (n = 14), and (c) no learning disability diagnosis group without identified language or perceptual-motor learning disability (n = 13). Between-group comparisons indicate no significant differences in immediate auditory or visual memory performances between language and perceptual-motor learning disability groups. Within-group comparisons revealed that both learning disability groups performed significantly lower on a task of immediate memory when the mode of stimulus presentation and mode of response were visual.

  4. [The clinico-immunological subtypes of systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranskiĭ, A I; Nasonova, V A; Ivanova, S M; Riazantseva, T A; Alekberova, Z S

    1992-01-01

    Based on clinico-immunologic studies subtypes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were distinguished. The ANF-R++H-DNA-CH50 variant determines acute onset of SLE with renal injury in the form of diffuse glomerulonephritis. The ANF-Sp-RNP-RF mirrors the development of Raynaud's syndrome, Sjögren's syndrome, polymyositis, pneumosclerosis and myocarditis. The ANF-Sp-Ro-RF variant is associated with skin derangement in the form of discoid foci, anular, papulosquamous eruption, vitiligo, hyperpigmentation, and cerebrovasculitis. The Ro-anti-Po, La-anti-La system is related to the idea of SLE, seronegative in accordance with ANF, when rat liver sections are used as a substrate in immunofluorescence.

  5. Programming and reprogramming neuronal subtypes in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouaux, Caroline; Bhai, Salman; Arlotta, Paola

    2012-07-01

    Recent discoveries in nuclear reprogramming have challenged the dogma that the identity of terminally differentiated cells cannot be changed. The identification of molecular mechanisms that reprogram differentiated cells to a new identity carries profound implications for regenerative medicine across organ systems. The central nervous system (CNS) has historically been considered to be largely immutable. However, recent studies indicate that even the adult CNS is imparted with the potential to change under the appropriate stimuli. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the capability of distinct cells within the CNS to reprogram their identity and consider the role of developmental signals in directing these cell fate decisions. Finally, we discuss the progress and current challenges of using developmental signals to precisely direct the generation of individual neuronal subtypes in the postnatal CNS and in the dish. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Subtyping Ageism: Policy Issues in Succession and Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Michael S; Fiske, Susan T

    2013-01-01

    Ageism research tends to lump "older people" together as one group, as do policy matters that conceptualize everyone over-65 as "senior." This approach is problematic primarily because it often fails to represent accurately a rapidly growing, diverse, and healthy older population. In light of this, we review the ageism literature, emphasizing the importance of distinguishing between the still-active "young-old" and the potentially more impaired "old-old" (Neugarten, 1974). We argue that ageism theory has disproportionately focused on the old-old and differentiate the forms of age discrimination that apparently target each elder subgroup. In particular, we highlight the young-old's plights predominantly in the workplace and tensions concerning succession of desirable resources; by contrast, old-old predicaments likely center on consumption of shared resources outside of the workplace. For both social psychological researchers and policymakers, accurately subtyping ageism will help society best accommodate a burgeoning, diverse older population.

  7. Antisocial personality disorder--stable and unstable subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2010-04-01

    There have been criticisms that the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are over-dependent on criminal behavior. This study aimed to identify unrelated criteria of social and behavioral problems and instability, and to investigate their associations in a representative household sample of adults in the UK. Approximately one third of adults with ASPD did not fulfill any of the criteria for instability. They were less aggressive and involved in illegal activities but expressed less remorse for their behaviors. Instability in ASPD was mediated primarily through comorbid anxiety disorders and borderline personality disorder. The concept of Secondary Psychopathy, which has not generally been applied to ASPD, demonstrated many similarities to the unstable subtype.

  8. Hooked on benzodiazepines: GABAA receptor subtypes and addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kelly R.; Rudolph, Uwe; Lüscher, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used clinically to treat anxiety and insomnia. They also induce muscle relaxation, control epileptic seizures, and can provoke amnesia. Moreover, benzodiazepines are often abused after chronic clinical treatment but also for recreational purposes. Within weeks, tolerance to the pharmacological effects can develop, in addition to dependence and even addiction in vulnerable individuals. Here, we review recent observations from animal models regarding the cellular and molecular basis that may underlie the addictive properties of benzodiazepines. These data reveal how benzodiazepines, acting through specific GABAA receptor subtypes, activate midbrain dopamine neurons and how this may hijack the mesolimbic reward system. Such findings have important implications for the future design of benzodiazepines with reduced or even absent addiction liability. PMID:21353710

  9. Evidence for genetic heterogeneity between clinical subtypes of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, A W; Ruderfer, D M; Stahl, E A; Moran, J L; Chambert, K; Belliveau, R A; Forty, L; Gordon-Smith, K; Di Florio, A; Lee, P H; Bromet, E J; Buckley, P F; Escamilla, M A; Fanous, A H; Fochtmann, L J; Lehrer, D S; Malaspina, D; Marder, S R; Morley, C P; Nicolini, H; Perkins, D O; Rakofsky, J J; Rapaport, M H; Medeiros, H; Sobell, J L; Green, E K; Backlund, L; Bergen, S E; Juréus, A; Schalling, M; Lichtenstein, P; Roussos, P; Knowles, J A; Jones, I; Jones, L A; Hultman, C M; Perlis, R H; Purcell, S M; McCarroll, S A; Pato, C N; Pato, M T; Craddock, N; Landén, M; Smoller, J W; Sklar, P

    2017-01-10

    We performed a genome-wide association study of 6447 bipolar disorder (BD) cases and 12 639 controls from the International Cohort Collection for Bipolar Disorder (ICCBD). Meta-analysis was performed with prior results from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Bipolar Disorder Working Group for a combined sample of 13 902 cases and 19 279 controls. We identified eight genome-wide significant, associated regions, including a novel associated region on chromosome 10 (rs10884920; P=3.28 × 10-8) that includes the brain-enriched cytoskeleton protein adducin 3 (ADD3), a non-coding RNA, and a neuropeptide-specific aminopeptidase P (XPNPEP1). Our large sample size allowed us to test the heritability and genetic correlation of BD subtypes and investigate their genetic overlap with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. We found a significant difference in heritability of the two most common forms of BD (BD I SNP-h2=0.35; BD II SNP-h2=0.25; P=0.02). The genetic correlation between BD I and BD II was 0.78, whereas the genetic correlation was 0.97 when BD cohorts containing both types were compared. In addition, we demonstrated a significantly greater load of polygenic risk alleles for schizophrenia and BD in patients with BD I compared with patients with BD II, and a greater load of schizophrenia risk alleles in patients with the bipolar type of schizoaffective disorder compared with patients with either BD I or BD II. These results point to a partial difference in the genetic architecture of BD subtypes as currently defined.

  10. Telomerase-independent paths to immortality in predictable cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of cancers commandeer the activity of telomerase - the remarkable enzyme responsible for prolonging cellular lifespan by maintaining the length of telomeres at the ends of chromosomes. Telomerase is only normally active in embryonic and highly proliferative somatic cells. Thus, targeting telomerase is an attractive anti-cancer therapeutic rationale currently under investigation in various phases of clinical development. However, previous reports suggest that an average of 10-15% of all cancers lose the functional activity of telomerase and most of these turn to an Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres pathway (ALT). ALT-positive tumours will therefore not respond to anti-telomerase therapies and there is a real possibility that such drugs would be toxic to normal telomerase-utilising cells and ultimately select for resistant cells that activate an ALT mechanism. ALT exploits certain DNA damage response (DDR) components to counteract telomere shortening and rapid trimming. ALT has been reported in many cancer subtypes including sarcoma, gastric carcinoma, central nervous system malignancies, subtypes of kidney (Wilm's Tumour) and bladder carcinoma, mesothelioma, malignant melanoma and germ cell testicular cancers to name but a few. A recent heroic study that analysed ALT in over six thousand tumour samples supports this historical spread, although only reporting an approximate 4% prevalence. This review highlights the various methods of ALT detection, unravels several molecular ALT models thought to promote telomere maintenance and elongation, spotlights the DDR components known to facilitate these and explores why certain tissues are more likely to subvert DDR away from its usually protective functions, resulting in a predictive pattern of prevalence in specific cancer subsets.

  11. Response to clozapine in a clinically identifiable subtype of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Fitzpatrick, Laura; Guna, Alina; Andrade, Danielle M.; Lang, Anthony E.; Chow, Eva W. C.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic testing in psychiatry promises to improve patient care through advances in personalised medicine. However, there are few clinically relevant examples. Aims To determine whether patients with a well-established genetic subtype of schizophrenia show a different response profile to the antipsychotic clozapine than those with idiopathic schizophrenia. Method We retrospectively studied the long-term safety and efficacy of clozapine in 40 adults with schizophrenia, half with a 22q11.2 deletion (22q11.2DS group) and half matched for age and clinical severity but molecularly confirmed to have no pathogenic copy number variant (idiopathic group). Results Both groups showed similar clinical improvement and significant reductions in hospitalisations, achieved at a lower median dose for those in the 22q11.2DS group. Most common side-effects were similarly prevalent between the two groups, however, half of the 22q11.2DS group experienced at least one rare serious adverse event compared with none of the idiopathic group. Many were successfully retried on clozapine. Conclusions Individuals with 22q11.2DS-schizophrenia respond as well to clozapine treatment as those with other forms of schizophrenia, but may represent a disproportionate number of those with serious adverse events, primarily seizures. Lower doses and prophylactic (for example anticonvulsant) management strategies can help ameliorate side-effect risks. This first systematic evaluation of antipsychotic response in a genetic subtype of schizophrenia provides a proof-of-principle for personalised medicine and supports the utility of clinical genetic testing in schizophrenia. PMID:25745132

  12. Analysis of PIK3CA mutations in breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic, Ruza; Lehmann, Annika; Budczies, Jan; Koch, Ines; Prinzler, Judith; Kleine-Tebbe, Anke; Schewe, Christiane; Loibl, Sibylle; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA) is a central element of a signaling pathway involved in cell proliferation, survival, and growth. Certain mutations in this pathway result in enhanced PI3K signaling, which is associated with oncogenic cellular transformation and cancer. The aims of this study were to characterize different types of PIK3CA mutations in exons 9 and 20 in a series of primary breast carcinomas and to correlate the results with clinicopathologic parameters and survival. We used frozen tissue samples and sequenced exons 9 and 20 for a series of 241 patients with a diagnosis of breast carcinoma. We found that 15.8% of the primary breast carcinomas possessed PIK3CA mutations in either exon 9 or exon 20. The rate of PIK3CA mutations was increased in HR(+)/HER2(-) tumors (18.6%), but this difference did not reach a statistical significance. The lowest rate of mutations was observed in HR(+)/HER2(+) tumors (5.3%). No statistically significant association was found between the presence of PIK3CA mutations and the prognostic/clinical features of breast cancer, including histologic subtype, Her2 status, axillary lymph node involvement, tumor grade, and tumor stage. However, the presence of the H1047R mutation in 10 samples was associated with a statistically significantly worse overall survival. PIK3CA mutation was found to be a frequent genetic change in all breast cancer subtypes but occurred with the highest rate in HR(+)/HER2(-) tumors. Further studies are needed to validate the prognostic impact of different PIK3CA mutations.

  13. Precision medicine for suicidality: from universality to subtypes and personalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, A B; Le-Niculescu, H; Levey, D F; Phalen, P L; Dainton, H L; Roseberry, K; Niculescu, E M; Niezer, J O; Williams, A; Graham, D L; Jones, T J; Venugopal, V; Ballew, A; Yard, M; Gelbart, T; Kurian, S M; Shekhar, A; Schork, N J; Sandusky, G E; Salomon, D R

    2017-01-01

    Suicide remains a clear, present and increasing public health problem, despite being a potentially preventable tragedy. Its incidence is particularly high in people with overt or un(der)diagnosed psychiatric disorders. Objective and precise identification of individuals at risk, ways of monitoring response to treatments and novel preventive therapeutics need to be discovered, employed and widely deployed. We sought to investigate whether blood gene expression biomarkers for suicide (that is, a ‘liquid biopsy’ approach) can be identified that are more universal in nature, working across psychiatric diagnoses and genders, using larger cohorts than in previous studies. Such markers may reflect and/or be a proxy for the core biology of suicide. We were successful in this endeavor, using a comprehensive stepwise approach, leading to a wealth of findings. Steps 1, 2 and 3 were discovery, prioritization and validation for tracking suicidality, resulting in a Top Dozen list of candidate biomarkers comprising the top biomarkers from each step, as well as a larger list of 148 candidate biomarkers that survived Bonferroni correction in the validation step. Step 4 was testing the Top Dozen list and Bonferroni biomarker list for predictive ability for suicidal ideation (SI) and for future hospitalizations for suicidality in independent cohorts, leading to the identification of completely novel predictive biomarkers (such as CLN5 and AK2), as well as reinforcement of ours and others previous findings in the field (such as SLC4A4 and SKA2). Additionally, we examined whether subtypes of suicidality can be identified based on mental state at the time of high SI and identified four potential subtypes: high anxiety, low mood, combined and non-affective (psychotic). Such subtypes may delineate groups of individuals that are more homogenous in terms of suicidality biology and behavior. We also studied a more personalized approach, by psychiatric diagnosis and gender, with a focus

  14. Precision medicine for suicidality: from universality to subtypes and personalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, A B; Le-Niculescu, H; Levey, D F; Phalen, P L; Dainton, H L; Roseberry, K; Niculescu, E M; Niezer, J O; Williams, A; Graham, D L; Jones, T J; Venugopal, V; Ballew, A; Yard, M; Gelbart, T; Kurian, S M; Shekhar, A; Schork, N J; Sandusky, G E; Salomon, D R

    2017-09-01

    Suicide remains a clear, present and increasing public health problem, despite being a potentially preventable tragedy. Its incidence is particularly high in people with overt or un(der)diagnosed psychiatric disorders. Objective and precise identification of individuals at risk, ways of monitoring response to treatments and novel preventive therapeutics need to be discovered, employed and widely deployed. We sought to investigate whether blood gene expression biomarkers for suicide (that is, a 'liquid biopsy' approach) can be identified that are more universal in nature, working across psychiatric diagnoses and genders, using larger cohorts than in previous studies. Such markers may reflect and/or be a proxy for the core biology of suicide. We were successful in this endeavor, using a comprehensive stepwise approach, leading to a wealth of findings. Steps 1, 2 and 3 were discovery, prioritization and validation for tracking suicidality, resulting in a Top Dozen list of candidate biomarkers comprising the top biomarkers from each step, as well as a larger list of 148 candidate biomarkers that survived Bonferroni correction in the validation step. Step 4 was testing the Top Dozen list and Bonferroni biomarker list for predictive ability for suicidal ideation (SI) and for future hospitalizations for suicidality in independent cohorts, leading to the identification of completely novel predictive biomarkers (such as CLN5 and AK2), as well as reinforcement of ours and others previous findings in the field (such as SLC4A4 and SKA2). Additionally, we examined whether subtypes of suicidality can be identified based on mental state at the time of high SI and identified four potential subtypes: high anxiety, low mood, combined and non-affective (psychotic). Such subtypes may delineate groups of individuals that are more homogenous in terms of suicidality biology and behavior. We also studied a more personalized approach, by psychiatric diagnosis and gender, with a focus on

  15. Cryptosporidium parvum GP60 subtypes in dairy cattle from Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryptosporidium parvum from 73 dairy calves less than two months old from Buenos Aires province (Argentina) were molecularly characterized using sequence analysis of the GP60 gene. Seventy five sequences were obtained, and seven different subtypes were identified, all belonging to the IIa subtype f...

  16. Association between endometriosis and risk of histological subtypes of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Templeman, Claire; Rossing, Mary Anne

    2012-01-01

    Endometriosis is a risk factor for epithelial ovarian cancer; however, whether this risk extends to all invasive histological subtypes or borderline tumours is not clear. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess the association between endometriosis and histological subtypes of...

  17. Inhibitory Deficits in reading disability depend on subtype: guessers but not spellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, M.; Licht, R.; Horsley, T.M.; Sergeant, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, children with the guessing subtype of dyslexia (who read fast and inaccurately) were compared with children with the spelling subtype (who read slowly and accurately) on three aspects of executive functioning (EF): response inhibition, susceptibility to interference from irrelevant

  18. Folic acid supplementation influences the distribution of neural tube defect subtypes : A registry-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, J. E. H.; Otten, E.; Verheij, J. B. G. M.; de Walle, H. E. K.

    Periconceptional folic acid (FA) reduces neural tube defect (NTD) risk, but seems to have a varying effect per NTD subtype. We aimed to study the effect of FA supplementation on NTD subtype distribution using data from EUROCAT Northern Netherlands. We included all birth types with non-syndromal NTDs

  19. Subtyping of swine influenza viruses using a high-throughput real time PCR platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goecke, Nicole Bakkegård; Krog, Jesper Schak; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    Introduction. Swine influenza is a respiratory disease caused by multiple subtypes of influenza A virus (IAV). The genome of IAV consists of 8 segments and subtype classification is based on the surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). In Denmark, the influenza screening t...

  20. Different subtypes of carcinoma in situ of the bladder do not have a different prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comperat, E.; Jacquet, S.F.; Varinot, J.; Conort, P.; Roupret, M.; Chartier-Kastler, E.; Bitker, M.O.; Witjes, J.A.; Cussenot, O.

    2013-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS) is a high-grade lesion with different subtypes (large cell pleomorphic (LCP), large cell nonpleomorphic (LC), small cell and clinging (CL)). We explored the frequency of different subtypes in primary CIS and compared different patterns with outcome. We explored

  1. [Subtype analysis and clinical significance of HPV infection in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and precancerous lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Linlin; Sun, Na; Sun, Guangbin; Fang, Qin; Meng, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Meng, Lingchao

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the correlation of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and precancerous lesion with HPV infection subtypes and possible clinical relationship. Eighty-three cases in paraffin embedded tissues were detected with thirty seven HPV subtypes by flow-through hybridization and gene chip (HybriMax), including 31 cases of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 52 cases of precancerous lesions (29 cases of vocal cord leukoplakia and 23 cases of laryngeal papilloma), and 36 cases of vocal cord polyp as normal vocal mucosa were used as control. The total positive rate of HPV was 19.4% in the group of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (6/31), 0 in vocal cord leukoplakia, 65.2% in laryngeal papilloma (15/23), and the control group were all negative, HPV virus subtype of HPV-positive laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were all high-risk HPV16; and there were 6 HPV virus subtypes in laryngeal papilloma (8: HPV6,4: HPV52, 1: HPV11, 1: HPV18, 2: HPV45, 3: HPV16), individual mixing two or more subtypes infection. HPV infection of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and precancerous lesions has no statistically significant difference according to gender, high low-risk subtypes. HPV infection related to laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and precancerous lesions, but no significant correlation with the subtype distribution of high and low risk; HPV detection is making positive sense to clinical diagnosis of laryngeal carcinoma and precancerous lesions as well as the development of specific HPV subtype vaccine.

  2. Do COPD subtypes really exist? COPD heterogeneity and clustering in 10 independent cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldi, Peter J; Benet, Marta; Petersen, Hans; Rafaels, Nicholas; Finigan, James; Paoletti, Matteo; Marike Boezen, H; Vonk, Judith M; Bowler, Russell; Pistolesi, Massimo; Puhan, Milo A; Anto, Josep; Wauters, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Janssens, Wim; Bigazzi, Francesca; Camiciottoli, Gianna; Cho, Michael H; Hersh, Craig P; Barnes, Kathleen; Rennard, Stephen; Boorgula, Meher Preethi; Dy, Jennifer; Hansel, Nadia N; Crapo, James D; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Agusti, Alvar; Silverman, Edwin K; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Background COPD is a heterogeneous disease, but there is little consensus on specific definitions for COPD subtypes. Unsupervised clustering offers the promise of 'unbiased' data-driven assessment of COPD heterogeneity. Multiple groups have identified COPD subtypes using cluster analysis, but there

  3. A Preliminary Comparison of Reading Subtypes in a Clinical Sample of Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Krimm, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this preliminary study was to (a) compare the pattern of reading subtypes among a clinical sample of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical language and (b) evaluate phonological and nonphonological language deficits within each reading impairment subtype. Method: Participants were 32…

  4. Correlation analysis between molecular subtypes and Nottingham Prognostic Index in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Hongchao; Yang, Liuting; Li, Li; Yu, Junxian; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yingying; Li, Qin

    2017-09-26

    Molecular subtypes and Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) are both prognostic models for breast cancer patients. We evaluated the association between molecular subtypes and NPI in 1042 breast cancer patients. The molecular subtypes indicating poorer prognosis were positively correlated to higher NPI (r = 0.138, P = 0.001). ER positive expression and PR high expression were positively correlated with NPI (r = 0.142, P = 0.001; r = 0.139, P = 0.001; respectively) and negatively correlated with histological grade (r = -0.233, P 5.40 were higher in the HER2 overexpression subtype, basal-like subtype, ER-, PR low/negative expression, and Ki67 high expression groups. The excellent consistence was observed between histological grade and molecular subtypes, ER, PR, Ki67. The difference of histological grade between the HER2 positive and negative group was statistically significant. In conclusion, there was closely association between molecular subtypes and NPI in breast cancer. For further comparing the prognostic significance of molecular subtypes and NPI, survival analyses should be performed on the same population in a large-scale prospective study.

  5. Distinct molecular subtypes of uterine leiomyosarcoma respond differently to chemotherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yang; Wang, Shuzhen; Li, Songlin; Zhang, Lulu; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Haojie; Zhu, Shibai; Zhu, Wan; Li, Yongqiang; Chen, Wenwu; Ji, Shaoping; Guo, Xiangqian

    2017-09-11

    Uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS) is an aggressive form of soft tissue tumors. The molecular heterogeneity and pathogenesis of ULMS are not well understood. Expression profiling data were used to determine the possibility and optimal number of ULMS molecular subtypes. Next, clinicopathological characters and molecular pathways were analyzed in each subtype to prospect the clinical applications and progression mechanisms of ULMS. Two distinct molecular subtypes of ULMS were defined based on different gene expression signatures. Subtype I ULMS recapitulated low-grade ULMS, the gene expression pattern of which resembled normal smooth muscle cells, characterized by overexpression of smooth muscle function genes such as LMOD1, SLMAP, MYLK, MYH11. In contrast, subtype II ULMS recapitulated high-grade ULMS with higher tumor weight and invasion rate, and was characterized by overexpression of genes involved in the pathway of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and tumorigenesis, such as CDK6, MAPK13 and HOXA1. We identified two distinct molecular subtypes of ULMS responding differently to chemotherapy treatment. Our findings provide a better understanding of ULMS intrinsic molecular subtypes, and will potentially facilitate the development of subtype-specific diagnosis biomarkers and therapy strategies for these tumors.

  6. Respiratory panic disorder subtype and sensitivity to the carbon dioxide challenge test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valença A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify the sensitivity to the carbon dioxide (CO2 challenge test of panic disorder (PD patients with respiratory and nonrespiratory subtypes of the disorder. Our hypothesis is that the respiratory subtype is more sensitive to 35% CO2. Twenty-seven PD subjects with or without agoraphobia were classified into respiratory and nonrespiratory subtypes on the basis of the presence of respiratory symptoms during their panic attacks. The tests were carried out in a double-blind manner using two mixtures: 1 35% CO2 and 65% O2, and 2 100% atmospheric compressed air, 20 min apart. The tests were repeated after 2 weeks during which the participants in the study did not receive any psychotropic drugs. At least 15 of 16 (93.7% respiratory PD subtype patients and 5 of 11 (43.4% nonrespiratory PD patients had a panic attack during one of two CO2 challenges (P = 0.009, Fisher exact test. Respiratory PD subtype patients were more sensitive to the CO2 challenge test. There was agreement between the severity of PD measured by the Clinical Global Impression (CGI Scale and the subtype of PD. Higher CGI scores in the respiratory PD subtype could reflect a greater sensitivity to the CO2 challenge due to a greater severity of PD. Carbon dioxide challenges in PD may define PD subtypes and their underlying mechanisms.

  7. HIV subtype and drug resistance patterns among drug naïve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... Data in the literature show a heterogeneous distribution of the sub-types and a pandemic of geographically localized genetic subtypes. (Kanki et al., 1997; Peeters et al., 1997). Genetic differ- ences in the virus impact the efficiency of diagnostic ass- ays such as viral loads assays (Coste et al., 1996; Triq-.

  8. Subtypes of primary colorectal tumors correlate with response to targeted treatment in colorectal cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlicker, A.; Beran, G.; Chresta, C.M.; McWalter, G.; Pritchard, A.; Weston, S.; Runswick, S.; Davenport, S.; Heathcote, K.; Alferez Castro, D.; Orphanides, G.; French, T.; Wessels, L.F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous and biologically poorly understood disease. To tailor CRC treatment, it is essential to first model this heterogeneity by defining subtypes of patients with homogeneous biological and clinical characteristics and second match these subtypes to

  9. Distribution And Clinicopathological Features Of Breast Cancer Histological Subtypes In Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebnijs Andrejs

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a heterogenous disease. It consists of several histological subtypes that can be separated by morphology and immunohistochemistry. The aim of our study was to determine the distribution of breast cancer histological and molecular subtypes, and their relationship with clinical and pathological characteristics. A total of 561 patients who underwent breast carcinoma surgical treatment from January 2003 till December 2012 were enrolled in the study. In total, invasive ductal carcinomas not otherwise specified (IDC-NOS plus invasive ductal carcinomas no special type (IDC-NST were observed in 430 patients (76.65% of cases, medullar carcinoma in 14 patients (2.45%, other rare ductal carcinoma subtypes in 13 patients (2.31%, lobular carcinoma in 81 patients (14.4% and tubulolobular carcinoma in 23 patients (4.19%. Ductal carcinoma, lobular and tubulolobular carcinoma had predominantly luminal A and B subtype, whereas medullar carcinoma had HER2-positive and triple-negative (TN subtype. Tubular, cribriform, mucinous, papillary, and apocrine carcinomas had predominantly luminal A subtype. Significant differences between breast cancer histological subtypes and clinicopathological characteristics were observed. Our study for the first time reported the distribution and characteristics of breast cancer histological subtypes in Latvian women and relationship to clinical and tumour histopathological characteristics.

  10. Evidence of chitinase activity within necrotic enteritis-associated subtypes of Clostridium perfringens

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. perfringens (Cp) is associated with the necrotic gastrointestinal condition known as necrotic enteritis (NE) in the chicken. rep-PCR subtyping identified subtypes of Cp from the gastrointestinal tracts of broiler chickens afflicted with NE that were distinguished from strains from environmental,...

  11. Plasma metabolomics combined with personalized diagnosis guided by Chinese medicine reveals subtypes of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: This study suggests that combining metabolomics with traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis can reveal metabolic signatures for CHF syndrome subtypes. The plasma metabolites identified might be of special clinical relevance for subtypes of CHF, which could lead to further understanding of mechanisms involved and an improvement in personalized treatment for CHF.

  12. HIV type 1 Thai subtype E is predominant in South Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menu, E; Truong, T X; Lafon, M E; Nguyen, T H; Müller-Trutwin, M C; Nguyen, T T; Deslandres, A; Chaouat, G; Duong, Q T; Ha, B K; Fleury, H J; Barré-Sinoussi, F

    1996-05-01

    Samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 50 HIV-1-infected individuals in South Vietnam were analyzed to determine with which HIV-1 subtype the subjects were infected. Participants were from Ho Chi Minh city and five surrounding provinces; 16 samples from female prostitutes, 32 from IV drug users, and one each from a man and woman not in any HIV risk group. 32 individuals were therefore most likely infected by IV drug use and the rest through sexual contacts. PCR amplification and heteroduplex mobility assay found all but one case to be infected with HIV-1 subtype E. The only nonsubtype E infection was HIV-1 subtype B in a woman sexually infected by her seropositive partner who was most likely exposed to the virus in Europe. HIV-1 subtype E strongly predominates in South Vietnam. The homogeneous geographic distribution of subtype E suggests the recent introduction of the virus into the country. A Thai origin can be considered given the genetic relationship between the Thai and Vietnamese subtypes E. It may be assumed that subtype E infections of Vietnamese prostitutes are related to the progressive entry and spread of HIV-1 subtype E from Thailand to Cambodia and then to southern Vietnam.

  13. GWAS of clinically defined gout and subtypes identifies multiple susceptibility loci that include urate transporter genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakayama, A.; Nakaoka, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Sakiyama, M.; Shaukat, A.; Toyoda, Y.; Okada, Y.; Kamatani, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Takada, T.; Inoue, K.; Yasujima, T.; Yuasa, H.; Shirahama, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Shimizu, S.; Higashino, T.; Kawamura, Y.; Ogata, H.; Kawaguchi, M.; Ohkawa, Y.; Danjoh, I.; Tokumasu, A.; Ooyama, K.; Ito, T.; Kondo, T.; Wakai, K.; Stiburkova, B.; Pavelka, K.; Stamp, L.K.; Dalbeth, N.; Sakurai, Y.; Suzuki, H; Hosoyamada, M.; Fujimori, S.; Yokoo, T.; Hosoya, T.; Inoue, I.; Takahashi, A.; Kubo, M.; Ooyama, H.; Shimizu, T.; Ichida, K.; Shinomiya, N.; Merriman, T.R.; Matsuo, H.; Andres, M; Joosten, L.A.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Jansen, T.L.; Liote, F.; Radstake, T.R.; Riches, P.L.; So, A.; Tauches, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gout and its subtypes was performed to identify novel gout loci, including those that are subtype-specific. METHODS: Putative causal association signals from a GWAS of 945 clinically defined gout cases and 1213 controls from Japanese males were

  14. Epidemiology of constipation (EPOC) study in the United States: relation of clinical subtypes to sociodemographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, W F; Liberman, J N; Sandler, R S; Woods, M S; Stemhagen, A; Chee, E; Lipton, R B; Farup, C E

    1999-12-01

    Constipation is a common heterogeneous condition, possibly encompassing different clinical subtypes. Little is known about the comparative epidemiology of constipation subtypes. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of constipation subtypes and determine whether subtypes differ by sociodemographic factors. Between June and September 1997, a telephone interview was conducted with individuals about their bowel habits in the preceding 3 months. Survey data on 15 constipation-related symptoms were used to identify individuals who met prespecified symptom criteria for the following mutually exclusive subgroups: functional constipation, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), outlet obstruction or delay (outlet), both IBS and outlet (IBS-outlet), and frequent laxative users (i.e., at least every other day). A total of 10,018 eligible individuals in the United States 18 yr of age or older completed the interview. Test-retest reliability of reporting symptoms was assessed in a separate national survey. The Spearman's correlation coefficient for reporting symptoms ranged from 0.54 to 0.83; all but three symptoms had correlations above 0.68. The overall prevalence of constipation was 14.7%. By subtype, prevalence was 4.6% for functional, 2.1% for IBS, 4.6% for outlet, and 3.4% for IBS-outlet. An additional 1.8% of respondents reported laxative use at least every other day. Outlet was the most common subtype among women, whereas functional constipation was the most common subtype among men. The gender ratio varied by subtype, with elevated ratios for outlet (F/M = 1.65) and IBS-outlet (F/M = 2.27) subtypes. The age pattern differed among each of the four subtypes. Prevalence of functional subtype decreased with increasing age. In contrast, outlet subtype did not seem to vary by age, and IBS (both men and women) and IBS-outlet (women only) subtypes increased to age 35 yr and declined thereafter. Prevalence of functional constipation increased with increasing education

  15. Distinct anatomical subtypes of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia: a cluster analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybelski, Scott A.; Weigand, Stephen D.; Ivnik, Robert J.; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Shiung, Maria M.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Knopman, David S.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    The behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by changes in personality and behaviour. It is typically associated with frontal lobe atrophy, although patterns of atrophy are heterogeneous. The objective of this study was to examine case-by-case variability in patterns of grey matter atrophy in subjects with the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia and to investigate whether behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia can be divided into distinct anatomical subtypes. Sixty-six subjects that fulfilled clinical criteria for a diagnosis of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia with a volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scan were identified. Grey matter volumes were obtained for 26 regions of interest, covering frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, striatum, insula and supplemental motor area, using the automated anatomical labelling atlas. Regional volumes were divided by total grey matter volume. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis using Ward's clustering linkage method was performed to cluster the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia subjects into different anatomical clusters. Voxel-based morphometry was used to assess patterns of grey matter loss in each identified cluster of subjects compared to an age and gender-matched control group at P < 0.05 (family-wise error corrected). We identified four potentially useful clusters with distinct patterns of grey matter loss, which we posit represent anatomical subtypes of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia. Two of these subtypes were associated with temporal lobe volume loss, with one subtype showing loss restricted to temporal lobe regions (temporal-dominant subtype) and the other showing grey matter loss in the temporal lobes as well as frontal and parietal lobes (temporofrontoparietal subtype). Another two subtypes were characterized by a large amount of frontal lobe volume loss, with one

  16. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone H1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure. H1 has multiple isoforms; the subtypes differ in timing of expression, extent of phosphorylation and turnover rate. In vertebrates, the amino acid substitution rates differ among subtypes by almost one order of magnitude, suggesting that each subtype might have acquired a unique function. We have devised a competitive assay to estimate the relative binding affinities of histone H1 mammalian somatic subtypes H1a-e and H1° for long chromatin fragments (30–35 nucleosomes in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl at constant stoichiometry. Results The H1 complement of native chromatin was perturbed by adding an additional amount of one of the subtypes. A certain amount of SAR (scaffold-associated region DNA was present in the mixture to avoid precipitation of chromatin by excess H1. SAR DNA also provided a set of reference relative affinities, which were needed to estimate the relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin from the distribution of the subtypes between the SAR and the chromatin. The amounts of chromatin, SAR and additional H1 were adjusted so as to keep the stoichiometry of perturbed chromatin similar to that of native chromatin. H1 molecules freely exchanged between the chromatin and SAR binding sites. In conditions of free exchange, H1a was the subtype of lowest affinity, H1b and H1c had intermediate affinities and H1d, H1e and H1° the highest affinities. Subtype affinities for chromatin differed by up to 19-fold. The relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin were equivalent to those estimated for a SAR DNA fragment and a pUC19 fragment of similar length. Avian H5 had an affinity ~12-fold higher than H1e for both DNA and chromatin. Conclusion H1 subtypes freely exchange in vitro between chromatin binding sites in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl. The large differences in relative affinity of the H1 subtypes for

  17. Specific trauma subtypes improve the predictive validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Bengt B; Broadbridge, Carissa L; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E

    2014-12-01

    Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12 and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7 and 3%, respectively). Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations.

  18. HIV-1 subtypes and response to combination antiretroviral therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, WP; Ruiz, L; Loveday, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may vary in ability to suppress viral load and increase CD4+ T-cell count in people infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, possibly due to differences in resistance development. Antiretroviral drugs have predominantly been developed in Western...... Europe/North America on the basis of the most prevalent subtype, B. However, non-B subtypes are increasingly spreading worldwide. OBJECTIVE: To compare virological and immunological response to cART between patients infected with B and non-B subtypes across Europe. DESIGN: EuroSIDA prospective......, observational cohort with 11,928 HIV-1-infected patients. METHODS: Response to cART was analysed in patients with subtypes determined pre-cART, via multivariable logistic regression on the first measurements 6–12 months after starting cART. A virological response was defined as a viral load

  19. Most Campylobacter subtypes from sporadic infections can be found in retail poultry products and food animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva M.; Fussing, V.; Engberg, J.

    2006-01-01

    The subtypes of Campylobacter isolates from human infections in two Danish counties were compared to isolates from retail food samples and faecal samples from chickens, pigs and cattle. During a 1-year period, 1285 Campylobacter isolates from these sources were typed by two methods: 'Penner' heat......-stable serotyping and automated ribotyping (RiboPrinting). C. jejuni was the dominating species, but C. coli was more prevalent among food and chicken isolates (16%) compared to human isolates (4%). In total, 356 different combined sero-ribotypes (subtypes) were found. A large subtype overlap was seen between human...... isolates and isolates from food (66%), chickens (59%) and cattle (83%). This was verified by PFGE typing of 212 isolates representing selected subtypes. All frequent (n > 3) subtypes found in food were also present in humans. Sixty-one per cent of the isolates from domestically acquired infections had...

  20. CRISPR typing and subtyping for improved laboratory surveillance of Salmonella infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laëtitia Fabre

    Full Text Available Laboratory surveillance systems for salmonellosis should ideally be based on the rapid serotyping and subtyping of isolates. However, current typing methods are limited in both speed and precision. Using 783 strains and isolates belonging to 130 serotypes, we show here that a new family of DNA repeats named CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats is highly polymorphic in Salmonella. We found that CRISPR polymorphism was strongly correlated with both serotype and multilocus sequence type. Furthermore, spacer microevolution discriminated between subtypes within prevalent serotypes, making it possible to carry out typing and subtyping in a single step. We developed a high-throughput subtyping assay for the most prevalent serotype, Typhimurium. An open web-accessible database was set up, providing a serotype/spacer dictionary and an international tool for strain tracking based on this innovative, powerful typing and subtyping tool.

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Blastocystis hominis isolates implicates subtype 3 as a subtype with pathogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, T C; Suresh, K G; Smith, H V

    2008-12-01

    Despite frequent reports on the presence of Blastocystis hominis in human intestinal tract, its pathogenicity remains a matter of intense debate. These discrepancies may be due to the varying pathogenic potential or virulence of the isolates studied. The present study represents the first to investigate both phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of B. hominis obtained from symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Symptomatic isolates had a significantly greater size range and lower growth rate in Jones' medium than asymptomatic isolates. The parasite cells of symptomatic isolates exhibited rougher surface topography and greater binding affinity to Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) and Helix pomatia (HPA). The present study also identifies further phenotypic characteristics, which aided in differentiating the pathogenic forms from the non-pathogenic forms of B. hominis. Blastocystis subtype 3 was found to be correlated well with the disease.

  2. Multivariate neuroanatomical classification of cognitive subtypes in schizophrenia: A support vector machine learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Ian C.; Shepherd, Alana M.; Laurens, Kristin R.; Cairns, Murray J.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Green, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity in the structural brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia has made identification of reliable neuroanatomical markers of the disease difficult. The use of more homogenous clinical phenotypes may improve the accuracy of predicting psychotic disorder/s on the basis of observable brain disturbances. Here we investigate the utility of cognitive subtypes of schizophrenia – ‘cognitive deficit’ and ‘cognitively spared’ – in determining whether multivariate patterns of volumetric brain differences can accurately discriminate these clinical subtypes from healthy controls, and from each other. We applied support vector machine classification to grey- and white-matter volume data from 126 schizophrenia patients previously allocated to the cognitive spared subtype, 74 cognitive deficit schizophrenia patients, and 134 healthy controls. Using this method, cognitive subtypes were distinguished from healthy controls with up to 72% accuracy. Cross-validation analyses between subtypes achieved an accuracy of 71%, suggesting that some common neuroanatomical patterns distinguish both subtypes from healthy controls. Notably, cognitive subtypes were best distinguished from one another when the sample was stratified by sex prior to classification analysis: cognitive subtype classification accuracy was relatively low (schizophrenia patients, the volumetric brain differences between cognitive subtypes are relatively minor in contrast to the large common disease-associated changes. Volumetric differences that distinguish between cognitive subtypes on a case-by-case basis appear to occur in a sex-specific manner that is consistent with previous evidence of disrupted relationships between brain structure and cognition in male, but not female, schizophrenia patients. Consideration of sex-specific differences in brain organization is thus likely to assist future attempts to distinguish subgroups of schizophrenia patients on the basis of neuroanatomical

  3. Subtypes Distribution and Frequency of Blastocystis sp. Isolated from Diarrheic and Non-diarrheic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid JALALLOU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blastocystis is one of the most common parasites, reported from both human and animals. This parasite is more prevalent in regions with low levels of hygiene, close contact with animal and unsuitable disposal systems. The aim of the study was to subtype Blastocystis sp., isolated from diarrheic and non-diarrheic patients using sequencing of 18S ribosomal DNA.Methods: Totally, 300 stool samples were collected from diarrheic and non-diarrheic patients referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tehran from Apr to Aug 2015. All samples were concentrated using conventional Formalin – ether technique and recognized under light microscope. The fresh stool samples were also cultivated in clotted fetal bovine medium and examined for growing of Blastocystis every 48 h with direct smear slides for 10 d.DNA extraction was performed on all positive samples. Amplified DNA fragment of 18S rDNA was sequenced and compared with reference genes, previously deposited in Genbank database.Results: The number of diarrheic and non-diarrheic patients participated in the study was 134 (44.66% and 166 (55.34%, respectively. Three subtypes 1, 2, 3 were identified from positive samples. Subtype 2 was the most prevalent (36.5% followed by subtype 1 (33.3% and subtype 3 (30.2%. There were no mixed subtypes. Furthermore, the most prevalent subtypes in diarrheic and non-diarrheic patients were subtype 2 (39.28% and subtype 1 (37.14%, respectively.Conclusion: Blastocystis sp., is one of the most prevalent unicellular parasites among diarrheic and non-diarrheic patients. Indeed, ST2 was the most prevalent subtype particularly in those samples collected from diarrheic patients.

  4. Comparison of sequencing (barcode region) and sequence-tagged-site PCR for Blastocystis subtyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, Christen Rune

    2013-01-01

    Blastocystis is the most common nonfungal microeukaryote of the human intestinal tract and comprises numerous subtypes (STs), nine of which have been found in humans (ST1 to ST9). While efforts continue to explore the relationship between human health status and subtypes, no consensus regarding subtyping methodology exists. It has been speculated that differences detected in subtype distribution in various cohorts may to some extent reflect different approaches. Blastocystis subtypes have been determined primarily in one of two ways: (i) sequencing of small subunit rRNA gene (SSU-rDNA) PCR products and (ii) PCR with subtype-specific sequence-tagged-site (STS) diagnostic primers. Here, STS primers were evaluated against a panel of samples (n = 58) already subtyped by SSU-rDNA sequencing (barcode region), including subtypes for which STS primers are not available, and a small panel of DNAs from four other eukaryotes often present in feces (n = 18). Although the STS primers appeared to be highly specific, their sensitivity was only moderate, and the results indicated that some infections may go undetected when this method is used. False-negative STS results were not linked exclusively to certain subtypes or alleles, and evidence of substantial genetic variation in STS loci was obtained. Since the majority of DNAs included here were extracted from feces, it is possible that STS primers may generally work better with DNAs extracted from Blastocystis cultures. In conclusion, due to its higher applicability and sensitivity, and since sequence information is useful for other forms of research, SSU-rDNA barcoding is recommended as the method of choice for Blastocystis subtyping.

  5. Emergence of novel subtypes of Cryptosporidium parvum in calves in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupke, Agnieszka; Rzeżutka, Artur

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the Cryptosporidium parvum subtypes circulating in Polish cattle and their distribution in relation to the age and health status of tested animals. In total, 779 fecal samples were obtained from young cattle originating from 237 farms. C. parvum strains were identified at the 18 small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), COWP, and LIB13 loci and were subsequently analyzed by sequencing at the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) locus for subtype determination. The presence of 71 C. parvum strains belonging to IIa, IId, or IIl subtype families was shown. The strains from the IIa allele family prevailed with IIaA17G1R1, IIaA17G2R1, and IIaA15G2R1 subtypes occurring frequently. Two novel subtypes IIaA10G1R1 and IIlA19R3 were detected for the first time in a bovine host. The highest C. parvum prevalence (22.5 %, confidence interval (CI) = 2.5 %) was observed among the youngest animals up to 2 weeks of age, followed by the prevalence among those aged 2 to 4 weeks (6.6 %, CI = 2.6 %) and then among older cattle (4.9 %, CI = 2.1). The occurrence of diarrhea in animals was associated with the presence of the IIaA16G1R1b subtype, while infections caused by IIaA15G2R1 strains were more likely to be asymptomatic. The geographical distribution of subtypes revealed that strains from the IIa subtype family were detected all over the country frequently compared to the IId and IIl subtypes, the sporadic appearances of which confirmed their endemic occurrence. Subtype analysis revealed the presence of zoonotic strains indicating cattle as a reservoir for human cryptosporidiosis.

  6. Subcortical volumes differ in Parkinson's disease motor subtypes: New insights into the pathophysiology of disparate symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Rosenberg-Katz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD can be classified, based on their motor symptoms, into the Postural Instability Gait Difficulty (PIGD subtype or the Tremor Dominant (TD subtype. Gray matter changes between the subtypes have been reported using whole brain Voxel-Based Morphometry, however, the evaluation of subcortical gray matter volumetric differences between these subtypes using automated volumetric analysis has only been studied in relatively small sample sizes and needs further study to confirm that the negative findings were not due to the sample size. Therefore, we aim to evaluate volumetric changes in subcortical regions and their association with PD motor subtypes. Methods: Automated volumetric MRI analysis quantified the subcortical gray matter volumes of patients with PD in the PIGD subtype (n=30, in the TD subtype (n=30, and in 28 healthy controls. Results: Significantly lower amygdala and globus pallidus gray matter volume was detected in the PIGD, as compared to the TD subtype, with a trend for an association between globus pallidus degeneration and higher (worse PIGD scores. Furthermore, among all the patients with PD, higher hippocampal volumes were correlated with a higher (better dual tasking gait speed (r=0.30, p<0.002 and with a higher global cognitive score (r=0.36, p<0.0001. Lower putamen volume was correlated (r=-0.28, p<0.004 with higher (worse freezing of gait score, an episodic symptom which is common among the PIGD subtype. As expected, differences detected between healthy controls and patients in the PD subgroups included regions within the amygdala and the dorsal striatum but not the ventral striatum, a brain region that is generally considered to be more preserved in PD.Conclusions: The disparate patterns of subcortical degeneration can explain some of the differences in symptoms between the PD subtypes such as gait disturbances and cognitive functions. These findings may, in the future, help to

  7. Subtypes and phylogenetic analysis of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in Jayapura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Widiyanti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, a retrovirus that infects the human immune system, is genetically differentiated into HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV1 is classified into 3 groups: M,N and O. Group M is subdivided into 9 subtypes, namely: A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J and K. HIV subtype mapping would constitute a good reference base to study the epidemiology of HIV-1. HIV phylogenetic analysis is required to understand virus origin, geographical distribution and tracking parameters of the HIV transmission process in a sample area. The objective of this study was to determine HIV-1 subtype distribution and the relationship between HIV-1 subtypes with genBank HIV isolates based on envelope gene fragments. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 36 subjects in Jayapura Regency between January and March 2013. Blood samples were taken and analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and nested PCR, and confirmed with sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis was performed along 400 bp of envelope gene fragment. The data were analyzed with Bioedit ver.7 and MEGA 5.1. software. RESULTS Two HIV-1 subtypes were found in Jayapura Regency. Subtype CRF01_AE was confirmed in 31 patients (86.1% and subtype B in 5 patients (13.9%. Phylogenetic analysis showed phylogenetic relationships between CRF01_AE from Jayapura and subtypes from Singapore and Thailand, while subtype B from Jayapura was closely related to subtypes from United States and United Kingdom CONCLUSION The results of this study reflect the independent introduction of multiple HIV-1 strains into Papua, with the rapid spread of a single strain of HIV-1 (CRF01_AE in the majority of infected patients tested.

  8. Results of total hip arthroplasty differ in subtypes of high dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartofilakidis, George; Babis, George C; Lampropoulou-Adamidou, Kalliopi; Vlamis, John

    2013-09-01

    In a previous study, we described two subtypes of high dislocation of the hip depending on the presence (C1) or absence (C2) of a false acetabulum, yet we have already presented the concise followup of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in these patients as a group at a minimum of 15 years. In this retrospective study, we investigated differences in the results of THA in the C1 and C2 subtypes of high dislocation such as (1) survivorship of the reconstructions; (2) Merle d'Aubigné-Postel clinical scores; (3) leg lengthening and femoral shortening; and (4) site of reattachment and union rate of the greater trochanter. We included 49 hips of the C1 subtype and 30 hips of the C2 subtype operated on from 1976 to 1994. We evaluated survivorship (using reoperation for any reason as the end point) and performed chart and radiographic reviews. The 15-year survival was 84% (± 10% [95% CI]) for the C1 subtype and 60% (± 17% [95% CI]) for the C2 subtype (p = 0.001). Cox regression analysis, after adjustment for confounding factors, showed also statistically significantly worse survivorship in the C2 subtype (p = 0.021) and, after adjustment for possible predictive factors, found a statistically significant relationship of high dislocation subtype (p = 0.018) and trochanteric union (p = 0.005) with survival of THAs. Pain, function, and mobility scores improved from preoperative to last followup in C1 and C2 groups but they did not differ between C1 and C2 hips. C2 hips were lengthened more (p dislocation subtypes, including the risk of revision, which was higher in patients whose hips did not have a false acetabulum. These findings indicate that while reporting THA results in patients with high dislocation, mixing results of the two subtypes may lead to statistical bias.

  9. Origin and dynamics of HIV-1 subtype C infection in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengli Shen

    Full Text Available To investigate the geographical origin and evolution dynamics of HIV-1 subtype C infection in India.Ninety HIV-1 subtype C env gp120 subtype C sequences from India were compared with 312 env gp120 reference subtype C sequences from 27 different countries obtained from Los Alamos HIV database. All the HIV-1 subtype C env gp120 sequences from India were used for the geographical origin analysis and 61 subtype C env gp120 sequences with known sampling year (from 1991 to 2008 were employed to determine the origin of HIV infection in India.Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 env sequences was used to investigate the geographical origin and tMRCA of Indian HIV-1 subtype C. Evolutionary parameters including origin date and demographic growth patterns of Indian subtype C were estimated using a Bayesian coalescent-based approach under relaxed molecular clock models.The majority of the analyzed Indian and South African HIV-1 subtype C sequences formed a single monophyletic cluster. The most recent common ancestor date was calculated to be 1975.56 (95% HPD, 1968.78-1981.52. Reconstruction of the effective population size revealed three phases of epidemic growth: an initial slow growth, followed by exponential growth, and then a plateau phase approaching present time. Stabilization of the epidemic growth phase correlated with the foundation of National AIDS Control Organization in India.Indian subtype C originated from a single South African lineage in the middle of 1970s. The current study emphasizes not only the utility of HIV-1 sequence data for epidemiological studies but more notably highlights the effectiveness of community or government intervention strategies in controlling the trend of the epidemic.

  10. Predominance and association risk of Blastocystis hominis subtype I in colorectal cancer: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amr Mohamed; Ahmed, Mona Abdelfattah; Ahmed, Sabah Abdelghany; Al-Semany, Sherif Ahmed; Alghamdi, Saad Saed; Zaglool, Dina Abdulla

    2017-01-01

    Blastocystis, a genetically diverse intestinal parasite with controversial pathogenic potential, has increasingly been incriminated for diarrheal illness in immunocompromised individuals including colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The aim of the current study was to assess the possible association between Blastocystis infection and CRC condition in Makkah, Saudi Arabia (KSA). Stool samples were collected from 80 non-cancer (NC) and 138 cancer subjects including 74 CRC patients and 64 patients with other cancers outside gastrointestinal tract (COGT). Molecularly confirmed Blastocystis isolates were genetically grouped and subtyped using multiplex polymerase chain reaction with restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequence-tagged site primers-based PCR (PCR-STS), respectively. Blastocystis hominis were confirmed in 29.7, 25 and 15% among CRC, COGT and NC patients, respectively. Obtained Blastocystis isolates were initially categorized into 2 groups (A and C), which were subsequently subtyped into 3 different subtypes; subtype-I (38%), subtype-II (44%) and subtype-V (22%). Interestingly, subtype-I was the most predominantly detected subtype (54.5%) among CRC patients with a significant association risk (COR 7.548; 95% CI: 1.629-34.987; P = 0.004). To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first to provide genetic insights on the prevalence of Blastocystis hominis among CRC patients in Makkah, KSA. Moreover, the study suggests for a possible association between subtype-I of Blastocystis hominis and CRC, which could indicate a potential influence of Blastocystis on CRC condition. Further studies are required to confirm this association risk and to investigate the possible underlying mechanism of postulated carcinogenic influence of Blastocystis hominis subtype-I.

  11. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  12. Cognitive subtypes in non-affected siblings of patients with schizophrenia : Characteristics and profile congruency with affected family member

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, P.J.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Aleman, A.; van den Heuvel, E.R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although cognitive subtypes have been suggested in schizophrenia patients, similar analyses have not been carried out in their unaffected siblings. Subtype classification may provide more insight into genetically driven variation in cognitive function. Objectives/aims: To investigate

  13. Cognitive subtypes in non-affected siblings of schizophrenia patients: characteristics and profile congruency with affected family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, P.J.; Alizadeh, BZ; Aleman, A.; van den Heuvel, E.R.; Bruggeman, R.; Cahn, W.; de Haan, L.; Kahn, R.; Krabbendam, L.; Linzen, D.; Myin-Germeys, I.; van Os, J; Wiersma, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although cognitive subtypes have been suggested in schizophrenia patients, similar analyses have not been carried out in their non-affected siblings. Subtype classification may provide more insight into genetically driven variation in cognitive function. We investigated cognitive

  14. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in a Single Institution: Biphenotypic Acute Myeloid Leukemia May Not Be an Aggressive Subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yuan Lee

    2007-07-01

    Conclusion: This was a clinicopathologic study of AML in Taiwan. Histologic subtype plays a significant prognostic role. Multilineage dysplasia-and therapy-related AML have worse prognosis. Biphenotypic AML may not be an aggressive subtype.

  15. Diagnosis and subtype analysis of Blastocystis sp. in 442 patients in a hospital setting in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, Aldert; Wentink-Bonnema, Ellen M. S.; Gilis, Henk; Verhaar, Nienke; Wassenaar, Carla J. A.; van Vugt, Michèle; Goorhuis, Abraham; van Gool, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Blastocystis sp. are among the most commonly observed intestinal parasites in routine clinical parasitology. Blastocystis in humans consists of at least 9 genetic subtypes. Different subtypes of Blastocystis may be associated with differences in pathogenicity and symptomatology. Advanced microscopy

  16. Fine motor skills in South African children with symptoms of ADHD: influence of subtype, gender, age, and hand dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Anneke

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motor problems, often characterised as clumsiness or poor motor coordination, have been associated with ADHD in addition to the main symptom groups of inattention, impulsiveness, and overactivity. The problems addressed in this study were: (1 Are motor problems associated with ADHD symptoms, also in African cultures? (2 Are there differences in motor skills among the subtypes with ADHD symptoms? (3 Are there gender differences? (4 Is there an effect of age? (5 Are there differences in performance between the dominant and non-dominant hand? Method A total of 528 children (264 classified as having symptoms of ADHD and 264 matched comparisons of both genders and from seven different South African ethnic groups participated in the study. They were assessed with three simple, easy to administer instruments which measure various functions of motor speed and eye-hand coordination: The Grooved Pegboard, the Maze Coordination Task, and the Finger Tapping Test. The results were analysed as a function of subtype, gender, age, and hand dominance. Results The findings indicate that children with symptoms of ADHD performed significantly poorer on the Grooved Pegboard and Motor Coordination Task, but not on the Finger Tapping Test than their comparisons without ADHD symptoms. The impairment was most severe for the subtype with symptoms of ADHD-C (combined and less severe for the subtypes with symptoms of ADHD-PI (predominantly inattentive and ADHD-HI (predominantly hyperactive/impulsive. With few exceptions, both genders were equally affected while there were only slight differences in performance between the dominant and non-dominant hand. The deficiencies in motor control were mainly confined to the younger age group (6 – 9 yr. Conclusion An association between the symptoms of ADHD and motor problems was demonstrated in terms of accuracy and speed in fairly complex tasks, but not in simple motor tests of speed. This deficiency is found

  17. Effects of age and subtype on emotional recognition in children with anxiety disorders: implications for cognitive-behavioural therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Trevor Changgun; Dupuis, Annie; Jones, Emily; Guberman, Carly; Herbert, Monique; Manassis, Katharina

    2013-05-01

    It remains unclear whether an anxiety diagnosis is associated with children's emotional recognition. We considered children's age and types of primary anxiety diagnosis, which have been neglected, to elucidate this relationship. Sixty-three referred children with anxiety disorder(s) and 59 volunteer children without anxiety disorder(s), aged between 6 and 11 years, were presented with animated characters, displaying a range of simple and complex emotions, for identification. Statistical analyses examined identification accuracy based on presence or absence of anxiety disorder, age, and types of primary diagnoses. Children with anxiety disorder(s) as a group performed comparably to children without anxiety disorder(s) in identifying emotions (z = -0.72, P = 0.47). In both groups, accuracy for disgust increased significantly each year of age ([anxiety group] OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.6 to 4.3, P separation anxiety disorder (SAD) showed deficits in overall emotional recognition, compared with children with other subtypes or without anxiety (P = 0.004). Further regression analyses showed that children with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) presented significantly lower accuracy than children without anxiety disorder(s) at a young age, but the deficit disappeared with increased age. Children with anxiety disorder(s) as a group may not appear to be impaired in emotional recognition. However, when age and subtypes are considered, children with SAD and young children with GAD appear to have difficulty, compared with children without anxiety disorder(s).

  18. In silico Analyses of Subtype Specific HIV-1 Tat-TAR RNA Interaction Reveals the Structural Determinants for Viral Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larance Ronsard

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Tat transactivates viral genes through strong interaction with TAR RNA. The stem-loop bulged region of TAR consisting of three nucleotides at the position 23–25 and the loop region consisting of six nucleotides at the position 30–35 are essential for viral transactivation. The arginine motif of Tat (five arginine residues on subtype TatC is critically important for TAR interaction. Any mutations in this motif could lead to reduce transactivation ability and pathogenesis. Here, we identified structurally important residues (arginine and lysine residues of Tat in this motif could bind to TAR via hydrogen bond interactions which is critical for transactivation. Natural mutant Ser46Phe in the core motif could likely led to conformational change resulting in more hydrogen bond interactions than the wild type Tat making it highly potent transactivator. Importantly, we report the possible probabilities of number of hydrogen bond interactions in the wild type Tat and the mutants with TAR complexes. This study revealed the differential transactivation of subtype B and C Tat could likely be due to the varying number of hydrogen bonds with TAR. Our data support that the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of Tat is involved in the TAR interactions through hydrogen bonds which is important for transactivation. This study highlights the evolving pattern of structurally important determinants of Tat in the arginine motif for viral transactivation.

  19. Neurophysiological mechanisms of emotion regulation for subtypes of externalizing children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieben, James

    Children referred for externalizing behavior problems may not represent a homogeneous population. The objective of this study was to assess the neural mechanisms of emotion regulation that might distinguish subtypes of externalizing children from each other and from their typically developing age-mates. Children with pure externalizing (EXT) problems were compared with children comorbid for externalizing and internalizing (MIXED) problems and with age-matched controls. Only boys were included in the analysis because so few girls were referred for treatment. A go/no-go task with a negative emotion induction was used to examine dense-array EEG data together with behavioral measures of performance. Four event-related potential (ERP) components tapping inhibitory control or self-monitoring were assessed including the inhibitory N2, the error-related negativity (ERN), the error positivity (Pe) and the frontal inhibitory P3 (iP3). Source models were constructed estimating the cortical generators of these components. The MIXED children's N2s increased in response to the emotion induction, resulting in greater amplitudes than EXT children in the following trial block. MIXED and EXT children showed increased N2 latencies compared to controls. ERN amplitudes were greatest for control children and smallest for EXT children with MIXED children in between, but only prior to the emotion induction. N2 component latencies were shorter for controls but only before and after the induction block with a significantly faster N2 for controls only in block C relative to MIXED children. Latencies for the ERN component were longer for the EXT children in blocks A and B relative to both MIXED and controls. Mixed results were found for both the Pe and frontal P3 amplitude. Pe amplitudes were smallest for control children in blocks A and B relative to both clinical groups. Pe latencies were consistent across groups with the exception of block B where EXT children showed an increase in

  20. Bilateral vestibular hypofunction: Insights in etiologies, clinical subtypes and diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. eLucieer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate the different etiologies and clinical subtypes of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH and the value of diagnostic tools in the diagnostic process of BVH.Materials and methods: A retrospective case review was performed on 154 patients diagnosed with BVH in a tertiary referral center, between 2013 and 2015. Inclusion criteria comprised 1 imbalance and/or oscillopsia during locomotion, and 2 summated slow phase velocity of nystagmus of less than 20 degrees per second during bithermal caloric tests.Results:The definite etiology of BVH was determined in 47% of the cases and the probable etiology in 22%. In 31%, the etiology of BVH remained idiopathic. BVH resulted from more than 20 different etiologies. In the idiopathic group, the percentage of migraine was significantly higher compared to the non-idiopathic group (50% versus 11%, p<0.001. Among all patients, 23.4% were known with autoimmune disorders in their medical history. All 4 clinical subtypes (recurrent vertigo with BVH, rapidly progressive BVH, slowly progressive BVH and slowly progressive BVH with ataxia were found in this population. Slowly progressive BVH with ataxia comprised only 4.5% of the cases. The head impulse test was abnormal in 94% of the cases. The torsion swing test was abnormal in 66%. Bilateral normal hearing to moderate hearing loss was found in 49%. Blood tests did not often contribute to the determination of the etiology of the disease. Abnormal cerebral imaging was found in 21 patients.Conclusion:BVH is a heterogeneous condition with various etiologies and clinical characteristics. Migraine seems to play a significant role in idiopathic BVH and auto-immunity could be a modulating factor in the development of BVH. The distribution of etiologies of BVH probably depends on the clinical setting. In the diagnostic process of BVH, the routine use of some blood tests can be reconsidered and a low-threshold use of audiometry and cerebral imaging is

  1. Distinct Molecular Features of Different Macroscopic Subtypes of Colorectal Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Kenichi; Konishi, Kazuo; Yamochi, Toshiko; Ito, Yoichi M.; Nozawa, Hisako; Tojo, Masayuki; Shinmura, Kensuke; Kogo, Mari; Katagiri, Atsushi; Kubota, Yutaro; Muramoto, Takashi; Yano, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiya; Kihara, Toshihiro; Tagawa, Teppei; Makino, Reiko; Takimoto, Masafumi; Imawari, Michio; Yoshida, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs). Methods We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI]) and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers) alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs), 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs), 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs), 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs) and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs) on the basis of macroscopic appearance. Results S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs) (P<0.001). By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively) (P<0.007). We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively) (P<0.005). Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05). PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41). Conclusion We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal

  2. Distinct molecular features of different macroscopic subtypes of colorectal neoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Konda

    Full Text Available Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs.We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI] and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs, 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs, 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs, 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs on the basis of macroscopic appearance.S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs (P<0.001. By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively (P<0.007. We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively (P<0.005. Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05. PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41.We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  3. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5: molecular pharmacology, allosteric modulation and stimulus bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengmany, K

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) is a family C GPCR that has been implicated in various neuronal processes and, consequently, in several CNS disorders. Over the past few decades, GPCR‐based drug discovery, including that for mGlu5 receptors, has turned considerable attention to targeting allosteric binding sites. Modulation of endogenous agonists by allosteric ligands offers the advantages of spatial and temporal fine‐tuning of receptor activity, increased selectivity and reduced adverse effects with the potential to elicit improved clinical outcomes. Further, with greater appreciation of the multifaceted nature of the transduction of mGlu5 receptor signalling, it is increasingly apparent that drug discovery must take into consideration unique receptor conformations and the potential for stimulus‐bias. This novel paradigm proposes that different ligands may differentially modulate distinct signalling pathways arising from the same receptor. We review our current understanding of the complexities of mGlu5 receptor signalling and regulation, and how these relate to allosteric ligands. Ultimately, a deeper appreciation of these relationships will provide the foundation for targeted drug design of compounds with increased selectivity, not only for the desired receptor but also for the desired signalling outcome from the receptor. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein‐Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc PMID:26276909

  4. Multiple Serotonergic Mechanisms Contributing to Sensitization in Aplysia: Evidence of Diverse Serotonin Receptor Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, Demian; DesGroseillers, Luc; Castellucci, Vincent F.; Carew, Thomas J.; Marinesco, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in memory encoding in Aplysia. Early evidence showed that during sensitization, 5-HT activates a cyclic AMP-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA)-dependent pathway within specific sensory neurons (SNs), which increases their excitability and facilitates synaptic transmission onto their follower motor neurons (MNs). However, recent data suggest that serotonergic modulation during sensitization is more complex and diverse. The neuronal circuits mediating defensive reflexes contain a number of interneurons that respond to 5-HT in ways opposite to those of the SNs, showing a decrease in excitability and/or synaptic depression. Moreover, in addition to acting through a cAMP-PKA pathway within SNs, 5-HT is also capable of activating a variety of other protein kinases such as protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, and tyrosine kinases. This diversity of 5-HT responses during sensitization suggests the presence of multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes within the Aplysia central nervous system. Four 5-HT receptors have been cloned and characterized to date. Although several others probably remain to be characterized in molecular terms, especially the Gs-coupled 5-HT receptor capable of activating cAMP-PKA pathways, the multiplicity of serotonergic mechanisms recruited into action during learning in Aplysia can now be addressed from a molecular point of view. PMID:14557610

  5. Proteomic comparison defines novel markers to characterize heterogeneous populations of extracellular vesicle subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Joanna; Arras, Guillaume; Colombo, Marina; Jouve, Mabel; Morath, Jakob Paul; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Dingli, Florent; Tkach, Mercedes; Théry, Clotilde

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have become the focus of rising interest because of their numerous functions in physiology and pathology. Cells release heterogeneous vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins, including small EVs formed inside endosomal compartments (i.e., exosomes) and EVs of various sizes budding from the plasma membrane. Specific markers for the analysis and isolation of different EV populations are missing, imposing important limitations to understanding EV functions. Here, EVs from human dendritic cells were first separated by their sedimentation speed, and then either by their behavior upon upward floatation into iodixanol gradients or by immuno-isolation. Extensive quantitative proteomic analysis allowing comparison of the isolated populations showed that several classically used exosome markers, like major histocompatibility complex, flotillin, and heat-shock 70-kDa proteins, are similarly present in all EVs. We identified proteins specifically enriched in small EVs, and define a set of five protein categories displaying different relative abundance in distinct EV populations. We demonstrate the presence of exosomal and nonexosomal subpopulations within small EVs, and propose their differential separation by immuno-isolation using either CD63, CD81, or CD9. Our work thus provides guidelines to define subtypes of EVs for future functional studies. PMID:26858453

  6. Inhibiting glutaminase in acute myeloid leukemia: metabolic dependency of selected AML subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matre, Polina; Velez, Juliana; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Qi, Yuan; Su, Xiaoping; Cai, Tianyu; Chan, Steven M; Lodi, Alessia; Sweeney, Shannon R; Ma, Helen; Davis, Richard Eric; Baran, Natalia; Haferlach, Torsten; Su, Xiaohua; Flores, Elsa Renee; Gonzalez, Doriann; Konoplev, Sergej; Samudio, Ismael; DiNardo, Courtney; Majeti, Ravi; Schimmer, Aaron D; Li, Weiqun; Wang, Taotao; Tiziani, Stefano; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-11-29

    Metabolic reprogramming has been described as a hallmark of transformed cancer cells. In this study, we examined the role of the glutamine (Gln) utilization pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and primary AML samples. Our results indicate that a subset of AML cell lines is sensitive to Gln deprivation. Glutaminase (GLS) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of Gln to glutamate. One of the two GLS isoenzymes, GLS1 is highly expressed in cancer and encodes two different isoforms: kidney (KGA) and glutaminase C (GAC). We analyzed mRNA expression of GLS1 splicing variants, GAC and KGA, in several large AML datasets and identified increased levels of expression in AML patients with complex cytogenetics and within specific molecular subsets. Inhibition of glutaminase by allosteric GLS inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide or by novel, potent, orally bioavailable GLS inhibitor CB-839 reduced intracellular glutamate levels and inhibited growth of AML cells. In cell lines and patient samples harboring IDH1/IDH2 (Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) mutations, CB-839 reduced production of oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, inducing differentiation. These findings indicate potential utility of glutaminase inhibitors in AML therapy, which can inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and/or differentiation in specific leukemia subtypes.

  7. Effect of estrogen receptor-subtype-specific ligands on fertility in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumasia, Kushaan; Kumar, Anita; Kadam, Leena; Balasinor, N H

    2015-06-01

    Maintenance of normal male fertility relies on the process of spermatogenesis which is under complex endocrine control by mechanisms involving gonadotropin and steroid hormones. Although testosterone is the primary sex steroid in males, estrogen is locally produced in the testis and plays a very crucial role in male fertility. This is evident from presence of both the estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) in the testis and their absence, as in the case of knockout mice models, leads to sterility. The present study was undertaken to understand individual roles of the two ERs in spermatogenesis and their direct contribution towards the maintenance of male fertility using receptor-subtype-specific ligands. Administration of ERα and β agonists to adult male rats for 60 days results in a significant decrease in fertility, mainly due to an increase in pre- and post-implantation loss and a concomitant decrease in litter size and sperm counts. Our results indicate that ERα is mainly involved in negative feedback regulation of gonadotropin hormones, whereas both ERs are involved in regulation of prolactin and testosterone production. Histological examinations of the testis reveal that ERβ could be involved in the process of spermiation since many failed spermatids were observed in stages IX-XI following ERβ agonist treatment. Our results indicate that overactivation of estrogen signaling through either of its receptors can have detrimental effects on the fertility parameters and that the two ERs have both overlapping and distinct roles in maintenance of male fertility. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. Molecular mechanism of ligand recognition by NR3 subtype glutamate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yongneng; Harrison, Chris B.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Schulten, Klaus; Mayer, Mark L. (UIUC); (NIH)

    2008-10-27

    NR3 subtype glutamate receptors have a unique developmental expression profile, but are the least well-characterized members of the NMDA receptor gene family, which have key roles in synaptic plasticity and brain development. Using ligand binding assays, crystallographic analysis, and all atom MD simulations, we investigate mechanisms underlying the binding by NR3A and NR3B of glycine and D-serine, which are candidate neurotransmitters for NMDA receptors containing NR3 subunits. The ligand binding domains of both NR3 subunits adopt a similar extent of domain closure as found in the corresponding NR1 complexes, but have a unique loop 1 structure distinct from that in all other glutamate receptor ion channels. Within their ligand binding pockets, NR3A and NR3B have strikingly different hydrogen bonding networks and solvent structures from those found in NR1, and fail to undergo a conformational rearrangement observed in NR1 upon binding the partial agonist ACPC. MD simulations revealed numerous interdomain contacts, which stabilize the agonist-bound closed-cleft conformation, and a novel twisting motion for the loop 1 helix that is unique in NR3 subunits.

  9. Does Subtype Matter? Assessing the Effects of Maltreatment on Functioning in Preadolescent Youth in Out-of-Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Christie L. M.; Friend, Angela; Garrido, Edward F.; Taussig, Heather N.; Culhane, Sara E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Attempts to understand the effects of maltreatment subtypes on childhood functioning are complicated by the fact that children often experience multiple subtypes. This study assessed the effects of maltreatment subtypes on the cognitive, academic, and mental health functioning of preadolescent youth in out-of-home care using both…

  10. Development of mesenchymal subtype gene signature for clinical application in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeeyun; Cristescu, Razvan; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Kyung; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Se Hoon; Kang, Won Ki

    2017-09-12

    Previously, in the Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) project, we defined four distinct molecular subtypes in gastric cancer (GC). Mesenchymal (microsatellite stable with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype, MSS/EMT) tumors showed the worst prognosis among all the subtypes. To develop a gene signature for predicting mesenchymal subtype GC, we conducted gene expression profiling using a NanoString assay in 70 ACRG specimens. The gene signature was validated in an independent set obtained from the prospective Adjuvant chemoRadioTherapy In Stomach Tumor (ARTIST) trial. The association between the mesenchymal subtype and survival was investigated. After cross-platform concordance test performed in 70 ACRG specimens, a 71-gene MSS/EMT signature was obtained. In the validation set, the gene signature predicted that 20 of 73 (27%) patients had mesenchymal tumors. Patients with mesenchymal subtype had diffuse GC, poorly-differentiated or signet ring cell carcinoma, and were microsatellite stable. The estimated hazard ratio for survival in patients with mesenchymal GC compared to those with non-mesenchymal tumors was 2.262 (95% confidence interval, 1.410 to 3.636; P=0.001). The survival difference remained significant when the subtypes were analyzed according to clinical prognostic parameters. This study suggested that the NanoString-based 71-gene signature for mesenchymal subtype is a strong predictor of the outcome in patients with GC.

  11. A magnetic resonance imaging study of adhesio interthalamica in clinical subtypes of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghir, Hossein; Mokhber, Naghmeh; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud-Reza; Haghighi, Mehri Baghban; Radmard, Mahla

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested subtle anatomical brain differences between patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. However, the results are inconsistent and there is no study investigating the various subtypes of this mental disorder separately. This study was conducted to compare the rate of absence of adhesio interthalamica (AI), a midline brain structure, between 3 subtypes of schizophrenia (paranoid, undifferentiated, and residual) and healthy control group, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 29 schizophrenia patients (21 men, 8 women) of three subtypes (paranoid, undifferentiated, and residual) were compared with 29 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent 3-D brain MRI of full coronal series, 1.5-mm slices without interslice gaps. If the grey matter band connecting the thalami could not be identified on two or more coronal adjacent slices, the AI was considered as absent. The results were statistically analyzed. The incidence rate of AI absence in patients with heterogenous subtypes of schizophrenia was was similar to control group, even when patients and controls of each gender were compared separately (P>0.05). In residual subtype, patients showed a significant priority in AI absence in comparison with the control group (P=0.041), which was not seen in paranoid and undifferentiated subtypes (P>0.05). Residual subtype of schizophrenia is associated with higher rate of AI absence in this study. Subsequent studies are required to determine if the absence of AI is a cause of residual schizophrenia or an effect.

  12. [Molecular subtyping of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in a post epidemic period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos R, Mayerling; Araya R, Pamela; Fernández R, Alda; Tognarelli, Javier; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández O, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has become one of the main agents causing food borne diseases worldwide. This agent is transmitted mainly by contaminated meat and poultry. To determine the genetic subtypes of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, circulating in Chile between 2001 and 2003, a post epidemic period. One hundred ninety three isolates coming from human samples, prepared foods and animal products for human consumption, were analyzed by pulsed field electrophoresis, using PulseNet standardized protocol. Thirteen subtypes of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis were identified, that had between 0 and 13 bands. A predominant subtype was identified in 172 strains (88%) that came from human isolates, prepared foods and animal products for human consumption. Other four subtypes, found in prepared foods and animal products for human consumption, were also found in human isolates. Most subtypes were tightly interrelated Subtypes II, VIII and XI were also found in the 1994 epidemic. Subtyping of bacterial strains by pulsed field electrophoresis is useful for the surveillance of food borne diseases.

  13. Tumor subtype-specific cancer-testis antigens as potential biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets for cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Caballero, Otavia L; Yung, W K Alfred; Weinstein, John N; Riggins, Gregory J; Strausberg, Robert L; Zhao, Qi

    2014-04-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are potential targets for cancer immunotherapy because of their restricted expression in immune-privileged germ cells and various malignancies. Current application of CT-based immunotherapy has been focused on CT expression-rich tumors such as melanoma and lung cancers. In this study, we surveyed CT expression using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets for ten common cancer types. We show that CT expression is specific and enriched within certain cancer molecular subtypes. For example, HORMAD1, CXorf61, ACTL8, and PRAME are highly enriched in the basal subtype of breast cancer; MAGE and CSAG are most frequently activated in the magnoid subtype of lung adenocarcinoma; and PRAME is highly upregulated in the ccB subtype of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Analysis of CT gene expression and DNA methylation indicates that some CTs are regulated epigenetically, whereas others are controlled primarily by tissue- and subtype-specific transcription factors. Our results suggest that although for some CT expression is associated with patient outcome, not many are independent prognostic markers. Thus, CTs with shared expression pattern are heterogeneous molecules with distinct activation modes and functional properties in different cancers and cancer subtypes. These data suggest a cancer subtype-orientated application of CT antigen as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets.

  14. Tissue-specific interferon alpha subtype response to SIV infection in brain, spleen, and lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Luna Alammar; Dery, Alicia; Leong, Wan Yee; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E

    2013-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is a type I interferon that plays a major role in host defense. There are 13 different IFNalpha genes in humans, but much of the work concerning their role in viral defense has been limited to studying either subtype 2 or pan IFNalpha due to the inability to distinguish between highly similar genetic and amino acid sequences. Because of recent advances in molecular and biochemical techniques, it is possible to study the regulation of individual subtypes. It has been reported that HIV/SIV infection results in impaired IFNalpha responses in certain tissues. Using a pigtailed macaque SIV model, we examined the subtype response during acute infection in 3 tissues that are known to be infected with HIV/SIV, but whose IFNalpha subtype response has not been extensively studied: the brain, spleen, and lung. We found that the expression and regulation of specific subtypes occur in a tissue-specific manner. There was more limited IFNalpha subtype expression in the lung and brain, where predominantly macrophages are infected compared to the spleen, which contains both infected CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages. Understanding the IFNalpha subtype response in tissues known to be infected with HIV/SIV can help tailor adjunctive treatment regimens to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  15. HIV-1 epidemiology and circulating subtypes in the countryside of South Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Sperotto Librelotto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has spread worldwide, with several subtypes and circulating recombinant forms. Brazil has an incidence of 20.5 HIV-1/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS patients per 100,000 inhabitants; however, the Southernmost State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS has more than twice the number of HIV-1-infected people (41.3/100,000 inhabitants and a different pattern of subtype frequencies, as previously reported in studies conducted in the capital (Porto Alegre and its metropolitan region. This study examined HIV-1/AIDS epidemiological and molecular aspects in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul. METHODS: Socio-demographic, clinical and risk behavioral characteristics were obtained from HIV-1-positive adult patients using a structured questionnaire. HIV-1 subtypes were determined by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing of the pol and env genes. RESULTS: The study sample included 149 (55% women patients with a mean age of 41.8 ± 11.9 years. Most (73.8% patients had a low education level and reported heterosexual practices as the most (91.9% probable transmission route. HIV-1 subtypes were detected in 26 patients: 18 (69.2% infected with subtype C, six (23.1% infected with subtype B and two (7.7% infected with BC recombinant forms. CONCLUSIONS: These data highlight the increasing number of HIV-1 subtype C infections in the countryside of South Brazil.

  16. HIV-1 epidemiology and circulating subtypes in the countryside of South Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librelotto, Carina Sperotto; Gräf, Tiago; Simon, Daniel; de Almeida, Sabrina Esteves Matos; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has spread worldwide, with several subtypes and circulating recombinant forms. Brazil has an incidence of 20.5 HIV-1/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients per 100,000 inhabitants; however, the Southernmost State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) has more than twice the number of HIV-1-infected people (41.3/100,000 inhabitants) and a different pattern of subtype frequencies, as previously reported in studies conducted in the capital (Porto Alegre) and its metropolitan region. This study examined HIV-1/AIDS epidemiological and molecular aspects in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul. Socio-demographic, clinical and risk behavioral characteristics were obtained from HIV-1-positive adult patients using a structured questionnaire. HIV-1 subtypes were determined by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the pol and env genes. The study sample included 149 (55% women) patients with a mean age of 41.8 ± 11.9 years. Most (73.8%) patients had a low education level and reported heterosexual practices as the most (91.9%) probable transmission route. HIV-1 subtypes were detected in 26 patients: 18 (69.2%) infected with subtype C, six (23.1%) infected with subtype B and two (7.7%) infected with BC recombinant forms. These data highlight the increasing number of HIV-1 subtype C infections in the countryside of South Brazil.

  17. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus subtypes 16 and 18 among Yemeni Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkarim; Bensumaidea, Saleh Hussein; Alshammari, Fawaz D; Alenazi, Fahaad Saleh H; ALmutlaq, Bassam Ahmed; Alturkstani, Majid Zannon; Aladani, Ihdaa Ali

    2017-06-25

    Background: The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a DNA tumor virus that causes epithelial proliferation. There are more than 100 HPV subtypes, of which 13 subtypes are regarded as high risk subtypes that can cause cancers of epithelial mucosal surfaces. High risk human papilloma viruses (HR-HPV) subtypes 16 and 18 plays a major role in the etiology of cervical cancer worldwide. Therefore, the aim of this study was to screen for the existence of HPV16 and HPV18 among Yemeni women with cervical lesions. Methodology: Formalin fixed paraffin wax processed tissue blocks were retrieved for 200 patients (150 were previously diagnosed with cervical cancer and the remaining 50 were diagnosed with different benign conditions). Results: Of the 200 cervical cancer tissue specimens, HR-HPV 16 was identified in 74/200 (37%) samples and couldn’t be recognized in 126/200(63%) tissue samples. HR-HPV 18 was identified in 32/200 (16%) specimens and couldn’t be recognized in 168/200(84%) tissue specimens. Conclusion: HR-HPV subtypes were prevalent among Yemeni women with cervical cancer, with significant increase of HR-HPV subtype 16 over the HR-HPV subtype 18. Creative Commons Attribution License

  18. Personality subtypes in male patients with eating disorder: validation of a classification approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Agüera, Zaida; Granero, Roser; Sánchez, Isabel; Menchón, Jose Manuel

    2012-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated personality subtypes and their correlates in a sample of 132 male patients with eating disorder (ED). All patients filled out the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised, the Eating Disorder Inventory-2, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Three personality subtypes emerged. Cluster 1, the adaptive-like subtype, was characterized by a high prevalence of eating-disorder-not-otherwise-specified and low levels of ED and general psychopathology. Cluster 2, the average or socially detached subtype, showed a high prevalence of eating-disorder-not-otherwise-specified, more social problems, less motivation for treatment, and an intermediate position on the psychopathology dimension between patients of clusters 1 and 3. Finally, cluster 3, the maladaptive subtype, was characterized the highest prevalence of bulimia nervosa and the highest scores on ED and general psychopathology. Our data support the presence of the 3 personality subtypes in male patients with ED. Future studies need to address whether patients of different subtypes differ with respect to therapy outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Subtype distribution of Blastocystis spp. isolated from children in Eskisehir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Nihal; Aydin, Merve; Tuzemen, Nazmiye Ulku; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Oguz, Ilkiz; Dogruman-Al, Funda

    2017-02-01

    Blastocystis spp. is the most common enteric protist found in human feces. The pathogenic role of Blastocystis remains controversial and it has been suggested that the symptomatology of Blastocystis is associated with its subtypes (ST). However, only few studies have investigated the relationship between the symptomatology and subtypes of Blastocystis in children. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of Blastocystis in children aged 3 to 13years with or without gastrointestinal complaints and determine the distribution of the subtypes of Blastocystis. A total of 303 stool samples obtained from symptomatic (n=84) and asymptomatic (n=219) children were included in the study. The presence of Blastocystis was investigated using native-lugol examination, trichrome staining and real-time PCR method. Using the real-time PCR method, 115 samples were found positive for Blastocystis. Subtyping was successfully performed on 46 samples using sequenced-tagged site (STS) primers and PCR. The remaining 69 samples could not be subtyped. The most frequently detected subtype was ST3 (43.4%) followed by ST1 (26.1%), ST4 (10.9%) and ST2 (8.7%). The mixed subtypes were identified in five samples (10.9%) as; ST1+ST3 (n=3), ST1+ST2 (n=1) and ST2+ST3 (n=1). None of the samples had ST5, ST6 or ST7. No statistically significant difference was found between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups in terms of the Blastocystis positivity and the distribution of subtypes (p>0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the subtype distribution of Blastocystis in children in Turkey and the results are in agreement with the related data available in Turkey. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Subtypes and phylogenetic analysis of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in Jayapura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Widiyanti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a retrovirus that infects human immune system. HIV is genetically differentiated into HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV- 1 is classified into 3 groups : M,N and O. M Group is divided into 9 subtypes, namely : A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J and K. HIV subtype mapping would become a good reference to study the epidemiology of HIV-1. HIV phylogenetic analysis required to understand virus origin, geographical distribution and tracking parameter of HIV transmission process in sample area. The objective of this study was to determine HIV-1 subtype distribution and the relationship between HIV-1 subtypes from with genBank HIV isolate based on envelope gene fragment. METHODS A cross setional design was conducted involving 36 subjects in Jayapura between January to March 2013. Blood samples were taken and analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, nested PCR and confirmed with sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis performed along 400 bp of envelope gene fragment. The data were analyzed with Bioedit ver.7 and MEGA 5.1. software. RESULT Two types of HIV-1 subtype were found in Jayapura Regency. CRF01_AE was confirmed in 31 patients (86.1% and subtype B in 5 patients (13.9%. Phylogenetic analysis showed phylogenetic relationship between CRF01_AE from jayapura with subtype from Singapore and Thailand, while subtype B from Jayapura were closely related with subtype from United States and United Kingdom CONCLUSION This study reflect the independent introduction of multiple HIV-1 strains into Papua, with the rapid spread in the majority of infected patients tested of single strain of HIV-1 (CRF01_AE.

  1. Genetic Alterations in the Molecular Subtypes of Bladder Cancer: Illustration in the Cancer Genome Atlas Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woonyoung; Ochoa, Andrea; McConkey, David J; Aine, Mattias; Höglund, Mattias; Kim, William Y; Real, Francisco X; Kiltie, Anne E; Milsom, Ian; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Lerner, Seth P

    2017-09-01

    Recent whole genome mRNA expression profiling studies revealed that bladder cancers can be grouped into molecular subtypes, some of which share clinical properties and gene expression patterns with the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer and the molecular subtypes found in other solid tumors. The molecular subtypes in other solid tumors are enriched with specific mutations and copy number aberrations that are thought to underlie their distinct progression patterns, and biological and clinical properties. The availability of comprehensive genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other large projects made it possible to correlate the presence of DNA alterations with tumor molecular subtype membership. Our overall goal was to determine whether specific DNA mutations and/or copy number variations are enriched in specific molecular subtypes. We used the complete TCGA RNA-seq dataset and three different published classifiers developed by our groups to assign TCGA's bladder cancers to molecular subtypes, and examined the prevalence of the most common DNA alterations within them. We interpreted the results against the background of what was known from the published literature about the prevalence of these alterations in nonmuscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancers. The results confirmed that alterations involving RB1 and NFE2L2 were enriched in basal cancers, whereas alterations involving FGFR3 and KDM6A were enriched in luminal tumors. The results further reinforce the conclusion that the molecular subtypes of bladder cancer are distinct disease entities with specific genetic alterations. Our observation showed that some of subtype-enriched mutations and copy number aberrations are clinically actionable, which has direct implications for the clinical management of patients with bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Familial aggregation and heritability of the melancholic and atypical subtypes of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Femke; Cui, Lihong; Hickie, Ian B; Roca, Catherine; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A; Merikangas, Kathleen R

    2016-11-01

    The heterogeneity of mood disorders has been a challenge to our understanding of their underlying biologic and genetic pathways. This report examines the specificity of the familial aggregation of atypical and melancholic subtypes of depression and their clinical correlates in a large community based family study of affective spectrum disorders. The sample includes 457 probands and their directly interviewed adult first degree relatives from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Family Study of Affective Spectrum Disorder. Depression subtypes were based on best estimate diagnoses using information from semi-structured diagnostic interviews by experienced clinical interviews and multiple family history reports. Atypical depression in probands was significantly associated with the atypical subtype of depression in relatives (OR 1.75 [95%CI 1.02-3.02], p=0.04), independent of proband and relative comorbid disorders. Melancholic depression in probands was not associated with melancholic depression in relatives (OR 1.25 [95%CI 0.62-2.55], p=.53). The familial heritability of the atypical subtype was 0.46 (95%CI 0.21-0.71), whereas that of the melancholic subtype was 0.33 (95%CI 0.21-0.45). Melancholic depression was associated with greater severity in terms of treatment, global functioning, suicide attempts, comorbid disorders, and an earlier age at onset of depression. The subsample of interviewed relatives necessary to assess specific subtypes of depression reduced the power to detect the specificity of mood disorder subtypes. The results indicate that the atypical subtype should be incorporated in future treatment, genetic and other etiologic studies of major depression. Findings further suggest that melancholic subtype may be an indicator of clinical severity of depression. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Clustering of HIV-1 Subtypes Based on gp120 V3 Loop electrostatic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López de Victoria Aliana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The V3 loop of the glycoprotein gp120 of HIV-1 plays an important role in viral entry into cells by utilizing as coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4, and is implicated in the phenotypic tropisms of HIV viruses. It has been hypothesized that the interaction between the V3 loop and CCR5 or CXCR4 is mediated by electrostatics. We have performed hierarchical clustering analysis of the spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials and charges of V3 loop structures containing consensus sequences of HIV-1 subtypes. Results Although the majority of consensus sequences have a net charge of +3, the spatial distribution of their electrostatic potentials and charges may be a discriminating factor for binding and infectivity. This is demonstrated by the formation of several small subclusters, within major clusters, which indicates common origin but distinct spatial details of electrostatic properties. Some of this information may be present, in a coarse manner, in clustering of sequences, but the spatial details are largely lost. We show the effect of ionic strength on clustering of electrostatic potentials, information that is not present in clustering of charges or sequences. We also make correlations between clustering of electrostatic potentials and net charge, coreceptor selectivity, global prevalence, and geographic distribution. Finally, we interpret coreceptor selectivity based on the N6X7T8|S8X9 sequence glycosylation motif, the specific positive charge location according to the 11/24/25 rule, and the overall charge and electrostatic potential distribution. Conclusions We propose that in addition to the sequence and the net charge of the V3 loop of each subtype, the spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials and charges may also be important factors for receptor recognition and binding and subsequent viral entry into cells. This implies that the overall electrostatic potential is responsible for long-range recognition of the V3

  4. Differential effects of safety behaviour subtypes in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasencia, M Leili; Alden, Lynn E; Taylor, Charles T

    2011-10-01

    Clinical observations indicate that individuals with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) use a variety of safety behaviours; however, virtually no research has examined the functional effect of different safety-seeking strategies. Accordingly, we conducted two studies to address this issue. Study 1 measured global patterns of safety behaviour use in a large analogue sample. Factor analysis revealed two primary safety behaviour categories, avoidance and impression management. Study 2 assessed situational use of safety behaviours during a controlled social interaction in a clinical sample of 93 patients with Generalised SAD. Factor analysis again revealed support for avoidance and impression-management subtypes. Notably, the two types of safety behaviours were associated with different social outcomes. Avoidance safety behaviours were associated with higher state anxiety during the interaction and negative reactions from participants' interaction partners. Impression-management strategies appeared to impede corrections in negative predictions about subsequent interactions. These findings suggest that it may be beneficial to consider the unique effects of different safety-seeking strategies when assessing and treating SAD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. T Cell Transcriptomes Describe Patient Subtypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean J Bradley

    Full Text Available T cells regulate the adaptive immune response and have altered function in autoimmunity. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE has great diversity of presentation and treatment response. Peripheral blood component gene expression affords an efficient platform to investigate SLE immune dysfunction and help guide diagnostic biomarker development for patient stratification.Gene expression in peripheral blood T cell samples for 14 SLE patients and 4 controls was analyzed by high depth sequencing. Unbiased clustering of genes and samples revealed novel patterns related to disease etiology. Functional annotation of these genes highlights pathways and protein domains involved in SLE manifestation.We found transcripts for hundreds of genes consistently altered in SLE T cell samples, for which DAVID analysis highlights induction of pathways related to mitochondria, nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication. Fewer genes had reduced mRNA expression, and these were linked to signaling, splicing and transcriptional activity. Gene signatures associated with the presence of dsDNA antibodies, low complement levels and nephritis were detected. T cell gene expression also indicates the presence of several patient subtypes, such as having only a minimal expression phenotype, male type, or severe with or without induction of genes related to membrane protein production.Unbiased transcriptome analysis of a peripheral blood component provides insight on autoimmune pathophysiology and patient variability. We present an open source workflow and richly annotated dataset to support investigation of T cell biology, develop biomarkers for patient stratification and perhaps help indicate a source of SLE immune dysfunction.

  6. Distinct Subtypes of Apathy Revealed by the Apathy Motivation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Yuen-Siang; Lockwood, Patricia; Apps, Matthew A J; Muhammed, Kinan; Husain, Masud

    2017-01-01

    Apathy is a debilitating but poorly understood disorder characterized by a reduction in motivation. As well as being associated with several brain disorders, apathy is also prevalent in varying degrees in healthy people. Whilst many tools have been developed to assess levels of apathy in clinical disorders, surprisingly there are no measures of apathy suitable for healthy people. Moreover, although apathy is commonly comorbid with symptoms of depression, anhedonia and fatigue, how and why these symptoms are associated is unclear. Here we developed the Apathy-Motivation Index (AMI), a brief self-report index of apathy and motivation. Using exploratory factor analysis (in a sample of 505 people), and then confirmatory analysis (in a different set of 479 individuals), we identified subtypes of apathy in behavioural, social and emotional domains. Latent profile analyses showed four different profiles of apathy that were associated with varying levels of depression, anhedonia and fatigue. The AMI is a novel and reliable measure of individual differences in apathy and might provide a useful means of probing different mechanisms underlying sub-clinical lack of motivation in otherwise healthy individuals. Moreover, associations between apathy and comorbid states may be reflective of problems in different emotional, social and behavioural domains.

  7. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  8. Subtypes of homicide offenders based on psychopathic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajevic, Marija; Batinic, Borjanka; Stevanovic, Nikola

    The aim of the present study was to explore the subtypes of offenders based on psychopathic traits in a sample of 127 adult homicide offenders (n=40.3% convicted of murder, n=32.6% convicted of aggravated murder, n=27.1% convicted of attempted murder). A two-step cluster analysis of the four factors of psychopathy yielded three clusters, which were then compared on the general dimensions of personality defined by the HEXACO model, intelligence, sadism and psychopathology variables conceptualized by the MMPI-202. Cluster 1 was characterized by moderate scores on psychopathy factors, Agreeableness and aggressiveness. Cluster 2 was a psychopathic-like group with the highest scores on psychopathy factors, sadism, aggressiveness and paranoia, and with the lowest scores on Emotionality and Agreeableness. Cluster 3 was a non-psychopathic group with the lowest scores on psychopathy factors and aggressiveness, and with the highest scores on Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility. There were no significant differences between the clusters on intelligence, Openness to experience, Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and a number of psychopathological variables, including depression and anxiety. Present findings did not provide support for the distinction between primary and secondary psychopathy. The current study further contributes to the person-oriented research of psychopathy by emphasizing the differences between the individuals with high, moderate and low psychopathic traits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in the rat ventricular muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinami, J; Tsuchihashi, H; Baba, S; Mano, F; Maruyama, K; Nagatomo, T

    1992-02-01

    Scatchard analyses of [3H]prazosin binding in rat ventricular muscle membranes showed biphasic curves, which identified alpha 1High- and alpha 1Low-affinity sites. The alpha 1High-affinity site was completely inhibited by 1 microM phenoxybenzamine. The displacement potencies of alpha 1-adrenergic antagonists were characterized by [3H]prazosin binding to alpha 1High- and alpha 1Low-affinity sites in the absence and presence of 1 microM phenoxybenzamine. The affinities of most chemicals for alpha 1Low-affinity sites were significantly lower than those for alpha 1High-affinity sites, but WB-4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxy-phenoxyethyl)aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane), arotinolol, cinanserin, nifedipine, and p-aminoclonidine had the same affinities for both alpha 1Low- and alpha 1High-affinity sites. These results show that two alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes, alpha 1High- and alpha 1Low-affinity, are present in the rat heart, and that there are physical variations in alpha 1-adrenoceptor binding sites, based on their selectivity to antagonists.

  10. Oxidatively Modified Proteins in the Serous Subtype of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifeh Mehrabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous subtype of ovarian cancer is considered to originate from fallopian epithelium mucosa that has been exposed to physiological changes resulting from ovulation. Ovulation influences an increased in inflammation of epithelial ovarian cells as results of constant exposure of cells to ROS. The imbalance between ROS and antioxidant capacities, as well as a disruption of redox signaling, causes a wide range of damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids. This study applied spectrophotometric, dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNPH assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and Western blot analyses to assess the levels of oxidatively modified proteins in 100 primary serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma and normal/surrounding tissues. These samples were obtained from 56 Caucasian and 44 African-American patients within the age range of 61±10 years. Analyses showed that the levels of reactive protein carbonyl groups increased as stages progressed to malignancy. Additionally, the levels of protein carbonyls in serous ovarian carcinoma among African Americans are 40% (P<0.05 higher relative to Caucasian at similar advanced stages. Results suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the modification of carbonyl protein groups, leading to increased aggressiveness of epithelial ovarian tumors and may contribute to the disease's invasiveness among African Americans.

  11. Bilateral Vestibular Hypofunction: Insights in Etiologies, Clinical Subtypes, and Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucieer, F; Vonk, P; Guinand, N; Stokroos, R; Kingma, H; van de Berg, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the different etiologies and clinical subtypes of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) and the value of diagnostic tools in the diagnostic process of BVH. A retrospective case review was performed on 154 patients diagnosed with BVH in a tertiary referral center, between 2013 and 2015. Inclusion criteria comprised (1) imbalance and/or oscillopsia during locomotion and (2) summated slow phase velocity of nystagmus of less than 20°/s during bithermal caloric tests. The definite etiology of BVH was determined in 47% of the cases and the probable etiology in 22%. In 31%, the etiology of BVH remained idiopathic. BVH resulted from more than 20 different etiologies. In the idiopathic group, the percentage of migraine was significantly higher compared to the non-idiopathic group (50 versus 11%, p development of BVH. The distribution of etiologies of BVH probably depends on the clinical setting. In the diagnostic process of BVH, the routine use of some blood tests can be reconsidered and a low-threshold use of audiometry and cerebral imaging is advised. The torsion swing test is not the "gold standard" for diagnosing BVH due to its lack of sensitivity. Future diagnostic criteria of BVH should consist of standardized vestibular tests combined with a history that is congruent with the vestibular findings.

  12. Subtyping Ageism: Policy Issues in Succession and Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Michael S.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    Ageism research tends to lump “older people” together as one group, as do policy matters that conceptualize everyone over-65 as “senior.” This approach is problematic primarily because it often fails to represent accurately a rapidly growing, diverse, and healthy older population. In light of this, we review the ageism literature, emphasizing the importance of distinguishing between the still-active “young-old” and the potentially more impaired “old-old” (Neugarten, 1974). We argue that ageism theory has disproportionately focused on the old-old and differentiate the forms of age discrimination that apparently target each elder subgroup. In particular, we highlight the young-old’s plights predominantly in the workplace and tensions concerning succession of desirable resources; by contrast, old-old predicaments likely center on consumption of shared resources outside of the workplace. For both social psychological researchers and policymakers, accurately subtyping ageism will help society best accommodate a burgeoning, diverse older population. PMID:24523829

  13. Pattern of Local Recurrence and Distant Metastasis in Breast Cancer By Molecular Subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingrao; Baig, Ayesha; Kasymjanova, Goulnar; Kafi, Kamran; Holcroft, Christina; Mekouar, Hind; Carbonneau, Annie; Bahoric, Boris; Sultanem, Khalil; Muanza, Thierry

    2016-12-09

     No longer considered a single disease entity, breast cancer is being classified into several distinct molecular subtypes based on gene expression profiling. These subtypes appear to carry prognostic implications and have the potential to be incorporated into treatment decisions. In this study, we evaluated patterns of local recurrence (LR), distant metastasis (DM), and association of survival with molecular subtype in breast cancer patients in the post-adjuvant radiotherapy setting.  The medical records of 1,088 consecutive, non-metastatic breast cancer patients treated at a single institution between 2004 and 2012 were reviewed. Estrogen/progesterone receptors (ER/PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) enrichment were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Patients were categorized into one of four subtypes: luminal-A (LA; ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade 1-2), luminal-B (LB; ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade > 2), HER2 over-expression (HER2; ER/PR-, HER2+), and triple negative (TN; ER/PR-, HER2-).  Results: The median follow-up time was 6.9 years. During the follow-up, 16% (174/1,088) of patients failed initial treatment and developed either LR (48) or DM (126). The prevalence of LR was the highest in TN (12%) and the lowest in LA (2%). Breast or chest wall relapse was the most frequent site (≈80%) of recurrence in LA, LB, and HER2 subtypes, whereas the regional lymph nodes and chest wall were the common sites of relapse in the TN group (50.0%). DM rates were 6.4% in LA, 12.1% in LB, 19.2% in HER2, and 27.4% in TN subgroups. Five-year survival rates were 84%, 83%, 84%, and 77% in the LA, LB, HER2 and TN subgroups, respectively. There was a statistically significant association between survival and molecular subtypes in an univariate analysis. In the adjusted multivariate analysis, the following variables were independent prognostic factors for survival: T stage, N stage, and molecular subtype.  Of the four subtypes, the LA subtype tends to have the best prognosis

  14. Subtype-specific reduction of olfactory bulb interneurons in Pax6 heterozygous mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Hasumi; Nomura, Tadashi; Suto, Fumikazu; Osumi, Noriko

    2009-09-01

    Interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) play essential roles in the processing of olfactory information. They are classified into several subpopulations by the expression of different neurochemical markers. Here we focused on a transcription factor Pax6, and examined its expression and function in distinct subtypes of OB interneurons. We identified Pax6 expression in specific subtypes of interneurons in the external plexiform layer (EPL). The number of these interneuron subtypes was dramatically decreased in Pax6 heterozygous mutant mice. These results indicate that Pax6 is required for differentiation and/or maintenance of EPL interneurons in the adult mouse OB.

  15. Neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 subtype B' clinical isolates from former plasma donors in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OuYang, Yabo; Sun, Jianping; Huang, Yang; Lu, Lu; Xu, Weisi; Hu, Xintao; Hong, Kunxue; Jiang, Shibo; Shao, Yiming; Ma, Liying

    2013-01-05

    HIV-1 subtype B' isolates have been predominantly circulating in China. Their intra- and inter-subtype neutralization sensitivity to autologous and heterologous plasmas has not been well studied. Twelve HIV-1 B' clinical isolates obtained from patients were tested for their intra- and inter-subtype neutralization sensitivity to the neutralization antibodies in the plasmas from patients infected by HIV-1 B' and CRF07_BC subtypes, respectively. We found that the plasmas from the HIV-1 B'-infected patients could potently neutralize heterologous viruses of subtype B' with mean ID50 titer (1/x) of about 67, but they were not effective in neutralizing autologous viruses of subtype B' with mean ID50 titer (1/x) of about 8. The plasmas from HIV-1 CRF07_BC-infected patients exhibited weak inter-subtype neutralization activity against subtype B' viruses with ID50 titer (1/x) is about 22. The neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 B' isolates was inversely correlated with the neutralizing activity of plasmas from HIV-1 B'-infected patients (Spearman's r = -0.657, P = 0.020), and with the number of potential N-glycosylation site (PNGS) in V1-V5 region (Spearman's r = -0.493, P = 0.034), but positively correlated with the viral load (Spearman's r = 0.629, P = 0.028). It had no correlation with the length of V1-V5 regions or the CD4+ T cell count. Virus AH259V has low intra-subtype neutralization sensitivity, it can be neutralized by 17b (IC50: 10μg/ml) and 447-52D (IC50: 1.6μg/ml), and the neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in plasma AH259P are effective in neutralizing infection by the primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes with ID50 titers (1/x) in the range of 32-396. These findings suggest that the HIV-1 subtype B' viruses may mutate under the immune pressure, thus becoming resistant to the autologous nAbs, possibly by changing the number of PNGS in the V1-V5 region of the viral gp120. Some of primary HIV-1 isolates are able to induce both intra- and inter-subtype cross

  16. Report of a Novel Case of Anaplastic Olfactory Groove Meningioma and Its Methylation Subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Aaron Song Chuan; Tan, Dominic Ti Ming; Tan, Char Loo; Sahm, Felix; von Deimling, Andreas; Yeo, Tseng Tsai

    2017-10-16

    We report a novel case of a World Health Organization grade 3 anaplastic meningioma arising from the olfactory groove in an 83-year-old woman. Molecular and methylation profiling confirm this lesion to be an NF2 subtype, methylation class intermediate type B meningioma. As most meningiomas in this location are indolent SMO subtype lesions, our report suggests that even though rare, aggressive NF2 subtype meningiomas can also occur along the midline anterior skull base. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Siberian subtype tick-borne encephalitis virus in Ixodes ricinus in a newly emerged focus, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Anu; Tonteri, Elina; Pieninkeroinen, Ilkka; Sironen, Tarja; Voutilainen, Liina; Kuusi, Markku; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-02-01

    The first tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) cases in Kotka, Finland appeared in 2010. Altogether ten human cases have been diagnosed by 2014. Four had long-lasting sequelae. We collected 195 Ixodes ricinus ticks, nine rodents, and eleven shrews from the archipelago of Kotka in 2011. Three Siberian subtype TBE virus (TBEV) strains were isolated from the ticks and three mammals were positive for TBEV antibodies. The archipelago of Kotka is a newly emerged TBE focus of Siberian subtype TBEV circulating notably in I. ricinus. The patients had on average longer hospitalization than reported for the European subtype infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards a brief definition of burnout syndrome by subtypes: Development of the "Burnout Clinical Subtypes Questionnaire" (BCSQ-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gili Margarita

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout has traditionally been described by means of the dimensions of exhaustion, cynicism and lack of eficacy from the "Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey" (MBI-GS. The "Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire" (BCSQ-12, comprising the dimensions of overload, lack of development and neglect, is proposed as a brief means of identifying the different ways this disorder is manifested. The aim of the study is to test the construct and criterial validity of the BCSQ-12. Method A cross-sectional design was used on a multi-occupational sample of randomly selected university employees (n = 826. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA was performed on half of the sample using the maximum likelihood (ML method with varimax orthogonal rotation, while confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was performed on the other half by means of the ML method. ROC curve analysis was preformed in order to assess the discriminatory capacity of BCSQ-12 when compared to MBI-GS. Cut-off points were proposed for the BCSQ-12 that optimized sensitivity and specificity. Multivariate binary logistic regression models were used to estimate effect size as an odds ratio (OR adjusted for sociodemographic and occupational variables. Contrasts for sex and occupation were made using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskall-Wallis tests on the dimensions of both models. Results EFA offered a solution containing 3 factors with eigenvalues > 1, explaining 73.22% of variance. CFA presented the following indices: χ2 = 112.04 (p 2/gl = 2.44, GFI = 0.958, AGFI = 0.929, RMSEA = 0.059, SRMR = 0.057, NFI = 0.958, NNFI = 0.963, IFI = 0.975, CFI = 0.974. The area under the ROC curve for 'overload' with respect to the 'exhaustion' was = 0.75 (95% CI = 0.71-0.79; it was = 0.80 (95% CI = 0.76-0.86 for 'lack of development' with respect to 'cynicism' and = 0.74 (95% CI = 0.70-0.78 for 'neglect' with respect to 'inefficacy'. The presence of 'overload' increased the likelihood of suffering from

  19. Unconvincing diagnosis of a rare subtype of primary gastric lymphoma with incongruent endoscopic presentation: a case of gastric schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, In Ho

    2013-12-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma is a rare gastric malignancy. Its diagnostic process is complex. Clinician may find initial diagnosis of primary gastric lymphoma unreliable, especially when it indicates the rarest subtype of gastric lymphoma, while its initial endoscopic presentation fails to raise the slightest suspicion of primary gastric lymphoma. A 53-year-old Korean man was diagnosed, by endoscopic examination, with a round submucosal tumor of the stomach. Deep endoscopic biopsy, however, confirmed CD5 positive gastric lymphoma. Surgical treatment was performed for diagnosis and treatment. Postoperative histo-logical examination confirmed gastric schwannoma. Gastric schwannoma is a spindle cell tumor, characterized by a peripheral cuff-like lymphocytic infiltration. Deep endoscopic biopsy may have been misdirected to the peripheral lymphoid cuff, failing to acquire spindle cells. The literature has been reviewed, and options for diagnostic accuracy have been suggested.

  20. A family inheriting different subtypes of acute myelogenous leukemia identifies a gene common to the differentation of multiple hematopoetic lineages and acting early in leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, M.S.; Radich, J. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Sabath, D.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The initial steps promoting carcinogenesis in the hematologic malignancies remain poorly understood. We report on a family with an incompletely penetrant, autosomal dominant syndrome of acute myelogenous leukemia, affecting at least eight adults from three generations. The affected individuals have developed leukemias differing in morphologic subtype, tumor cytogenetics, and abruptness of presentation. Within this family are found subtypes affecting the granulocytic, monocytic, and megakaryocytic lineages. At least one individual has a normal tumor karyotype while another has complex rearrangements including monsomy 7, trisomy 8 and translocation 1;7. Some have presented with acute onset and others with a protracted myelodysplasia syndrome. One person at fifty percent risk of inheriting this gene developed disseminated atypical mycobacterium infection in the absence of leukemia, but also without apparent causes for acquired deficiencies in cellular immunity. Features common to affected family members, including the individual with mycobacterium infection, are the early presence in bone marrow of red cell and platelet maturation defects. A search for mutations in diseased marrows fails to detect abnormalities of p53 exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 or N-ras codons 12, 13 and 61. We conclude that there is a gene in this family that probably acts early in hematopoetic differentiation and confers susceptibility to a wide range of leukemia subtypes spanning the maturation of the myeloid series.

  1. HIV subtype is not associated with dementia among individuals with moderate and advanced immunosuppression in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacktor, Ned; Nakasujja, Noeline; Redd, Andrew D; Manucci, Jordyn; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Wendel, Sarah K; Porcella, Stephen F; Martens, Craig; Bruno, Daniel; Skolasky, Richard L; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Robertson, Kevin; Musisi, Seggane; Katabira, Elly; Quinn, Thomas C

    2014-06-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are a common neurological manifestation of HIV infection. A previous study suggested that HIV dementia may be more common among patients with subtype D virus than among those with subtype A virus among HIV+ individuals with advanced immunosuppression. We conducted a study to evaluate the frequency of HIV dementia, and the association of HIV dementia with HIV subtype and compartmentalization among HIV+ individuals with moderate and advanced immunosuppression (CD4 lymphocyte count >150 cells/μL and Uganda. HIV+ individuals received neurological, neuropsychological testing, and functional assessments, and gag and gp41 regions were subtyped. Subjects were considered infected with a specific subtype if both regions analyzed were from the same subtype. 41% of the HIV+ individuals had HIV dementia (mean CD4 lymphocyte count = 233 cells/μL). 67 individuals had subtype A, 25 individuals had subtype D, 24 individuals were classified as A/D recombinants, and one individual had subtype C. There was no difference in the frequency of HIV dementia when stratified by HIV subtype A and D and no association with compartmentalization between the cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood. These results suggest that HIV dementia is common in HIV+ individuals in Uganda. There was no association between HIV subtype and dementia among HIV+ individuals with moderate and advanced immunosuppression. Future studies should be performed to confirm these results.

  2. Interpersonal Subtypes of Anxiety Disorder Patients: Relationship to Assessment and Treatment Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Seth R; Hilsenroth, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    We attempted to replicate earlier findings of interpersonal subtypes in patients with anxiety disorder (Psychotherapy. 2011;48:304-310) and examine whether these subtypes are characterized by different types of pathology and respond differently to treatment. Interpersonal problems were measured by the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Manual. San Antonio, TX: Psychological Cooperation; 2000) in a sample of 31 patients with anxiety disorder. Results demonstrated the existence of 4 interpersonal subtypes. The subtypes did not differ in severity of anxiety and global levels of symptoms at pretreatment or in Reliable Change Index of anxiety symptoms over the course of treatment. However, they were significantly different in terms of overall interpersonal problems (p = 0.004). Regarding treatment variables, half of the patients in the nonassertive cluster discontinued treatment prematurely. The number of psychotherapy sessions attended was significantly different across the 4 clusters (p = 0.04), with socially avoidant patients attending significantly greater number of sessions.

  3. Distinguishing subtypes of extrinsic motivation among people with mild to borderline intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frielink, N.; Schuengel, C.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.

    Background According to self-determination theory, motivation is ordered in types, including amotivation, extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. Self-determination theory defines four subtypes of extrinsic motivation: external motivation, introjected motivation, identified motivation and

  4. Birth weight and the risk of histological subtypes of ovarian and endometrial cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trabert, Britton; Aarestrup, Julie; Ulrich, Lian G

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of birth weight associations with ovarian and endometrial cancer risks are limited with inconsistent results, and none has evaluated associations by histologic subtype. We utilized prospectively collected birth weight information to investigate the association with risk of ova...

  5. Variation of types of alcoholism: review and subtypes identified in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Lu, Ru-Band

    2014-01-03

    Alcoholism, as it has been hypothesized, is caused by a highly heterogeneous genetic load. Since 1960, many reports have used the bio-psycho-social approach to subtype alcoholism; however, no subtypes have been genetically validated. We reviewed and compared the major single-gene, multiple-gene, and gene-to-gene interaction studies on alcoholism published during the past quarter-century, including many recent studies that have made contributions to the subtyping of alcoholism. Four subtypes of alcoholism have been reported: [1] pure alcoholism, [2] anxiety/depression alcoholism, [3] antisocial alcoholism, and [4] mixed alcoholism. Most of the important studies focused on three genes: DRD2, MAOA, and ALDH2. Therefore, our review focuses on these three genes. © 2013.

  6. DNA methylation-based subtype prediction for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordlund, Jessica; Bäcklin, Christofer L; Zachariadis, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a method that utilizes DNA methylation profiling for prediction of the cytogenetic subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells from pediatric ALL patients. The primary aim of our study was to improve risk stratification of ALL patients into treatment groups using DNA...... methylation as a complement to current diagnostic methods. A secondary aim was to gain insight into the functional role of DNA methylation in ALL. RESULTS: We used the methylation status of ~450,000 CpG sites in 546 well-characterized patients with T-ALL or seven recurrent B-cell precursor ALL subtypes...... methylation classification to screen for subtype membership of 210 patients with undefined karyotype (normal or no result) or non-recurrent cytogenetic aberrations ('other' subtype). Nearly half (n = 106) of the patients lacking cytogenetic subgrouping displayed highly similar methylation profiles...

  7. Data-driven subtypes of major depressive disorder : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loo, Hanna M.; de Jonge, Peter; Romeijn, Jan-Willem; Kessler, Ronald C.; Schoevers, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: According to current classification systems, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may have very different combinations of symptoms. This symptomatic diversity hinders the progress of research into the causal mechanisms and treatment allocation. Theoretically founded subtypes of

  8. Age, dyslexia subtype and comorbidity modulate rapid auditory processing in developmental dyslexia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Cantiani, Chiara; Molteni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    .... Following the hypothesis that the heterogeneity of the dyslexic population may have led to contrasting results, the aim of the study was to define the effect of age, dyslexia subtype and comorbidity...

  9. Serum testosterone levels and symptom-based depression subtypes in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eRodgers

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this preliminary study was to further clarify the association between T levels and depression by investigating symptom-based depression subtypes in a sample of 64 men. The data was taken from the ZInEP epidemiology survey. Gonadal hormones of a melancholic (n=25 and an atypical (n=14 depression subtype, derived from latent class analysis, were compared with those of healthy controls (n=18. Serum T was assayed using an ELISA procedure. Analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, non-parametrical tests and generalized linear regression models were performed to examine group differences. The atypical depressive subtype showed significantly lower T levels compared with the melancholic depressives. While accumulative evidence indicates that, beyond psychosocial characteristics, the melancholic and atypical depressive subtypes are also distinguishable by biological correlates, the current study expanded this knowledge to include gonadal hormones. Further longitudinal research is warranted to disclose causality by linking the multiple processes in pathogenesis of depression.

  10. Practical and Robust Identification of Molecular Subtypes in Colorectal Cancer by Immunohistochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trinh, A.; Trumpi, K.; Sousa, E.M.F. De; Wang, X.; Jong, J.H.A.L. de; Fessler, E.; Kuppen, P.J.; Reimers, M.S.; Swets, M.; Koopman, M.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Jansen, M.; Hooijer, G.K.J.; Offerhaus, G.J.; Kranenburg, O.; Punt, C.J.A.; Medema, J.P.; Markowetz, F.; Vermeulen, L.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recent transcriptomic analyses have identified four distinct molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer with evident clinical relevance. However, the requirement for sufficient quantities of bulk tumor and difficulties in obtaining high-quality genome-wide transcriptome data from

  11. Exhaled air molecular profiling in relation to inflammatory subtype and activity in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fens, N.; de Nijs, S. B.; Peters, S.; Dekker, T.; Knobel, H. H.; Vink, T. J.; Willard, N. P.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Krouwels, F. H.; Janssen, H.-G.; Lutter, R.; Sterk, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predictive for responses to inhaled steroids. We hypothesised that the inflammatory subtype in mild and moderate COPD can be assessed by exhaled breath metabolomics. Exhaled compounds were analysed using gas chromatography

  12. Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors by Histologic Subtype : An Analysis From the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Poole, Elizabeth M; Trabert, Britton; White, Emily; Arslan, Alan A; Patel, Alpa V; Setiawan, V Wendy; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans-Olov; Black, Amanda; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A; Buring, Julie; Butler, Lesley M; Chamosa, Saioa; Clendenen, Tess V; Dossus, Laure; Fortner, Renee; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Gram, Inger T; Hartge, Patricia; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Idahl, Annika; Jones, Michael; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kirsh, Victoria; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lacey, James V; Lee, I-Min; Lundin, Eva; Merritt, Melissa A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peters, Ulrike; Poynter, Jenny N; Rinaldi, Sabina; Robien, Kim; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P; Schairer, Catherine; Schouten, Leo J; Sjöholm, Louise K; Sieri, Sabina; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tjonneland, Anna; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; van den Brandt, Piet A; Wilkens, Lynne; Wolk, Alicja; Yang, Hannah P; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S

    PURPOSE: An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer is important for improving prevention, early detection, and therapeutic approaches. We evaluated 14 hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors by histologic subtype in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). PATIENTS

  13. Substance Use Disorders and Suicide Attempts in Bipolar Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublette, M. Elizabeth; Carballo, Juan J.; Moreno, Carmen; Galfalvy, Hanga C.; Brent, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Mann, J. John; Oquendo, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    1. Abstract Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with high rates of suicide attempt and completion. Substance use disorders (SUD) have been identified as potent risk factors for suicidal behavior in BD. However, little is known concerning differences between BD subtypes with regard to SUD as a risk factor for suicidal behavior. We studied previous suicidal behavior in adults with a major depressive episode in context of BD type I (BD-I; N=96) or BD type II (BD-II; N=42), with and without history of SUD. Logistic regressions assessed the association between SUD and suicide attempt history by BD type, and exploratory analyses examined the effects of other clinical characteristics on these relationships. SUD were associated with suicide attempt in BD-I but not BD-II, an effect not attributable to sample size differences. The higher suicide attempt rate associated with alcoholism in BD-I was mostly explained by higher aggression scores, and earlier age of BD onset increased the likelihood that alcohol use disorder would be associated with suicide attempt(s). The higher suicide attempt rate associated with other drug use disorders in BD-I was collectively explained by higher impulsivity, hostility, and aggression scores. The presence of both alcohol and drug use disorders increased odds of a history of suicide attempt in a multiplicative fashion: 97% of BD-I who had both comorbid drug and alcohol use disorders had made a suicide attempt. A critical next question is how to target SUD and aggressive traits for prevention of suicidal behavior in BD-I. PMID:18590916

  14. SGA subtypes and mortality risk among singleton births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Sibylle; Salihu, Hamisu M; Keith, Louis G; Kirby, Russell S; Fowler, Karen B; Pass, Mary Ann B

    2007-02-01

    To determine whether early mortality (first year of life) risks among small for gestational age (SGA) neonates were similar regardless of SGA subtype based on three chronological classifications (term, preterm and post-term). Retrospective cohort study on all singleton live births in the United States from 1995 to 1999 inclusive. Adjusted risk estimates were computed from logistic regression models using non-SGA infants as the referent. When SGA infants were compared as a homogeneous entity to non-SGA infants, the risks for infant, neonatal and post-neonatal mortality were significantly greater in SGA infants [AOR (adjusted odds ratio)=3.0, 95% CI (confidence interval)=2.9-3.0 for infant mortality; AOR=3.2, 95% CI=3.1-3.2 for neonatal mortality; and AOR=2.6, 95% CI=2.6-2.7 for post-neonatal mortality]. However, heterogeneity existed in terms of mortality risk thresholds across SGA babies. The most remarkable risk magnitude was observed among preterm SGA infants [infant mortality AOR=13.8, 95% CI=13.6-14.1; neonatal death AOR=17.4, 95% CI=17.0-17.7; and post-neonatal death AOR=7.4, 95% CI=7.1-7.6]. The adjusted odds ratio for term and post-term SGA infants were comparable regardless of the period during infancy, and were much less than those observed for preterm SGA infants. SGA is a heterogeneous disease in terms of prognosis for survival. Preterm SGA infants bear an extremely high risk for mortality during infancy, and counseling of affected parents should reflect this risk divergence.

  15. Ocular disorders in children with spastic subtype of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Yaman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To document common ocular abnormalities in children with spastic subtype of cerebral palsy (CP and to find out whether any correlation exists between their occurance and etiologic factors. METHODS: Totally 194 patients with the diagnosis of spastic type CP were enrolled in this retrospective study. Detailed ophthalmic examinations were performed. Demographic data and neuroradiological findings were documented. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney U, Pearson Chi-square tests and Student’s t tests were used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mean age was 64.7±44.2 months on the first ophthalmic examination. Prevalences of diplegia (47.4% and tetraplegia (36.1% were found to be higher than the frequency of hemiplegia (16.5% in our study population. Etiologic factor was asphyxia in 60.8% of the patients. Abnormal ocular findings were present in 78.9% of the patients. Statistically significant poor vision was detected in tetraplegia group among all the spastic ubtypes of CP (P=0.000. Anisometropia and significant refractive error were found in 14.4% and 70.1% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-six children (18.6% had nystagmus and 107 children (55.2% had strabismus. Lower gestational age and birth weight were statistically higher in patients with esotropia than exotropia (P=0.009 and P=0.024, respectively. Abnormal morphology of the optic disc was present in 152 eyes (39.2%. Severe periventricular leukomalacia (PVL was found in 48 patients and statistically significant poor vision was detected in the presence of PVL (P=0.000. CONCLUSION: Spastic diplegic or tetraplegic CP patients with positive neuroradiological symptoms, younger gestational age and lower birth weight ought to have detailed ophthalmic examinations as early as possible to provide best visual rehabilitation.

  16. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the CPu and SNR.

  17. The prevalence of dementia subtypes in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddick, Stella-Maria; Longdon, Anna; Kisoli, Aloyce; Gray, William K; Dotchin, Catherine L; Jusabani, Ahmed; Iqbal, Ahmed; Hughes, Julian; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Chaote, Paul; Walker, Richard W

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of dementia is predicted to increase rapidly in developing countries. Vascular risk factors may contribute to this rise. Our aim was to estimate the proportions of Alzheimer's disease (ADD) and vascular dementia (VAD) in a prevalent cohort of dementia cases in rural Tanzania. A two-stage door-to-door dementia prevalence study. Hai district, Tanzania In Phase I, the Community Screening Instrument for Dementia (CSI-D) was used to screen 1198 community-dwelling people for dementia. In Phase II, 168/184 (91.3%) of those with poor performance, 56/104 (53.8%) of those with intermediate performance and 72/910 (7.9%) of those with good performance on CSI-D were interviewed and diagnoses were made using the DSM-IV criteria. For subtype diagnosis, DSM-IV dementia criteria plus NINCDS-ADRDA criteria were used for ADD and NINDS-AIREN criteria for VAD. Other dementias were diagnosed by international consensus criteria. Diagnoses were confirmed or excluded by computerised tomography where clinically appropriate. Of 78 dementia cases, 38 (48.7%) were ADD and 32 (41.0%) were VAD. The crude prevalence of ADD was 3.7% (95% CI 2.5 to 4.9) and of VAD was 2.9% (95% CI 1.9 to 3.9). The age-adjusted prevalence was 3.0% (95% CI 1.8 to 4.2) for ADD and 2.6% (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6) for VAD. A previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was independently associated with greater odds of having VAD than ADD. VAD accounted for a greater proportion of dementia cases than expected. Further investigation and treatment of risk factors is required in this setting. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Evolutionary Analysis of HIV-1 Pol Proteins Reveals Representative Residues for Viral Subtype Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Nagata

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses have been used as model systems to understand the patterns and processes of molecular evolution because they have high mutation rates and are genetically diverse. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1, the etiological agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, is highly genetically diverse, and is classified into several groups and subtypes. However, it has been difficult to use its diverse sequences to establish the overall phylogenetic relationships of different strains or the trends in sequence conservation with the construction of phylogenetic trees. Our aims were to systematically characterize HIV-1 subtype evolution and to identify the regions responsible for HIV-1 subtype differentiation at the amino acid level in the Pol protein, which is often used to classify the HIV-1 subtypes. In this study, we systematically characterized the mutation sites in 2,052 Pol proteins from HIV-1 group M (144 subtype A; 1,528 subtype B; 380 subtype C, using sequence similarity networks. We also used spectral clustering to group the sequences based on the network graph structures. A stepwise analysis of the cluster hierarchies allowed us to estimate a possible evolutionary pathway for the Pol proteins. The subtype A sequences also clustered according to when and where the viruses were isolated, whereas both the subtype B and C sequences remained as single clusters. Because the Pol protein has several functional domains, we identified the regions that are discriminative by comparing the structures of the domain-based networks. Our results suggest that sequence changes in the RNase H domain and the reverse transcriptase (RT connection domain are responsible for the subtype classification. By analyzing the different amino acid compositions at each site in both domain sequences, we found that a few specific amino acid residues (i.e., M357 in the RT connection domain and Q480, Y483, and L491 in the RNase H domain represent the differences among

  19. Mood state sub-types in adults who stutter: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Yvonne; Blumgart, Elaine; Craig, Ashley

    2017-10-28

    Many adults who stutter have elevated negative mood states like anxiety and depressive mood. Little is known about how mood states change over time. The purpose of this study was to determine the trajectories or sub-types of mood states in adults who stutter over a 6 month period, and establish factors that contribute to these sub-types. Participants included 129 adults who stutter who completed an assessment regimen at baseline, including a measure of mood states (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised). Three mood states were assessed (interpersonal sensitivity or IS, depressive mood and anxiety) once a month over 6 months. Latent class growth mixture modeling was used to establish trajectories of change in these mood states over time. Logistic regression was then used to determine factors assessed at baseline that contribute to the IS trajectories. Three-class trajectory models were accepted as the best fit for IS, depressive mood and anxiety mood sub-types. Stable and normal mood state sub-types were found, incorporating around 60% of participants. Up to 40% belonged to sub-types comprising elevated levels of negative mood states. The logistic regression was conducted only with the IS domain, and revealed four factors that significantly contributed to IS mood sub-types. Those with low perceived control, low vitality, elevated social fears and being female were more likely to belong to elevated IS classes. This research revealed mood sub-types in adults who stutter, providing direction for the treatment of stuttering. Clarification of how much stuttering influences mood sub-types versus pre-existing mood is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Delirium clinical motor subtypes: a narrative review of the literature and insights from neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, James M

    2018-04-01

    Clinical motor subtypes have been long recognised in delirium and, despite a growing body of research, a lack of clarity exists regarding the importance of these motor subtypes. The aims of this review are to (1) examine how the concept of motor subtypes has evolved, (2) explore their relationship to the clinical context, (3) discuss the relationship between the phenomenology of delirium and motor activity, (4) discuss the application of neurobiology to the theory of delirium motor subtypes, and (5) identify methodological issues and provide solutions for further studies. The following databases were searched: PubMed, PsychInfo, EBSCO, Medline, BioMed central and Science Direct. Inclusion criteria specified peer-reviewed research assessing delirium motor subtypes published between 1990 and 2016. Sixty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies (n = 50) were found to use validated psychometric tools, while the remainder (n = 11) used clinical criteria. The majority of studies (n = 45) were conducted in the medical setting, while the remainder were in the ICU/post-operative setting (n = 17). Although host sensitivities (e.g. frailty) and exogenous factors (e.g. medication exposure) may determine the type of motor disturbance, it remains unclear to what extent motor subtypes are influenced by other features of delirium. The use of more specialised tools (e.g. delirium motor subtyping scale), may enable researchers to develop an approach to delirium that has a greater nosological consistency. Future studies investigating delirium motor subtypes may benefit from enhanced theoretical considerations of the dysfunctional neural substrate of the delirious state.

  1. Emergence of canine parvovirus subtype 2b (CPV-2b) infections in Australian dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nicholas J; Seddon, Jennifer M; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat; Al-Alawneh, John; Harper, Gavin; McDonagh, Phillip; Meers, Joanne

    2017-12-16

    Tracing the temporal dynamics of pathogens is crucial for developing strategies to detect and limit disease emergence. Canine parvovirus (CPV-2) is an enteric virus causing morbidity and mortality in dogs around the globe. Previous work in Australia reported that the majority of cases were associated with the CPV-2a subtype, an unexpected finding since CPV-2a was rapidly replaced by another subtype (CPV-2b) in many countries. Using a nine-year dataset of CPV-2 infections from 396 dogs sampled across Australia, we assessed the population dynamics and molecular epidemiology of circulating CPV-2 subtypes. Bayesian phylogenetic Skygrid models and logistic regressions were used to trace the temporal dynamics of CPV-2 infections in dogs sampled from 2007 to 2016. Phylogenetic models indicated that CPV-2a likely emerged in Australia between 1973 and 1988, while CPV-2b likely emerged between 1985 and 1998. Sequences from both subtypes were found in dogs across continental Australia and Tasmania, with no apparent effect of climate variability on subtype occurrence. Both variant subtypes exhibited a classical disease emergence pattern of relatively high rates of evolution during early emergence followed by subsequent decreases in evolutionary rates over time. However, the CPV-2b subtype maintained higher mutation rates than CPV-2a and continued to expand, resulting in an increase in the probability that dogs will carry this subtype over time. Ongoing monitoring programs that provide molecular epidemiology surveillance will be necessary to detect emergence of new variants and make informed recommendations to develop reliable detection and vaccine methods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A magnetic resonance imaging study of adhesio interthalamica in clinical subtypes of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Haghir, Hossein; Mokhber, Naghmeh; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud-Reza; Haghighi, Mehri Baghban; Radmard, Mahla

    2013-01-01

    Context: Previous studies have suggested subtle anatomical brain differences between patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. However, the results are inconsistent and there is no study investigating the various subtypes of this mental disorder separately. Aim: This study was conducted to compare the rate of absence of adhesio interthalamica (AI), a midline brain structure, between 3 subtypes of schizophrenia (paranoid, undifferentiated, and residual) and healthy control grou...

  3. Distinguishing subtypes of extrinsic motivation among people with mild to borderline intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Frielink, N.; Schuengel, C.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background According to self-determination theory, motivation is ordered in types, including amotivation, extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. Self-determination theory defines four subtypes of extrinsic motivation: external motivation, introjected motivation, identified motivation and integrated motivation. Although it has been argued theoretically that the different types of motivation are universally applicable, Reid et al. (2009) proposed a dichotomy of broad subtypes of extrins...

  4. Plasma Biomarker Profiles Differ Depending on Breast Cancer Subtype but RANTES is Consistently Increased

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Daly, Don S.; Tan, Ruimin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-07-01

    Background: Current biomarkers for breast cancer have little potential for detection. We determined if breast cancer subtypes influence circulating protein biomarkers. Methods: A sandwich-ELISA microarray platform was used to evaluate 23 candidate biomarkers in plasma samples that were obtained from subjects with either benign breast disease or invasive breast cancer. All plasma samples were collected at the time of biopsy, after a referral due to a suspicious screen (e.g., mammography). Cancer samples were evaluated based on breast cancer subtypes, as defined by the HER2 and estrogen receptor statuses. Results: Ten proteins were statistically altered in at least one breast cancer subtype, including four epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, two matrix metalloproteases, two cytokines, and two angiogenic factors. Only one cytokine, RANTES, was significantly increased (P<0.01 for each analysis) in all four subtypes, with areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) that ranged from 0.76 to 0.82, depending on cancer subtype. The best AUC values were observed for analyses that combined data from multiple biomarkers, with values ranging from 0.70 to 0.99, depending on the cancer subtype. Although the results for RANTES are consistent with previous publications, the multi-assay results need to be validated in independent sample sets. Conclusions: Different breast cancer subtypes produce distinct biomarker profiles, and circulating protein biomarkers have potential to differentiate between true and false positive screens for breast cancer. Impact: Subtype-specific biomarker panels may be useful for detecting breast cancer or as an adjunct assay to improve the accuracy of current screening methods.

  5. Tissue-Specific Interferon Alpha Subtype Response to SIV Infection in Brain, Spleen, and Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Zaritsky, Luna Alammar; Dery, Alicia; Leong, Wan Yee; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E.

    2013-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is a type I interferon that plays a major role in host defense. There are 13 different IFNalpha genes in humans, but much of the work concerning their role in viral defense has been limited to studying either subtype 2 or pan IFNalpha due to the inability to distinguish between highly similar genetic and amino acid sequences. Because of recent advances in molecular and biochemical techniques, it is possible to study the regulation of individual subtypes. It has bee...

  6. Tracing the Origin and Northward Dissemination Dynamics of HIV-1 Subtype C in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatorre, Edson; Couto-Fernandez, José C.; Guimarães, Monick Lindenmayer; Vaz Cardoso, Ludimila Paula; de Alcantara, Keila Correia; Martins de Araújo Stefani, Mariane; Romero, Hector; Freire, Caio C. M.; Iamarino, Atila; de A Zanotto, Paolo M.; Morgado, Mariza G.; Bello, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the HIV-1 subtype C epidemic in southern Brazil was initiated by the introduction of a single founder strain probably originating from east Africa. However, the exact country of origin of such a founder strain as well as the origin of the subtype C viruses detected outside the Brazilian southern region remains unknown. HIV-1 subtype C pol sequences isolated in the southern, southeastern and central-western Brazilian regions (n = 209) were compared with a large number (n ~ 2,000) of subtype C pol sequences of African origin. Maximum-likelihood analyses revealed that most HIV-1 subtype C Brazilian sequences branched in a single monophyletic clade (CBR-I), nested within a larger monophyletic lineage characteristic of east Africa. Bayesian analyses indicate that the CBR-I clade most probably originated in Burundi and was introduced into the Paraná state (southern region) around the middle 1970s, after which it rapidly disseminated to neighboring regions. The states of Paraná and Santa Catarina have been the most important hubs of subtype C dissemination, and routine travel and spatial accessibility seems to have been the major driving forces of this process. Five additional introductions of HIV-1 subtype C strains probably originated in eastern (n = 2), southern (n = 2) and central (n = 1) African countries were detected in the Rio de Janeiro state (southeastern region). These results indicate a continuous influx of HIV-1 subtype C strains of African origin into Brazil and also unveil the existence of unrecognized transmission networks linking this country to east Africa. PMID:24069269

  7. Subtype-specific, bi-component inhibition of SK channels by low internal pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peitersen, Torben; Jespersen, Thomas; Jorgensen, Nanna K

    2006-01-01

    The effects of low intracellular pH (pH(i) 6.4) on cloned small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel currents of all three subtypes (SK1, SK2, and SK3) were investigated in HEK293 cells using the patch-clamp technique. In 400 nM internal Ca2+ [Ca2+]i, all subtypes were inhibited by pH(i) 6...

  8. Empirically derived personality subtyping for predicting clinical symptoms and treatment response in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynos, Ann F; Pearson, Carolyn M; Utzinger, Linsey M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B

    2017-05-01

    Evidence suggests that eating disorder subtypes reflecting under-controlled, over-controlled, and low psychopathology personality traits constitute reliable phenotypes that differentiate treatment response. This study is the first to use statistical analyses to identify these subtypes within treatment-seeking individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) and to use these statistically derived clusters to predict clinical outcomes. Using variables from the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire, K-means cluster analyses identified under-controlled, over-controlled, and low psychopathology subtypes within BN patients (n = 80) enrolled in a treatment trial. Generalized linear models examined the impact of personality subtypes on Eating Disorder Examination global score, binge eating frequency, and purging frequency cross-sectionally at baseline and longitudinally at end of treatment (EOT) and follow-up. In the longitudinal models, secondary analyses were conducted to examine personality subtype as a potential moderator of response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Enhanced (CBT-E) or Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy for BN (ICAT-BN). There were no baseline clinical differences between groups. In the longitudinal models, personality subtype predicted binge eating (p = 0.03) and purging (p = 0.01) frequency at EOT and binge eating frequency at follow-up (p = 0.045). The over-controlled group demonstrated the best outcomes on these variables. In secondary analyses, there was a treatment by subtype interaction for purging at follow-up (p = 0.04), which indicated a superiority of CBT-E over ICAT-BN for reducing purging among the over-controlled group. Empirically derived personality subtyping appears to be a valid classification system with potential to guide eating disorder treatment decisions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:506-514). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Longitudinal white matter change in frontotemporal dementia subtypes and sporadic late onset Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny M. Elahi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: All three of the canonical subtypes of FTD are associated with significant change in white matter integrity over one year. These changes are consistent enough that drug effects in future clinical trials could be detected with relatively small numbers of participants. While there are some differences in regions of change across groups, the genu of the corpus callosum is a region that could be used to track progression in studies that include all subtypes.

  10. Zebrafish Mnx proteins specify one motoneuron subtype and suppress acquisition of interneuron characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seredick Steve D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise matching between motoneuron subtypes and the muscles they innervate is a prerequisite for normal behavior. Motoneuron subtype identity is specified by the combination of transcription factors expressed by the cell during its differentiation. Here we investigate the roles of Mnx family transcription factors in specifying the subtypes of individually identified zebrafish primary motoneurons. Results Zebrafish has three Mnx family members. We show that each of them has a distinct and temporally dynamic expression pattern in each primary motoneuron subtype. We also show that two Mnx family members are expressed in identified VeLD interneurons derived from the same progenitor domain that generates primary motoneurons. Surprisingly, we found that Mnx proteins appear unnecessary for differentiation of VeLD interneurons or the CaP motoneuron subtype. Mnx proteins are, however, required for differentiation of the MiP motoneuron subtype. We previously showed that MiPs require two temporally-distinct phases of Islet1 expression for normal development. Here we show that in the absence of Mnx proteins, the later phase of Islet1 expression is initiated but not sustained, and MiPs become hybrids that co-express morphological and molecular features of motoneurons and V2a interneurons. Unexpectedly, these hybrid MiPs often extend CaP-like axons, and some MiPs appear to be entirely transformed to a CaP morphology. Conclusions Our results suggest that Mnx proteins promote MiP subtype identity by suppressing both interneuron development and CaP axon pathfinding. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of transcription factors that act to distinguish CaP and MiP subtype identities. Our results also suggest that MiP motoneurons are more similar to V2 interneurons than are CaP motoneurons.

  11. Distribution And Clinicopathological Features Of Breast Cancer Histological Subtypes In Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Srebnijs Andrejs; Isajevs Sergejs; Eglītis Jānis; Krūmiņš Viesturs; Bērziņš Juris; Vikmanis Uldis

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogenous disease. It consists of several histological subtypes that can be separated by morphology and immunohistochemistry. The aim of our study was to determine the distribution of breast cancer histological and molecular subtypes, and their relationship with clinical and pathological characteristics. A total of 561 patients who underwent breast carcinoma surgical treatment from January 2003 till December 2012 were enrolled in the study. In total, invasive ductal carc...

  12. Regional brain network organization distinguishes the combined and inattentive subtypes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline F. Saad; Kristi R. Griffiths; Michael R. Kohn; Simon Clarke; Leanne M. Williams; Mayuresh S. Korgaonkar

    2017-01-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is characterized clinically by hyperactive/impulsive and/or inattentive symptoms which determine diagnostic subtypes as Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive (ADHD-HI), Predominantly Inattentive (ADHD-I), and Combined (ADHD-C). Neuroanatomically though we do not yet know if these clinical subtypes reflect distinct aberrations in underlying brain organization. We imaged 34 ADHD participants defined using DSM-IV criteria as ADHD-I (n?=?16) or as ADH...

  13. Distributions of major sub-types of lymphoid malignancies among adults in Mashhad, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaheb, Z; Aledavood, A; Farzad, F

    2011-02-01

    Global variations in the frequency of the major sub-types of lymphoma have been reported. However, studies on different sub-types of adult malignant lymphoma had never been conducted in Mashhad, Iran. In this paper, we aimed to identify the major sub-types of malignant lymphoma in our area and compare the distribution with other published studies. During a retrospective study we evaluate 391 adult patients with lymphoid malignancy from "Omid Hospital" - a cancer research center and an outpatient hematologic clinic in Mashhad - were evaluated from 2000 to 2009. Patients were reclassified using the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. The frequency of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) was 92% (n=359) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) was 8% (n=32). The most frequent NHL sub-type using WHO classification was diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and the second most common NHL was chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). The most common sub-type of HL was mixed cellularity. In this study the frequency of primary extranodal NHL in our study was 11.5%, which slightly less common than other eastern countries. Our findings add to the body of knowledge concerning geographic variations in the descriptive epidemiology of the major lymphoma sub-types. Such observations are extremely important since they potentially point to underling etiological variations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Drug Resistance in Non-B Subtype HIV-1: Impact of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalendra Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV causes approximately 2.5 million new infections every year, and nearly 1.6 million patients succumb to HIV each year. Several factors, including cross-species transmission and error-prone replication have resulted in extraordinary genetic diversity of HIV groups. One of these groups, known as group M (main contains nine subtypes (A-D, F-H and J-K and causes ~95% of all HIV infections. Most reported data on susceptibility and resistance to anti-HIV therapies are from subtype B HIV infections, which are prevalent in developed countries but account for only ~12% of all global HIV infections, whereas non-B subtype HIV infections that account for ~88% of all HIV infections are prevalent primarily in low and middle-income countries. Although the treatments for subtype B infections are generally effective against non-B subtype infections, there are differences in response to therapies. Here, we review how polymorphisms, transmission efficiency of drug-resistant strains, and differences in genetic barrier for drug resistance can differentially alter the response to reverse transcriptase-targeting therapies in various subtypes.

  15. Clinicopathologic characteristics and molecular subtypes of invasive papillary carcinoma of the breast: a large case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi Yu; Liu, Ning; Wang, Ya Hong; Yang, Cui Cui; Zhang, Jing; Lv, Shu Hua; Niu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Although patients with invasive papillary carcinoma (IPC) often have favorable prognoses, it remains unclear whether this special type of breast cancer represents a distinct morphological entity with its own biological features and clinical behavior distinct from those of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and whether its four molecular subtypes are associated with different prognoses. The study is a retrospective analysis of a large patient cohort from a single institution. 284 IPC samples were collected from January 2000 to May 2011. 300 IDC cases were selected randomly from 13,428 cases of IDC during the same periods. We assessed the clinicopathologic characteristics, molecular features, and prognostic value of IPC (n = 284) and compared them to those of IDC (n = 300). Clinicopathologic features and survival status of the four subtypes of IPC were also evaluated. IPC differed from IDC with respect to age upon diagnosis, tumor grade, lymph node status, and menopausal status (P IPC was associated with a better 5-year overall survival rate (OS) (92.77 vs. 87.95 %) and disease-free survival rate (DFS) (87.95 vs. 80.72 %) than IDC. Tumors of the luminal A subtype had a better 5-year OS (97.78 %) and DFS (95.56 %) than other subtypes. The biologic behavior of IPC is more favorable to patient outcome than that of IDC. The chance of pure IPC causing death without an intervening event of a different histologic type is exceptionally low. Luminal A subtypes have better outcomes when compared to the other subtypes.

  16. Latent constructs underlying sensory subtypes in children with autism: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brittany N; Dennis, Simon; Lane, Alison E

    2017-08-01

    Recent reports identify sensory subtypes in ASD based on shared patterns of responses to daily sensory stimuli [Ausderau et al., 2014; Lane, Molloy, & Bishop, 2014]. Lane et al. propose that two broad sensory dimensions, sensory reactivity and multisensory integration, best explain the differences between subtypes, however this has yet to be tested. The present study tests this hypothesis by examining the latent constructs underlying Lane's sensory subtypes. Participants for this study were caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 2-12 years. Caregiver responses on the Short Sensory Profile (SSP), used to establish Lane's sensory subtypes, were extracted from two existing datasets (total n = 287). Independent component analyses were conducted to test the fit and interpretability of a two-construct structure underlying the SSP, and therefore, the sensory subtypes. The first construct was largely comprised of the taste/smell sensitivity domain, which describes hyper-reactivity to taste and smell stimuli. The second construct had a significant contribution from the low energy/weak domain, which describes behaviors that may be indicative of difficulties with multisensory integration. Findings provide initial support for our hypothesis that sensory reactivity and multisensory integration underlie Lane's sensory subtypes in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1364-1371. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A latent class approach to the external validation of respiratory and non-respiratory panic subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson-Nay, R.; Latendresse, S. J.; Kendler, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The phenotypic variance observed in panic disorder (PD) appears to be best captured by a respiratory and non-respiratory panic subtype. We compared respiratory and non-respiratory panic subtypes across a series of external validators (temporal stability, psychiatric co-morbidity, treatment response) to determine whether subtypes are best conceptualized as differing: (1) only on their symptom profiles with no other differences between them; (2) on a quantitative (i.e. severity) dimension only; or (3) qualitatively from one another. Method Data from a large epidemiological survey (National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions) and a clinical trial (Cross-National Collaborative Panic Study) were used. All analytic comparisons were examined within a latent class framework. Results High temporal stability of panic subtypes was observed, particularly among females. Respiratory panic was associated with greater odds of lifetime major depression and a range of anxiety disorders as well as increased treatment utilization, but no demographic differences. Treatment outcome data did not suggest that the two PD subtypes were associated with differential response to either imipramine or alprazolam. Conclusions These data suggest that respiratory and non-respiratory panic represent valid subtypes along the PD continuum, with the respiratory variant representing a more severe form of the disorder. PMID:21846423

  18. Laryngeal papillomatosis associated dysplasia in the adult population: an update on prevalence and HPV subtyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Taryn; Muller, Susan; Wise, Justin C; Johns, Michael M; Klein, Adam

    2014-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the prevalence of laryngeal dysplasia and associated human papilloma virus (HPV) subtypes in adult patients, 18 years or older, suffering from laryngeal papillomatosis at a tertiary care institution. Retrospective cohort study. Patients with biopsy proven laryngeal papillomatosis were identified via chart review. All available pathology specimens were reviewed by a dedicated head and neck pathologist to confirm/refute the diagnosis of laryngeal dysplasia, and grade the level of dysplasia. Interrater agreement was compared using cross-tabulation methods. Specimens identified to be positive for dysplasia underwent further testing via in situ hybridization for low-risk (6/11) or high-risk (16/18) HPV subtypes. Of the 85 subjects identified to have laryngeal papillomatosis, 24(28%) demonstrated laryngeal dysplasia. There was good interrater agreement on the presence of dysplasia; however, there was only fair agreement on the grade of dysplasia. Of the pathology specimens tested for HPV subtype, the majority of patients (62%) were positive for HPV 6/11, including all high-grade dysplasia patients. Three (12%) dysplasia specimens were negative for both high- and low-risk HPV subtypes. We found a 28% prevalence of dysplasia in our patient population with the majority of patients positive for low-risk HPV subtypes indicating that high-risk HPV subtypes do not predispose laryngeal papilloma patients to dysplasia.

  19. Association Between Imaging Characteristics and Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingxiang; Ma, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer can be divided into four major molecular subtypes based on the expression of hormone receptor (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, HER2 status, and molecular proliferation rate (Ki67). In this study, we sought to investigate the association between breast cancer subtype and radiological findings in the Chinese population. Medical records of 300 consecutive invasive breast cancer patients were reviewed from the database: the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The imaging characteristics of the lesions were evaluated. The molecular subtypes of breast cancer were classified into four types: luminal A, luminal B, HER2 overexpressed (HER2), and basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between the subtype (dependent variable) and mammography or 15 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators (independent variables). Luminal A and B subtypes were commonly associated with "clustered calcification distribution," "nipple invasion," or "skin invasion" (P cancers showed association with persistent enhancement in the delayed phase on MRI and "clustered calcification distribution" on mammography (P breast tumor, which are potentially useful tools in the diagnosis and subtyping of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Admixture analysis of the diagnostic subtypes of social anxiety disorder: implications for the DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderka, Idan M; Nickerson, Angela; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2012-06-01

    Much controversy exists regarding diagnostic subtypes of social anxiety disorder (SAD). The present study used admixture analysis to examine whether individuals with generalized and nongeneralized SAD belong to the same or different populations of origin. This can inform diagnostic subtyping of SAD in the forthcoming DSM-V. Treatment-seeking individuals with generalized SAD (n = 154) and nongeneralized SAD (n = 48) completed a battery of questionnaires. Based on participants' responses to the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), we estimated log likelihood and chi-square goodness-of-fit for models with 1, 2, 3, or 4 populations of origin, and compared models using forward stepwise estimation and maximum likelihood ratio tests. Admixture analyses suggested that the two diagnostic subtypes of SAD belong to the same underlying population of origin. In addition, observable differences in depression, general anxiety, and comorbidity were no longer significant when controlling for social anxiety severity. Our sample was recruited in the U.S. and was a treatment-seeking sample. Future studies should examine whether our results generalize to different cultures, and community samples. Support for qualitative differences between SAD subtypes was not found. Rather, our findings support the notion that the diagnostic subtypes of SAD differ quantitatively, and that SAD exists on a continuum of severity. This finding informs diagnostic subtyping of SAD in the forthcoming DSM-V. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Racial Variations in Prostate Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Androgen Receptor Signaling Reflect Anatomic Tumor Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Farzana A; Sundi, Debasish; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Choeurng, Voleak; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Ross, Ashley E; Klein, Eric; Den, Robert; Dicker, Adam; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Tamara L; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) subtypes based on ETS gene expression have been described. Recent studies suggest there are racial differences in tumor location, with PCa located anteriorly more often among African-American (AA) compared to Caucasian-American (CA) men. In this retrospective analysis of a multi-institutional cohort treated by radical prostatectomy (179 CA, 121 AA), we evaluated associations among molecular subtype, race, anatomic tumor location, and androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Subtype (m-ERG(+), m-ETS(+), m-SPINK1(+), or triple-negative) was determined using distribution-based outlier analysis. AR signaling was investigated using gene expression profiling of canonical AR targets. m-ERG(+) was more common in CA than AA men (47% vs 22%, pRacial differences in molecular subtypes did not persist when tumors were analyzed by location, suggesting a biologically important relationship between tumor location and subtype. Accordingly, anterior tumor location was associated with higher Decipher scores and lower global AR signaling. This study demonstrates associations among patient race, prostate cancer molecular subtypes, and tumor location. Location-specific differences in androgen regulation may further underlie these relationships. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Distinct subtype distribution and somatic mutation spectrum of lymphomas in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weicheng; Li, Wei; Ye, Xiaofei; Liu, Hui; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Here, we give an updated overview of the subtype distribution of lymphomas in East Asia and also present the genome sequencing data on two major subtypes of these tumors. The distribution of lymphoma types/subtypes among East Asian countries is very similar, with a lower proportion of B-cell malignancies and a higher proportion of T/natural killer (NK)-cell lymphomas as compared to Western populations. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma is more frequently observed in East Asia, whereas follicular lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, are proportionally lower. The incidence rate of lymphoma subtypes in Asians living in the US was generally intermediate to the general rate in US and Asia, suggesting that both genetic and environmental factors may underlie the geographical variations observed.Key cancer driver mutations have been identified in Asian patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma through genome sequencing. A distinct somatic mutation profile has also been observed in Chinese diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. The incidence and distribution of lymphoma subtypes differed significantly between patients from East Asia and Western countries, suggesting subtype-specific etiologic mechanisms. Further studies on the mechanism underlying these geographical variations may give new insights into our understanding of lymphomagenesis.

  3. Childhood adversity subtypes and depressive symptoms in early and late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, Michelle C; Croudace, Tim; Dunn, Valerie J; Jones, Peter B; Herbert, Joe; Goodyer, Ian M

    2015-08-01

    Within a longitudinal study of 1,005 adolescents, we investigated how exposure to childhood psychosocial adversities was associated with the emergence of depressive symptoms between 14 and 17 years of age. The cohort was classified into four empirically determined adversity subtypes for two age periods in childhood (0-5 and 6-11 years). One subtype reflects normative/optimal family environments (n = 692, 69%), while the other three subtypes reflect differential suboptimal family environments (aberrant parenting: n = 71, 7%; discordant: n = 185, 18%; and hazardous: n = 57, 6%). Parent-rated child temperament at 14 years and adolescent self-reported recent negative life events in early and late adolescence were included in models implementing path analysis. There were gender-differentiated associations between childhood adversity subtypes and adolescent depressive symptoms. The discordant and hazardous subtypes were associated with elevated depressive symptoms in both genders but the aberrant parenting subtype only so in girls. Across adolescence the associations between early childhood adversity and depressive symptoms diminished for boys but remained for girls. Emotional temperament was also associated with depressive symptoms in both genders, while proximal negative life events related to depressive symptoms in girls only. There may be neurodevelopmental factors that emerge in adolescence that reduce depressogenic symptoms in boys but increase such formation in girls.

  4. Pan-urologic cancer genomic subtypes that transcend tissue of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengju; Zhang, Yiqun; Bossé, Dominick; Lalani, Aly-Khan A; Hakimi, A Ari; Hsieh, James J; Choueiri, Toni K; Gibbons, Don L; Ittmann, Michael; Creighton, Chad J

    2017-08-04

    Urologic cancers include cancers of the bladder, kidney, prostate, and testes, with common molecular features spanning different types. Here, we show that 1954 urologic cancers can be classified into nine major genomic subtypes, on the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive molecular characterization (including DNA methylation and copy number, and RNA and protein expression). Tissue dominant effects are first removed computationally in order to define these subtypes, which reveal common processes-reflecting in part tumor microenvironmental influences-driving cellular behavior across tumor lineages. Six of the subtypes feature a mixture of represented cancer types as defined by tissue or cell of origin. Differences in patient survival and in the manifestation of specific pathways-including hypoxia, metabolism, NRF2-ARE, Hippo, and immune checkpoint-can further distinguish the subtypes. Immune checkpoint markers and molecular signatures of macrophages and T cell infiltrates are relatively high within distinct subsets of each cancer type studied. The pan-urologic cancer genomic subtypes would facilitate information sharing involving therapeutic implications between tissue-oriented domains.Urological cancers have disparate tissues and cells of origin but share many molecular features. Here, the authors use multidimensional and comprehensive molecular characterization to classify urological cancers into nine major genomic subtypes, highlighting potential therapeutic targets.

  5. Documentation of subtype C HIV Type 1 strains in Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, G; Eyzaguirre, L; Montano, S M; Laguna-Torres, V; Serra, M; Aguayo, N; Avila, M M; Ruchansky, D; Pando, M A; Vinoles, Jose; Perez, J; Barboza, A; Chauca, G; Romero, A; Galeano, A; Blair, P J; Weissenbacher, M; Birx, D L; Sanchez, J L; Olson, J G; Carr, J K

    2004-09-01

    HIV subtypes B, F, and BF recombinants have been previously reported in South America. This report describes the presence of HIV-1 subtype C infection in the countries of Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay dating back to at least 1999. Surveillance for uncommon non-B/non-F subtype viruses circulating in South America has been conducted in samples obtained from nine countries. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), dried filter paper (FP), and fresh blood (FB) samples were collected from HIV-positive patients from Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Chile, Bolivia, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay. From a total of 2962 HIV seropositive samples examined during a 9-year period (1995-2003), only 11 (0.4%) were found to be infected with non-B/non-F HIV variants. Eight of these 11 strains were determined to be subtype C by heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA). Five of these 8 strains were further characterized by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the protease (Pro) and reverse transcriptase (RT) region of the genome and two were sequenced full length. One of the strains was found to be a unique BC recombinant. The spread of a third subtype of HIV, subtype C, should raise the question of its potential future role in the HIV epidemic in this region.

  6. [Breast cancer brain metastases: clinical and prognostic characteristics of different biological subtypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongtong; Li, Qing; Xu, Binghe; Zhang, Pin; Yuan, Peng; Ma, Fei; Wang, Jiayu; Fan, Ying

    2014-09-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics and survival depending on biological subtypes in breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BM). A retrospective analysis was performed on 152 breast cancer patients with BM admitted to the Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from January 2003 to December 2012. Depending on the biological characteristics, these patients were divided into three subtypes: Luminal, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)-overexpressing, and triple-negative subtypes. The clinicopathological characteristics, recurrence status, and prognostic factors were analyzed at the initial diagnosis. The systemic therapy after BM was further studied. Among the 152 patients, the number of Luminal, HER-2-overexpressing, and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtypes were 60, 53, and 39 cases, respectively. The median time from first recurrence to BM of all patients was 7.3 months, the median time of Luminal, HER-2-overexpressing, and TNBC subtypes was 11.0 months, 9.6 months, and 5.5 months, respectively (P cancer patients (17.1 vs. 1.7 months, P brain meatastases occurr earlier in HER-2-overexpressing and TNBC subtypes. Trastuzumab can delay the occurrence of BM from advanced breast cancer, and systemic therapy can improve the survival of patients after brain metastasis.

  7. Molecular subtype analysis determines the association of advanced breast cancer in Egypt with favorable biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhia, Bodour; Tapia, Coya; Ishak, Elia A; Gaber, Salwa; Berghuis, Bree; Hussain, Khateeb H; DuQuette, Rachelle A; Resau, James; Carpten, John

    2011-09-30

    Prognostic markers and molecular breast cancer subtypes reflect underlying biological tumor behavior and are important for patient management. Compared to Western countries, women in North Africa are less likely to be prognosticated and treated based on well-characterized markers such as the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Her2. We conducted this study to determine the prevalence of breast cancer molecular subtypes in the North African country of Egypt as a measure of underlying biological characteristics driving tumor manifestations. To determine molecular subtypes we characterized over 200 tumor specimens obtained from Egypt by performing ER, PR, Her2, CK5/6, EGFR and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Our study demonstrated that the Luminal A subtype, associated with favorable prognosis, was found in nearly 45% of cases examined. However, the basal-like subtype, associated with poor prognosis, was found in 11% of cases. These findings are in sharp contrast to other parts of Africa in which the basal-like subtype is over-represented. Egyptians appear to have favorable underlying biology, albeit having advanced disease at diagnosis. These data suggest that Egyptians would largely profit from early detection of their disease. Intervention at the public health level, including education on the benefits of early detection is necessary and would likely have tremendous impact on breast cancer outcome in Egypt.

  8. Molecular subtype analysis determines the association of advanced breast cancer in Egypt with favorable biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DuQuette Rachelle A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic markers and molecular breast cancer subtypes reflect underlying biological tumor behavior and are important for patient management. Compared to Western countries, women in North Africa are less likely to be prognosticated and treated based on well-characterized markers such as the estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and Her2. We conducted this study to determine the prevalence of breast cancer molecular subtypes in the North African country of Egypt as a measure of underlying biological characteristics driving tumor manifestations. Methods To determine molecular subtypes we characterized over 200 tumor specimens obtained from Egypt by performing ER, PR, Her2, CK5/6, EGFR and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Results Our study demonstrated that the Luminal A subtype, associated with favorable prognosis, was found in nearly 45% of cases examined. However, the basal-like subtype, associated with poor prognosis, was found in 11% of cases. These findings are in sharp contrast to other parts of Africa in which the basal-like subtype is over-represented. Conclusions Egyptians appear to have favorable underlying biology, albeit having advanced disease at diagnosis. These data suggest that Egyptians would largely profit from early detection of their disease. Intervention at the public health level, including education on the benefits of early detection is necessary and would likely have tremendous impact on breast cancer outcome in Egypt.

  9. Heterosubtypic immunity to influenza A virus infections in mallards may explain existence of multiple virus subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Latorre-Margalef

    Full Text Available Wild birds, particularly duck species, are the main reservoir of influenza A virus (IAV in nature. However, knowledge of IAV infection dynamics in the wild bird reservoir, and the development of immune responses, are essentially absent. Importantly, a detailed understanding of how subtype diversity is generated and maintained is lacking. To address this, 18,679 samples from 7728 Mallard ducks captured between 2002 and 2009 at a single stopover site in Sweden were screened for IAV infections, and the resulting 1081 virus isolates were analyzed for patterns of immunity. We found support for development of homosubtypic hemagglutinin (HA immunity during the peak of IAV infections in the fall. Moreover, re-infections with the same HA subtype and related prevalent HA subtypes were uncommon, suggesting the development of natural homosubtypic and heterosubtypic immunity (p-value = 0.02. Heterosubtypic immunity followed phylogenetic relatedness of HA subtypes, both at the level of HA clades (p-value = 0.04 and the level of HA groups (p-value = 0.05. In contrast, infection patterns did not support specific immunity for neuraminidase (NA subtypes. For the H1 and H3 Clades, heterosubtypic immunity showed a clear temporal pattern and we estimated within-clade immunity to last at least 30 days. The strength and duration of heterosubtypic immunity has important implications for transmission dynamics of IAV in the natural reservoir, where immune escape and disruptive selection may increase HA antigenic variation and explain IAV subtype diversity.

  10. A possible link between subtype 2 and asymptomatic infections of Blastocystis hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogruman-Al, Funda; Dagci, Hande; Yoshikawa, Hisao; Kurt, Ozgur; Demirel, Mete

    2008-08-01

    Blastocystis hominis is one of the most common eukaryotic organisms in the intestinal tract of humans, while its pathogenic potential is still controversial. A total of 286 stool samples obtained from adult and pediatric patients with or without gastrointestinal symptoms in two hospitals in Manisa, Turkey, were cultured to detect B. hominis infection. Forty-one and 51 isolates were obtained from the adults and children, respectively, and these isolates were subjected to subtyping by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the known sequence-tagged site primers. The correlation between the genotype and the symptoms was evaluated. PCR subtyping indicated that subtype 3 was the most common genotype in both symptomatic and asymptomatic groups, and the second common genotype was subtypes 1 and 2 in symptomatic and asymptomatic groups, respectively. A significant correlation between subtype 2 and the asymptomatic groups was found among both in pediatric and adult patients (chi(2) (cal) = 4.38, df = 1, p = 0.044). However, there were no significant differences between the other genotypes and the symptomatic or asymptomatic groups, as well as both the age and sex of the patients. The present study suggests that subtype 2 is a non-pathogenic genotype of B. hominis.

  11. Colorectal lateral spreading tumor subtypes: clinicopathology and outcome of endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Li, Quan-Lin; Zhou, Ping-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Qun; Zhong, Yun-Shi; Chen, Wei-Feng; Ma, Li-Li; Qin, Wen-Zheng; Hu, Jian-Wei; Yao, Li-Qing

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the clinicopathological features of specific subtypes of laterally spreading tumor (LST) and assessed the outcome of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) based upon subdifferentiation status. A total of 137 LSTs were present in 135 patients; 96 were granular and 41 exhibited a nongranular pattern. Granular LSTs, subdivided into homogeneous and nodular mixed, and nongranular LSTs, subdivided into flat-elevated and pseudodepressed, were retrospectively evaluated with respect to clinicopathological features and results of ESD (en bloc R0 curative resection, procedure time, complication, and recurrence rate) according to specific subtype. The distribution of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and submucosal carcinomas was more prominent among granular nodular mixed tumors than among granular homogeneous tumors (P = 0.007), whereas there was no significant difference between nongranular pseudodepressed tumors and flat-elevated tumors. The frequency of en bloc R0 curative resection did not differ significantly among specific subtypes. For nodular mixed and pseudodepressed lesions, the median tumor size was significantly larger (P < 0.001 for each) and mean procedure time was also longer (P < 0.05 for each) than for the other two subtypes. All complications, which included three perforations, five episodes of postoperative bleeding, and one recurrence, occurred in granular nodular mixed and nongranular pseudodepressed tumors. The risk of cancer varies with the subtypes of LSTs. ESD is an effective treatment for LSTs, however ESD is more technically demanding and carries more complications in pseudodepressed and granular mixed subtypes.

  12. Cerebral artery alpha-1 AR subtypes: high altitude long-term acclimatization responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Goyal

    Full Text Available In response to hypoxia and other stress, the sympathetic (adrenergic nervous system regulates arterial contractility and blood flow, partly through differential activities of the alpha1 (α1 - adrenergic receptor (AR subtypes (α1A-, α1B-, and α1D-AR. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that with acclimatization to long-term hypoxia (LTH, contractility of middle cerebral arteries (MCA is regulated by changes in expression and activation of the specific α1-AR subtypes. We conducted experiments in MCA from adult normoxic sheep maintained near sea level (300 m and those exposed to LTH (110 days at 3801 m. Following acclimatization to LTH, ovine MCA showed a 20% reduction (n = 5; P<0.05 in the maximum tension achieved by 10-5 M phenylephrine (PHE. LTH-acclimatized cerebral arteries also demonstrated a statistically significant (P<0.05 inhibition of PHE-induced contractility in the presence of specific α1-AR subtype antagonists. Importantly, compared to normoxic vessels, there was significantly greater (P<0.05 α1B-AR subtype mRNA and protein levels in LTH acclimatized MCA. Also, our results demonstrate that extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2-mediated negative feedback regulation of PHE-induced contractility is modulated by α1B-AR subtype. Overall, in ovine MCA, LTH produces profound effects on α1-AR subtype expression and function.

  13. Prognostic implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes in male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrine, Abdeljaoued; Lhem, Bettaieb; Meher, Nasri; Olfa, Adouni; Aida, Goucha; Hatem, Bouzaiene; Hamouda, Boussen; Khaled, Rahal; Amor, Gamoudi

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic molecular subtyping has been widely used in female breast cancer, and it has proven its significance. In this article, we aimed to study the intrinsic subtypes of male breast cancer (MBC) in correlation with clinicopathological features. We retrospectively identified 130 MBC cases from 2004 to 2013. Intrinsic molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). From a total of 130 MBC cases, 45.4% of tumors were luminal A subtype, 44.6% were luminal B, 5% were HER2 positive and 5% were triple negative tumors. There were statistically significant differences between different IHC intrinsic subtypes regarding tumor size (p=0.001), estrogen receptor (ER) status (p=0.001), progesterone receptor (PR) status (p=0.001), HER2 status (p=0.001) and Ki67 proliferation index (p=0.001). The distribution of breast cancer intrinsic subtypes in males is different compared to its female counterpart; however, they don't seem to give the same prognostic value.

  14. Seroepidemiological Evidence of Subtype H3N8 Influenza Virus Infection among Pet Dogs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pei; Huang, San; Zeng, Weijie; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Lifang; Fu, Xinliang; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    The H3N8 virus and the H3N2 virus are the main subtypes of canine influenza virus (CIV). H3N8 CIV mainly circulates in America, and H3N2 CIV mainly circulates in Asia. However, there was an outbreak of the Asian H3N2 virus in the United States (US) in 2015. Thus, it is important to evaluate the presence of subtype H3N8 virus in dogs in China. From May 2015 to November 2015, 600 sera from pet dogs were collected from Guangzhou, Shanghai, Beijing and Shenzhen for hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays and microneutralization (MN) assays. Fifty-two (8.66%) of the 600 sera were positive for the subtype H3N2 virus, which matched the previous reports. Five (0.83%) of 600 sera were positive for the subtype H3N8 virus (H3N8 EIV or H3N8 AIV or H3N8 CIV), which is the first report of subtype H3N8 virus infection among dogs in China and remind us to play more attention to this subtype virus. Therefore, further serological and virological surveillance of influenza virus infection among dogs in China is imperative.

  15. Complex Narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.; Buckland, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the opening chapter, "Complex Narratives," Jan Simons brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. He presents an overview of the different concepts - forking path narratives, mind-game films,

  16. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  17. Improved darunavir genotypic mutation score predicting treatment response for patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B and non-subtype B receiving a salvage regimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Luca, Andrea; Flandre, Philippe; Dunn, David; Zazzi, Maurizio; Wensing, Annemarie; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Wittkop, Linda; Kordossis, Theodoros; Garcia, Federico; Castagna, Antonella; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Churchill, Duncan; de Wit, Stéphane; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Imaz, Arkaitz; Mussini, Cristina; Obel, Niels; Perno, Carlo Federico; Roca, Bernardino; Reiss, Peter; Schülter, Eugen; Torti, Carlo; van Sighem, Ard; Zangerle, Robert; Descamps, Diane; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Günthard, Huldrych; Touloumi, Giota; Warszawski, Josiane; Meyer, Laurence; Dabis, François; Krause, Murielle Mary; Ghosn, Jade; Leport, Catherine; Wit, Ferdinand; Prins, Maria; Bucher, Heiner; Gibb, Diana; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; del Amo, Julia; Thorne, Claire; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Stephan, Christoph; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Chkhartishvili, Nikoloz; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Antinori, Andrea; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Prieto, Luis; Conejo, Pablo Rojo; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Battegay, Manuel; Kouyos, Roger; Tookey, Pat; Casabona, Jordi; Miró, Jose M.; Konopnick, Deborah; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Sönnerborg, Anders; Sabin, Caroline; Teira, Ramon; Garrido, Myriam; Haerry, David; Costagliola, Dominique; D'Arminio-Monforte, Antonella; Raben, Dorthe; Chêne, Geneviève; Judd, Ali; Barger, Diana; Schwimmer, Christine; Termote, Monique; Campbell, Maria; Frederiksen, Casper M.; Friis-Møller, Nina; Kjaer, Jesper; Brandt, Rikke Salbøl; Berenguer, Juan; Bohlius, Julia; Bouteloup, Vincent; Davies, Mary-Anne; Dorrucci, Maria; Egger, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Guiguet, Marguerite; Grabar, Sophie; Lambotte, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Lodi, Sara; Matheron, Sophie; Monge, Susana; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Paredes, Roger; Phillips, Andrew; Puoti, Massimo; Schomaker, Michael; Smit, Colette; Sterne, Jonathan; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; van der Valk, Marc; Wyss, Natasha; Aubert, V.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Dollenmaier, G.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C. A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hoffmann, M.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kouyos, R.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; de Tejada, B. Martinez; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Nicca, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schmid, P.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the prediction of the impact of HIV-1 protease mutations in different viral subtypes on virological response to darunavir. Darunavir-containing treatment change episodes (TCEs) in patients previously failing PIs were selected from large European databases.

  18. Improved darunavir genotypic mutation score predicting treatment response for patients infected with HIRaben-1 subtype B and non-subtype B receiving a salvage regimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, Andrea; Flandre, Philippe; Dunn, David; Zazzi, Maurizio; Wensing, Annemarie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30817724X; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Wittkop, Linda; Kordossis, Theodoros; Garcia, Federico; Castagna, Antonella; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Churchill, Duncan; De Wit, Stéphane; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Imaz, Arkaitz; Mussini, Cristina; Obel, Niels; Perno, Carlo Federico; Roca, Bernardino; Reiss, Peter; Schülter, Eugen; Torti, Carlo; van Sighem, Ard; Zangerle, Robert; Descamps, Diane; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Sabin, Caroline; De Wit, Stéphane; Casabona, Jordi; Miró, Jose M.; Touloumi, Giota; Garrido, Myriam; Teira, Ramon; Wit, Ferdinand; Warszawski, Josiane; Meyer, Laurence; Dabis, François; Krause, Murielle Mary; Ghosn, Jade; Leport, Catherine; Prins, Maria; Bucher, Heiner; Gibb, Diana; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; del Amo, Julia; Thorne, Claire; Stephan, Christoph; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Chkhartishvili, Nikoloz; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Antinori, Andrea; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Prieto, Luis; Conejo, Pablo Rojo; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Battegay, Manuel; Kouyos, Roger; Tookey, Pat; Konopnick, Deborah; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Sönnerborg, Anders; Haerry, David; de Wit, Stéphane; Costagliola, Dominique; Raben, Dorthe; Chêne, Geneviève; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Günthard, Huldrych; Judd, Ali; Barger, Diana; Schwimmer, Christine; Termote, Monique; Campbell, Maria; Frederiksen, Casper M.; Friis-Møller, Nina; Kjaer, Jesper; Brandt, Rikke Salbøl; Berenguer, Juan; Bohlius, Julia; Bouteloup, Vincent; Davies, Mary Anne; Dorrucci, Maria; Egger, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Guiguet, Marguerite; Grabar, Sophie; Lambotte, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Lodi, Sara; Matheron, Sophie; Monge, Susana; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Paredes, Roger; Phillips, Andrew; Puoti, Massimo; Schomaker, Michael; Smit, Colette; Sterne, Jonathan; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; van der Valk, Marc; Wyss, Natasha; Aubert, V.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Dollenmaier, G.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C. A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hoffmann, M.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kouyos, R.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Nicca, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schmid, P.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this studywas to improve the prediction of the impact of HIV-1 protease mutations in different viral subtypes on virological response to darunavir. Methods: Darunavir-containing treatment change episodes (TCEs) in patients previously failing PIs were selected from large

  19. Improved darunavir genotypic mutation score predicting treatment response for patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B and non-subtype B receiving a salvage regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Luca, Andrea; Flandre, Philippe; Dunn, David

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to improve the prediction of the impact of HIV-1 protease mutations in different viral subtypes on virological response to darunavir. METHODS: Darunavir-containing treatment change episodes (TCEs) in patients previously failing PIs were selected from...

  20. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Nancy A; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S; Luby, Stephen P; Wentworth, David E; Donis, Ruben O; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C Todd

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversit