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Sample records for complex refinery history

  1. A review of refinery complexity applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mark J. Kaiser

    2017-01-01

    Refinery complexity quantifies the sophistication and capital intensity of a refinery and has found widespread application in facility classification, cost estimation, sales price models, and other uses...

  2. Integrated pollution control for oil refinery complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiperstok, A. [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil); Sharratt, P.N. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology

    1993-12-31

    Improving environmental performance of oil refineries is a complex task. Emission limits, operating constraints, available technologies, operating techniques, and local environment sensitivity must all be considered. This work describes efforts to build an interactive software to deal with this problem. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Ten years of advanced control systems in Brazil's most complex refinery: history and future perspectives; Dez anos de sistemas de controle avancado na refinaria mais complexa do Brasil: historia e perspectivas futuras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinotti, Rafael; Wanderley, Alexandre; Areal, Oswaldo Fraga; Romeiro, Murillo Terroso; Caneschi, Jose Ricardo [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    In 1994 Duque de Caxias Refinery implemented its first Multivariable Predictive Controller (MPC), in the Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit. The software, then licensed under contract by the DMCC company, used the Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC) technique. This enterprise culminated with the development, by PETROBRAS engineers, of a proprietary MPC. Since 1994, other units have been contemplated with MPC and advanced regulatory projects, which have been suffering adaptations in order to keep pace with new control and information systems (DCS, Data Bank). The Integrated Control Center, designed to host units controlled by DCS, was inaugurated in 1998, allowing a simpler monitoring routine of the MPC systems by control engineers, easing the tuning of regulatory control loops, and helping in the implementation of new MPC projects. This work depicts the evolution of advanced control systems at REDUC, and explores future perspectives and challenges in an ever-changing environment, where new units are constantly being added-up to an already very complex net of more than thirty units. (author)

  4. Lymphohematopoietic Cancer Mortality and Morbidity of Workers in a Refinery/Petrochemical Complex in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hee Koh

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion: The results showed a potential relationship between leukemia and lymphohematopoietic cancers and exposure to benzene in refinery/petrochemical complex workers. This study yielded limited results due to a short observational period; therefore, a follow-up study must be performed to elucidate the relationship between petrochemical exposure and cancer rates.

  5. INTEGRATING THE EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS WITH EMISSION LIMITATIONS FOR REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Kamiński

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on selected activities undertaken in the refinery and petrochemical complex with the projected capacity of 17 Mg crude oil annually with own energy system, the present study shows possible ways of bringing production installations into line with binding legal rules and European Union guidelines on environmental protection. Having adopted an integrated approach, we correlated some environmental protection undertakings with energy-related efficiency improvements affecting the whole plant. Our aim was to try to answer the following question - what consequences follow from the limitation of industrial emissions.

  6. Ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations around a petrochemical complex and a petroleum refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Eylem; Odabasi, Mustafa; Seyfioglu, Remzi

    2003-08-01

    Air samples were collected between September 2000 and September 2001 in Izmir, Turkey at three sampling sites located around a petrochemical complex and an oil refinery to measure ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations. VOC concentrations were 4-20-fold higher than those measured at a suburban site in Izmir, Turkey. Ethylene dichloride, a leaded gasoline additive used in petroleum refining and an intermediate product of the vinyl chloride process in the petrochemical complex, was the most abundant volatile organic compound, followed by ethyl alcohol and acetone. Evaluations based on wind direction clearly indicated that ambient VOC concentrations measured were affected by the refinery and petrochemical complex emissions. VOC concentrations showed seasonal variations at all sampling sites. Concentrations were highest in summer, followed by autumn, probably due to increased evaporation of VOCs from fugitive sources as a result of higher temperatures. VOC concentrations generally increased with temperature and wind speed. Temperature and wind speed together explained 1-60% of the variability in VOC concentrations. The variability in ambient VOC concentrations that could not be explained by temperature and wind speed can be attributed to the effect of other factors (i.e. wind direction, other VOC sources).

  7. PEMEX selects the H-Oil{reg_sign} process for their hydrodesulfurization residue complex at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisdom, L.I.; Colyar, J.J. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) has selected the H-Oil Process for the conversion and upgrading of a blend of Maya and Isthmus vacuum residua at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery. The 8,450 metric ton/day (50,000 bpsd) H-Oil Plant will produce a low sulfur (0.8 wt%) fuel oil, diesel, naphtha, and LPG. The H-Oil Plant will be a key component of the Hydrodesulfurization Residue (HDR) Complex which will be located at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Tula, State of Hidalgo, Mexico. The project is part of PEMEX`s Ecology Projects currently underway in Mexico. This paper describes the HDR Complex and the design basis of the H-Oil Plant and provides the current status of this project.

  8. Petrochemical refinery and integrated petrochemical complexes; Refinaria petroquimica e complexos petroquimicos integrados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Patricia C. dos; Seidl, Peter R.; Borschiver, Suzana [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Global demand for light olefins points to strong prospects for growth, stimulating investments in overall productive capacity. With propylene demand growing slightly faster than that of ethylene, rising prices and difficulties in supplies of petrochemical feedstocks (mainly naphtha and natural gas), steam crackers alone are not able to fill the light olefins gap nor do they allow extraordinary margins. As petrochemical market dynamics also influence refining activities, there has been significant progress in the development of technologies for petrochemical refining, such as Petrochemical FCC. This petrochemistry-refining integration offers great opportunities for synergism since both industries share many common challenges, like more severe environmental requirements and optimizing the use of utilities. However, in the case of valuation of non-conventional oils (which tend to increase in importance in oil markets), to take full advantage of this opportunity to add value to low cost streams, deep conversion and treatment processes are of great significance in refining scheme to have enough feedstock for cracking. In this context, a petrochemical refinery seems to be an important alternative source of petrochemicals and may be integrated or not to a petrochemical complex. (author)

  9. Monitoring coastal pollution associated with the largest oil refinery complex of Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Croquer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated pollution levels in water and sediments of Península de Paraguaná and related these levels with benthic macrofauna along a coastal area where the largest Venezuelan oil refineries have operated over the past 60 years. For this, the concentration of heavy metals, of hydrocarbon compounds and the community structure of the macrobenthos were examined at 20 sites distributed along 40 km of coastline for six consecutive years, which included windy and calm seasons. The spatial variability of organic and inorganic compounds showed considerably high coastal pollution along the study area, across both years and seasons. The southern sites, closest to the refineries, had consistently higher concentrations of heavy metals and organic compounds in water and sediments when compared to those in the north. The benthic community was dominated by polychaetes at all sites, seasons and years, and their abundance and distribution were significantly correlated with physical and chemical characteristics of the sediments. Sites close to the oil refineries were consistently dominated by families known to tolerate xenobiotics, such as Capitellidae and Spionidae. The results from this study highlight the importance of continuing long-term environmental monitoring programs to assess the impact of effluent discharge and spill events from the oil refineries that operate in the western coast of Paraguaná, Venezuela.

  10. Monitoring coastal pollution associated with the largest oil refinery complex of Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croquer, Aldo; Bone, David; Bastidas, Carolina; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pollution levels in water and sediments of Península de Paraguaná and related these levels with benthic macrofauna along a coastal area where the largest Venezuelan oil refineries have operated over the past 60 years. For this, the concentration of heavy metals, of hydrocarbon compounds and the community structure of the macrobenthos were examined at 20 sites distributed along 40 km of coastline for six consecutive years, which included windy and calm seasons. The spatial variability of organic and inorganic compounds showed considerably high coastal pollution along the study area, across both years and seasons. The southern sites, closest to the refineries, had consistently higher concentrations of heavy metals and organic compounds in water and sediments when compared to those in the north. The benthic community was dominated by polychaetes at all sites, seasons and years, and their abundance and distribution were significantly correlated with physical and chemical characteristics of the sediments. Sites close to the oil refineries were consistently dominated by families known to tolerate xenobiotics, such as Capitellidae and Spionidae. The results from this study highlight the importance of continuing long-term environmental monitoring programs to assess the impact of effluent discharge and spill events from the oil refineries that operate in the western coast of Paraguaná, Venezuela.

  11. Refinery scheduling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Marcus V.; Fraga, Eder T. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Shah, Nilay [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    This work addresses the refinery scheduling problem using mathematical programming techniques. The solution adopted was to decompose the entire refinery model into a crude oil scheduling and a product scheduling problem. The envelope for the crude oil scheduling problem is composed of a terminal, a pipeline and the crude area of a refinery, including the crude distillation units. The solution method adopted includes a decomposition technique based on the topology of the system. The envelope for the product scheduling comprises all tanks, process units and products found in a refinery. Once crude scheduling decisions are Also available the product scheduling is solved using a rolling horizon algorithm. All models were tested with real data from PETROBRAS' REFAP refinery, located in Canoas, Southern Brazil. (author)

  12. Size distribution and chemical composition of metalliferous stack emissions in the San Roque petroleum refinery complex, southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Campa, A M Sánchez; Moreno, T; de la Rosa, J; Alastuey, A; Querol, X

    2011-06-15

    We demonstrate that there is great variation in the size range and chemical composition of metalliferous particulate matter (PM) present within petrochemical complex chimney stacks. Cascade impactor PM samples from seven size ranges (17, 14, 5, 2.5, 1.3, 0.67, and 0.33 μm) were collected from inside stacks within the San Roque complex which includes the largest oil refinery in Spain. SEM analysis demonstrates the PM to be mostly carbonaceous and aluminous fly ash and abundant fine metalliferous particles. The metals with the most extreme concentrations averaged over all size ranges were Ni (up to 3295 μg m(-3)), Cr (962 μg m(-3)), V (638 μg m(-3)), Zn (225 μg m(-3)), Mo (91 μg m(-3)), La (865 μg m(-3)), and Co (94 μg m(-3)). Most metal PM are strongly concentrated into the finest fraction (fluid catalytic cracking stack shows high concentrations of La (>200 μg m(-3) in PM(0.67-1.3)), Cr and Ni in a relatively coarse PM size range (0.7-14 μm). Our unique database, directly sampled from chimney stacks, confirms that oil refinery complexes such as San Roque are a potent source of a variety of fine, deeply inhalable metalliferous atmospheric PM emissions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficient biodegradation of naphthalene by a newly characterized indigenous Achromobacter sp. FBHYA2 isolated from Tehran Oil Refinery Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjadfard, Sima; Borghei, Seyyed Mehdi; Hassani, Amir Hessam; Yakhchali, Bagher; Ardjmand, Mehdi; Zeinali, Majid

    2012-01-01

    A bacterial strain, FBHYA2, capable of degrading naphthalene, was isolated from the American Petroleum Institute (API) separator of the Tehran Oil Refinery Complex (TORC). Strain FBHYA2 was identified as Achromobacter sp. based on physiological and biochemical characteristics and also phylogenetic similarity of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The optimal growth conditions for strain FBHYA2 were pH 6.0, 30 °C and 1.0% NaCl. Strain FBHYA2 can utilize naphthalene as the sole source of carbon and energy and was able to degrade naphthalene aerobically very fast, 48 h for 96% removal at 500 mg/L concentration. The physiological response of Achromobacter sp., FBHYA2 to several hydrophobic chemicals (aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons) was also investigated. No biosurfactant was detected during bacterial growth on any aliphatic/aromatic hydrocarbons. The results of hydrophobicity measurements showed no significant difference between naphthalene- and LB-grown cells. The capability of the strain FBHYA2 to degrade naphthalene completely and rapidly without the need to secrete biosurfactant may make it an ideal candidate to remediate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sites.

  14. STUDY OF EFFECTIVENESS OF BREAKWATER STRUCTURES OF THE “EASTERN PETROCHEMICAL COMPANY” JSC OIL REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS PORT COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prikhod’ko Oleg Alekseevich

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the research of MGSU Corporation for testing of design solutions of the “Eastern petrochemical company” JSC oil refinery and petrochemical plants port complex using the physical modeling method. Construction of the marine terminal of the oil refinery and petrochemical plants port complex is planned to be on the Eastern shore of the Vostok Bay which is the part of Peter the Great Bay in the Sea of Japan. The port area is created by means of an artificial land site. The water area of the terminal will be guarded against sea waves by a breakwater. Experiments on the study of wave propagation in the port model water area at the Eastern and Western breakwaters were performed in the laboratory wave basin in three-dimensional layout, with the aim of obtaining of data about wave heights at berthing facilities. Effectiveness of the breakwater designs was studied in two-dimensional layout in a wave flume. During the port model construction all the designed waterworks as well as the project bathymetry of the port water area were reproduced at a scale of 1:100. Analysis of the experiment results with the slope protection embodiment version demonstrates that this engineering solution is able to withstand waves of the design parameters.

  15. Assessing the compatibility of the management of standardized procedures with the complexity of a sociotechnical system: case study of a control room in an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurin, Tarcisio Abreu; Gonzalez, Santiago Sosa

    2013-09-01

    Although the need for the management of complex socio-technical systems (STS) to be compatible with the nature of those systems is widely recognized, there are few guidelines on how to determine the actual extent of this compatibility. The purpose of this study is to assess how compatible the management of standardized procedures (SPs) is with the nature of a complex STS. To this end, a case study was made of a control room in an oil refinery, involving the following stages: (a) delimitation of the investigated STS; (b) description of the STS according to a set of characteristics of complex STS; (c) application of two types of questionnaires to thirty workers - one of them to assess their perceptions about the applicability of seven principles of SPs management in complex STS and the other to determine their perceptions about the actual use of these principles; and (d) a feedback meeting with workers to discuss the results of the assessment. The assessment is discussed in terms of its limitations, usefulness and ease of use of the data collection and analysis tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing the complexity of a refinery: a analysis of the economic impacts of the introduction of new process in refineries; O aumento da complexidade de uma refinaria: uma analise dos impactos economicos da introducao de novos processos em refinarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Cristiane M.; Seidl, Peter R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    The importance of the refining segment in the oil productive chain turns decision making on production and investment to be made at refineries dependent upon general context of the oil industry. Several technical and economic factors limit the possibilities to be foreseen by the managers. The ultimate goal of a refinery is to meet market demand in a region. Moreover, the type of processed oil and refining techniques will shape the profile of the production of derivatives. In a segment dynamic and full of uncertainties, such as refining, where the type of oil supplied to processing, specifications of products, and their demands, changes in the course of time, how to keep refining margins acceptable? This paper presents the relationship between the characteristics and the use of different kinds of oil, the characteristics of the national market of derivatives, and some characteristics of the refining processes considered in the study. The possible economic impacts that the introduction of different processes can bring to a refinery are analysed and alternatives for expansion are evaluated. To achieve these goals, a methodology for analysis considering the yield of Marlin oil refining for different schemes has been developed. (author)

  17. Trace elements record complex histories in diogenites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, J. B.; Beck, A. W.; McSween, H. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Diogenite meteorites are cumulate rocks composed mostly of orthopyroxene and chemically linked to eucrites (basaltic) and howardites (brecciated mixtures of diogenites and eucrites). Together, they represent the largest single family of achondrite meteorites delivered to Earth, and have been spectrally linked to the asteroid 4 Vesta, the largest remaining basaltic protoplanet. However, this spectral link is non-unique as many basaltic asteroids likely formed and were destroyed in the early solar system. Recent work suggested that Vesta may be an unlikely parent body for the diogenites based on correlations between trace elements and short-lived isotope decay products, which would be unlikely to survive on a body as large as Vesta due to its long cooling history [1]. Recent analyses of terrestrial and martian olivines have demonstrated that trace element spatial distributions can preserve evidence of their crystallization history even when major elements have been homogenized [2]. We have mapped minor elements including Cr, Al, and Ti in seemingly homogeneous diogenite orthopyroxenes and found a variety of previously unobserved textures. The pyroxenes in one sample (GRA 98108) are seemingly large grains of variable shapes and sizes, but the trace elements reveal internal grain boundaries between roughly-equal sized original subgrains, with equilibrated metamorphic triple junctions between them and trace element depletions at the boundaries. These trends suggest extraction of trace elements by a magma along those relict grain boundaries during a reheating event. Two other samples show evidence of fracturing and annealing, with trace element mobility within grains. One sample appears to have remained a closed system during annealing (MET 01084), while the other has interacted with a fluid or magma to move elements along annealed cracks (LEW 88679). These relict features establish that the history of diogenite pyroxenes is more complex than their homogeneous major

  18. Zimbabwean history: becoming complex | Moore | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review of Brian Raftopoulos and Alois Mlambo, eds. Becoming Zimbabwe: A History from the Pre-Colonial Period to 2008. Harare and Johannesburg: Weaver and Jacana, 2009 pp. v-xxxiv, 260. ISBN: 978-1-77922-083-7. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  19. Associations between personal exposure to air pollutants and lung function tests and cardiovascular indices among children with asthma living near an industrial complex and petroleum refineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smargiassi, Audrey; Goldberg, Mark S; Wheeler, Amanda J; Plante, Céline; Valois, Marie-France; Mallach, Gary; Kauri, Lisa Marie; Shutt, Robin; Bartlett, Susan; Raphoz, Marie; Liu, Ling

    2014-07-01

    The acute cardiorespiratory effects of air quality among children living in areas with considerable heavy industry have not been well investigated. We conducted a panel study of children with asthma living in proximity to an industrial complex housing two refineries in Montreal, Quebec, in order to assess associations between their personal daily exposure to air pollutants and changes in pulmonary function and selected indicators of cardiovascular health. Seventy-two children with asthma age 7-12 years in 2009-2010 participated in this panel study for a period of 10 consecutive days. They carried a small backpack for personal monitoring of sulphur dioxide (SO2), benzene, fine particles (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and underwent daily spirometry and cardiovascular testing (blood pressure, pulse rate and oxygen saturation). To estimate these associations, we used mixed regression models, adjusting for within-subject serial correlation, and for the effects of a number of personal and environmental variables (e.g., medication use, ethnicity, temperature). Children with asthma involved in the study had relatively good pulmonary function test results (mean FEV1 compared to standard values: 89.8%, mean FVC: 97.6%, mean FEF25-75: 76.3%). Median diastolic, systolic blood pressures and oxygen saturation were 60/94 mmHg and 99%, respectively. Median personal concentrations of pollutants were NO2, 5.5 ppb; benzene, 2.1 µg/m(3); PM2.5, 5.7 µg/m(3); and total PAH, 130 µg/m(3). Most personal concentrations of SO2 were below the level of detection. No consistent associations were observed between cardio-pulmonary indices and personal exposure to PM2.5, NO2 and benzene, although there was a suggestion for a small decrease in respiratory function with total concentrations of PAHs (e.g., adjusted association with FVC: -9.9 ml per interquartile range 95%CI: -23.4, 3.7). This study suggests that at low daily average levels of exposure

  20. [Liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Silvany Neto, Annibal Muniz; Mendes, João Luiz Barberino; Cotrim, Helma Pinchemel; Nascimento, Ana Lísia Cunha; Lima Júnior, Alberto Soares; Cunha, Tatiana Oliveira Bernardo da

    2006-02-01

    Occupational exposure typical of an oil refinery may alter liver function among the workers. Thus, the objective of the study was to identify risk factors for liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers. The workers at an oil refinery in Northeastern Brazil underwent routine annual medical examination from 1982 to 1998. This case-control study investigated all the 150 cases of individuals with simultaneous gamma-glutamyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase abnormalities of at least 10% above reference levels. As controls, 150 workers without any liver enzyme or bilirubin abnormalities since starting to work there were selected. Odds ratios and the respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated from logistic regression models. In all the production sectors, the risk of liver enzyme abnormalities was significantly higher than in the administrative sector (OR=5.7; 95% CI: 1.7-18.4), even when the effects of alcohol, obesity and medical history of hepatitis were controlled for. During the period from 1992 to 1994, 88 out of the 89 cases occurred among workers from the various production sectors. Occupational exposure plays an important role in causing liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers. This is in addition to the specifically biological and/or behavioral risk factors such as obesity and alcohol consumption.

  1. What history tells us XXXIV. The complex history of the selective ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 3. What history tells us XXXIV. The complex history of the selective model of antibody formation. Michel Morange. Series Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2014 pp 347-350. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. The natural history of epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Catherine Jean; Major, Philippe; Camposano, Susana; Muzykewicz, David; Thiele, Elizabeth Anne

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although epilepsy affects most patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), little is known about the natural history of epilepsy in this genetic disease. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all patients with TSC seen between January 2002 and October 2008. Charts were reviewed for a history of infantile spasms (IS), seizure other than IS, refractory epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), anticonvulsant medication use, ages of seizure onset, last seizure, last clinic ...

  3. The natural history of epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu-Shore, Catherine J; Major, Philippe; Camposano, Susana; Muzykewicz, David; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2010-07-01

    Although epilepsy affects most patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), little is known about the natural history of epilepsy in this genetic disease. A retrospective chart review of all patients with TSC seen between January 2002 and October 2008. Charts were reviewed for a history of infantile spasms (IS), seizure other than IS, refractory epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), anticonvulsant medication use, ages of seizure onset, last seizure, last clinic visit, clinical seizure phenotype(s), cognitive impairment, and genetic mutation. Two hundred ninety-one patients were included. Among these patients, 37.8% had a history of IS; 85.2% had a history of seizure; 54.1% developed multiple seizure types, not including IS; 63.2% had seizure onset in the first year of life; and 12.1% of adults without a seizure history developed epilepsy. Of epilepsy patients, 62.5% developed refractory epilepsy and 33.5% achieved epilepsy remission; 37.5% of these patients achieved medication freedom. IS was a risk factor for refractory epilepsy (pHistory of seizure, IS, age at seizure onset, and refractory epilepsy each correlated with poor cognitive outcome (pEpilepsy remission correlated with better cognitive outcome (pepilepsy; patients without an identified mutation were more likely to achieve remission. Most patients with TSC develop epilepsy and most develop multiple seizure types. Onset typically occurs in the first year of life; however, adults remain at risk. Although refractory epilepsy is common, many patients achieve seizure control. Many features of seizure history are predictive of cognitive and epilepsy outcome.

  4. Refinery uses bioslurry process to treat RCRA wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oolman, T.; Baker, R.R. [Radian International LLC, Austin, TX (United States); Renfro, N.L.; Marshall, G.E. [Valero Refining Co., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Restrictions on land disposal of oily refinery wastes have forced the refining industry to develop cost-effective methods to treat these wastes before disposal. Valero Refining Company is using an onsite, tank-based biological treatment process to treat oily wastes at its Corpus Christi, Texas, refinery. This system consistently treats these wastes to RCRA universal treatment standards (UTS), thereby allowing direct disposal of the treated residue in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted landfill. In selecting the biotreatment process, Valero used several criteria including environmental performance, equipment reliability and ability to be integrated into refinery operations and process safety. Capital investment, maintenance and operating costs also were important considerations. This case history shows how Valero successfully used the bioslurry process to treat oily wastes such as API separator sludge and slop-oil emulsion before landfill disposal.

  5. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS type 1 validating case histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berger

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has been advocated as the corner stone and most important aspect of treatment in the rehabilitation of these individuals but unfortunately it has been difficult to execute when pain is exacerbated due to allodynia (unbearable to touch or move and hyperalgesia. Best results have been obtained if the patients are recognised and treated in the early or acute phase and it has been found that through careful assessment and analysis these patients can be recognised by previous events that have occurred in their initial case history. The treatment in the acute stage with physiotherapy modalities such as electrical stimulation and acupuncture will produce an early cessation of the symptoms and prevention of the disease developing into the fully blown CRPS type 1 with irreversible and possibly atrophic consequences. Case histories have been presented that illustrate these important aspects and demonstrate  the value of early and the appropriate physiotherapy that may be more successful than other pharmacological and physical interventions in this disease.

  6. Complex history of admixture between modern humans and Neandertals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernot, Benjamin; Akey, Joshua M

    2015-03-05

    Recent analyses have found that a substantial amount of the Neandertal genome persists in the genomes of contemporary non-African individuals. East Asians have, on average, higher levels of Neandertal ancestry than do Europeans, which might be due to differences in the efficiency of purifying selection, an additional pulse of introgression into East Asians, or other unexplored scenarios. To better define the scope of plausible models of archaic admixture between Neandertals and anatomically modern humans, we analyzed patterns of introgressed sequence in whole-genome data of 379 Europeans and 286 East Asians. We found that inferences of demographic history restricted to neutrally evolving genomic regions allowed a simple one-pulse model to be robustly rejected, suggesting that differences in selection cannot explain the differences in Neandertal ancestry. We show that two additional demographic models, involving either a second pulse of Neandertal gene flow into the ancestors of East Asians or a dilution of Neandertal lineages in Europeans by admixture with an unknown ancestral population, are consistent with the data. Thus, the history of admixture between modern humans and Neandertals is most likely more complex than previously thought. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Operational planning of refineries; Planejamento operacional de refinarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinay, Maria Cristina Fogliatti de [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bueno, Catia [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The activities integration that compose the petroleum logistic chain makes more complex its planning which is normally done in a joined level, using operation research models in order to find optimized solutions. When this integrated planning is repassed to the companies and its constitutes parts (mainly refinery) uncertainness are generated about the solution that will be adopted in case of new restrictions appear. Then, the purpose of this work is propose a procedure that is capable to adequate and specifies optimized solutions presented by corporative model to refinery operations, using 'What-if' and deterministic simulation technique with optimization. To achieve this objective will be analysed typical activities in refineries and basic principles to their operational planning. (author)

  8. Hydroprocessing and premium II refinery: a new refining philosophy for an era of clean fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgaudio, Caio Veiga Penna; Pinotti, Rafael [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses a brief history of Brazilian's emission and fuel specifications, since the appearance of PROCONVE until the late stages of the program for vehicles powered by gasoline and diesel. The development of the Brazilian refining is analyzed taking into account the emission and specification evolutions, and it can be perceived that the system's complexity increases while new constraints are imposed by the regulator. This aspect is even more apparent when the detailed scheme of the Premium II refinery and its main unit, the catalytic hydrocracker (HCC, which has not yet been part of PETROBRAS' refining park and will appear in three of the four new refineries of the company) is described. The new projects represent the culmination of the intensive use of energy and raw material for obtaining the products with the new specifications. There is a price for this development, both in investments and increased operating costs due to greater complexity of the system. To adapt to the era of clean fuels, refiners will present a series of challenges that will lead them to seek for more efficient processes and operational excellence (and ongoing efforts to reduce their emissions) in order to ensure positive refining margins. (author)

  9. The natural history of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Robert J; Erwin, Kirsten L; Alexander, Guillermo M

    2009-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a severe chronic pain condition characterized by sensory, autonomic, motor, and dystrophic signs and symptoms. This study was undertaken to expand our current knowledge of the evolution of CRPS signs and symptoms with duration of disease. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis using data extracted from a patient questionnaire to evaluate the clinical characteristics of CRPS at different time points of disease progression. Data from the questionnaire included pain characteristics and associated symptoms. It also included autonomic, motor, and dystrophic symptoms and also initiating events, ameliorating and aggravating factors, quality of life, work status, comorbid conditions, pattern of pain spread, family history, and demographics. Comparisons were made of different parameters as they varied with disease duration. A total of 656 patients with CRPS of at least 1-year duration were evaluated. The average age of all participants was 37.5 years, with disease duration varying from 1 to 46 years. The majority of participants were white (96%). A total of 80.3% were females. None of the patients in this study demonstrated spontaneous remission of their symptoms. The pain in these patients was refractory showing only modest improvement with most current therapies. This study shows that although CRPS is a progressive disease, after 1 year, the majority of the signs and symptoms were well developed and although many variables worsen over the course of the illness, the majority demonstrated only moderate increases with disease duration.

  10. From model state combine to top refinery. The successful history of the PCK Raffinerie GmbH; Vom Vorzeigekombinat zur Spitzenraffinerie. Die erfolgreiche Entwicklung der PCK Raffinerie GmbH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winsen, Josephus van [PCK Raffinerie GmbH, Schwedt an der Oder (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    The PCK Raffinerie GmbH had a double anniversary in 2011: It was founded 50 years ago and passed into private hands 20 years ago. The PCK is regularly cited as one of the leading European refineries in the global Solomon study, which is published every two years. This was achieved by a number of measures, e.g. regular 'best practice' analyses and an effective suggestion awards system. (orig./AKB)

  11. 40 CFR 80.1441 - Small refinery exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... refinery meets the definition of a small refinery under § 80.1401 for calendar year 2006. (2) The exemption.... (4) This exemption shall only apply to refineries that process crude oil through refinery processing... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small refinery exemption. 80.1441...

  12. Petroleum Refineries (Catalytic Cracking, Catalytic Reforming and Sulfur Recovery Units): National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    learn more about the NESHAP for catalytic cracking and reforming units, as well as sulfur recovery units in petroleum refineries by reading the rule history, rule summary, background information documents, and compliance information

  13. EFFECTS OF REFINERY EFFLUENT ON THE PHYSICO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECTS OF REFINERY EFFLUENT ON THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF STREAM WATER. ... Global Journal of Engineering Research ... In this work, the effects of refinery effluent discharge on the physico-chemical parameters of the stream water has been studied, using treated effluent water discharged ...

  14. Smoking habits of oil refinery employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Peenen, P F; Blanchard, A G; Wolkonsky, P M

    1984-01-01

    Smoking habits of White male employees of a large oil company were analyzed. There were only slight differences in smoking habits between refinery and nonrefinery employees. Salaried employees, both at refineries and elsewhere, smoked much less than hourly employees. PMID:6507698

  15. Bioremediation of petroleum refinery effluent by Planococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present investigation, Planococcus halophilus was screened for hydrocarbon degradation and bioremediation of refinery effluent. The test organism, P. halophilus, showed the capability to utilize kerosene as carbon source in minimal medium. Biological treatment of the refinery effluent with P. halophilus reduced the ...

  16. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS) type 1 validating case histories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve...

  17. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  18. Refinery production planning and scheduling: the refining core business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Joly

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent production planning and scheduling are of paramount importance to ensure refinery profitability, logistic reliability and safety at the local and corporate levels. In Brazil, such activities play a particularly critical role, since the Brazilian downstream model is moving towards a demand-driven model rather than a supply-driven one. Moreover, new and specialized non-linear constraints are continuously being incorporated into these large-scale problems: increases in oil prices implying the need for processing poor quality crudes, increasing demand and new demand patterns for petroleum products, new stringent environmental regulations related to clean fuels and start-up of new production technologies embedded into more complex refining schemes. This paper aims at clarifying the central role of refinery planning and scheduling activities in the Petrobras refining business. Major past and present results are outlined and corporate long-term strategies to deal with present and future challenges are presented.

  19. First insights into the evolutionary history of the Davallia repens complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.-W.; Ngan, L.T.; Hidayat, A.; Evangelista, L.; Nooteboom, H.P.; Chiou, W.-L.

    2014-01-01

    Davallia repens and its close relatives have been identified as a species complex in this study because of the existence of continuously morphological variation. To decipher its evolutionary history, integrated methodologies were applied in this study including morphology, cytology, reproductive

  20. 40 CFR 80.1141 - Small refinery exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... parties under this subpart if that refinery meets the definition of a small refinery under § 80.1101(g... crude oil, or feedstocks derived from crude oil, through refinery processing units. (b)(1) The small... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small refinery exemption. 80.1141...

  1. The complex history of the fronto-occipital fasciculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Pandya, Deepak N

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the history of the fronto-occipital fasciculus (FOF) and related tracts in the cerebral white matter because of their contemporary relevance for connectional neuroanatomy, magnetic resonance tractography, and clinical neurology. The term "FOF" originated with Forel and Onufrowicz who misidentified aberrant longitudinally oriented callosal fibers in patients with callosal agenesis. This error was soon recognized, and Dejerine described an actual FOF linking frontal and occipital lobes, but gross dissection and lesion-degeneration methods could not distinguish the FOF from the subcallosal fasciculus of Muratoff and neighboring white matter bundles. Subsequent descriptions of a probably nonexistent "inferior FOF" have led to the FOF being misnamed post-hoc "superior FOF," and other imprecise anatomical concepts and terminologies from the early literature are still perpetuated. Our analysis of brain fiber pathways using isotope anterograde tract tracers (Schmahmann & Pandya, 2006) resolves the earlier uncertainties and provides hypotheses regarding functions of these fiber pathways.

  2. Meteorologically estimated exposure but not distance predicts asthma symptoms in schoolchildren in the environs of a petrochemical refinery: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Wesley

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community concern about asthma prompted an epidemiological study of children living near a petrochemical refinery in Cape Town, South Africa. Because of resource constraints and the complexity of refinery emissions, neither direct environmental measurements nor modelling of airborne pollutants was possible. Instead a meteorologically derived exposure metric was calculated with the refinery as the putative point source. The study aimed to determine whether (1 asthma symptom prevalences were elevated compared to comparable areas in Cape Town and (2 whether there was an association between asthma symptom prevalences and the derived exposure metric. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out of all consenting school children aged 11 to 14 years attending schools in a defined area, utilizing the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC written and video questionnaires. Information was collected on potential confounders, e.g. parental history of atopic disease, active and passive smoking by the participant, birth order, number of children in the home and distance from a major road. The exposure metric combined residential distance of each child from the refinery with a wind vector in the form of wind speed, wind direction and proportion of the year blown. Results A total of 2,361 children from 17 schools met the criteria for inclusion. In multivariate analysis, meteorologically estimated exposure (MEE, but not simple distance from the refinery, was positively associated with having to take an inhaler to school [odds ratio per interquartile range (OR 1.22, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.06-1.40], and with a number of video elicited asthma symptoms, including recent waking with wheezing (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.06-1.66 and frequent wheezing at rest (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.05 - 1.54. Symptom prevalences were higher than in other areas of the city, with frequent waking with wheezing being in great excess (OR 8.92, 95% CI

  3. Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deger, Leylâ; Plante, Céline; Jacques, Louis; Goudreau, Sophie; Perron, Stéphane; Hicks, John; Kosatsky, Tom; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children’s respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO2 have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO2 from petroleum refineries located in Montreal’s (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO2 exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO2 exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child’s age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home. RESULTS: The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO2 levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO2. The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO2 [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]). CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO2 and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries. PMID:22536578

  4. Hydrogen management in the MiRO refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, G. [Mineraloelraffinerie Oberrhein GmbH und Co. KG, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    The importance of hydrogen in refineries has increased over the last 20 years as new regulations affecting gasoline and diesel composition have been implemented throughout Europe and in an environment of increasingly stringent clean fuel regulations, decreasing heavy fuel oil demand and increasing heavy more sour crude supply. In Germany, the introduction of sulphur free gasoline and diesel with less than 10ppm sulphur(Auto Oil Program) and light home fuel oil with less than 50ppm this year were the last link in a long chain of environmental regulations, which had a considerable effect on the hydrogen demand in refineries. In the complex MiRO-refinery with a large FCC- and Coker-Unit for atmospheric residue conversion and a total throughput of more than 15 Mio.T/ a and more than 14 Mio.T/a crude oils of different origin from high sulphur, bituminous crudes to medium, low sulphur crudes for calcinate-production from green coke the only source of hydrogen for a long time was catalytic reforming. The only chance of balancing the hydrogen production and consumption was to improve the existing catalytic reforming and the optimisation of hydrogen recovery from waste or purge streams and the hydrogen network of the refinery. In 2007 a new hydrogen plant via steam reforming of natural gas went on stream. The main reason for this step was the shrinking market for gasoline in the last ten years and the blending of bio-ethanol into the gasoline pool, which released reforming capacities and the demand for octane. Another important issue is the production planning taking into account the potentials of hydrogen production via catalytic and steam reforming and the hydrogen consumption via desulphurisation and the saturation of olefins and (poly-)aromatics of the main product streams, gasoline, diesel and light home fuel oil. (orig.)

  5. Mazeikiai refinery woes deepen on all fronts

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Leedu rahandusminister teatas, et riigieelarvet mõjutavad probleemid Mazeikiai tehasega, mis on Leedu suurim maksumaksja. Lisa: Russian oil company to build refinery. Surgutneftegaz teatas plaanist ehitada naftatöötlustehas Peterburi lähedale

  6. Health risk assessments for alumina refineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, A Michael; Coffey, Patrick S

    2014-05-01

    To describe contemporary air dispersion modeling and health risk assessment methodologies applied to alumina refineries and to summarize recent results. Air dispersion models using emission source and meteorological data have been used to assess ground-level concentrations (GLCs) of refinery emissions. Short-term (1-hour and 24-hour average) GLCs and annual average GLCs have been used to assess acute health, chronic health, and incremental carcinogenic risks. The acute hazard index can exceed 1 close to refineries, but it is typically less than 1 at neighboring residential locations. The chronic hazard index is typically substantially less than 1. The incremental carcinogenic risk is typically less than 10(-6). The risks of acute health effects are adequately controlled, and the risks of chronic health effects and incremental carcinogenic risks are negligible around referenced alumina refineries.

  7. Refinery energy profile. Preparation Task 1 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, R.W.

    1977-07-01

    The objective of the effort is to develop a technique for efficiently conducting energy audits on petroleum refineries. Work on the completed Task No. 1 is reported for the Gulf's Alliance Refinery. Background on the contract is presented in Sections II and III; a discussion of the Alliance Refinery is presented in Section IV and a summary of the work under Task I is presented in Section V. A glossary of terms used for this report is found in the Appendix. In Task No. 1, the refinery was separated into 12 processing units, utilities, and offsites; or a total of 14 units in all to be studied individually. This was accomplished through studying the various process flow charts, and then confirming the break-out of units by on-site visits as reasonable for the identification of areas where essential data such as temperature, pressure, and flow rates can be measured. (MCW)

  8. The real and the complex a history of analysis in the 19th century

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a history of real and complex analysis in the nineteenth century, from the work of Lagrange and Fourier to the origins of set theory and the modern foundations of analysis. It studies the works of many contributors including Gauss, Cauchy, Riemann, and Weierstrass. This book is unique owing to the treatment of real and complex analysis as overlapping, inter-related subjects, in keeping with how they were seen at the time. It is suitable as a course in the history of mathematics for students who have studied an introductory course in analysis, and will enrich any course in undergraduate real or complex analysis.

  9. Health Risk Assessments for Alumina Refineries

    OpenAIRE

    Donoghue, A Michael; Coffey, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe contemporary air dispersion modeling and health risk assessment methodologies applied to alumina refineries and to summarize recent results. Methods: Air dispersion models using emission source and meteorological data have been used to assess ground-level concentrations (GLCs) of refinery emissions. Short-term (1-hour and 24-hour average) GLCs and annual average GLCs have been used to assess acute health, chronic health, and incremental carcinogenic risks. Results: The ...

  10. Current situation of oil refinery in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershkova, Elena; Petkova, Petinka; Grinkevich, Anastasia

    2016-09-01

    This article deals with the classification approach for oil refineries in international practices. Criteria of refinery estimation group, including its financial status estimation, have been investigated. The analysis object is “Lukoil Neftochim Bourgas” AD (LNCHB) activity. This company is a leading enterprise in Bulgaria. The analysis of LNCHB operating: energy intensity index; index of operating costs and return on investment index have been performed.

  11. Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

  12. HUBBLE PROBES THE COMPLEX HISTORY OF A DYING STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen, NGC 6543, nicknamed the 'Cat's Eye Nebula.' Hubble reveals surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas. Estimated to be 1,000 years old, the nebula is a visual 'fossil record' of the dynamics and late evolution of a dying star. A preliminary interpretation suggests that the star might be a double-star system. The dynamical effects of two stars orbiting one another most easily explains the intricate structures, which are much more complicated than features seen in most planetary nebulae. (The two stars are too close together to be individually resolved by Hubble, and instead, appear as a single point of light at the center of the nebula.) According to this model, a fast 'stellar wind' of gas blown off the central star created the elongated shell of dense, glowing gas. This structure is embedded inside two larger lobes of gas blown off the star at an earlier phase. These lobes are 'pinched' by a ring of denser gas, presumably ejected along the orbital plane of the binary companion. The suspected companion star also might be responsible for a pair of high-speed jets of gas that lie at right angles to this equatorial ring. If the companion were pulling in material from a neighboring star, jets escaping along the companion's rotation axis could be produced. These jets would explain several puzzling features along the periphery of the gas lobes. Like a stream of water hitting a sand pile, the jets compress gas ahead of them, creating the 'curlicue' features and bright arcs near the outer edge of the lobes. The twin jets are now pointing in different directions than these features. This suggests the jets are wobbling, or precessing, and turning on and off episodically. The image was taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 on September 18, 1994. NGC 6543 is 3,000 light-years away in the

  13. History matching of a complex epidemiological model of human immunodeficiency virus transmission by using variance emulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianakis, I; Vernon, I; McCreesh, N; McKinley, T J; Oakley, J E; Nsubuga, R N; Goldstein, M; White, R G

    2017-08-01

    Complex stochastic models are commonplace in epidemiology, but their utility depends on their calibration to empirical data. History matching is a (pre)calibration method that has been applied successfully to complex deterministic models. In this work, we adapt history matching to stochastic models, by emulating the variance in the model outputs, and therefore accounting for its dependence on the model's input values. The method proposed is applied to a real complex epidemiological model of human immunodeficiency virus in Uganda with 22 inputs and 18 outputs, and is found to increase the efficiency of history matching, requiring 70% of the time and 43% fewer simulator evaluations compared with a previous variant of the method. The insight gained into the structure of the human immunodeficiency virus model, and the constraints placed on it, are then discussed.

  14. Status and tasks of oil refinery industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, I.M. [Korea Petroleum Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The oil refinery industry is currently undergoing more difficulties than other industries. Since crude oil is all imported, whose import amount is the biggest as single item, and usance financing that once extended up to one hundred eighty (180) days is not easy to get under the current exchange and financial crisis, there are many hardships in import of crude oil. With this, domestic petroleum products demand shows sudden decline trend while competition gets more intensified due to remarkable regulation relief and liberalization measures in oil refinery industry such as the liberalization of domestic oil prices, etc. It is estimated that it entered the low growth stage as high-growth age of double-digit ends due to several complicated factors and rapid changes of economic environment. Under these crisis situations, domestic oil refinery industry drives super retrenchment management and restructuring for survival, but they are bombarded with piled up tasks while faced with liberalization and outward opening of imminent oil refinery business and domestic petroleum market. Domestic oil refinery industry should provide petroleum energy, which is blood of national economy and industries steadily without interruption overcoming wisely the worst management crisis with collective wisdom based on the accumulated management know-how and experience for the past first generation, and I also firmly believe that they can do that. 21 tabs.

  15. Innovative study clarifies evolutionary history of early complex single-celled organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2004-01-01

    A billion years ago (the Neoproterozoic age), complex single-celled organisms, acritarchs, began to develop, grow, and thrive. Almost a billion years later, the study of the evolutionary history of acritarchs began to bog down amid inconsistencies in the reporting of the diversity of species.

  16. 76 FR 52556 - Election To Expense Certain Refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... October 3, 2008, the 2008 Act amended the definition of ``qualified refinery'' under section 179C(d)(1) to..., in Sec. 1.179C- 1(b)(5)(i), modify this definition to provide generally that refinery property is... the primary purpose of the refinery is to process liquid fuel from crude oil, qualified fuels, or...

  17. Early days in complex dynamics a history of complex dynamics in one variable during 1906-1942

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Daniel S; Rosa, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The theory of complex dynamics, whose roots lie in 19th-century studies of the iteration of complex function conducted by Kœnigs, Schröder, and others, flourished remarkably during the first half of the 20th century, when many of the central ideas and techniques of the subject developed. This book by Alexander, Iavernaro, and Rosa paints a robust picture of the field of complex dynamics between 1906 and 1942 through detailed discussions of the work of Fatou, Julia, Siegel, and several others. A recurrent theme of the authors' treatment is the center problem in complex dynamics. They present its complete history during this period and, in so doing, bring out analogies between complex dynamics and the study of differential equations, in particular, the problem of stability in Hamiltonian systems. Among these analogies are the use of iteration and problems involving small divisors which the authors examine in the work of Poincaré and others, linking them to complex dynamics, principally via the work of Samuel...

  18. Historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jens Aage

    Historie i serien handler om læreplaner og læremidler og deres brug i skolefaget historie. Bogen indeholder nyttige redskaber til at analysere og vurdere læremidler......Historie i serien handler om læreplaner og læremidler og deres brug i skolefaget historie. Bogen indeholder nyttige redskaber til at analysere og vurdere læremidler...

  19. Energy supply of oil refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derbaremdiker, M.I.; Kirichenko, N.A.; Nikolayev, N.I.; Yermakov, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    Residual products of refining oil should be used at the site of their production, i.e., at the oil refinery, in particular for gasification. According to the plan of the All-Union Scientific Research Industry of the Oil Industry, gasification is done in a lined reactor at 1400-1500/sup 0/C under pressure up to 1.5 MPa. The fuel components of gas are CO and H/sub 2/. The combustion heat of gas is 4600 kJ/m/sup 3/. The carbon black formed in the process is returned to the reactor and completely gasified, 90-93% of the sulfur from the fuel is converted into H/sub 2/S, the remaining part into organosulfuric compound. The fuel ash together with the carbon black is removed by gas from the reactor. The physical heat of the gas which is up to 25% of the combustion heat of the fuel is used in the boiler-recovery unit for producting saturated steam with pressure to 10 MPa. The gas cooled in the boiler-recovery unit is washed of carbon black and ash by hot water, then from H/sub 2/S by an alkaline sorbent (aqueous solution of tricalcium phosphate). The H/sub 2/S released during regeneration of the sorbent is used as the raw material for producing the elementary sulfur or A/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The carbon black is removed from the wash water by the granulation method. With mixing of the water containing carbon black with mazut, granules are obtained which are then dissolved by the original raw material, and the obtained suspension is fed into the reactor. The clarified water is returned to the cycle of gas purification. Based on the experimental data of the Institute of High Temperatures of the USSR Academy of Sciences, All-Union Scientific Research Institute of the Oil Industry and NIIOTAZ, a unit was developed for gasifying high-sulfur mazut for power plants.

  20. Introductory Paper on the Assab Petroleum Refinery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    decided upon. The most practical and economical type of refinery chosen consisted of the following technolo- logical processes:- a) Desalting b) Atmospheric distillation c) Vacuum distillation d) Hydrotreating of reforming charge and catalytic reforming for premium gasoline e) Desulphurisation for lighting and jet kerosenes.

  1. Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

  2. Philosophy, history and sociology of science: interdisciplinary relations and complex social identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, Hauke

    2014-12-01

    Sociology and philosophy of science have an uneasy relationship, while the marriage of history and philosophy of science has--on the surface at least--been more successful I will take a sociological look at the history of the relationships between philosophy and history as well as philosophy and sociology of science. Interdisciplinary relations between these disciplines will be analysed through social identity complexity theory in oider to draw out some conclusions on how the disciplines interact and how they might develop. I will use the relationships between the disciplines as a pointer for a more general social theory of interdisciplinarity which will then be used to sound a caution on how interdisciplinary relations between the three disciplines might be managed.

  3. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil From Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Michael [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Marker, Terry [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Ortiz-Toral, Pedro [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Linck, Martin [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Felix, Larry [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Wangerow, Jim [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Swanson, Dan [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); McLeod, Celeste [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Del Paggio, Alan [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Urade, Vikrant [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Rao, Madhusudhan [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Narasimhan, Laxmi [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Gephart, John [Johnson Timber, Hayward, WI (United States); Starr, Jack [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Hahn, John [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Stover, Daniel [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Parrish, Martin [Valero, San Antonio, TX (United States); Maxey, Carl [Valero, San Antonio, TX (United States); Shonnard, David [MTU, Friedrichshafen (Germany); Handler, Robert [MTU, Friedrichshafen (Germany); Fan, Jiquig [MTU, Friedrichshafen (Germany)

    2015-08-31

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be converted to bio-oils containing less than 10% oxygen by a hydropyrolysis process. Hydropyrolysis is the first step in Gas Technology Institute’s (GTI) integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion IH2®. These intermediate bio-oils can then be converted to drop-in hydrocarbon fuels using existing refinery hydrotreating equipment to make hydrocarbon blending components, which are fully compatible with existing fuels. Alternatively, cellulosic or woody biomass can directly be converted into drop-in hydrocarbon fuels containing less than 0.4% oxygen using the IH2 process located adjacent to a refinery or ethanol production facility. Many US oil refineries are actually located near biomass resources and are a logical location for a biomass to transportation fuel conversion process. The goal of this project was to work directly with an oil refinery partner, to determine the most attractive route and location for conversion of biorenewables to drop in fuels in their refinery and ethanol production network. Valero Energy Company, through its subsidiaries, has 12 US oil refineries and 11 ethanol production facilities, making them an ideal partner for this analysis. Valero is also part of a 50- 50 joint venture with Darling Ingredients called Diamond Green Diesel. Diamond Green Diesel’s production capacity is approximately 11,000 barrels per day of renewable diesel. The plant is located adjacent to Valero’s St Charles, Louisiana Refinery and converts recycled animal fats, used cooking oil, and waste corn oil into renewable diesel. This is the largest renewable diesel plant in the U.S. and has successfully operated for over 2 years For this project, 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oil from wood and 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oils from corn stover were produced. The hydropyrolysis oil produced had 4-10% oxygen. Metallurgical testing of hydropyrolysis liquids was completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratories (Oak Ridge) and showed the

  4. Production planning and scheduling in refinery industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jan

    1999-07-01

    In this thesis we consider production planning and scheduling in refinery industry, in particular we study the planning and scheduling at the Nynaes AB refinery and at the Scanraff AB refinery. The purpose is to contribute to the development and the use of optimization models to support efficient decision making. We identify various decision problems concerning the aggregated production planning, the shipment planning, the scheduling of operation modes, and the utilization of pipes and tanks; and we discuss the potential to successfully apply optimization models on these problems. We formulate a mixed integer linear programming model for the scheduling of operation modes at Nynaes. The model concerns decisions about which mode of operation to use at a particular point in time in order to minimize costs of changing modes and costs of keeping inventories, given demands for products. We derive several types of valid inequalities for this mathematical problem and show how these inequalities can improve the lower bound obtained from the linear programming relaxation of the problem. We also show how the valid inequalities can be used to improve the performance of a branch and bound solution approach. Further, a tabu search heuristic is developed for the scheduling problem. The solution methods are tested on data provided by the Nynaes refinery, and the performance of the methods are discussed. We present several extensions of the proposed model, and illustrate how the model can be used to support both operational and strategic decision making at the refinery. 66 refs, 6 figs, 32 tabs. Also published as: Dissertation from the International Graduate School of Management and Industrial Engineering, No 25, Licenciate Thesis.

  5. Production planning and scheduling in refinery industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jan

    1999-06-01

    In this thesis we consider production planning and scheduling in refinery industry, in particular we study the planning and scheduling at the Nynaes AB refinery and at the Scanraff AB refinery. The purpose is to contribute to the development and the use of optimization models to support efficient decision making. We identify various decision problems concerning the aggregated production planning, the shipment planning, the scheduling of operation modes, and the utilization of pipes and tanks; and we discuss the potential to successfully apply optimization models on these problems. We formulate a mixed integer linear programming model for the scheduling of operation modes at Nynaes. The model concerns decisions about which mode of operation to use at a particular point in time in order to minimize costs of changing modes and costs of keeping inventories, given demands for products. We derive several types of valid inequalities for this mathematical problem and show how these inequalities can improve the lower bound obtained from the linear programming relaxation of the problem. We also show how the valid inequalities can be used to improve the performance of a branch and bound solution approach. Further, a tabu search heuristic is developed for the scheduling problem. The solution methods are tested on data provided by the Nynaes refinery, and the performance of the methods are discussed. We present several extensions of the proposed model, and illustrate how the model can be used to support both operational and strategic decision making at the refinery. 66 refs, 6 figs, 32 tabs. Also published as: Dissertation from the International Graduate School of Management and Industrial Engineering, No 25, Licenciate Thesis

  6. Cross-sectional survey of kidney function in refinery employees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viau, C.; Bernard, A.; Lauwerys, R.; Buchet, J.P.; Quaeghebeur, L.; Cornu, M.E.; Phillips, S.C.; Mutti, A.; Lucertini, S.; Franchini, I.

    1987-01-01

    We examined sensitive biochemical and immunological markers of kidney function and damage in 53 male oil refinery workers exposed to hydrocarbons and compared their results with those of a control group of 61 age-matched nonexposed males. The mean duration of employment of exposed males was 11 years. The current levels of exposure to a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as determined by personal monitoring, were well below the current threshold limit values. No difference was found in the urinary tubular parameters beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m) and retinol-binding protein. Similar serum beta 2-m levels indicated no impairment of the glomerular filtration rate in the exposed workers. The levels of circulating immune complexes were also identical in both groups. The mean albuminuria was slightly higher (p less than .005) in the exposed group in a quantitative assay but was not dipstick-detectable. The mean urinary excretion of a renal antigen was also higher (p less than .05) in the exposed group and correlated with the excretion of albumin. Finally, slightly higher titers of anti-laminin antibodies were found in five exposed employees, but this was not accompanied by an increased albuminuria. We conclude that chronic low-level hydrocarbon exposure in these refinery workers does not lead to clinically significant renal abnormalities. Nevertheless, some findings are consistent with the possible role of hydrocarbon exposure in the induction of renal disturbances.

  7. Macroevolution of hyperdiverse flightless beetles reflects the complex geological history of the Sunda Arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tänzler, Rene; Van Dam, Matthew H; Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Suhardjono, Yayuk R; Balke, Michael; Riedel, Alexander

    2016-01-08

    The Sunda Arc forms an almost continuous chain of islands and thus a potential dispersal corridor between mainland Southeast Asia and Melanesia. However, the Sunda Islands have rather different geological histories, which might have had an important impact on actual dispersal routes and community assembly. Here, we reveal the biogeographical history of hyperdiverse and flightless Trigonopterus weevils. Different approaches to ancestral area reconstruction suggest a complex east to west range expansion. Out of New Guinea, Trigonopterus repeatedly reached the Moluccas and Sulawesi transgressing Lydekker's Line. Sulawesi repeatedly acted as colonization hub for different segments of the Sunda Arc. West Java, East Java and Bali are recognized as distinct biogeographic areas. The timing and diversification of species largely coincides with the geological chronology of island emergence. Colonization was not inhibited by traditional biogeographical boundaries such as Wallace's Line. Rather, colonization patterns support distance dependent dispersal and island age limiting dispersal.

  8. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  9. Analysis of an alumina refinery steam system

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Craig Leslie

    2017-01-01

    The Rio Tinto Alcan - Yarwun (RTA Y) alumina refinery is currently undergoing a major expansion, with the possibility of further expansion in the future. The current expansion sees the addition of a Gas Turbine (GT) and Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) to the utility system, resulting in significant excess high pressure (HP) steam generating capacity in the utility system. Additionally, an excess of low pressure (LP) flash steam is generated from the HP condensate and is currently vented ...

  10. Aggradational and erosional history of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechert, T.V.; McDaniel, P.A.; Falen, A.L. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Long-term performance of the low-level waste disposal site at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is partially dependent on the stability of the land surface with respect to erosion of cover materials. This document discusses the aggradational and erosional history of the naturally occurring sediments and soils in and around the RWMC, focusing on the late-Pleistocene and Holocene epochs. Other related issues include the ages of the various deposits, the extent to which they have been altered by soil formation and other processes, their relationships to the basalt flows in the area, and the impact of human activity on the materials at the RWMC.

  11. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in alumina refinery employees

    OpenAIRE

    Musk, A; de Klerk, N H; Beach, J.; Fritschi, L; Sim, M.; Benke, G.; Abramson, M; McNeil, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Employees in alumina refineries are known to be exposed to a number of potential respiratory irritants, particularly caustic mist and bauxite and alumina dusts. To examine the prevalence of work related respiratory symptoms and lung function in alumina refinery employees and relate these to their jobs.
METHODS—2964 current employees of three alumina refineries in Western Australia were invited to participate in a cross sectional study, and 89% responded. Subjects were given a quest...

  12. The Lutzomyia longipalpis complex: a brief natural history of aggregation-sex pheromone communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina N. Spiegel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper we review the natural history of pheromone communication and the current diversity of aggregation-sex pheromones in the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis. This species complex is the main vector of Leishmania infantum, the agent of visceral leishmaniasis in the Americas. The identification of variation in pheromone chemotypes combined with molecular and sound analyses have all contributed to our understanding of the extent of divergence among cryptic members of this complex. The importance of chemical signals as pre-mating barriers and drivers of speciation is discussed. Moreover, the importance of aggregation-sex pheromones as sexually selected signals is highlighted with evidence from the literature suggesting their potential role in species and mate recognition as well as mate assessment. The distinct evolutionary forces possibly involved are briefly reviewed and discussed in the context of this intriguing insect.

  13. Complex History and Differentiation Patterns of the t-Haplotype, a Mouse Meiotic Driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Reka K; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2017-11-14

    The t-haplotype, a mouse meiotic driver found on chromosome 17, has been a model for autosomal segregation distortion for close to a century, but several questions remain regarding its biology and evolutionary history. A recently published set of population genomics resources for wild mice includes several individuals heterozygous for the t-haplotype, which we use to characterize this selfish element at the genomic and transcriptomic level. Our results show that large sections of the t-haplotype have been replaced by standard homologous sequences, possibly due to occasional events of recombination, and that this complicates the inference of its history. As expected for a long genomic segment of very low recombination, the t-haplotype carries an excess of fixed nonsynonymous mutations compared to the standard chromosome. This excess is stronger for regions that have not undergone recent recombination, suggesting that occasional gene flow between the t and the standard chromosome may provide a mechanism to regenerate coding sequences that have accumulated deleterious mutations. Finally, we find that t-complex genes with altered expression largely overlap with deleted or amplified regions, and that carrying a t-haplotype alters the testis expression of genes outside of the t-complex, providing new leads into the pathways involved in the biology of this segregation distorter. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  14. A Bayesian Calibrated Deglacial History for the North American Ice Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, L.; Neal, R. M.; Peltier, W. R.

    2004-05-01

    Past deglacial ice-sheet reconstructions have generally relied upon discipline-specific constraints with no attention to the determination of objective confidence intervals. Reconstructions based on geophysical inversion of relative sea-level (RSL) data have the advantage of large sets of proxy data but lack constraints from ice-mechanics. Conversely reconstructions based on dynamical ice-sheet models are glaciologically self-consistent, but are dependent on poorly constrained climate forcings and sub-glacial processes. As an example of a much more constrained methodology, we present a high-resolution glaciologically-self-consistent deglacial history for the North American ice complex calibrated against a large set of RSL and geodetic data. The history is derived from ensemble-based analyses using the 3D University of Toronto glacial systems model and a new high-resolution ice-margin chronology derived from geological and geomorphological observations. Isostatic response is computed with the VM2 viscosity structure. Bayesian calibration of the model is carried out using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in combination with neural networks trained to model results. The calibration provides a posterior distribution for model parameters (and thereby modelled glacial histories) given the observational data sets that thereby also takes into account data uncertainty. Incorporation of a surface drainage solver offers the possibility of adding strandline and lake shoreline tilt data to the constraint and/or validation data sets. Comparison against the current version of the ICE-5G deglacial load history will also be presented to elucidate the impact of glaciological self-consistency on inferred load chronologies.

  15. Evaluation of treatment efficiency of processes for petroleum refinery`s wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, Kean Chin [National Univ. of Singapore, Kent Ridge (Singapore). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-12-31

    Processes used in the treatment of a petroleum refinery wastewater included initial API oil separator to be followed by dissolved air flotation and extended aeration system. The use of extended aeration biological system proved to be an improvement but not a solution yet in such kind of treatment. 2 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Avoiding the Complex History, Simple Answer Syndrome: A Lesson Plan for Providing Depth and Analysis in the High School History Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Examining history from the perspective of investigators who wrestle with involved scenarios for which no simple answers exist, or from which no obvious conclusions can be drawn, allows students to understand the historiographic process and the complex nature of historical events, while gaining valuable practice in applying analytical and critical…

  17. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons from a refinery spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergueiro-Lopez, J.R.; Serra-Socias, F.; Moreno-Garcia-Luengo, S.; Morales-Correas, N.; Dominguez-Laseca, F. [Universidad de las Islas Baleares (Spain)

    1996-09-01

    The biodegradation of several crude oil wastes from an oil refinery spill, was studied. Crude oil was spilled onto soil; with time, only the higher boiling point hydrocarbons remained as residue. Samples of this highly weathered hydrocarbon mixture were suspended in water to which Finasol OSR 51 dispersant was added in order to enhance dispersion. Also, certain microorganisms and a degradation accelerator, were both added to accelerate degradation. Each compound was identified by CG/FID. Daily records were kept of the concentration of hydrocarbons, and the percent degradation. Tables showing the degradation percentages achieved by each compound of the crude left over after several days, are included. 4 refs., tabs., 1 fig.

  18. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  19. Assessment of the effect of effluent discharge from coffee refineries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Therefore, urgent attention should be given to the coffee refinery for effluent ... as their maintenance and restoration. ... sound ecohydrological of river basin management, human activities can upset the ... determine the rivers' recovery potential. At each ... much stress from the coffee refineries disposal at p<0.05 and 0.01.

  20. Medical history and the onset of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mos, M; Huygen, F J P M; Dieleman, J P; Koopman, J S H A; Stricker, B H Ch; Sturkenboom, M C J M

    2008-10-15

    Knowledge concerning the medical history prior to the onset of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) might provide insight into its risk factors and potential underlying disease mechanisms. To evaluate prior to CRPS medical conditions, a case-control study was conducted in the Integrated Primary Care Information (IPCI) project, a general practice (GP) database in the Netherlands. CRPS patients were identified from the records and validated through examination by the investigator (IASP criteria) or through specialist confirmation. Cases were matched to controls on age, gender and injury type. All diagnoses prior to the index date were assessed by manual review of the medical records. Some pre-specified medical conditions were studied for their association with CRPS, whereas all other diagnoses, grouped by pathogenesis, were tested in a hypothesis-generating approach. Of the identified 259 CRPS patients, 186 cases (697 controls) were included, based on validation by the investigator during a visit (102 of 134 visited patients) or on specialist confirmation (84 of 125 unvisited patients). A medical history of migraine (OR: 2.43, 95% CI: 1.18-5.02) and osteoporosis (OR: 2.44, 95% CI: 1.17-5.14) was associated with CRPS. In a recent history (1-year before CRPS), cases had more menstrual cycle-related problems (OR: 2.60, 95% CI: 1.16-5.83) and neuropathies (OR: 5.7; 95% CI: 1.8-18.7). In a sensitivity analysis, including only visited cases, asthma (OR: 3.0; 95% CI: 1.3-6.9) and CRPS were related. Psychological factors were not associated with CRPS onset. Because of the hypothesis-generating character of this study, the findings should be confirmed by other studies.

  1. Comparative phylogeographic analyses illustrate the complex evolutionary history of threatened cloud forests of northern Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Sosa, Victoria; Soltis, Douglas E; Daza, Juan M; González, Clementina; Soltis, Pamela S; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Carla; de los Monteros, Alejandro Espinosa; Castoe, Todd A; Bell, Charles; Ruiz-Sanchez, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography can elucidate the influence of historical events on current patterns of biodiversity and can identify patterns of co-vicariance among unrelated taxa that span the same geographic areas. Here we analyze temporal and spatial divergence patterns of cloud forest plant and animal species and relate them to the evolutionary history of naturally fragmented cloud forests--among the most threatened vegetation types in northern Mesoamerica. We used comparative phylogeographic analyses to identify patterns of co-vicariance in taxa that share geographic ranges across cloud forest habitats and to elucidate the influence of historical events on current patterns of biodiversity. We document temporal and spatial genetic divergence of 15 species (including seed plants, birds and rodents), and relate them to the evolutionary history of the naturally fragmented cloud forests. We used fossil-calibrated genealogies, coalescent-based divergence time inference, and estimates of gene flow to assess the permeability of putative barriers to gene flow. We also used the hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation (HABC) method implemented in the program msBayes to test simultaneous versus non-simultaneous divergence of the cloud forest lineages. Our results show shared phylogeographic breaks that correspond to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Los Tuxtlas, and the Chiapas Central Depression, with the Isthmus representing the most frequently shared break among taxa. However, dating analyses suggest that the phylogeographic breaks corresponding to the Isthmus occurred at different times in different taxa. Current divergence patterns are therefore consistent with the hypothesis of broad vicariance across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec derived from different mechanisms operating at different times. This study, coupled with existing data on divergence cloud forest species, indicates that the evolutionary history of contemporary cloud forest lineages is complex and often lineage

  2. Comparative phylogeographic analyses illustrate the complex evolutionary history of threatened cloud forests of northern Mesoamerica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Ornelas

    Full Text Available Comparative phylogeography can elucidate the influence of historical events on current patterns of biodiversity and can identify patterns of co-vicariance among unrelated taxa that span the same geographic areas. Here we analyze temporal and spatial divergence patterns of cloud forest plant and animal species and relate them to the evolutionary history of naturally fragmented cloud forests--among the most threatened vegetation types in northern Mesoamerica. We used comparative phylogeographic analyses to identify patterns of co-vicariance in taxa that share geographic ranges across cloud forest habitats and to elucidate the influence of historical events on current patterns of biodiversity. We document temporal and spatial genetic divergence of 15 species (including seed plants, birds and rodents, and relate them to the evolutionary history of the naturally fragmented cloud forests. We used fossil-calibrated genealogies, coalescent-based divergence time inference, and estimates of gene flow to assess the permeability of putative barriers to gene flow. We also used the hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation (HABC method implemented in the program msBayes to test simultaneous versus non-simultaneous divergence of the cloud forest lineages. Our results show shared phylogeographic breaks that correspond to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Los Tuxtlas, and the Chiapas Central Depression, with the Isthmus representing the most frequently shared break among taxa. However, dating analyses suggest that the phylogeographic breaks corresponding to the Isthmus occurred at different times in different taxa. Current divergence patterns are therefore consistent with the hypothesis of broad vicariance across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec derived from different mechanisms operating at different times. This study, coupled with existing data on divergence cloud forest species, indicates that the evolutionary history of contemporary cloud forest lineages is complex

  3. Approaches to the Low Grade Metamorphic History of the Karakaya Complex by Chlorite Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Tetiker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, chlorite is used to investigate the diagenetic-metamorphic evolution and accurate geological history of the different units belonging to the Karakaya complex, Turkey. Primary and secondary chlorite minerals in the very low-grade metamorphic rocks display interference colors of blue and brown and an appearance of optical isotropy. Chlorites are present in the matrix, pores, and/or rocks units as platy/flaky and partly radial forms. X-ray diffraction (XRD data indicate that Mg-Fe chlorites with entirely IIb polytype (trioctahedral exhibit a variety of compositions, such as brunsvigite-diabantite-chamosite. The major element contents and structural formulas of chlorite also suggest these were derived from both felsic and metabasic source rocks. Trace and rare earth element (REE concentrations of chlorites increase with increasing grade of metamorphism, and these geochemical changes can be related to the tectonic structures, formational mechanics, and environments present during their generation.

  4. Origin and Dispersal History of Two Colonial Ascidian Clades in the Botryllus schlosseri Species Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L Nydam

    Full Text Available Human-induced global warming and species introductions are rapidly altering the composition and functioning of Earth's marine ecosystems. Ascidians (Phylum Chordata, Subphylum Tunicata, Class Ascidiacea are likely to play an increasingly greater role in marine communities. The colonial ascidian B. schlosseri is a cryptic species complex comprising five genetically divergent clades (A-E. Clade A is a global species, and Clade E has so far been identified in European waters only. Using the largest mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I datasets yet assembled, we determine the origin and dispersal history of these species. Nucleotide diversity and Approximate Bayesian Computation analyses support a Pacific origin for Clade A, with two likely dispersal scenarios that both show the northwestern Atlantic populations establishing early in the history of the species. Both Discrete Phylogeographic Analysis and Approximate Bayesian Computation support an origin of Clade E on the French side of the English Channel. An unsampled lineage evolved from the French lineage, which reflects the conclusion from the median joining network that not all Clade E lineages have been sampled. This unsampled lineage gave rise to the haplotypes on the English side of the English Channel, which were the ancestors to the Mediterranean and Bay of Biscay populations. Clade E has a wider geographic range than previously thought, and shows evidence of recent range expansion. Both Clade A and Clade E should be considered widespread species: Clade A globally and Clade E within Europe.

  5. Origin and Dispersal History of Two Colonial Ascidian Clades in the Botryllus schlosseri Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydam, Marie L; Giesbrecht, Kirsten B; Stephenson, Emily E

    2017-01-01

    Human-induced global warming and species introductions are rapidly altering the composition and functioning of Earth's marine ecosystems. Ascidians (Phylum Chordata, Subphylum Tunicata, Class Ascidiacea) are likely to play an increasingly greater role in marine communities. The colonial ascidian B. schlosseri is a cryptic species complex comprising five genetically divergent clades (A-E). Clade A is a global species, and Clade E has so far been identified in European waters only. Using the largest mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I datasets yet assembled, we determine the origin and dispersal history of these species. Nucleotide diversity and Approximate Bayesian Computation analyses support a Pacific origin for Clade A, with two likely dispersal scenarios that both show the northwestern Atlantic populations establishing early in the history of the species. Both Discrete Phylogeographic Analysis and Approximate Bayesian Computation support an origin of Clade E on the French side of the English Channel. An unsampled lineage evolved from the French lineage, which reflects the conclusion from the median joining network that not all Clade E lineages have been sampled. This unsampled lineage gave rise to the haplotypes on the English side of the English Channel, which were the ancestors to the Mediterranean and Bay of Biscay populations. Clade E has a wider geographic range than previously thought, and shows evidence of recent range expansion. Both Clade A and Clade E should be considered widespread species: Clade A globally and Clade E within Europe.

  6. Test of colonisation scenarios reveals complex invasion history of the red tomato spider mite Tetranychus evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubou, Angham; Migeon, Alain; Roderick, George K; Auger, Philippe; Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Magalhães, Sara; Navajas, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The spider mite Tetranychus evansi is an emerging pest of solanaceous crops worldwide. Like many other emerging pests, its small size, confusing taxonomy, complex history of associations with humans, and propensity to start new populations from small inocula, make the study of its invasion biology difficult. Here, we use recent developments in Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) and variation in multi-locus genetic markers to reconstruct the complex historical demography of this cryptic invasive pest. By distinguishing among multiple pathways and timing of introductions, we find evidence for the "bridgehead effect", in which one invasion serves as source for subsequent invasions. Tetranychus evansi populations in Europe and Africa resulted from at least three independent introductions from South America and involved mites from two distinct sources in Brazil, corresponding to highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages. Mites from southwest Brazil (BR-SW) colonized the African continent, and from there Europe through two pathways in a "bridgehead" type pattern. One pathway resulted in a widespread invasion, not only to Europe, but also to other regions in Africa, southern Europe and eastern Asia. The second pathway involved the mixture with a second introduction from BR-SW leading to an admixed population in southern Spain. Admixture was also detected between invasive populations in Portugal. A third introduction from the Brazilian Atlantic region resulted in only a limited invasion in Europe. This study illustrates that ABC methods can provide insights into, and distinguish among, complex invasion scenarios. These processes are critical not only in understanding the biology of invasions, but also in refining management strategies for invasive species. For example, while reported observations of the mite and outbreaks in the invaded areas were largely consistent with estimates of geographical expansion from the ABC approach, historical observations failed to

  7. Test of colonisation scenarios reveals complex invasion history of the red tomato spider mite Tetranychus evansi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angham Boubou

    Full Text Available The spider mite Tetranychus evansi is an emerging pest of solanaceous crops worldwide. Like many other emerging pests, its small size, confusing taxonomy, complex history of associations with humans, and propensity to start new populations from small inocula, make the study of its invasion biology difficult. Here, we use recent developments in Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC and variation in multi-locus genetic markers to reconstruct the complex historical demography of this cryptic invasive pest. By distinguishing among multiple pathways and timing of introductions, we find evidence for the "bridgehead effect", in which one invasion serves as source for subsequent invasions. Tetranychus evansi populations in Europe and Africa resulted from at least three independent introductions from South America and involved mites from two distinct sources in Brazil, corresponding to highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages. Mites from southwest Brazil (BR-SW colonized the African continent, and from there Europe through two pathways in a "bridgehead" type pattern. One pathway resulted in a widespread invasion, not only to Europe, but also to other regions in Africa, southern Europe and eastern Asia. The second pathway involved the mixture with a second introduction from BR-SW leading to an admixed population in southern Spain. Admixture was also detected between invasive populations in Portugal. A third introduction from the Brazilian Atlantic region resulted in only a limited invasion in Europe. This study illustrates that ABC methods can provide insights into, and distinguish among, complex invasion scenarios. These processes are critical not only in understanding the biology of invasions, but also in refining management strategies for invasive species. For example, while reported observations of the mite and outbreaks in the invaded areas were largely consistent with estimates of geographical expansion from the ABC approach, historical

  8. A Spatial Risk Analysis of Oil Refineries within the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    hydroskimming refineries utilize atmospheric distillation, naphtha reforming and can use sweet crude to produce gasoline; cracking refineries add vacuum...distillation and catalytic cracking to produce light and middle distillates; and coking refineries are high conversion refineries that add coking/resid

  9. Refinery energy profile: User's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, R.W.; Olivent, W.P.; Brandt, D.L.; Golden, T.G.

    1979-01-01

    Energy profiles are essentially detailed energy balances of refineries showing all inputs and losses for the total refinery and for each of the individual processing units. By showing the losses from each individual heater, exchanger, etc., the items with the greatest potential for saving energy are pinpointed for further evaluation. This User's Guide contains the step-by-step procedure that has been developed for preparing energy profiles at any refinery. The guide is written for people familiar with refinery equipment and operations and should provide sufficient guidance so that problems in preparing an energy profile at any refinery can be resolved. The technique is presented as four parts covering preparation, data gathering, performing calculations, and preparing the profiles. Section 2 on preparation gives the steps to take in starting the project and the procedures to follow in making preparations for gathering the raw data needed to calculate the various energy balances that are used in developing refinery energy profiles. Section 3 gives the procedures for gathering the raw data at a refinery. Section 4 gives the procedures for calculating the various energy balances. Section 5 gives the procedures for preparing the profiles once the various calculations have been completed.

  10. Improved petroleum refinery wastewater treatment and seawater desalination performance by combining osmotic microbial fuel cell and up-flow microbial desalination cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevda, Surajbhan; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M

    2017-12-09

    The petroleum refinery wastewater which is a product of petroleum refinery has a high organic content. This study explores the utilization of petroleum refinery wastewater collected from petroleum refinery as a resource for bioelectricity generation and using this energy for salt removal from seawater in a hydraulically connected osmotic microbial fuel cell (OsMFC) and up flow microbial desalination cell (UMDC). Anaerobic mixed sludge was used in the anodic chamber of OsMFC and UMDC. Petroleum refinery wastewater was fed first into the OsMFC and then transferred to the UMDC. The OsMFC and UMDC were connected to 1000 and 100 Ω external resistance respectively. Experimental results showed that the combined system could remove 93% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from the petroleum refinery wastewater whilst 48% salts were removed from the seawater. Experimental results showed that this complex wastewater can be treated and produce bioelectricity, with COD removal and salt removal. The hydraulically connected OsMFC and up flow MDC provide a suitable platform for wastewater treatment and seawater desalination.

  11. Complex evolutionary history of the Aeromonas veronii group revealed by host interaction and DNA sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Silver

    Full Text Available Aeromonas veronii biovar sobria, Aeromonas veronii biovar veronii, and Aeromonas allosaccharophila are a closely related group of organisms, the Aeromonas veronii Group, that inhabit a wide range of host animals as a symbiont or pathogen. In this study, the ability of various strains to colonize the medicinal leech as a model for beneficial symbiosis and to kill wax worm larvae as a model for virulence was determined. Isolates cultured from the leech out-competed other strains in the leech model, while most strains were virulent in the wax worms. Three housekeeping genes, recA, dnaJ and gyrB, the gene encoding chitinase, chiA, and four loci associated with the type three secretion system, ascV, ascFG, aexT, and aexU were sequenced. The phylogenetic reconstruction failed to produce one consensus tree that was compatible with most of the individual genes. The Approximately Unbiased test and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection both provided further support for differing evolutionary histories among this group of genes. Two contrasting tests detected recombination within aexU, ascFG, ascV, dnaJ, and gyrB but not in aexT or chiA. Quartet decomposition analysis indicated a complex recent evolutionary history for these strains with a high frequency of horizontal gene transfer between several but not among all strains. In this study we demonstrate that at least for some strains, horizontal gene transfer occurs at a sufficient frequency to blur the signal from vertically inherited genes, despite strains being adapted to distinct niches. Simply increasing the number of genes included in the analysis is unlikely to overcome this challenge in organisms that occupy multiple niches and can exchange DNA between strains specialized to different niches. Instead, the detection of genes critical in the adaptation to specific niches may help to reveal the physiological specialization of these strains.

  12. Treatment of Tehran refinery wastewater using rotating biological contactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, Masoud; Mirsajadi, Hassan; Ganjidoust, Hossien [Tarbeyat Modarres Univ., Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Environmental Engineering Dept.

    1993-12-31

    Tehran Refinery is a large plant which produces several petroleum products. The wastewaters are generated from several different refinery processes and units. Because of the wastewaters uniqueness they need to be treated in each specific plant. Currently, an activated sludge system is the main biological wastewater treatment process in Tehran refinery plant. A study was initiated in order to find a more suitable and reliable process which can produce a better treated effluent which might, in case the process be successful, be reused for irrigation lands. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  13. The Convergence of Ricoeur’s and Von Wright’s Complex Models of History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L. Cox

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the structural identity of narrative and the truth claim of the historical narrative work is one of importance to Ricœur. He considers the attempts of two interwoven models of history emerging from analytic philosophy—explanatory and narrative—to articulate this relationship. This paper explores the trajectories of these models as well as the epistemological and ontological crises culminating from the “simple” theses of each model. The solution to these crises requires a more complex method to account for the nature of the connections underlying historical understanding. Georg Henrik von Wright’s provisional or “hybrid” model of explanation and understanding revises the simple explanatory model and is foundational for Ricœur’s own complex revision of narrativist models through his notion of questioning back. The present paper argues that the structure of this hybrid model was unsatisfactory for von Wright, and leads in the direction of Ricœur’s own narrative method. Keywords: Ricœur, von Wright, Narrative, History, Questioning back. Résumé La relation entre l’identité structurale du récit et la prétention à la vérité de l’œuvre de récit historique est fondamentale chez Ricœur. Il considère que les deux modèles historiographiques de provenance analytique – le modèle explicatif et le modèle narratif – peuvent s’articuler. Cet article explore les trajectoires de ces modèles autant que les crises épistémologiques et ontologiques qui culminent dans chacune des thèses prise dans un sens unilatéral. La solution pour remédier à ces crises requiert une méthode plus complexe pour tenir compte de la nature des liens qui sous-tendent la compréhension historique. Le modèle d’explication et de compréhension, provisoire et “hybride,” de Georg Henrik von Wright permet de réviser le simple modèle explicatif. Ceci est fondamental pour comprendre  la révision complexe que

  14. The complex evolutionary history of the tympanic middle ear in frogs and toads (Anura)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Martín O.; Womack, Molly C.; Barrionuevo, J. Sebastián; Blotto, Boris L.; Baldo, Diego; Targino, Mariane; Ospina-Sarria, Jhon Jairo; Guayasamin, Juan M.; Coloma, Luis A.; Hoke, Kim L.; Grant, Taran; Faivovich, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Most anurans possess a tympanic middle ear (TME) that transmits sound waves to the inner ear; however, numerous species lack some or all TME components. To understand the evolution of these structures, we undertook a comprehensive assessment of their occurrence across anurans and performed ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analysis indicates that the TME was completely lost at least 38 independent times in Anura. The inferred evolutionary history of the TME is exceptionally complex in true toads (Bufonidae), where it was lost in the most recent common ancestor, preceding a radiation of >150 earless species. Following that initial loss, independent regains of some or all TME structures were inferred within two minor clades and in a radiation of >400 species. The reappearance of the TME in the latter clade was followed by at least 10 losses of the entire TME. The many losses and gains of the TME in anurans is unparalleled among tetrapods. Our results show that anurans, and especially bufonid toads, are an excellent model to study the behavioural correlates of earlessness, extratympanic sound pathways, and the genetic and developmental mechanisms that underlie the morphogenesis of TME structures. PMID:27677839

  15. Biogeographic history of the species complex Basileuterus culicivorus (Aves, Parulidae) in the Neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaça, Sibelle Torres; Santos, Fabrício Rodrigues

    2010-11-01

    The taxonomic status of Basileuterus culicivorus complex has been under debate for a long time. There are uncertainties about the relationships among recognized species (B. culicivorus and B. hypoleucus), and whether B. culicivorus can be considered as a single species. In order to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships among these species and their biogeographic history we used a broad geographic sampling from Mexico to Argentina of B. culicivorus and B. hypoleucus. Using a mitochondrial gene, a nuclear intron and microsatellites we identified highly structured groups according to their spatial distribution. The known subspecies of B. culicivorus formed monophyletic groups, except two ones from Brazil and Paraguay. Basileuterus hypoleucus sequences did not form a monophyletic clade, being more related to B. culicivorus from Brazil and Paraguay. The divergence time analysis indicated that the deep separation of the basal lineages of B. culicivorus occurred in Late Pliocene. Contrasting with the other geographically structured populations from Central and South America, the clade of birds from Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina showed a remarkably high population growth starting in the mid-Pleistocene, according to the most plausible evolutionary scenario expected for parulid birds of a range expansion directed southwards. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Who is the best player ever? A complex network analysis of the history of professional tennis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Radicchi

    Full Text Available We considered all matches played by professional tennis players between 1968 and 2010, and, on the basis of this data set, constructed a directed and weighted network of contacts. The resulting graph showed complex features, typical of many real networked systems studied in literature. We developed a diffusion algorithm and applied it to the tennis contact network in order to rank professional players. Jimmy Connors was identified as the best player in the history of tennis according to our ranking procedure. We performed a complete analysis by determining the best players on specific playing surfaces as well as the best ones in each of the years covered by the data set. The results of our technique were compared to those of two other well established methods. In general, we observed that our ranking method performed better: it had a higher predictive power and did not require the arbitrary introduction of external criteria for the correct assessment of the quality of players. The present work provides novel evidence of the utility of tools and methods of network theory in real applications.

  17. Re-analyses of “Algal” Genes Suggest a Complex Evolutionary History of Oomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qia Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The spread of photosynthesis is one of the most important but constantly debated topics in eukaryotic evolution. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the plastid distribution in extant eukaryotes. Notably, the chromalveolate hypothesis suggested that multiple eukaryotic lineages were derived from a photosynthetic ancestor that had a red algal endosymbiont. As such, genes of plastid/algal origin in aplastidic chromalveolates, such as oomycetes, were considered to be important supporting evidence. Although the chromalveolate hypothesis has been seriously challenged, some of its supporting evidence has not been carefully investigated. In this study, we re-evaluate the “algal” genes from oomycetes with a larger sampling and careful phylogenetic analyses. Our data provide no conclusive support for a common photosynthetic ancestry of stramenopiles, but show that the initial estimate of “algal” genes in oomycetes was drastically inflated due to limited genome data available then for certain eukaryotic lineages. These findings also suggest that the evolutionary histories of these “algal” genes might be attributed to complex scenarios such as differential gene loss, serial endosymbioses, or horizontal gene transfer.

  18. Outbreak of Neisseria meningitidis C in a Brazilian oil refinery involving an adjacent community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liphaus, Bernadete L; Cappeletti-Gonçalves-Okai, Maria Inês; Silva-Delemos, Ana Paula; Gorla, Maria Cecília; Rodriguez-Fernandes, Miriam; Pacola, Márcia Regina; Fernandez-Collucci, Maria Ângela; Matsumoto-Shinkai, Iara Akemi; Takenori-Higa, Fábio; Ferreira-Catani, Cleide; Gonçalves-Lemes-Marques, Eneida; Marques-Pinto-Carvalhanas, Telma Regina

    2013-02-01

    An outbreak of serogroup C meningococcal disease (MD) that involved employees from an oil refinery occurred in Paulínia, from March to June 2010, and spread to the community of Cosmópolis, both situated in São Paulo State, Brazil. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological and laboratory aspects, and the control measures that were implemented. Descriptive and molecular epidemiological analysis was used to define the extent of the outbreak and the common risk factors among outbreak related cases. Vaccination initiative targeted the employees from the oil refinery and the community-based individuals. A total of six outbreak-related cases of MD in the oil refinery and 12 cases in the city of Cosmópolis, São Paulo State occurred in a three-month period. All 18 MD cases were confirmed as serogroup C either by culture, real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), or counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE). The meningococcal isolates (n=15) had the phenotype C:23:P1.14-6 and showed close genetic relationship by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) characterization showed that the clones were ST 3780, ST-103 complex. The isolates were susceptible to the antibiotics tested. Vaccination was administered to 15,848 persons at the oil refinery and 18,571 persons of the community. The molecular characterization of the Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) strains, and the efficient investigation and the prompt measures implemented were essential for controlling the disease in the region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Tesoro Los Angeles Refinery Integration and Compliance Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 9 has two announcements pertaining to the Los Angeles Refinery Integration and Compliance project (LARIC project): permit revisions meet all CAA requirements and federal PSD permitting provisions do not apply to this project.

  20. A Complex Exposure History of the Gold Basin L4-Chondrite Shower from Cosmogenic Radionuclides and Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Masarik, J.; Wieler, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in samples of the Gold Basin L-chondrite shower indicate a complex exposure history, with a first stage exposure on the parent body, followed by a second stage of approx. 19 Myr in a meteoroid 3-4 m in radius. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Hannah's Feeding Journey: A Multidisciplinary Treatment Approach to Establishing Oral Acceptance for a Toddler with a Complex Medical History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Dena M.; Galbally, Sandra Lynn; Markowitz, Goldie; Pucci, Kristy N.; Brochi, Ligia; Cohen, Sherri Shubin

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the importance of multidisciplinary, family-centered care, and a developmental bio-psycho-social approach to treating feeding difficulties in a child with a complex medical history. Hannah spent the first 9 months of her life in the hospital and was discharged dependent on nasogastric tube feeding. Her journey to recovery…

  2. Mathematical programming studies of short run oil refinery rents

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez Buelga, A.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find general behavioural patterns or tendencies of Oil Refinery Rents in the short term with the objective of constructing functional relationships between them and their determinants. The theory of rent is examined in general, and in particular in relation to the oil refinery. Under two main hypotheses, the existence of a competitive equilibrium market for oil, and the Unidimensionality in energy pricing or The First Principle of Energy Substitution, two Linea...

  3. Unraveling the history of complex zoned garnets from the North Motagua Mélange (Guatemala)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barickman, M. H.; Martin, C.; Flores, K. E.; Harlow, G. E.; Bonnet, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Guatemala Suture Zone (GSZ) is situated in central Guatemala, between the North American and Caribbean plates. Two serpentinite mélanges straddle the Motagua Fault system: the North Motagua Mélange (NMM) and the South Motagua Mélange (SMM). In this study, chemically zoned garnet grains from four eclogite blocks from the NMM were analyzed by EMPA for major elements and LA-ICP-MS for trace elements to unravel the geological history of the eclogites. These eclogites typically consist of euhedral to subhedral garnets, partly retrogressed omphacite grains, and accessory minerals such as phengite and epidote as inclusions in garnet. EBSD was employed to examine apparent garnet inclusions in garnet. The garnet grains in NMM eclogites display complex chemical zonations: all grains roughly show a spessartine-rich core, an almandine-rich core and/or intermediate zone, and a pyrope and grossular-rich rim. Additionally, crystal resorption can be observed between the different zones, and the pyrope-grossular rim can display oscillatory zoning. Finally, grossular-rich zones (crystallographically syntactic) within garnet are present in all studied samples. REE and spider diagrams do not show any significant difference in the patterns of the different zones within the garnet, or indicating that the chemical environment from which each garnet zone grew was broadly the same. The lack of significant variation in LILE content indicates that a fluid influx during garnet growth is unlikely. Consequently, we interpret that garnet grains grew in a largely closed system; however, the presence of the grossular-rich zones, argues for occasional excursions into conditions when either two garnets crystallized or Ca-rich overgrowths that were largely resorbed prior to subsequent continued garnet growth.

  4. Ecological interactions in dinosaur communities: influences of small offspring and complex ontogenetic life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codron, Daryl; Carbone, Chris; Clauss, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Because egg-laying meant that even the largest dinosaurs gave birth to very small offspring, they had to pass through multiple ontogenetic life stages to adulthood. Dinosaurs' successors as the dominant terrestrial vertebrate life form, the mammals, give birth to live young, and have much larger offspring and less complex ontogenetic histories. The larger number of juveniles in dinosaur as compared to mammal ecosystems represents both a greater diversity of food available to predators, and competitors for similar-sized individuals of sympatric species. Models of population abundances across different-sized species of dinosaurs and mammals, based on simulated ecological life tables, are employed to investigate how differences in predation and competition pressure influenced dinosaur communities. Higher small- to medium-sized prey availability leads to a normal body mass-species richness (M-S) distribution of carnivorous dinosaurs (as found in the theropod fossil record), in contrast to the right-skewed M-S distribution of carnivorous mammals (as found living members of the order Carnivora). Higher levels of interspecific competition leads to a left-skewed M-S distribution in herbivorous dinosaurs (as found in sauropods and ornithopods), in contrast to the normal M-S distribution of large herbivorous mammals. Thus, our models suggest that differences in reproductive strategy, and consequently ontogeny, explain observed differences in community structure between dinosaur and mammal faunas. Models also show that the largest dinosaurian predators could have subsisted on similar-sized prey by including younger life stages of the largest herbivore species, but that large predators likely avoided prey much smaller than themselves because, despite predicted higher abundances of smaller than larger-bodied prey, contributions of small prey to biomass intake would be insufficient to satisfy meat requirements. A lack of large carnivores feeding on small prey exists in mammals

  5. Ecological interactions in dinosaur communities: influences of small offspring and complex ontogenetic life histories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl Codron

    Full Text Available Because egg-laying meant that even the largest dinosaurs gave birth to very small offspring, they had to pass through multiple ontogenetic life stages to adulthood. Dinosaurs' successors as the dominant terrestrial vertebrate life form, the mammals, give birth to live young, and have much larger offspring and less complex ontogenetic histories. The larger number of juveniles in dinosaur as compared to mammal ecosystems represents both a greater diversity of food available to predators, and competitors for similar-sized individuals of sympatric species. Models of population abundances across different-sized species of dinosaurs and mammals, based on simulated ecological life tables, are employed to investigate how differences in predation and competition pressure influenced dinosaur communities. Higher small- to medium-sized prey availability leads to a normal body mass-species richness (M-S distribution of carnivorous dinosaurs (as found in the theropod fossil record, in contrast to the right-skewed M-S distribution of carnivorous mammals (as found living members of the order Carnivora. Higher levels of interspecific competition leads to a left-skewed M-S distribution in herbivorous dinosaurs (as found in sauropods and ornithopods, in contrast to the normal M-S distribution of large herbivorous mammals. Thus, our models suggest that differences in reproductive strategy, and consequently ontogeny, explain observed differences in community structure between dinosaur and mammal faunas. Models also show that the largest dinosaurian predators could have subsisted on similar-sized prey by including younger life stages of the largest herbivore species, but that large predators likely avoided prey much smaller than themselves because, despite predicted higher abundances of smaller than larger-bodied prey, contributions of small prey to biomass intake would be insufficient to satisfy meat requirements. A lack of large carnivores feeding on small prey

  6. Ecological Interactions in Dinosaur Communities: Influences of Small Offspring and Complex Ontogenetic Life Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codron, Daryl; Carbone, Chris; Clauss, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Because egg-laying meant that even the largest dinosaurs gave birth to very small offspring, they had to pass through multiple ontogenetic life stages to adulthood. Dinosaurs’ successors as the dominant terrestrial vertebrate life form, the mammals, give birth to live young, and have much larger offspring and less complex ontogenetic histories. The larger number of juveniles in dinosaur as compared to mammal ecosystems represents both a greater diversity of food available to predators, and competitors for similar-sized individuals of sympatric species. Models of population abundances across different-sized species of dinosaurs and mammals, based on simulated ecological life tables, are employed to investigate how differences in predation and competition pressure influenced dinosaur communities. Higher small- to medium-sized prey availability leads to a normal body mass-species richness (M-S) distribution of carnivorous dinosaurs (as found in the theropod fossil record), in contrast to the right-skewed M-S distribution of carnivorous mammals (as found living members of the order Carnivora). Higher levels of interspecific competition leads to a left-skewed M-S distribution in herbivorous dinosaurs (as found in sauropods and ornithopods), in contrast to the normal M-S distribution of large herbivorous mammals. Thus, our models suggest that differences in reproductive strategy, and consequently ontogeny, explain observed differences in community structure between dinosaur and mammal faunas. Models also show that the largest dinosaurian predators could have subsisted on similar-sized prey by including younger life stages of the largest herbivore species, but that large predators likely avoided prey much smaller than themselves because, despite predicted higher abundances of smaller than larger-bodied prey, contributions of small prey to biomass intake would be insufficient to satisfy meat requirements. A lack of large carnivores feeding on small prey exists in mammals

  7. Collaborative Complexities: Co-Authorship, Voice, and African American Rhetoric in Oral History Community Literacy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobman, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    This co-authored article describes a community literacy oral history project involving 14 undergraduate students. It is intellectually situated at the intersection of writing studies, oral history, and African American rhetoric and distinguished by two features: 1) we were a combined team of 20 collaborators, and 2) our narrator, Frank Gilyard,…

  8. Oil refinery experience with the assessment of refinery effluents and receiving waters using biologically based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Michael H I; Girling, Andrew; den Haan, Klaas H; Whale, Graham

    2015-10-01

    The trend in discharges of petroleum-related substances from refineries in Europe shows a consistent picture of declining emissions, since first measured in 1969. This decline coincides with enhanced internal capture or recycling procedures and increasing use of physical and biological treatments. At the same time, and partly in response to legislative drivers, there has been an increase in the use of chronic (long-term) toxicity tests and alternative methods for assessing the quality of effluent discharges. The Whole Effluent Assessment (WEA) approach has also driven the increased conduct of studies addressing the fate of effluent constituents. Such studies have included the use of biodegradation and solid-phase micro-extraction-biomimetic extraction (SPME-BE) methods to address potentially bioaccumulative substances (PBS). In this way, it is then possible to address the persistence and toxicity of these PBS constituents of an effluent. The data collected in various case studies highlights the advantages and pitfalls of using biologically-based methods to assess the potential for refinery effluents to cause environmental impacts. © 2015 SETAC.

  9. The plant Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) existed in the ancestor of seed plants and has a complex duplication history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Lidija; Snel, Berend

    2015-03-13

    Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) is an essential protein complex for plant development. It catalyzes ubiquitination of histone H2A that is an important part of the transcription repression machinery. Absence of PRC1 subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana plants causes severe developmental defects. Many aspects of the plant PRC1 are elusive, including its origin and phylogenetic distribution. We established the evolutionary history of the plant PRC1 subunits (LHP1, Ring1a-b, Bmi1a-c, EMF1, and VRN1), enabled by sensitive phylogenetic methods and newly sequenced plant genomes from previously unsampled taxonomic groups. We showed that all PRC1 core subunits exist in gymnosperms, earlier than previously thought, and that VRN1 is a recent addition, found exclusively in eudicots. The retention of individual subunits in chlorophytes, mosses, lycophytes and monilophytes indicates that they can moonlight as part of other complexes or processes. Moreover, we showed that most PRC1 subunits underwent a complex, duplication-rich history that differs significantly between Brassicaceae and other eudicots. PRC1 existed in the last common ancestor of seed plants where it likely played an important regulatory role, aiding their radiation. The presence of LHP1, Ring1 and Bmi1 in mosses, lycophytes and monilophytes also suggests the presence of a primitive yet functional PRC1.

  10. Troubleshooting vacuum systems steam turbine surface condensers and refinery vacuum towers

    CERN Document Server

    Lieberman, Norman P

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum systems are in wide spread use in the petrochemical plants, petroleum refineries and power generation plants. The existing texts on this subject are theoretical in nature and only deal with how the equipment functions when in good mechanical conditions, from the viewpoint of the equipment vendor.  In this much-anticipated volume, one of the most well-respected and prolific process engineers in the world takes on troubleshooting vacuum systems, and especially steam ejectors, an extremely complex and difficult subject that greatly effects the profitability of the majority of the world'

  11. Bayesian history matching of complex infectious disease models using emulation: a tutorial and a case study on HIV in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Andrianakis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in scientific computing have allowed the development of complex models that are being routinely applied to problems in disease epidemiology, public health and decision making. The utility of these models depends in part on how well they can reproduce empirical data. However, fitting such models to real world data is greatly hindered both by large numbers of input and output parameters, and by long run times, such that many modelling studies lack a formal calibration methodology. We present a novel method that has the potential to improve the calibration of complex infectious disease models (hereafter called simulators. We present this in the form of a tutorial and a case study where we history match a dynamic, event-driven, individual-based stochastic HIV simulator, using extensive demographic, behavioural and epidemiological data available from Uganda. The tutorial describes history matching and emulation. History matching is an iterative procedure that reduces the simulator's input space by identifying and discarding areas that are unlikely to provide a good match to the empirical data. History matching relies on the computational efficiency of a Bayesian representation of the simulator, known as an emulator. Emulators mimic the simulator's behaviour, but are often several orders of magnitude faster to evaluate. In the case study, we use a 22 input simulator, fitting its 18 outputs simultaneously. After 9 iterations of history matching, a non-implausible region of the simulator input space was identified that was 10(11 times smaller than the original input space. Simulator evaluations made within this region were found to have a 65% probability of fitting all 18 outputs. History matching and emulation are useful additions to the toolbox of infectious disease modellers. Further research is required to explicitly address the stochastic nature of the simulator as well as to account for correlations between outputs.

  12. A case of complexity in the Latin American family. Tracing the Galleno Villafán history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Galleno

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and diversity of many Latin America families create a peculiar space of real as well as phantasmagoric presences. The Latin American history draws upon multicultural and multiethnic references that are at times untraceable. Latin American fa milies develop in this context often unaware of the constant transformation and amalgamation impacting the personal and communal consciousness. Yet memory anchors their evolutional reference and serves to create an identity. In this essay, I present a case study of family complexity and the relevance of memory in defining or forming family identity. This is the Galleno Villafán family, my family that evolved from Peruvians and immigrants.

  13. Planning and scheduling for petroleum refineries using mathematical programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joly M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is the development and solution of nonlinear and mixed-integer (MIP optimization models for real-world planning and scheduling problems in petroleum refineries. Firstly, we present a nonlinear planning model that represents a general refinery topology and allows implementation of nonlinear process models as well as blending relations. The optimization model is able to define new operating points, thus increasing the production of the more valuable products and simultaneously satisfying all specification constraints. The second part addresses scheduling problems in oil refineries, which are formulated as MIP optimization models and rely on both continuous and discrete time representations. Three practical applications closely related to the current refinery scenario are presented. The first one addresses the problem of crude oil inventory management of a refinery that receives several types of crude oil delivered exclusively by a single oil pipeline. Subsequently, two optimization models intended to define the optimal production policy, inventory control and distribution are proposed and solved for the fuel oil and asphalt plant. Finally, the planning model of Moro et al. (1998 is extended in order to sequence decisions at the scheduling level in the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG area for maximization of the production of petrochemical-grade propane and product delivery.

  14. The medical history of adults with complex congenital heart disease affects their social development and professional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsenty, Clement; Maury, Philippe; Blot-Souletie, Nathalie; Ladouceur, Magalie; Leobon, Bertrand; Senac, Valérie; Mondoly, Pierre; Elbaz, Meyer; Galinier, Michel; Dulac, Yves; Carrié, Didier; Acar, Philippe; Hascoet, Sebastien

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, advances in surgery and therapeutic catheterization have steadily increased the life expectancy and prevalence of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). We assessed medical and psychosocial variables of adults with CHD, according to the disease complexity. We included, from a single-centre observational cohort study, 135 consecutive adults with CHD (median age of 40 years, interquartile range: 28.0-51.0) followed in our cardiology unit, who answered a questionnaire assessing daily activity and psychosocial functioning. Disease complexity was classified according to the Bethesda conference. Cardiac malformation complexity was simple in 61 (45.2%), moderate in 50 (37.0%) and complex in 24 (17.8%) patients. Cardiac surgery had been performed in 86.5% of moderate and complex patients. Complications (such as heart failure, arrhythmia and pulmonary hypertension) were mainly observed in the complex group (P=0.003). Physical activity was lower in the complex group (no activity in 58.8%, but sport previously contraindicated in 50% of these; P=0.03). Education level tended to be lower in the complex and moderate groups than in the simple group (respectively, 31.2% and 33.3% vs. 45.7% had passed the Baccalaureate; P=0.47). The pass rate was lower in patients with complications (P=0.037) or more than one cardiac surgery (P=0.03). In the complex group, 56.3% of patients were unemployed (P=0.048). Complexity of heart disease and medical history affect education level and employment of adults with CHD. Academic education of children with a complex defect and career counselling are important to prevent unemployment among adults with CHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Occupational exposure to benzene at the ExxonMobil Refinery in Baytown, TX (1978-2006)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gaffney, Shannon H; Panko, Julie M; Unice, Ken M; Burns, Amanda M; Kreider, Marisa L; Gelatt, Richard H; Booher, Lindsay E; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2011-01-01

    ... concentrations at specific refineries and tasks. This study characterizes benzene exposures at the ExxonMobil Baytown, TX, refinery from 1978 to 2006 to understand the variability in workers' exposures over time and during different job tasks...

  16. A new heavy residue upgrading process to retrofit existing refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaedian, Maryam; Zarkesh, Jamshid [NIOC-Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (Russian Federation); Khadzhiev, S.; Kadiev, H. [Russian Academy of science (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Light crude oil reserves have declined and new fields being explored tend to be heavy oil, requiring processes to convert heavy residue to light products. The aim of this paper is to present the use of heavy residue hydroconversion (HRH) to upgrade heavy residues in existing refineries. A case study was carried out on a refinery with 250,000 barrel per day capacity, two cases were examined: the base case and the HRH case. Results showed that HRH provides higher IRR and NPV than the base case for the same investment. The heavy residue hydroconversion process was proved to be a feasible and reliable alternative which could eliminate residue while creating added value in existing refineries.

  17. Do complex population histories drive higher estimates of substitution rate in phylogenetic reconstructions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Uma; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2009-11-01

    Our curiosity about biodiversity compels us to reconstruct the evolutionary past of species. Molecular evolutionary theory now allows parameterization of mathematically sophisticated and detailed models of DNA evolution, which have resulted in a wealth of phylogenetic histories. But reconstructing how species and population histories have played out is critically dependent on the assumptions we make, such as the clock-like accumulation of genetic differences over time and the rate of accumulation of such differences. An important stumbling block in the reconstruction of evolutionary history has been the discordance in estimates of substitution rate between phylogenetic and pedigree-based studies. Ancient genetic data recovered directly from the past are intermediate in time scale between phylogenetics-based and pedigree-based calibrations of substitution rate. Recent analyses of such ancient genetic data suggest that substitution rates are closer to the higher, pedigree-based estimates. In this issue, Navascués & Emerson (2009) model genetic data from contemporary and ancient populations that deviate from a simple demographic history (including changes in population size and structure) using serial coalescent simulations. Furthermore, they show that when these data are used for calibration, we are likely to arrive at upwardly biased estimates of mutation rate.

  18. Holocaust Education in Austria: A (Hi)story of Complexity and Ambivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastel, Heribert; Matzka, Christian; Miklas, Helene

    2010-01-01

    In Austria, activities for teaching about and remembering the Holocaust have concentrated mainly on National Socialism and its atrocities. Austria's history of political anti-Semitism goes back to the 19th century, however, and has been widely and publicly acknowledged. It has always been linked to nationalistic tendencies that are still present…

  19. 75 FR 27641 - Safety Zone; Marathon Oil Refinery Construction, Rouge River, Detroit, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... No. USCG-2010-0333] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Marathon Oil Refinery Construction, Rouge River... vessels from a portion of the Rouge River during the Marathon Oil Refinery Construction project. This... offloading of equipment in conjunction with the Marathon Oil Refinery Construction project. The offloading of...

  20. Geomorphology and failure history of the earthquake-induced Farmington Siding landslide complex, Davis County, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, M.; Harty, K.M. (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The Farmington Siding landslide complex covers an area of 19.5 km[sup 2] in central Davis County. First identified and mapped in the 1970s, the feature was classified by previous researchers as a liquefaction-induced lateral spread based on surface geomorphology and exposures on the landslide complex. This was the first landslide in Utah to be attributed to earthquake-induced liquefaction. Geomorphic and geologic evidence indicate that the Farmington Sliding landslide complex likely consists of liquefaction-induced landslides that failed by means of both flow failure and lateral spreading. The landslide complex is located in an area underlain primarily by fine-grained deposits of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville and Holocene Great Salt Lake. Geomorphic features of the landslide complex include main and minor scarps, hummocks, closed depressions, and transverse lineaments. The main scarp consists mostly of a series of arcuate scallops near the left flank of the landslide, but it is a relatively linear, single scarp near the right flank of the landslide. Hummocks and closed depressions are most common near the head region of the landslide complex. Failure of the Farmington Sliding landslide complex has occurred at least twice. The older, distal portion of the landslide complex is cut by the Gilbert shoreline of the Bonneville lake cycle, indicating that landsliding occurred more than 10,000 years ago. In the younger portion of the landslide complex, landsliding has disrupted the Gilbert shoreline. Radiocarbon age estimates from trenches on a hummock near the main scarp of the younger landslide indicate that slope failure occurred sometime between about 2,730 [+-] 370 cal. yr B.P. and 4,530 [+-] 300 cal. yr B.P., possibly during the penultimate or antepenultimate surface-faulting earthquake on the Weber segment of the Wasatch fault zone.

  1. Enrichment and characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from petroleum refinery waste as potent bioaugmentation agent for in situ bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Poulomi; Roy, Ajoy; Pal, Siddhartha; Mohapatra, Balaram; Kazy, Sufia K; Maiti, Mrinal K; Sar, Pinaki

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsic biodegradation potential of bacteria from petroleum refinery waste was investigated through isolation of cultivable strains and their characterization. Pseudomonas and Bacillus spp. populated the normal cultivable taxa while prolonged enrichment with hydrocarbons and crude oil yielded hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria of genera Burkholderia, Enterobacter, Kocuria, Pandoraea, etc. Strains isolated through enrichment showed assemblages of superior metabolic properties: utilization of aliphatic (C6-C22) and polyaromatic compounds, anaerobic growth with multiple terminal electron acceptors and higher biosurfactant production. Biodegradation of dodecane was studied thoroughly by GC-MS along with detection of gene encoding alkane hydroxylase (alkB). Microcosms bioaugmented with Enterobacter, Pandoraea and Burkholderia strains showed efficient biodegradation (98% TPH removal) well fitted in first order kinetic model with low rate constants and decreased half-life. This study proves that catabolically efficient bacteria resides naturally in complex petroleum refinery wastes and those can be useful for bioaugmentation based bioremediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. environmental impact of illegal refineries on the vegetation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. O. M. Adesope

    destruction of wildlife habitat, disruption of water cycle and loss of medicinal plant species. Youth empowerment ... brackish and tidal fresh water are noted for organisms that depend on the diurnal tidal cycle. Most of the flora and fauna ... petroleum products; this is the origin of 'illegal refineries' in the Niger Delta. All known.

  3. Environmental impact of illegal refineries on the vegetation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The activities of illegal refineries severely impacted biodiversity, aesthetic scenery of the forest, regeneration of plant species and destruction of wildlife habitat, disruption of water cycle and loss of medicinal plant species. Youth empowerment, through vocational training and environmental education can ameliorate the ...

  4. a factorial study of corporate performance of nigerian refineries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    2016-01-01

    Jan 1, 2016 ... hieving parsimony by clustering a plethora of sixty ... To boot, an outstanding sturdy cluster wielding remarkable positive factor loadings, .... cursory study on how best our refineries can be deregulated to achieve optimal performance of the industry. Again, safety of operators and equipment is of great.

  5. Ecotoxicological effects of discharge of Nigerian petroleum refinery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-04-07

    Apr 7, 2014 ... were examined. The ecotoxicological effects examined included acute toxicity tests on Nitrobacter sp., fresh water ... Key words: Toxic effects, petroleum refinery oily sludge, biological sentinels. INTRODUCTION ..... for the Examination of Water and Waste Water 20th Edition Published by American Public ...

  6. Assessment of the effect of effluent discharge from coffee refineries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    The ecohydrological quality of water resource of Ethiopia is declining at an alarming rate, resulting in severe environmental degradation. This study finds out the effects of effluent discharge from intensive coffee refineries on river water quality based on physicochemical parameters and benthos assemblages as biological ...

  7. Texas refinery air pollution emissions are being severely underestimated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-06-01

    The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria region of southeastern Texas is home to heavy industrial investment in oil refining and petrochemical production. Pollutants emanating from the factories and refineries have repeatedly caused the region to fail national and state-level tests for air quality and ground-level ozone.

  8. Assessment of the effect of effluent discharge from coffee refineries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    As might be expected, water quality in Limu Kosa District rivers and wetlands ranges from absolutely pristine to dangerously poor. Methods. Study period. A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the impact of wastewater discharge on ecohydrological river water quality by coffee refineries in Limu Kosa District from ...

  9. Phylogeographic analyses and genetic structure illustrate the complex evolutionary history of Phragmites australis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Ricardo; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2016-05-01

    Genetic data suggest that three lineages of Phragmites australis are found in North America: the Native North American lineage, the Gulf Coast lineage, and the Invasive lineage. In Mexico, P. australis is a common species, but nothing is known about the distribution or ecology of these lineages. We examined the phylogeography of P. australis to analyze the current geographic distribution of genetic variation, demographic history, and dispersal patterns to better understand its evolutionary history in Mexico. We sampled 427 individuals from 28 populations. We used two noncoding regions of chloroplast DNA to estimate the levels of genetic variation and identified the genetic groups across the species' geographical range in Mexico. We compared the genealogical relationships among haplotypes with those previously reported. A hypothesis of demographic expansion was also tested for the Mexican P. australis lineages. We found 13 new haplotypes native to Mexico that might be undergoing an active process of expansion and diversification. Genealogical analyses provided evidence that two independent lineages of P. australis are present in Mexico. The invasive lineage was not detected with our sampling. Our estimates of population expansions in Mexico ranged from 0.202 to 0.726 mya. Phragmites australis is a native species that has been in Mexico for thousands of years. Genetic data suggest that climatic changes during the Pleistocene played an important role in the demographic expansion of the populations that constitute the different genetic groups of P. australis in Mexico. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  10. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in alumina refinery employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musk, A W; de Klerk, N H; Beach, J R; Fritschi, L; Sim, M R; Benke, G; Abramson, M; McNeil, J J

    2000-04-01

    Employees in alumina refineries are known to be exposed to a number of potential respiratory irritants, particularly caustic mist and bauxite and alumina dusts. To examine the prevalence of work related respiratory symptoms and lung function in alumina refinery employees and relate these to their jobs. 2964 current employees of three alumina refineries in Western Australia were invited to participate in a cross sectional study, and 89% responded. Subjects were given a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, smoking, and occupations with additional questions on temporal relations between respiratory symptoms and work. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured with a rolling seal spirometer. Atopy was assessed with prick skin tests for common allergens. Associations between work and symptoms were assessed with Cox's regression to estimate prevalence ratios, and between work and lung function with linear regression. Work related wheeze, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and rhinitis were reported by 5.0%, 3.5%, 2.5%, and 9.5% of participants respectively. After adjustment for age, smoking, and atopy, most groups of production employees reported a greater prevalence of work related symptoms than did office employees. After adjustment for age, smoking, height, and atopy, subjects reporting work related wheeze, chest tightness, and shortness of breath had significantly lower mean levels of FEV(1) (186, 162, and 272 ml respectively) than subjects without these symptoms. Prevalence of most work related symptoms was higher at refinery 2 than at the other two refineries, but subjects at this refinery had an adjusted mean FEV(1) >60 ml higher than the others. Significant differences in FVC and FEV(1)/FVC ratio, but not FEV(1), were found between different process groups. There were significant differences in work related symptoms and lung function between process groups and refineries, but these were mostly not consistent

  11. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide

  12. History of Science, Physics, and Art: A Complex Approach in Brazilian Syllabuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Marco; Guerra, Andreia; Reis, José Claudio

    2013-01-01

    This paper is about new contents that can be introduced into science education. It is a description of an experience aimed at introducing a complex approach into the final grade of a Brazilian elementary school. The aim is to show the transformation of the conception of space and time from the Middle Ages with the physics of Aristotle to the 20th…

  13. Fate and effect of naphthenic acids on oil refinery activated sludge wastewater treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiti, Teresa; Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2013-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex group of alkyl-substituted acyclic, monocyclic and polycyclic carboxylic acids present in oil sands process waters, crude oil, refinery wastewater and petroleum products. Crude oil, desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent refinery samples were received from six United States refineries. The total acid number (TAN) of the six crudes tested ranged from 0.12 to 1.5 mg KOH/g crude oil and correlated to the total NA concentration in the crudes. The total NA concentration in the desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent samples ranged from 4.2 to 40.4, 4.5 to 16.6, 9.6 to 140.3 and 2.8 to 11.6 mg NA/L, respectively. The NAs in all wastewater streams accounted for less than 16% of the total COD, indicating that many other organic compounds are present and that NAs are a minor component in refinery wastewaters. Susceptibility tests showed that none of the activated sludge heterotrophic microcosms was completely inhibited by NAs up to 400 mg/L. Growth inhibition ranging from 10 to 59% was observed in all microcosms at and above 100 mg NA/L. NAs chronically-sorbed to activated sludge mixed liquor biomass and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were recalcitrant and persistent. More than 80% of the total NAs remained in the solid phase at the end of the 10-day desorption period (five successive desorption steps). Throughout a 90-day incubation period, the total NA concentration decreased by 33 and 51% in PAC-free and PAC-containing mixed liquor microcosms, respectively. The lower molecular weight fraction of NAs was preferentially degraded in both mixed liquors. The persistence of the residual, higher molecular weight NAs is likely a combination of molecular recalcitrance and decreased bioavailability when chronically-sorbed to the biomass and/or PAC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oil refinery dusts: morphological and size analysis by TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sielicki, Przemyslaw; Janik, Helena; Guzman, Agnieszka [Gdansk University of Technology, Department of Polymer Technology, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk (Poland); Broniszewski, Mieczyslaw [Environmental Protection Office, Lotos Group, Gdansk (Poland); Namiesnik, Jacek [Gdansk University of Technology, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-03-15

    The objectives of this work were to develop a means of sampling atmospheric dusts on the premises of an oil refinery for electron microscopic study to carry out preliminary morphological analyses and to compare these dusts with those collected at sites beyond the refinery limits. Carbon and collodion membranes were used as a support for collection of dust particles straight on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Micrographs of the dust particles were taken at magnifications from x 4,000 to x 80,000 with a Tesla BS500 transmission electron microscope. Four parameters were defined on the basis of the micrographs: surface area, Feret diameter, circumference, and shape coefficient. The micrographs and literature data were used to classify the atmospheric dusts into six groups: particles with an irregular shape and rounded edges; particles with an irregular shape and sharp edges; soot and its aggregates; spherical particles; singly occurring, ultrafine dust particles; and particles not allocated to any of the previous five groups. The types of dusts found in all the samples were similar, although differences did exist between the various morphological parameters. Dust particles with the largest Feret diameter were present in sample 3 (mean, 0.739 {mu}m) - these were collected near the refinery's effluent treatment plant. The particles with the smallest diameter were found in the sample that had been intended to be a reference sample for the remaining results (mean, 0.326 {mu}m). The dust particles collected in the refinery had larger mean Feret diameters, even 100% larger, than those collected beyond it. Particles with diameters from 0.1 to 0.2 {mu}m made up the most numerous group in all the samples collected in the refinery. (orig.)

  15. Oil refinery dusts: morphological and size analysis by TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielicki, Przemysław; Janik, Helena; Guzman, Agnieszka; Broniszewski, Mieczysław; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2011-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop a means of sampling atmospheric dusts on the premises of an oil refinery for electron microscopic study to carry out preliminary morphological analyses and to compare these dusts with those collected at sites beyond the refinery limits. Carbon and collodion membranes were used as a support for collection of dust particles straight on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Micrographs of the dust particles were taken at magnifications from ×4,000 to ×80,000 with a Tesla BS500 transmission electron microscope. Four parameters were defined on the basis of the micrographs: surface area, Feret diameter, circumference, and shape coefficient. The micrographs and literature data were used to classify the atmospheric dusts into six groups: particles with an irregular shape and rounded edges; particles with an irregular shape and sharp edges; soot and its aggregates; spherical particles; singly occurring, ultrafine dust particles; and particles not allocated to any of the previous five groups. The types of dusts found in all the samples were similar, although differences did exist between the various morphological parameters. Dust particles with the largest Feret diameter were present in sample 3 (mean, 0.739 μm)-these were collected near the refinery's effluent treatment plant. The particles with the smallest diameter were found in the sample that had been intended to be a reference sample for the remaining results (mean, 0.326 μm). The dust particles collected in the refinery had larger mean Feret diameters, even 100% larger, than those collected beyond it. Particles with diameters from 0.1 to 0.2 μm made up the most numerous group in all the samples collected in the refinery.

  16. Portuguese crypto-Jews: the genetic heritage of a complex history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueiro, Inês; Teixeira, João C.; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The first documents mentioning Jewish people in Iberia are from the Visigothic period. It was also in this period that the first documented anti-Judaic persecution took place. Other episodes of persecution would happen again and again during the long troubled history of the Jewish people in Iberia and culminated with the Decrees of Expulsion and the establishment of the Inquisition: some Jews converted to Catholicism while others resisted and were forcedly baptized, becoming the first Iberian Crypto-Jews. In the 18th century the official discrimination and persecution carried out by the Inquisition ended and several Jewish communities emerged in Portugal. From a populational genetics point of view, the worldwide Diaspora of contemporary Jewish communities has been intensely studied. Nevertheless, very little information is available concerning Sephardic and Iberian Crypto-Jewish descendants. Data from the Iberian Peninsula, the original geographic source of Sephardic Jews, is limited to two populations in Portugal, Belmonte, and Bragança district, and the Chueta community from Mallorca. Belmonte was the first Jewish community studied for uniparental markers. The construction of a reference model for the history of the Portuguese Jewish communities, in which the genetic and classical historical data interplay dynamically, is still ongoing. Recently an enlarged sample covering a wide region in the Northeast Portugal was undertaken, allowing the genetic profiling of male and female lineages. A Jewish specific shared female lineage (HV0b) was detected between the community of Belmonte and Bragança. In contrast to what was previously described as a hallmark of the Portuguese Jews, an unexpectedly high polymorphism of lineages was found in Bragança, showing a surprising resistance to the erosion of genetic diversity typical of small-sized isolate populations, as well as signs of admixture with the Portuguese host population. PMID:25699075

  17. PORTUGUESE CRYPTO-JEWS: THE GENETIC HERITAGE OF A COMPLEX HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Pires Nogueiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The first documents mentioning Jewish people in Iberia are from the Visigothic period. It was also in this period that the first documented anti-Judaic persecution took place. Other episodes of persecution would happen again and again during the long troubled history of the Jewish people in Iberia and culminated with the Decrees of Expulsion and the establishment of the Inquisition: some Jews converted to Catholicism while others resisted and were forcedly baptized, becoming the first Iberian Crypto-Jews. In the 18th century the official discrimination and persecution carried out by the Inquisition ended and several Jewish communities emerged in Portugal. From a populational genetics point of view, the worldwide Diaspora of contemporary Jewish communities has been intensely studied. Nevertheless, very little information is available concerning Sephardic and Iberian Crypto-Jewish descendants. Data from the Iberian Peninsula, the original geographic source of Sephardic Jews, is limited to two populations in Portugal, Belmonte and Bragança district, and the Chueta community from Mallorca. Belmonte was the first Jewish community studied for uniparental markers. The construction of a reference model for the history of the Portuguese Jewish communities, in which the genetic and classical historical data interplay dynamically, is still ongoing. Recently an enlarged sample covering a wide region in the Northeast Portugal was undertaken, allowing the genetic profiling of male and female lineages. A Jewish specific shared female lineage (HV0b was detected between the community of Belmonte and Bragança. In contrast to what was previously described as a hallmark of the Portuguese Jews, an unexpectedly high polymorphism of lineages’ was found in Bragança, showing a surprising resistance to the erosion of genetic diversity typical of small-sized isolate populations, as well as signs of admixture with the Portuguese host population.

  18. Discrete event simulation for petroleum transfers involving harbors, refineries and pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcella S.R.; Lueders, Ricardo; Delgado, Myriam R.B.S. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays a great effort has been spent by companies to improve their logistics in terms of programming of events that affect production and distribution of products. In this case, simulation can be a valuable tool for evaluating different behaviors. The objective of this work is to build a discrete event simulation model for scheduling of operational activities in complexes containing one harbor and two refineries interconnected by a pipeline infrastructure. The model was developed in Arena package, based on three sub-models that control pier allocation, loading of tanks, and transfers to refineries through pipelines. Preliminary results obtained for a given control policy, show that profit can be calculated by taking into account many parameters such as oil costs on ships, pier using, over-stay of ships and interface costs. Such problem has already been considered in the literature but using different strategies. All these factors should be considered in a real-world operation where decision making tools are necessary to obtain high returns. (author)

  19. Stabilization of Bio-Oil Fractions for Insertion into Petroleum Refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Smith, Ryan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Wright, Mark [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Elliott, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Resasco, Daniel [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Crossley, Steven [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-28

    This project is part of a collaboration effort between Iowa State University (ISU), University of Oklahoma (OK) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The purpose of this project is to stabilize bio-oil fractions and improve their suitability for insertion into petroleum refineries. Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass is a complex mixture of unstable organic compounds. These organic compounds react under standard room conditions resulting in increases in bio-oil viscosity and water content – both detrimental for bio-oil storage and transportation. This study employed fractionation and upgrading systems to improve the stability of bio-oil. The fractionation system consists of a series of condensers, and electrostatic precipitators designed to separate bio-oil into five fractions: soluble carbohydrates (SF1&2), clean phenolic oligomers (CPO) and middle fraction (SF3&4), light oxygenates (SF5). A two-stage upgrading process was designed to process bio-oil stage fractions into stable products that can be inserted into a refinery. In the upgrading system, heavy and middle bio-oil fractions were upgraded into stable oil via cracking and subsequent hydrodeoxygenation. The light oxygenate fraction was steam reformed to provide a portion of requisite hydrogen for hydroprocessing. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking employed hydrogen from natural gas, fuel gas and light oxygenates reforming. The finished products from this study consist of gasoline- and diesel-blend stock fuels.

  20. ENHANCEMENT OF PHENOL REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN DORA REFINERY WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah F. Sharif

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Because the sanctions imposed on Iraq by the United Nations, programmed maintenance and wearing parts replacement has not been performed according to schedules in DORA Refinery Wastewater Unit, which resulted in higher phenol content and BOD5 in effluents disposed to river. The investigations showed that two main reasons were behind this problem: Firstly, increased emissions of hydrocarbons in the complexity of refinery equipment and Secondly, the decreased efficiency of the aerators in the biological. During the last few months, phenol average concentration in the effluent, after biological treatment was found to be between 0.06-0.13 mg/L, while COD was exceeding 110 mg/L after treatment in the same period. Considerable enhancement, has been indicated recently, after the following performances: First: Recycling wastewater from some heat exchangers, and the segregation of low and high strength of wastewaters, Second: Minimizing emissions of hydrocarbons from fluid catalytic cracking and steam cracking, Third: Replacement of driving motors of the aerators in the biological treatment unit. After replacement of these units, a significant decrease in phenol concentration was obtained in purified water (0.03-0.05 mg/L and COD of 60 mg/L before the tertiary treatment. It is concluded that a better quality of effluents has been obtained after a series of emissions control and wastewater treatment unit equipment maintenance performances.

  1. Phylogeography, colonization and population history of the Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp. in the Nicaraguan crater lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Axel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of the mechanisms driving speciation requires detailed knowledge about the phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of the incipient species within their entire ranges as well as their colonization history. The Midas cichlid species complex Amphilophus spp. has been proven to be a powerful model system for the study of ecological specialization, sexual selection and the mechanisms of sympatric speciation. Here we present a comprehensive and integrative phylogeographic analysis of the complete Midas Cichlid species complex in Nicaragua (> 2000 individuals covering the entire distributional range, using two types of molecular markers (the mitochondrial DNA control region and 15 microsatellites. We investigated the majority of known lake populations of this species complex and reconstructed their colonization history in order to distinguish between alternative speciation scenarios. Results We found that the large lakes contain older and more diverse Midas Cichlid populations, while all crater lakes hold younger and genetically less variable species assemblages. The large lakes appear to have repeatedly acted as source populations for all crater lakes, and our data indicate that faunal exchange among crater lakes is extremely unlikely. Despite their very recent (often only a few thousand years old and common origin from the two large Nicaraguan lakes, all crater lake Midas Cichlid radiations underwent independent, but parallel, evolution, and comprise distinct genetic units. Indeed several of these crater lakes contain multiple genetically distinct incipient species that most likely arose through sympatric speciation. Several crater lake radiations can be traced back to a single ancestral line, but some appear to have more than one founding lineage. The timing of the colonization(s of each crater lake differs, although most of them occurred more (probably much more recently than 20,000 years ago. Conclusion The

  2. Meteorologically estimated exposure but not distance predicts asthma symptoms in schoolchildren in the environs of a petrochemical refinery: a cross-sectional study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    White, N

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available the city wide ISAAC study, exposure to tobacco smoke could be a contributor to the asthma symptom excess in this population. In addition, there has long been a high level of concern among parents about the effect of emissions from the refinery... the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC) written and video questionnaires. Information was collected on potential confounders, e.g. parental history of atopic disease, active and passive smoking by the participant, birth order, number...

  3. [History, classification and clinic of the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troeger, H; Hasenböhler, P

    2010-02-01

    Almost 150 years are gone since the first description of the classic symptoms, what is today summarized under the term CRPS. From a big number of different names, it has been agreed in 1986 to this term and has also defined more exactly the corresponding terms to it. In the pathophysiology of this complex of symptoms is today accepted that it is a combination of inflammatory, vegetative and central-nervous processes in different size and weight as a key position. There are hardly new findings in epidemiology and frequency. In opposite to this a number of results are produced by better methods for examination which let appear the connections in a new view and make new therapy options possible. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  4. The R package 'Luminescence': a history of unexpected complexity and concepts to deal with it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Sebastian; Burow, Christoph; Dietze, Michael; Fuchs, Margret C.; Friedrich, Johannes; Fischer, Manfred; Schmidt, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Overcoming limitations in the so far used standard software, developing an efficient solution of low weight for a very specific task or creating graphs of high quality: the reasons that may had initially lead a scientist to work with R are manifold. And as long as developed solutions, e.g., R scripts, are needed for personal use only, code can remain unstructured and a documentation is not compulsory. However, this changes with the first friendly request for help after the code has been reused by others. In contrast to single scripts, written without intention to ever get published, for R packages the CRAN policy demands a more structured and elaborated approach including a minimum of documentation. Nevertheless, growing projects with thousands of lines of code that need to be maintained can become overwhelming, in particular as researchers are not by definition experts on managing software projects. The R package 'Luminescence' (Kreutzer et al., 2017), a collection of tools dealing with the analysis of luminescence data in a geoscientific, geochronological context, started as one single R script, but quickly evolved into a comprehensive solution connected with various other R packages. We present (1) a very brief development history of the package 'Luminescence', before we (2) sketch technical challenges encountered over time and solutions that have been found to deal with it by using various open source tools. Our presentation is considered as a collection of concepts and approaches to set up R projects in geosciences. References. Kreutzer, S., Dietze, M., Burow, C., Fuchs, M. C., Schmidt, C., Fischer, M., Friedrich, J., 2017. Luminescence: Comprehensive Luminescence Dating Data Analysis. R package version 0.6.4. https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=Luminescence

  5. Can backcalculation models unravel complex larval growth histories in a tropical freshwater fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrs, D; Ebner, B C; Fulton, C J

    2013-07-01

    This experimental study compared the precision and accuracy of the biological intercept (BI), modified fry (MF) and time-varying growth (TVG) backcalculation models in estimating the early growth of the tropical freshwater purple-spotted gudgeon Mogurnda adspersa. Larvae were reared up to 41 days post hatching under two temperatures and four different feeding regimes. Food and temperature treatments induced complex growth profiles among fish, and although total length (LT ) and otolith radius were related under all conditions, some uncoupling was evident in the otolith-somatic-growth (OSG) relationship of fish subjected to periods of changing food availability. Furthermore, otolith growth was found to be significantly influenced by temperature, but not by food availability. Analysis of backcalculation residuals by linear mixed effects modelling revealed that BI and TVG were equally precise in predicting somatic growth, with the highest accuracy provided by TVG. The performance of all the three models declined as the OSG relationship weakened under low-food conditions, with maximum errors estimated to be 39, 60 and 36% of observed LT for the BI, MF and TVG models, respectively. The need for careful validation of backcalculation models is emphasized when examining fishes subjected to variable environmental conditions, and when exploring the differential influence of temperature and food on fish LT and otolith growth. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Bio-refinery approach for spent coffee grounds valorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Teresa M; Martins, António A; Caetano, Nídia S

    2018-01-01

    Although normally seen as a problem, current policies and strategic plans concur that if adequately managed, waste can be a source of the most interesting and valuable products, among which metals, oils and fats, lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses, tannins, antioxidants, caffeine, polyphenols, pigments, flavonoids, through recycling, compound recovery or energy valorization, following the waste hierarchy. Besides contributing to more sustainable and circular economies, those products also have high commercial value when compared to the ones obtained by currently used waste treatment methods. In this paper, it is shown how the bio-refinery framework can be used to obtain high value products from organic waste. With spent coffee grounds as a case study, a sequential process is used to obtain first the most valuable, and then other products, allowing proper valorization of residues and increased sustainability of the whole process. Challenges facing full development and implementation of waste based bio-refineries are highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Global Warming Potential Of A Waste Refinery Using Enzymatic Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Astrup, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    and fossil resources. This is especially important with respect to the residual waste (i.e. the remains after source-separation and separate collection) which is typically incinerated or landfilled. In this paper the energy and Global Warming performance of a pilot-scale waste refinery for the enzymatic......Decrease of fossil fuel dependence and resource saving has become increasingly important during the last years. In this perspective, higher recycling rates for valuable materials as well as energy recovery from waste streams could play a significant role substituting for virgin material production...... treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) was presented. The refinery produced a liquid (liquefied organic materials and paper) and a solid fraction (non-degradable materials) from the initial waste. A number of scenarios for the utilization of the two outputs were analyzed. Co-combustion in existing power...

  8. Complex history of admixture during citrus domestication revealed by genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G. Albert; Prochnik, Simon; Jenkins, Jerry; Salse, Jerome; Hellsten, Uffe; Murat, Florent; Perrier, Xavier; Ruiz, Manuel; Scalabrin, Simone; Terol, Javier; Takita, Marco Aur& #233; lio,; Labadie, Karine; Poulain, Julie; Couloux, Arnaud; Jabbari, Kamel; Cattonaro, Federica; Fabbro, Cristian Del; Pinosio, Sara; Zuccolo, Andrea; Chapman, Jarrod; Grimwood, Jane; Tadeo, Francisco; Estornell, Leandro H.; Mu?oz-Sanz, Juan V.; Ibanez, Victoria; Herrero-Ortega, Amparo; Aleza, Pablo; P& #233; rez, Juli& #225; n P& #233; rez,; Ramon, Daniel; Brunel, Dominique; Luro, Francois; Chen, Chunxian; Farmerie, William G.; Desany, Brian; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Harkins, Tim; Fredrikson, Karin; Burns, Paul; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark; Reforgiato, Giuseppe; Freitas-Astua, Juliana; Quetier, Francis; Navarro, Luis; Roose, Mikeal; Wincker, Patrick; Schmutz, Jeremy; Morgante, Michele; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Talon, Manuel; Jaillon, Olivier; Ollitrault, Patrick; Gmitter, Frederick; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-06-30

    Although Citrus is the most globally significant tree fruit, its domestication history is poorly understood. Cultivated citrus types are believed to comprise selections from and/or hybrids of several wild progenitor species, but the identities of these progenitors, and their contribution to modern cultivars, remain controversial. Here we report the genomes of a collection of mandarins, pummelos, and oranges, including a high quality reference sequence from a haploid Clementine mandarin. By comparative genome analysis we show that these cultivated types can be derived from two progenitor species. Cultivated pummelos represent selections from a single progenitor species C. maxima. Unexpectedly, however, we find that cultivated mandarins are introgressions of C. maxima into a distinct second population that we identify with the ancestral wild mandarin species C. reticulata. Sweet and sour oranges are found to be interspecific hybrids. Sweet orange, the most widely cultivated citrus, arose as the offspring of previously admixed individuals. In contrast, sour (or Seville) orange is an F1 hybrid of pure C. maxima and C. reticulata parents, implying that wild mandarins were part of the early breeding germplasm. Surprisingly, we also find that a wild Chinese mandarin from Mangshan, China shows substantial sequence divergence from C. reticulata and appears to represent a distinct taxon. Understanding the relationships and phylogeny of cultivated citrus through genome analysis will clarify taxonomic relationships and enable previously inconceivable opportunities for sequence-directed genetic improvement. Citrus are widely consumed worldwide as juice or fresh fruit, providing important sources of vitamin C and other health-promoting compounds. Global production in 2012 exceeded 86 million metric tons, with an estimated value of US$9 billion (http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/citrus.pdf). The very narrow genetic diversity of cultivated citrus makes it highly

  9. Multiple Geographic Origins of Commensalism and Complex Dispersal History of Black Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Ken P.; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Chinen, Alejandro A.; Chesser, R. Terry; ten Have, José; Donnellan, Stephen C.; Austin, Jeremy; Frost, Angela; Gonzalez, Jean Paul; Herbreteau, Vincent; Catzeflis, Francois; Soubrier, Julien; Fang, Yin-Ping; Robins, Judith; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Bastos, Amanda D. S.; Maryanto, Ibnu; Sinaga, Martua H.; Denys, Christiane; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.; Conroy, Chris; Rowe, Kevin; Cooper, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The Black Rat (Rattus rattus) spread out of Asia to become one of the world's worst agricultural and urban pests, and a reservoir or vector of numerous zoonotic diseases, including the devastating plague. Despite the global scale and inestimable cost of their impacts on both human livelihoods and natural ecosystems, little is known of the global genetic diversity of Black Rats, the timing and directions of their historical dispersals, and the risks associated with contemporary movements. We surveyed mitochondrial DNA of Black Rats collected across their global range as a first step towards obtaining an historical genetic perspective on this socioeconomically important group of rodents. We found a strong phylogeographic pattern with well-differentiated lineages of Black Rats native to South Asia, the Himalayan region, southern Indochina, and northern Indochina to East Asia, and a diversification that probably commenced in the early Middle Pleistocene. We also identified two other currently recognised species of Rattus as potential derivatives of a paraphyletic R. rattus. Three of the four phylogenetic lineage units within R. rattus show clear genetic signatures of major population expansion in prehistoric times, and the distribution of particular haplogroups mirrors archaeologically and historically documented patterns of human dispersal and trade. Commensalism clearly arose multiple times in R. rattus and in widely separated geographic regions, and this may account for apparent regionalism in their associated pathogens. Our findings represent an important step towards deeper understanding the complex and influential relationship that has developed between Black Rats and humans, and invite a thorough re-examination of host-pathogen associations among Black Rats. PMID:22073158

  10. The merger history of the complex cluster Abell 1758: a combined weak lensing and spectroscopic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, R.; Cypriano, E. S.; Machado, R. E. G.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Sodré, L.; Dupke, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present a weak-lensing and dynamical study of the complex cluster Abell 1758 (A1758, bar{z} = 0.278) supported by hydrodynamical simulations. This cluster is composed of two main structures called A1758N and A1758S. The northern structure is composed of A1758NW and A1758NE, with lensing determined masses of 7.90_{-1.55}^{+1.89} × 1014 M⊙ and 5.49_{-1.33}^{+1.67} × 1014 M⊙, respectively. They show a remarkable feature: while in A1758NW, there is a spatial agreement among weak-lensing mass distribution, intracluster medium and its brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), in A1758NE, the X-ray peak is located 96_{-15}^{+14} arcsec away from the mass peak and BCG positions. Given the detachment between gas and mass, we could use the local surface mass density to estimate an upper limit for the dark matter self-interaction cross-section: σ/m < 5.83 cm2 g-1. Combining our velocity data with hydrodynamical simulations, we have shown that A1758 NW and NE had their closest approach 0.27 Gyr ago and their merger axis is 21° ± 12° from the plane of the sky. In the A1758S system, we have measured a total mass of 4.96_{-1.19}^{+1.08} × 10^{14} M⊙ and, using radial velocity data, we found that the main merger axis is located at 70° ± 4° from the plane of the sky, therefore closest to the line of sight.

  11. Multiple geographic origins of commensalism and complex dispersal history of Black Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken P Aplin

    Full Text Available The Black Rat (Rattus rattus spread out of Asia to become one of the world's worst agricultural and urban pests, and a reservoir or vector of numerous zoonotic diseases, including the devastating plague. Despite the global scale and inestimable cost of their impacts on both human livelihoods and natural ecosystems, little is known of the global genetic diversity of Black Rats, the timing and directions of their historical dispersals, and the risks associated with contemporary movements. We surveyed mitochondrial DNA of Black Rats collected across their global range as a first step towards obtaining an historical genetic perspective on this socioeconomically important group of rodents. We found a strong phylogeographic pattern with well-differentiated lineages of Black Rats native to South Asia, the Himalayan region, southern Indochina, and northern Indochina to East Asia, and a diversification that probably commenced in the early Middle Pleistocene. We also identified two other currently recognised species of Rattus as potential derivatives of a paraphyletic R. rattus. Three of the four phylogenetic lineage units within R. rattus show clear genetic signatures of major population expansion in prehistoric times, and the distribution of particular haplogroups mirrors archaeologically and historically documented patterns of human dispersal and trade. Commensalism clearly arose multiple times in R. rattus and in widely separated geographic regions, and this may account for apparent regionalism in their associated pathogens. Our findings represent an important step towards deeper understanding the complex and influential relationship that has developed between Black Rats and humans, and invite a thorough re-examination of host-pathogen associations among Black Rats.

  12. A Novel Transporting System Model for Oil Refinery

    OpenAIRE

    Razman M. Tahar; Waleed K. Abduljabbar

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Oil refineries are widely used to store various liquids and gases. Petroleum products are in high demand. Oil companies have abundant resources of petroleum products in pipelines and storage tanks. Approach: Included are storage tanks at retail gasoline station, home heating oil tanks, lubricant storage at automotive service facilities, propane tanks in all sorts of application, and oil company terminals across the world. The aim of this study is to present a model by which...

  13. Legitimacy in Green: Pollution vs. Profit in Canadian Oil Refineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Magness

    2007-06-01

    light of changing societal expectations have created an external environment that encourages the development of new technologies that promote cost efficiencies and good environmental performance simultaneously.  Russo and Fouts (1997 argued that industries subject to rapid technological advance are well suited to respond to these changes in the external environment. The findings of this paper suggest that the petroleum refinery sector of the oil and gas industry may be meeting the challenge of the environmental movement.

  14. Leukaemia incidence in people living close to an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barregard, Lars; Holmberg, Erik; Sallsten, Gerd

    2009-11-01

    To assess the incidence of leukaemia in an area downwind of a large oil refinery emitting carcinogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including benzene. Using a dispersion model and the prevailing wind direction, two parishes with about 5000 inhabitants were a priori considered to be exposed to VOCs from the refinery. Numbers of observed and expected leukaemia cases in 1975-2004 were calculated using regional sex- and age-specific incidence rates. In addition, five nearby parishes (12000 inhabitants), considered unaffected by the emissions, served as a local reference area. Based on emission data, dispersion modelling and VOC measurements, the refinery's contribution to the population's exposure to carcinogenic VOCs was estimated. Published "unit risks" for carcinogenic VOCs were used to estimate the expected excess leukaemia risk. The incidence of leukaemia in the "exposed parishes" was significantly increased in 1975-2004 (33 cases v. 22 expected cases), owing to an increase in the last 10-year period, from 1995 to 2004 (19 cases v. 8.5 expected cases). The leukaemia incidence in the local control area was normal (50 cases v. 56 expected cases). The estimated contribution from the refinery to VOC concentrations was, however, only about 2 microg/m(3) (yearly average) for benzene, 2 microg/m(3) for ethylene, 0.5 microg/m(3) for 1,3-butadiene and 5 microg/m(3) for propene. Calculations of expected excess risk using published risk estimates would indicate a much lower excess risk in the exposed parishes. Using risk estimates extrapolated from high-level exposure, we would not expect an increase of leukaemia at low exposure to VOC emissions. Nevertheless, the clear elevation of leukaemia in the priori selected, exposed parishes was remarkable. Our finding may reflect a causal association due to emissions, but it could also be due to unknown confounding, or chance.

  15. Simulation of production and sales planning in refinery operations

    OpenAIRE

    Bredström, David; Flisberg, Patrik; Rönnqvist, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we discuss some computational experiments on simulating refinery operations. We compare an integrated approach with recursively solving a production planning and sales planning problem. We test two different descriptions of the demand behaviour. The first is based on a fixed lower and upper limit and the second on a demand that varies with the product price. We also test the impact of different number of time periods in the planning horizon. We simulate the behaviour when detail...

  16. A Typical Case Study: Solid Waste Management in Petroleum Refineries

    OpenAIRE

    Jadea S. Alshammari; Fatma K. Gad; Ahmed A.M. Elgibaly; Abdul R. Khan

    2008-01-01

    The current environmental concerns have forced developed and developing countries to reduce air, water and land pollution for sustainable growth. Solid refinery waste is cocktail of hydrocarbons, water, heavy metal and fine solids and is substantial in quantity. The principal processes of waste management focus mainly on waste source reduction, reusing, recycling, composting, incineration with or without energy recovery, fuel production and land filling. Waste management models have a common ...

  17. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  18. Treatment of Refinery Waste Water Using Environmental Friendly Adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, M. Geetha; Al-Moshrafi, Samira Mohammed Khamis; Al Hudaifi, Alaa; Al Aisari, Buthaina Hamood

    2017-09-01

    This research evaluates the effectiveness of activated carbon prepared from walnut shell in the removal of pollutants from refinery waste water by adsorption technique. A series of batch experiments were carried out by varying the effluent solution pH, stirring time, stirring speed and adsorbent dosage in the reduction of pollutants from refinery effluent. Characterization of the adsorbent was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Brunauer Emmett and Teller (BET) isotherm and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. The best quality activated carbon was obtained with a particle size of 0.75 µm, activation temperature of 800 °C and activation time 24 h. The maximum BET surface area obtained was 165.2653 m2/g. The experimental results demonstrates that the highest percentage reduction in COD was 79%, using 0.6 g walnut shell powder at an optimum stirring speed of 100 rpm, at pH 6 and 120 min of contact time. The outcome of the result shows that walnut shell carbon is a potentially useful adsorbent for the removal of pollutants from refinery waste water.

  19. Catalytic upgrading of refinery cracked products by trans-hydrogenation: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Garba, Mustapha Danlami; Jackson, S. David

    2017-01-01

    The production of high premium fuel is an issue of priority to every refinery. The trans-hydrogenation process is devised to convert two low valued refinery cracked products to premium products; the conversion processes involve the combination of dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reaction as a single step process. The paper reviews the recent literature on the use of catalysts to convert low value refinery products (i.e. alkanes and alkynes or alkadienes) to alkenes (olefins) by trans-hydroge...

  20. Multiple cosmogenic nuclides document complex Pleistocene exposure history of glacial drifts in Terra Nova Bay (northern Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nicola, Luigia; Strasky, Stefan; Schlüchter, Christian; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Akçar, Naki; Kubik, Peter W.; Christl, Marcus; Kasper, Haino Uwe; Wieler, Rainer; Baroni, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Geomorphological and glacial geological surveys and multiple cosmogenic nuclide analyses ( 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne) allowed us to reconstruct the chronology of variations prior to the last glacial maximum of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) and valley glaciers in the Terra Nova Bay region. Glacially scoured coastal piedmonts with round-topped mountains occur below the highest local erosional trimline. They represent relict landscape features eroded by extensive ice overriding the whole coastal area before at least 6 Ma (pre-dating the build-up of the Mt. Melbourne volcanic field). Since then, summit surfaces were continuously exposed and well preserved under polar condition with negligible erosion rates on the order of 17 cm/Ma. Complex older drifts rest on deglaciated areas above the younger late-Pleistocene glacial drift and below the previously overridden summits. The combination of stable and radionuclide isotopes documents complex exposure histories with substantial periods of burial combined with minimal erosion. The areas below rounded summits were repeatedly exposed and buried by ice from local and outlet glaciers. The exposure ages of the older drift(s) indicate multiple Pleistocene glacial cycles, which did not significantly modify the pre-existing landscape.

  1. Subsoil heterogeneities controlling porewater contaminant mass and microbial diversity at a site with a complex pollution history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigserver, Diana; Carmona, José M; Cortés, Amparo; Viladevall, Manuel; Nieto, José M; Grifoll, Magdalena; Vila, Joaquim; Parker, Beth L

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to improve our understanding of the conceptual model of pollutant transport and fate in cases of DNAPL contamination at sites with a complex contamination history. The study was carried out in an unconfined aquifer of alluvial fans in the Tarragona Petrochemical Complex (Spain). Two boreholes were drilled and continuous cores were recovered in order to carry out a detailed core description at centimeter scale and a comprehensive sampling of borehole cores. The biogeochemical heterogeneity at these sites is controlled by the conjunction of lithological, hydrochemical and microbiological heterogeneities. Biodegradation processes of contaminant compounds take place not only at the level of the dissolved fraction in the aquifer but also at the level of the fraction retained in the fine, less conductive materials as shown by the biodegradation haloes of parent and metabolite compounds. Sampling the low-conductivity levels also allowed us to identify compounds, e.g. BTEX, that are the remaining traces of the passage of old contaminant plumes whose sources no longer exist. This enabled us to describe past biogeochemical processes and to partially account for the processes occurring today. Transition zones, characterized by numerous textural changes, constitute ecotones whose biostimulation could be effective in promoting the acceleration of the remediation of the multiple pollution at these sites. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems)

    2010-12-08

    Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

  3. A combined genetic-morphometric analysis unravels the complex biogeographical history of Polyommatus icarus and Polyommatus celina common blue butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincă, Vlad; Dapporto, Leonardo; Vila, Roger

    2011-09-01

    Widespread species have the potential to reveal large-scale biogeographical patterns, as well as responses to environmental changes possibly unique to habitat generalists. This study presents a continental-scale phylogeographical analysis of Polyommatus icarus, one of the most common Palaearctic butterflies, and the morphologically and ecologically similar Polyommatus celina, a recently discovered cryptic species. By combining data from mitochondrial [cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] and nuclear [internal transcribed spacer (ITS2)] molecular markers with geometric morphometrics, we document a complex phylogeographical history for the two species. Despite morphological similarities, the genetic divergence between these two species is high (more than 5% at COI) and they are not sister species. For the first time, we show that P. celina occurs not only in North Africa but also in Europe, where it inhabits several west Mediterranean islands, as well as large parts of Iberia, where it occurs in parapatry with P. icarus. The two species appear to completely exclude each other on islands, but we provide morphological and molecular evidence that introgression occurred in the Iberian Peninsula. We discovered strongly diverged lineages that seem to represent relict populations produced by past range expansions and contractions: Crete and Iberian isolates for P. icarus, Balearics-Sardinia and Sicily-Lipari for P. celina. This study shows that a combined genetic-morphometric approach can shed light on cryptic diversity while providing the necessary resolution to reconstruct a fine-scale phylogeographical history of species at both spatial and temporal levels. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Ancient DNA Reveals Prehistoric Gene-Flow from Siberia in the Complex Human Population History of North East Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Balanovsky, Oleg; Brandt, Guido; Khartanovich, Valery; Buzhilova, Alexandra; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Gronenborn, Detlef; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Kolpakov, Eugen; Shumkin, Vladimir; Alt, Kurt W.; Balanovska, Elena; Cooper, Alan; Haak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present). We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses) and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a), a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population movements across

  5. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clio Der Sarkissian

    Full Text Available North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present. We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a, a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population

  6. Denudational and thermal history of the Early Cretaceous Brandberg and Okenyenya igneous complexes on Namibia's Atlantic passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, M. J.; Brown, R. W.; Gallagher, K.; Weber, K.; Gleadow, A. J. W.

    2005-06-01

    The Early Cretaceous Brandberg and Okenyenya igneous complexes provide ideal locations to quantify the postbreakup denudation history of the continental margin of central Namibia. Apatite fission track analysis has been applied to vertical sample profiles extending over 1-2 km of relief to constrain the denudation history of this region. An advantage of vertical profiles is that they allow the inference of the paleogeothermal gradient directly from the data. An independent, data-consistent thermal gradient estimate is essential to determine the amount of denudation as well as to resolve phases of slow and accelerated denudation. We obtained independent paleogeothermal gradient estimates for the two vertical profiles from 26 ± 32°C to 23 ± 16°C. The uncertainties are large but are considered pessimistic. The best fit values agree well with each other, and the present-day gradients of 22°C. The total amount of denudation since the Late Cretaceous has been estimated as 5 km in the Brandberg area and 4 km for the Okenyenya area. The data from the two vertical profiles imply a phase of rapid exhumation in the Late Cretaceous between 80 and 60 Ma, at rates between 0.2 and 0.125 km/m.y. These decline rapidly in the Early Tertiary to a maximum denudation rate between 0.023 and 0.015 km/m.y. The denudation chronology inferred from the new apatite fission track data is consistent with the observation of a major influx of clastic sediment to offshore basins about 50 m.y. after continental breakup. The study shows that vertical fission track profiles provide key insights into postbreakup tectonic and geomorphic processes in the Central Damara Zone in Namibia, where no Phanerozoic sedimentary record has been preserved.

  7. Assessment of cytotoxicity and AhR-mediated toxicity in tropical fresh water sediments under the influence of an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suares-Rocha, Paula; Braunbeck, Thomas; de Angelis, Dejanira de Francheschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2015-08-01

    Oil refinery effluents contain many chemicals at variable concentrations. Therefore, it is difficult to predict potential effects on the environment. The Atibaia River (SP, Brazil), which serves as a source of water supply for many municipalities, receives the effluents of one of the biggest oil refinery of this country. The aim of this study was to identify the (eco)toxicity of fresh water sediments under the influence of this oil refinery through neutral red (cytotoxicity) and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assays (AhR-mediated toxicity) in RTL-W1 cells (derived from fish liver). Once the refinery captures the waters of Jaguarí River for the development of its activities and discharges its effluents after treatment into the Atibaia River, which then flows into Piracicaba River, sediments from both river systems were also investigated. The samples showed a high cytotoxic potential, even when compared to well-known pollution sites. However, the cytotoxicity of samples collected downstream the effluent was not higher than that of sediments collected upstream, which suggested that the refinery discharges are not the main source of pollution in those areas. No EROD activity could be recorded, which could be confirmed by chemical analyses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that revealed a high concentration of phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene, which are not EROD inducers in RTL-W1 cells. In contrast, high concentrations of PAHs were found upstream the refinery effluent, corroborating cytotoxicity results from the neutral red assay. A decrease of PAHs was recorded from upstream to downstream the refinery effluent, probably due to dilution of compounds following water discharges. On the other hand, these discharges apparently contribute specifically to the amount of anthracene in the river, since an increase of anthracene concentrations could be recorded downstream the effluent. Since the extrapolation of results from acute toxicity to

  8. Zimbabwean History: Becoming Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    starts at around 850) with an openness of inquiry that prefigures a truly democratic dispensation while at the same time being very much aware that, as Bill Freund .... partially by merit, wealth and property, could not last long even if protected by an impressive – but expensive – war machine. In that context, perhaps it is not.

  9. Assessing the risk of subsequent tonic-clonic seizures in patients with a history of simple or complex partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jennifer K; Hutton, Jane; Marson, Anthony G; Chadwick, David W

    2012-08-01

    Patients who present with only simple or complex partial seizures have a poorly documented prognosis. Treatment may be advocated to prevent future secondary generalised seizures, reduce the frequency of further simple or complex partial seizures or a combination of both. A full statistical analysis on 1334 patients was carried out. The outcomes measured were post-randomisation times to first seizure of any type and first tonic-clonic seizure. Methodology was adopted that accounted for individuals' underlying pre-randomisation seizure counts and allowed for the possibility that there may be a proportion of the sample that will not experience post-randomisation seizure recurrence. 103 subjects randomised to the MESS (Multicentre Study of Early Epilepsy and Single Seizures) study had only partial seizures at randomisation. Only 17 of these had a tonic-clonic seizure during follow-up. The presence of an abnormal EEG at randomisation influenced this risk: an estimated 23% of those with EEG abnormality were at risk of tonic-clonic seizures during follow-up compared with 16% of those with a normal EEG. The group did, however, continue to have partial seizures during follow-up, and modelling showed that the impact of treatment on these seizures was significantly less than the effects of treatment on the frequency of tonic-clonic seizures in those patients with such pre-randomisation seizures. Patients presenting with a history of only partial seizures are at low risk of subsequent tonic-clonic seizures in the period of time to which therapeutic decisions are relevant. The effects of the antiepileptic drugs used in the MESS study are greater for tonic-clonic seizures than they are for partial seizures.

  10. Complex interactions between the subject factors of biological sex and prior histories of binge-drinking and unpredictable stress influence behavioral sensitivity to alcohol and alcohol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadir, Sema G; Guzelian, Eugenie; Palmer, Mason A; Martin, Douglas L; Kim, Jennifer; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2017-08-10

    Alcohol use disorders, affective disorders and their comorbidity are sexually dimorphic in humans. However, it is difficult to disentangle the interactions between subject factors influencing alcohol sensitivity in studies of humans. Herein, we combined murine models of unpredictable, chronic, mild stress (UCMS) and voluntary binge-drinking to examine for sex differences in the interactions between prior histories of excessive ethanol-drinking and stress upon ethanol-induced changes in motor behavior and subsequent drinking. In Experiment 1, female mice were insensitive to the UCMS-induced increase in ethanol-induced locomotion and ethanol intake under continuous alcohol-access. Experiment 2 revealed interactions between ethanol dose and sex (females>males), binge-drinking history (water>ethanol), and UCMS history (UCMS>controls), with no additive effect of a sequential prior history of both binge drinking and UCMS observed. We also observed an interaction between UCMS history and sex for righting recovery. UCMS history potentiated subsequent binge-drinking in water controls of both sexes and in male binge-drinking mice. Conversely, a prior binge-drinking history increased subsequent ethanol intake in females only, irrespective of prior UCMS history. In Experiment 3, a concurrent history of binge-drinking and UCMS did not alter ethanol intake, nor did it influence the ethanol dose-locomotor response function, but it did augment alcohol-induced sedation and reduced subsequent alcohol intake over that produced by binge-drinking alone. Thus, the subject factors of biological sex, prior stressor history and prior binge-drinking history interact in complex ways in mice to impact sensitivity to alcohol's motor-stimulating, -incoordinating and intoxicating effects, as well as to influence subsequent heavy drinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Water quality of the Atibaia River, the upstream and downstream of the REPLAN/PETROBRAS Refinery; Qualidade da agua do Rio Atibaia a jusante e a montante da Refinaria REPLAN/PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieczorek, A.; Angelis, D.F.; Kataoka, A.P.A.G.; Coneglian, C.M.R.; Oliveira, V.J.A. [UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Bioquimica e Microbiologia]. E-mail: artwiec@hotmail.com; dangelis@rc.unesp.com.br

    2003-07-01

    Oil refineries use a large amount of water in the oil refinement process everyday, which results in complex mixtures of chemistry substances effectively pollutant to fresh water. This investigation evaluates the water quality of Atibaia river, the upstream and downstream of REPLAN/PETROBRAS oil refinery. Water samples were collected every two weeks between July and December, 2001. The most important physical, chemical and toxicological parameters were studied, besides the water quality index. The results demonstrated that, in some samplings, the refinery wastewater modified parameters like: chlorides, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and water electrical conductivity of the Atibaia river. This change was mainly observed during months of less rainfall, consequently bringing a decrease in the stream flow rate and in the river ability of self purification. (author)

  12. 77 FR 5865 - In the Matter of Blue Earth Refineries, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Blue Earth Refineries, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading February 2, 2012. It... concerning the securities of Blue Earth Refineries, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since..., Secretary. BILLING CODE 8011-01-P ...

  13. The Implementation and Maintenance of a Behavioral Safety Process in a Petroleum Refinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Wanda V.; McSween, Terry E.; Medina, Rixio E.; Rost, Kristen; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2010-01-01

    A values-centered and team-based behavioral safety process was implemented in a petroleum oil refinery. Employee teams defined the refinery's safety values and related practices, which were used to guide the process design and implementation. The process included (a) a safety assessment; (b) the clarification of safety-related values and related…

  14. Environmental nickel exposure from oil refinery emissions: a case study in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Raúl; Harari, Florencia; Forastiere, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Nickel is a strong skin and respiratory sensitizer and a recognized carcinogen. Oil refineries are important sources of atmospheric emissions of toxic pollutants, including nickel. Populations residing close to oil refineries are at potential risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exposure to nickel in a population living close to the largest oil refinery in Ecuador, located in the city of Esmeraldas. We recruited 47 workers from the oil refinery as well as 195 students from 4 different schools close to the plant and 94 students from another school 25 km far from the industry. Urinary nickel concentrations were used to assess the exposure to nickel. Students from the school next to the oil refinery showed the highest urinary nickel concentrations while workers from the refinery showed the lowest concentrations. Median nickel concentrations were > 2µg/L in all study groups. The populations living close to the oil refineries are potentially exposed to nickel from atmospheric emissions. Further studies investigating nickel-related health effects in the population residing close to the refinery of Esmeralda are needed.

  15. Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

  16. A case-control study of lung cancer among refinery workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosamilia, K; Wong, O; Raabe, G K

    1999-12-01

    This case-control study examined the relationship between lung cancer and the work histories of male employees at a large Texas refinery. The study included 112 lung cancer deaths observed between 1946 and 1987 and 490 matched controls. Employment histories were obtained from personnel records, and smoking information was available from medical records. Both stratification methods and conditional logistic regression were used in data analyses. Overall employment in four general job categories (administrative, engineering/laboratory, process, maintenance/mechanical) was not associated with lung cancer mortality. Results by hire period (study do not support the hypothesis that work in maintenance/mechanical jobs increases lung cancer risk. On the basis of analyses in this study, it is unlikely that asbestos exposure contributed to excess lung cancer mortality. Additional analyses were conducted for specific maintenance jobs with potential exposure to asbestos and by duration in jobs with occasional or routine asbestos exposure. No significant increase in lung cancer was found in any subgroup. Furthermore, there was no significant trend toward lung cancer risk in relation to duration of employment in jobs with asbestos exposure.

  17. 19 CFR Appendix to Part 146 - Guidelines for Determining Producibility and Relative Values for Oil Refinery Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Relative Values for Oil Refinery Zones Appendix to Part 146 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER... pounds domestic status class III crude oil. Day 10 Removal from the refinery subzone for exportation of... aviation gasoline could have been produced from the crude oils that were admitted into the refinery subzone...

  18. Environmental performance of an innovative waste refinery based on enzymatic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    ) from the waste. The waste refinery was compared to alternative treatments such as incineration, bioreactor landfill and mechanical-biological treatment followed by utilization of the RDF (refuse-derived fuel) for energy. The performance of the waste refinery turned out to be comparable...... for virgin material and saving fossil resources. In this paper a life-cycle assessment of a pilot-scale waste refinery for the enzymatic treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) is presented. The refinery produced a liquid (liquefied organic materials and paper) and a solid fraction (non-degradable materials...... with incineration for most environmental categories. Landfilling turned out to be the worst option with respect to most categories (especially energy-related such as GW). The refinery treatment has large margins of improvement with respect to the environmental performance. These are mainly associated...

  19. Biodegradation of oil refinery wastes under OPA and CERCLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamblin, W.W.; Banipal, B.S.; Myers, J.M. [Ecology and Environment, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Land treatment of oil refinery wastes has been used as a disposal method for decades. More recently, numerous laboratory studies have been performed attempting to quantify degradation rates of more toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). This paper discusses the results of the fullscale aerobic biodegradation operations using land treatment at the Macmillan Ring-Free Oil refining facility. The tiered feasibility approach of evaluating biodegradation as a treatment method to achieve site-specific cleanup criteria, including pilot biodegradation operations, is discussed in an earlier paper. Analytical results of biodegradation indicate that degradation rates observed in the laboratory can be met and exceeded under field conditions and that site-specific cleanup criteria can be attained within a proposed project time. Also prevented are degradation rates and half-lives for PAHs for which cleanup criteria have been established. PAH degradation rates and half-life values are determined and compared with the laboratory degradation rates and half-life values which used similar oil refinery wastes by other in investigators (API 1987).

  20. Application of Ozone MBBR Process in Refinery Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wang

    2018-01-01

    Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) is a kind of sewage treatment technology based on fluidized bed. At the same time, it can also be regarded as an efficient new reactor between active sludge method and the biological membrane method. The application of ozone MBBR process in refinery wastewater treatment is mainly studied. The key point is to design the ozone +MBBR combined process based on MBBR process. The ozone +MBBR process is used to analyze the treatment of concentrated water COD discharged from the refinery wastewater treatment plant. The experimental results show that the average removal rate of COD is 46.0%~67.3% in the treatment of reverse osmosis concentrated water by ozone MBBR process, and the effluent can meet the relevant standard requirements. Compared with the traditional process, the ozone MBBR process is more flexible. The investment of this process is mainly ozone generator, blower and so on. The prices of these items are relatively inexpensive, and these costs can be offset by the excess investment in traditional activated sludge processes. At the same time, ozone MBBR process has obvious advantages in water quality, stability and other aspects.

  1. From Complex Organisms to a Complex Organization: An Oral History with UCSC Chancellor M.R.C. Greenwood, 1996-2004

    OpenAIRE

    Reti, Irene H.; Greenwood, M.R.C.

    2014-01-01

    The Regional History Project conducted this oral history with UCSC Chancellor M.R.C. (Mary Rita Cooke) Greenwood as part of its University History series. Greenwood was appointed as chancellor of UC Santa Cruz in July of 1996 and served until April of 2004. While at UCSC, she also held an appointment as a professor of biology. M.R.C. Greenwood was born in 1943 in Gainesville, Florida. She graduated summa cum laude in biology from Vassar College in 1968, and earned her PhD in physiolo...

  2. Amphibole zonation as a tool for tracing metamorphic histories: examples from Lavrion and Penteli metamorphic core complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baziotis, Ioannis; Proyer, Alexander; Mposkos, Evripides; Marsellos, Antonios; Leontakianakos, George

    2014-05-01

    The amphiboles represent the predominant minerals in high pressure/low temperature metamafic rocks. Amphibole composition (e.g. cations Si, Al, Na) depends on the bulk composition, the solid solution's gaps and the P-T conditions during metamorphism. The AlIV , NaA and Ti increase with temperature, whereas AlV I and NaB with pressure (Triboulet, 1992). Increase of Si+4 and decrease of AlV I and (NaA+NaB) in clinoamphibole is concurrent with pressure decrease. We focus on Na- and Ca-amphiboles from greenschists and blueschists from Lavrion (upper tectonic unit-UTU) and Penteli (lower tectonic unit-LTU) metamorphic complexes (Baziotis et al. 2009; Baziotis & Mposkos, 2011) in order to unravel the relation of zonation with: (1) the physicochemical conditions and (2) the P-T stages during metamorphic evolution. Amphiboles in Lavrion metabasites are the dominant rock constituents: (ferro)-glaucophane in the blueschists and actinolite in the greenschists. Blue-amphiboles occur in various textural modes: parallel to the foliation, replacing omphacite, rimmed by Ca-amphibole, as inclusions in albite and epidote or in calcitic veinlets. The blue-amphibole composition varies from glaucophane to ferro-glaucophane with the NaB ranging from 1.617 to 1.979 a.p.f.u., whereas the green-amphiboles are actinolites. In the blueschists, actinolite has higher R3+ at a given NaB compared to the greenschists, attributed to Fe+3-rich bulk composition of the blueschists. Three types of zoning were observed in these amphiboles: glaucophane rimming actinolite, glaucophane with increasing AlIV , AlV I and NaB values towards the rim, and actinolite mantling glaucophane. The zoning patterns in the blue-amphiboles are characterized by increasing Tschermak and glaucophane components towards the rim, consistent with increasing temperature and pressure during prograde metamorphism. Two different modes of actinolite represent different stages of the metamorphic history. The actinolite inclusions

  3. Projection of opportunities for a refinery in a global long-term scenario; Projecao de oportunidades para uma refinaria em cenario mundial de longo prazo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, Sergio Cunha de; Perisse, Juarez Barbosa; Farah, Marco Antonio; Faria, Marcia Dardari Castanheira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Paredes, Marcio Luis Lyra [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    The outlook for 2050 pointed out by companies associated with research into energy on the globe indicate that global energy production still fairly representative in oil. In the future the relative contribution related to the consumption of oil in world energy matrix reduces, however increases in absolute values. That is, the oil market through its derivatives, is still the focus of great opportunities. These business opportunities will be as close as the flexibility of production derived from a particular refinery permits. Moreover, production flexibility is associated to investment costs. This paper focuses on the evaluation of different configurations of an oil refinery and shows that adding complexity to a refining scheme should not always be regarded as the best strategic path. (author)

  4. Techno-Economic Evaluation of Technologies to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emissions at North American Refineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motazedi, Kavan; Abella, Jessica P; Bergerson, Joule A

    2017-02-07

    A petroleum refinery model, Petroleum Refinery Life-cycle Inventory Model (PRELIM), that estimates energy use and CO2 emissions was modified to evaluate the environmental and economic performance of a set of technologies to reduce CO2 emissions at refineries. Cogeneration of heat and power (CHP), carbon capture at fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) and steam methane reformer (SMR) units, and alternative hydrogen production technologies were considered in the analysis. The results indicate that a 3-44% reduction in total annual refinery CO2 emissions (2-24% reductions in the CO2 emissions on a per barrel of crude oil processed) can be achieved in a medium conversion refinery that processes a typical U.S. crude slate obtained by using the technologies considered. A sensitivity analysis of the quality of input crude to a refinery, refinery configuration, and prices of natural gas and electricity revealed how the magnitude of possible CO2 emissions reductions and the economic performance of the mitigation technologies can vary under different conditions. The analysis can help inform decision making related to investment decisions and CO2 emissions policy in the refining sector.

  5. Revegetation strategies for bauxite refinery residue: a case study of Alcan Gove in Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, J Bernhard; Fulton, Ian; Menzies, Neal W

    2006-03-01

    Alumina extraction from bauxite ore with strong alkali produces waste bauxite refinery residue consisting of residue sand and red mud. The amount and composition of refinery residue depend on the purity of the bauxite ore and extraction conditions, and differs between refineries. The refinery residue is usually stored in engineered disposal areas that eventually have to be revegetated. This is challenging because of the alkaline and sodic nature of the residue. At Alcan Gove's bauxite refinery in Gove, Northern Territory, Australia, research into revegetation of bauxite residue has been conducted since the mid-1970s. In this review, we discuss approaches taken by Alcan Gove to achieve revegetation outcomes (soil capping of refinery residue) on wet-slurry disposal areas. Problems encountered in the past include poor drainage and water logging during the wet season, and salt scalding and capillary rise during the dry season. The amount of available water in the soil capping is the most important determinant of vegetation survival in the seasonally dry climate. Vegetation cover was found to prevent deterioration of the soil cover by minimising capillary rise of alkalinity from the refinery residue. The sodicity and alkalinity of the residue in old impoundments has diminished slightly over the 25 years since it was deposited. However, development of a blocky structure in red mud, presumably due to desiccation, allows root penetration, thereby supplying additional water to salt and alkali-tolerant plant species. This has led to the establishment of an ecosystem that approaches a native woodland.

  6. Combined analysis of job and task benzene air exposures among workers at four US refinery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Amanda; Shin, Jennifer Mi; Unice, Ken M; Gaffney, Shannon H; Kreider, Marisa L; Gelatt, Richard H; Panko, Julie M

    2017-03-01

    Workplace air samples analyzed for benzene at four US refineries from 1976 to 2007 were pooled into a single dataset to characterize similarities and differences between job titles, tasks and refineries, and to provide a robust dataset for exposure reconstruction. Approximately 12,000 non-task (>180 min) personal samples associated with 50 job titles and 4000 task (job titles and task codes across all four refineries, and (5) our analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the distribution of benzene air concentrations for select jobs/tasks across all four refineries. The jobs and tasks most frequently sampled included those with highest potential contact with refinery product streams containing benzene, which reflected the targeted sampling approach utilized by the facility industrial hygienists. Task and non-task data were analyzed to identify and account for significant differences within job-area, task-job, and task-area categories. This analysis demonstrated that in general, areas with benzene containing process streams were associated with greater benzene air concentrations compared to areas with process streams containing little to no benzene. For several job titles and tasks analyzed, there was a statistically significant decrease in benzene air concentration after 1990. This study provides a job and task-focused analysis of occupational exposure to benzene during refinery operations, and it should be useful for reconstructing refinery workers' exposures to benzene over the past 30 years.

  7. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  8. Allowance Allocation and CO{sub 2} intensity of the EU15 and Norwegian refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Kristina; Zetterberg, Lars; Aahman, Markus

    2005-02-01

    On 1 January 2005, the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) was launched. The launch has been preceded by an allocation process in each of the Member States. The main objective of this study was to analyse the allocation in relation to CO{sub 2} efficiency for the mineral oil refining sector. A CO{sub 2} intensity index for mineral oil refineries has been defined and calculated for the refineries within the EU15 and Norway. The IVL CO{sub 2} intensity index is based both on the Solomon Energy Intensity Index (EII), an assumed fuel mix, and process-specific emissions. Due to uncertainties in input data, the determined values for the individual refineries are quite uncertain. However, the regional values can be used to identify trends. It was concluded that there are substantial differences in the CO{sub 2} intensity between refineries within different regions/countries in the EU and these differences have not been considered in the allocation process. Only a few countries have mentioned energy efficiency or reduction potential due to CO{sub 2} intensity of fuels used. Only one country (Denmark) has explicitly given a benchmark that will be used for allocation to new mineral oil refineries. The allocation has generally been based on historic emissions, which will result in refineries with historically higher emissions being allocated larger amounts than refineries with historically lower emissions. This might be favourable for refineries that recently have performed emission-reducing measures but might be less favourable for refineries that during a long time period have implemented emission-reducing measures.

  9. Comprehensive characterization of oil refinery effluent-derived humic substances using various spectroscopic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingbo, Li; Song, Yan; Congbi, Han; Guangbo, Shan

    2005-07-01

    Refinery effluent-derived humic substances (HS) are important for developing refinery effluent reclamation techniques and studying the environmental chemistry of wastewater effluents. In this study, dissolved organic matter (DOM) from refinery effluent was concentrated using a portable reverse osmosis (RO) system. HS were isolated from RO retentates with XAD-8 resin. A variety of approaches such as specific UV absorbance at 254nm (SUV(254)), elemental analysis, size exclusion chromatography (SEC), solid-state cross polarization magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry ((13)C CPMAS NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and electrospray ionization/ion trap/mass spectrometry (ESI/ion trap/MS) were employed for characterization of HS. The portable RO system exhibited high yield and recovery of DOM for concentrating refinery effluent. The concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the refinery effluent was 9.9mg/l, in which humic acids (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) accounted for 2.3% and 34.6%, respectively. Elemental and SUV(254) analyses indicated relative high amounts of aliphatic structures and low amounts of aromatic structures in refinery effluent-derived HS. Refinery effluent-derived HS displayed lower molecular weight than natural HS. The number-average molecular weight (M(n)) and the weight-average molecular weight (M(w)) of HA were 1069 and 2934, and those of FA were 679 and 1212 by SEC, respectively. By ESI/ion trap/MS, the M(n) and the M(w) of FA were 330 and 383. Four kinds of carbon structures (aliphatic, aromatic, heteroaliphatic, and carboxylic carbons) were found in refinery effluent-derived HS by (13)C NMR analysis. The quantitative results support the interpretation that these HS are rich in aliphatic carbons and poor in aromatic carbons. Proteinaceous materials were identified by FTIR analysis in refinery effluent-derived HS.

  10. TOSCA - first international registry to address knowledge gaps in the natural history and management of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingswood, John C; Bruzzi, Paolo; Curatolo, Paolo; de Vries, Petrus J; Fladrowski, Carla; Hertzberg, Christoph; Jansen, Anna C; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Nabbout, Rima; Sauter, Matthias; Touraine, Renaud; O'Callaghan, Finbar; Zonnenberg, Bernard; Crippa, Stefania; Comis, Silvia; d'Augères, Guillaume Beaure; Belousova, Elena; Carter, Tom; Cottin, Vincent; Dahlin, Maria; Ferreira, José Carlos; Macaya, Alfons; Benedik, Mirjana Perkovic; Sander, Valentin; Youroukos, Sotirios; Castellana, Ramon; Ulker, Bulent; Feucht, Martha

    2014-11-26

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare, multisystem, genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence between 1/6800 and 1/15000. Although recent years have seen huge progress in understanding the pathophysiology and in the management of TSC, several questions remain unanswered. A disease registry could be an effective tool to gain more insights into TSC and thus help in the development of improved management strategies. TuberOus SClerosis registry to increase disease Awareness (TOSCA) is a multicentre, international disease registry to assess manifestations, interventions, and outcomes in patients with TSC. Patients of any age diagnosed with TSC, having a documented visit for TSC within the preceding 12 months, or newly diagnosed individuals are eligible. Objectives include mapping the course of TSC manifestations and their effects on prognosis, identifying patients with rare symptoms and co-morbidities, recording interventions and their outcomes, contributing to creation of an evidence-base for disease assessment and therapy, informing further research on TSC, and evaluating the quality of life of patients with TSC. The registry includes a 'core' section and subsections or 'petals'. The 'core' section is designed to record general information on patients' background collected at baseline and updated annually. Subsections will be developed over time to record additional data related to specific disease manifestations and will be updated annually. The registry aimed to enrol approximately 2000 patients from about 250 sites in 31 countries. The initial enrolment period was of 24 months. A follow-up observation period of up to 5 years is planned. A pre-planned administrative analysis of 'core' data from the first 100 patients was performed to evaluate the feasibility of the registry. Results showed a high degree of accuracy of the data collection procedure. Annual interim analyses are scheduled. Results of first interim analysis will be presented subsequent to

  11. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zald, Harold S J; Spies, Thomas A; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J; Olsen, Keith A; Steel, E Ashley

    2016-04-15

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and developmental stage, an important consideration as forest landscapes often have a diversity of stand ages from past management and other disturbance agents. Quantifying forest C density and its underlying environmental determinants in mountain terrain has remained challenging because many available data sources lack the spatial grain and ecological resolution needed at both stand and landscape scales. The objective of this study was to determine if environmental factors influencing aboveground live carbon (ALC) density differed between young versus old forests. We integrated aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data with 702 field plots to map forest ALC density at a grain of 25 m across the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a 6369 ha watershed in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, USA. We used linear regressions, random forest ensemble learning (RF) and sequential autoregressive modeling (SAR) to reveal how mapped forest ALC density was related to climate, topography, soils, and past disturbance history (timber harvesting and wildfires). ALC increased with stand age in young managed forests, with much greater variation of ALC in relation to years since wildfire in old unmanaged forests. Timber harvesting was the most important driver of ALC across the entire watershed, despite occurring on only 23% of the landscape. More variation in forest ALC density was explained in models of young managed forests than in models of old unmanaged forests. Besides stand age, ALC density in young managed forests was driven by factors influencing site productivity, whereas variation in ALC density in old unmanaged forests

  12. Surgery on the affected upper extremity of patients with a history of complex regional pain syndrome: the use of intravenous regional anesthesia with clonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, Scott S; Rosenthal, Erik A; Steinberg, Robert B; Faruqi, Shameema; Kilaru, Prasad A

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) with clonidine in patients with a previous history of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) who are undergoing upper extremity hand surgery. Prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Operating suites and Pain Management Center of a large university-affiliated medical center. 84 patients with a previous history of upper extremity CRPS undergoing surgery on the affected extremity. All signs and symptoms of CRPS had resolved prior to the time of surgery. Patients were randomized to receive IVRA with 0.5 % lidocaine with either 1 mL normal saline (n=42) or clonidine 1 microg/kg (n=42) added to the lidocaine solution. Recurrence of CRPS symptoms at 1 year following surgery were recorded. The recurrence rate of CRPS was significantly lower (p history of CRPS can significantly reduce the recurrence rate of this disease process.

  13. Removal of mercury from an alumina refinery aqueous stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullett, Mark; Tardio, James; Bhargava, Suresh; Dobbs, Charles

    2007-06-01

    Digestion condensate is formed as a by-product of the alumina refinery digestion process. The solution exhibits a high pH and is chemically reducing, containing many volatile species such as water, volatile organics, ammonia, and mercury. Because digestion condensate is chemically unique, an innovative approach was required to investigate mercury removal. The mercury capacity and adsorption kinetics were investigated using a number of materials including gold, silver and sulphur impregnated silica and a silver impregnated carbon. The results were compared to commercial sorbents, including extruded and powdered virgin activated carbons and a sulphur impregnated mineral. Nano-gold supported on silica (88% removal under batch conditions and 95% removal under flow conditions) and powdered activated carbon (91% under batch conditions and 98% removal under flow conditions) were the most effective materials investigated. The silver and sulphur impregnated materials were unstable in digestion condensate under the test conditions used.

  14. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  15. Sperm as an indicator of reproductive risk among petroleum refinery workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M.J.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Ratcliffe, J.; Gordon, L.A.; Watchmaker, G.; Fox, S.H.; Moore, D.H.; Hornung, R.W.

    1985-02-01

    A questionnaire study of men in a wastewater treatment plant of a petroleum refinery showed twice the rate of fetal loss in the period during employment in the plant compared with the periods before and after. Questions regarding the interpretation of that study and continuing concern about reproductive risk prompted us to perform a cross sectional evaluation of sperm concentration and morphology. After adjustment for an abstinence period, the mean sperm concentration of the 74 unexposed men did not differ significantly from that of the 34 exposed men (79.9 million/cm/sup 3/ v 68.2 million/cm/sup 3/, p(1) . 0.16). The two groups also had a similar proportion of sperm with abnormal morphology (49.1% v 44.5%, p(1) . 0.94). This lack of association remained when degree of exposure, age, use of alcohol and marijuana, past illness or fever, use of baths or sauna, and history of urological problems were considered. These results are most consistent with the absence of sperm mediated reproductive problems.

  16. Process Description and Operating History for the CPP-601/-640/-627 Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. P. Wagner

    1999-06-01

    The Fuel Reprocessing Complex (FRC) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was used for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from the early 1950's until 1992. The reprocessing facilities are now scheduled to be deactivated. As part of the deactivation process, three Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units located in the complex must be closed. This document gathers the historical information necessary to provide a rational basis for the preparation of a comprehensive closure plan. Included are descriptions of process operations and the operating history of the FRC. A set of detailed tables record the service history and present status of the process vessels and transfer lines.

  17. Solid waste management : a case study of National Refinery Limited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, A.H.; Syed, Z.R. [National Refinery Ltd., Karachi (Pakistan); NED Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2000-07-01

    A study was conducted to quantify and classify the waste generated at the National Refinery Limited (NRL). This refinery, located in Karachi, Pakistan, produces naphtha, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene and lubricating oils and much more. Various units such as crude oil storage, thermal cracking, catalytic cracking and others were surveyed to assess the source and nature of the pollution. It was found that the major contributor to air pollution was the sulfur released through the burning of fuel oil during day-to-day operations. It was determined that approximately 2000 metric tons of solid waste were produced each day, along with 0.55 million gallons of waste water. In addition, sulfur, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide were also released in the atmosphere. The solid waste was composed of municipal waste, sludges from the API and other discarded materials. The authors then proceeded to determine the heavy metals contents in samples obtained from combined sludge dumping areas on the premises. The sludges contained sulfur (0-1.26 wt per cent), lead (0-0.156 wt per cent), iron (0.01-3.4 wt per cent), chromium (0-0.159 per cent), copper (0-0.05 wt per cent), cadmium (0-0.0034 wt per cent), nickel (0-0.168 wt per cent), and manganese (0.0015-0.0776 wt per cent). It was recommended that hazardous and non-hazardous wastes be segregated, that a separate feasibility study be undertaken to determine the best possible course of action to dispose of solid waste, and that government guidelines be established on the same topic. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Molecular characterization and corrosion behavior of thermophilic (55 C) SRB Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii isolated from cooling tower in petroleum refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandkumar, B. [Department of Biotechnology, Sourashtra College, Madurai (India); Choi, J.H. [Electrokinetics Division, Korea ElectroTechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea); Venkatachari, G.; Maruthamuthu, S. [Corrosion Protection Division, Central Electro Chemical Research Institute (CECRI), Karaikudi (India)

    2009-09-15

    Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii (D. Kuznetsovii), a thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB), was identified in a cooling tower of a petroleum refinery by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and its functional gene encoding dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB). The thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterial species have been reported for the first time in the cooling towers of an Indian petroleum refinery. The protein coded by dsrAB gene was cloned, expressed, and identified using recombinant DNA technology. Weight loss method, electrochemical and surface analysis showed the corrosion behavior of the isolate. In the presence of D. kuznetsovii, the corrosion rate was higher when compared to control at 55 C. It suppresses the anodic reaction and enhances the cathodic reaction by the production of organic complex and iron sulfide, respectively. Numerous pitting were noticed on mild steel which is due to the presence of D. kuznetsovii and its role in the corrosion process has been discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Impact of hydrotreaters ammonium chloride salt deposition of refinery operations; Formacao de depositos de sais de amonio em Unidades de Hidrotramento (HDT'S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Nelmo Furtado; Cunha, Fabiana A.; Alvise, Paulo Pio [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Fouling and consequent under deposit corrosion caused by ammonium salts, especially ammonium chloride, have serious impact on the reliability of operation of various process units. In hydrotreating units salt deposition on heat exchanger tubes causes a decrease in heat transfer efficiency, decrease hydrotreating efficiency, increased pressure drops, and corrosion. This paper will discuss the causes of ammonium chloride fouling,methods to help prevent and/or mitigate the fouling, and provide a case history demonstrating the effects of ammonium chloride formations in one refinery operation. (author)

  20. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    .... Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days...

  1. Design decisions on the reduction of hydrocarbons in Kremenchug refinery structures from mechanical wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С.В. Бойченко

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available  The advanced technical decisions relating to the reduction of losses of oil and petroleum product from the facilities of the first system from waste water mechanical treatment at the refinery have been considered.

  2. Inefficiency of Malaysian palm oil refineries and the impact of different factors on its inefficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahverdi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze changes in the inefficiency of Malaysian palm oil refineries using DEA window analysis method over the period 1996 to 2009. We investigated the effects of different factors on inefficiency of Malaysian palm oil refineries. Based on empirical results, the effect of all factors such as vertical integration, types of ownership, foreign investment, location, experience, and liberalization on inefficiency of refineries was significant. Experience, liberalization, and joint venture between private and public sectors showed an increase in efficiency, while joint venture between local and foreign investment and vertical integration increased refineries’ inefficiency. However, palm oil refineries which were located in the states of Sabah and Sarawak were less technically inefficient than those located in peninsular Malaysia.

  3. Analysis of standard and innovative methods for allocating upstream and refinery GHG emissions to oil products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moretti, Christian; Moro, Alberto; Edwards, Robert A; Rocco, Matteo Vincenzo; Colombo, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Alternative fuel policies need accurate and transparent methods to find the embedded carbon intensity of individual refinery products. This study investigates different ways of allocating greenhouse gases emissions deriving from refining and upstream crude oil supply. Allocation methods based on

  4. Implication of coastal refineries to the ecology of the Gulf of Kachchh

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Anand, N.M.

    bank of the Gulf of Kachchh. An assessment of probable impact of establishment of these refineries to the rich biodiversity of the Gulf and suggestions to minimise these impacts have been made in this paper....

  5. Co-processing potential of HTL bio-crude at petroleum refineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Uhrenholt; Hoffmann, Jessica; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study on hydrotreatment of ligno-cellulosic hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) bio-crude to achieve a bio-feed compatible for co-processing at a refinery was made to investigate the effect of operating temperature, pressure and hydrogen to oil ratio. Using a conventional NiMo/Al2O3......-processing at existing refineries can be facilitated by intermediate hydrotreating of the bio-crude from hydrothermal liquefaction....

  6. Mild Biomass Liquefaction Process for Economic Production of Stabilized Refinery-Ready Bio-oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, Santosh [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); Meng, Jiajia [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); McCabe, Kevin [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); Larson, Eric [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Environmental Inst.; Mastro, Kelly [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-04-25

    Southern Research (SR) in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bioenergy Technology Office (BETO), investigated a biomass liquefaction process for economic production of stabilized refinery-ready bio-oil. The project was awarded by DOE under a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA-0000686) for Bio-oil Stabilization and Commoditization that intended to evaluate the feasibility of using bio-oil as a potential feedstock in an existing petroleum refinery. SR investigated Topic Area 1 of the FOA at Technology Readiness Level 2-3 to develop thermochemical liquefaction technologies for producing a bio-oil feedstock from high-impact biomass that can be utilized within a petroleum refinery. Bio-oil obtained from fast pyrolysis of biomass is a green intermediate that can be further upgraded into a biofuel for blending in a petroleum refinery using a hydro-deoxygenation (HDO) route. Co-processing pyrolysis bio-oil in a petroleum refinery is an attractive approach to leverage the refinery’s existing capital. However, the petroleum industry is reluctant to accept pyrolysis bio-oil because of a lack of a standard definition for an acceptable bio-oil feedstock in existing refinery processes. Also per BETO’s multiyear program plan, fast pyrolysis-based bio-fuel is presently not cost competitive with petroleum-based transportation fuels. SR aims to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective low-severity thermal liquefaction and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process to convert woody biomass to stabilized bio-oils that can be directly blended with hydrotreater input streams in a petroleum refinery for production of gasoline and/or diesel range hydrocarbons. The specific project objectives are to demonstrate the processes at laboratory scale, characterize the bio-oil product and develop a plan in partnership with a refinery company to move the technology towards commercialization.

  7. Analysis of standard and innovative methods for allocating upstream and refinery GHG emissions to oil products

    OpenAIRE

    MORETTI CHRISTIAN; MORO ALBERTO; EDWARDS ROBERT; ROCCO MATTEO VINCENZO; COLOMBO EMANUELA

    2016-01-01

    Alternative fuel policies need accurate and transparent methods to find the embedded carbon intensity of individual refinery products. This study investigates different ways of allocating greenhouse gases emissions deriving from refining and upstream crude oil supply. Allocation methods based on mass, energy content, economic value and, innovatively, added-value, are compared with the marginal refining emissions calculated by CONCAWE’s linear-programming model to the average EU refinery, whic...

  8. Potential responses to climate change in organisms with complex life histories: evolution and plasticity in Pacific salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.G. Crozier; A.P. Hendry; P.W. Lawson; T.P. Quinn; N.J. Mantua; J. Battin; R.G. Shaw; R.B. Huey

    2008-01-01

    Salmon life histories are finely tuned to local environmental conditions, which are intimately linked to climate. We summarize the likely impacts of climate change on the physical environment of salmon in the Pacific Northwest and discuss the potential evolutionary consequences of these changes, with particular reference to Columbia River Basin spring/summer Chinook (...

  9. Stratigraphy and Stress History Recorded by a Complex Volcano-Tectonic Feature in the Nemesis Tessera Quadrangle, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, T. C.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2002-01-01

    The stress history of a feature, identified as a previously uncataloged dike swarm, at 45N 191E is mapped as clockwise rotation of maximum horizontal compressive stress. It is intermediate between areas associated with compression, mantle upwelling and convection. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. A revision of the history of the Colletotrichum acutatum species complex in the Nordic countries based on herbarium specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundelin, Thomas; Strømeng, Gunn Mari; Gjærum, Halvor B.

    2015-01-01

    and Denmark before the first confirmed findings of C. acutatum complex members in this region. Sequencing parts of the fungal ITS regions showed that members of the species complex were present in 13 of the 21 specimens collected in different parts of Norway and Denmark between 1948 and 1991, representing...

  11. Opportunities and challenges at the interface between petrochemistry and refinery. The BASF perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankertz, H.J. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the BASF perspective according to opportunities and challenges at the interface between petrochemistry and refinery. This contribution is divided into the following chapters: (a) Overview BASF-Group; (b) Overview BASF Petrochemicals; (c) The refinery-chemistry interface; (d) Main focus refineries; (e) Interface challenges and opportunities; (f) What can BASF do for refineries. BASF employs the Verbund concept, a system that combines production with energy needs in an intelligent way. The idea is to reduce of primary energy carriers both in terms of raw materials and for power and steam generation. The authors describes the petrochemicals of BASF AG (Ludwigshafen, Federal Republic of Germany), the raw material development, evolution of thermal steamcracking and crackerproducts. Major feedstock source of the European petrochemical industry are streams out of refineries which can't be used for transportation fuels. The gap between propylene demand and production out of steam crackers has to be closed by propylene out for FCC's. Demand for aromatics (xylenes and benzene, and to a lesser extent toluene) needs to be filled in by aromatics out of refineries. Market drivers for the refining industry are lowering crude costs, growing clean products, increasing capacity and enhancing E and P integration. BASF has various business with the oil und refining industry and provides solutions for oil field chemicals, process chemicals and performance additives. The author explains which kind of products and services BASF provides for refiners.

  12. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Marshall [MRG and Associates, Nevada City, CA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  13. Mortality of UK oil refinery and petroleum distribution workers, 1951-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorahan, Tom

    2007-05-01

    The health of UK petroleum industry workers has been monitored for many years. To identify any long-term adverse health outcomes from occupational exposures in this industry. The mortality (1951-2003) and cancer morbidity (1971-2003) experienced by cohorts of 28,555 oil refinery workers and 16,477 petroleum distribution workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those males first employed in the period 1946-74 at one of eight UK oil refineries or 476 UK petroleum distribution centres; all subjects had a minimum of 12 months employment with some employment after 1 January 1951. Observed numbers of cause-specific deaths and site-specific cancer registrations were compared with expectations based on national mortality and cancer incidence rates. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were significantly oil refinery workers (Obs 11,156, SMR 89) and in petroleum distribution workers (Obs 7320, SMR 96). Significantly elevated SMRs were shown in oil refinery workers for cancer of the pleura (mesothelioma) (Obs 64, SMR 261) and melanoma (Obs 48, SMR 168). Significantly elevated SMRs were not found in petroleum distribution workers for any site of cancer. Significantly elevated standardized registration ratios (SRRs) were only shown in oil refinery workers and for cancer of the pleura (mesothelioma) (Obs 115, SMR 274), melanoma (Obs 85, SMR 129) and other skin cancer (Obs 983, SRR 117). The only findings that showed clear evidence of an occupational cancer hazard were those for mesothelioma in oil refinery workers.

  14. Water quality of the culture beds of hard clam and adjacent sea of the Yeosu Refinery of Honam Oil Refinery Company in Kwang Yang Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, J.H.; Go, N.P.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of oil spill from the wastewater of Yeosu Refinery on water quality of hard clam culture beds in Taein-Ri, Kwang Yang Bay, South Korea, were studied. Wastewater and oil spillage may reach culture beds in 6 to 8 h by tidal current movement. Water quality is nearly as normal as unpolluted sea water except the concentration of n-hexane extractive chemicals which was higher than unpolluted sea water in Sept.-Oct. 1973. It may be caused by wastewater of Yeosu Refinery.

  15. An approximation solution to refinery crude oil scheduling problem with demand uncertainty using joint constrained programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qianqian; Yang, Genke; Xu, Guanglin; Pan, Changchun

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to develop an approximation method for scheduling refinery crude oil operations by taking into consideration the demand uncertainty. In the stochastic model the demand uncertainty is modeled as random variables which follow a joint multivariate distribution with a specific correlation structure. Compared to deterministic models in existing works, the stochastic model can be more practical for optimizing crude oil operations. Using joint chance constraints, the demand uncertainty is treated by specifying proximity level on the satisfaction of product demands. However, the joint chance constraints usually hold strong nonlinearity and consequently, it is still hard to handle it directly. In this paper, an approximation method combines a relax-and-tight technique to approximately transform the joint chance constraints to a serial of parameterized linear constraints so that the complicated problem can be attacked iteratively. The basic idea behind this approach is to approximate, as much as possible, nonlinear constraints by a lot of easily handled linear constraints which will lead to a well balance between the problem complexity and tractability. Case studies are conducted to demonstrate the proposed methods. Results show that the operation cost can be reduced effectively compared with the case without considering the demand correlation.

  16. The complex early life history of a marine estuarine-opportunist fish species, Solea turbynei (Soleidae from temperate South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine A. Strydom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The early life history stages and ecology of Solea turbynei, a marine estuarine-opportunist species, is described from nursery areas in Algoa Bay, South Africa. Early life history stages were collected over multiple years from known nursery habitats using plankton, fyke and larval seine nets. The larvae are described using morphometric measurements, meristic counts and pigmentation based on 29 individuals. Solea turbynei is differentiated from other Soleidae by the small size at flexion (3-4 mm, low myomere count and presence of two characteristic blotches of pigment on the dorsal fin. This species has a unique early life history strategy in that the larvae progressively span nearshore, surf zone and estuarine habitats with ontogeny. Abundance of preflexion stages peaks in summer in nearshore waters, indicative of peak spawning period but preflexion larvae are present throughout the year, indicating protracted spawning by adults. At flexion stage, larvae utilize surf zones where metamorphosis and settlement takes place. Early juveniles migrate into the sandy lower reaches of estuaries, after which fish take up residency to adulthood. Warm water is important for larval growth and survival in the nearshore, while turbidity shows a positive relationship with recruitment into estuarine nurseries.

  17. Surgery on the affected upper extremity of patients with a history of complex regional pain syndrome: a retrospective study of 100 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, S S; Rosenthal, E A; Steinberg, R B

    2000-11-01

    Surgery on the extremity affected with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is generally avoided because of the risk that the symptoms will recur or worsen. Perioperative sympathectomy or stellate ganglion block has previously been recommended for CRPS patients requiring surgery of the affected upper extremity. We evaluated 100 patients with a history of upper extremity CRPS undergoing surgery on the affected extremity. All signs and symptoms of CRPS had resolved before surgery. After completion of the surgical procedure half of the patients (n = 50) underwent a stellate ganglion block; the other half received no intervention. The recurrence rate of CRPS was significantly lower in those patients receiving a postoperative stellate ganglion block (n = 5; 10%) compared with those receiving no intervention (n = 36; 72%). We conclude that performing a perioperative stellate ganglion block in patients with a history of CRPS can significantly reduce the recurrence rate of this disease process.

  18. The Mesozoic accretionary complex in Northeast China: Evidence for the accretion history of Paleo-Pacific subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Bo; Li, Long

    2017-09-01

    The Mesozoic accretionary complex in Northeast China, which mainly consists of the Jilin-Heilongjiang high-pressure (HP) metamorphic belt and the Nadanhada accretionary complex, are the key area to understand the Paleo-Pacific subduction-accretion. The Jilin-Heilongjiang HP belt is a HP metamorphic zone between the Jiamusi and Songliao blocks and consists of the Heilongjiang blueschist belt and the Zhangguangcai Complex. Previously published and our new geochronological data indicate that the collision between the Jiamusi and Songliao blocks along the Jilin-Heilongjiang HP belt occurred between 210 and 180 Ma, suggesting that the Jilin-Heilongjiang HP belt is an important unit for characterizing the geodynamic switch from the north-south closure of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt to the onset of westward accretion related to subduction of Paleo-Pacific plate in the Latest Triassic to Early Jurassic. Early Permian igneous rocks with arc affinity in the eastern margin of the Jiamusi Block are more likely related to the Mongol-Okhotsk subduction rather than the Paleo-Pacific subduction or the collision between the Jiamusi and Khanka blocks as previously considered. The Nadanhada accretionary complex lies to the east of the Jiamusi Block, and is composed of the Yuejinshan and Raohe complexes. Compilation of published geochronological data indicate that the Yuejinshan Complex was probably formed between 210 Ma and 180 Ma, similar to ages for the Jilin-Heilongjiang HP belt along the western margin of the Jiamusi-Khanka Block. The Raohe Complex was formed later in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (170-137 Ma), likely more related to the subduction-accretion of Paleo-Pacific plate. The final accretion in the target area took place in the Early Cretaceous (137-130 Ma).

  19. Short-term scheduling of crude oil operations in refinery with high-fusion-point oil and two transportation pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, NaiQi; Zhu, MengChu; Bai, LiPing; Li, ZhiWu

    2016-07-01

    In some refineries, storage tanks are located at two different sites, one for low-fusion-point crude oil and the other for high one. Two pipelines are used to transport different oil types. Due to the constraints resulting from the high-fusion-point oil transportation, it is challenging to schedule such a system. This work studies the scheduling problem from a control-theoretic perspective. It proposes to use a hybrid Petri net method to model the system. It then finds the schedulability conditions by analysing the dynamic behaviour of the net model. Next, it proposes an efficient scheduling method to minimize the cost of high-fusion-point oil transportation. Finally, it gives a complex industrial case study to show its application.

  20. A revision of the history of the Colletotrichum acutatum species complex in the Nordic countries based on herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundelin, Thomas; Strømeng, Gunn Mari; Gjærum, Halvor B; Amby, Daniel Buchvaldt; Ørstad, Kari; Jensen, Birgit; Lund, Ole Søgaard; Stensvand, Arne

    2015-08-01

    Herbaria collections containing plants with disease symptoms are highly valuable, and they are often the only way to investigate outbreaks and epidemics from the past as the number of viable isolates in culture collections is often limited. Species belonging to the Colletotrichum acutatum complex infect a range of important crops. As members of the C. acutatum complex are easily confused with other Colletotrichum species, molecular methods are central for the correct identification. We performed molecular analyses on 21 herbaria specimens, displaying anthracnose symptoms, collected in Norway and Denmark before the first confirmed findings of C. acutatum complex members in this region. Sequencing parts of the fungal ITS regions showed that members of the species complex were present in 13 of the 21 specimens collected in different parts of Norway and Denmark between 1948 and 1991, representing seven plant hosts (three cherry species, apple, raspberry and rhododendron). This is the first time herbarium specimens have been used to study these pathogens under Nordic conditions. Differences in the ITS sequences suggest the presence of different genotypes within the complex, indicating a well-established population. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Yields from pyrolysis of refinery residue using a batch process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Prithiraj

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Batch pyrolysis was a valuable process of assessing the potential of recovering and characterising products from hazardous waste materials. This research explored the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon-rich refinery residue, from crude oil processes, in a 1200 L electrically-heated batch retort. Furthermore, the off-gases produced were easily processed in compliance with existing regulatory emission standards. The methodology offers a novel, cost-effective and environmentally compliant method of assessing recovery potential of valuable products. The pyrolysis experiments yielded significant oil (70% with high calorific value (40 MJ/kg, char (14% with carbon content over 80% and non-condensable gas (6% with significant calorific value (240 kJ/mol. The final gas stream was subjected to an oxidative clean-up process with continuous on-line monitoring demonstrating compliance with South African emission standards. The gas treatment was overall economically optimal as only a smaller portion of the original residue was subjected to emission-controlling steps. Keywords: Batch pyrolysis, Volatiles, Oil yields, Char, Emissions, Oil recovery

  2. Regeneration and reuse waste from an edible oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukerroui, Abdelhamid; Belhocine, Lydia; Ferroudj, Sonia

    2017-08-21

    A spent bleaching earth (SBE) from an edible oil refinery has been regenerated by thermal processing in oven, followed by washing with a cold solution of hydrochloric acid (1M). Optimal regeneration conditions have been controlled by decolorization tests of degummed and neutralized soybean oil. Optimal values of treatment (temperature 350°C, carbonization time 01 h, and HCl concentration 1M) gave a very efficient material. After bleaching oil by regenerated spent bleaching earth (RSBE), the chlorophyll-a and β-carotenes contained in crude edible oil and observed respectively at 430, 454, and 483 nm, value of λ max, are very much decreased. The results obtained after decolorization of edible oil by RSBE material indicate, that, during the process, the bleaching oil did not undergo any changes in the free fatty acid content. The peroxide value (PV) was reduced from 4.2 to 1.8 meq O2/kg, and the color has been improved (Lovibond color yellow/red: from 50/0.5 to 2.7/0.3, respectively). The RSBE material obtained was characterized by several techniques (FTIR, SEM). The results show that the heat treatment did not affect the mineral structure of RSBE, and the regenerated material recovered its porous structure.

  3. Thermodynamics analysis of refinery sludge gasification in adiabatic updraft gasifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Reem; Sinnathambi, Chandra M; Eldmerdash, Usama; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available about the thermodynamic evaluation for biomass gasification process using updraft gasifier. Therefore, to minimize errors, the gasification of dry refinery sludge (DRS) is carried out in adiabatic system at atmospheric pressure under ambient air conditions. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the physical and chemical energy and exergy of product gas at different equivalent ratios (ER). It will also be used to determine whether the cold gas, exergy, and energy efficiencies of gases may be maximized by using secondary air injected to gasification zone under various ratios (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5) at optimum ER of 0.195. From the results obtained, it is indicated that the chemical energy and exergy of producer gas are magnified by 5 and 10 times higher than their corresponding physical values, respectively. The cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies of DRS gasification are in the ranges of 22.9-55.5%, 43.7-72.4%, and 42.5-50.4%, respectively. Initially, all 3 efficiencies increase until they reach a maximum at the optimum ER of 0.195; thereafter, they decline with further increase in ER values. The injection of secondary air to gasification zone is also found to increase the cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies. A ratio of secondary air to primary air of 0.5 is found to be the optimum ratio for all 3 efficiencies to reach the maximum values.

  4. A method for cleaning contaminants from refinery equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipert, Yu.I.; Khadzhiev, S.N.; Kolozhvari, A.A.; Martirosov, R.A.; Pereverzev, A.N.; Prokof' ev, V.P.; Varshaver, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    The existing method for cleaning contaminants from refinery equipment involves water vapor steaming them and rinsing them with condensate in order to increase the effectiveness of the cleansing process. The condensate circulates in two separate procedures, each lasting 12 hours, in which initially 0.005 to 0.02 percent demulsifier is injected; the equipment is rinsed at 70-85 degrees; dissolvan 4411 is used as the demulsifier. Incorporating the proposed method makes it possible to remove the following compounds from the equipment (by volume): NH/sub 4/Cl 0.96; carbamide 0.7; biuret 0.65; ferrous oxides 0.6; amonia carbonate (NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/(NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) 0.3; mechanical impurities 0.007; this method also makes it possible to reduce the time needed to steam and condensate rinse the equipment, to lower steam consumption and to reduce the amount of human labor compared to the method now used.

  5. Purification and detoxification of petroleum refinery wastewater by electrocoagulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousmi, N; Sahmi, A; Li, H Z; Poncin, S; Djebbar, R; Bensadok, K

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of synthetic oily wastewater having the characteristics of a typical petroleum refinery wastewater (PRW) by electrocoagulation (EC) using iron and aluminum electrodes was conducted in an electrolytic reactor equipped with fluid recirculation. During the treatment, the emulsion stability was followed by the measurement of Zeta potential and particle sizes. Effects of some operating conditions such as electrodes material, current density and electrolysis time on removal efficiencies of turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were investigated in detail. The PRW purification by the EC process was found to be the most effective using aluminum as the anode and cathode, current density of 60 A/m(2) and 30 min of electrolysis time. Under these conditions, the process efficiencies were 83.52% and 99.94%, respectively, for COD and turbidity removals which correspond to final values of 96 mg O2/L and 0.5 NTU. A moderate energy consumption (0.341 kWh) was needed to treat 1 m(3) of PRW. Besides, the ecotoxicity test proved that toxic substances presented in the PRW, and those inhibiting the germination growth of whet, were eliminated by the EC technique.

  6. Towards effective waste management. Knowledge centre Waste Refinery Activity Report 2007-2009; Mot effektivare avfallshantering. Kunskapscentrum Waste Refinery Verksamhetsrapport 2007-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    This report aims to provide a comprehensive picture of the areas that have been discussed and developed during the knowledge centre Waste Refinery first three years. Details and depth analyzes of each area are contained in project reports, which can be downloaded free of charge through our website www.wasterefinery.se

  7. Effects of memantine on event-related potential, oscillations, and complexity in individuals with and without family histories of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Balaji; Stevens, Michael C; Jiantonio, Rachel E; Krystal, John H; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2013-03-01

    Enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function associated with a positive family history of alcoholism (FHP) has been hypothesized to contribute to the heritable risk for alcoholism. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of alcoholism family history, NMDA receptor function, and cortical information processing by testing acute effects of the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine on event-related potential (ERP). Twenty-two healthy FHP and 20 healthy family history-negative (FHN; no alcoholic relatives) subjects were administered placebo or 40 mg of memantine under double-blind counterbalanced conditions on two separate occasions. Electroencephalogram data were collected from eight channels with eyes open during an auditory oddball discrimination task. We evaluated P3b amplitude, total theta, alpha activity, and fractal dimension from ERP trials. FHP and FHN subjects did not differ in P3b amplitude. A significant Group × Drug interaction was observed in theta, alpha activity, and fractal dimension at the parietal and occipital sites. FHP individuals exhibited significantly higher fractal dimension and lower theta and alpha activity after placebo relative to FHN subjects. Following memantine administration, theta activity decreased in both groups but more markedly for FHN individuals. Alpha activity decreased for FHN subjects and increased for FHP individuals, whereas the fractal dimension decreased for FHP subjects and increased for FHN subjects after memantine. A plausible interpretation of these results is that FHP individuals may have altered NMDA receptor function compared with FHN individuals. These findings provide additional evidence of differences in the regulation of NMDA receptor function between FHP and FHN individuals.

  8. Assessing the Methane Emissions from Natural Gas-Fired Power Plants and Oil Refineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Tegan N; Shepson, Paul B; Gore, Chloe A; Stirm, Brian H; Kaeser, Robert; Wulle, Bernard; Lyon, David; Rudek, Joseph

    2017-03-21

    Presently, there is high uncertainty in estimates of methane (CH4) emissions from natural gas-fired power plants (NGPP) and oil refineries, two major end users of natural gas. Therefore, we measured CH4 and CO2 emissions at three NGPPs and three refineries using an aircraft-based mass balance technique. Average CH4 emission rates (NGPPs: 140 ± 70 kg/h; refineries: 580 ± 220 kg/h, 95% CL) were larger than facility-reported estimates by factors of 21-120 (NGPPs) and 11-90 (refineries). At NGPPs, the percentage of unburned CH4 emitted from stacks (0.01-0.14%) was much lower than respective facility-scale losses (0.10-0.42%), and CH4 emissions from both NGPPs and refineries were more strongly correlated with enhanced H2O concentrations (R(2)avg = 0.65) than with CO2 (R(2)avg = 0.21), suggesting noncombustion-related equipment as potential CH4 sources. Additionally, calculated throughput-based emission factors (EF) derived from the NGPP measurements made in this study were, on average, a factor of 4.4 (stacks) and 42 (facility-scale) larger than industry-used EFs. Subsequently, throughput-based EFs for both the NGPPs and refineries were used to estimate total U.S. emissions from these facility-types. Results indicate that NGPPs and oil refineries may be large sources of CH4 emissions and could contribute significantly (0.61 ± 0.18 Tg CH4/yr, 95% CL) to U.S. emissions.

  9. The evolutionary history of the Arabidopsis lyrata complex: a hybrid in the amphi-Beringian area closes a large distribution gap and builds up a genetic barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Marcus A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of higher plants are, on the majority, polyploid, and hybridisation is more frequent in plants than in animals. Both polyploidisation and hybridisation contribute to increased variability within species, and may transfer adaptations between species in a changing environment. Studying these aspects of evolution within a diversified species complex could help to clarify overall spatial and temporal patterns of plant speciation. The Arabidopsis lyrata complex, which is closely related to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, is a perennial, outcrossing, herbaceous species complex with a circumpolar distribution in the Northern Hemisphere as well as a disjunct Central European distribution in relictual habitats. This species complex comprises three species and four subspecies, mainly diploids but also several tetraploids, including one natural hybrid. The complex is ecologically, but not fully geographically, separated from members of the closely related species complex of Arabidopsis halleri, and the evolutionary histories of both species compexes have largely been influenced by Pleistocene climate oscillations. Results Using DNA sequence data from the nuclear encoded cytosolic phosphoglucoisomerase and Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 and 2 of the ribosomal DNA, as well as the trnL/F region from the chloroplast genome, we unravelled the phylogeography of the various taxonomic units of the A. lyrata complex. We demonstrate the existence of two major gene pools in Central Europe and Northern America. These two major gene pools are constructed from different taxonomic units. We also confirmed that A. kamchatica is the allotetraploid hybrid between A. lyrata and A. halleri, occupying the amphi-Beringian area in Eastern Asia and Northern America. This species closes the large distribution gap of the various other A. lyrata segregates. Furthermore, we revealed a threefold independent allopolyploid origin of this hybrid

  10. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater containing heavily polluting substances in an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramel, S; Bassin, J P; Dezotti, M; Sant'Anna, G L

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum refineries produce large amount of wastewaters, which often contain a wide range of different compounds. Some of these constituents may be recalcitrant and therefore difficult to be treated biologically. This study evaluated the capability of an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor (ASFBR) containing a corrugated PVC support material for biofilm attachment to treat a complex and high-strength organic wastewater coming from a petroleum refinery. The reactor operation was divided into five experimental runs which lasted more than 250 days. During the reactor operation, the applied volumetric organic load was varied within the range of 0.5-2.4 kgCOD.m(-3).d(-1). Despite the inherent fluctuations on the characteristics of the complex wastewater and the slight decrease in the reactor performance when the influent organic load was increased, the ASFBR showed good stability and allowed to reach chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids removals up to 91%, 90% and 92%, respectively. Appreciable ammonium removal was obtained (around 90%). Some challenging aspects of reactor operation such as biofilm quantification and important biofilm constituents (e.g. polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PT)) were also addressed in this work. Average PS/volatile attached solids (VAS) and PT/VAS ratios were around 6% and 50%, respectively. The support material promoted biofilm attachment without appreciable loss of solids and allowed long-term operation without clogging. Microscopic observations of the microbial community revealed great diversity of higher organisms, such as protozoa and rotifers, suggesting that toxic compounds found in the wastewater were possibly removed in the biofilm.

  11. Hazard estimates for El Chichón volcano, Chiapas, México: a statistical approach for complex eruptive histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rosas, A. T.; de La Cruz-Reyna, S.

    2010-06-01

    The El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, México) most recent eruption occurred in 1982 causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of Mexico. Prior to the eruption, El Chichón volcano was not considered a very hazardous volcano, a perception mostly caused by the low eruption rate of the past eruptions. The correct assessment of volcanic hazard is the first step to prevent a disaster. In this paper, we analyze two periods of the reported eruptive history of El Chichón volcano during the Holocene, searching for the eruption rates of different VEI magnitude categories and testing their time dependence. One period accounting the eruptions of the last 3707 years before the last eruption (BLE) is assumed to be complete, with no missing relevant events. More scarce information of a period extending to 7772 years BLE is then added. We then apply the Non-Homogeneous Generalized Pareto-Poisson Process (NHGPPP), and the Mixture of Exponentials Distribution (MOED) methods to estimate the volcanic hazard of El Chichón considering both periods. The results are compared with the probabilities obtained from the homogeneous Poisson and Weibull distributions. In this case the MOED and the Weibull distribution are rather insensitive to the inclusion of the extended period. In contrast, the NHGPPP is strongly influenced by the extended period.

  12. Complex interplay of body condition, life history, and prevailing environment shapes immune defenses of garter snakes in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Maria G; Cunnick, Joan E; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2013-01-01

    The immunocompetence "pace-of-life" hypothesis proposes that fast-living organisms should invest more in innate immune defenses and less in adaptive defenses compared to slow-living ones. We found some support for this hypothesis in two life-history ecotypes of the snake Thamnophis elegans; fast-living individuals show higher levels of innate immunity compared to slow-living ones. Here, we optimized a lymphocyte proliferation assay to assess the complementary prediction that slow-living snakes should in turn show stronger adaptive defenses. We also assessed the "environmental" hypothesis that predicts that slow-living snakes should show lower levels of immune defenses (both innate and adaptive) given the harsher environment they live in. Proliferation of B- and T-lymphocytes of free-living individuals was on average higher in fast-living than slow-living snakes, opposing the pace-of-life hypothesis and supporting the environmental hypothesis. Bactericidal capacity of plasma, an index of innate immunity, did not differ between fast-living and slow-living snakes in this study, contrasting the previously documented pattern and highlighting the importance of annual environmental conditions as determinants of immune profiles of free-living animals. Our results do not negate a link between life history and immunity, as indicated by ecotype-specific relationships between lymphocyte proliferation and body condition, but suggest more subtle nuances than those currently proposed.

  13. Evolutionary History of the Live-Bearing Endemic Allotoca diazi Species Complex (Actinopterygii, Goodeinae: Evidence of Founder Effect Events in the Mexican Pre-Hispanic Period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diushi Keri Corona-Santiago

    Full Text Available The evolutionary history of Mexican ichthyofauna has been strongly linked to natural events, and the impact of pre-Hispanic cultures is little known. The live-bearing fish species Allotoca diazi, Allotoca meeki and Allotoca catarinae occur in areas of biological, cultural and economic importance in central Mexico: Pátzcuaro basin, Zirahuén basin, and the Cupatitzio River, respectively. The species are closely related genetically and morphologically, and hypotheses have attempted to explain their systematics and biogeography. Mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite markers were used to investigate the evolutionary history of the complex. The species complex shows minimal genetic differentiation. The separation of A. diazi and A. meeki was dated to 400-7000 years ago, explained by geological and climate events. A bottleneck and reduction of genetic diversity in Allotoca diazi was detected, attributed to recent climate fluctuations and anthropogenic activity. The isolation of A. catarinae occurred ~1900 years ago. No geological events are documented in the area during this period, but the date is contemporary with P'urhépecha culture settlements. This founder effect represents the first evidence of fish species translocation by a pre-Hispanic culture of Mexico. The response of the complex to climate fluctuation, geological changes and human activity in the past and the future according to the ecological niches predictions indicates areas of vulnerability and important information for conservation. The new genetic information showed that the Allotoca diazi complex consist of two genetic groups with an incomplete lineage sorting pattern: Pátzcuaro and Zirahuén lakes, and an introduced population in the Cupatitzio River.

  14. Out of Arabia: a complex biogeographic history of multiple vicariance and dispersal events in the gecko genus Hemidactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smíd, Jiří; Carranza, Salvador; Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Gvoždík, Václav; Nasher, Abdul Karim; Moravec, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The geological history of the Arabian Peninsula has played a crucial role in shaping current diversity and distribution patterns of many Arabian and African faunal elements. The gecko genus Hemidactylus is not an exception. In this study, we provide an insight into the phylogeny and systematics of 45 recognized species of the so-called Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus from Arabia, the Horn of Africa, the Levant and Iran. The material comprises 358 specimens sequenced for up to two mitochondrial (12S rRNA, cytochrome b) and four nuclear (mc1r, cmos, rag1, rag2) genes with 4766 bp of the concatenated alignment length. A robust calibrated phylogeny and reconstruction of historical biogeography are inferred. We link the history of this genus with major geological events that occurred in the region within the last 30 million years. Two basal divergences correspond with the break-ups of the Arabian and African landmasses and subsequent separation of Socotra from the Arabian mainland, respectively, segregating the genus by means of vicariance. Formation of the Red Sea led to isolation and subsequent radiation in the Arabian Peninsula, which was followed by multiple independent expansions: 13.1 Ma to Iran; 9.8 Ma to NE Africa; 8.2 to Socotra Archipelago; 7-7.3 Ma two colonizations to the Near East; 5.9 Ma to NE Africa; and 4.1 to Socotra. Moreover, using multiple genetic markers we detected cryptic diversity within the genus, particularly in south-western Arabia and the Ethiopian highlands, and confirmed the existence of at least seven new species in the area. These findings highlight the role of Arabia and the Horn of Africa as an important Hemidactylus diversity hotspot.

  15. Out of Arabia: A Complex Biogeographic History of Multiple Vicariance and Dispersal Events in the Gecko Genus Hemidactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmíd, Jiří; Carranza, Salvador; Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Gvoždík, Václav; Nasher, Abdul Karim; Moravec, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The geological history of the Arabian Peninsula has played a crucial role in shaping current diversity and distribution patterns of many Arabian and African faunal elements. The gecko genus Hemidactylus is not an exception. In this study, we provide an insight into the phylogeny and systematics of 45 recognized species of the so-called Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus from Arabia, the Horn of Africa, the Levant and Iran. The material comprises 358 specimens sequenced for up to two mitochondrial (12S rRNA, cytochrome b) and four nuclear (mc1r, cmos, rag1, rag2) genes with 4766 bp of the concatenated alignment length. A robust calibrated phylogeny and reconstruction of historical biogeography are inferred. We link the history of this genus with major geological events that occurred in the region within the last 30 million years. Two basal divergences correspond with the break-ups of the Arabian and African landmasses and subsequent separation of Socotra from the Arabian mainland, respectively, segregating the genus by means of vicariance. Formation of the Red Sea led to isolation and subsequent radiation in the Arabian Peninsula, which was followed by multiple independent expansions: 13.1 Ma to Iran; 9.8 Ma to NE Africa; 8.2 to Socotra Archipelago; 7–7.3 Ma two colonizations to the Near East; 5.9 Ma to NE Africa; and 4.1 to Socotra. Moreover, using multiple genetic markers we detected cryptic diversity within the genus, particularly in south-western Arabia and the Ethiopian highlands, and confirmed the existence of at least seven new species in the area. These findings highlight the role of Arabia and the Horn of Africa as an important Hemidactylus diversity hotspot. PMID:23724016

  16. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Brochier-Armanet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 °C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  17. Out of Arabia: a complex biogeographic history of multiple vicariance and dispersal events in the gecko genus Hemidactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Smíd

    Full Text Available The geological history of the Arabian Peninsula has played a crucial role in shaping current diversity and distribution patterns of many Arabian and African faunal elements. The gecko genus Hemidactylus is not an exception. In this study, we provide an insight into the phylogeny and systematics of 45 recognized species of the so-called Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus from Arabia, the Horn of Africa, the Levant and Iran. The material comprises 358 specimens sequenced for up to two mitochondrial (12S rRNA, cytochrome b and four nuclear (mc1r, cmos, rag1, rag2 genes with 4766 bp of the concatenated alignment length. A robust calibrated phylogeny and reconstruction of historical biogeography are inferred. We link the history of this genus with major geological events that occurred in the region within the last 30 million years. Two basal divergences correspond with the break-ups of the Arabian and African landmasses and subsequent separation of Socotra from the Arabian mainland, respectively, segregating the genus by means of vicariance. Formation of the Red Sea led to isolation and subsequent radiation in the Arabian Peninsula, which was followed by multiple independent expansions: 13.1 Ma to Iran; 9.8 Ma to NE Africa; 8.2 to Socotra Archipelago; 7-7.3 Ma two colonizations to the Near East; 5.9 Ma to NE Africa; and 4.1 to Socotra. Moreover, using multiple genetic markers we detected cryptic diversity within the genus, particularly in south-western Arabia and the Ethiopian highlands, and confirmed the existence of at least seven new species in the area. These findings highlight the role of Arabia and the Horn of Africa as an important Hemidactylus diversity hotspot.

  18. Identification of the odour and chemical composition of alumina refinery air emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, P S; Ioppolo-Armanios, M

    2004-01-01

    Alcoa World Alumina Australia has undertaken comprehensive air emissions monitoring aimed at characterising and quantifying the complete range of emissions to the atmosphere from Bayer refining of alumina at its Western Australian refineries. To the best of our knowledge, this project represents the most complete air emissions inventory of a Bayer refinery conducted in the worldwide alumina industry. It adds considerably to knowledge of air emission factors available for use in emissions estimation required under national pollutant release and transfer registers (NPRTs), such as the Toxic Releases Inventory, USA, and the National Pollutant Inventory, Australia. It also allows the preliminary identification of the key chemical components responsible for characteristic alumina refinery odours and the contribution of these components to the quality, or hedonic tone, of the odours. The strength and acceptability of refinery odours to employees and neighbours appears to be dependent upon where and in what proportion the odorous gases have been emitted from the refineries. This paper presents the results of the programme and develops a basis for classifying the odour properties of the key emission sources in the alumina-refining process.

  19. Reducing refinery CO2 emissions through amine solvent upgrade and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Thiago V.; Valenzuela, Michelle [The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Regional initiatives are underway to reduce and limit the emissions of greenhouse gases. With CO2 emissions making up over 80% of the greenhouse gases, cap-and-trade programs will focus on those industries that consume the most energy. Refineries are among the top energy consumers and are seeking opportunities to reduce usage. With tightening margins, energy management programs will not only help refineries meet CO{sub 2} emission regulations, but can also provide a competitive advantage. With the trend towards heavier and higher sulfur containing crudes, refineries are increasing processing capabilities, which can include capital-intensive projects and additional energy consumption. Energy conservation plans should include optimization of these processes. One area to consider includes the acid gas removal systems in refineries. Through the selection and use of optimal solvents and implementation of energy efficiency techniques, which require minimal capital investment and expenditures, refineries can reduce energy usage, overall CO{sub 2} emissions, and total cost in acid gas systems. This paper will discuss these approaches and share case studies detailing the implementation and results. (author)

  20. Predicting refinery effluent toxicity on the basis of hydrocarbon composition determined by GCxGC analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whale, G. [and others

    2013-04-15

    A high resolution analytical method for determining hydrocarbon blocks in petroleum products by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) was used for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons extracted from refinery effluents. From 105 CONCAWE refineries in Europe 111 refinery effluents were collected in the period June 2008 to March 2009 (CONCAWE, 2010). The effluents were analysed for metals, standard effluent parameters (including Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), oil in water (OiW), GCxGC speciated hydrocarbons, BTEX (Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes) and volatile organic compounds. This report describes the subsequent analysis of the GCxGC data, as described in hydrocarbon blocks, and uses the PETROTOX model, to predict the environmental toxicity (i.e. ecotoxicity) of the discharged effluents. A further analysis was undertaken to address the potential environmental impact of these predicted effects initially using default dilution factors and then,when necessary site specific factors. The report describes all the methods used to arrive at the predictions, and shows that for the majority of refinery effluents direct toxicity effects in the effluents are not anticipated. Furthermore, when applying either the EU Risk Assessment Technical Guidance Document (TGD) default dilution factors or site specific dilution factors, none of the refineries are predicted to exerting either acute or chronic toxicity to organisms in the receiving aquatic environment, based on their hydrocarbon composition present in the effluent samples.

  1. Energy demand analysis of Port-Harcourt refinery, Nigeria and its policy implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesuleye, O.A.; Siyanbola, W.O.; Sanni, S.A. [Obafemi Awolowo Univ., National Centre for Technology Management, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Ilori, M.O. [Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Technology Planning and Development Unit, Ile-Ife (Nigeria)

    2007-02-15

    This paper analyses energy demand of Port-Harcourt refinery, Nigeria, based on information obtained from its annual publications, backed-up by spot interviews. The analytical approach adopted for the study involves the calculation of energy intensities to determine the refinery's annual energy demand for various energy types considered from 1989 to 2004. The results showed that the actual energy demand per year for processing crude oil into refined products, exceeded, in varying degrees the stipulated refinery standard of 4 barrels of oil equivalent (BOE) per 100 BOE. It varied from 4.28-8.58 BOE per 100 BOE. In terms of energy demand efficiency, this implies very poor performance of the refinery during the 16-year period under investigation. The excess demand which translates to an average daily wastage of about 2005 BOE is estimated to be $56,196 (US Dollars) based on the 2003 OPEC basket price of $28.0213 per barrel. Lack of optimal fuel utilization-mix and non-compliance with the Turn-Around-Maintenance schedules were attributed to the refinery's inefficient energy demand pattern. (Author)

  2. Biorefineries: Relocating Biomass Refineries to the Rural Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Papendiek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The field for application of biomass is rising. The demand for food and feeding stuff rises while at the same time energy, chemicals and other materials also need to be produced from biomass because of decreasing fossil resources. However, the biorefinery ideas and concepts can help to use the limited renewable raw materials more efficiently than today. With biorefineries, valuable products, such as platform chemicals, can be produced from agricultural feedstock, which can subsequently be further processed into a variety of substances by the chemical industry. Due to the role they play as producers of biomass, rural areas will grow in importance in the decades to come. Parts of the biorefinery process can be relocated to the rural areas to bring a high added value to these regions. By refining biomass at the place of production, new economic opportunities may arise for agriculturists, and the industry gets high-grade pre-products. Additionally, an on-farm refining can increase the quality of the products because of the instant processing. To reduce competition with the food production and to find new possibilities of utilisation for these habitats, the focus for new agricultural biomass should be on grasslands. But also croplands can provide more renewable raw materials without endangering a sustainable agriculture, e.g. by implementing legumes in the crop rotation. To decide if a region can provide adequate amounts of raw material for a biorefinery, new raw material assessment procedures have to be developed. In doing so, involvement of farmers is inevitable to generate a reliable study of the biomass refinery potentials.

  3. The evolution of the Dogger Bank, North Sea: A complex history of terrestrial, glacial and marine environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, Carol J.; Phillips, Emrys; James, Leo; Forsberg, Carl Fredrik; Tjelta, Tor Inge; Carter, Gareth; Dove, Dayton

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a summary of the results of a detailed multidisciplinary study of the near surface geology of the Dogger Bank in the southern central North Sea, forming part of a site investigation for a major windfarm development undertaken by the Forewind consortium. It has revealed that the Dogger Bank is internally complex rather than comprising a simple ;layer cake; of the Quaternary sediments as previously thought. Regional and high-resolution seismic surveys have enabled a revised stratigraphic framework to be established for the upper part of this sequence which comprises the Eem (oldest), Dogger Bank, Bolders Bank formations and Botney Cut Formation (youngest), overlain by a typically thin Holocene sequence. Detailed mapping of key horizons identified on the high-resolution seismic profiles has led to the recognition of a series of buried palaeo-landsystems which are characterised by a range of features including; glacial, glacifluvial and fluvial channels, a large-scale glacitectonic thrust-moraine complex with intervening ice-marginal basins, a lacustrine basin and marine ravinement surfaces. Interpretation of these buried landscapes has enabled the development of an environmental change model to explain the evolution of the Dogger Bank. This evolution was driven by the complex interplay between climate change, ice sheet dynamics and sea level change associated with the growth and subsequent demise of the British and Irish and Fennoscandian ice sheets during the Weichselian glaciation. Following the decay of these ice sheets the Dogger Bank entered a period of significant climatic and environmental flux which saw a terrestrial landscape being progressively inundated as sea levels rose during the Holocene.

  4. Noble gases and halogens in Graves Nunataks 06129: The complex thermal history of a felsic asteroid crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Jennifer L.; Crowther, Sarah A.; Fernandes, Vera A.; Gilmour, Jamie D.

    2015-06-01

    The meteorite Graves Nunataks 06128/06129 is a rare example of felsic asteroidal crust. Knowledge of its history can help shed light on the evolution processes of planetesimals. The noble gases can be used to constrain both the chronology of meteorites and the processes that result in movements of volatile elements on asteroidal bodies. We have examined the I-Xe and Ar-Ar systems of the plagioclase-rich achondrite, Graves Nunataks 06129 by high-resolution laser step-heating of irradiated samples. Iodine and 129Xe∗ are both present but are released at different temperatures and do not show a correlation, therefore the I-Xe system in GRA 06129 has no chronological significance. We propose that radiogenic 129Xe∗ was lost from primary phases and parentless 129Xe∗ was later introduced into the rock by interaction with a fluid sourced from a reservoir that evolved with a high I/Xe ratio. This could have been the same halogen-rich fluid that induced the conversion of merrillite and pyroxene into chlorapatite. Inherited 40Ar (i.e. not generated by in situ decay of 40K) is also present in one of three fragments studied here and may have been introduced at the same time as parentless 129Xe∗.

  5. The impact of history on our perception of evolutionary events: endosymbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-02-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses are correctly interpreted as products of the data they set out to explain, but they are less often recognized as being heavily influenced by other factors. One of these is the history of preceding thought, and here I look back on historically important changes in our thinking about the role of endosymbiosis in the origin of eukaryotic cells. Specifically, the modern emphasis on endosymbiotic explanations for numerous eukaryotic features, including the cell itself (the so-called chimeric hypotheses), can be seen not only as resulting from the advent of molecular and genomic data, but also from the intellectual acceptance of the endosymbiotic origin of mitochondria and plastids. This transformative idea may have unduly affected how other aspects of the eukaryotic cell are explained, in effect priming us to accept endosymbiotic explanations for endogenous processes. Molecular and genomic data, which were originally harnessed to answer questions about cell evolution, now so dominate our thinking that they largely define the question, and the original questions about how eukaryotic cellular architecture evolved have been neglected. This is unfortunate because, as Roger Stanier pointed out, these cellular changes represent life's "greatest single evolutionary discontinuity," and on this basis I advocate a return to emphasizing evolutionary cell biology when thinking about the origin of eukaryotes, and suggest that endogenous explanations will prevail when we refocus on the evolution of the cell.

  6. Emergency Response Program Designing Based On Case Study ERP Regulations In Ilam Gas Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tahmasbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Emergency response plan designing is one of the most important prevention approaches in crisis management. This study aims to design emergency response plan based on case study ERP regulations in Ilam gas refinery. On the basis of risk assessment and identification techniques such as HAZOP and FMEA in Ilam gas refinery the risks have been prioritized and then according to this prioritization the design of possible scenarios which have the highest rate of occurrence and the highest level of damage has been separated. Possible scenarios were simulated with PHAST software. Then emergency response program has been designed for the special mode or similar cases. According to the internal emergency response plan for Ilam gas refinery and predictable conditions of the process special instructions should be considered at the time of the incident to suffer the least damage on people and environment in the shortest time possible.

  7. Asbestos-related cancers in refinery workers in the Australian petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun, Richard; Pratt, Nicole L; Roder, David M; Ryan, Philip

    2006-01-01

    In this study of the incidence of asbestos-related cancer in the Australian petroleum industry, the authors traced a cohort of 16,543 petroleum industry workers for a total of 226,989 person-years. There were 18 cases of pleural mesothelioma; 12 occurred in refinery nonoffice workers, for whom the Standardized Incidence Ratio was 3.77 (95% confidence interval = 1.95-6.59). The incidence of lung cancer was significantly lower than that in the general male population. Lung cancer incidence was higher in maintenance workers than in nonmaintenance workers, but the excess was not statistically significant, as it was based on small numbers with wide confidence intervals. Lung cancer rates in refinery workers did not increase with duration of employment; however, they did tend to be higher in workers hired in earlier decades. Excess mesothelioma incidence in refinery workers is confirmed, but it is likely that there are few if any asbestos-related lung cancers.

  8. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2013-05-01

    High-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) were used to perform treatability studies on many different refinery wastewater samples all having appreciably different characteristics, which resulted in large differences in current generation. A de-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1±0.2A/m2 (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal. These results were similar to those obtained using domestic wastewater. Two other de-oiled refinery wastewater samples also showed good performance, with a de-oiled oily sewer sample producing less current. A stabilization lagoon sample and a stripped sour wastewater sample failed to produce appreciable current. Electricity production, organics removal, and startup time were improved when the anode was first acclimated to domestic wastewater. These results show mini-MECs are an effective method for evaluating treatability of different wastewaters. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Mechanism of removal of undesirable residual amylase, insoluble starch, and select colorants from refinery streams by powdered activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a need in the world-wide sugar industry to find a practical and economical solution to remove or inactivate residual alpha-amylases that are high temperature stable from factory or refinery streams. A survey of refineries that used amylase and had activated carbon systems for decolorization...

  10. 33 CFR 165.T09-0333 - Safety zone; Marathon Oil Refinery construction, Rouge River, Detroit, MI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Coast Guard District § 165.T09-0333 Safety zone; Marathon Oil Refinery construction, Rouge River... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety zone; Marathon Oil Refinery construction, Rouge River, Detroit, MI. 165.T09-0333 Section 165.T09-0333 Navigation and Navigable...

  11. Integration of biofiltration and advanced oxidation processes for tertiary treatment of an oil refinery wastewater aiming at water reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, A A; Bassin, J P; Cerqueira, A C; Dezotti, M

    2016-05-01

    The combination of biological and chemical oxidation processes is an interesting approach to remove ready, poor, and non-biodegradable compounds from complex industrial wastewaters. In this study, biofiltration followed by H2O2/UV oxidation (or microfiltration) and final reverse osmosis (RO) step was employed for tertiary treatment of an oil refinery wastewater. Biofiltration alone allowed obtaining total organic carbon (TOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD), UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254), ammonium, and turbidity removal of around 46, 46, 23, 50, and 61 %, respectively. After the combined biological-chemical oxidation treatment, TOC and UV254 removal amounted to 88 and 79 %, respectively. Whereas, the treatment performance achieved with different UV lamp powers (55 and 95 W) and therefore distinct irradiance levels (26.8 and 46.3 mW/cm(2), respectively) were very similar and TOC and UV254 removal rates were highly affected by the applied C/H2O2 ratio. Silt density index (SDI) was effectively reduced by H2O2/UV oxidation, favoring further RO application. C/H2O2 ratio of 1:4, 55 W UV lamp, and 20-min oxidation reaction corresponded to the experimental condition which provided the best cost/benefit ratio for TOC, UV254, and SDI reduction from the biofilter effluent. The array of treatment processes proposed in this study has shown to be adequate for tertiary treatment of the oil refinery wastewater, ensuring the mitigation of membrane fouling problems and producing a final effluent which is suitable for reuse applications.

  12. Demographic histories of three predatory lady beetles reveal complex patterns of diversity and population size change in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, Arun; Janzen, Fredric J; Rubio, Michael A; Vasquez, Yumary; Obrycki, John J

    2017-05-15

    Predatory lady beetles (Coccinellidae) contribute to biological control of agricultural pests, however, multiple species frequently compete for similar resources in the same environment. Numerous studies have examined ecological interactions among the native North American convergent lady beetle (Hippodamia convergens) and two introduced species, the seven-spotted lady beetle (Coccinella septempunctata) and the Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis), in agricultural fields and described multiyear population dynamics. However, the evolutionary dynamics of these interacting species of predatory beetles are uncharacterized. We utilize publicly available multilocus genotype data from geographically disjunct populations of these three species to estimate demography across North American populations. Coalescent analyses reveal (1) a recent (∼4-5 years) decline (>12 fold) in microsatellite effective population size of H. convergens, while expanding (mutation scaled growth rate in 1/u generations = 2910, SD = 362) over evolutionary time scales, (2) a massive (>150 fold), and very recent, effective population size decline in Ha. axyridis, and (3) population size growth (mutation scaled growth rate = 997, SD = 60) over recent and evolutionary time scales in C. septempunctata. Although these estimates are based on genetic data with different mutation rates and patterns of inheritance (mitochondrial versus nuclear), these dynamic and differing population size histories are striking. Further studies of the interactions of these predatory lady beetles in the field are thus warranted to explore the consequences of population size change and biological control activities for evolutionary trajectories in North America. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. The history of decisions on creation of nuclear and metallurgical complex on the basis of the Kola nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudrin B. I.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Some reasons for the choice of directions for using electric and thermal energy of the Kola nuclear power plant located beyond the Arctic Circle have been presented. The regions of the country and their large-scale industrial productions based on metallurgical enterprises have been indicated; the electrical supply of these enterprises is implemented from the Kola NPP. The results of research of energy inputs for the production of a ton of steel and cast iron have been presented. It has been determined that the main direction of technological modernization in the steel industry is avoiding the use of organic fuels (particularly in coke-blast furnace production as the most energy-intensive and its replacement with the technology of direct reduction of iron with hydrogen. As an alternative energy source for organic fuels the creation of a fuel-free nuclear-metallurgical electrified complex has been proposed. The principal scheme of the fuel-free nuclear-metallurgical electrified complex has been described, here the main novelty has a reducing gases preparation block giving the potential ability for creating waste-free process. It has been noted that this technology requires using high temperatures and solving technical problems related to heat resistance of constructions. Some examples of world research on the implementation of similar projects have been presented. It has been determined that the use of new technology will cause the need for optimization of power consumption structure due to the redistribution of capacity and electrical consumption between productions. The introduction of new technologies requires solving a number of problems on electric power supply and electrical equipment designing. It has been observed that on the Kola NPP large-scale reconstruction was carried out during the working period, it helped to increase its project capacity and extend the operation life. Nowadays the region has excess installed capacity that can be

  14. FUZZY MODELING APPLICATION OF FLUID CATALYTIC CRACKING UNIT (FCCU OF A PETROLEUM REFINERY (TÜPRAŞ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithat ZEYDAN

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fuzzy modeling of FCCU in the refinery system as the most important part of Petrochemical Industry was carried out. FCCU is the most important unit in the refinery system as it is a higly nonlinear system with MIMO (Multi input-multi output, internal feedback, strongly coupling, time-varying, distributed parameter, significantly uncertain behaviours in nature. Mathematical Models is not enough to identify this system. On the occasion of this, FCCU has a characteristic specifications as a subject of Fuzzy Logic.

  15. Electroacoustic isoelectric point determinations of bauxite refinery residues: different neutralization techniques and minor mineral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Tiago S S; Clark, Malcolm W; Comarmond, M Josick; Payne, Timothy E; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J; Thorogood, Gordon J

    2012-08-14

    Bauxite refinery residue (BRR) is a highly caustic, iron hydroxide-rich byproduct from alumina production. Some chemical treatments of BRR reduce soluble alkalinity and lower residue pH (to values <10) and generate a modified BRR (MBRR). MBRR has excellent acid neutralizing (ANC) and trace-metal adsorption capacities, making it particularly useful in environmental remediation. However, soluble ANC makes standard acid-base isoelectric point (IEP) determination difficult. Consequently, the IEP of a BRR and five MBRR derivatives (sulfuric acid-, carbon dioxide-, seawater-, a hybrid neutralization, i.e, partial CO(2) neutralization followed by seawater, and an activated-seawater-neutralized MBRR) were determined using electroacoustic techniques. Residues showed three significantly different groups of IEPs (p < 0.05) based around the neutralization used. Where the primary mineral assemblage is effectively unchanged, the IEPs were not significantly different from BRR (pH 6.6-6.9). However, neutralizations generating neoformational minerals (alkalinity precipitation) significantly increased the IEP to pH 8.1, whereas activation (a removal of some primary mineralogy) significantly lowered the IEP to pH 6.2. Moreover, surface charging curves show that surfaces remain in the ±30 mV surface charge instability range, which provides an explanation as to why MBRRs remove trace metals and oxyanions over a broad pH range, often simultaneously. Importantly, this work shows that minor mineral components in complex mineral systems may have a disproportionate effect on the observable bulk IEP. Furthermore, this work shows the appropriateness of electroacoustic techniques in investigating samples with significant soluble mineral components (e.g., ANC).

  16. Oil refinery sludge and green waste simulated windrow composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, M S; Terzakis, S; Georgaki, E; Drakopoulou, S; Sabathianakis, I; Kouzoulakis, M; Manios, T

    2009-04-01

    Oil refinery sludge (ORS) was mixed with shredded green wastes (GW) at ratios of 1:1 v/v (RI) and 1:3 v/v (RII). The mixtures, of approximately volumes of 1,020 l and 990 l respectively, were introduced in metal cubic containers of 1.0 m(3) volume, opened at the top and with small holes punctured in the bottom and the side. The containers were additionally insulated with a layer of rockwool (20 mm). The boxes were emptied, the mixtures were turned and water was added occasionally, in one to two weeks intervals, simulating a windrow composting system. Temperature, physiochemical characteristics, mineral oil and grease (MOG) concentration, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentration, carbon dioxide emission, methane emission and microorganisms presence were recorded either daily or every time the mixtures were turned, for a period of 120 days. RII recorded temperatures as high as 62 degrees C, reaching 56 degrees C in Day 6 and retained temperatures above 50 degrees C for more than 40 days. RI recorded its highest temperature of 53 degrees C in Day 77. The reason why the two mixtures behaved so differently can be explained by: (i) extended co-digestion phenomena by the microorganisms decomposing the GW in RII, (ii) toxic effect of ORS in RI due to the far larger amounts used (840 kg in RI in comparison with the 460 kg in RII). After Day 36 temperature increased gradually in RI and MOG and PAHs reduction was first noted. At the end of the experiment MOG concentration in RI was 57.2 mg/kg dry weight (dw) (52.1% reduction) where in RII was 34.3 mg/kg dw (62.1% reduction). Emissions of methane and carbon dioxide support the concept of the toxic effect and the delay ignition of the decomposing process in RI. In total, CO(2) and CH(4) emissions from RI were recorded to be 30.8 kg and 18.5 g, respectively, where from RII 59.6 kg of CO(2) and 6.4 g of CH(4) were emitted. An effort was made to determine the effect of temperature alone (as an abiotic treating

  17. Trends in desulfurization capabilities, processing technologies, and the availability of crude oils: U. S. refineries; Caribbean ''exporting'' refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, E. L.; Marsik, F. V.

    1977-12-01

    A review of all U.S. refineries and their downstream equipment has led to the conclusion that slightly more than 40 percent of the existing capacity can handle some sour crude of one type or another. For various reasons, this cannot be an exactly defined number, nor does it coincide with the percent of hydroprocessing equipment in relation to crude capacity. A few refineries have hydrotreating facilities and yet only have sweet crude capability. A few refiners may only have capability to handle sour crudes in the lower sulfur ranges, say 0.5 to 1.0 percent, due to emissions problems or other limitations. These are limitations which can be overcome by investments. Still others would face problems in their product output pattern due to low gravity of some sour crudes. Catalytic hydroprocessing (hydrocracking, hydrorefining, and hydrotreating) removes sulfur from refinery streams so that the total amount of sulfur in the products and residues is less than that in the crude oil feedstock. For this reason, changes in hydroprocessing capacity are used to express the changing capabilities of refiners to process sour crudes. On the other hand, thermal processes (vacuum distillation, visbreaking, and coking), segregate most of the sulfur contained in the refinery feedstocks into residual fractions, allowing the production of low sulfur containing products, but the total amount of sulfur in the products and in the residual fractions is essentially the same as that in the crude oil feedstocks. In this regard, thermal processes are limited in their ability to produce low-sulfur products.

  18. Environmental complexity and biodiversity: the multi-layered evolutionary history of a log-dwelling velvet worm in Montane Temperate Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James K; Sands, Chester J; Garrick, Ryan C; Gardner, Michael G; Tait, Noel N; Briscoe, David A; Rowell, David M; Sunnucks, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies provide a framework for understanding the importance of intrinsic versus extrinsic factors in shaping patterns of biodiversity through identifying past and present microevolutionary processes that contributed to lineage divergence. Here we investigate population structure and diversity of the Onychophoran (velvet worm) Euperipatoides rowelli in southeastern Australian montane forests that were not subject to Pleistocene glaciations, and thus likely retained more forest cover than systems under glaciation. Over a ~100 km transect of structurally-connected forest, we found marked nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) DNA genetic structuring, with spatially-localised groups. Patterns from mtDNA and nuclear data broadly corresponded with previously defined geographic regions, consistent with repeated isolation in refuges during Pleistocene climatic cycling. Nevertheless, some E. rowelli genetic contact zones were displaced relative to hypothesized influential landscape structures, implying more recent processes overlying impacts of past environmental history. Major impacts at different timescales were seen in the phylogenetic relationships among mtDNA sequences, which matched geographic relationships and nuclear data only at recent timescales, indicating historical gene flow and/or incomplete lineage sorting. Five major E. rowelli phylogeographic groups were identified, showing substantial but incomplete reproductive isolation despite continuous habitat. Regional distinctiveness, in the face of lineages abutting within forest habitat, could indicate pre- and/or postzygotic gene flow limitation. A potentially functional phenotypic character, colour pattern variation, reflected the geographic patterns in the molecular data. Spatial-genetic patterns broadly match those in previously-studied, co-occurring low-mobility organisms, despite a variety of life histories. We suggest that for E. rowelli, the complex topography and history of the region has led to

  19. Complex marital histories and economic well-being: the continuing legacy of divorce and widowhood as the HRS cohort approaches retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, K C; Kuo, H H

    1996-06-01

    We use data from the first wave of the Health and Retirement Survey (HRS) to examine the marital histories of this cohort of women and men on the verge of retirement. The legacy of past increases in divorce rates is evident in the complex marital histories of HRS households and the relationship between those histories and current economic status. Couples in a first marriage now make up only one-quarter of black households and fewer than half of all white and Hispanic households. In over one-third of all married-couple households, at least one spouse had a previous marriage that ended in divorce or widowhood. These couples have significantly lower incomes and assets than couples in first marriages. Contrary to the popular notion that private and public insurance better provide for the security of widows than divorced persons, currently widowed households and couples in which the prior marriage of one spouse had ended in widowhood are no better off than are their divorced peers. This holds true for both black and white households. From a single cross-section, one cannot tell what caused these differences in income and wealth across marital status groups although it is clear that women and blacks spend a higher percentage of their lifetime outside of marriage than do men and whites. We also speculate from estimates of widowhood expectations for a subset of married respondents that underestimating the chances of widowhood--because both men and women overestimate their chances of joint survival--may be a factor in the relatively low economic status of widows. Because couples in life-long marriages have been the traditional standard upon which marital property reform and the survivorship rules of private and public programs are based, their diminishing importance among all households raises concern about the protection provided by these institutions against the long-term economic consequences of past and future marital dissolution.

  20. Environmental complexity and biodiversity: the multi-layered evolutionary history of a log-dwelling velvet worm in Montane Temperate Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Bull

    Full Text Available Phylogeographic studies provide a framework for understanding the importance of intrinsic versus extrinsic factors in shaping patterns of biodiversity through identifying past and present microevolutionary processes that contributed to lineage divergence. Here we investigate population structure and diversity of the Onychophoran (velvet worm Euperipatoides rowelli in southeastern Australian montane forests that were not subject to Pleistocene glaciations, and thus likely retained more forest cover than systems under glaciation. Over a ~100 km transect of structurally-connected forest, we found marked nuclear and mitochondrial (mt DNA genetic structuring, with spatially-localised groups. Patterns from mtDNA and nuclear data broadly corresponded with previously defined geographic regions, consistent with repeated isolation in refuges during Pleistocene climatic cycling. Nevertheless, some E. rowelli genetic contact zones were displaced relative to hypothesized influential landscape structures, implying more recent processes overlying impacts of past environmental history. Major impacts at different timescales were seen in the phylogenetic relationships among mtDNA sequences, which matched geographic relationships and nuclear data only at recent timescales, indicating historical gene flow and/or incomplete lineage sorting. Five major E. rowelli phylogeographic groups were identified, showing substantial but incomplete reproductive isolation despite continuous habitat. Regional distinctiveness, in the face of lineages abutting within forest habitat, could indicate pre- and/or postzygotic gene flow limitation. A potentially functional phenotypic character, colour pattern variation, reflected the geographic patterns in the molecular data. Spatial-genetic patterns broadly match those in previously-studied, co-occurring low-mobility organisms, despite a variety of life histories. We suggest that for E. rowelli, the complex topography and history of the

  1. The risk of pain syndrome affecting a previously non-painful limb following trauma or surgery in patients with a history of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satteson, Ellen S; Harbour, Patrick W; Koman, L Andrew; Smith, Beth P; Li, Zhongyu

    2017-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a challenging complication after surgery or trauma. This study sought to determine the incidence of CRPS after a second inciting event in a previously unaffected extremity in patients with a history of an ongoing CRPS diagnosis in another extremity. A retrospective review identified patients with CRPS seen in clinic over a 20-month period. The incidence of CRPS after subsequent surgery or injury in a previous unaffected extremity was determined and compared to an average incidence reported in the literature. Ninety-three patients had a diagnosis of primary CRPS. Nineteen (20.4%) developed CRPS in one or more additional extremity compared to the incidence of 23.4 per 100,000 (0.0234%) in the literature (odds ratio 1069.6, pCRPS compared to a CRPS incidence rate of 6.4% following distal radius fracture, as determined by literature review (odds ratio 11.7, phistory of CRPS are more likely to develop secondary CRPS compared to the rates reported in the literature among the general population. Patients with a history of CRPS should be counselled that they may be at risk for developing secondary CRPS if they undergo surgery or sustain trauma to another extremity. Copyright © 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A complex evolutionary history in a remote archipelago: phylogeography and morphometrics of the Hawaiian endemic Ligia isopods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Santamaria

    Full Text Available Compared to the striking diversification and levels of endemism observed in many terrestrial groups within the Hawaiian Archipelago, marine invertebrates exhibit remarkably lower rates of endemism and diversification. Supralittoral invertebrates restricted to specific coastal patchy habitats, however, have the potential for high levels of allopatric diversification. This is the case of Ligia isopods endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago, which most likely arose from a rocky supralittoral ancestor that colonized the archipelago via rafting, and diversified into rocky supralittoral and inland lineages. A previous study on populations of this isopod from O'ahu and Kaua'i revealed high levels of allopatric differentiation, and suggested inter-island historical dispersal events have been rare. To gain a better understanding on the diversity and evolution of this group, we expanded prior phylogeographic work by incorporating populations from unsampled main Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i, and Hawai'i, increasing the number of gene markers (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes, and conducting Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Our study revealed new lineages and expanded the distribution range of several lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area are complex, with Hawai'i, O'ahu, and the Maui-Nui islands sharing major lineages, implying multiple inter-island historical dispersal events. In contrast, the oldest and most geographically distant of the major islands (Kaua'i shares no lineages with the other islands. Our results did not support the monophyly of all the supralittoral lineages (currently grouped into L. hawaiensis, or the monophyly of the terrestrial lineages (currently grouped into L. perkinsi, implying more than one evolutionary transition between coastal and inland forms. Geometric-morphometric analyses of three supralittoral clades revealed significant body shape differences among them

  3. Resilience vs soft crisis: dynamic risk assessment in complex hybrid systems. Case history of Ginosa (Taranto, Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Alessandro; Argentiero, Ilenia; Fidelibus, Maria Dolores; Pellicani, Roberta; Spilotro, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Considering a natural system without human-induced modifications, its resilience can be altered by many natural drivers (e.g. geological characteristics, climate) and their spatial modifications over time. Therefore, natural hazardous phenomena could shift natural system over tipping points in an easier or more difficult way. So long as natural system does not involve human settlements or transport infrastructures, natural system risk assessment could not be a basic topic. Nowadays, human activities have modified many natural systems forming, as a result, hybrid systems (both human and natural), in which natural and human-induced drivers modify hybrid systems vulnerability in order to decrease or increase their resilience: scientists define this new age Anthropocene. In this context, dynamic risk assessment of hybrid systems is required in order to avoid disaster when hazardous phenomena occur, but it is a quite complex issue. In fact, soft crisis emerging signals are difficult to identify because of wrong risk perception and lack of communication. Furthermore, natural and human-induced modifications are rarely registered and supervised by governments, so it is fairly difficult defining how systems resilience changes over time. Inhabitants of Ginosa (Taranto, South of Italy) had modified many old rock dwellings over thousand years since the Middle Ages. Indeed, they had built up three-storey houses on three hypogeum levels of rock dwellings along the ravine. The Matrice street collapse in Ginosa is an example of how natural and human-induced spatial modifications over time had led a soft crisis to evolve in a disaster, fortunately without fatalities. This research aim is to revisit events before the Matrice street collapse on the 21st January 2014. The will is to define the relationship between the hybrid system resilience and soft crisis variation over time and how human and natural drivers were involved in the shift.

  4. Sequence of the Gonium pectorale Mating Locus Reveals a Complex and Dynamic History of Changes in Volvocine Algal Mating Haplotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hamaji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sex-determining regions (SDRs or mating-type (MT loci in two sequenced volvocine algal species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri, exhibit major differences in size, structure, gene content, and gametolog differentiation. Understanding the origin of these differences requires investigation of MT loci from related species. Here, we determined the sequences of the minus and plus MT haplotypes of the isogamous 16-celled volvocine alga, Gonium pectorale, which is more closely related to the multicellular V. carteri than to C. reinhardtii. Compared to C. reinhardtii MT, G. pectorale MT is moderately larger in size, and has a less complex structure, with only two major syntenic blocs of collinear gametologs. However, the gametolog content of G. pectorale MT has more overlap with that of V. carteri MT than with C. reinhardtii MT, while the allelic divergence between gametologs in G. pectorale is even lower than that in C. reinhardtii. Three key sex-related genes are conserved in G. pectorale MT: GpMID and GpMTD1 in MT–, and GpFUS1 in MT+. GpFUS1 protein exhibited specific localization at the plus-gametic mating structure, indicating a conserved function in fertilization. Our results suggest that the G. pectorale–V. carteri common ancestral MT experienced at least one major reformation after the split from C. reinhardtii, and that the V. carteri ancestral MT underwent a subsequent expansion and loss of recombination after the divergence from G. pectorale. These data begin to polarize important changes that occurred in volvocine MT loci, and highlight the potential for discontinuous and dynamic evolution in SDRs.

  5. A complex evolutionary history in a remote archipelago: phylogeography and morphometrics of the Hawaiian endemic Ligia isopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Carlos A; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano; DeWitt, Thomas J; Hurtado, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the striking diversification and levels of endemism observed in many terrestrial groups within the Hawaiian Archipelago, marine invertebrates exhibit remarkably lower rates of endemism and diversification. Supralittoral invertebrates restricted to specific coastal patchy habitats, however, have the potential for high levels of allopatric diversification. This is the case of Ligia isopods endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago, which most likely arose from a rocky supralittoral ancestor that colonized the archipelago via rafting, and diversified into rocky supralittoral and inland lineages. A previous study on populations of this isopod from O'ahu and Kaua'i revealed high levels of allopatric differentiation, and suggested inter-island historical dispersal events have been rare. To gain a better understanding on the diversity and evolution of this group, we expanded prior phylogeographic work by incorporating populations from unsampled main Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i, and Hawai'i), increasing the number of gene markers (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes), and conducting Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Our study revealed new lineages and expanded the distribution range of several lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area are complex, with Hawai'i, O'ahu, and the Maui-Nui islands sharing major lineages, implying multiple inter-island historical dispersal events. In contrast, the oldest and most geographically distant of the major islands (Kaua'i) shares no lineages with the other islands. Our results did not support the monophyly of all the supralittoral lineages (currently grouped into L. hawaiensis), or the monophyly of the terrestrial lineages (currently grouped into L. perkinsi), implying more than one evolutionary transition between coastal and inland forms. Geometric-morphometric analyses of three supralittoral clades revealed significant body shape differences among them. A taxonomic

  6. Use of activated carbons to remove undesirable residual amylase from factory and refinery streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over residual (carry-over) activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in white, refined sugars from refineries to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were develope...

  7. Use of activated carbon to remove undesirable residual amylase from refinery streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over residual (carry-over)activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in white, refined sugars from refineries to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were developed ...

  8. The Effects of Refinery Effluent of the Chlorophyll a and Gross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Kaduna Refinery effluent discharge on the chlorophyll a and gross primary productivity of river Rido was studied for 12 months at 3 stations in the river. Station 1 is the clean water station not affected by the discharge; stations 2 & 3 are the polluted area. The values for chlorophyll a and gross primary productivity ...

  9. Risk assessment of Ilam gas refinery on the base of William fine method in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Jafari Nodosuahan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Industrial growth, development programs and infrastructure projects, in spite of all the advantages and benefits to humans, has been considered as the source of many hazards, risks and failures. Risk assessment is the organized and systematic method to identify hazards and risk estimation for decisions ranking, in order to reduce the risk to an acceptable extent. The aim of this study was the risk assessment of Ilam gas refinery with William fine procedure. Materials and methods: executive group consisting of managers of the gas refinery departments and agencies were formed in order to identify the risks. The risks of units using the form HSE-FO-001 (0 -90 were identified and the risk assessment of them was recorded. This technique is based on the calculation and assessment of risks that including the severity of the outcome, Occurrence probability and exposure. Results: 289 risks were found in this study which 5 risks (1.73% had level of urgency (urgent need for corrective actions, 40Risk (13.84% had abnormal levels (need of immediate attention and 244 Risk (84.43% had a normal risk level(should be deleted. Conclusion: According to information obtained from the risk assessment tables, the major risks that threaten employees of Ilam gas refinery including the risks associated with working at height, inhalation of gas containing H2S and exposure to excessive noise. Therefore, the engineering measures, in order to reduce the level of risk in the refinery units, must be conducted.

  10. PORTABLE IMAGING DEVICES FOR INDUSTRIAL LEAK DETECTION AT PETROLEUM REFINERIES AND CHEMICAL PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undiscovered gas leaks, or fugitive emissions, in chemical plants and refinery operations can impact regional air quality as well as being a public health problem. Surveying a facility for potential gas leaks can be a daunting task. Industrial Leak Detection and Repair (LDAR) pro...

  11. Pyrolysis oil upgrading for Co-processing in standard refinery units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Miguel Mercader, F.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis considers the route that comprises the upgrading of pyrolysis oil (produced from lingo-cellulosic biomass) and its further co-processing in standard refineries to produce transportation fuels. In the present concept, pyrolysis oil is produced where biomass is available and then

  12. Recent grassland losses are concentrated around U.S. ethanol refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher K.; Larson, Ben; Lark, Tyler J.; Gibbs, Holly K.

    2017-04-01

    Although the United States has pursued rapid development of corn ethanol as a matter of national biofuel policy, relatively little is known about this policy’s widespread impacts on agricultural land conversion surrounding ethanol refineries. This knowledge gap impedes policy makers’ ability to identify and mitigate potentially negative environmental impacts of ethanol production. We assessed changes to the landscape during initial implementation of the Renewable Fuel Standard v2 (RFS2) from 2008 to 2012 and found nearly 4.2 million acres of arable non-cropland converted to crops within 100 miles of refinery locations, including 3.6 million acres of converted grassland. Aggregated across all ethanol refineries, the rate of grassland conversion to cropland increased linearly with proximity to a refinery location. Despite this widespread conversion of the landscape, recent cropland expansion could have made only modest contributions to mandated increases in conventional biofuel capacity required by RFS2. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a shortcoming in the existing ‘aggregate compliance’ method for enforcing land protections in the RFS2 and suggest an alternative monitoring mechanism would be needed to appropriately capture the scale of observed land use changes.

  13. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.; Bijmans, M.F.M.; Abbas, B.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Muyzer, G.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na(+)= 0.8M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80-90% saturation) at

  14. Environmental and economic sustainability of integrated production in bio-refineries: The thistle case in Sardinia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazan, Devrim; Yazan, Devrim Murat; Mandras, Giovanni; Garau, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at evaluating the environmental and economic sustainability of bio-refineries that produce multiple products through their supply chains (SCs). A physical enterprise input-output (EIO) model is used to quantify the material/energy/waste flows and integrated to the monetary EIO model

  15. 76 FR 72675 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status, Valero Refining Company-California, (Oil Refinery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ..., (Oil Refinery), Benicia, CA Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18... special-purpose subzone at the oil refining facilities of Valero Refining Company--California, located in... listed below; Now, therefore, the Board hereby grants authority for subzone status for the oil refining...

  16. 75 FR 37730 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 63 RIN 2060-AO55 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From... as amendments to the national emission standards for petroleum refineries. In this notice, we are... (APA), 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B), provides that, when an agency, for good cause, finds that notice and public...

  17. 77 FR 63320 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... in Foreign Trade Sub-zones AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade... Trade Sub-zones. OMB Number: 1651-0063. Form Number: None. Abstract: The Foreign Trade Zones Act, 19 U.S...

  18. Prospective techno-economic and environmental assessment of carbon capture at a refinery and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Dacosta, C.; Van Der Spek, Mijndert; Hung, Christine Roxanne; Oregionni, Gabriel David; Skagestad, Ragnhild; Parihar, Prashant; Gokak, D. T.; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Ramirez Ramirez, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 utilisation is gaining interest as a potential element towards a sustainable economy. CO2 can be used as feedstock in the synthesis of fuels, chemicals and polymers. This study presents a prospective assessment of carbon capture from a hydrogen unit at a refinery, where

  19. An integrated biohydrogen refinery: Synergy of photofermentation, extractive fermentation and hydrothermal hydrolysis of food wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Redwood, Mark D.; Orozco, Rafael L.; Majewski, Artur J.; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2012-01-01

    An Integrated Biohydrogen Refinery (IBHR) and experimental net energy analysis are reported. The IBHR converts biomass to electricity using hydrothermal hydrolysis, extractive biohydrogen fermentation and photobiological hydrogen fermentation for electricity generation in a fuel cell. An extractive fermentation, developed previously, is applied to waste-derived substrates following hydrothermal pre treatment, achieving 83 99% biowaste destruction. The selective separation of organic acids fro...

  20. Risk analysis of the sea desalination plant at the 5th refinery of south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... due to water flow shortage. Based on the HAZOP study results expressed here, the start-up procedure was also modified and problems associated with design, several mechanical parts and pipe lines installed were identified and adjusted. Keywords: HAZOP; hazard identity; sea water desalination unit; risk; gas refinery.

  1. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or imported...: ER26FE07.012 Where: Bavg = Average benzene concentration for the applicable averaging period (volume...

  2. Production of advanced biofuels: co-processing of upgraded pyrolysis oil in standard refinery units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Miguel Mercader, F.; de Miguel Mercader, F.; Groeneveld, M.J.; Hogendoorn, Kees; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Way, N.W.J.; Schaverien, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the possible process options for the production of advanced biofuels is the co-processing of upgraded pyrolysis oil in standard refineries. The applicability of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) was studied as a pyrolysis oil upgrading step to allow FCC co-processing. Different HDO reaction end

  3. REMOTE SENSING DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL PLANTS AND REFINERIES FOLLOWING HURRICANES KATRINA AND RITA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The massive destruction brought by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita also impacted the many chemical plants and refineries in the region. The achievement of this rapid analysis capability highlights the advancement of this technology for air quality assessment and monitoring. Case st...

  4. Profitability diagnosis of refinery and improvement proposal; Seiyusho no shueki shindan to kaizen teian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, H.

    2000-07-01

    Based on consulting service RPS-J under joint operation of Nikki, UOP LLC of U.S.A. and Nikki Universal, approaching ways applied for profitability improvement and improvement proposal for refineries and analyzing techniques used for resolution of process bottlenecks were described. In RPS-J, themes of (1) energy saving, (2) quality upgrading, (3) improvement of disintegrating ratio, (4) reduction of give-away, (5) improvement of equipment operation ratio, (6) reduction of maintenance cost, (7) effective utilization of catalysts, are considered for profitability improvement fields. Procedures from idea excavation for profitability improvement to realization of profitability improvement are carried out in the order of, (1) Grasping of the present state, (2) Excavation of improving items and selection, (3) Quantitative evaluation of draft profitability improvement plan and focusing, (4) Profitability improvement by operation improvement, (5) Profitability improvement by minor improvement, (6) Profitability improvement in middle- and long-term vision, (7) Final focusing by feasibility study. Afterwards, examination to economically solve bottlenecks of critical facilities, examination on bottlenecks of distillation tower and refining tower and utility analysis are carried out. RPS-J was already applied to 4 refineries including Muroran Refinery and Negishi Refinery of Nisseki Mitsubishi, and profitability improvement themes were found to improve profitability of 50 to 150 cents per barrel. (NEDO)

  5. 40 CFR 80.94 - Requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... United States. (m) English language reports. Any report or other document submitted to EPA by any foreign... refineries in the aggregation. (d) Designation, product transfer documents, and foreign refiner certification... transportation mode for transport to the United States, the foreign refiner shall prepare a certification for...

  6. Carbon flow analysis and Carbon emission reduction of FCC in Chinese oil refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fengrui; Wei, Na; Ma, Danzhu; Liu, Guangxin; Wu, Ming; Yue, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    The major problem of the energy production in oil refineries is the high emission of CO2 in China. The fluid catalytic cracking unit (FCC) is the key source of carbon emission in the oil refineries. According to the statistical data, the carbon emission of FCC unit accounts for more than 31% for the typical oil refineries. The carbon flow of FCC in the typical Chinese oil refineries were evaluated and analysed, which aimed at the solution of CO2 emission reduction. The method of substances flow analysis (SFA) and the mathematical programming were used to evaluate the carbon metabolism and optimize the carbon emission. The results indicated that the combustion emission of the reaction-regeneration subsystem (RRS) was the major source of FCC. The quantity of CO2 emission of RSS was more than 90%. The combustion efficiency and the amount of residual oil affected the carbon emission of RRS most according to the optimized analysis of carbon emission reduction. Moreover, the fractionation subsystem (TFS) had the highest environmental efficiency and the absorption-stabilization subsystem (ASS) had the highest resource efficiency (approximately to 1) of carbon.

  7. Reconstructing reticulation history in a phylogenetic framework and the potential of allopatric speciation driven by polyploidy in an agamic complex in Crataegus (Rosaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Eugenia Y Y; Stefanović, Saša; Dickinson, Timothy A

    2010-12-01

    Polyploidy plays a prominent role in the speciation process in plants. Many species are known to be part of agamic complexes comprising sexual diploids and more or less exclusively asexual polyploids. However, polyploid formation has been studied in very few cases, primarily because of the challenges in examining these cases phylogenetically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of a variety of phylogenetic approaches to unravel origins and infer reticulation history in a diploid-polyploid complex of black-fruited Crataegus. The tree approaches are shown to be useful in testing alternative hypotheses and in revealing genealogies of nuclear genes, particularly in polyploid organisms that may contain multiple copies. Compared to trees, network approaches provide a better indication of reticulate relationships among recently diverged taxa. Taken together, our data point to both the autopolyploid and allopolyploid origins of triploids in natural populations of Crataegus suksdorfii, whereas tetraploids are formed via a triploid bridge, involving the backcross of allotriploid offspring with their diploid C. suksdorfii parent, followed by gene introgression from sympatric C. douglasii. Our findings provide empirical evidence for different pathways of polyploid formation that are all likely to occur within natural populations and the allopatric establishment of neopolyploids subsequent to their formation. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Oil refinery hazardous effluents minimization by membrane filtration: An on-site pilot plant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno; Crespo, João G; Santos, Maria António; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2016-10-01

    Experiments for treating two different types of hazardous oil refinery effluents were performed in order to avoid/minimize their adverse impacts on the environment. First, refinery wastewater was subjected to ultrafiltration using a ceramic membrane, treatment, which did not provide an adequate reduction of the polar oil and grease content below the maximal contaminant level allowed. Therefore the option of reducing the polar oil and grease contamination at its main emission source point in the refinery - the spent caustic originating from the refinery kerosene caustic washing unit - using an alkaline-resistant nanofiltration polymeric membrane treatment was tested. It was found that at a constant operating pressure and temperature, 99.9% of the oil and grease and 97.7% of the COD content were rejected at this emission point. Moreover, no noticeable membrane fouling or permeate flux decrease were registered until a spent caustic volume concentration factor of 3. These results allow for a reuse of the purified permeate in the refinery operations, instead of a fresh caustic solution, which besides the improved safety and environmentally related benefits, can result in significant savings of 1.5 M€ per year at the current prices for the biggest Portuguese oil refinery. The capital investment needed for nanofiltration treatment of the spent caustic is estimated to be less than 10% of that associated with the conventional wet air oxidation treatment of the spent caustic that is greater than 9 M€. The payback period was estimated to be 1.1 years. The operating costs for the two treatment options are similar, but the reuse of the nanofiltration spent caustic concentrate for refinery pH control applications can further reduce the operating expenditures. Overall, the pilot plant results obtained and the process economics evaluation data indicate a safer, environmentally friendly and highly competitive solution offered by the proposed nanofiltration treatment, thus

  9. Utilization of the BR-SIPP systems (Integrated Refinery Scheduling System) at the PETROBRAS Capuava refinery; Utilizacao do sistema BR-SIPP - Sistema Integrado de Programacao de Producao PETROBRAS na refinaria de Capuava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, Marcel [PETROBRAS, Maua, SP (Brazil). Refinaria de Capuava (RECAP). Gerencia de Otimizacao]. E-mail: joly@petrobras.com.br; Hassimotto, Marcelo Kenji [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Solucoes de Negocios de Logistica e Planejamento]. E-mail: kenji@petrobras.com.br; Magalhaes, Marcus Vinicius de Oliveira [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Otimizacao]. E-mail: vinicius@petrobras.com.br

    2007-04-15

    The BR-SIPP is a production scheduling decision support tool for refineries. It is integrated into the Corporate Inventory, Movements and Quality Data Base and is based on events simulation technology for the elaboration and analysis of scheduling scenarios. Its utilization at the Capuava Refinery allows the production programming team to analyze and anticipate difficulties and opportunities, thereby being able to make viable a potential integration of management and people directly involved with the refinery scheduling information, such as planning, logistics and commercial areas. (author)

  10. Oil Refineries, These data identify the locations of petroleum refineries. Knowledge of these locations is of interest to the Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office (LOSCO) because of their potential to produce an oil spill., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University (LSU).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Oil Refineries dataset current as of 2007. These data identify the locations of petroleum refineries. Knowledge of these locations is of interest to the Louisiana...

  11. Test plan, the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Tien, A.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Worsztynowicz, A.; Ulfig, K. [Inst. for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland)

    1997-05-10

    The overall objective of the bioremediation project is to provide a cost effective bioremediation demonstration of petroleum contaminated soil at the Czechowice Oil Refinery. Additional objectives include training of personnel, and transfer of this technology by example to Poland, and the Risk Abatement Center for Central and Eastern Europe (RACE). The goal of the remediation is to reduce the risk of PAH compounds in soil and provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. Initial project discussions with the Czechowice Oil Refinery resulted in helping the refinery find an immediate cost effective solution for the dense organic sludge in the lagoons. They found that when mixed with other waste materials, the sludge could be sold as a fuel source to local cement kilns. Thus the waste was incinerated and provided a revenue stream for the refinery to cleanup the lagoon. This allowed the bioremediation project to focus on remediation of contaminated soil that unusable as fuel, less recalcitrant and easier to handle and remediate. The assessment identified 19 compounds at the refinery that represented significant risk and would require remediation. These compounds consisted of metals, PAH`s, and BTEX. The contaminated soil to be remediated in the bioremediation demonstration contains only PAH (BTEX and metals are not significantly above background concentrations). The final biopile design consists of (1) dewatering and clearing lagoon A to clean clay, (2) adding a 20 cm layer of dolomite with pipes for drainage, leachate collection, air injection, and pH adjustment, (3) adding a 1.1 m layer of contaminated soil mixed with wood chips to improve permeability, and (4) completing the surface with 20 cm of top soil planted with grass.

  12. Becoming a refinery leader by changing operations to match new product quality regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, Maryro P. [KBC Advanced Technologies, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Global environmental concerns have forced the automotive and oil industries to increase efficiency and reduce emissions, which has led to the tightening of fuels specifications around the world. The implementation of ultra-low sulphur transport fuels has become a worldwide trend with growing momentum. Compliance with these standards requires the refiner to make decisions in advance of the implementation date. Therefore, in order to make changes on time, refiners are currently assessing options and changes required to comply with regulations by 2016. Similar regulations have been implemented in Europe already and KBC has the methodology and experience to assess the existing refinery configuration, unit capability and facility infrastructure to provide the basis for decision making. This paper focus on KBC's methodology which looks at the molecular management needed to produce the low levels of sulfur and toxic required in today's refined products. A key element to the study is the use of Petro-SIM for development of a representative detailed non-linear model, of the refinery which has been used to test ideas and configurations and help confirm the Refinery LP development activities. Using a Petro-SIM representation, KBC is able to make an assessment of the impact of imposing Tier 3 gasoline (sulphur to < 10 ppm) on the refinery, examining critical blending constraints, unused stream qualities and quantities and likely type and scale of capital investment that would be required while optimising unit operations and maximising margins. This paper illustrates KBC's current thinking based on studies done to date to review clean fuels and Tier 3 specifications options for specific refinery configurations. (author)

  13. Atmospheric BTEX concentrations in the vicinity of the crude oil refinery of the Baltic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Baltrėnaitė, Edita; Serevičienė, Vaida; Pereira, Paulo

    2011-11-01

    Among chemical industries, petroleum refineries have been identified as large emitters of a wide variety of pollutants. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) form an important group of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) because of their role in the troposphere chemistry and the risk posed to human health. A very large crude oil refinery of the Baltic States (200,000 bbl/day) is situated in the northern, rural part of Lithuania, 10 km from the town of Mažeikiai (Lithuania). The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine of atmospheric levels of BTEX in the region rural and urban parts at the vicinity of the crude oil refinery; and (2) to investigate the effect of meteorological parameters (wind speed, wind direction, temperature, pressure, humidity) on the concentrations measured. The averaged concentration of benzene varied from 2.12 ppbv in the rural areas to 2.75 ppbv in the urban areas where the traffic was determined to be a dominant source of BTEX emissions. Our study showed that concentration of benzene, as strictly regulated air pollutant by EU Directive 2008/50/EC, did not exceed the limit of 5 ppbv in the region in the vicinity of the crude oil refinery during the investigated period. No significant change in air quality in the vicinity of the oil refinery was discovered, however, an impact of the industry on the background air quality was detected. The T/B ratio (0.50-0.81) that was much lower than 2.0, identified other sources of pollution than traffic.

  14. Comparison of the response of bacterial luminescence and mitochondrial respiration to the effluent of an oil refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riisberg, M.; Bratlie, E.; Stenersen, J. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)

    1996-04-01

    The effects of oil refinery effluents on rat mitochondrial respiration and on the luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum were compared. Mitochondria from male Wistar rat livers were exposed to different concentrations of refinery effluents in a semiclosed 3-ml reaction vessel. Respiration was measured polarographically with an oxygen electrode. Effects on P. phosphoreum were measured by the standard test developed by Microbics. The mitochondrial method showed EC50s in the range from 1 to 7.5%, while Microtox gave EC50 in the range from 30 to 42%. The higher sensitivity of mitochondria may be exploited in the development of a sensitive biosensor for toxicity of oil refinery effluents.

  15. Of mice and the 'Age of Discovery': the complex history of colonization of the Azorean archipelago by the house mouse (Mus musculus) as revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, S I; Mathias, M L; Searle, J B

    2015-01-01

    Humans have introduced many species onto remote oceanic islands. The house mouse (Mus musculus) is a human commensal and has consequently been transported to oceanic islands around the globe as an accidental stowaway. The history of these introductions can tell us not only about the mice themselves but also about the people that transported them. Following a phylogeographic approach, we used mitochondrial D-loop sequence variation (within an 849- to 864-bp fragment) to study house mouse colonization of the Azores. A total of 239 sequences were obtained from all nine islands, and interpretation was helped by previously published Iberian sequences and 66 newly generated Spanish sequences. A Bayesian analysis revealed presence in the Azores of most of the D-loop clades previously described in the domesticus subspecies of the house mouse, suggesting a complex colonization history of the archipelago as a whole from multiple geographical origins, but much less heterogeneity (often single colonization?) within islands. The expected historical link with mainland Portugal was reflected in the pattern of D-loop variation of some of the islands but not all. A more unexpected association with a distant North European source area was also detected in three islands, possibly reflecting human contact with the Azores prior to the 15th century discovery by Portuguese mariners. Widening the scope to colonization of the Macaronesian islands as a whole, human linkages between the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, Portugal and Spain were revealed through the sharing of mouse sequences between these areas. From these and other data, we suggest mouse studies may help resolve historical uncertainties relating to the 'Age of Discovery'. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  16. Late Cretaceous Localized Crustal Thickening as a Primary Control on the 3-D Architecture and Exhumation Histories of Cordilleran Metamorphic Core Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, P. B.; Wong, M.

    2014-12-01

    The juxtaposition of mylonitic mid-crustal rocks and faulted supracrustal rocks in metamorphic core complexes (MMCs) is usually portrayed in 2 dimensions and attributed to a single event of large-scale slip ± isostatic doming along a low-angle "detachment fault"/ shear zone. This paradigm does not explain dramatic along strike (3-D) variations in slip magnitude, footwall architecture, and burial / exhumation histories of most MMCs. A fundamental question posed by MMCs is how did their earlier thickening and exhumation histories influence the geometric evolution and 3-D slip distribution on the subsequent detachment faults? New geologic mapping and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology from the Snake Range-Kern Mts-Deep Creek Mts (SKDC) complex in eastern Nevada offer important insights into this question. Crustal shortening and thickening by large-scale non-cylindrical recumbent folds and associated thrust faults during the late Cretaceous (90-80 Ma) resulted in deep burial (650°C, 20-25 km) of the central part of the footwall, but metamorphic grade decreases dramatically to the N and S in concert with decreasing amplitude on the shortening structures. Subsequent Paleogene extensional exhumation by normal faulting and ESE-directed mylonitic shearing is greatest in areas of maximum earlier thickening and brought highest grade rocks back to depths of~10-12 km. After ≥15 Ma of quiescence, rapid E-directed slip initiated along the brittle Miocene Snake Range detachment at 20 Ma and reactivated the Eocene shear zone. The ≥200°C gradient across the footwall at this time implies that the Miocene slip surface originated as a moderately E-dipping normal fault. This Miocene slip surface can be tracked for more than 100 km along strike, but the greatest amount of Miocene slip also coincides with parts of the footwall that were most deeply buried in the Cretaceous. These relations indicate that not only is the SKDC MMC a composite feature, but that the crustal welt created by

  17. Age and thermal history of the Geysers plutonic complex (felsite unit), Geysers geothermal field, California: A 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M.; Harrison, T.M.; Hulen, J.B.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yield 207Pb/206Pb vs. 238U/206Pb concordia ages ranging from 1.13 ?? 0.04 Ma to 1.25 ?? 0.04 (1??) Ma. The weighted mean of the U/Pb model ages is 1.18 ?? 0.03 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum plateau and 'terminal' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350??C by ~0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar 40Ar/39Ar age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350??to 300??C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350??C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Subsequent rapid cooling to below 260??C between 0.4 and 0.2 Ma is in agreement with previous proposals that vapor-dominated conditions were initiated within the hydrothermal system at this time. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the present elevated regional heat flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2 to 0.6 Ma.

  18. A Steam Utility Network Model for the Evaluation of Heat Integration Retrofits – A Case Study of an Oil Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Marton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a real industrial example in which the steam utility network of a refinery is modelled in order to evaluate potential Heat Integration retrofits proposed for the site. A refinery, typically, has flexibility to optimize the operating strategy for the steam system depending on the operation of the main processes. This paper presents a few examples of Heat Integration retrofit measures from a case study of a large oil refinery. In order to evaluate expected changes in fuel and electricity imports to the refinery after implementation of the proposed retrofits, a steam system model has been developed. The steam system model has been tested and validated with steady state data from three different operating scenarios and can be used to evaluate how changes to steam balances at different pressure levels would affect overall steam balances, generation of shaft power in turbines, and the consumption of fuel gas.

  19. Energy markets : refinery outages can have varying gasoline price impacts, but gaps in federal data limit understanding of impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    In 2008, GAO reported that, with : the exception of the period : following Hurricanes Katrina and : Rita, refinery outages in the United : States did not show discernible : trends in reduced production : capacity, frequency, and location : from 2002 ...

  20. Current status of vegetation of six PETROBRAS refineries; Status dos fragmentos de vegetacao em seis refinarias da PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basbaum, Marcos Andre; Bonafini, Fabio Loureiro; Porciano, Patricia Pereira [SEEBLA, Servicos de Engenharia Emilio Baumgart Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Torggler, Bianca Felippe; Fernandes, Renato [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Engenharia; Vieira, Elisa Diniz Reis [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Most of refineries from PETROBRAS have significant vegetation areas within their limits. The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary assessment study of the vegetation fragments on six refineries, including the quantification of permanent preservation areas (Brazilian environmental law requirement). Besides that, the authors propose potential recovery areas and some reforestation techniques. The methodology was based on Rapid Ecological Assessment, that consists on the selection of target areas by image analysis (satellite or aerial photos) and expedite fieldwork - three days on each refinery. The main features of vegetation, like phytophysiognomy and successional stage were obtained, and registered on a specific form developed to be used at fieldwork. The results achieved show that 44,7% of the areas from these six refineries were occupied by vegetation. The most representative categories of vegetation were Atlantic forest fragments and mangroves, as well as to permanent preservation areas. (author)

  1. Decreased language laterality in tuberous sclerosis complex: a relationship between language dominance and tuber location as well as history of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anne; Tanaka, Naoaki; Suzuki, Nao; Liu, Hesheng; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2012-09-01

    Nearly 90% of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) have epilepsy. Epilepsy surgery can be considered, which often requires a presurgical assessment of language lateralization. This is the first study to investigate language lateralization in TSC patients using magnetoencephalography. Fifteen patients performed a language task during magnetoencephalography recording. Cerebral generators of language-evoked fields (EF) were identified in each patient. Laterality indices (LI) were computed using magnetoencephalography data extracted from the inferior frontal as well as middle and superior temporal gyri from both hemispheres between 250 and 550 ms. Source analysis demonstrated a fusiform gyrus activation, followed by an activation located in the basal temporal language area and middle and superior temporal gyri responses, ending with an inferior frontal activation. Eleven patients (73.3%) had left-hemisphere language dominance, whereas four patients (26.7%) showed a bilateral language pattern, which was associated with a history of epilepsy and presence of tubers in language-related areas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Material resources, energy, and nutrient recovery from waste: are waste refineries the solution for the future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-01-01

    Waste refineries focusing on multiple outputs of material resources, energy carriers, and nutrients may potentially provide more sustainable utilization of waste resources than traditional waste technologies. This consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluated the environmental performance...... of a Danish waste refinery solution against state-of-the-art waste technology alternatives (incineration, mechanical-biological treatment (MBT), and landfilling). In total, 252 scenarios were evaluated, including effects from source-segregation, waste composition, and energy conversion pathway efficiencies...... 15-40% compared with incineration), albeit at the potential expense of additional toxic emissions to soil. Society's need for the outputs from waste, i.e., energy products (electricity vs transport fuels) and resources (e.g., phosphorus), and the available waste composition were found decisive...

  3. Toward zero waste to landfill: an effective method for recycling zeolite waste from refinery industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homchuen, K.; Anuwattana, R.; Limphitakphong, N.; Chavalparit, O.

    2017-07-01

    One-third of landfill waste of refinery plant in Thailand was spent chloride zeolite, which wastes a huge of land, cost and time for handling. Toward zero waste to landfill, this study was aimed at determining an effective method for recycling zeolite waste by comparing the chemical process with the electrochemical process. To investigate the optimum conditions of both processes, concentration of chemical solution and reaction time were carried out for the former, while the latter varied in term of current density, initial pH of water, and reaction time. The results stated that regenerating zeolite waste from refinery industry in Thailand should be done through the chemical process with alkaline solution because it provided the best chloride adsorption efficiency with cost the least. A successful recycling will be beneficial not only in reducing the amount of landfill waste but also in reducing material and disposal costs and consumption of natural resources as well.

  4. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  5. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-04-23

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  6. Air emissions from Wagerup alumina refinery and community symptoms: an environmental case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, A Michael; Cullen, Mark R

    2007-09-01

    Commissioning of a liquor burner at Wagerup alumina refinery gave rise to complaints of malodor and irritation among employees. Subsequently, community members complained about odor and various health issues. Some employees and community members were diagnosed by general practitioners as having multiple chemical sensitivity. After implementation of emission controls, the situation improved; however, community concerns lingered. This paper describes this experience and summarizes several recent investigations including air dispersion modeling, health risk assessment, ambient air quality monitoring, and complaints analyses. It is concluded that refinery emissions currently present negligible risks of acute or chronic health effects including cancer. Communication of these findings has been generally well received, but modifying the perception of risk among some elements of the community has been difficult. Organizations need to effectively address both technical and perception of risk issues.

  7. Achieving the Great Lakes Initiative mercury limits in oil refinery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem; Gillenwater, Patricia; Negri, M Cristina; Lin, YuPo; Snyder, Seth; Doctor, Richard; Pierce, Linda; Alvarado, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    To meet the stringent Great Lakes Initiative (GLI) wastewater discharge mercury (Hg) limit of 1.3 ppt (ng/L), mercury removal technologies need to be identified and investigated. The goals of this study were to (1) identify and assess available wastewater treatment technologies for mercury removal from an oil refinery wastewater; and (2) conduct bench-scale tests to provide comparable, transparent, and uniform results to assess their performance at low mercury concentrations. The study found that many tested technologies were able to achieve the GLI mercury target concentration at the bench-scale, albeit with different efficiencies and engineering implications. These results demonstrate that at this scale there is no fundamental physical or chemical barrier to achieving oil refinery wastewater, which might be applicable to other types of mercury-containing wastewater.

  8. Radiation doses and hazards from processing of crude oil at the Tema oil refinery in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darko, E O; Kpeglo, D O; Akaho, E H K; Schandorf, C; Adu, P A S; Faanu, A; Abankwah, E; Lawluvi, H; Awudu, A R

    2012-02-01

    Processing of crude oil has been carried out in Ghana for more than four decades without measures to assess the hazards associated with the naturally occurring radionuclides in the raw and processed materials. This study investigates the exposure of the public to (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in crude oil, petroleum products and wastes at the Tema oil refinery in Ghana using gamma-ray spectrometry. The study shows higher activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides in the wastes than the crude oil and the products with estimated hazard indices less than unity. The values obtained in the study are within recommended limits for public exposure indicating that radiation exposure from processing of the crude oil at the refinery does not pose any significant radiological hazard but may require monitoring to establish long-term effect on both public and workers.

  9. Treatment of oil refinery wastewater using crude Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehata, K.; Buchanan, I. D.; Smith, D. W. [University of Alberta, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-11-01

    Enzymatic treatment of oil refinery wastewater was investigated using crude peroxidase derived from the fungus Coprinus cinereus (CIP), and hydrogen peroxide. Further objectives were to investigate the effects of residual organic compounds in the crude enzyme, and compare the performance of CIP to those of purified horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) in the treatment of a strong refinery wastewater. Phenols in the wastewater were converted to coloured polymeric products and then removed by coagulation with alum. As a result of the enzymatic treatment and alum coagulation of the wastewater containing 6.4 mM total phenol, the chemical oxygen demand and the 5-d biochemical oxygen demand were reduced by 52 per cent and 58 per cent, respectively. Reduction of the oxygen demands notwithstanding, the dissolved organic materials in the crude CIP were not affected by either of these processes and tended to remain in the treated wastewater. 31 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  10. Life-cycle assessment of a waste refinery process for enzymatic treatment of municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Astrup, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    production and saving fossil resources. This is especially important with respect to residual waste (i.e. the remains after source-separation and separate collection) which in Denmark is typically incinerated. In this paper, a life-cycle assessment and energy balance of a pilot-scale waste refinery......Decrease of fossil fuel dependence and resource saving has become increasingly important in recent years. From this perspective, higher recycling rates for valuable materials (e.g. metals) as well as energy recovery from waste streams could play a significant role substituting for virgin material...... for the enzymatic treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) is presented. The refinery produced a liquid (liquefied organic materials and paper) and a solid fraction (non-degradable materials) from the initial waste. A number of scenarios for the energy utilization of the two outputs were assessed. Co...

  11. Genotoxic evaluation of an industrial effluent from an oil refinery using plant and animal bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Postalli Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are genotoxic chemicals commonly found in effluents from oil refineries. Bioassays using plants and cells cultures can be employed for assessing environmental safety and potential genotoxicity. In this study, the genotoxic potential of an oil refinery effluent was analyzed by means of micronucleus (MN testing of Alium cepa, which revealed no effect after 24 h of treatment. On the other hand, primary lesions in the DNA of rat (Rattus norvegicus hepatoma cells (HTC were observed through comet assaying after only 2 h of exposure. On considering the capacity to detect DNA damage of a different nature and of these cells to metabolize xenobiotics, we suggest the association of the two bioassays with these cell types, plant (Allium cepa and mammal (HTC cells, for more accurately assessing genotoxicity in environmental samples.

  12. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-11-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  13. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  14. Psidium guajava as a bioaccumulator of nickel around an oil refinery, southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade Perry, Carolina; Divan, Armando Molina; Raya Rodriguez, Maria Teresa; Lúcia Atz, Vera

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the potential of Psidium guajava as a biological accumulator of air pollutants, saplings were exposed at nine sites receiving atmospheric emissions from an oil refinery (five within, four outside the industrial area) and another reference site located at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 27 km from the refinery. Exposures lasted about 3 months each, coincided with the seasons, and totaled five exposures between 2005 and 2006. The following parameters were evaluated: dry weight of leaves, stems, and roots, leaf area, rate of relative height increase, Ni and S contents, maximum assimilation rate, and carboxylation efficiency invivo. P. guajava was found to be an efficient accumulator of Ni, since highly significant differences were observed (Pguajava is a good bioaccumulator for Ni. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Discoloration of Moso-chiku (Phyllostachys pubescens) leaves in an area adjacent to an aluminium refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, H.; Ishida, N.; Iwatsubo, G.; Kitao, K.; Kitayama, S.

    1976-09-01

    Injury to plants due to air pollution is found in the ares adjacent to such chemical factories as aluminium refineries due to the gaseous fluoride compounds generated. The authors observed the gradual discoloration of Moso-chiku (Phyllostachys pubescens) leaves from tip to base in accordance with the degree of injury in the area adjacent to an aluminium refinery in Ehime Pref. The fluoride contents of the leaves were also determined. It was found that the closer to the factory, the more remarkable the discoloration of the leaves. The discoloration of Moso-chiku leaves was correlated to the fluoride contents of the leaves. The areal distribution of discolored Moso-chiku leaves showed the range of fluoride air pollution affecting the growth of the plant. For this reason, Moso-chiku is useful as an indicator plant of air pollution by fluoride.

  16. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses

  17. Optimal Renewable Energy Integration into Refinery with CO2 Emissions Consideration: An Economic Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnifro, M.; Taqvi, S. T.; Ahmad, M. S.; Bensaida, K.; Elkamel, A.

    2017-08-01

    With increasing global energy demand and declining energy return on energy invested (EROEI) of crude oil, global energy consumption by the O&G industry has increased drastically over the past few years. In addition, this energy increase has led to an increase GHG emissions, resulting in adverse environmental effects. On the other hand, electricity generation through renewable resources have become relatively cost competitive to fossil based energy sources in a much ‘cleaner’ way. In this study, renewable energy is integrated optimally into a refinery considering costs and CO2 emissions. Using Aspen HYSYS, a refinery in the Middle East was simulated to estimate the energy demand by different processing units. An LP problem was formulated based on existing solar energy systems and wind potential in the region. The multi-objective function, minimizing cost as well as CO2 emissions, was solved using GAMS to determine optimal energy distribution from each energy source to units within the refinery. Additionally, an economic feasibility study was carried out to determine the viability of renewable energy technology project implementation to overcome energy requirement of the refinery. Electricity generation through all renewable energy sources considered (i.e. solar PV, solar CSP and wind) were found feasible based on their low levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). The payback period for a Solar CSP project, with an annual capacity of about 411 GWh and a lifetime of 30 years, was found to be 10 years. In contrast, the payback period for Solar PV and Wind were calculated to be 7 and 6 years, respectively. This opens up possibilities for integrating renewables into the refining sector as well as optimizing multiple energy carrier systems within the crude oil industry

  18. Exposure of Tanzanian gold mine refinery workers to hydrogen cyanide / K. Linde

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Karlien

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide gas (HCN{g)) is formed during the process of extracting gold from ore and may pose a risk to the health of the workers at the gold refinery (Mill/plant), especially the risk of detrimental effects on the central nervous system and the cardiovascular system. The measurement of the personal airborne HCN(g) exposure of a worker using sorbent tubes, provides the concentration of the chemical that the worker breaths in. The measurement of the urinary thiocyanat...

  19. The application of the Layer of Protection Analysis (LOPA) in Sour Water Refinery Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsanollah Habibi; Saeed Zare; Mehrzad Keshavarzi; Maryam Mousavi; Hossein Ali Yousefi

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The objective of this study was to analyze major accidents take place in sour water refineries, and to assess the adequacy of safeguard layers in the system. Also it has been provided safety recommendations in regarding to our analysis. Materials and Methods: Using the layer of protection analysis (LOPA), the role of protective layers in controlling the potential risks in Sour Water Recycling Unit is determined and required recommendations to reduce risk are provided. Results: T...

  20. Management of waste generation in the oil refining industry. The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lage Refinery experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, J.I.; Machado, J.B.; Linhares, C.A.; Mazarino, P.R. [PETROBRAS, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). REVAP. Refinaria Henrique Lage

    1993-12-31

    The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lages Refinery - located in Sao Paulo State (Southeast Brazil), has been developing for many years a systematic program for solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generation reduction. The waste minimization management program success has been built due to the structure behavioural modifications due to the new environment protection and quality politics; the training and equipment investments, and operational procedures changes. (author). 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, brachial artery distensibility and blood pressure among children residing near an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasande, Leonardo; Urbina, Elaine M; Khoder, Mamdouh; Alghamdi, Mansour; Shabaj, Ibrahim; Alam, Mohammed S; Harrison, Roy M; Shamy, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced by the burning and processing of fuel oils, and have been associated with oxidant stress, insulin resistance and hypertension in adults. Few studies have examined whether adolescents are susceptible to cardiovascular effects of PAHs. To study associations of PAH exposure with blood pressure (BP) and brachial artery distensibility (BAD), an early marker of arterial wall stiffness, in young boys attending three schools in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in varying proximity to an oil refinery. Air samples collected from the three schools were analyzed for PAHs. PAH metabolites (total hydroxyphenanthrenes and 1-hydroxypyrene) were measured in urine samples from 184 adolescent males, in whom anthropometrics, heart rate, pulse pressure, brachial artery distensibility and blood pressure were measured. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed to assess relationships of school location and urinary PAH metabolites with cardiovascular measures. Total suspended matter was significantly higher (444 ± 143 μg/m(3)) at the school near the refinery compared to a school located near a ring road (395 ± 65 μg/m(3)) and a school located away from vehicle traffic (232 ± 137 μg/m(3)), as were PAHs. Systolic (0.47 S D units, p = 0.006) and diastolic (0.53 SD units, p refinery, with a 4.36-fold increase in prehypertension (p = 0.001), controlling for confounders. No differences in pulse pressure, BAD and heart rate were noted in relationship to school location. Urinary total hydroxyphenanthrenes and 1-hydroxypyrene were not associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Proximity to an oil refinery in Saudi Arabia is associated with prehypertension and increases in PAH and particulate matter exposures. Further study including insulin resistance measurements, better control for confounding, and longitudinal measurement is indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE EXPOSURE IN RESIDENTS LIVING NEAR A FERROMANGANESE REFINERY IN SOUTHEAST OHIO: A PILOT STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes, Erin N.; Heckel, Pamela; Ryan, Patrick; Roda, Sandy; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Sebastian, Kelly; Succop, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element, yet is neurotoxic in excess. The majority of Mn research has been conducted on occupationally exposed adults with few studies focused on an environmentally exposed population. Marietta, Ohio is home to one of the largest airborne Mn emission sources in the United States, a ferromanganese refinery. In preparation for a community-based participatory research study, a preliminary pilot study was initiated to characterize the community’s exposure to Mn in a...

  3. Programming of a refinery from the perspective of the decision makers: trade-offs analysis for corporate and technical guidelines; A programacao de uma refinaria sob a otica do decisor: uma analise dos trade-offs diante das orientacoes tecnicas e corporativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, Thais; Caulliraux, Heitor Mansur; Proenca, Adriano [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Refineries usually gather a set of activities that shape how complex and dynamic it is. Adding to the complexity of the refining process, there is also a great freedom in the refinery operations, multiple arrangements possible to convert certain oil in derivatives. In this context, this article focuses on decision-making processes that lead refineries of an integrated oil company in their day to day. As decision-making, the text refers to a process that always brings a kind of conflict resolution, in which contradictory goals have to be negotiated and reconciled. The object of analysis is inserted in hierarchical decision-making processes, ie a process of disintegration, which begins with a comprehensive assessment, and then divides the decision in elements smaller and more defined, so that they are interdependent. The output at an aggregate level shall be the input in the next detailed level. In each level of the hierarchical, decision-making is the result of a problem, presented in a given context to a decision maker. Decision maker will be the responsible for the direction of the refinery production to which it is allocated. The programmer of each refinery is general guidelines that should be considered, albeit non-explicit or non-configurable, in some cases these take the form of technical criteria and in other situations derived from the business. From these, this article presents a critical and analytical in the face of dilemmas that emerge in front of decision makers search for converging a production schedule that meets both the criteria set. (author)

  4. Identifying ideology: media representations of the Irving Oil Refinery strike, 1994-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steuter, E.C.

    1998-07-01

    Media coverage of a strike at the Irving Oil Refinery in Saint John, New Brunswick which began in 1994 and lasted until 1996 is used as a background for the examination of ideology, used here in the more inclusive sense, one in which the term suggests a frame of mind without the coherence and easily recognized label usually associated with political ideology. Central issues such as monopoly ownership of the New Brunswick media by the Irving Group of Companies (also owners of the refinery) , the ideological presentation of strikes in general, and the representation of changing labour relations in a post-industrial, globally-oriented society are analyzed to show how these issues influenced media coverage. Four New Brunswick dailies as well as selected English-language dailies from other parts of Canada have been scrutinized in an effort to determine their ideological stand. It was found that restrictive ideologies such as liberalism or conservatism are on the decline; instead, more inclusive ideologies like defeatism and individualism were prominently featured especially by the St. John Telegraph-Journal in New Brunswick and other papers outside the province. The most striking finding was that if the media coverage of the Irving Refinery strike is representative of public opinion, the current organization of the provincial political economy is accepted as 'natural' by a majority of New Brunswickers.

  5. Catalytic ozonation for odour removal of high temperature alumina refinery condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinguang; Guan, Jing; Stuetz, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Odour emissions from aluminium processing can cause an impact on local communities surrounding such facilities. Of particular concern is fugitive odours emitted from the handling and use of refinery condensate streams, particularly the digestion condensate. This study evaluated the application of using catalytic ozonation to treat alumina refinery condensate in order to remove the potential emission of odourous compounds from the industrial wastewater. The technical challenges in treating the alumina refinery condensate are the high pH and temperatures of the wastewater effluent (over 80 °C and pH above 10) due the industrial process. The odour removal efficiencies for different catalysts (FeCl(3), MnO, and MnSO(4)) under experimental conditions in terms of controlled pH, temperature and ozone dosage were determined before and after ozone treatment using dynamic olfactometry. The result demonstrated that the addition of both FeCl(3) and MnO catalysts improved odour removal efficiencies during the ozonation of alumina condensates at similar pH and temperature conditions. FeCl(3) and MnO had similar enhancement for odour removal, however MnO was determined to be more appropriate than MnSO(4) for odour removal due to the colouration of the treated condensate.

  6. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lijiao; Siegert, Michael; Ivanov, Ivan; Pisciotta, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-05-01

    High-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) were used to perform treatability studies on many different refinery wastewater samples all having appreciably different characteristics, which resulted in large differences in current generation. A de-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1±0.2 A/m(2) (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal. These results were similar to those obtained using domestic wastewater. Two other de-oiled refinery wastewater samples also showed good performance, with a de-oiled oily sewer sample producing less current. A stabilization lagoon sample and a stripped sour wastewater sample failed to produce appreciable current. Electricity production, organics removal, and startup time were improved when the anode was first acclimated to domestic wastewater. These results show mini-MECs are an effective method for evaluating treatability of different wastewaters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. WATER PINCH TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION TO MINIMIZE SULPHUROUS WASTEWATER IN AN OIL REFINERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Orlando Lobelles Sardiñas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oil refining industries there is a high water consumption, which influences the high production costs and impacts the environment due to the discharge of their wastes. It is known that there are no technological conditions for the reuse of industrial water at the oil refineries, based on hydroskimming processes. The objective of this study is to implement the process integration methodology, Water Pinch, to a sour water stripper unit, as a unitary process of an oil refinery, to minimize the amount of sulphurous waste water and reduce contamination of the bay that receives these wastes. The technology is applied to evaluate the volume of sulphurous wastewater generated in the Cienfuegos oil refinery. This technology allows identifying opportunities for recovery and reuse of water, based on concentration ranges of contaminants. To achieve this purpose, a sour water stripper tower was assessed with the help of Water Pinch software, which provided an optimized distribution network, as a proposed technological improvement. This facilitated to recover and reuse 667 757, 28 m3 of water per year, and 1 035 023, 78 CUC were saved, at the same time the amount of polluting effluents decreased in approximately 2 % of non-reusable treated water.

  8. Plant biotests in the bioindication of the rainfall pollution in an oil refinery region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukowska-Wieszczek, D.; Zimny, H.

    1980-01-01

    Rainfall was collected during spring and summer at four points localized in the vicinity of the largest oil refinery in Europe. The rain water was analyzed chemically by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Sulfur was estimated by nephelometric methods, chlorine was measured argentometrically and pH, electrometrically. Beans, beetroot and cucumber were grown in the rainwater. Rainwater collected near the industrial and oil refinery regions had a pH value ranging from 2.4 to 4.4. Chemical analysis showed that the water was high in minerals and pollution by heavy metal ions as well as having increased acidity due to sulfates, nitrates and nitrites. The germination capacity of seeds treated with rain water from the refinery region was significantly decreased in comparison to those germinating on distilled water. Impairment of seed germination capacity was higher for seeds germinating on water from the summer than from the spring rainfalls. Seedling growth, while vigorous at first, soon showed signs of shortening and thickening of the hypocotyl and maceration of root-cap. Beetroot showed the most significant changes. 5 references, 4 tables.

  9. Optimization of operating conditions of distillation columns: an energy saving option in refinery industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Fazlali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While energy prices continue to climb, it conservation remains the prime concern for process industries. The daily growth of energy consumption throughout the world and the real necessity of providing it, shows that optimization of energy generation and consumption units is an economical and sometimes vital case. Hence, the optimization of a petroleum refinery is aimed towards great production and an increase in quality. In this research, the atmospheric distillation unit of the Iran-Arak-Shazand petroleum refinery was subject to optimization efforts. It was performed by the means of using a simulator with the aim to earn more overhead products. In the next step the optimization results from the simulators were carried out in the real world, at the above mentioned unit. Results demonstrate that the changes in the real operating conditions increase the overhead products with desirable quality. Finally, a net economical balance between the increments of the overhead products and the energy consumption shows an energy saving in this refinery.

  10. Incidence of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in UK Petroleum Distribution and Oil Refinery Workers, 1995–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Sorahan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS experienced by cohorts of 16,467 petroleum distribution workers and 28,554 oil refinery workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those male employees first employed at one of 476 UK petroleum distribution centres or eight UK oil refineries in the period 1946–1974; all subjects had a minimum of twelve months employment with some employment after 1st January, 1951. Observed numbers (Obs of MDS cases were compared with expectations based on national incidence rates for the period 1995–2011. The overall standardised registration ratio (SRR was 73 (Obs = 17 in petroleum distribution workers for the age-range 15–84 years, and 77 (Obs = 21 for the age-range 15–99 years. The overall SRR was 81 (Obs = 29 in oil refinery workers for the age-range 15–84 years, and 83 (Obs = 36 for the age-range 15–99 years. More detailed analyses were carried out in terms of year of registration, period from hire, decade of hire, and duration of employment. The overall SRR findings did not provide clear evidence for the presence of an occupational cancer hazard, and provide no support for the hypothesis that low-level benzene exposure has an important effect on the risks of MDS.

  11. Oil refinery wastewater treatment using physicochemical, Fenton and Photo-Fenton oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony, Maha A; Purcell, Patrick J; Zhao, Yaqian

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to the treatment of wastewaters contaminated with hydrocarbon oil. Three different oil-contaminated wastewaters were examined and compared: (i) a 'real' hydrocarbon wastewater collected from an oil refinery (Conoco-Phillips Whitegate refinery, County Cork, Ireland); (ii) a 'real' hydrocarbon wastewater collected from a car-wash facility located at a petroleum filling station; and (iii) a 'synthetic' hydrocarbon wastewater generated by emulsifying diesel oil and water. The AOPs investigated were Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2) (Fenton's reagent), Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)/UV (Photo-Fenton's reagent) which may be used as an alternative to, or in conjunction with, conventional treatment techniques. Laboratory-scale batch and continuous-flow experiments were undertaken. The photo-Fenton parametric concentrations to maximize COD removal were optimized: pH = 3, H(2)O(2) = 400 mg/L, and Fe(2+) = 40 mg/L. In the case of the oil-refinery wastewater, photo-Fenton treatment achieved approximately 50% COD removal and, when preceded by physicochemical treatment, the percentage removal increased to approximately 75%.

  12. Incidence of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in UK Petroleum Distribution and Oil Refinery Workers, 1995–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorahan, Tom; Mohammed, Nuredin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) experienced by cohorts of 16,467 petroleum distribution workers and 28,554 oil refinery workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those male employees first employed at one of 476 UK petroleum distribution centres or eight UK oil refineries in the period 1946–1974; all subjects had a minimum of twelve months employment with some employment after 1st January, 1951. Observed numbers (Obs) of MDS cases were compared with expectations based on national incidence rates for the period 1995–2011. The overall standardised registration ratio (SRR) was 73 (Obs = 17) in petroleum distribution workers for the age-range 15–84 years, and 77 (Obs = 21) for the age-range 15–99 years. The overall SRR was 81 (Obs = 29) in oil refinery workers for the age-range 15–84 years, and 83 (Obs = 36) for the age-range 15–99 years. More detailed analyses were carried out in terms of year of registration, period from hire, decade of hire, and duration of employment. The overall SRR findings did not provide clear evidence for the presence of an occupational cancer hazard, and provide no support for the hypothesis that low-level benzene exposure has an important effect on the risks of MDS. PMID:27164123

  13. Ultrasonic oil recovery and salt removal from refinery tank bottom sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Thring, Ronald W; Arocena, Joselito

    2014-01-01

    The oil recovery and salt removal effects of ultrasonic irradiation on oil refinery tank bottom sludge were investigated, together with those of direct heating. Ultrasonic power, treatment duration, sludge-to-water ratio, and initial sludge-water slurry temperature were examined for their impacts on sludge treatment. It was found that the increased initial slurry temperature could enhance the ultrasonic irradiation performance, especially at lower ultrasonic power level (i.e., 21 W), but the application of higher-power ultrasound could rapidly increase the bulk temperature of slurry. Ultrasonic irradiation had a better oil recovery and salt removal performance than direct heating treatment. More than 60% of PHCs in the sludge was recovered at an ultrasonic power of 75 W, a treatment duration of 6 min, an initial slurry temperature of 25°C, and a sludge-to-water ratio of 1:4, while salt content in the recovered oil was reduced to refinery feedstock oil. In general, ultrasonic irradiation could be an effective method in terms of oil recovery and salt removal from refinery oily sludge, but the separated wastewater still contains relatively high concentrations of PHCs and salt which requires proper treatment.

  14. Understanding the chronic impacts of oil refinery wastewater requires consideration of sediment contributions to toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughery, Jennifer R; Arciszewski, Tim J; Kidd, Karen A; Mercer, Angella; Hewitt, L Mark; Maclatchy, Deborah L; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies at an oil refinery in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, found a diminished fish community downstream of the effluent outfall that appeared to be associated with periodic low dissolved oxygen concentrations due to episodic discharges of contaminated transport vessel ballast water. This study was initiated after the ballast water was removed from the effluent to further investigate the potential causes of residual effects in the study stream, Little River. We used field caging of fish, laboratory bioassays, and chemical analysis of effluents and sediments from the field site to determine if the effluent or contaminated sediments were affecting the recovery of the fish community in Little River. The field studies suggested that exposed, caged fish were affected, displaying >40 % increases in liver sizes and increased liver detoxification enzyme activity (cytochrome P450 1A, CYP1A); however, similar responses were absent in laboratory exposures that used effluent only. Adding sediments collected from the vicinity of the refinery's outfall to the laboratory bioassays reproduced some of the field responses. Chemical analyses showed high concentrations of PAHs in sediments but low concentrations in the effluent, suggesting that the PAHs in the sediment were contributing more to the impacts than the effluent. Application of effects-based monitoring is suggested as beneficial to identify impacts to fisheries where refinery effluents of this type are involved.

  15. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-09-22

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm² in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm² in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10⁻²% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  16. Incidence of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in UK Petroleum Distribution and Oil Refinery Workers, 1995-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorahan, Tom; Mohammed, Nuredin

    2016-05-06

    The incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) experienced by cohorts of 16,467 petroleum distribution workers and 28,554 oil refinery workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those male employees first employed at one of 476 UK petroleum distribution centres or eight UK oil refineries in the period 1946-1974; all subjects had a minimum of twelve months employment with some employment after 1st January, 1951. Observed numbers (Obs) of MDS cases were compared with expectations based on national incidence rates for the period 1995-2011. The overall standardised registration ratio (SRR) was 73 (Obs = 17) in petroleum distribution workers for the age-range 15-84 years, and 77 (Obs = 21) for the age-range 15-99 years. The overall SRR was 81 (Obs = 29) in oil refinery workers for the age-range 15-84 years, and 83 (Obs = 36) for the age-range 15-99 years. More detailed analyses were carried out in terms of year of registration, period from hire, decade of hire, and duration of employment. The overall SRR findings did not provide clear evidence for the presence of an occupational cancer hazard, and provide no support for the hypothesis that low-level benzene exposure has an important effect on the risks of MDS.

  17. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dip Majumder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059, a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm chemical oxygen demand (COD could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  18. Bioremediation of refinery wastewater using immobilised Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp and their transconjugants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi T. Ajao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When oil spill occurs, it poses serious toxic hazards to all forms of life. Mixed culture of Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp isolated from refinery sludge using selective enrichment technique was used for bioremediation of refinery wastewater in a laboratoryscale bioreactor. Physicochemical parameters of both raw and treated water were as determined and compared with Federal Environ - mental Protection Agency (FEPA-limit, Abuja, Nigeria to asses the efficiency of the bioremediation process. Each of the bacterium was screened for the presence of plasmid DNA and for the involvement or otherwise of plasmid in the bioremediation of wastewater. The immobilised cells showed percentage decrease in chemical oxygen demand (97%, biochemical oxygen demand (94%, phenol (98%, total petroleum hydrocarbon (79%, oil and grease (90% of the refinery waste water after 20 days of treatment while their transconjugants showed the multiplicative effect by achieving the same percentage after 10 days of treatment. Therefore, the findings revealed that bioaugmentation of wastewater using transmissible catabolic plasmid will enhance efficiency of the bioremediation by spreading the plasmid among indigenous microbial community either through horizontal gene transfer or transformation.

  19. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  20. Exergy and exergoeconomic analysis of a petroleum refinery utilities plant using the condensing to power method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes da Silva, Julio Augusto; Pellegrini, Luiz Felipe; Oliveira Junior, Silvio [Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mails: jams@usp.br, luiz.pellegrini@usp.br, soj@usp.br; Plaza, Claudio; Rucker, Claudio [Petrobras - Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mails: claudioplaza@petrobras.com.br, rucker@petrobras.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a brief description of the main processes present in a modern high capacity refinery is done. The methodology used to evaluate, through exergy analysis, the performance of the refinery's utilities plant since it is responsible for a very considerable amount of the total exergy destruction in a refinery is presented. The utilities plant products: steam, electricity, shaft power and high pressure water had their exergy unit cost determined using exergoeconomic approach. A simple and effective method called condensing to power was used to define the product of the condensers in exergy basis. Using this method it is possible to define the product of the condenser without the use of negentropy concept nor the aggregation of condensers to the steam turbines. By using this new approach, the costs obtained for the plant's products are exactly the same costs obtained when the condenser is aggregated to the steam turbine but with the advantage that the information about the stream between condenser and the steam turbine is not lost and the condenser can be evaluated singly. The analysis shows that the equipment where attention and resources should be focused are the boilers followed by the gas turbine, that together, are responsible for 80% of total exergy destruction in the utilities plant. The total exergy efficiency found for the utilities plant studied is 35% while more than 280 MW of exergy is destroyed in the utilities processes. (author)

  1. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation. PMID:25247576

  2. Industrial application of gasoline aromatization and desulfurization technology in Hohhot refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zixia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gasoline aromatization and desulfurization (GARDES technology is extensively used in refineries of Petrochina, aiming to produce high quality ultraclean fluid catalytic cracking (FCC gasoline. This article introduces the industrial application results on the hydrodesulfurization unit of the Hohhot refinery, which plays an important role in guiding next round gasoline upgrading. The characteristics and the principle of GARDES technology were elaborated by analyzing the distribution of sulfur and hydrocarbon compounds in the feed and product. The analysis results proved that the presence of broad ranged sulfur types in the feed can be removed at different stages. Olefin can be decreased by saturation and conversion into i-paraffins and aromatics. The sulfur content of the blend product can be limited under 10 mg/kg, showing GARDES technology has excellent sulfur removal ability. The olefin reduction can also satisfy the ever-increasing severe requirement about the olefin limitation, while the loss of research octane number (RON can be minimized to an acceptable level. Furthermore, according to the demand of gasoline upgrading, GARDES technology has great flexibility by adjusting operation condition without any further investment, which brings more economic benefits for refinery.

  3. Oil refinery wastewater treatment in the Niger Delta, Nigeria: current practices, challenges, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, Oluwatomiwa A; Yu, Tianyu; Lin, Sijie

    2017-10-01

    The extensive oil exploration has led to a series of environmental issues in the Niger Delta, Nigeria, over the years. Aside from oil spill, insufficient wastewater treatment of oil refineries and the discharged effluents become another potential source of pollution that has not received enough attention from the government and the public. Through reviewing the current oil refinery wastewater treatment processes and the discharge standards of wastewater effluents in Nigeria, we aimed to raise the awareness of the shortcomings of the current wastewater treatment technology and to discuss the consequences of insufficient treatment to the environment. This article further discussed the use of nanotechnology as a potential upgrade to the conventional treatment technologies as it has shown its capacity of removing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) or converting hazardous components to environmentally friendly derivatives. It should also prove beneficial to the key stakeholders involved in the exploration of crude oil in the region to consider optimization of oil refinery wastewater treatment processes through integration of emerging technologies.

  4. New isotopic age data constrain the depositional age and accretionary history of the Neoproterozoic-Ordovician Mona Complex (Anglesey-Lleyn, Wales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Hisashi; Fujisaki, Wataru; Sato, Tomohiko; Sakata, Shuhei; Sawaki, Yusuke; Aoki, Kazumasa; Okada, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Shigenori; Hirata, Takafumi; Itaya, Tetsumaru; Windley, Brian F.

    2017-06-01

    The Mona Complex in Anglesey-Lleyn, Wales formed by Avalonian subduction and accretion from the latest Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic. It comprises an ophiolite, high-pressure metamorphic rocks, volcaniclastic sediments and mélanges. However, understanding of the tectonic evolution has been held back by the paucity of age constraints, thus only a major geochronological study will be sufficient to decipher the subduction, accretion and exhumation history of this significant Avalonian orogen. We conducted U-Pb dating of detrital zircons in the Monian Supergroup in order to constrain the maximum depositional ages, and undertook K-Ar dating of phengites and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons in the Blueschist unit, the Central Shear Zone (CSZ), and the New Harbour Group to estimate the timing and duration of the metamorphic events, and to constrain the minimum depositional ages of the Gwna Group. Our geochronological data give minimum (K-Ar) depositional ages of 578-530 Ma on phengites and maximum (U-Pb zircon) depositional ages of 878-550 Ma, which indicates that the sediments in the structurally uppermost Gwna Group were deposited earlier than those in the middle New Harbour Group (maximum depositional ages of 548-515 Ma, this study) and earlier than in the lowermost South Stack Group (maximum depositional ages of 569-522 Ma, this study). Phengite-rich schists in the Blueschist unit and the CSZ show indistinct K-Ar ages ranging from ca. 578 to 530 Ma. However, the K-Ar age of the New Harbour Group is ca. 474 Ma, which we interpret to reflect a later metamorphic event. In a larger perspective, our new ages are broadly contemporaneous with the calc-alkaline continental arc magmatism in NW Wales and Central England that formed by successive eastward subduction from ca.711 to 474 Ma.

  5. The Complexity of H-wave Amplitude Fluctuations and Their Bilateral Cross-Covariance Are Modified According to the Previous Fitness History of Young Subjects under Track Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Ceballos-Villegas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Hoffmann reflex (H-wave is produced by alpha-motoneuron activation in the spinal cord. A feature of this electromyography response is that it exhibits fluctuations in amplitude even during repetitive stimulation with the same intensity of current. We herein explore the hypothesis that physical training induces plastic changes in the motor system. Such changes are evaluated with the fractal dimension (FD analysis of the H-wave amplitude-fluctuations (H-wave FD and the cross-covariance (CCV between the bilateral H-wave amplitudes. The aim of this study was to compare the H-wave FD as well as the CCV before and after track training in sedentary individuals and athletes. The training modality in all subjects consisted of running three times per week (for 13 weeks in a concrete road of 5 km. Given the different physical condition of sedentary vs. athletes, the running time between sedentary and athletes was different. After training, the FD was significantly increased in sedentary individuals but significantly reduced in athletes, although there were no changes in spinal excitability in either group of subjects. Moreover, the CCV between bilateral H-waves exhibited a significant increase in athletes but not in sedentary individuals. These differential changes in the FD and CCV indicate that the plastic changes in the complexity of the H-wave amplitude fluctuations as well as the synaptic inputs to the Ia-motoneuron systems of both legs were correlated to the previous fitness history of the subjects. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that the FD and CCV can be employed as indexes to study plastic changes in the human motor system.

  6. Whole-genome sequence analyses of Western Central African Pygmy hunter-gatherers reveal a complex demographic history and identify candidate genes under positive natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, PingHsun; Veeramah, Krishna R; Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Wall, Jeffrey D; Hammer, Michael F; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2016-03-01

    African Pygmies practicing a mobile hunter-gatherer lifestyle are phenotypically and genetically diverged from other anatomically modern humans, and they likely experienced strong selective pressures due to their unique lifestyle in the Central African rainforest. To identify genomic targets of adaptation, we sequenced the genomes of four Biaka Pygmies from the Central African Republic and jointly analyzed these data with the genome sequences of three Baka Pygmies from Cameroon and nine Yoruba famers. To account for the complex demographic history of these populations that includes both isolation and gene flow, we fit models using the joint allele frequency spectrum and validated them using independent approaches. Our two best-fit models both suggest ancient divergence between the ancestors of the farmers and Pygmies, 90,000 or 150,000 yr ago. We also find that bidirectional asymmetric gene flow is statistically better supported than a single pulse of unidirectional gene flow from farmers to Pygmies, as previously suggested. We then applied complementary statistics to scan the genome for evidence of selective sweeps and polygenic selection. We found that conventional statistical outlier approaches were biased toward identifying candidates in regions of high mutation or low recombination rate. To avoid this bias, we assigned P-values for candidates using whole-genome simulations incorporating demography and variation in both recombination and mutation rates. We found that genes and gene sets involved in muscle development, bone synthesis, immunity, reproduction, cell signaling and development, and energy metabolism are likely to be targets of positive natural selection in Western African Pygmies or their recent ancestors. © 2016 Hsieh et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Smart microgrids in refineries, Mexico case; Microrredes inteligentes en refinerias, caso Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Garcia, Javier Alejandro; Linan Garcia, Roberto; Picasso Blanquel, Cuitlahuac; Silva Farias, Jose Luis [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we present the technological trends on smart microgrids for refineries, case Mexico. Distributed generation on refineries is a model of microgrid with great challenges to solve, considering renewable energy. Also it discusses the scenario in bidirectional connection from refineries to the utility supergrid Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE by its acronym in Spanish) and how to reach the development of a smart microgrid. We look different scenarios in power systems refineries, and the feasibility to achieve and develop the technology concepts in smart grid, such as: demand response in real time, exchange of energy between microgrid with supergrid-CFE and viceversa, energy efficiency, microgrid automation, selfhealing/real time autorecovery fault in power systems, storage energy and its application on power systems blackout in refineries. Finally we discussed the concepts that represent the greatest challenges to be solved on the smart microgrids and consider obtaining alternatives solution in medium or long term. [Spanish] En este documento se presentan las tendencias tecnologicas en micro redes inteligentes para refinerias, en el caso de Mexico. La generacion distribuida en refinerias es un modelo de micro red con grandes desafios por resolver, considerando la energia renovable. Se analiza tambien el escenario en conexion bidireccional de refinerias a la super red de la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), la empresa electrica mexicana, y como lograr el desarrollo de una micro red inteligente. Se consideran diferentes escenarios en refinerias de sistemas de potencia, y la factibilidad de alcanzar y desarrollar los conceptos de tecnologia en una red inteligente, tales como: respuesta de demanda en tiempo real, intercambio de energia entre la micro red con la super red de la CFE y viceversa, eficiencia de energia, automatizacion de micro redes, autorrecuperacion de fallas en autoarreglo/tiempo real. En sistemas de potencia, almacenamiento de

  8. Changes in hydrocarbon groups, soil ecotoxicity and microbiology along horizontal and vertical contamination gradients in an old landfarming field for oil refinery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Anu; Hakala, Kati P; Lappi, Kaisa; Kondo, Elina; Vaalama, Anu; Suominen, Leena

    2012-03-01

    Horizontal and vertical contaminant gradients in an old landfarming field for oil refinery waste were characterised with the aim to assess parallel changes in hydrocarbon groups and general, microbiological and ecotoxicological soil characteristics. In the surface soil polar compounds were the most prevalent fraction of heptane-extractable hydrocarbons, superseding GC-FID-resolvable and high-molar-mass aliphatics and aromatics, but there was no indication of their relatively higher mobility or toxicity. The size of the polar fraction correlated poorly with soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties, which were better explained by the total heptane-extractable and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Deleterious effects on soil microbiology in situ were observed at surprisingly low TPH concentrations (0.3%). Due to the accumulation of polar and complexed degradation products, TPH seems an insufficient measure to assess the quality and monitor the remediation of soil with weathered hydrocarbon contamination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Neuro-Ophthalmological History Taking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Helmut

    2017-11-01

    Neuro-ophthalmological history may be very complex and difficult. This article provides 14 hints about how to construct history taking efficiently and how to avoid collecting unnecessary information. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Linking sources to early effects by profiling urine metabolome of residents living near oil refineries and coal-fired power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Hsin Sally; Yuan, Tzu-Hsuen; Shie, Ruei-Hao; Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2017-05-01

    This study aims at identifying metabolic changes linking external exposure to industrial air toxics with oxidative stress biomarkers. We classified 252 study subjects as 111 high vs. 141 low exposure subjects by the distance from their homes to the two main emission sources, oil refineries and coal-fired power plants. We estimated individual's external exposure to heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by dispersion and kriging models, respectively. We measured urinary levels of heavy metals and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) as biomarkers of internal exposure, and 8-OHdG, HNE-MA, 8-isoPGF 2α , and 8-NO 2 Gua as biomarkers of early health effects. We used two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify urine metabolomics. We applied "meet-in-the-middle" approach to identify potential metabolites as putative intermediate biomarkers linking multiple air toxics exposures to oxidative stress with plausible exposures-related pathways. High exposure subjects showed elevated ambient concentrations of vanadium and PAHs, increased urine concentrations of 1-OHP, vanadium, nickel, copper, arsenic, strontium, cadmium, mercury, and thallium, and higher urine concentrations of all four urine oxidative stress biomarkers compared to low exposure subjects. We identified a profile of putative intermediate biomarkers that were associated with both exposures and oxidative stress biomarkers in participants. Urine metabolomics identified age-dependent biological pathways, including tryptophan metabolism and phenylalanine metabolism in children subjects (aged 9-11), and glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism in elderly subjects (aged>55), that could associate multiple exposures with oxidative stress. By profiling urine biomarkers and metabolomics in children and elderly residents living near a petrochemical complex, we can link their internal exposure to oxidative stress biomarkers through biological pathways associated with common complex

  11. MISA (Municipal/Industrial Strategy for Abatement) monitoring results for Ontario petroleum refineries (for the period December 1, 1988 to November 30, 1989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, D.T.; Loo-Sy, E.

    1990-09-01

    The flow, chemical concentration and toxicity results obtained by the 7 Ontario petroleum refineries under the Municipal Industry Strategy for Abatement (MISA) monitoring regulations are summarized and analyzed. During the monitoring period, all 7 Ontario refineries provided secondary treatment of process wastewater and were capable of achieving U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) best possible technology (BPT) performance requirements for end-of-pipe treatment of phenolics, oil and grease, sulphides and chromium. Five refineries had annual average total suspended solids (TSS) concentration higher than the performance requirements, while 4 of the 5 had TSS concentrations above Ministry of Environment (MOE) objectives for industrial waste discharges. One refinery had annual phenolic and zinc concentrations which were above MOE objectives. Four refineries use once-through cooling water, and the volume discharged accounted for 88% of the total volume discharged by all streams in the petroleum refinery sector. Process effluents accounted for 12% of the volume, while landfarm leachates and emergency overflows contributed an insignificant volume. Although storm flow volumes were less than 1% of the total, the volume discharged during a storm event could significantly contribute to total daily discharges from a refinery. Seventy-eight compounds were detected in the refinery process effluents during MISA monitoring. Forty-two were judged likely present and 36 possibly present in the process effluents at 1 or more refineries. Except for 1 refinery, process effluents were not lethal to rainbow trout, and not lethal to Daphnia magna at 5 of the 7 refineries. Cooling water was not lethal to either at all plants. 9 refs., 3 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. CARBON ACCOUNTING INITIATIVES: CASE STUDY OF A PETROLEUM REFINERY IN MALAYSIA TO PREPARE FOR FUTURE CARBON MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMANDA H.L. CHEE

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum refining process produces a large amount of atmospheric pollutants including greenhouse gases which are attributed to global warming. The international community inevitably addressed the global warming issue by introducing a market-based mechanism known as Emission Trading Systems (ETS under the Kyoto Protocol which imposes binding limits to developed nations using three flexibility mechanisms, including the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM. This case study was carried out in a petroleum refinery in Malaysia to explore the possibility for the refinery to participate in CDM. Information was collected through observatory field survey at the refinery and documentation review. Results show that the current monitoring tool using indirect calculation of fuel consumption provides a comprehensive coverage of emission sources but the reporting frequency should be increased for data accuracy. An accounting system was then created to predict the emissions gap of the refinery with reference to the baseline-year set by the Kyoto Protocol. It was concluded that the refinery showed promising potential to participate in CDM to benefit from technology transfer by selling their ‘credits’ to Annex I countries despite the uncertainty on the impact of the carbon market in a Non-Annex I country.

  13. Nature's refineries — Metals and metalloids in arc volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, R.W.; Berger, Byron R.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical data for fumaroles and for atmospheric gas and ash plumes from active arc volcanoes provide glimpses of the rates of release of metal and metalloids, such as Tl and Cd, from shallow and mid-crust magmas. Data from copper deposits formed in ancient volcanoes at depths of up to about 1500 m in the fractures below paleo-fumaroles, and at around 2000–4000 m in association with sub-volcanic intrusions (porphyry copper deposits) provide evidence of sub-surface deposition of Cu–Au–Ag–Mo and a range of other minor elements including Te, Se, As and Sb. These deposits, or ‘sinks’, of metals consistently record sustained histories of magmatic gas streaming through volcanic systems interspersed by continuing intrusive and eruptive activity. Here we integrate data from ancient and modern volcanic systems and show that the fluxes of metals and metalloids are controlled by a) the maintenance of fracture permeability in the stressed crust below volcanoes and b) the chemical processes that are triggered as magmatic gas, initially undersaturated with metals and metalloids, expands from lithostatic to very low pressure conditions through fracture arrays. The recognition of gas streaming may also account for the phenomenon of ‘excess degassing’, and defines an integral, but generally understated, component of active volcanic systems – a volcanic gas core – that is likely to be integral to the progression of eruptions to Plinean state.Destabilization of solvated molecular metal and metalloid species in magmatic gas mixtures and changes in their redox state are triggered, as it expands to the surface by abrupt pressure drops, or throttles' in the fracture array that guides expansion to the surface. The electronically harder, low electronegativity metals, such as copper and iron, deposit rapidly in response to expansion followed more slowly by arsenic with antimony as sulfosalts. Heavy, large radius, softer elements such as bismuth, lead, and thallium

  14. Alteração de enzimas hepáticas em trabalhadores de refinaria de petróleo Liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martins Carvalho

    2006-02-01

    the 150 cases of individuals with simultaneous gamma-glutamyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase abnormalities of at least 10% above reference levels. As controls, 150 workers without any liver enzyme or bilirubin abnormalities since starting to work there were selected. Odds ratios and the respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated from logistic regression models. RESULTS: In all the production sectors, the risk of liver enzyme abnormalities was significantly higher than in the administrative sector (OR=5.7; 95% CI: 1.7-18.4, even when the effects of alcohol, obesity and medical history of hepatitis were controlled for. During the period from 1992 to 1994, 88 out of the 89 cases occurred among workers from the various production sectors. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational exposure plays an important role in causing liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers. This is in addition to the specifically biological and/or behavioral risk factors such as obesity and alcohol consumption.

  15. The guava tree as bioindicator during the process of fuel replacement of an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Simone F; Meirelles, Sérgio T; Moraes, Regina M

    2013-05-01

    This study was performed to verify whether the exchange of the fuel used in the boilers of a crude oil refinery located in Cubatão (SE Brazil) would result in alterations on gas exchange, growth and leaf injuries in saplings of Psidium guajava 'Paluma'. The purpose of the refinery was to reduce the SO2 emission, but using natural gas as fuel could increase the concentrations of O3 precursors in the atmosphere. Thus a biomonitoring was performed with a native species sensitive to O3. The plants were exposed in five areas (CM1, CM5, CEPEMA, Centro, and RP) at different distances to the refinery, both before and after the fuel exchange. We performed six exposures under environmental conditions, with length of ca. 90 days each. With the utilization of natural gas, the saplings presented reductions in carbon assimilation rate under saturating light conditions (Asat, μmolCO2m(-2)s(-1)) and the stomatal conductance (gs, molH2Om(-2)s(-1)), and increase in height, number of leaves, and dry mass of leaves and shoots. There were also reductions in root dry mass and in the root/shoot ratio. The saplings also presented O3-induced leaf injuries. The responses of P. guajava 'Paluma' were altered after the fuel exchange as a result of a new combination of pollutants in the atmosphere. The fuel exchange has not resulted in environmental benefit to the surrounding forest; it has only altered the contamination profile of the region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment and control design for steam vent noise in an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Nourollahi, Maryam; Momen Bellah Fard, Samaneh

    2011-06-13

    Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. Noise pollution in oil refinery industries is related to workers' health. This study aimed to determine the overall noise pollution of an oil refinery operation and its frequency analysis to determine the control plan for a vent noise in these industries. This experimental study performed in control unit of Tehran Oil Refinery in 2008. To determine the noise distributions, environmental noise measurements were carried out by lattice method according to basic information and technical process. The sound pressure level and frequency distribution was measured for each study sources subject separately was performed individually. According to the vent's specification, the measured steam noise characteristics reviewed and compared to the theoretical results of steam noise estimation. Eventually, a double expansion muffler was designed. Data analysis and graphical design were carried out using Excel software. The results of environmental noise measurements indicated that the level of sound pressure was above the national permitted level (85 dB (A)). The Mean level of sound pressure of the studied steam jet was 90.3 dB (L). The results of noise frequency analysis for the steam vents showed that the dominant frequency was 4000 Hz. To obtain 17 dB noise reductions, a double chamber aluminum muffler with 500 mm length and 200 mm diameter consisting pipe drilled was designed. The characteristics of steam vent noise were separated from other sources, a double expansion muffler was designed using a new method based on the level of steam noise, and principle sound frequency, a double expansion muffler was designed.

  17. Test plan: the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, D.J.; Lombard, K.H.; Hazen, T.C.

    1997-03-31

    The remediation strategies that will be applied at the Czechowice Oil Refinery waste lagoon in Czechowice, Poland are designed, managed, and implemented under the direction of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). WSRC will be assisted in the demonstration by The Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas (IETU). This collaboration between IETU and DOE will provide the basis for international technology transfer of new and innovative remediation technologies that can be applied in Poland and the Eastern European Region as well.

  18. Seismic Scenario in the Acambay Graben and Possible Affectations in the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama Membrillo, S.; Aguirre, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we presented synthetic acceleration records in the Miguel Hidalgo refinery, Hidalgo due to a seismic scenario originated in the graben Acambay, such as occurred in 1912 (70 km distance to it). This earthquake had a magnitude of 6.9 and caused extensive damage, according to reports caused 164 deaths and numerous houses collapsing. To simulate the event of M = 6.9 we used the empirical Greeńs function method proposed by Irikura (1986). Due to the low seismic activity we have not any small earthquake record or an "element earthquake" so that we generated a synthetic seismogram of M = 4.1 to be used as empirical Greeńs function. The seismogram was constructed in two parts. For low frequencies we constructed from cross-correlations of seismic noise, while for high frequencies we made a stochastic simulation. Subsequently, we applied a "matched filter" to join the two frequency bands of synthetic earthquake. For the construction of seismic scenario the method of Irikura (1986) was used. We consider a square fault of 47.75 km long, a radial rupture propagation, rupture velocity of 3.06 m/s, and with the following focal mechanism: strike of 280°, dip of 66 ° and rake of -138 °. With these parameters we obtained the synthetic seismograms. Since there was not any observed earthquake to validate the model, the 1912 event was simulated and then from relationships of intensity (obtained Wald et al.,2005; Sandoval et al., 2013; and Arias, 1969), we estimated the Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) for the refinery. We compare our result with isoseismal map obtained by Suter et al. (1996) for the earthquake of 1912. In agreement with Suter, our results shown a MMI V-VI for the Miguel Hidalgo refinery. With this qualitative validation we search the seismic scenario with the higher accelerations and from this synthetic seismogram, we obtained parameters that are of interest in engineering to estimate the possible affectations to the Miguel Hidalgo refinery, such as

  19. IgE antibody responses to platinum group metals: a large scale refinery survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Murdoch, R D; Pepys, J; Hughes, E G

    1986-01-01

    All 306 South African platinum refinery workers (116 white, 190 coloured) accepted for employment on grounds of absence of evidence of atopy were investigated using the skin prick test and RAST to detect sensitivity to platinum, palladium, and rhodium salts. RAST studies were made for these, together with HSA and DNP-HSA RAST. Of the 306 workers, 38 had a positive skin prick test to the platinum halide salts; of these, one gave a positive reaction to the palladium salt and six to the rhodium ...

  20. Determination of the priority indexes for the oil refinery wastewater treatment process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, M. G.; Myshlyavtsev, A. V.; Kriga, A. S.; Shaporenko, A. P.; Markelov, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The wastewater biological treatment intensity and effectiveness are influenced by many factors: temperature, pH, presence and concentration of toxic substances, the biomass concentration et al. Regulation of them allows controlling the biological treatment process. Using the Bayesian theorem the link between changes was determined and the wastewater indexes normative limits exceeding influence for activated sludge characteristics alteration probability was evaluated. The estimation of total, or aposterioric, priority index presence probability, which characterizes the wastewater treatment level, is an important way to use the Bayesian theorem in activated sludge swelling prediction at the oil refinery biological treatment unit.

  1. Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using rotating cage

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cage (RC) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Measurement of particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) around a petroleum refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Padma S; Ansari, M Faiyaz; Pipalatkar, P; Kumar, A; Nema, P; Devotta, S

    2008-02-01

    A study on concentrations of ambient particulates viz. total suspended particulate matters (TSP), respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were carried out at six sites around the Asia's largest, 12 MMTPA, petroleum refinery in west coast of India. PAH concentrations are correlated with each other in these sites, suggesting that they have related sources and sinks. The present article discusses the monitoring aspects such as sample collection, pretreatment and analytical methods and compares the monitored levels for assessing the source receptor distribution pattern. The main sources of RSPM and PAHs in urban air are automobile exhaust (CPCB, Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in air and their effects on human health. " http://www.cpcb.nic.in/ph/ch21103.htm ", 2003; Manuel et al., Environmental Science and Technology, 13: 227-231, 2004) and industrial emissions like petroleum refinery (Vo-Dinh, Chemical analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, Wiley: New York, 1989; Wagrowaski and Hites, Environmental Science and Technology, 31: 279-282, 1997). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous constituents of urban airborne particulate mostly generated by anthropogenic activities (Li et al., Environmental Science and Technology, 37:1958-2965, 2003; Thorsen et al., Environmental Science and Technology, 38: 2029-2037, 2004; Ohura et al., Environmental Science and Technology, 32: 450-455, 2004) and some of them are of major health concern mainly due to their well-known carcinogenic and mutagenic properties (Soclo et al., Marine Pollution Bulletin, 40: 387-396, 2000; Chen et al., Environment International, 28: 659-668, 2003; Larsen and Baker, Environmental Science and Technology, 32: 450-455, 2003). Limited information is available on PAHs contributions from refineries to ambient air. Hence this study would not only create a database but also provide necessary inputs towards dose-response relationship for

  3. Synergies between bio- and oil refineries for the production of fuels from biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, George W; Corma, Avelino

    2007-01-01

    As petroleum prices continue to increase, it is likely that biofuels will play an ever-increasing role in our energy future. The processing of biomass-derived feedstocks (including cellulosic, starch- and sugar-derived biomass, and vegetable fats) by catalytic cracking and hydrotreating is a promising alternative for the future to produce biofuels, and the existing infrastructure of petroleum refineries is well-suited for the production of biofuels, allowing us to rapidly transition to a more sustainable economy without large capital investments for new reaction equipment. This Review discusses the chemistry, catalysts, and challenges involved in the production of biofuels.

  4. [Factors of work environment and employment of workers in production of fuels and solvents at the oil refinery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebotarev, P A; Kharlashova, N V

    2012-01-01

    Factors of the industrial environment and labor activity of workers of manufacture propellants and solvents at the oil refining enterprise. Working conditions of workers at all installations of manufacture No 1 JSC "Naftan" of Novopolotsk of Byelorussia (production of fuels and solvents). Hygienic evaluation of working conditions of persons working in the production of fuels and solvents at the oil refinery. Sanitary description of the production with hygienic analysis of project design and technological documentation, qualitative and quantitative characteristics of conventional methods in the work environment and working process of employees in the workplace for the main modes of operation of the equipment. The working environment of refineries is influenced by a number of simultaneously acting factors, which have different material nature and characteristics of the action on the human body, the workers in production of fuels and solvents at the refinery, are exposed to a variety of hazardous and dangerous factors of production, a chemical factor is prevalent, of course.

  5. Personal exposure to benzene and 1,3-butadiene during petroleum refinery turnarounds and work in the oil harbour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerstrom, M; Almerud, P; Andersson, E M; Strandberg, B; Sallsten, G

    2016-11-01

    Petroleum refinery workers' exposure to the carcinogens benzene and 1,3-butadiene has decreased during normal operations. However, certain occupational groups or events at the refineries still involve a risk of higher exposures. The aim of this study was to examine the personal exposure to benzene and 1,3-butadiene at refinery turnarounds and during work in the oil harbour. Personal exposure measurements of benzene and 1,3-butadiene were taken during work shifts, with a priori assumed higher benzene exposure, using PerkinElmer diffusive samplers filled with Carbopack X. Mean exposure levels were calculated, and repeated exposure measurements, when available, were assessed using mixed effect models. Group and individual compliance with the Swedish occupational exposure limit (OEL) was tested for the different exposure groups. Mean benzene exposure levels for refinery workers during the three measured turnarounds were 150, 610 and 960 µg/m(3), and mean exposures for oil harbour workers and sewage tanker drivers were 310 and 360 µg/m(3), respectively. Higher exposures were associated with handling benzene-rich products. Most occupational groups did not comply with the Swedish OEL for benzene nor did the individuals within the groups. The exposure to 1,3-butadiene was very low, between refinery industry, with potential exposure to open product streams containing higher fractions of benzene, pose a risk of personal benzene exposures exceeding the OEL. Refinery workers performing these work tasks frequently, such as contractors, sewage tanker drivers and oil harbour workers, need to be identified and protected.

  6. The Comparative Analysis of Investment Activities on the Oil Refining Enterprises in the Russian Federation (on the example of JSC "LUKOIL" and JSC "GAZPROM-Refinery"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Trofimov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to research of specific features of investment management on the oil refining enterprise in the Russian Federation. The aim of this article is to give a comparative analysis of investment activities on the oil refineries. To achieve this goal the article will be addressed the following tasks: 1. Studying the academic definition of the term investment, then, on the basis of the studied material and the comparative analysis, offer the own definition of this term; 2. Giving the examples of investment activities of several oil refineries, namely, PJSC "LUKOIL" and PJSC "GAZPROM oil refinery"; 3. Analyzing the statistics of refineries, and justifying the investment on the oil refinery.

  7. [INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENT FACTORS ON THE MORBIDITY RATE WITH TEMPORARY DISABILITY OF WORKING IN OIL REFINERY WORKERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlashova, N V; Chebotarev, P A

    2015-01-01

    There was performed a comprehensive assessment of working conditions of refinery workers on the results of the carrying out of certification of workplaces on working conditions. An analysis of the sample materials laboratory control over the content of harmful substances in the working area of industrial premises refinery. The prolonged exposure to harmful factors on the health ofworkers of the main production throughout the length of service was established to be a major riskfactor for the development of somatic and malignant diseases, to the gain in the morbidity rate and can become a cause of the emergency of malignancies.

  8. University and Community Partners in Oral History Projects: Fulfilling the Urban University Research and Service Mission within the Complexity of Engaged Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Central to the urban university's academic mission is supporting scholarship that expands knowledge and "service to the state" and local region. Documenting local history is an aspect of scholarship that supports the community directly. This manuscript addresses the role of the urban university in collaborating with community…

  9. William Faulkner as History Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. Ben

    1976-01-01

    William Faulkner's novel "Absalom, Absalom!" is described as a valuable teaching resource for an introduction to the philosophy of history. At least six ways of viewing history are presented in the book, which is useful and motivating in helping students understand the complex nature of history. (AV)

  10. Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

    2012-05-15

    Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

  11. Influence of operating conditions on the air gasification of dry refinery sludge in updraft gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, R.; Sinnathambi, C. M.

    2013-06-01

    In the present work, details of the equilibrium modeling of dry refinery sludge (DRS) are presented using ASPEN PLUS Simulator in updraft gasifier. Due to lack of available information in the open journal on refinery sludge gasification using updraft gasifier, an evaluate for its optimum conditions on gasification is presented in this paper. For this purpose a Taguchi Orthogonal array design, statistical software is applied to find optimum conditions for DRS gasification. The goal is to identify the most significant process variable in DRS gasification conditions. The process variables include; oxidation zone temperature, equivalent ratio, operating pressure will be simulated and examined. Attention was focused on the effect of optimum operating conditions on the gas composition of H2 and CO (desirable) and CO2 (undesirable) in terms of mass fraction. From our results and finding it can be concluded that the syngas (H2 & CO) yield in term of mass fraction favors high oxidation zone temperature and at atmospheric pressure while CO2 acid gas favor at a high level of equivalent ratio as well as air flow rate favoring towards complete combustion.

  12. Research of combined adsorption-coagulation process in treating petroleum refinery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Shui, Yiyu; Ren, Hongyang; He, Min

    2017-02-01

    The petroleum refinery industry generates a significant amount of wastewater that contains a high level of organic matter, which calls for effective and costly treatments. In this research, the effectiveness of the petroleum refinery effluent (PRE) treatment with physicochemical process of combined adsorption and coagulation was evaluated. The effects of initial pH, hydraulic condition , and combined sequence of treatment process, different treating reagent types and dosages on the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were investigated. Additionally, the elimination efficiency of pollutant wastewater was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometer was adopted to describe the structure of the wastewater. Wooden activated carbon was chosen as adsorbent at the dosage of 10 g/L as a primary treatment, and 1500 mg/L polymeric magnesium ferric sulfate was used in coagulation. Results showed that adsorption and subsequent coagulation displayed the best performance when initial pH was 9 at shear rates (G) of G1 = 65 s-1 and G2 = 20 s-1, which reached maximal removal rate of COD and total organic carbon GC-MS testing result revealed that adsorption was effective in phenols and iso-alkanes removal, whereas coagulation was good at removing esters and n-alkanes.

  13. Optimization of water network in petroleum refinery; Otimizacao de redes de agua em refinarias de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Debora C.; Souza, Selene M.A. Guelli Ulson de; Souza, Antonio A. Ulson de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The petroleum refineries have shown high water's consuming that creates high costs and damages the hydric resources. However, the industrial sector, especially the petroleum industry, has been looking for alternatives that minimizing the impact caused by to use these natural resources. Currently, methodologies of controlling the pollution on the source have been appearing how a strong tendency and the reuse and/or recycle of wastewater can be emphasized. The optimization by mathematical programming, together with engineering know-how, is one of the great tendency in process integration technology developed. The present work presents one optimization mathematical model that objectifies to reduce the water's consuming and/or operational costs. The model is based in chemical species and mass conservation equation. This work presents the solution of one case found in literature that broach one petroleum refinery's network of water. This network is composed of six operations and three regenerative processes, and there are four keys contaminants. The water's consuming was minimized first and next the minimum cost in the minimum consume was broached. The results found were enough satisfactory and presented reductions up to 76% in the water consume and approximately 65% in the operational costs. (author)

  14. Catalytic ozonation of petroleum refinery wastewater utilizing Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O 3 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmao; Yoza, Brandon A; Wang, Yandan; Wang, Ping; Li, Qing X; Guo, Shaohui; Yan, Guangxu

    2015-04-01

    There is of great interest to develop an economic and high-efficient catalytic ozonation system (COS) for the treatment of biologically refractory wastewaters. Applications of COS require options of commercially feasible catalysts. Experiments in the present study were designed to prepare and investigate a novel manganese-iron-copper oxide-supported alumina-assisted COS (Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS) for the pretreatment of petroleum refinery wastewater. The highly dispersed composite metal oxides on the catalyst surface greatly promoted the performance of catalytic ozonation. Hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation is a dominant reaction in Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS. Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS enhanced COD removal by 32.7% compared with a single ozonation system and by 8-16% compared with Mn-Fe/Al2O3-COS, Mn-Cu/Al2O3-COS, and Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS. The O/C and H/C ratios of oxygen-containing polar compounds significantly increased after catalytic ozonation, and the biodegradability of petroleum refinery wastewater was significantly improved. This study illustrates potential applications of Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS for pretreatment of biologically refractory wastewaters.

  15. MBBR evaluation for oil refinery wastewater treatment, with post-ozonation and BAC, for wastewater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E E; Cerqueira, A C F P; Dezotti, M

    2011-01-01

    This work evaluated the performance of a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) in the treatment of an oil refinery wastewater. Also, it investigated the possibility of reuse of the MBBR effluent, after ozonation in series with a biological activated carbon (BAC) column. The best performance of the MBBR was achieved with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 hours, employing a bed to bioreactor volume ratio (V(B)/V(R)) of 0.6. COD and N-NH₄(+) MBBR effluent concentrations ranged from 40 to 75 mg L⁻¹ (removal efficiency of 69-89%) and 2 to 6 mg L⁻¹ (removal efficiency of 45-86%), respectively. Ozonation carried out for 15 min with an ozone concentration of 5 mg L⁻¹ was able to improve the treated wastewater biodegradability. The treatment performance of the BAC columns was practically the same for ozonated and non ozonated MBBR effluents. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content of the columns of the activated carbon columns (CAG) was in the range of 2.1-3.8 mg L⁻¹, and the corresponding DOC removal efficiencies were comprised between 52 and 75%. The effluent obtained at the end of the proposed treatment presented a quality, which meet the requirements for water reuse in the oil refinery.

  16. Scheduling of Crude Oil Operations in Refinery without Sufficient Charging Tanks Using Petri Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan An

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A short-term schedule for crude oil operations in a refinery should define and sequence the activities in detail. Each activity involves both discrete-event and continuous variables. The combinatorial nature of the scheduling problem makes it difficult to solve. For such a scheduling problem, charging tanks are a type of critical resources. If the number of charging tanks is not sufficient, the scheduling problem is further complicated. This work conducts a study on the scheduling problem of crude oil operations without sufficient charging tanks. In this case, to make a refinery able to operate, a charging tank has to be in simultaneous charging and feeding to a distiller for some time, called simultaneously-charging-and-feeding (SCF mode, leading to disturbance to the oil distillation in distillers. A hybrid Petri net model is developed to describe the behavior of the system. Then, a scheduling method is proposed to find a schedule such that the SCF mode is minimally used. It is computationally efficient. An industrial case study is given to demonstrate the obtained results.

  17. Auxiliary units for refining of high nitrogen content oils: Premium II refinery case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolato, Paolo Contim; Pinotti, Rafael [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    PETROBRAS is constantly investing on its refining park in order to increase the production of clean and stable fuels and to be capable to process heavier oils with high contaminants content. Sulfur and nitrogen are the main heteroatoms present in petroleum. They are responsible for some undesirable fuels properties like corrosivity and instability, and also emit pollutants when burnt. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are designed to remove these contaminants and adjust other fuel properties, generating, as byproduct, sour gases and sour water streams rich in H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}, which are usually sent to Sour Water Treatment Units and Sulfur Recovery Units. The regeneration of the amine used for the light streams treatment, as fuel gas and LPG, also generates sour gas streams that must be also sent to Sulfur Recovery Units. As the ammonia content in the sour streams increases, some design parameters must be adjusted to avoid increasing the Refinery emissions. Sulfur Recovery Units must provide proper NH3 destruction. Sour Water Treatment must have a proper segregation between H{sub 2}S and ammonia streams, whenever desirable. Amine Regeneration Systems must have an efficient procedure to avoid the ammonia concentration in the amine solution. This paper presents some solutions usually applied to the Petroleum Industry and analyses some aspects related to Premium II Refinery Project and how its design will help the Brazilian refining park to meet future environmental regulation and market demands. (author)

  18. Biostimulation and bioaugmentation of native microbial community accelerated bioremediation of oil refinery sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ajoy; Dutta, Avishek; Pal, Siddhartha; Gupta, Abhishek; Sarkar, Jayeeta; Chatterjee, Ananya; Saha, Anumeha; Sarkar, Poulomi; Sar, Pinaki; Kazy, Sufia K

    2018-01-03

    Scope for developing an engineered bioremediation strategy for the treatment of hydrocarbon-rich petroleum refinery waste was investigated through biostimulation and bioaugmentation approaches. Enhanced (46-55%) total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) attenuation was achieved through phosphate, nitrate or nitrate+phosphate amendment in the sludge with increased (upto 12%) abundance of fermentative, hydrocarbon degrading, sulfate-reducing, CO2-assimilating and methanogenic microorganisms (Bacillus, Coprothermobacter, Rhodobacter, Pseudomonas, Achromobacter, Desulfitobacter, Desulfosporosinus, T78, Methanobacterium, Methanosaeta, etc). Together with nutrients, bioaugmentation with biosurfactant producing and hydrocarbon utilizing indigenous Bacillus strains resulted in 57-75% TPH reduction. Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt) analysis revealed enhanced gene allocation for transporters (0.45-3.07%), ABC transporters (0.38-2.07%), methane (0.16-1.06%), fatty acid (0.018-0.15%), nitrogen (0.07-0.17%), butanoate (0.06-0.35%), propanoate (0.004-0.26%) metabolism and some xenobiotics (0.007-0.13%) degradation. This study indicated that nutrient-induced community dynamics of native microorganisms and their metabolic interplay within oil refinery sludge could be a driving force behind accelerated bioremediation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF CO2 EMISSION MITIGATION FOR A BRAZILIAN OIL REFINERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. Chan

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently the oil refining sector is responsible for approximately 5% of the total Brazilian energy related CO2 emissions. Possibilities to reduce CO2 emissions and related costs at the largest Brazilian refinery have been estimated. The abatement costs related to energy saving options are negative, meaning that feasibility exists without specific income due to emission reductions. The assessment shows that short-term mitigation options, i.e., fuel substitution and energy efficiency measures, could reduce CO2 emissions by 6% of the total current refinery emissions. It is further shown that carbon capture and storage offers the greatest potential for more significant emission reductions in the longer term (up to 43%, but costs in the range of 64 to162 US$/t CO2, depending on the CO2 emission source (regenerators of FCC units or hydrogen production units and the CO2 capture technology considered (oxyfuel combustion or post-combustion. Effects of uncertainties in key parameters on abatement costs are also evaluated via sensitivity analysis.

  20. The Complexities of Intimate Partner Violence: Mental Health, Disabilities, and Child Abuse History for White, Indigenous, and Other Visible Minority Canadian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutty, Leslie M; Radtke, H L; Ateah, Christine A; Ursel, E Jane; Thurston, Wilfreda E Billie; Hampton, Mary; Nixon, Kendra

    2017-11-01

    This research examines how mental health issues associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) relate to women's intersecting identities of race/ethnicity, disability status, and child abuse history. Data ( N = 595) from a Canadian triprovincial study included women who were White ( n = 263, 44.8%), Indigenous ( n = 292, 49.7%), or visible minority ( n = 32, 5.5%). Few demographic differences were found. None of the mental health measures (Symptom Checklist-Short Form [SCL-10], Centre for Epidemiological Studies-Depression [CES-D-10], Posttraumatic Stress Disorder [PTSD] Checklist) were in the clinical ranges. In a MANCOVA on the mental health scales, with IPV severity, racial group, disability status, and child abuse history as variables, only disability was significantly associated with more mental health symptoms.

  1. Effect of Awareness about Health, Safety and Environment Management System on Safety Climate and Risk Perception in Oil Refinery Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Marzaleh M. MSc,

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Health, safety and environment is an integrated and convergence system and also a synergistic arrangement of human resources, facilities and equipment. This study aimed to determine the relationship of safety climate and perception of risk with the awareness level of HSE management system among oil refineries employees. Instrument & Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed at 2016 in all Kermanshah Oil Refinery employees. “Demographic characteristic”, “safety climate”, “perception of risk” and “awareness of the HSE management system” questionnaires were used for data collection. Data was analyzed in SPSS 22 statistical software using Pearson correlation and ANOVA tests. Findings: The average of total awareness of HSE was 20.85±4.82. The average of safety climate was 157.04±22.42. The average of perception of risk was 3.45±0.84. There was a significant relationship between awareness of HSE management system and safety climate (r=0.219; p=0.001, but there was no significant relationship between awareness of HSE management system and perception of risk (r=0.137; p=0.128. The relationship between perception of risk and safety climate was significant (r=0.651; p=0.001. Conclusion: Oil refinery's employees have the moderate awareness of HSE management system, high perception of risk and positive safety climate. By increasing the perception of risk and safety climate, the safety performance of the refinery staffs increase.

  2. Efficient ozonation of reverse osmosis concentrates from petroleum refinery wastewater using composite metal oxide-loaded alumina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Chun-Mao; Yoza, Brandon A; Li, Qing X; Guo, Shao-Hui; Wang, Ping; Dong, Shi-Jie; Wang, Qing-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Novel Mn–Fe–Mg- and Mn–Fe–Ce-loaded alumina (Mn–Fe–Mg/Al2O3 and Mn–Fe–Ce/Al2O3) were developed to catalytically ozonate reverse osmosis concentrates generated from petroleum refinery wastewaters (PRW-ROC...

  3. How the physical forms of starch affect filterability at a carbonatation refinery. Part II: simulated carbonatation filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although starch is known to detrimentally impact carbonatation filtration at sugarcane refineries, the physical form(s) of starch responsible is unknown. Thus, a study was undertaken to elucidate the effects of the physical starch forms, i.e., soluble, swollen, and insoluble, and their concentration...

  4. Analysis of snow-cap pollution for air quality assessment in the vicinity of an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krastinyte, Viktorija; Baltrenaite, Edita; Lietuvninkas, Arvydas

    2013-01-01

    Snow-cap can be used as a simple and effective indicator of industrial air pollution. In this study snow-cap samples were collected from 11 sites located in the vicinity of an oil refinery in Mazeikiai, a region in the north-west of Lithuania, in the winter of 2011. Analysis of snowmelt water and snow-dust was used to determine anthropogenic pollutants such as: sulphates and chlorides, nitrites, nitrates, ammonium nitrogen, total carbon, total nitrogen; heavy metals: lead (Pb), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd). Concentrations of heavy metals in snow-dust were detected thousands of times higher than those in the snowmelt water. In this study, analysis of heavy metal concentration was conducted considering different distances and the wind direction within the impact zone of the oil refinery. The sequence of heavy metals according to their mean concentrations in the snow-dust samples was the following: Pb > Cr > Cu > Cd. Heavy metals highly correlated among each other. The load of snow-dust was evaluated to determine the pollution level in the study area. The highest daily load of snow-dust was 45.81 +/- 12.35 mg/m2 in the north-western direction from the oil refinery. According to classification of the daily load of snow-dust a lower than medium-risk level of pollution was determined in the vicinity of the oil refinery.

  5. Prospective techno-economic and environmental assessment of carbon capture at a refinery and CO2 utilisation in polyol synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández-Dacosta, Cora; Van Der Spek, Mijndert; Hung, Christine Roxanne; Oregionni, Gabriel David; Skagestad, Ragnhild; Parihar, Prashant; Gokak, D. T.; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Ramirez, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    CO2 utilisation is gaining interest as a potential element towards a sustainable economy. CO2 can be used as feedstock in the synthesis of fuels, chemicals and polymers. This study presents a prospective assessment of carbon capture from a hydrogen unit at a refinery, where the CO2 is either stored,

  6. Modeling and optimization of oil refinery wastewater chemical oxygen demand removal in dissolved air flotation system by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yasser vasseghian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this present study the dissolved air flotation (DAF system was investigated for the treatment of Kermanshah Oil Refinery wastewater. The effect of three parameters on flotation efficiency including of flow rate (outflow from the flotation tank, saturation pressure and coagulant dosage on chemical oxygen demand (COD removal was examined experimentally. All the experiments were done under a certain time (in this case 3 min. After final testing maximum COD removal efficiency was obtained 67.86%. In the next step of study, response surface method (RSM was applied to model oil refinery wastewater COD removal as a function of flow rate, saturation pressure and coagulant dosage. Coefficient of determination, R2, showed that the RSM model can explain the variation with the accuracy of 0.996, indicating there was strong correlation. Moreover, process optimization were performed to predict the best operating conditions using RSM method, which resulted in the maximum COD removal of the oil refinery wastewater. The maximum COD removal of oil refinery wastewater was estimated by RSM to be 67.87% under the operational conditions of flow rate (3.76 – 3.86 L/min, saturation pressure (4.99 - 5bar and coagulant dosage (24.16 – 24.79 mg/L.

  7. Phytoremediation of heavy metals (Cd, Pb and V in gas refinery wastewater using common reed (Phragmitis australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Hamidian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Industrial wastewaters are of the major sources of heavy metal pollution in the environment. In the Middle East, gas and oil industry is the major source of heavy metal pollution and releases significant amounts of metals into the terrestrial and aquatic environment. In this research the capability of the common reed (Phragmitis australis in absorbing heavy metals Cd, Pb and V from the wastewater of a gas refinery plant in Iran was investigated. The plant samples were collected from the vicinity of the Bidboland gas refinery plant in Iran and were used for the treatment of wastewaters collected from the outflow of the refinery plant. The metal concentrations were measured in the roots of the plant species before treatment and after 2, 6 and 10 days of treatment procedure. The heavy metal concentrations were measured after acid digestion and using an ICP-OES instrument. After 10 days of treatment, the concentrations of the metals in plant tissues increased by 2.5, 6.9 and 2.7 times for Cd, Pb and V, respectively. The best treatment time was suggested to be 6 days. The common reed was observed to have a very good capability in removing heavy metals from the gas refinery wastewater.

  8. Pathways of inhalation exposure to manganese in children living near a ferromanganese refinery: A structural equation modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is both essential element and neurotoxicant. Exposure to Mn can occur from various sources and routes. Structural equation modeling was used to examine routes of exposure to Mn among children residing near a ferromanganese refinery in Marietta, Ohio. An inhalation ...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... foreign refiner shall be in English language, or shall include an English language translation. (n... documents, and foreign refiner certification. (1) Any foreign refiner of a foreign refinery that has been... transportation mode for transport to the United States, the foreign refiner shall prepare a certification for...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1030 - What are the requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries having individual refiner...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) English language reports. Any report or other document submitted to EPA by a foreign refiner shall be in... refiner certification. (1) Any foreign refiner of a foreign refinery that has been assigned an individual... request, within a reasonable time period. (viii) English language translations of any documents will be...

  11. Managing Exposure to Benzene and Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons at Two Oil Refineries 1977-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Tapani; Veijalainen, Henna; Santonen, Tiina

    2018-01-24

    Air concentrations of and inhalation exposure to total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and benzene was monitored separately at two oil refineries from 1977 to 2014. Prevention policies and control measures that may explain changes were surveyed. The aim was to evaluate how the application of of Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series OHSAS 18001.04 principles as well as Environmental protection Agency EPA and European Oil Company Organisation for Environment, Health and Safety CONCAWE practices have influenced air concentrations. Benzene air concentrations declined in 11 of 17 units, six of which were associated with declining exposures. Benzene air concentrations declined across all units on average by 46%. This amounts to an average yearly decline of 1.7%. TPH air concentrations declined in 10 of 17 units, seven of which were associated with declining exposures. The average decline in TPH air concentrations was 49%, corresponding to 1.3% per year. As a result, average working day exposure in 10 of 17 units have declined significantly and today, benzene and TPH exposure in most units are well below 10% of the current Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL 8h :s). A decline in air concentrations have coincided with consistent implementation of control measures. Such measures include on-line monitoring of leaks; benzene recovery; floating container roofs; improved valves and seals; hermetic pumps; recovery of loading gases and instalment of torches in terminals; cutback in coke combustion; a new production line spanning directly from the dock to aromatics production; and recovery of loading gases in the doc. Other tools in exposure management include personal leak monitors, on-line measurements, monitoring campaigns, risk assessment, and availability and user training of protective equipment. However, improvements are still needed. Hydrocarbon or benzene air concentrations have not declined in 8 of 17 units, in some of which concentrations exceed 10% of the relevant

  12. HANDBOOK FOR CONDUCTING ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEWS RELATED TO TRIBAL AND INDIAN PARTICIPATION IN THE CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND CLEANUP OF THE NUCLEAR WEAPONS COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristann Gibson; Mervyn L. Tano; Albert Wing

    1999-08-31

    There were three major projects undertaken at the outset of the DOE/EM 22 Cooperative Agreement back in September 1995. There was a project relating to Tribal oral histories. Another project of the Cooperative Agreement related to technology and Tribal values and needs. This project by analogy could apply to issues of technology, environmental cleanup and other indigenous peoples internationally. How can Indian Tribes participate in defining the need for technology development rather than merely learning to adapt themselves and their situations and values to technology developed by others with differing needs, values and economic resources? And the third project was the placement of a Tribal intern in EM-22.

  13. Life History of a Topic in an Online Discussion: A Complex Systems Theory Perspective on How One Message Attracts Class Members to Create Meaning Collaboratively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Jane S.; Schallert, Diane L.; Jordan, Michelle E.; Song, Kwangok; Sanders, Anke J. Z.; Te Chiang, Yueh-hui Yan; Lee, Ji-Eun; Park, Jeongbin Hannah; Yu, Li-Tang

    2017-01-01

    Complex adaptive systems theory served as a framework for this qualitative study exploring the process of how meaning emerges from the collective interactions of individuals in a synchronous online discussion through their shared words about a topic. In an effort to bridge levels of analysis from the individual to the small group to the community,…

  14. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for

  15. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO

  16. Electrical CT image reconstruction technique for powder flow in petroleum refinery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Masahiro; Doh, Deog-Hee; Ochi, Mitsuaki

    2008-03-01

    A new reconstruction method called sampled pattern matching (SPM) was applied to the image reconstruction of an electrical capacitance computed tomography in powder flow in a vertical pipe for petroleum refinery process. This new method is able to achieve stable convergence without the use of an empirical value. Experiments were carried out using fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts as powder with two air volume flow rates and four powder volume flow rates to measure the capacitance of a pipe cross section. The SPM method is compared with conventional methods in terms of volume fraction, residual capacitance, and correlation capacitance. Overall, the SPM method proved superior to conventional methods without any empirical value because SPM achieves accurate reconstruction by using an objective function that is calculated as the inner product calculation between the experimental capacitance and the reconstructed image capacitance.

  17. Microscopy of high chloride primary froth : refinery implications of non-mixing emulsified water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, G.R.D.; Munoz, V.A.; Mikula, R.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CanmetENERGY Research and Development

    2009-07-01

    The chloride content in hydrocarbons presents a major concern to petroleum refiners because it causes corrosion. The geological formation in which oil sand ore is found determines the water chemistry of the oil. Prehistoric marine environments usually have higher chloride contents than oil sand ores from estuarine or fluvial locations. This poster showed that during refinery operations, the water that originated from the ore containing high chlorine concentration does not mix well with the process water and remains in the form of small droplets. The chlorine is therefore carried over with the bitumen phase. The impact of chlorine on the upgrader and refiner can be immediate, rather than gradual. A method was therefore developed to measure the size of droplets and chloride concentration in a primary froth using a combination of cryo-scanning electron microscopy and elemental mapping by X-ray spectroscopy analysis. tabs., figs.

  18. Petroleum refinery secondary effluent polishing using freezing processes--toxicity and organic contaminant removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, W; Smith, D W; Habib, M

    2008-06-01

    A petroleum refinery secondary effluent was treated using two freezing techniques--spray freezing and unidirectional downward freezing (UDF). The freezing processes were effective to remove toxicity and total organic carbon (TOC)- and chemical oxygen demand (COD)-causing materials in the effluent. Agitation of the liquid during UDF significantly improved the impurity separation efficiency; 85 to 96% removal of TOC and COD was achieved without any pretreatment and freezing only 70% of the feed water. The treatment efficiency of the spray freezing was at the same level as that of UDF without mixing. The spray ice with longer storage time released more contaminants with early meltwater. The initial contaminant concentration of the feed water and the freezing temperatures (-10 degrees C and -25 degrees C) had no significant influence on the treatment efficiency. A small fluctuation in effluent TOC concentration caused a dramatic change in effluent toxicity (Microtox). The effective concentration (EC20) (Microtox) was effective in detecting effluent toxicity.

  19. Cancer incidence in a population living near a petrochemical facility and oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Petar; Ivić, Milka L Avramov; Jovanović, Mića B; Petrović, Slobodan D; Miljus, Dragan; Todorović, Tanja; Miladinov-Mikov, Marica M; Bogdanović, Milka

    2011-06-01

    There is growing concern that pollution from petrochemical and oil refinery installations in Pancevo (Serbia) has increased the incidence of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate cancer incidence in Pancevo and to compare it with the region of central Serbia. Cancer incidence data were obtained from the corresponding Serbian Cancer Registries. Systematic local monitoring of benzene, toluene and methyl mercaptane in the atmosphere within Pancevo's industrial area indicated that the average monthly and yearly concentrations often exceeded permitted levels proposed by EU standards (5 microgm(-3)). Cancer incidence was lower in Pancevo than in central Serbia (the standardised incidence for all types of cancers in Pancevo was 218.3 and in central Serbia it was 241.7 per 100,000 inhabitants). The available data do not allow us to correlate air pollution in Pancevo with increased cancer incidence.

  20. Oil recovery from refinery oily sludge using a rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Lu, Mang; Yang, Qin; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Chen, Rong

    2012-07-01

    In this study, a rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa F-2, was used to recover oil from refinery oily sludge in laboratory and pilot-scale experiments. The optimum values of carbon to nitrogen ratio, temperature, sludge-water ratio and inoculum size for oil recovery were determined as 10, 35 °C, 1:4 and 4%, respectively. An oil recovery of up to 91.5% was obtained with the equipping of draft tubes during the field pilot-scale studies. The results showed that strain F-2 has the potential for industrial applications and may be used in oil recovery from oily sludge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

  2. An integrated biohydrogen refinery: synergy of photofermentation, extractive fermentation and hydrothermal hydrolysis of food wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Mark D; Orozco, Rafael L; Majewski, Artur J; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2012-09-01

    An Integrated Biohydrogen Refinery (IBHR) and experimental net energy analysis are reported. The IBHR converts biomass to electricity using hydrothermal hydrolysis, extractive biohydrogen fermentation and photobiological hydrogen fermentation for electricity generation in a fuel cell. An extractive fermentation, developed previously, is applied to waste-derived substrates following hydrothermal pre-treatment, achieving 83-99% biowaste destruction. The selective separation of organic acids from waste-fed fermentations provided suitable substrate for photofermentative hydrogen production, which enhanced the gross energy generation up to 11-fold. Therefore, electrodialysis provides the key link in an IBHR for 'waste to energy'. The IBHR compares favourably to 'renewables' (photovoltaics, on-shore wind, crop-derived biofuels) and also emerging biotechnological options (microbial electrolysis) and anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Automatic crude oil handling through a pressurized system from the wellhead to the refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.B.; Truman, P.W.; Groeneman, A.R.

    1967-01-01

    Production from 51 wells completed in the 3 unitized formations of the Lost Soldier Field, Sweetwater Co., Wyoming, is brought to a central point through individual flow lines. Here the fluids are directed through separate automatic well testing and oil treating facilities, one for each formation. After separation of oil, gas and water, the oil goes to pressurized surge tanks and then to lease automatic custody transfer units. There is one surge tank and one LACT unit for each formation. The oil is automatically transferred to the Sinclair Pipe Line Co. for delivery to Sinclair's refinery at Sinclair, Wyoming, through a closed pipe line system. A central console provides: (1) supervisory control from the wellheads through the LACT units, (2) well test and production data logging, and (3) monitoring by activating alarms for abnormal conditions of flow, liquid levels, temperatures and pressures.

  4. Environmental impact of plantations in and around the petroleum refinery: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Padma S; Mhaisalkar, Vasant A; Shrivastava, A; Kumar, Animesh; Chakrabarti, T; Devotta, S

    2010-09-01

    Plantation or green belt (GB) grown around the factories and industrial premises improves the condition of land, mitigates air pollution (as the plants serve as a sink for pollutants and check the flow of dust, etc.), and reduces the level of noise pollution. The software developed by NEERI for the determination of the optimal width of GB in and around an industry is based on the pollution attenuation coefficient of selected plant species of deciduous trees existing in the region. The assessment of the impact of these plantations/green belts of 500-m width in and around a petroleum refinery in the west coast of India is evaluated for reducing/managing various waste generated, and it is observed that the overall efficiency is more than 60%.

  5. Gasoline from biomass through refinery-friendly carbohydrate-based bio-oil produced by ketalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Nuno; da Silva, Alessandra V; de Souza, Matheus O; da Costa, Bruna M C; Gomes, Elisa S; Silva, Thiago C; Barros, Thalita G; Gonçalves, Maria L A; Caramão, Elina B; dos Santos, Luciana R M; Almeida, Marlon B B; de Souza, Rodrigo O M A; Lam, Yiu L; Carvalho, Nakédia M F; Miranda, Leandro S M; Pereira, Marcelo M

    2014-06-01

    The introduction of biomass-derived compounds as an alternative feed into the refinery structure that already exists can potentially converge energy uses with ecological sustainability. Herein, we present an approach to produce a bio-oil based on carbohydrate-derived isopropylidene ketals obtained by reaction with acetone under acidic conditions directly from second-generation biomass. The obtained bio-oil showed a greater chemical inertness and miscibility with gasoil than typical bio-oil from fast pyrolysis. Catalytic upgrading of the bio-oil over zeolites (USY and Beta) yielded gasoline with a high octane number. Moreover, the co-processing of gasoil and bio-oil improved the gasoline yield and quality compared to pure gasoil and also reduced the amount of oxygenated compounds and coke compared with pure bio-oil, which demonstrates a synergistic effect. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Process-optimization in Europe's largest refinery; Prozessoptimierung in Europas groesster Raffinerie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbstritt, M. [AUMA Riester GmbH und Co. KG, Muellheim (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    More than 1000 valves are to be replaced, with new actuator systems, in the context of the PROMS (''Profitable Oil Movement Systems'') project at the Nerefco refinery in Rotterdam. The requirements for this project include redundant data transmission, facilities for scanning of all actuator parameters and states from the control room, and the ability to record torque curves for the valves, in order to permit deductions concerning valve condition. Explosion-safety and high resistance to corrosion are, of course, basic preconditions. Finally, conversion to the new valve and actuator systems is to be accomplished without interruption to plant operation. A single manufacturer, who thus simultaneously plays the role of a system integrator, has been able to meet all these demands. (orig.)

  7. The Conversion and Sustainable Use of Alumina Refinery Residues: Global Solution Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, Lee

    This paper introduces current industry best practice for the conversion of alumina refinery residues (or "red mud") from hazardous waste to benign, inert material. The paper will examine four neutralization methods and Basecon Technology, a sustainable conversion process. The paper will consider ways through which this converted material can be combined and processed for sustainable applications in the treatment of hazardous waste streams (such as industrial wastewater and sludges, biosolids, and CCA wastes), contaminated brownfield sites, and mine site wastes. Recent discoveries and applications, such as the successful treatment of high levels of radium in drinking water in the USA, will also be discussed. Examples of global solutions and their technical merits will be assessed.

  8. Assessment and planning of the electrical systems in Mexican refineries by 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Flores, Luis Ivan; Rodriguez Martinez, Jose Hugo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Dario Taboada; Guillermo; Pano Jimenez, Javier [PEMEX, (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays the refining sector in Mexico needs to increase the quantity and quality of produced fuels by installing new process plants for gasoline and ultra-low sulphur diesel. These plants require the provision of electricity and steam, among other services to function properly, which can be supplied by the power plants currently installed in each refinery through an expansion of their generation capacity. These power plants need to increase its production of electricity and steam at levels above their installed capacity, which involves the addition of new power generating equipment (gas or steam turbo-generators) as well as the raise of the electrical loads. Currently, the Mexican Petroleum Company (PEMEX) is planning to restructure their electrical and steam systems in order to optimally supply the required services for the production of high quality fuels. In this paper the present status of the original electrical power systems of the refineries is assessed and the electrical integration of new process plants in the typical schemes is analyzed. Also this paper shows the conceptual schemes proposed to restructure the electrical power system for two refineries and the strategic planning focused on implement the modifications required for the integration of new process plants that will demand about 20 MW for each refinery by 2014. The results of the analysis allowed to identify the current conditions of the electrical power systems in the oil refining industry or National Refining Industry (NRI), and thereby to offer technical solutions that could be useful to engineers facing similar projects. [Spanish] Hoy en dia, el sector de refinacion en Mexico necesita aumentar la cantidad y calidad de los combustibles producidos, mediante la instalacion de nuevas plantas de proceso para la gasolina y el diesel ultra bajo en azufre. Estas plantas requieren el suministro de electricidad y vapor de agua, entre otros servicios, para que funcione correctamente, los cuales pueden

  9. Integration of RTO and MPC in the Hydrogen Network of a Petrol Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar de Prada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problems associated with the implementation of Real Time Optimization/Model Predictive Control (RTO/MPC systems, taking as reference the hydrogen distribution network of an oil refinery involving eighteen plants. This paper addresses the main problems related to the operation of the network, combining data reconciliation and a RTO system, designed for the optimal generation and redistribution of hydrogen, with a predictive controller for the on-line implementation of the optimal policies. This paper describes the architecture of the implementation, showing how RTO and MPC can be integrated, as well as the benefits obtained in terms of improved information about the process, increased hydrocarbon load to the treatment plants and reduction of the hydrogen required for performing the operations.

  10. Reuse and recycling of secondary effluents in refineries employing advanced multi-barrier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahnsteiner, J; Mittal, R

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the reclamation and reuse of municipal secondary effluents, as well as the reclamation and recycling of refinery secondary effluents, are technically and economically evaluated. It is shown that both practices are feasible and sustainable, and that the reclamation costs depend largely on specific circumstances such as legal requirements, price policy, reuse application, raw water composition, etc. The reclaimed water is reused, or respectively recycled, as boiler make-up. Therefore both reclamation plants employ advanced multi-barrier systems including ultra-filtration and reverse osmosis. The employed processes have shown excellent performance with regard to the removal of critical parameters such as silica. For example, this parameter was reduced from 13 mg/l in the raw water to 7 μg/l in the boiler make-up.

  11. Application of organic polymeric flocculants in centrifugal dewatering of oil refinery sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi-zhong; Zhang, Yue-feng; Chen, Xiao-ping; Gao, Hua-sheng

    2003-07-01

    In order to evaluate the applicability of the organic polymeric flocculants (OPF) in the treatment of oil refinery sludge, experiments were conducted to show that OPF have better performance of flocculation than inorganic flocculants. Both the anionic and cationic OPF have satisfactory flocculation efficiency in oil sludge treatment, but the latter are more cost-efficient. Among the over 20 types of flocculants tested, 2 OPF (CPAM-2 and HPAM-2) were selected as the treatment agents, based on their good treatment performances, oil-resistance and economic feasibility. It was demonstrated in the industrial-scale centrifugal dewatering experiments that the application of either CPAM-2 or HPAM-2 could achieve high treatment efficiency of the oil sludge dewatering and reduce the COD of centrifugal liquid to less than 1000 mg/L.

  12. The Process of Coagulation, Flocculation and Advanced Oxidation in Effluent Treatment of Second Refinery Oil Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Yari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: One of the industries dependent on oil compounds that play an important role in economy, preserve resources and oil reserves, as well as environmental protection is the secondary refinery Oil industries. The efficiency of Coagulation, flocculation and advanced oxidation process in the Effluent treatment industry was studied.

     

    Methods: This study is a descriptive- quasi-experimental that effluent pollution quality measured with COD. Physicochemical processes of coagulation, flocculation, by using conventional coagulants and oxidation with ozone for the removal to access environmental discharge effluent standards were studied. Coagulants such as aluminum sulfate, ferric chloride, sodium silicate, poly aluminum chloride were evaluated. Jartest was used to determine the efficiency of coagulation and flocculation. Samples were collected from Salafchegan industrial district in Qom. Examination methods were extracted from Standard methods for water and wastewater examination.

     

    Results: Initial experiments showed that BOD, indicating biological treatment wastewater, in comparison with COD, indicating chemical oxygen demand of wastewater is very low. Thus, the application of biological processes of effluent treatment without using chemical processes, not performance and not economic. The experiment showed that the amount of COD in raw effluent was varied from 38000 to 78000mg/l.

    Using advanced oxidation with O3 in pH=11.5 can reach 77.5% and in pH=9 in 57.2 and in pH=3.25 in 21.3 COD removal efficiency respectively.

     

    Conclusion: According to the results, advanced oxidation process prior to biological effluent treatment of the second refinery oil industries is effective in eliminating pollutants and toxic substances.

     

  13. Bioconversion of biodiesel refinery waste in the bioemulsifier by Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans CLA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Monteiro Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The microbial bioemulsifiers was surface active compounds, are more effective in stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions. The yeasts have been isolated to produce bioemulsifiers from vegetable oils and industrial wastes. Results Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans CLA2 is bioemulsifier-producing yeast strain isolated from effluents of the dairy industry, with ability to emulsify different hydrophobic substrates. Bioemulsifier production (mg/L and the emulsifying activity (E24 of this strain were optimized by response surface methodology using mineral minimal medium containing refinery waste as the carbon source, which consisted of diatomaceous earth impregnated with esters from filters used in biodiesel purification. The highest bioemulsifier production occurred in mineral minimal medium containing 75 g/L biodiesel residue and 5 g/L ammonium sulfate. The highest emulsifying activity was obtained in medium containing 58 g/L biodiesel refinery residue and 4.6 g/L ammonium sulfate, and under these conditions, the model estimated an emulsifying activity of 85%. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis suggested a bioemulsifier molecule consisting of monosaccharides, predominantly xylose and mannose, and a long chain aliphatic groups composed of octadecanoic acid and hexadecanoic acid at concentrations of 48.01% and 43.16%, respectively. The carbohydrate composition as determined by GC-MS of their alditol acetate derivatives showed a larger ratio of xylose (49.27%, mannose (39.91%, and glucose (10.81%. 1 H NMR spectra confirmed by COSY suggested high molecular weight, polymeric pattern, presence of monosaccharide’s and long chain aliphatic groups in the bioemulsifier molecule. Conclusions The biodiesel residue is an economical substrate, therefore seems to be very promising for the low-cost production of active emulsifiers in the emulsification of aromatics, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and kerosene.

  14. Monitoring of Emissions From a Refinery Tank Farm Using a Combination of Optical Remote Sensing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, A.; Tisopulos, L.; Pikelnaya, O.; Mellqvist, J.; Samuelsson, J.; Marianne, E.; Robinson, R. A.; Innocenti, F.; Finlayson, A.; Hashmonay, R.

    2016-12-01

    Despite great advances in reducing air pollution, the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) still faces challenges to attain federal health standards for air quality. Refineries are large sources of ozone precursors and, hence contribute to the air quality problems of the region. Additionally, petrochemical facilities are also sources of other hazardous air pollutants (HAP) that adversely affect human health, for example aromatic hydrocarbons. In order to assure safe operation, decrease air pollution and minimize population exposure to HAP the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) has a number of regulations for petrochemical facilities. However, significant uncertainties still exist in emission estimates and traditional monitoring techniques often do not allow for real-time emission monitoring. In the fall of 2015 the SCAQMD, Fluxsense Inc., the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and Atmosfir Optics Ltd. conducted a measurement study to characterize and quantify gaseous emissions from the tank farm of one of the largest oil refineries in the SCAB. Fluxsense used a vehicle equipped with Solar Occultation Flux (SOF), Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), and Extractive Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy instruments. Concurrently, NPL operated their Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system. Both research groups quantified emissions from the entire tank farm and identified fugitive emission sources within the farm. At the same time, Atmosfir operated an Open Path FTIR (OP-FTIR) spectrometer along the fenceline of the tank farm. During this presentation we will discuss the results of the emission measurements from the tank farm of the petrochemical facility. Emission rates resulting from measurements by different ORS methods will be compared and discussed in detail.

  15. Oil refinery wastewater treatment using coupled electrocoagulation and fixed film biological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Laura S.; Rodriguez, Oscar M.; Reyna, Silvia; Sánchez-Salas, José Luis; Lozada, J. Daniel; Quiroz, Marco A.; Bandala, Erick R.

    2016-02-01

    Oil refinery wastewater was treated using a coupled treatment process including electrocoagulation (EC) and a fixed film aerobic bioreactor. Different variables were tested to identify the best conditions using this procedure. After EC, the effluent was treated in an aerobic biofilter. EC was capable to remove over 88% of the overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the wastewater under the best working conditions (6.5 V, 0.1 M NaCl, 4 electrodes without initial pH adjustment) with total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal slightly higher than 80%. Aluminum release from the electrodes to the wastewater was found an important factor for the EC efficiency and closely related with several operational factors. Application of EC allowed to increase the biodegradability of the sample from 0.015, rated as non-biodegradable, up to 0.5 widely considered as biodegradable. The effluent was further treated using an aerobic biofilter inoculated with a bacterial consortium including gram positive and gram negative strains and tested for COD and TPH removal from the EC treated effluent during 30 days. Cell count showed the typical bacteria growth starting at day three and increasing up to a maximum after eight days. After day eight, cell growth showed a plateau which agreed with the highest decrease on contaminant concentration. Final TPHs concentration was found about 600 mgL-1 after 30 days whereas COD concentration after biological treatment was as low as 933 mgL-1. The coupled EC-aerobic biofilter was capable to remove up to 98% of the total TPH amount and over 95% of the COD load in the oil refinery wastewater.

  16. Relation Between Job Stress Dimensions and Job Satisfaction in Workers of a Refinery Control Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behjati Ardakani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job stress can result from an imbalance between job demands and the abilities to cope them. Stress can affect individuals and lead to job dissatisfaction. This study was conducted to assess the influence of different job stress dimensions on job satisfaction in workers of a refinery control room located at the south of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study all 100 workers of an oil refinery control room were studied. Job stress and job satisfaction was measured using standard questionnaires provided by national institute of mental health (NIMH and Robbins respectively. After collecting, data were analyzed using SPSS ver.16 software. A general linear model was used to estimate the effect of different job stress dimensions on the job satisfaction. Results: In this study 62.08 percent of workers were categorized as having high level of stress. In job satisfaction case, 9.2, 27.6, 28.7, 16.1 and 18.4 of workers were classified as totally dissatisfied, dissatisfied, not satisfied nor dissatisfied, satisfied and totally satisfied, respectively. A Pearson correlation test revealed a significant negative correlation between job satisfaction and all studied dimensions of job stress (p= 0.01. In the general regression model, partial Eta squared was 0.03, 0.3 and 0.23 for respectively interpersonal relationships, physical conditions of work and job interest. Conclusion: This study showed that job satisfaction is mostly influenced by physical conditions and job interest dimensions of job stress. Therefore, for improvement of job satisfaction in workers, different parameters of these two dimensions of job stress should be considered.

  17. Bio-Refineries Bioprocess Technologies for Waste-Water Treatment, Energy and Product Valorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Cowan, A.

    2010-04-01

    Increasing pressure is being exerted on communities and nations to source energy from forms other than fossil fuels. Also, potable water is becoming a scarce resource in many parts of the world, and there remains a large divide in the demand and utilization of plant products derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The most extensive user and manager of terrestrial ecosystems is agriculture which is also the de facto steward of natural resources. As stated by Miller (2008) no other industry or institution comes close to the comparative advantage held for this vital responsibility while simultaneously providing food, fiber, and other biology-based products, including energy. Since modern commercial agriculture is transitioning from the production of bulk commodities to the provision of standardized products and specific-attribute raw materials for differentiated markets, we can argue that processes such as mass cultivation of microalgae and the concept of bio-refineries be seen as part of a `new' agronomy. EBRU is currently exploring the integration of bioprocess technologies using microalgae as biocatalysts to achieve waste-water treatment, water polishing and endocrine disruptor (EDC) removal, sustainable energy production, and exploitation of the resultant biomass in agriculture as foliar fertilizer and seed coatings, and for commercial extraction of bulk commodities such as bio-oils and lecithin. This presentation will address efforts to establish a fully operational solar-driven microalgae bio-refinery for use not only in waste remediation but to transform waste and biomass to energy, fuels, and other useful materials (valorisation), with particular focus on environmental quality and sustainability goals.

  18. Impact of biodegradation on the potential bioaccumulation and toxicity of refinery effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonards, Pim E G; Postma, Jaap F; Comber, Mike; Whale, Graham; Stalter, George

    2011-10-01

    Whole effluent assessments (WEA) are being investigated as potential tools for controlling aqueous industrial discharges and minimizing environmental impact. The present study investigated how toxicity and the presence of potentially bioaccumulative substances altered when refinery effluents were subjected to biodegradation tests. Three petrochemical effluents were assessed, two freshwater and one saline, and subjected to two different types of biodegradation tests, resembling either a ready style (dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-die away) or an inherent style (Zahn-Wellens) test and the toxicity and potential to bioaccumulate parameters were re-analysed during and after biodegradation. A high proportion of the potentially bioaccumulative substances (PBS) in these effluents was easily biodegradable. Biodegradation not only lowered the PBS concentration but also toxicity. Appropriate controls are required however, as some increases in toxicity were observed after 4 h. In the present study, six other petrochemical effluents were also assessed for their PBS content and toxicity to increase the understanding of the relationship between PBS and toxicity. The results showed that the PBS concentrations in these samples were lower than the estimated benchmarks of acute toxicity for algae, fish and crustacean, although two samples were above the critical PBS values for chronic narcotic toxicity for Daphnia magna, which support the assumption that narcotic effects are mainly responsible for the observed toxicity in refinery effluents. It can be concluded that for facilities processing petroleum products that the measurement of PBS is a suitable surrogate for toxicity tests at the screening stage. Finally, the combination of persistency, bioaccumulation, and toxicity tests was shown to have additional value compared to an approach using only toxicity tests. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  19. Optimization of petroleum refinery effluent treatment in a UASB reactor using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastegar, S.O. [Biotechnology Group, Chemical Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mousavi, S.M., E-mail: mousavi_m@modares.ac.ir [Biotechnology Group, Chemical Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shojaosadati, S.A. [Biotechnology Group, Chemical Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheibani, S. [R and T Management Department, National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A UASB was successfully used for treatment of petroleum refinery effluent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Response surface methodology was applied to design and analysis of experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System was modeled between efficient factors include HRT, influent COD and V{sub up}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UASB was able to remove about 76.3% influent COD at optimum conditions. - Abstract: An upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor was successfully used for the treatment of petroleum refinery effluent. Before optimization, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was 81% at a constant organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.4 kg/m{sup 3} d and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 48 h. The rate of biogas production was 559 mL/h at an HRT of 40 h and an influent COD of 1000 mg/L. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to predict the behaviors of influent COD, upflow velocity (V{sub up}) and HRT in the bioreactor. RSM showed that the best models for COD removal and biogas production rate were the reduced quadratic and cubic models, respectively. The optimum region, identified based on two critical responses, was an influent COD of 630 mg/L, a V{sub up} of 0.27 m/h, and an HRT of 21.4 h. This resulted in a 76.3% COD removal efficiency and a 0.25 L biogas/L feed d biogas production rate.

  20. Manufacture Of Pozzolanic Cement From RFCC Spent Catalyst In Khartoum Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam E Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pozzolana is defined as Siliceous and aluminous material which reacts with calcium hydroxide in presence of water at room temperature to form strong slow-hardening cement. Pozzolana has the advantage of reduction of leachibility of calcium hydroxide liberated during the setting and hydration of cement. In Khartoum Refinery five to ten tons per week of spent catalyst are produced in fine powder this quantity is sent to dumping sites or landfills. In this study pilot experiments were successfully carried out at different ratios to produce cement. The RFCC spent catalyst samples were subjected to chemical analysis to determine the content of Al2O3 SiO3TiO3 CaO and V2O5 ..etc. These were found to be 49.5 41.1 0.32 1.4 and 0.09 percent respectively other compounds are Na2O MgO P2O5SO3 K2O MnOFe2O3Co3O4 and NiO2 with. It is found that the percentages of SiO2 Al2O3 and Fe2O3 amount up to 91.5 that is above the ASTM standard C6182003 which stipulated that the minimum of such compound is 70 . Physical properties of RFCC spent catalyst were also carried out including crystallinity and Pozzolanicity index. The cement produced was tested for compressive strength consistency and setting time .It is concluded that RFCC spent catalyst in Khartoum Refinery is a Pozzolanic material and up to 30 replacement from Portland cement blended cement complies with the Sudanese and European Standards No SSMO 39982011and EN-197-11992 respectively. The study shows that the compressive strength of blended Pozzolanic cements decreases with increasing Pozzolana content. From the foregoing it is recommended to use RFCC spent catalyst with Portland cement as blended cement to produce mortars for construction and concrete.

  1. Opportunities and challenges at the interface between petrochemicals and refinery. The OMV view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtscheidl, J. [OMV Refining and Marketing GmbH, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    OMV's refineries have been integrated into petrochemicals since the first steam cracker came on line in 1970. The refineries in Schwechat, Burghausen and Romania, especially Arpechim, have significant petrochemical capacities. In 1998 PCD was merged with Borealis, a leading producer of high grade polymers. OMV's initial 25% stake in Borealis increased to 36 in 2007. The last years have seen major investments in Schwechat and Burghausen: Schwechat's cracker was expanded by approximately 150 KTA to a nominal 500 KTA of ethylene. And in Burghausen the revamp of the cracker has been combined with a metathesis unit in order to feed a new 330 KTA polypropylene plant. The polymer market is still growing. However, the bulk of investments to increase capacity are located in the Middle East and in the Asia-Pacific region, predominately in China. As more and more products from these regions find their way to Europe, the European petrochemicals industry faces fierce competition. The response is restructuring: the creation of Arkema (Total), the takeover of BP's petrochemical assets by INEOS, the disposal of Shell-BASF subsidiary Basell to Haldia Petrochemical and Accent Industries, and the transfer of Statoil's interest in Borealis to IPIC and OMV. And most recently, Basell's acquisition of Lyondell. Compared with competitors in the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region, producers in Europe are burdened with serious disadvantages: fairly old, small units and high costs of labor, energy and raw materials. There is no single solution. OMV, however, will continue to follow the strategies that have been successful so far: - Ever closer integration of refining and petrochemicals; - Capturing market opportunities for profitable growth; -Remaining market orientated. (orig.)

  2. Comparative phylogeography between two generalist flea species reveal a complex interaction between parasite life history and host vicariance: parasite-host association matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mescht, Luther; Matthee, Sonja; Matthee, Conrad A

    2015-06-10

    In parasitic taxa, life history traits such as microhabitat preference and host specificity can result in differential evolutionary responses to similar abiotic events. The present study investigates the influence of vicariance and host association on the genetic structure of two generalist flea species, Listropsylla agrippinae, and Chiastopsylla rossi. The taxa differ in the time spent on the host (predominantly fur vs. nest) and level of host specificity. A total of 1056 small mammals were brushed to collect 315 fleas originating from 20 geographically distinct localities in South Africa. Phylogeographic genetic structure of L. agrippinae and C. rossi were determined by making use of 315 mitochondrial COII and 174 nuclear EF1-α sequences. Both parasites show significant genetic differentiation among the majority of the sampling sites confirming limited dispersal ability for fleas. The generalist fur flea with a narrower host range, L. agrippinae, displayed geographic mtDNA spatial genetic structure at the regional scale and this pattern is congruent with host vicariance. The dating of the divergence between the L. agrippinae geographic clades co-insides with paleoclimatic changes in the region approximately 5.27 Ma and this provides some evidence for a co-evolutionary scenario. In contrast, the more host opportunistic nest flea, C. rossi, showed a higher level of mtDNA and nDNA spatial genetic structure at the inter-populational scale, most likely attributed to comparatively higher restrictions to dispersal. In the present study, the evolutionary history of the flea species could best be explained by the association between parasite and host (time spent on the host). The phylogeographic pattern of the fur flea with a narrower host range correspond to host spatial genetic structures, while the pattern in the host opportunistic nest flea correspond to higher genetic divergences between sampling localities that may also be associated with higher effective

  3. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to

  4. Understanding History

    OpenAIRE

    Gorman, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Has any question about the historical past ever been finally answered? Of course there is much disagreement among professional historians about what happened in the past and how to explain it. But this incisive study goes one step further and brings into question the very ability of historians to gather and communicate genuine knowledge about the past. Understanding History applies this general question from the philosophy of history to economic history of American slaveholders. Do we unders...

  5. Financial History

    OpenAIRE

    Cassis, Y.; Cottrell, P. L

    2017-01-01

    The considerable renewal of interest in all aspects of financial history over recent years provided one motivation for this new venture. Yet, the foundations for our specialism, which draws from both History and the Social Sciences, especially economics, have been laid by many. Some would point to continuity in our interest from the publication in the 1930s of jubilee banking history volumes, such as those written for British institutions by Gregory, and by Crick and Wadsworth. Further schola...

  6. Conceptual History, Cultural History, Social History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Zhivov (†

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available V. M. Zhivov’s introduction to Studies in Historical Semantics of the Russian Language in the Early Modern Period (2009, translated here for the first time, offers a critical survey of the historiography on Begriffsgeschichte, the German school of conceptual history associated with the work of Reinhart Koselleck, as well as of its application to the study of Russian culture.  By situating Begriffsgeschichte in the context of late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century European philosophy, particularly hermeneutics and phenomenology, the author points out the important, and as yet unacknowledged, role that Russian linguists have played in the development of a native school of conceptual history.  In the process of outlining this alternative history of the discipline, Zhivov provides some specific examples of the way in which the study of “historical semantics” can be used to analyze the development of Russian modernity.

  7. Analyzing Perceptions of Wellbeing in Relation to Refinería Esmeraldas, The Largest Oil Refinery in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, K. S.; Valdivia, G.

    2016-12-01

    Refinería Esmeraldas, the largest oil refinery in Ecuador, has a great influence on the wellbeing of the mainly Afro-Ecuadorean neighborhoods that surround it. Understanding the extent of the refinery's influence on the local community is important as it contributes to a more effective planning for the predicted risks of environmental suffering associated with it, some of which may extend for generations to come. The problem of increased environmental burdens in low income communities of color, such as exposure to environmental pollutants, is often linked to improper regulation. Solutions are often framed in terms of stricter government policies, but equally important and more difficult to quantify factors, such as how pollution manifests in everyday life, also need to be addressed. This study uses primarily qualitative data, composed of structured interviews; spatial data; and audiovisual data, all of which was processed using analytic softwares such as Atlas.ti, Tableau, and ArcGIS, to map the experience of pollution and wellbeing in the city of Esmeraldas. The data was collected using a structured sample design, followed by snowball sampling in neighborhoods within the city. The findings indicate that the impacts of the refinery are not always direct, but rather affect various aspects of the life of Esmeraldeños. Several major wellbeing themes include Personal Trajectories, (Dis)able Bodies, and Urban Needs. These themes provide a more holistic understanding of life with pollution and help understand how people see themselves in relation to the refinery and how it affects their wellbeing. Grounded theory, which adopts an inductive approach, was used to analyze the everyday dimensions of the experience of pollution. The findings suggest that there are varying experiences of wellbeing in relation the refinery and that these have health, environmental, social, and physiological roots, which indicate possible connections between epigenetic manifestations and the

  8. Well-to-Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emission Analysis of High-Octane Fuels with Ethanol Blending: Phase II Analysis with Refinery Investment Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Elgowainy, Amgad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; DiVita, Vincent [Jacobs Consultancy Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Higher-octane gasoline can enable increases in an internal combustion engine’s energy efficiency and a vehicle’s fuel economy by allowing an increase in the engine compression ratio and/or by enabling downspeeding and downsizing. Producing high-octane fuel (HOF) with the current level of ethanol blending (E10) could increase the energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity of the fuel product from refinery operations. Alternatively, increasing the ethanol blending level in final gasoline products could be a promising solution to HOF production because of the high octane rating and potentially low blended Reid vapor pressure (RVP) of ethanol at 25% and higher of the ethanol blending level by volume. In our previous HOF well-to-wheels (WTW) report (the so-called phase I report of the HOF WTW analysis), we conducted WTW analysis of HOF with different ethanol blending levels (i.e., E10, E25, and E40) and a range of vehicle efficiency gains with detailed petroleum refinery linear programming (LP) modeling by Jacobs Consultancy and showed that the overall WTW GHG emission changes associated with HOFVs were dominated by the positive impact associated with vehicle efficiency gains and ethanol blending levels, while the refining operations to produce gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (BOB) for various HOF blend levels had a much smaller impact on WTW GHG emissions (Han et al. 2015). The scope of the previous phase I study, however, was limited to evaluating PADDs 2 and 3 operation changes with various HOF market share scenarios and ethanol blending levels. Also, the study used three typical configuration models of refineries (cracking, light coking, and heavy coking) in each PADD, which may not be representative of the aggregate response of all refineries in each PADD to various ethanol blending levels and HOF market scenarios. Lastly, the phase I study assumed no new refinery expansion in the existing refineries, which limited E10 HOF production to the

  9. Interdisciplinary study of atmospheric processes and constituents of the mid-Atlantic coastal region. Attachment 3: Data set for Craney Island oil refinery installation experiment. [air pollution monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindle, E. C.; Bandy, A.; Copeland, G.; Blais, R.; Levy, G.; Sonenshine, D.; Adams, D.; Maier, G.

    1975-01-01

    Data tables and maps are presented which include background information and experimental data on the Craney Island oil refinery installation experiment. The experiment was to investigate air pollution effects.

  10. Intellectual History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In the 5 Questions book series, this volume presents a range of leading scholars in Intellectual History and the History of Ideas through their answers to a brief questionnaire. Respondents include Michael Friedman, Jacques le Goff, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Jonathan Israel, Phiip Pettit, John Pocock...

  11. Romerrigets historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Erik

    Romerrigets historie fra Roms legendariske grundlæggelse i 753 f.v.t. til Heraklios' tronbestigelse i 610 e.v.t.......Romerrigets historie fra Roms legendariske grundlæggelse i 753 f.v.t. til Heraklios' tronbestigelse i 610 e.v.t....

  12. DGMK guideline: safety of fired process heaters in refineries and petrochemical plants; DGMK-Leitfaden: Sicherheit von Prozessoefen in Raffinerien und Petrochemie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.; Ries, L.; Roith, W.; Stroebl, J.; Steiglecher, J.

    2002-08-01

    The DGMK guideline compares the requirements for the safely instrumentation of Fired Process Heaters in refineries and petrochemical plants based on the EN 746-2, published in 1997 with actual installations in the industry and other regulations i.e. the American NFPA 85 from 2001. Main focus is the safety related instrumentation for Multiburner Installations, mainly used in Refineries and Petrochemical Plants in combination with the relevant operating procedures (orig.)

  13. Development of Statistical Accuracy Improvement Methodology for Oil Refinery Sector's Energy and Carbon Balance and Statistical Accuracy on Japanese General Energy Statistics (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    KAINOU Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Current Japanese General Energy Statistics quantifies energy and carbon balance of oil refinery sector solely by input such as crude oil and output such as gasoline, and regards the discrepancy as a statistical error and does not count energy consumption or energy origin carbon dioxide emission for the discrepancy. But issues are raised by a related committee of Ministry of the Environment that some part of the discrepancy of oil refinery sector might contain energy consumption and energy ori...

  14. Multilocus genetic analyses and spatial modeling reveal complex population structure and history in a widespread resident North American passerine (Perisoreus canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohms, Kimberly M; Graham, Brendan A; Burg, Theresa M

    2017-12-01

    An increasing body of studies of widely distributed, high latitude species shows a variety of refugial locations and population genetic patterns. We examined the effects of glaciations and dispersal barriers on the population genetic patterns of a widely distributed, high latitude, resident corvid, the gray jay (Perisoreus canadensis), using the highly variable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and microsatellite markers combined with species distribution modeling. We sequenced 914 bp of mtDNA control region for 375 individuals from 37 populations and screened seven loci for 402 individuals from 27 populations across the gray jay range. We used species distribution modeling and a range of phylogeographic analyses (haplotype diversity, ΦST, SAMOVA, FST, Bayesian clustering analyses) to examine evolutionary history and population genetic structure. MtDNA and microsatellite markers revealed significant genetic differentiation among populations with high concordance between markers. Paleodistribution models supported at least five potential areas of suitable gray jay habitat during the last glacial maximum and revealed distributions similar to the gray jay's contemporary during the last interglacial. Colonization from and prolonged isolation in multiple refugia is evident. Historical climatic fluctuations, the presence of multiple dispersal barriers, and highly restricted gene flow appear to be responsible for strong genetic diversification and differentiation in gray jays.

  15. Putting the military back into the history of the military-industrial complex: the management of technological innovation in the U.S. Army, 1945-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassman, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    In 1946 General Dwight Eisenhower, the Army Chief of Staff, established the Research and Development (R&D) Division on the War Department General Staff to expedite major technological breakthroughs in weapons technology. This goal, based on the separation of the management of R&D from procurement, captured the Army's preference for qualitative rather than quantitative superiority on the battlefield, but it threatened to upend entrenched methods of incremental product improvement under way in the Army's supply organizations, collectively called the technical services. The division's brief existence (it ceased operations in 1947) contrasted sharply with the longevity of the Ordnance Department's in-house manufacturing arsenals; for more than a century they had exploited synergies between R&D and production to turn out new weapons mass-produced in industry. The history of the R&D Division and the corresponding management of technological innovation in the technical services broadens an otherwise narrow historiographical interpretation of postwar knowledge production in the United States that is still focused heavily on the moral and political economy of military-funded academic research.

  16. A History of Repeated Failures: Stratigraphy of the Currituck and Cape Fear Slide Complexes on the Central U.S. Atlantic Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. C.; Brothers, D. S.; Ten Brink, U. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Currituck and Cape Fear Slide complexes, offshore of North Carolina, are two of the largest (>150 km3) submarine slope failure provinces on the U.S. Atlantic margin. Detailed stratigraphy of these slides and the surrounding regions is derived from a combination of high-resolution sparker multichannel seismic (MCS) data collected by the USGS in 2012, airgun MCS collected as part of the NSF GeoPRISMs Community Seismic Experiment in 2014 & legacy industry airgun MCS data collected in 1970s and 80s. Both the Currituck and Cape Fear Slide complexes are located in regions with high sediment input that resulted in the development of a broad, low gradient (salt diapir displays evidence of possible downslope creep folding within strata that downlap onto a possible buried failure plane. While submarine slope failure along this portion of the margin has long been linked with hydrate dissociation and/or salt tectonics, features that are pervasive along the margin, our new stratigraphic analyses suggest that antecedent margin physiography and sediment loading may be critical factors in determining the locations of large-scale slope failures.

  17. The RAM +L analysis methodology: the refinery plants case study; Analise RAM +L: um estudo integrado de varias unidades de producao de uma refinaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto, Eduardo [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Bretas, Rogerio [PETROBRAS S.A., Betim, MG (Brazil). Refinaria Gabriel Passos (REGAP)

    2008-07-01

    The RAM (Reliability, Availability and Maintainability) main objective is assess the system and equipment performance in order to identify the critical issues to implement system's improvements. The first step is define equipment failure modes and it's PDF as well as repair time for each failure mode. The second step is modeling system regarding diagram block logic dependency among equipment and its failures which cause system production losses. The third step is simulating model in defined period of time in order to identify critical equipment to propose system improvement. Despite being having been used constantly to assess system performances, those methodology do not consider the logistic complex assumptions in so many cases to huge systems and it RDB logic do not represent the real effect in production losses. Even if that good enough to perform system analysis it's not quite enough to complex system with logistic resources regarding system's products efficiency. By the other way round, in logistic complex system analysis methodologies, equipment failures details are not regarded in so many times, showing that there's a necessary improvement in those analysis. Therefore, the RAM + L analysis is a methodology which regards all equipment failures issues as well as logistic assumptions being a more realistic analysis. The refinery case study Will be propose to demonstrate a new vision of two recognized methodologies regarding a complex system with over than 200 equipment comprising two tanks, two pumps and five Unit Plants as Vacuum Distillation, Atmospheric Distillation, Hydrogen Generation, Diesel Hydrotreating Unit and DEA. (author)

  18. Past soil erosion history recorded by lake sediments in mountain areas (north and south French Alps): complex interactions with climatic and human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguet-Covex, C.; Poulenard, J.; Arnaud, F.; Disnar, J.-R.; Sabatier, P.; Wilhelm, B.; Jouffroy-Bapicot, I.; Rey, P.-J.; David, F.; Malet, E.

    2012-04-01

    Erosion rates and patterns are influenced both by hydrological activity and the evolution of soil-vegetation cover. This soil-vegetation cover is in turn impacted by climatic changes and human activities through deforestation, grazing and agriculture. Such land uses are reported in mountain areas since several millennia (the Neolithic or Bronze Age in the Alps). The effects of these activities and climatic changes on erosion and above all on soil cover are relatively few documented. However, a good knowledge of these processes is important to better evaluate the future evolution of soils and the sustainability for agricultural practices, in the context of global change. Because lakes act as traps of erosion products, lake sediments represent interesting continuous archives of past soil evolution and erosion. They provide a unique opportunity to reconstruct at high resolution the soil history over long time periods and thus to determine the timing of changes in response to climate and/or anthropogenic pressures. As a result of the Pygmalion research program, we present the study of two small mountain catchment in north (Lake Anterne, 2063 m asl) and south French Alps (Lake Lauzanier, 2285 m asl), covering the Holocene and the last 1000 years, respectively. To trace the past soil erosion erosion history and bring arguments about the origin of changes, mineral and organic geochemical analyses were performed and combined with quantitative reconstructions of terrigenous inputs. To emphasize our assumptions about the origins of recorded changes, a pluridisciplinary approach (palynology, archaeology...) was also adopted. The study of Lake Anterne shows the second half of the Holocene is characterized by four important phases of erosion. These phases are underlined by high flood frequencies and different geochemical composition of sediments. These geochemical signatures reveal changes of sediment sources related to different erosion patterns. In particular, the first phase

  19. DINOFLAGELLATE CYSTS AND CALCAREOUS NANNOFOSSILS FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS SARACENO FORMATION (CALABRIA, ITALY: IMPLICATIONS ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THE LIGURIDE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFANO TORRICELLI

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts and calcareous nannofossils recovered from the turbidites of the Saraceno Formation outcropping in the type area (north-eastern Calabria, Italy are presented. They provide new information about the age of the Saraceno Formation, hence a constraint to reconstruct the timing of deformations that affected the Liguride Complex. The distribution of dinoflagellate cysts and calcareous nannofossils in the succession studied is compared with biostratigraphies available for the Upper Cretaceous. Accordingly, the age of the lowermost part of the Fiumara Saraceno section is latest Albian to Turonian, whereas the upper part of the section is dated as late Campanian-?earliest Maastrichtian. A hiatus spanning che Coniacian, che Santonian and most of che Campanian is inferred between these two successions, which are also distinguished by the presence and absence of flint respectively. Consistencies and discrepancies of che present data with biostratigraphical information previously published for che Saraceno Formation, are discussed. 

  20. The impact of the maintenance management system: a case study of the PetroSA GTL refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahlangu, Bafana Petrus

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research study investigated the impact of the maintenance management system (MMS on production output and profitability (PO&P at the PetroSA GTL refinery, a state-owned company. The two groups that participated were the maintenance group, consisting of 56 respondents, and the production group, with 38 respondents. The main findings of the research study suggested that the MMS impacts positively on PO&P at the PetroSA GTL refinery. The maintenance scorecard assessment tool – consisting of six perspectives – was used to assess the gap between the MMS and PO&P. The positivism paradigm, the deductive process, a cross-sectional quantitative survey, and descriptive statistics were used to conduct the research study.

  1. An Analysis of the Technological Structure of Refineries and Blenders: Estimation of the Leontief Multiproduct Cost Function and Reservation Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Domínguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Leontief multiproduct flexible cost function aims to give an approach to the technology used by refineries and blenders. In general, this cost function satisfies rational behavior restrictions imposed by economic theory. The estimated marginal costs are incorporated in a monopolistic competition model to calculate the virtual prices of other products provided by refineries and blenders in the hypothetical situation in which reformulated gasoline is absent in fuel markets. I have found that conventional gasoline and other product prices are greater than those in the mentioned hypothetical case. This result reflects the fact that consumers are being charged with high prices in order to have available a fuel which satisfies the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA regulations. Finally, when all the products become perfect substitutes, i.e. consumers are not interested in the quality of fuels, price differences tend to be negligibly small.

  2. A geoprocessing model for the selection of populations most affected by diffuse industrial contamination: the case of oil refinery plants

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Pasetto; Marco De Santis

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. A method to select populations living in areas affected by diffuse environmental contamination is presented, with particular regard to oil refineries, in the Italian context. The reasons to use municipality instead of census tract populations for environment and health small-area studies of contaminated sites are discussed. METHODS. Populations most affected by diffuse environmental contamination are identified through a geoprocessing model. Data from the national census 2001 we...

  3. Childhood Exposure to Manganese and Postural Instability in Children living near a Ferromanganese Refinery in Southeastern Ohio

    OpenAIRE

    Rugless, Fedoria; Bhattacharya, Amit; Succop, Paul; Dietrich, Kim N.; Cox, Cyndy; Alden, Jody; Kuhnell, Pierce; Barnas, Mary; Wright, Robert; Parsons, Patrick J.; Praamsma, Meredith L.; Palmer, Christopher D.; Beidler, Caroline; Wittberg, Richard; Haynes, Erin N.

    2013-01-01

    Airborne manganese (Mn) exposure can result in neurotoxicity and postural instability in occupationally exposed workers, yet few studies have explored the association ambient exposure to Mn in children and postural stability. The goal of this study was to determine the association between Mn and lead (Pb) exposure, as measured by blood Pb, blood and hair Mn and time weighted distance (TWD) from a ferromanganese refinery, and postural stability in children. A subset of children ages 7–9 years ...

  4. Soot and SO2 contribution to the supersites in the MILAGRO campaign from elevated flares in the Tula Refinery

    OpenAIRE

    Almanza, V. H.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a simulation of the plume trajectory emitted by flaring activities of the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Mexico. The flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order to estimate emission rates of combustion by-products of interest for air quality: acetylene, ethylene, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, soot and sulfur dioxide. The emission rates of NO2 and SO2 were compared with measurements obtained at Tula as part of MILAGRO field campaig...

  5. Carbon Capture and Sequestration from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, Cheryl; Williams, Bryan, Valluri, Kiranmal; Watwe, Ramchandra; Kumar, Ravi; Mehlman, Stewart

    2010-06-21

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE?s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities

  6. An integrated study on microtectonics, geothermometry and thermochronology of the Çataldaǧ Core Complex (NW Turkey): Implications for cooling, deformation and uplift history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaci, Omer; Altunkaynak, Safak

    2017-04-01

    We present an integrated study on structure, microstructure, geothermometry and thermochronology of the Çataldaǧ Core Complex (ÇCC) in NW Turkey in order to understand the cooling, deformation and uplift mechanisms. ÇCC is formed from an Eo-Oligocene granite-gneiss-migmatite complex (GGMC) and an Early Miocene I-type granodioritic body (ÇG: Çataldaǧ granodiorite) which were exhumed as a dome-shaped core complex in the footwall of a ring-shaped low-angle detachment zone (The Çataldaǧ Detachment Fault Zone; ÇDFZ) in the Early Miocene. New U-Pb zircon (LA-ICPMS) and monazite ages of GGMC yielded magmatic ages of 33.8 and 30.1 Ma (Latest Eocene-Early Oligocene). 40Ar/39Ar muscovite, biotite and K-feldspar from the GGMC yielded the deformation age span 21.38±0,05 Ma and 20.81±0.04 Ma, which is also the emplacement age (20.84±0.13 Ma and 21.6±0.04 Ma) of ÇG. ÇDFZ is responsible for mainly top-to-the-north sense kinematic processes. The microstructural features of quartz, feldspar and mica indicate that the ÇCC has undergone continuous deformations during its cooling, from submagmatic to cataclastic conditions. Five microstructural grades have been classified under ductile (DZ) and ductile-to-brittle shear zone (SZ), according to the estimated deformation temperature and intensity of the strain. Microcline twinning, marginally replacement myrmekite and flame-perthite are predominant features for feldspar while chessboard extinction, grain boundary migration and subgrain rotation recrystallization is common for quartz in the DZ which has a deformation temperature range of >600°C to 400°C. Grain size reduction is an important factor for the ductile to brittle shear zone (SZ). Feldspar is represented by bulging recrystallization (BLG), feldspar-fish and domino-type microfracture/microfaulting and quartz show more elongated structures such as ribbons with high aspect ratios. Mineral-fish (muscovite, biotite and feldspar) structures indicate a temperature

  7. Displaced/re-worked rhodolith deposits infilling parts of a complex Miocene multistorey submarine channel: A case history from the Sassari area (Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murru, Marco; Bassi, Davide; Simone, Lucia

    2015-08-01

    In the Sassari area (north-western Sardinia, Italy), the Miocene Porto Torres sub-basin sequences represent the complex multistorey mixed carbonate-siliciclastic submarine feature called the Sassari Channel. During the late Burdigalian-early Serravallian, repeated terrigenous supplies from uplifted Paleozoic crystalline substrata fed the Sassari Channel system by means of turbidity and locally hyper-concentrated turbidity flows. Shelfal areas were the source of terrigenous clasts, but open shelf rhodalgal/foramol carbonate areas were very productive and largely also contributed to the channel infilling. Re-worked sands and skeletal debris were discontinuously re-sedimented offshore as pure terrigenous, mixed and/or carbonate deposits. Major sediment supply was introduced between the latest Burdigalian and the start of the middle Langhian, during which a large amount of carbonate, mixed and siliciclastic sediments reached the Porto Torres Basin (Sassari Channel I). Contributions from shallow proximal source areas typify the lower intervals (Unit A) in marginal sectors of the channel. Upward, these evolve into autochthonous rhodolith deposits, winnowed by strong currents in relatively shallow well lit settings within a complex network of narrow tidally-controlled channels (Unit D) locally bearing coral assemblages. Conversely, re-sedimented rhodoliths from the Units B and C accumulated under conditions of higher turbidity. In deeper parts of the channel taxonomically diversified rhodoliths point to the mixing of re-deposited skeletal components from different relatively deep bathmetric settings. In the latest early Langhian, major re-sedimentation episodes, resulting in large prograding bodies (Unit D), triggered by repeated regression pulses in a frame of persistent still stand. During these episodes photophile assemblages dwelled in the elevated margin sectors of the channel. A significant latest early Langhian drop in relative sea-level resulted in impressive mass

  8. A METHODOLOGY BASED ON AN ECOLOGICAL ECONOMY APPROACH FOR THE INTEGRATING MANAGEMENT OF THE SULPHUROUS WATER IN AN OIL REFINERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Orlando Lobelles Sardiñas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the current highly stringent international standards regulating the contaminating emissions to the environment, the Oil refinery of Cienfuegos is still generating liquid and gaseous emissions contaminating the environment. The construction of new units as part of the Refinery expansion leads to an increase of these emissions due to the lack of technologies for the reutilization of the sulphurous water. The objective of this paper is to propose a methodology for the integral management of the sulphurous residual water in the oil refining process, including the evaluation and selection of the most feasible technological variant to minimize the sulphur contamination of water and the resulting emissions during the process. The methodology is based on the ecological economy tools, allowing a comprehensible evaluation of six technological variants at the refinery of Cienfuegos. The Life Cycle Assessment was applied (ACV by its Spanish acronym, by means of the software SimaPro 7.1. It was evaluated through the Eco Speed Method, to minimize the possible uncertainty. An economic evaluation was performed, taking into account the external costs for a more comprehensive analysis, enabling, along with the ecological indicators, the selection of the best technological variant, achieving a methodology based on a comprehensive evaluation, and as a positive impact, the implementation of the chosen variant (V5, 98.27% of the process water was recovered, as well as the sulphur that recovered from 94 to 99.8 %, reducing the emissions from 12 200 to 120 mg/Nm3 as SO2.

  9. Evaluation of the dispersion of oil refinery liquid effluent; Avaliacao da dispersao de efluente liquido de refinaria de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariano, Adriano Pinto; Silva, Ariovaldo Jose da; Oliveira, Valdenilson Jose Alves de; Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi de [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Microbiologia. Inst. de Biociencias], e-mail: adrianomariano@yahoo.com.br

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, two techniques to evaluate the dispersion of the effluent of an oil refinery are presented. Thus, the dispersion plume was characterized by field measurements of electrical conductivity and by computational simulation (Cormix simulator). An oil refinery whose effluent is discharged on the Atibaia river (Paulinia/SP) is taken as study case. The behavior of the effluent was evaluated until 1000 m after the discharge. The results show that the measurement of electrical conductivity is a suitable technique to evaluate the dispersion of oil refinery wastewaters, since they have high conductivity and for this reason there is a strong contrast between the values of the wastewater and the ambient background. Furthermore, other water quality parameters had a dispersion behavior similar to that shown by the conductivity. The dispersion plume generated by the computational simulator showed high concordance with the field data. In this manner, computational simulation can be a useful tool to evaluate the dispersion of discharges considering hypothetical scenarios, as well as to design the discharge channel. (author)

  10. Potential and optimization of two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge and microbial community study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghong; Liang, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Li, Qing X.; Guo, Shaohui; Chen, Chunmao

    2016-12-01

    Oil refinery waste activated sludge produced from oil wastewater biological treatment is a major industrial sludge. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge was studied for the first time. Thermal pretreatment under 170 °C is effective on sludge solubilization. At the optimum hydrolytic-acidogenic condition which was pH of 6.5, temperature of 55 °C and HRT of 2 days, 2754 mg/L volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced and acetic acid and butyric acid were the key components. Comparative studies of single-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion in terms of organic removal, biogas production and methane concentration were conducted. The cumulative methane production and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiency in the two-phase system were 228 mL/g COD added and 77.8%, respectively, which were 1.6 and 2.1 times higher than those in single-phase anaerobic digestion. Such improved performance is attributed to intensification of dominant microbial population in separated reactors. Caloramator, Ureibacillus, Dechloromonas, Petrobacter, and T78 played important roles in hydrolytic-acidification and oil-organics degradation. Syntrophic bacteria in the family Porphyromonadaceae and the genus Anaerobranca provide acetate for methanogen. The results demonstrated the potential and operating condition of two-phase anaerobic digestion in treatment of oil refinery waste activated sludge.

  11. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Charles [Environ Holdings, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Wilson, Robert [Environ Holdings, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    This project culminated in the demonstration of a full-scale industrial burner which allows a broad range of “opportunity” gaseous fuels to be cost-effectively and efficiently utilized while generating minimal emissions of criteria air pollutants. The burner is capable of maintaining a stable flame when the fuel composition changes rapidly. This enhanced stability will contribute significantly to improving the safety and reliability of burner operation in manufacturing sites. Process heating in the refining and chemicals sectors is the primary application for this burner. The refining and chemical sectors account for more than 40% of total industrial natural gas use. Prior to the completion of this project, an enabling technology did not exist that would allow these energy-intensive industries to take full advantage of opportunity fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gaseous fuels include biogas (from animal and agricultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills) as well as syngas (from the gasification of biomass, municipal solid wastes, construction wastes, and refinery residuals). The primary challenge to using gaseous opportunity fuels is that their composition and combustion performance differ significantly from those of conventional fuels such as natural gas and refinery fuel gas. An effective fuel-flexible burner must accept fuels that range widely in quality and change in composition over time, often rapidly. In Phase 1 of this project, the team applied computational fluid dynamics analysis to optimize the prototype burner’s aerodynamic, combustion, heat transfer, and emissions performance. In Phase 2, full-scale testing and refinement of two prototype burners were conducted in test furnaces at Zeeco’s offices in Broken Arrow, OK. These tests demonstrated that the full range of conventional and opportunity fuels could be utilized by the project’s burner while achieving robust flame stability and very low levels of

  12. A review of scientific literature examining the mining history, geology, mineralogy, and amphibole asbestos health effects of the Rainy Creek igneous complex, Libby, Montana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandli, Bryan R; Gunter, Mickey E

    2006-11-01

    This article reviews the past 90 yr of scientific research directed on multiple aspects of the unique geology and environmental health issues surrounding the vermiculite deposit found at Libby, MT. Hydrothermal alteration and extensive weathering of the ultramafic units resulted in the formation of a rich deposit of vermiculite that was mined for 67 yr and used in numerous consumer products in its expanded form. Later intrusions of alkaline units caused hydrothermal alteration of the pyroxenes, resulting in formation of amphiboles. Some of these amphiboles occur in the asbestiform habit and have been associated with pulmonary disease in former miners and mill workers. Identification of these amphibole asbestos minerals has received little attention in the past, but recent work shows that the majority of the amphibole mineral species present may not be any of the amphibole species currently regulated by government agencies. Epidemiological studies on former miners have, nevertheless, shown that the amphibole asbestos from the Rainy Creek igneous complex is harmful; also, a recent study by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry shows that residents of Libby who had not been employed in the vermiculite mining or milling operations also appear to have developed asbestos-related pulmonary diseases at a higher rate than the general public elsewhere. Since November 1999, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been involved in the cleanup of asbestos-contaminated sites in and around Libby associated with the mining and processing of vermiculite.

  13. Competitive strategy to provide technology and basic designs for the construction of new refineries premium of the PETROBRAS; Estrategia competitiva para prover tecnologias e projetos basicos para a construcao de novas refinarias premium da PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudia, Baptista M.L.A.; Adalberto, Barbalho S. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, there are major incentives for the construction of new refineries in Brazil: the increase of the local market and the discovery of huge oil reserves in the southeastern Atlantic coast of Brazil. In this scenario, PETROBRAS decided to construct two new refineries, Premium I and II, with a total refining capacity of 900.000 BPSD. The refineries will be designed to process a mix of Brazilian national crudes. The main objects of this ambitious project are to produce high quality diesel and jet fuel from an elevated nitrogen content feedstock, minimizing capital expenditure and schedule. Both refineries will have the same flow scheme with a target to maximize Middle distillate production for the European and local markets. In order to assure that the refinery scheme and the technologies selected will provide the best Net Present Value (NPV), it was decided to perform a Design Competition process to select the company to provide the basic design for all Premium refineries. As the concepts behind a Design Competition were new for PETROBRAS a rigorous process was developed and followed, which entailed contracting three benchmark companies with outstanding knowledge and experience in hydroprocessing to provide independent conceptual studies for a 300.000 BPSD refinery called Premium II. The vision was to utilize the same refinery scheme in the construction of the Premium I refinery which will have two identical trains processing 300.000 BPD. The awarded company was selected based on technical and economic evaluations, supported by state of the art hydroprocessing technologies, block flow diagram optimization and heat integration. This strategy allowed PETROBRAS to acquire the best refinery scheme and process designs for the PREMIUM refineries. The present paper discusses the design competition process, the refinery scheme adopted and the results achieved. (author)

  14. An environmentally friendly process for the recovery of valuable metals from spent refinery catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Laura; Fonti, Viviana; Vegliò, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca

    2013-06-01

    The present study dealt with the whole valorization process of exhaust refinery catalysts, including metal extraction by ferric iron leaching and metal recovery by precipitation with sodium hydroxide. In the leaching operation the effects on metal recovery of the concentration and kind of acid, the concentration of catalyst and iron (III) were determined. The best operating conditions were 0.05 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid, 40 g L(-1) iron (III), 10% catalyst concentration; almost complete extraction of nickel and vanadium, and 50%extraction efficiency of aluminium and less than 20% for molybdenum. Sequential precipitation on the leach liquor showed that it was not possible to separate metals through such an approach and a recovery operation by means of a single-stage precipitation at pH 6.5 would simplify the procedures and give a product with an average content of iron (68%), aluminium (13%), vanadium (11%), nickel (6%) and molybdenum (1%) which would be potentially of interest in the iron alloy market. The environmental sustainability of the process was also assessed by means of life cycle assessment and yielded an estimate that the highest impact was in the category of global warming potential with 0.42 kg carbon dioxide per kg recovered metal.

  15. Life Cycle Analysis of Bitumen Transportation to Refineries by Rail and Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimana, Balwinder; Verma, Aman; Di Lullo, Giovanni; Rahman, Md Mustafizur; Canter, Christina E; Olateju, Babatunde; Zhang, Hao; Kumar, Amit

    2017-01-03

    Crude oil is currently transported primarily by pipelines and rail from extraction sites to refineries around the world. This research evaluates energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for three scenarios (synthetic crude oil and dilbit with and without diluent return) in which 750 000 bpd of Alberta's bitumen is transported 3000 km to determine which method has a lower environmental impact. Each scenario has a pipeline and rail pathway, and the dilbit without diluent return scenario has an additional heated bitumen pathway, which does not require diluent. An Excel based bottom-up model is developed using engineering first-principles to calculate mass and energy balances for each process. Results show that pipeline transportation produced between 61% and 77% fewer GHG emissions than by rail. The GHG emissions decreased by 15% and 73% for rail and pipelines as the capacity increased from 100 000 to 800 000 bpd. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to determine the uncertainty in the emissions and found that the uncertainty was larger for pipelines (up to ±73%) and smaller for rail (up to ±28%). The uncertainty ranges do not overlap, thus confirming that pipelines have lower GHG emissions, which is important information for policy makers conducting pipeline reviews.

  16. The application of the Layer of Protection Analysis (LOPA in Sour Water Refinery Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsanollah Habibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study was to analyze major accidents take place in sour water refineries, and to assess the adequacy of safeguard layers in the system. Also it has been provided safety recommendations in regarding to our analysis. Materials and Methods: Using the layer of protection analysis (LOPA, the role of protective layers in controlling the potential risks in Sour Water Recycling Unit is determined and required recommendations to reduce risk are provided. Results: This study showed that there are 49 high risk areas in Sour Water Recycling Unit. Moreover, Excessive flow rate in pipelines, Excessive temperature, Reverse flow, H 2 S leakage, Flow interruption, and Corrosion are the main identified hazards. Conclusion: It can be conclude that the effectiveness of protective layers is not enough and additional protective layers are required to improve the process safety system. Furthermore, LOPA is an improved technique when use the output of hazard and operability study (HAZOP and it has some advantages due to its semi-quantitative nature in estimating hazards.

  17. Measurements of radiation level in petroleum products and wastes in Riyadh City Refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, F.S. [Physics Department, Girls College of Education, Riyadh University for Women, Al-rowdah, P.O. Box 27329, Riyadh, Central 11417 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: ferdoasalsaleh@hotmail.com; Al-Harshan, G.A. [Physics Department, Girls College of Education, Riyadh University for Women, Al-rowdah, P.O. Box 27329, Riyadh, Central 11417 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-07-15

    Recent concern has been devoted to the hazard arising from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas facilities. Twenty-seven petroleum samples were collected from Riyadh Refinery. Fourteen samples were products and 13 were waste samples; three of them were scale samples and 10 were sludge samples. The specific radioactivities of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 224}Ra, {sup 40}K, and {sup 235}U for all samples were determined using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The radium equivalent activity, radiation hazard indices and absorbed dose rate in air for all waste samples were estimated. The radon emanation coefficient of the waste samples was estimated. It ranged between 0.574 and 0.154. The age of two scale samples was determined and found to be 2.39 and 3.66 years. The chemical structure of the waste samples was investigated using X-ray florescence analysis (XRF) and Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, Ca and Fe were found in all samples. From this study, it was noticed that the concentrations of the natural radionuclides in the petroleum wastes were higher than that of the petroleum products.

  18. Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem; Benda, Paul L; Gillenwater, Patricia S; Negri, M Cristina; Xiong, Hui; Snyder, Seth W

    2012-05-15

    Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7bar). However, higher operating pressures (≥34.5bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1±0.0μm to 0.74±0.2μm after UF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Material Balance And Reaction Kinetics Modeling For Penex Isomerization Process In Daura Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamadi Adel Sharif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penex Deisohexanizer isomerization of light straight run naphtha is a significant process for petroleum refining and proved to be effective technology to produce gasoline components with a high octane number. Modeling of the chemical kinetic reactions is an important tool because it is a better tool for optimization of the experimental data into parameters used for industrial reactors. The present study deals on the isomerization process in Daura refinery. Material balance calculations were done mathematically on the unit for the kinetics prediction purpose. A kinetic mathematical model was derived for the prediction rate constants K1 and K2 and activation energy Ea at operating temperatures range 120-180°C. According to the model, the results show that with increasing of temperature leads to increased K1 directly, where the K2 values proportional inversely. The activation energy results show that Ea1(nC6

  20. Summary of the proceedings of the workshop on the refinery of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This report on the Workshop on the Refinery of the Future has been prepared for participants to provide them with a succinct summary of the presentations, deliberations, and discussions. In preparing the summary, we have striven to capture the key findings (conclusions) and highlight the issues and concerns raised during the plenary and breakout sessions. The presentation of the summary of the proceedings follows the final workshop agenda, which is given in Section I; each section is tabbed to facilitate access to specific workshop topics. The material presented relies heavily on the outline summaries prepared and presented by the Plenary Session Chairman and the Facilitators for each breakout group. These summaries are included essentially as presented. In addition, individuals were assigned to take notes during each session; these notes were used to reconstruct critical issues that were discussed in more detail. The key comments made by the participants, which tended to represent the range of views expressed relative to the issues, are presented immediately following the facilitator`s summary outline in order to convey the flavor of the discussions. The comments are not attributed to individuals, since in many instances they represent a composite of several similar views expressed during the discussion. The facilitators were asked to review the writeups describing the outcomes of their sessions for accuracy and content; their suggested changes were incorporated. Every effort has thus been made to reconstruct the views expressed as accurately as possible; however, errors and/or misinterpretations undoubtedly have occurred.

  1. Regular exercise training attenuates pulmonary inflammatory responses to inhaled alumina refinery dust in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normando, Valéria Marques Ferreira; Mazzoli-Rocha, Flavia; Moreira, Dayse Kelly Molina; Barcellos, Bárbara Chaves; Picanço-Diniz, Domingos Wanderley; Zin, Walter Araújo

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to alumina dust has been recently associated with impaired lung mechanics and inflammation. We aimed at evaluating if moderate exercise training prevents these outcomes. Twenty-three female BALB/c mice (25-30g) were randomly divided in two main groups: control (C) and exercise (E), which were submitted, or not, to 15min of swimming, 5 days/week during 4 weeks. Then, the animals were exposed for 1h to either saline solution (CS or ES) or to a suspension of 8mg/m(3) of alumina dust (CA or EA). Twenty-four hours later pulmonary mechanics was determined by the end-inflation occlusion method. Left lungs were prepared for histology and right lungs for TGF-β determination. Static elastance increased after alumina dust exposure independently of swimming. In CA group the viscoelastic component of elastance, the viscoelastic/inhomogeneous pressure, the polymorphonuclear amount, the fraction area of alveolar collapse and TGF-β increased. Thus, exercise training may mitigate the pro-inflammatory response to inhaled aluminum refinery dust. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Large scale low cost production of submicrometric powder through biomass refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daltro Garcia Pinatti

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomass Refinery (BR is a null pollution thermochemical sequential cracking of any biomass and some petrochemical products, which generates chemicals, liquid or solid fuels and inorganic submicrometric/nanometric powders (SM/NM such as ashes, silica, and carbon black. The processing route, powder characterisation and addition of some ashes to red clay resulting a grès-type ceramics will be presented. Rupture strengths of the vitrified ceramics were respectively 36 MPa for pure clay, 44 MPa for clay + 13.5% MOL ash (organic matter of municipal solid waste, 50 MPa for clay + 20% F+20% CL* ash (50% MOL + 50% wood and 42 MPa for clay + 40% feldspar (used for comparison. The reason why the BR-ashes are better than feldspar is due to their submicrometric and partially nanometric nature. The impact of BR-ash technology can be evaluated by its national potential production of 2 × 10(6 ton/year only from municipal solid waste (MSW compared to 350,000 ton/year of national consumption. The first BR is under installation in Lorena - SP, Brazil.

  3. Evaluation of noise propagation characteristics of compressors in tehran oil refinery center and presenting control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Rostam; Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Nourollahi, Maryam; Nezafat, Ali; Momen Bellah Fard, Samaneh

    2010-06-24

    The adverse effects of noise are well known and noise problems due to industrialization of communities are increasing over the time. Oil industries due to the process and nature of production; contain many noise sources such as compressors, turbines, and pumps, which cause excessive noise exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the noise characteristics of compressors in Tehran Oil Refinery and study on visible control measures.  To get to the appropriate control method, procedures such as basic theories, measuring sound parameters, frequency analysis, related diagrams and noise propagation schemes due to the measurement results, equivalent noise exposure level (L(eq(8h))) and exposure noise dose and  technical specification of compressors are considered in this paper. Considering field and analytical re-sults, module enclosure with particular specifications (like absorbent layer, specific wall, window and door design etc.) is predicted to be the best control method.  Calculation results of multiple layer density of the enclosure (W = 16.5 kg/m(2)) and needed density for the dominant frequency of the source (W = 12 kg/m(2)) demonstrated that the designed enclosure satisfies the goal. RESULTS of designing sandwich layers' module demonstrated that install-ing the designed enclosure causes 20 dB(A) reduction in total sound pres-sure level of the source's dominant frequency.

  4. Bioremediation of wastewater from edible oil refinery factory using oleaginous microalga Desmodesmus sp. S1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Cho Cho; Fan, Yong; Li, Fu-Li; Hu, Guang-Rong

    2016-12-01

    Edible oil industry produced massive wastewater, which requires extensive treatment to remove pungent smell, high phosphate, carbon oxygen demand (COD), and metal ions prior to discharge. Traditional anaerobic and aerobic digestion could mainly reduce COD of the wastewater from oil refinery factories (WEORF). In this study, a robust oleaginous microalga Desmodesmus sp. S1 was adapted to grow in WEORF. The biomass and lipid content of Desmodesmus sp. S1 cultivated in the WEORF supplemented with sodium nitrate were 5.62 g·L(-1) and 14.49%, whereas those in the WEORF without adding nitrate were 2.98 g·L(-1) and 21.95%. More than 82% of the COD and 53% of total phosphorous were removed by Desmodesmus sp. S1. In addition, metal ions, including ferric, aluminum, manganese and zinc were also diminished significantly in the WEORF after microalgal growth, and pungent smell vanished as well. In comparison with the cells grown in BG-11 medium, the cilia-like bulges and wrinkles on the cell surface of Desmodesmus sp. S1 grown in WEORF became out of order, and more polyunsaturated fatty acids were detected due to stress derived from the wastewater. The study suggests that growing microalgae in WEORF can be applied for the dual roles of nutrient removal and biofuel feedstock production.

  5. Degradation of palm oil refinery wastewaters by non-thermal gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountapmbeme-Kouotou, P; Laminsi, S; Acayanka, E; Brisset, J-L

    2013-07-01

    The gliding electric discharge in humid air is a source of activated species forming (e.g. (•)OH, (•)NO and their derivatives H2O2, ONO2H and NO3H) which are present in a non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure. These species are able to degrade organic pollutants in palm oil refinery wastewaters (PORW). The increase in acidity (pH decrease), conductivity and total dissolved solids (TDS) and the decrease in the total organic carbon (TOC) of PORW samples exposed to the discharge are reported. More than 50% TOC abatement is obtained for 15 min treatment in batch conditions with a laboratory reactor. The organic pollutants of PORW, i.e. mainly fatty acids are degraded according to a pseudo first-order reaction (k* = 0.06 min(-1)). Post discharge reactions are also observed after having switched off the discharge, which suggests that the pseudo first-order (k ≈ 0.05 min(-1)) degradation reactions should be attributed to the diffusion of soluble reactive species, e.g. H2O2 and ONOOH in the liquid target.

  6. Water pinch analysis for water and wastewater minimization in Tehran oil refinery considering three contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadnejad, Shahin; Ataei, Abtin; Nabi Bidhendi, Gholam Reza; Mehrdadi, Naser; Ebadati, Fatemeh; Lotfi, Fatemeh

    2012-05-01

    This study aims to find an appropriate way to minimize water utility in the petrochemical and petroleum industries due to high rate of water consumption. For this purpose, Tehran oil refinery has been well studied. In this research, three key contaminants including suspended solid, hardness as well as COD have been considered to analyze the water network. In addition, the potential of water reuse was studied for all methods. These key contaminants once were analyzed separately as a single contaminant and the amount of required freshwater was calculated for them. In this stage, amount of freshwater was reduced to about 60.9 (17%), 203 (59.7%) and 143 m(3)/h (42.5%) in terms of suspended solids, hardness, and COD, respectively. Water minimization within operations for suspended solids is less than two others. Therefore, this is a limiting contaminant and can be selected as a key contaminant. In the next stage, three contaminants were analyzed two by two based on their mass transfer. Results show that, in the targeting for minimization based on the suspended solids and hardness, the amount of required water is reduced to 142.74 m(3)/h or 42%. This amount for suspended solids and COD is equal to 86.3 m(3)/h (26%) and for COD and hardness is 124 m(3)/h (37%). Analyzing the methods shows that the method based on the double contaminant gives more precise results rather than single contaminant.

  7. Identification and characterization of ethanol utilizing fungal flora of oil refinery contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Singh, Pratiksha; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Chakdar, Hillol; Kumar, Sudheer; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2014-02-01

    The indigenous fungal flora of three oil refinery contaminated sites (Bharuch, Valsad and Vadodara) of India has been documented in the present investigation. A total seventy-five fungal morphotypes were isolated from these sites and out of them, only fifteen isolates were capable of utilizing ethanol (0-8%; v:v) as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Ten percent ethanol was completely lethal for the growth of all the isolated fungus. Biochemical characterization of the potent ethanol utilizing fungal isolates was studied based on substrate utilization profiles using BIOLOG phenotype microarray plates. Based on the morphological characters and Internal Transcribed Spacer region of ribosomal DNA, the fungal isolates were identified as Fusarium brachygibbosum, Fusarium equiseti, Fusarium acuminatum, Pencillium citrinum, Alternaria tenuissima, Septogloeum mori, Hypocrea lixii, Aureobasidium sp., Penicillium sp., and Fusarium sp. Intra-species genetic diversity among Fusarium sp. was evaluated by whole genome analysis with repetitive DNA sequences (ERIC, REP and BOX) based DNA fingerprinting. It was found that these fungus use alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes based metabolism pathway to utilize ethanol for their growth and colonization.

  8. Production and characterization of rhamnolipid using palm oil agricultural refinery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzuan, Mohd Nazren; Banat, Ibrahim M; Winterburn, James

    2017-02-01

    In this research we assess the feasibility of using palm oil agricultural refinery waste as a carbon source for the production of rhamnolipid biosurfactant through fermentation. The production and characterization of rhamnolipid produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 grown on palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) under batch fermentation were investigated. Results show that P. aeruginosa PAO1 can grow and produce 0.43gL(-1) of rhamnolipid using PFAD as the sole carbon source. Identification of the biosurfactant product using mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of monorhamnolipid and dirhamnolipid. The rhamnolipid produced from PFAD were able to reduce surface tension to 29mNm(-1) with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) 420mgL(-1) and emulsify kerosene and sunflower oil, with an emulsion index up to 30%. Results demonstrate that PFAD could be used as a low-cost substrate for rhamnolipid production, utilizing and transforming it into a value added biosurfactant product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fingerprinting aliphatic hydrocarbon pollutants over agricultural lands surrounding Tehran oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Javad; Hashemi, Seyed Hossein; Khoshbakht, Korros; Deihimfard, Reza

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of aliphatic hydrocarbons, which are composed of n-alkanes as well as branched and cyclic alkanes, can be used to distinguish between the sources of hydrocarbon contamination. In this study, the concentration of aliphatic hydrocarbons, soil pH, and organic matter in agricultural soils located south of Tehran were monitored. Eighty-three soil samples were taken from two depth ranges of 0-30 and 30-60 cm. The results showed that aliphatic compounds ranged from 0.22-68.11 mg kg(-1) at the top to 0.33-53.18 mg kg(-1) at subsoil. The amount of hydrocarbons increases from the northern parts toward the south, and hydrocarbon pollutants originated from both petroleum and non-petroleum sources. Higher concentrations of aliphatic compounds in the southern parts indicated that, aside from the practice of irrigating with untreated wastewater, leakage from oil refinery storage tanks possibly contributed to soil pollution. The results also showed that several sources have polluted the agricultural soils. It is necessary to develop a new local pollution criterion as a diagnostic index that includes not only hydrocarbons but also other parameters such as heavy metal content in both soil and untreated wastewater, surface runoff, and other irrigation water resources to determine the exact origin of pollution.

  10. Nitrogen cycling in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems: Challenges for waste refinery and food production processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauwaert, Peter; Muys, Maarten; Alloul, Abbas; De Paepe, Jolien; Luther, Amanda; Sun, Xiaoyan; Ilgrande, Chiara; Christiaens, Marlies E. R.; Hu, Xiaona; Zhang, Dongdong; Lindeboom, Ralph E. F.; Sas, Benedikt; Rabaey, Korneel; Boon, Nico; Ronsse, Frederik; Geelen, Danny; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E.

    2017-05-01

    In order to sustain human life in an isolated environment, an efficient conversion of wasted nutrients to food might become mandatory. This is particularly the case for space missions where resupply from earth or in-situ resource utilization is not possible or desirable. A combination of different technologies is needed to allow full recycling of e.g. nitrogenous compounds in space. In this review, an overview is given of the different essential processes and technologies that enable closure of the nitrogen cycle in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS). Firstly, a set of biological and physicochemical refinery stages ensures efficient conversion of waste products into the building blocks, followed by the production of food with a range of biological methods. For each technology, bottlenecks are identified. Furthermore, challenges and outlooks are presented at the integrated system level. Space adaptation and integration deserve key attention to enable the recovery of nitrogen for the production of nutritional food in space, but also in closed loop systems on earth.

  11. Perancangan Safety Instrumented System pada Proses Loading PT Pertamina (Persero Refinery Unit VI Balongan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Tri widodo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu proses yang ada di PT Pertamina (Persero Refinery Unit VI adalah pengiriman crude oil menuju kapal tanker. Proses tersebut disebut dengan proses loading. Terdapat beberapa jenis crude yang dikirim pada proses loading tersebut, diantaranya adalah crude Jatibarang dan Crude DCO. Terdapat beberapa masalah yang kerap terjadi pada proses loading ini. Yang sering terjadi adalah kebocoran offshore pipeline yang biasa disebabkan oleh korosi air laut. Selain itu juga pernah terjadi penyumbatan pipa oleh crude akibat heater yang tidak berfungsi dengan baik. Sampai saat ini safety system yang ada pada proses loading ini hanya sebuah shutdown valve yang dijalankan manual dengan menggunakan hand switch. Sistem tersebut masih belum bisa menangani permasalahan yang ada. Oleh karena itu pada tugas akhir kali ini dilakukan perancangan SIS pada jalur loading PT Pertamina RU VI Balongan yang kemudian disimulasikan pada software Matlab (Simulink. Simulasi dilakukan dengan memberikan manipulasi besar disturbance yang merepresentasikan kebocoran pada offshore pipeline. Berdasarkan simulasi yang dilakukan, didapatkan bahwa SIS dapat berjalan dengan baik karena dapat menghentikan proses dengan menutup ESDV dan mematikan pompa saat keadaan perbedaan tekanan antara ujung-ujung pipa offshore tinggi. Tingginya perbedaan tekanan antar ujung offshore pipeline mengindikasikan terjadinya kebocoran. SIS yang sudah dirancang kemudian dihitung nilai PFDtotal dan diapatkan nilai sebesar 0,085 sehingga rancangan SIS.

  12. [Source profile of volatile carbonyl compounds in wastewater treatment plant of an oil refinery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo-Yu; Liu, Wang; Wang, Bo-Guang; Zhou, Mi; Huang, Qing; Zhou, Lei

    2013-07-01

    An observation was conducted at the wastewater treatment plant in a refinery in Guangdong province, using the PFPH-GC/MS method to analyze the composition and the concentration of volatile carbonyl compounds. The emission characteristics and the atmospheric chemical reactivity of these compounds were also studied. The results showed that 20 kinds of carbonyl compounds were detected with a concentration range of 0 to 68.80 microg x m(-3). The mean value of total concentration in all processing unit was (253.02 +/- 124.5) microg x m(-3). Background corrected concentrations showed that for each of the 6 treatment units of the plant, over 90% of the volatile carbonyl emissions were contributed by 14 of the 20 volatile carbonyl compounds, among which aldehyde was the most abundant with an average concentration of (44.74 +/- 20.89) microg x m(-3), followed by 2-butanone and acetaldehyde with average concentrations of (30.47 +/- 12.94) microg x m(-3) and (23.51 +/- 14.57) microg x m(-3), respectively. Several molecular markers were identified based on the analysis of the chemical activities and atmospheric lifetimes of the 20 carbonyl compounds. Finally, a source profile was established for the plant.

  13. Inhibition of dehydrogenase activity in petroleum refinery wastewater bacteria by phenolic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon C. Okpokwasili

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of phenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 4-bromophenol and 3,5-dimethylphenol on Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Escherichia species isolated from petroleum refinery wastewater was assessed via inhibition of dehydrogenase enzyme activity. At low concentrations, 2-nitrophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 4-bromophenol and 3,5-dimethylphenol stimulated dehydrogenase activity and at sufficient concentrations, phenolic compounds inhibited dehydrogenase activities. Generally, phenol is less toxic than substituted phenols. Estimations of the degree of inhibition/stimulation of dehydrogenase activities showed significant dose-dependent responses that are describable by logistic functions. The toxicity thresholds varied significantly (P < 0.05 among the bacterial strains and phenolic compounds. The median inhibitory concentrations (IC50s ranged from 4.118 ± 0.097 mg.L-1 for 4-nitrophenol against Pseudomonas sp. DAF1 to 1407.997 ± 7.091 mg.L-1 for phenol against Bacillus sp. DISK1. This study suggested that the organisms have moderate sensitivity to phenols and have the potential to be used as indicators for assessment of chemical toxicity. They could also be used as catalysts for degradation of phenols in effluents.

  14. Bioproducts for Sludge Reduction in Activated Sludge Systems Treating Oil Refinery Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre V.M.F.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of bioproducts that change the cellular metabolism and reduce microbial growth without affecting the organic matter removal is very promising for reducing the amount of sludge in wastewater treatment systems. In this study, two bioproducts were evaluated and compared with a well-known chemical (2,4-DiNitroPhenol – DNP in activated sludge treating petroleum refinery wastewater. In batch experiments, 10 mg/L of DNP, 0.8 mg/L of a bioproduct based on Folic Acid (FA and 10 mg/L of a bioproduct based on Stress Proteins (SP led to 30.6%, 43.2% and 29.8% lower disposal of total solids, respectively. Operating on a continuous regimen, the addition of 10 mg/L of the bioproduct based on SP led to 45.7% lower disposal for 50 days. In all cases, no loss of efficiency in the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD removal was observed.

  15. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Final report, April 1994--July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Breshears, F.S.; Gaines, L.D.; Hays, K.S.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a commercial process for producing ethanol from refinery waste gases. this report presents results from the development phases. The major focus of this work was the preparation of the prototype design which will demonstrate this technology in a 2.5 lb/hr ethanol production facility. Additional areas of focus included efforts in obtaining an industrial partner to help finance the prototype, and advanced engineering experiments concentrating on process optimization in various areas needing future development and optimization. The advanced engineering experiments were performed in the laboratory in these areas: treatment and use of recycle water from distillation back to fermentation; alternative methods of removing cells from the fermentation broth; the fermentation of streams containing CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} alone, with little to no CO present; dealing with methanogen contaminants that are capable of fermenting CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} to methane; and acetate tolerance by the culture. Results from the design, industrial partner search and the laboratory R&D efforts are discussed in this report.

  16. Treatment of alumina refinery waste (red mud) through neutralization techniques: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Suchita; Wasewar, K L; Agnihotri, A

    2017-06-01

    In the Bayer process of extraction of alumina from bauxite, the insoluble product generated after bauxite digestion with sodium hydroxide at elevated temperature and pressure is known as 'red mud' or 'bauxite residue'. This alumina refinery waste is highly alkaline in nature with a pH of 10.5-12.5 and is conventionally disposed of in mostly clay-lined land-based impoundments. The alkaline constituents in the red mud impose severe and alarming environmental problems, such as soil and air pollution. Keeping in view sustainable re-vegetation and residue management, neutralization/treatment of red mud using different techniques is the only alternative to make the bauxite residue environmentally benign. Hence, neutralization techniques, such as using mineral acids, acidic waste (pickling liquor waste), coal dust, superphosphate and gypsum as amenders, CO 2 , sintering with silicate material and seawater for treatment of red mud have been studied in detail. This paper is based upon and emphasizes the experimental work carried out for all the neutralization techniques along with a comprehensive review of each of the processes. The scope, applicability, limitations and feasibility of these processes have been compared exhaustively. Merits and demerits have been discussed using flow diagrams. All the techniques described are technically feasible, wherein findings obtained with seawater neutralization can be set as a benchmark for future work. Further studies should be focused on exploring the economical viability of these processes for better waste management and disposal of red mud.

  17. Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced electrode configurations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of refinery wastewater (RW) treatment using air-cathode, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was examined relative to previous tests based on completely anaerobic microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). MFCs were configured with separator electrode assembly (SEA) or spaced electrode (SPA) configurations to measure power production and relative impacts of oxygen crossover on organics removal. The SEA configuration produced a higher maximum power density (280±6mW/m2; 16.3±0.4W/m3) than the SPA arrangement (255±2mW/m2) due to lower internal resistance. Power production in both configurations was lower than that obtained with the domestic wastewater (positive control) due to less favorable (more positive) anode potentials, indicating poorer biodegradability of the RW. MFCs with RW achieved up to 84% total COD removal, 73% soluble COD removal and 92% HBOD removal. These removals were higher than those previously obtained in mini-MEC tests, as oxygen crossover from the cathode enhanced degradation in MFCs compared to MECs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Optimization of petroleum refinery effluent treatment in a UASB reactor using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, S O; Mousavi, S M; Shojaosadati, S A; Sheibani, S

    2011-12-15

    An upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor was successfully used for the treatment of petroleum refinery effluent. Before optimization, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was 81% at a constant organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.4 kg/m(3) d and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 48 h. The rate of biogas production was 559 mL/h at an HRT of 40 h and an influent COD of 1000 mg/L. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to predict the behaviors of influent COD, upflow velocity (V(up)) and HRT in the bioreactor. RSM showed that the best models for COD removal and biogas production rate were the reduced quadratic and cubic models, respectively. The optimum region, identified based on two critical responses, was an influent COD of 630 mg/L, a V(up) of 0.27 m/h, and an HRT of 21.4 h. This resulted in a 76.3% COD removal efficiency and a 0.25 L biogas/L feed d biogas production rate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of the implementation of ergonomic design at the new units of an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passero, Carolina Reich Marcon; Ogasawara, Erika Lye; Baú, Lucy Mara Silva; Buso, Sandro Artur; Bianchi, Marcos Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Ergonomic design is the adaptation of working conditions to human limitations and skills in the physical design phase of a new installation, a new working system, or new products or tools. Based on this concept, the purpose of this work was to analyze the implementation of ergonomic design at the new industrial units of an oil refinery, using the method of Ergonomic Workplace Assessment. This study was conducted by a multidisciplinary team composed of operation, maintenance and industrial safety technicians, ergonomists, designers and engineers. The analysis involved 6 production units, 1 industrial wastewater treatment unit, and 3 utilities units, all in the design detailing phase, for which 455 ergonomic requirements were identified. An analysis and characterization of the requirements identified for 5 of the production units, involving a total of 246 items, indicated that 62% were related to difficult access and blockage operations, while 15% were related to difficulties in the circulation of employees inside the units. Based on these data, it was found that the ergonomic requirements identified in the design detailing phase of an industrial unit involve physical ergonomics, and that it is very difficult to identify requirements related to organizational or cognitive ergonomics.

  20. In Situ Visualization of the Phase Behavior of Oil Samples Under Refinery Process Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde-Boutet, Cedric; McCaffrey, William C

    2017-02-21

    To help address production issues in refineries caused by the fouling of process units and lines, we have developed a setup as well as a method to visualize the behavior of petroleum samples under process conditions. The experimental setup relies on a custom-built micro-reactor fitted with a sapphire window at the bottom, which is placed over the objective of an inverted microscope equipped with a cross-polarizer module. Using reflection microscopy enables the visualization of opaque samples, such as petroleum vacuum residues, or asphaltenes. The combination of the sapphire window from the micro-reactor with the cross-polarizer module of the microscope on the light path allows high-contrast imaging of isotropic and anisotropic media. While observations are carried out, the micro-reactor can be heated to the temperature range of cracking reactions (up to 450 °C), can be subjected to H2 pressure relevant to hydroconversion reactions (up to 16 MPa), and can stir the sample by magnetic coupling. Observations are typically carried out by taking snapshots of the sample under cross-polarized light at regular time intervals. Image analyses may not only provide information on the temperature, pressure, and reactive conditions yielding phase separation, but may also give an estimate of the evolution of the chemical (absorption/reflection spectra) and physical (refractive index) properties of the sample before the onset of phase separation.

  1. Attitude in English and Competence of Students at Integrated Refinery Petro-Chemical Complex (IRPCT) Technological College, Rayong, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Chinebeth

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted at IRPC Technological College, Thailand. The objectives of this study were to investigate (1) The attitude of students towards English; (2) The attitude of students towards teaching English; (3) The competence level of their English. The participants were asked to answer and complete the survey questionnaires that would…

  2. Matematikkens historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Matematikkens historie i syv kapitler: 1. Matematik i støbeskeen; 2. Matematikkens græske arv; 3. Den gyldne tidsalder for hinduer og arabere; 4. Matematik i Kina; 5. Renæssancens matematik; 6. Regning med infinitesimaler ser dagens lys; 7. Matematik i det tyvende århundrede.......Matematikkens historie i syv kapitler: 1. Matematik i støbeskeen; 2. Matematikkens græske arv; 3. Den gyldne tidsalder for hinduer og arabere; 4. Matematik i Kina; 5. Renæssancens matematik; 6. Regning med infinitesimaler ser dagens lys; 7. Matematik i det tyvende århundrede....

  3. Cultural history as polyphonic history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This texts offers a reflection on the origins and actual development of the field of cultural history through a comparison with the term that has served as title for this seminar: “polyphonic history”. The author provides an overview of the themes that have structured the seminar (the history of representations, the history of the body and the cultural history of science with the aim of making explicit and clarifying this plurality of voices in the field of history as well as its pervasiveness in other research areas.

    En este texto se ofrece una reflexión sobre el origen y actual desarrollo del campo de la historia cultural a través de una comparación con el término que ha dado título a este seminario: “historia polifónica”. El autor propone un recorrido por las áreas temáticas que han conformado la estructura del seminario (la historia de las representaciones, la historia del cuerpo y la historia cultural de la ciencia con el objeto de explicitar y explicar esta pluralidad de voces en el campo de la historia, así como su repercusión en otras áreas del conocimiento.

  4. Potted history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, N.; Van Dijk, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Jordan Valley was once populated by a people, now almost forgotten by historians, with whom the pharaoh of Egypt sought favour. That is the conclusion reached by Niels Groot, the first researcher to take a PhD at the Delft-Leiden Centre for Archaeology, Art History and Science.

  5. LCA History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Molin, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The idea of LCA was conceived in the 1960s when environmental degradation and in particular the limited access to resources started becoming a concern. This chapter gives a brief summary of the history of LCA since then with a focus on the fields of methodological development, application...

  6. A Study on the Preparation of Regular Multiple Micro-Electrolysis Filler and the Application in Pretreatment of Oil Refinery Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihong Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Through a variety of material screening experiments, Al was selected as the added metal and constituted a multiple micro-electrolysis system of Fe/C/Al. The metal proportion of alloy-structured filler was also analyzed with the best Fe/C/Al ratio of 3:1:1. The regular Fe/C/Al multiple micro-electrolysis fillers were prepared using a high-temperature anaerobic roasting method. The optimum conditions for oil refinery wastewater treated by Fe/C/Al multiple micro-electrolysis were determined to be an initial pH value of 3, reaction time of 80 min, and 0.05 mol/L Na2SO4 additive concentration. The reaction mechanism of the treatment of oil refinery wastewater by Fe/C/Al micro-electrolysis was investigated. The process of the treatment of oil refinery wastewater with multiple micro-electrolysis conforms to the third-order reaction kinetics. The gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS used to analyze the organic compounds of the oil refinery wastewater before and after treatment and the Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–VIS absorption spectrum analyzed the degradation process of organic compounds in oil refinery wastewater. The treatment effect of Fe/C/Al multiple micro-electrolysis was examined in the continuous experiment under the optimum conditions, which showed high organic compound removal and stable treatment efficiency.

  7. A Study on the Preparation of Regular Multiple Micro-Electrolysis Filler and the Application in Pretreatment of Oil Refinery Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruihong; Zhu, Jianzhong; Li, Yingliu; Zhang, Hui

    2016-04-29

    Through a variety of material screening experiments, Al was selected as the added metal and constituted a multiple micro-electrolysis system of Fe/C/Al. The metal proportion of alloy-structured filler was also analyzed with the best Fe/C/Al ratio of 3:1:1. The regular Fe/C/Al multiple micro-electrolysis fillers were prepared using a high-temperature anaerobic roasting method. The optimum conditions for oil refinery wastewater treated by Fe/C/Al multiple micro-electrolysis were determined to be an initial pH value of 3, reaction time of 80 min, and 0.05 mol/L Na₂SO₄ additive concentration. The reaction mechanism of the treatment of oil refinery wastewater by Fe/C/Al micro-electrolysis was investigated. The process of the treatment of oil refinery wastewater with multiple micro-electrolysis conforms to the third-order reaction kinetics. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) used to analyze the organic compounds of the oil refinery wastewater before and after treatment and the Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) absorption spectrum analyzed the degradation process of organic compounds in oil refinery wastewater. The treatment effect of Fe/C/Al multiple micro-electrolysis was examined in the continuous experiment under the optimum conditions, which showed high organic compound removal and stable treatment efficiency.

  8. Mapping of Biomass Fluxes: A Method for Optimizing Biogas-Refinery of Livestock Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Nardin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the topic of the management of livestock effluents and, therefore, nutrients (particularly N in the framework of the biogas supply chain. The bio-refinery will be analyzed as a unique system, from the farm to the biomass produced and sent to anaerobic digestion, focusing on the fate/change of the flow of material and nutrients content through the system. Within four categories of farms considered in the article, integrated ones frequently have a breeding consistency from 90 to 320 heads, according to more extensive or intensive settings. These farms must manage from 3.62 to 12.81 m3 day−1 of slurry and from 11.40 to 40.34 kg day−1 of nitrogen (N as the sum of excreta from all herd categories. By selecting a hypo-protein diet, a reduction of 10% and 24% for total effluent amount and for N excreted, respectively, can be achieved. Nitrogen can be reduced up to 45% if the crude protein content is limited and a further 0.23% if animals of similar ages, weights and (or production or management are grouped and fed according to specific requirements. Integrated farms can implement farming activity with biogas production, possibly adding agricultural residues to the anaerobically-digested biomass. Average biogas yields for cattle effluents range from 200 to 400 m3 ton−1 VS (volatile solids. Values from 320 to 672 m3 day−1 of biogas can be produced, obtaining average values from 26 to 54.5 kWe (kilowatt-electric. This type of farm can well balance farm-production profit, environmental protection, animal husbandry well-being and energy self-sufficiency.

  9. Diversity shift in bacterial phenol hydroxylases driven by alkyl-phenols in oil refinery wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzallah, Besma; Bousseboua, Hacène; Jouanneau, Yves

    2017-06-01

    Phenol hydroxylases (PHs) play a primary role in the bacterial degradation of phenol and alkylphenols. They are divided into two main classes, single-component and multi-component PHs, having distinctive catalytic subunits designated as PheA1 and LmPH, respectively. The diversity of these enzymes is still largely unexplored. Here, both LmPH and pheA1 gene sequences were examined in activated sludge from oil refinery wastewaters. Phenol, p-cresol, or 3,4-dimethylphenol (3,4-DMP) supplied as extra carbon sources were rapidly mineralized by the microbial community. Analysis of LmPH genes revealed a wide range of sequences, most of which exhibited moderate similarity with homologs found in Proteobacteria. Moreover, the LmPH diversity profiles showed a dramatic shift upon sludge treatment with p-cresol or 3,4-DMP amendment. This resulted in an enrichment in sequences similar to LmPHs from Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. RT-PCR analysis of RNA extracted from wastewater sludge highlighted LmPH genes best expressed in situ. A PCR approach was implemented to analyze the pheA1 gene diversity in the same microbial community. Retrieved sequences fell into four clusters and appeared to be distantly related to pheA1 genes from Actinobacteria. Altogether, our results provide evidence that phenol degraders carrying LmPH are more diverse than PheA1 carrying bacteria and suggest that PHs with best adapted substrate specificity are recruited in response to (methyl)phenol availability.

  10. 197Au Mössbauer study of copper refinery anode slimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, J. A.; Dutrizac, J. E.; Friedl, J.; Wagner, F. E.; Chen, T. T.

    1993-06-01

    Copper refinery anode slimes are abundantly produced during the electrolytic refining of copper. Although the slimes contain significant and economically recoverable amounts of gold and silver, the chemical state of the gold has not been fully identified. In the present work, the chemical form of gold in a copper anode, in a raw slime, and in slimes treated by different leaching procedures has been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy with the 77.3 keV γ-rays of197Au. The Mössbauer spectrum of the anode is typical of a dilute Au:Cu alloy. The spectrum of the raw slime consists of two components, namely, a single, rather broad line with an isomer shift (IS) of about -0.3 mm/s relative to a Pt metal source and a quadrupole doublet with an IS of + 1.2 mm/s and a quadrupole splitting of 5.0 mm/s. The single line component can be attributed to a gold-rich alloy, with an approximate composition of Au60Ag{n40} or Au80Cu20 if it is a binary alloy, or to a ternary Au-Ag-Cu alloy of appropriate composition. The parameters of the quadrupole doublet match those of Ag3AuSe2 (fischesserite) or related Ag2-xAuxSe compounds. In these compounds, the gold atoms are coordinated by two selenium atoms in a linear arrangement, as is typical for Au(I). It was found that the ratio between the concentrations of the metallic phase and the selenide strongly depends on the leaching conditions. The measurement of the Lamb-Mössbauer factor of fischesserite is also reported.

  11. [Isotopic dilution HPLC/MS/MS urinary trans, trans-muconic quantitative analysis among refinery workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranfo, G; Paci, E; Pigini, D

    2007-01-01

    The determination of trans, trans muconic acid (t,t-MA) in human urine, a biomarker suggested by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists for occupational benzene exposure, with a limit value of 500 microg/g creatinine, is usually performed by means of gas or liquid chromatographic methods. Almost all the HPLC methods make use of strong ionic exchange cartridges for sample cleaning, reverse phase separation and detection either by UV at lambda = 259 nm or; more recently, by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry: yet, not all of these methods have been validated for quantitative analysis considering also the matrix effect. This paper presents the quantitative analysis of t,t-MA in 94 end-shift urine samples from workers of an oil refinery performed by means of an HPLC/MS/MS analytical method that uses a commercially available deuterium labeled isotope as internal standard, that during the validation has highlited the problem of interferences due to urine ion suppression effect and to the interference from isobaric ions both for the analyte and the internal standared. The following mean values have been obtained: 47.37 microg/g creatinine for non smokers non occupationally exposed to benzene, 97.40 microg/g creatinine for non smokers exposed to benzene, 142.38 microg/g creatinine for smokers non occupationally exposed and 149.08 microg/g creatinine for smokers occupationally exposed to benzene. The results obtained demonstrate that using this analytical method for urinary t,t,MA it is possible to discriminate among groups with different levels of benzene exposure, due to all the possible benzenene sources: environmetal, occupational, due to smoking, and their possible combinations.

  12. Environmental manganese exposure in residents living near a ferromanganese refinery in Southeast Ohio: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Erin N; Heckel, Pamela; Ryan, Patrick; Roda, Sandy; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Sebastian, Kelly; Succop, Paul

    2010-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element, yet is neurotoxic in excess. The majority of Mn research has been conducted on occupationally exposed adults with few studies focused on an environmentally exposed population. Marietta, OH is home to one of the largest airborne Mn emission sources in the United States, a ferromanganese refinery. In preparation for a community-based participatory research study, a preliminary pilot study was initiated to characterize the community's exposure to Mn in ambient air and to evaluate the relationship between biological indices of Mn exposure and genes associated with Mn metabolism in Marietta area residents. Participants in the pilot study were recruited through newspaper advertisement, fliers and direct mailing. Exposure to ambient Mn was estimated using an air pollution dispersion model, AERMOD. A total of 141 residents participated in the pilot study ranging in age from 2 to 81 years. Estimated annual average ambient air Mn concentrations in the study area obtained from AERMOD varied from 0.02 to 2.61 microg/m(3). Mean blood and hair Mn values were 9.12 microg/L (SD 3.90) and 5.80 microg/g (SD 6.40 microg/g), respectively and were significantly correlated (r=0.30, p<0.01). Blood and hair Mn was significantly associated within families (r=0.27, p=<0.02 and r=0.43, p<0.01), respectively. The relationship between hair Mn and estimated ambient air Mn became significant when genes for iron metabolism were included in linear models. The preliminary ambient air and biological concentrations of Mn found in this population demonstrate the need for further research into potential health effects. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Business History as Cultural History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Jørgensen, Ida

    The paper engages with the larger question of how cultural heritage becomes taken for granted and offers a complimentary view to the anthropological ʻCopenhagen School’ of business history, one that draws attention to the way corporate wealth directly and indirectly influences the culture available...

  14. Results of the simulation of gasification of the mexican petroleum coke from the refineries of Ciudad Madero and Cadereyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Urquiza–Beltrán

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates in terms of energy the gasification of the petroleum coke from the refineries of Cd Madero and Cadereyta in Mexico. The energy evaluation of the synthetic gas (syngas focuses mainly on the chemical composition of the clean syngas (gasl and its energy characteristics: heating value, the energy power, the cold gas efficiency and the thermal efficiency of gasification. The results of the simulation indicate that the gasification of the petroleum coke from Cadereyta called CRC, produces a gasl with better performance and energy characteristics than those obtained when gasifying the coke of petroleum from Cd. Madero, called CRM. When the CRC is gasified, the rate of production of gasl obtained is of 2.07 kggasl/kgcoque, while the rate of production of gasl for the CRM is 1.89 kggasl/kgcoque. The HHV of the gasl of the CRC is 12 729.56 kJ/kggasl while for the CRM is 11 639.13 kJ/kggasl. The energy power of the gasl of the CRC is greater, with a difference of 25.87 GJ/h, with regard to the energy power of the gasl of the CRM. Under the specified conditions of operation, energy is generated ata rate of 26.46 MJ/kgcoque coke in the gasification of the CRC coke of petroleum, while when gasifying the CRM coke of petroleum 22.09 MJ/kgcoque are generated. Currently, the petroleum coke produced in the refinery of Madero is consumed in the power plants of Tamuín, San Luis Potosí, Mexico, while the petroleum coke produced by the refinery of Cadereyta is used in the cement industry.

  15. Public health risk assessment with bioaccessibility considerations for soil PAHs at oil refinery vicinity areas in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, Abhrajyoti; Sinha, Alok

    2017-10-21

    Populations living in the vicinity of oil refinery sludge deposition sites may be at greater risk of potential exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) through inhalation, ingestion, and direct contact with contaminated media. Three Indian oil refinery sludge deposition sites (at Haldia, Barauni and Guwahati) were chosen for study. Soil samples were collected from three different locations at each site. Mild solvent extraction by butanol and exhaustive extraction by acetone/hexane have been conducted to estimate the bioaccessible PAHs beside the total extractable PAHs content of the soil samples. Concentrations of 13 PAHs in the soils were found to be in a range of 67.02-95.21μg/g and bioaccessible PAHs were in a range of 19.296-36.657μg/g. A probabilistic health risk assessment with bioaccessibility considerations was carried out using Monte Carlo simulations for the estimation of the cancer risk exposed to the PAHs. The 90th percentiles cancer risks with bioaccessibility considerations of soil PAHs for children is 6.506E-05 and for the adults the risk is 6.609E-05. Risk assessments on extracted PAHs from exhaustive solvent extraction can overestimate the risk by 2.87-2.89 folds at 90% confidence level with respect to the biomimetic mild extraction procedure using butanol. According to USEPA above 1×10(-6) extra risk of cancer is an alarm towards management. So, public health issues due to PAHs is imminent in these oil refinery vicinity areas. Sensitivity analysis revealed exposure duration (ED) and relative skin adherence factor for soil (AF) as the most influential parameters of the assessment. The profiling and risk assessment study with bioaccessibility considerations of PAHs from soil indicates that high PAHs concentration can lead to higher cancer risk for the vicinity area residents and local government should take immediate management actions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-15

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  17. Isolation and Identification of Carcinogen Acenaphthene-Degrading Endemic Bacteria from Crude Oil Contaminated Soils around Abadan Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Kafilzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: PAHs are non-polar organic compounds consisting of two or more fused benzene multi-rings. Among these compounds, acenaphthene is a multi-ring hydrocarbon that occurs abundantly in nature. Use of microorganisms to clean the contaminations of soil can be cheap and effective. The most important acenaphthene-degrading bacteria are pseudomonas, micrococcus, and Bacillus. The goal of this study was to isolate and identify the bacteria which degrade acenaphthene in soils around Abadan Refinery and to investigate the relation between the levels of environmental pollution with acenaphthene. Materials and Methods: Soil samples were collected from three areas around Abadan Refinery. The number of the bacteria was counted on the nutrient agar culture with and without acenaphthene. Isolation of the bacteria was done by culturing the samples on acenaphthene broth with a mineral-salt medium, and on an acenaphthene agar medium. Then, the bacteria were identified via biochemical diagnostic tests. Results: The logarithm average of the bacteria was 4.786 ± 0.073 at a medium with acenaphthene, which was 6.671 ± 0.073 less than that of the control medium. The maximum number of degrading bacteria was 7.089 ± 0.089 at Station C, and the minimum number of the degrading bacteria was 4.485 ± 0.089 at Station B. In this study, Bacillus sp, Micrococcus Luteus, Corynebacterium sp, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas sp bacteria were isolated and identified in terms of frequency, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the soil around Abadan Refinery contained a great number of acenaphthene degrading bacteria, especially Bacillus and Micrococcus.

  18. Overfished history

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data inform the agency of all stocks and stock complexes that have been overfished since 2000. If stocks are no longer overfished, the year the stock was taken...

  19. Overfishing History

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data inform the agency of all stocks and stock complexes that have been subject to overfishing since 2000. If stocks are no longer subject to overfishing, the...

  20. Sommerferiens historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Summer holiday is a pleasure which did not become available to many people until the 20th Century. The article describes the early mountain rambles of the bourgeoisie and their holidays in seaside boarding houses. Outdoor pursuits and stays in boarding houses at bathing resorts also became...... pattern. Finally, the history of the special holiday camps is told, which were established by American Jews because they were excluded from many hotels....